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Sample records for coli nusb-s10 transcription

  1. Transcription of foreign DNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Warren, René L; Freeman, John D; Levesque, Roger C; Smailus, Duane E; Flibotte, Stephane; Holt, Robert A

    2008-11-01

    Propagation of heterologous DNA in E. coli host cells is central to molecular biology. DNA constructs are often engineered for expression of recombinant protein in E. coli, but the extent of incidental transcription arising from natural regulatory sequences in cloned DNA remains underexplored. Here, we have used programmable microarrays and RT-PCR to measure, comprehensively, the transcription of H. influenzae, P. aeruginosa, and human DNA propagating in E. coli as bacterial artificial chromosomes. We find evidence that at least half of all H. influenzae genes are transcribed in E. coli. Highly transcribed genes are principally involved in energy metabolism, and their proximal promoter regions are significantly enriched with E. coli sigma(70) (also known as RpoD) binding sites. H. influenzae genes acquired from an ancient bacteriophage Mu insertion are also highly transcribed. Compared with H. influenzae, a smaller proportion of P. aeruginosa genes are transcribed in E. coli, and in E. coli there is punctuated transcription of human DNA. The presence of foreign DNA in E. coli disturbs the host transcriptional profile, with expression of the E. coli phage shock protein operon and the flagellar gene cluster being particularly strongly up-regulated. While cross-species transcriptional activation is expected to be enabling for horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, incidental expression of toxic genes can be problematic for DNA cloning. Ongoing characterization of cross-expression will help inform the design of biosynthetic gene clusters and synthetic microbial genomes.

  2. rRNA transcription rate in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gotta, S L; Miller, O L; French, S L

    1991-01-01

    The rate of in vivo transcription elongation for Escherichia coli rRNA operons was determined by electron microscopy following addition of rifampin to log-phase cultures. Direct observation of RNA polymerase positions along rRNA operons 30, 40, and 70 s after inhibition of transcription initiation yielded a transcription elongation rate of 42 nucleotides per s. Images FIG. 1 PMID:1717439

  3. A comprehensive library of fluorescent transcriptional reporters for Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zaslaver, Alon; Bren, Anat; Ronen, Michal; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Kikoin, Ilya; Shavit, Seagull; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Surette, Michael G; Alon, Uri

    2006-08-01

    E. coli is widely used for systems biology research; there exists a need, however, for tools that can be used to accurately and comprehensively measure expression dynamics in individual living cells. To address this we present a library of transcriptional fusions of gfp to each of about 2,000 different promoters in E. coli K12, covering the great majority of the promoters in the organism. Each promoter fusion is expressed from a low-copy plasmid. We demonstrate that this library can be used to obtain highly accurate dynamic measurements of promoter activity on a genomic scale, in a glucose-lactose diauxic shift experiment. The library allowed detection of about 80 previously uncharacterized transcription units in E. coli, including putative internal promoters within previously known operons, such as the lac operon. This library can serve as a tool for accurate, high-resolution analysis of transcription networks in living E. coli cells.

  4. Antitermination of transcription from an Escherichia coli ribosomal RNA promoter.

    PubMed

    Holben, W E; Morgan, E A

    1984-11-01

    The Escherichia coli lac and ara promoters and rrnC ribosomal RNA promoter-leader region were fused to lacZYA. Transcription termination signals were introduced into the lac genes of these fusions by Tn9 and IS1 insertions. Measurement of lac enzymes from upstream and downstream of the insertions showed that termination signals resulting from these insertions are very efficient when transcription begins at lac or ara promoters but are very inefficient when transcription begins at the rrnC promoter-leader region. The rrnC promoter-leader region must, therefore, modify RNA polymerase to enable it to read through transcription termination signals.

  5. Evidence for antitermination in Escherichia coli RRNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, S; Squires, C L; Squires, C

    1984-07-01

    The stable RNA operons of Escherichia coli do not exhibit polarity, even though they make an RNA product that is not translated. By contrast, most E. coli operons that specify proteins exhibit polarity if their translation is interrupted. The transcriptional component of this polarity depends on the action of Rho protein on the exposed mRNA, which results in premature transcription termination. Here we examine how a stable RNA operon (rrnG) transcript is protected from the Rho protein-mediated polarity response. We compared transcription from the ara and the rrnG promoters through a 16S DNA segment. In each case, the promoter-16S sequences were joined to a trp-lac fusion, and lacZ mRNA was examined in rho+ and rho-115 strains. We found significant Rho protein-dependent termination of transcripts from the ara promoter but little or no Rho protein effect on transcription from the rrnG promoter. We concluded that the transcript of the 16S ribosomal DNA segment does contain Rho protein-dependent transcription terminators, but there is an antitermination system in the rrnG control region that allows it to transcribe through those terminators.

  6. The Transcription Unit Architecture of the Escherichia Coli Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Byung-Kwan; Zengler, Karsten; Qiu, Yu; Park, Young S.; Knight, Eric M.; Barrett, Christian; Gao, Yuan; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2009-11-01

    Under EMSL User Proposal 25660, the authors reported that bacterial genomes are organized by structural and functional elements, including promoters, transcription start and termination sites, open reading frames, regulatory noncoding regions, untranslated regions and transcription units. Here, we iteratively integrate high-throughput, genome-wide measurements of RNA polymerase binding locations and mRNA transcript abundance, 5' sequences and translation into proteins to determine the organizational structure of the Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 genome. Integration of the organizational elements provides an experimentally annotated transcription unit architecture, including alternative transcription start sites, 5' untranslated region, boundaries and open reading frames of each transcription unit. A total of 4,661 transcription units were identified, representing an increase of >530% over current knowledge. This comprehensive transcription unit architecture allows for the elucidation of condition-specific uses of alternative sigma factors at the genome scale. Furthermore, the transcription unit architecture provides a foundation on which to construct genome-scale transcriptional and translational regulatory networks.

  7. Dissecting the stochastic transcription initiation process in live Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Price, Jason; Startceva, Sofia; Kandavalli, Vinodh; Chandraseelan, Jerome G; Goncalves, Nadia; Oliveira, Samuel M D; Häkkinen, Antti; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the hypothesis that, in Escherichia coli, while the concentration of RNA polymerases differs in different growth conditions, the fraction of RNA polymerases free for transcription remains approximately constant within a certain range of these conditions. After establishing this, we apply a standard model-fitting procedure to fully characterize the in vivo kinetics of the rate-limiting steps in transcription initiation of the Plac/ara-1 promoter from distributions of intervals between transcription events in cells with different RNA polymerase concentrations. We find that, under full induction, the closed complex lasts ∼788 s while subsequent steps last ∼193 s, on average. We then establish that the closed complex formation usually occurs multiple times prior to each successful initiation event. Furthermore, the promoter intermittently switches to an inactive state that, on average, lasts ∼87 s. This is shown to arise from the intermittent repression of the promoter by LacI. The methods employed here should be of use to resolve the rate-limiting steps governing the in vivo dynamics of initiation of prokaryotic promoters, similar to established steady-state assays to resolve the in vitro dynamics.

  8. Dissecting the stochastic transcription initiation process in live Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd-Price, Jason; Startceva, Sofia; Kandavalli, Vinodh; Chandraseelan, Jerome G.; Goncalves, Nadia; Oliveira, Samuel M. D.; Häkkinen, Antti; Ribeiro, Andre S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the hypothesis that, in Escherichia coli, while the concentration of RNA polymerases differs in different growth conditions, the fraction of RNA polymerases free for transcription remains approximately constant within a certain range of these conditions. After establishing this, we apply a standard model-fitting procedure to fully characterize the in vivo kinetics of the rate-limiting steps in transcription initiation of the Plac/ara-1 promoter from distributions of intervals between transcription events in cells with different RNA polymerase concentrations. We find that, under full induction, the closed complex lasts ∼788 s while subsequent steps last ∼193 s, on average. We then establish that the closed complex formation usually occurs multiple times prior to each successful initiation event. Furthermore, the promoter intermittently switches to an inactive state that, on average, lasts ∼87 s. This is shown to arise from the intermittent repression of the promoter by LacI. The methods employed here should be of use to resolve the rate-limiting steps governing the in vivo dynamics of initiation of prokaryotic promoters, similar to established steady-state assays to resolve the in vitro dynamics. PMID:27026687

  9. Control of rRNA transcription in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Condon, C; Squires, C; Squires, C L

    1995-01-01

    The control of rRNA synthesis in response to both extra- and intracellular signals has been a subject of interest to microbial physiologists for nearly four decades, beginning with the observations that Salmonella typhimurium cells grown on rich medium are larger and contain more RNA than those grown on poor medium. This was followed shortly by the discovery of the stringent response in Escherichia coli, which has continued to be the organism of choice for the study of rRNA synthesis. In this review, we summarize four general areas of E. coli rRNA transcription control: stringent control, growth rate regulation, upstream activation, and anti-termination. We also cite similar mechanisms in other bacteria and eukaryotes. The separation of growth rate-dependent control of rRNA synthesis from stringent control continues to be a subject of controversy. One model holds that the nucleotide ppGpp is the key effector for both mechanisms, while another school holds that it is unlikely that ppGpp or any other single effector is solely responsible for growth rate-dependent control. Recent studies on activation of rRNA synthesis by cis-acting upstream sequences has led to the discovery of a new class of promoters that make contact with RNA polymerase at a third position, called the UP element, in addition to the well-known -10 and -35 regions. Lastly, clues as to the role of antitermination in rRNA operons have begun to appear. Transcription complexes modified at the antiterminator site appear to elongate faster and are resistant to the inhibitory effects of ppGpp during the stringent response. PMID:8531889

  10. Meta-Analysis of Transcriptional Responses to Mastitis-Causing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Younis, Sidra; Javed, Qamar; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a widespread disease in dairy cows, and is often caused by bacterial mammary gland infection. Mastitis causes reduced milk production and leads to excessive use of antibiotics. We present meta-analysis of transcriptional profiles of bovine mastitis from 10 studies and 307 microarrays, allowing identification of much larger sets of affected genes than any individual study. Combining multiple studies provides insight into the molecular effects of Escherichia coli infection in vivo and uncovers differences between the consequences of E. coli vs. Staphylococcus aureus infection of primary mammary epithelial cells (PMECs). In udders, live E. coli elicits inflammatory and immune defenses through numerous cytokines and chemokines. Importantly, E. coli infection causes downregulation of genes encoding lipid biosynthesis enzymes that are involved in milk production. Additionally, host metabolism is generally suppressed. Finally, defensins and bacteria-recognition genes are upregulated, while the expression of the extracellular matrix protein transcripts is silenced. In PMECs, heat-inactivated E. coli elicits expression of ribosomal, cytoskeletal and angiogenic signaling genes, and causes suppression of the cell cycle and energy production genes. We hypothesize that heat-inactivated E. coli may have prophylactic effects against mastitis. Heat-inactivated S. aureus promotes stronger inflammatory and immune defenses than E. coli. Lipopolysaccharide by itself induces MHC antigen presentation components, an effect not seen in response to E. coli bacteria. These results provide the basis for strategies to prevent and treat mastitis and may lead to the reduction in the use of antibiotics.

  11. Meta-Analysis of Transcriptional Responses to Mastitis-Causing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Younis, Sidra; Javed, Qamar; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Bovine mastitis is a widespread disease in dairy cows, and is often caused by bacterial mammary gland infection. Mastitis causes reduced milk production and leads to excessive use of antibiotics. We present meta-analysis of transcriptional profiles of bovine mastitis from 10 studies and 307 microarrays, allowing identification of much larger sets of affected genes than any individual study. Combining multiple studies provides insight into the molecular effects of Escherichia coli infection in vivo and uncovers differences between the consequences of E. coli vs. Staphylococcus aureus infection of primary mammary epithelial cells (PMECs). In udders, live E. coli elicits inflammatory and immune defenses through numerous cytokines and chemokines. Importantly, E. coli infection causes downregulation of genes encoding lipid biosynthesis enzymes that are involved in milk production. Additionally, host metabolism is generally suppressed. Finally, defensins and bacteria-recognition genes are upregulated, while the expression of the extracellular matrix protein transcripts is silenced. In PMECs, heat-inactivated E. coli elicits expression of ribosomal, cytoskeletal and angiogenic signaling genes, and causes suppression of the cell cycle and energy production genes. We hypothesize that heat-inactivated E. coli may have prophylactic effects against mastitis. Heat-inactivated S. aureus promotes stronger inflammatory and immune defenses than E. coli. Lipopolysaccharide by itself induces MHC antigen presentation components, an effect not seen in response to E. coli bacteria. These results provide the basis for strategies to prevent and treat mastitis and may lead to the reduction in the use of antibiotics. PMID:26933871

  12. Transcriptional start and MetR binding sites on the Escherichia coli metH gene.

    PubMed

    Marconi, R; Wigboldus, J; Weissbach, H; Brot, N

    1991-03-29

    The 5' upstream region of the Escherichia coli metH gene has been sequenced. Primer extension analysis revealed a transcription start site at 324 bases upstream of the initiator codon. An 8 base sequence homologous to the MetR binding region on the E. coli metE gene is present 217 bp downstream of the transcription start site. Gel retardation experiments showed that purified MetR protein could bind to a 30 base oligonucleotide containing the putative MetR binding region. No "met box" was present which explains the relative lack of regulation of the expression of the metH gene by methionine.

  13. Genome-Wide Identification of Transcription Start Sites, Promoters and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Vargas, Alfredo; Olvera, Leticia; Olvera, Maricela; Grande, Ricardo; Vega-Alvarado, Leticia; Taboada, Blanca; Jimenez-Jacinto, Verónica; Salgado, Heladia; Juárez, Katy; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Huerta, Araceli M.; Collado-Vides, Julio; Morett, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Despite almost 40 years of molecular genetics research in Escherichia coli a major fraction of its Transcription Start Sites (TSSs) are still unknown, limiting therefore our understanding of the regulatory circuits that control gene expression in this model organism. RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx/) is aimed at integrating the genetic regulatory network of E. coli K12 as an entirely bioinformatic project up till now. In this work, we extended its aims by generating experimental data at a genome scale on TSSs, promoters and regulatory regions. We implemented a modified 5′ RACE protocol and an unbiased High Throughput Pyrosequencing Strategy (HTPS) that allowed us to map more than 1700 TSSs with high precision. From this collection, about 230 corresponded to previously reported TSSs, which helped us to benchmark both our methodologies and the accuracy of the previous mapping experiments. The other ca 1500 TSSs mapped belong to about 1000 different genes, many of them with no assigned function. We identified promoter sequences and type of σ factors that control the expression of about 80% of these genes. As expected, the housekeeping σ70 was the most common type of promoter, followed by σ38. The majority of the putative TSSs were located between 20 to 40 nucleotides from the translational start site. Putative regulatory binding sites for transcription factors were detected upstream of many TSSs. For a few transcripts, riboswitches and small RNAs were found. Several genes also had additional TSSs within the coding region. Unexpectedly, the HTPS experiments revealed extensive antisense transcription, probably for regulatory functions. The new information in RegulonDB, now with more than 2400 experimentally determined TSSs, strengthens the accuracy of promoter prediction, operon structure, and regulatory networks and provides valuable new information that will facilitate the understanding from a global perspective the complex and intricate regulatory

  14. Deciphering Fur transcriptional regulatory network highlights its complex role beyond iron metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Latif, Haythem; O'Brien, Edward J; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-09-15

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism. However, the full regulatory potential of Fur remains undefined. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the Fur transcriptional regulatory network in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in response to iron availability using genome-wide measurements. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 81 genes in 42 transcription units are directly regulated by three different modes of Fur regulation, including apo- and holo-Fur activation and holo-Fur repression. We show that Fur connects iron transport and utilization enzymes with negative-feedback loop pairs for iron homeostasis. In addition, direct involvement of Fur in the regulation of DNA synthesis, energy metabolism and biofilm development is found. These results show how Fur exhibits a comprehensive regulatory role affecting many fundamental cellular processes linked to iron metabolism in order to coordinate the overall response of E. coli to iron availability.

  15. Short-Patch Reverse Transcription in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, D. S.; Tombline, G.; Zahn, K.

    1995-01-01

    Chimeras of RNA and DNA have distinctive physical and biological properties. Chimeric oligonucleotides that contained one, two or three ribonucleotides whose phosphodiester backbone was covalently continuous with DNA were synthesized. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to assess genetic information transfer from the ribonucleotide positions. Transfer was scored by the formation or reversion of an ochre site that also corresponded to a restriction cleavage site. This allowed physical as well as genetic assay of mutational events. Bases attached to the ribonucleotides were able to accurately direct the synthesis of progeny DNA. The results suggest that in vivo DNA polymerases utilize a ``running start'' on a DNA backbone to continue across a covalent backbone junction into a region of ribonucleotides and then back again onto a normal DNA backbone. The phenomenon is designated short-patch reverse transcription (SPRT) by analogy to short-patch mismatch correction and reverse transcription as the term is generally used. The possibility is considered that SPRT contributes to an unrecognized pathway of mutagenesis. PMID:7545627

  16. Firefly luciferase as the reporter for transcriptional response to the environment in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ryo, Masashi; Oshikoshi, Yuta; Doi, Shosei; Motoki, Shogo; Niimi, Atsuko; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2013-12-15

    We demonstrate that firefly luciferase is a good reporter in Escherichia coli for transcription dynamics in response to the environment. E. coli strains, carrying a fusion of the promoter of the ycgZ gene and the coding region of the luciferase gene, showed transient bioluminescence on receiving blue light. This response was compromised in mutants lacking known regulators in manners consistent with each regulator's function. We also show that relA, a gene encoding a (p)ppGpp synthetase, affects ycgZ dynamics when nullified. Moreover, two unstable luciferase variants showed improved response dynamics and should be useful to study quick changes of gene expression.

  17. Mechanistic basis for transcriptional bursting of ribosomal genes in E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Sandeep; Sanchez, Alvaro; Kondev, Jane

    2012-02-01

    Upon adding more ribosomal genes to the E. coli cell, it adjusts the overall transcription of these genes by reducing the average transcription rate per gene, so as to keep constant the level of ribosomal RNA in the cell. It was observed that this reduction in the average transcription level per gene is accompanied by the generation of transcriptional bursts. The biophysical mechanism responsible for this type of transcriptional control is not yet known. We consider three possible mechanisms suggested in the literature: proximal pausing by RNA polymerase, cooperative recruitment of RNA polymerase by DNA supercoiling, and competition between RNA polymerase and a transcription factor for binding to regulatory DNA. We compute the expected statistical properties of transcription initiation for each one of these models,and compare our predictions with published distributions of distances between the polymerases transcribing the ribosomal genes, obtained from electron micrographs.We use this data to estimate the rates of transcription initiation, which are found to be in good agreement with independent measurements. We also show that the three mechanisms considered here can be discriminated by comparing their predictions for the mean and the variance of interpolymerase distances.

  18. Organization and transcription of the dnaA and dnaN genes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Y; Tsukano, H; Sako, T

    1981-01-01

    The locations of the linked dnaA and dnaN genes of Escherichia coli in a specialized transducing lambda phage genome have been determined by electron microscopic heteroduplex analysis, using phages with deletions or insertions in the dnaA or dnaN gene. The transcription initiation sites for the dna genes were also localized by electron microscopic analysis of DNA-RBA heteroduplex molecules formed between the E. coli DNA fragment of the phage genome and the in vitro transcription products of the fragment. The dnaN gene was found to be transcribed in the same direction as the dnaA gene, and predominantly from the promoter of the dnaA gene.

  19. A Transcriptional “Scream” Early Response of E. coli Prey to Predatory Invasion by Bdellovibrio

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Carey; Ivanov, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    We have transcriptionally profiled the genes differentially expressed in E. coli prey cells when predatorily attacked by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus just prior to prey cell killing. This is a brief, approximately 20–25 min period when the prey cell is still alive but contains a Bdellovibrio cell in its periplasm or attached to and penetrating its outer membrane. Total RNA was harvested and labelled 15 min after initiating a semi-synchronous infection with an excess of Bdellovibrio preying upon E. coli and hybridised to a macroarray spotted with all predicted ORFs of E. coli. SAM analysis and t-tests were performed on the resulting data and 126 E. coli genes were found to be significantly differentially regulated by the prey upon attack by Bdellovibrio. The results were confirmed by QRT-PCR. Amongst the prey genes upregulated were a variety of general stress response genes, potentially “selfish” genes within or near prophages and transposable elements, and genes responding to damage in the periplasm and osmotic stress. Essentially, the presence of the invading Bdellovibrio and the resulting damage to the prey cell elicited a small “transcriptional scream”, but seemingly no specific defensive mechanism with which to counter the Bdellovibrio attack. This supports other studies which do not find Bdellovibrio resistance responses in prey, and bodes well for its use as a “living antibiotic”. PMID:20024656

  20. Transcription of the Escherichia coli fliC gene is regulated by metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Guzzo, A.; Diorio, C.; DuBow, M.S. )

    1991-08-01

    luxAB gene fusions in the Escherichia coli genome were used to screen for clones displaying transcriptional changes in the presence of aluminum. One clone was found that contained a luciferase gene fusion in which transcription was increased in the presence of aluminum and which was subsequently shown to be induced by copper, iron, and nickel. Cloning of the metal-regulated gene, hybridization to the ordered phage {lambda} bank of the E. coli chromosome, and sequencing of DNA adjacent to the luxAB fusion revealed that the insertion occurred within the fliC (hag) gene of E. coli. This gene encodes flagellin the filament subunit of the bacterial motility organ, and is under the control of several regulatory cascades. These results suggest that environmental metals may play a role in the regulation of the motility potential of E. coli and that this bioluminescent gene fusion clone (or derivatives thereof) may be used to prepare a biosensor for the rapid detection of metal contamination in water samples.

  1. Transcriptional Responses of Escherichia coli K-12 and O157:H7 Associated with Lettuce Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Ryan C.; Black, Elaine P.; Hou, Zhe; Sugawara, Masayuki; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of outbreaks of gastroenteritis recently caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7 have been linked to the consumption of leafy green vegetables. Although it is known that E. coli survives and grows in the phyllosphere of lettuce plants, the molecular mechanisms by which this bacterium associates with plants are largely unknown. The goal of this study was to identify E. coli genes relevant to its interaction, survival, or attachment to lettuce leaf surfaces, comparing E. coli K-12, a model system, and E. coli O157:H7, a pathogen associated with a large number of outbreaks. Using microarrays, we found that upon interaction with intact leaves, 10.1% and 8.7% of the 3,798 shared genes were differentially expressed in K-12 and O157:H7, respectively, whereas 3.1% changed transcript levels in both. The largest group of genes downregulated consisted of those involved in energy metabolism, including tnaA (33-fold change), encoding a tryptophanase that converts tryptophan into indole. Genes involved in biofilm modulation (bhsA and ybiM) and curli production (csgA and csgB) were significantly upregulated in E. coli K-12 and O157:H7. Both csgA and bhsA (ycfR) mutants were impaired in the long-term colonization of the leaf surface, but only csgA mutants had diminished ability in short-term attachment experiments. Our data suggested that the interaction of E. coli K-12 and O157:H7 with undamaged lettuce leaves likely is initiated via attachment to the leaf surface using curli fibers, a downward shift in their metabolism, and the suppression of biofilm formation. PMID:22247152

  2. Comparative analysis of the transcription-factor gene regulatory networks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Vargas, Lev; Santillán, Moisés

    2008-01-01

    Background The regulatory interactions between transcription factors (TF) and regulated genes (RG) in a species genome can be lumped together in a single directed graph. The TF's and RG's conform the nodes of this graph, while links are drawn whenever a transcription factor regulates a gene's expression. Projections onto TF nodes can be constructed by linking every two nodes regulating a common gene. Similarly, projections onto RG nodes can be made by linking every two regulated genes sharing at least one common regulator. Recent studies of the connectivity pattern in the transcription-factor regulatory network of many organisms have revealed some interesting properties. However, the differences between TF and RG nodes have not been widely explored. Results After analysing the RG and TF projections of the transcription-factor gene regulatory networks of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found several common characteristic as well as some noticeable differences. To better understand these differences, we compared the properties of the E. coli and S. cerevisiae RG- and TF-projected networks with those of the corresponding projections built from randomized versions of the original bipartite networks. These last results indicate that the observed differences are mostly due to the very different ratios of TF to RG counts of the E. coli and S. cerevisiae bipartite networks, rather than to their having different connectivity patterns. Conclusion Since E. coli is a prokaryotic organism while S. cerevisiae is eukaryotic, there are important differences between them concerning processing of mRNA before translation, DNA packing, amount of junk DNA, and gene regulation. From the results in this paper we conclude that the most important effect such differences have had on the development of the corresponding transcription-factor gene regulatory networks is their very different ratios of TF to RG numbers. This ratio is more than three times larger in S

  3. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, ‘Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli’ (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). PMID:26843427

  4. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation and Chromosome Structural Arrangement by GalR in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhong; Trostel, Andrei; Lewis, Dale E. A.; Lee, Sang Jun; He, Ximiao; Stringer, Anne M.; Wade, Joseph T.; Schneider, Thomas D.; Durfee, Tim; Adhya, Sankar

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory protein, GalR, is known for controlling transcription of genes related to D-galactose metabolism in Escherichia coli. Here, using a combination of experimental and bioinformatic approaches, we identify novel GalR binding sites upstream of several genes whose function is not directly related to D-galactose metabolism. Moreover, we do not observe regulation of these genes by GalR under standard growth conditions. Thus, our data indicate a broader regulatory role for GalR, and suggest that regulation by GalR is modulated by other factors. Surprisingly, we detect regulation of 158 transcripts by GalR, with few regulated genes being associated with a nearby GalR binding site. Based on our earlier observation of long-range interactions between distally bound GalR dimers, we propose that GalR indirectly regulates the transcription of many genes by inducing large-scale restructuring of the chromosome. PMID:27900321

  5. The Escherichia coli transcriptional regulator MarA directly represses transcription of purA and hdeA.

    PubMed

    Schneiders, Thamarai; Barbosa, Teresa M; McMurry, Laura M; Levy, Stuart B

    2004-03-05

    The Escherichia coli MarA protein mediates a response to multiple environmental stresses through the activation or repression in vivo of a large number of chromosomal genes. Transcriptional activation for a number of these genes has been shown to occur via direct interaction of MarA with a 20-bp degenerate asymmetric "marbox" sequence. It was not known whether repression by MarA was also direct. We found that purified MarA was sufficient in vitro to repress transcription of both purA and hdeA. Transcription and electrophoretic mobility shift experiments in vitro using mutant promoters suggested that the marbox involved in the repression overlapped the -35 promoter motif and was in the "backward" orientation. This organization contrasts with that of the class II promoters activated by MarA, in which the marbox also overlaps the -35 motif but is in the "forward" orientation. We conclude that MarA, a member of the AraC/XylS family, can act directly as a repressor or an activator, depending on the position and orientation of the marbox within a promoter.

  6. Genes on a Wire: The Nucleoid-Associated Protein HU Insulates Transcription Units in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael; Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Petya; Rapiteanu, Radu; Lisicovas, Viktoras; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which chromosomal gene position in prokaryotes affects local gene expression remains an open question. Several studies have shown that chromosomal re-positioning of bacterial transcription units does not alter their expression pattern, except for a general decrease in gene expression levels from chromosomal origin to terminus proximal positions, which is believed to result from gene dosage effects. Surprisingly, the question as to whether this chromosomal context independence is a cis encoded property of a bacterial transcription unit, or if position independence is a property conferred by factors acting in trans, has not been addressed so far. For this purpose, we established a genetic test system assessing the chromosomal positioning effects by means of identical promoter-fluorescent reporter gene fusions inserted equidistantly from OriC into both chromosomal replichores of Escherichia coli K-12. Our investigations of the reporter activities in mutant cells lacking the conserved nucleoid associated protein HU uncovered various drastic chromosomal positional effects on gene transcription. In addition we present evidence that these positional effects are caused by transcriptional activity nearby the insertion site of our reporter modules. We therefore suggest that the nucleoid-associated protein HU is functionally insulating transcription units, most likely by constraining transcription induced DNA supercoiling. PMID:27545593

  7. Model of transcriptional activation by MarA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wall, Michael E; Markowitz, David A; Rosner, Judah L; Martin, Robert G

    2009-12-01

    The AraC family transcription factor MarA activates approximately 40 genes (the marA/soxS/rob regulon) of the Escherichia coli chromosome resulting in different levels of resistance to a wide array of antibiotics and to superoxides. Activation of marA/soxS/rob regulon promoters occurs in a well-defined order with respect to the level of MarA; however, the order of activation does not parallel the strength of MarA binding to promoter sequences. To understand this lack of correspondence, we developed a computational model of transcriptional activation in which a transcription factor either increases or decreases RNA polymerase binding, and either accelerates or retards post-binding events associated with transcription initiation. We used the model to analyze data characterizing MarA regulation of promoter activity. The model clearly explains the lack of correspondence between the order of activation and the MarA-DNA affinity and indicates that the order of activation can only be predicted using information about the strength of the full MarA-polymerase-DNA interaction. The analysis further suggests that MarA can activate without increasing polymerase binding and that activation can even involve a decrease in polymerase binding, which is opposite to the textbook model of activation by recruitment. These findings are consistent with published chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of interactions between polymerase and the E. coli chromosome. We find that activation involving decreased polymerase binding yields lower latency in gene regulation and therefore might confer a competitive advantage to cells. Our model yields insights into requirements for predicting the order of activation of a regulon and enables us to suggest that activation might involve a decrease in polymerase binding which we expect to be an important theme of gene regulation in E. coli and beyond.

  8. Model of transcriptional activation by MarA in escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Michael E; Rosner, Judah L; Martin, Robert G

    2009-01-01

    The AraC family transcription factor MarA activates approximately 40 genes (the marA/soxS/rob regulon) of the Escherichia coli chromosome resulting in different levels of resistance to a wide array of antibiotics and to superoxides. Activation of marA/soxS/rob regulon promoters occurs in a well-defined order with respect to the level of MarA; however, the order of activation does not parallel the strength of MarA binding to promoter sequences. To understand this lack of correspondence, we developed a computational model of transcriptional activation in which a transcription factor either increases or decreases RNA polymerase binding, and either accelerates or retards post-binding events associated with transcription initiation. We used the model to analyze data characterizing MarA regulation of promoter activity. The model clearly explains the lack of correspondence between the order of activation and the MarA-DNA affinity and indicates that the order of activation can only be predicted using information about the strength of the full MarA-polymerase-DNA interaction. The analysis further suggests that MarA can activate without increasing polymerase binding and that activation can even involve a decrease in polymerase binding, which is opposite to the textbook model of activation by recruitment. These findings are consistent with published chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of interactions between polymerase and the E. coli chromosome. We find that activation involving decreased polymerase binding yields lower latency in gene regulation and therefore might confer a competitive advantage to cells. Our model yields insights into requirements for predicting the order of activation of a regulon and enables us to suggest that activation might involve a decrease in polymerase binding which we expect to be an important theme of gene regulation in E. coli and beyond.

  9. The functional landscape bound to the transcription factors of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Tenorio-Salgado, Silvia; Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Balderas-Martínez, Yalbi I; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    Motivated by the experimental evidences accumulated in the last ten years and based on information deposited in RegulonDB, literature look up, and sequence analysis, we analyze the repertoire of 304 DNA-binding Transcription factors (TFs) in Escherichia coli K-12. These regulators were grouped in 78 evolutionary families and are regulating almost half of the total genes in this bacterium. In structural terms, 60% of TFs are composed by two-domains, 30% are monodomain, and 10% three- and four-structural domains. As previously noticed, the most abundant DNA-binding domain corresponds to the winged helix-turn-helix, with few alternative DNA-binding structures, resembling the hypothesis of successful protein structures with the emergence of new ones at low scales. In summary, we identified and described the characteristics associated to the DNA-binding TF in E. coli K-12. We also identified twelve functional modules based on a co-regulated gene matrix. Finally, diverse regulons were predicted based on direct associations between the TFs and potential regulated genes. This analysis should increase our knowledge about the gene regulation in the bacterium E. coli K-12, and provide more additional clues for comprehensive modelling of transcriptional regulatory networks in other bacteria.

  10. Transcriptional analysis of different stress response genes in Escherichia coli strains subjected to sodium chloride and lactic acid stress.

    PubMed

    Peng, Silvio; Stephan, Roger; Hummerjohann, Jörg; Tasara, Taurai

    2014-12-01

    Survival of Escherichia coli in food depends on its ability to adapt against encountered stress typically involving induction of stress response genes. In this study, the transcriptional induction of selected acid (cadA, speF) and salt (kdpA, proP, proW, otsA, betA) stress response genes was investigated among five E. coli strains, including three Shiga toxin-producing strains, exposed to sodium chloride or lactic acid stress. Transcriptional induction upon lactic acid stress exposure was similar in all but one E. coli strain, which lacked the lysine decarboxylase gene cadA. In response to sodium chloride stress exposure, proW and otsA were similarly induced, while significant differences were observed between the E. coli strains in induction of kdpA, proP and betA. The kdpA and betA genes were significantly induced in four and three strains, respectively, whereas one strain did not induce these genes. The proP gene was only induced in two E. coli strains. Interestingly, transcriptional induction differences in response to sodium chloride stress exposure were associated with survival phenotypes observed for the E. coli strains in cheese as the E. coli strain lacking significant induction in three salt stress response genes investigated also survived poorly compared to the other E. coli strains in cheese.

  11. Agent-based modeling of oxygen-responsive transcription factors in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hao; Rolfe, Matthew D; Jia, Wenjing; Coakley, Simon; Poole, Robert K; Green, Jeffrey; Holcombe, Mike

    2014-04-01

    In the presence of oxygen (O2) the model bacterium Escherichia coli is able to conserve energy by aerobic respiration. Two major terminal oxidases are involved in this process - Cyo has a relatively low affinity for O2 but is able to pump protons and hence is energetically efficient; Cyd has a high affinity for O2 but does not pump protons. When E. coli encounters environments with different O2 availabilities, the expression of the genes encoding the alternative terminal oxidases, the cydAB and cyoABCDE operons, are regulated by two O2-responsive transcription factors, ArcA (an indirect O2 sensor) and FNR (a direct O2 sensor). It has been suggested that O2-consumption by the terminal oxidases located at the cytoplasmic membrane significantly affects the activities of ArcA and FNR in the bacterial nucleoid. In this study, an agent-based modeling approach has been taken to spatially simulate the uptake and consumption of O2 by E. coli and the consequent modulation of ArcA and FNR activities based on experimental data obtained from highly controlled chemostat cultures. The molecules of O2, transcription factors and terminal oxidases are treated as individual agents and their behaviors and interactions are imitated in a simulated 3-D E. coli cell. The model implies that there are two barriers that dampen the response of FNR to O2, i.e. consumption of O2 at the membrane by the terminal oxidases and reaction of O2 with cytoplasmic FNR. Analysis of FNR variants suggested that the monomer-dimer transition is the key step in FNR-mediated repression of gene expression.

  12. Coordination logic of the sensing machinery in the transcriptional regulatory network of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Janga, Sarath Chandra; Salgado, Heladia; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2007-01-01

    The active and inactive state of transcription factors in growing cells is usually directed by allosteric physicochemical signals or metabolites, which are in turn either produced in the cell or obtained from the environment by the activity of the products of effector genes. To understand the regulatory dynamics and to improve our knowledge about how transcription factors (TFs) respond to endogenous and exogenous signals in the bacterial model, Escherichia coli, we previously proposed to classify TFs into external, internal and hybrid sensing classes depending on the source of their allosteric or equivalent metabolite. Here we analyze how a cell uses its topological structures in the context of sensing machinery and show that, while feed forward loops (FFLs) tightly integrate internal and external sensing TFs connecting TFs from different layers of the hierarchical transcriptional regulatory network (TRN), bifan motifs frequently connect TFs belonging to the same sensing class and could act as a bridge between TFs originating from the same level in the hierarchy. We observe that modules identified in the regulatory network of E. coli are heterogeneous in sensing context with a clear combination of internal and external sensing categories depending on the physiological role played by the module. We also note that propensity of two-component response regulators increases at promoters, as the number of TFs regulating a target operon increases. Finally we show that evolutionary families of TFs do not show a tendency to preserve their sensing abilities. Our results provide a detailed panorama of the topological structures of E. coli TRN and the way TFs they compose off, sense their surroundings by coordinating responses.

  13. Tandem transcription termination sites in the dnaN gene of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Armengod, M E; García-Sogo, M; Pérez-Roger, I; Macián, F; Navarro-Aviñó, J P

    1991-10-15

    The dnaN gene of Escherichia coli encodes the beta-subunit of DNA polymerase III and maps between the dnaA and recF genes. We demonstrated previously that dnaN and recF constitute a transcriptional unit under control of the dnaN promoters. However, the recF gene has its own promoter region located in the middle of the dnaN structural gene. In this report, we use S1 mapping of mRNAs, transcriptional and translational fusions to the galK and lacZ genes, and in vitro mutagenesis to identify and characterize three tandem transcription termination sites responsible for transcriptional polarity in the dnaN-recF operon. These sites are located in the dnaN gene, downstream from the recF promoter region. Cumulatively, they terminate about 80% of the untranslated transcripts started at the recF promoters. As expected, they do not reduce transcription coming from the dnaN promoters unless dnaN translation was prematurely disrupted by the presence of a nonsense codon. The particular arrangement of regulatory elements (promoters and terminators) in the dnaN-recF region provides an exceptional in vivo system to confirm the latent termination site model of transcriptional polarity. In addition, our results contribute to the understanding of the complex regulation of the dnaA, dnaN, and recF genes. We propose that these three genes constitute an operon and that the terminators described in this work could be used to reduce expression of the distal genes of the operon under circumstances in which the dnaN translation happens to be slowed down.

  14. Escherichia coli dihydroxyacetone kinase controls gene expression by binding to transcription factor DhaR.

    PubMed

    Bächler, Christoph; Schneider, Philipp; Bähler, Priska; Lustig, Ariel; Erni, Bernhard

    2005-01-26

    Dihydroxyacetone (Dha) kinases are a sequence-conserved family of enzymes, which utilize either ATP (in animals, plants, bacteria) or the bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) as a source of high-energy phosphate. The PTS-dependent kinase of Escherichia coli consists of three subunits: DhaK contains the Dha binding site, DhaL contains ADP as cofactor for the double displacement of phosphate from DhaM to Dha, and DhaM provides a phospho-histidine relay between the PTS and DhaL::ADP. DhaR is a transcription activator belonging to the AAA+ family of enhancer binding proteins. It stimulates transcription of the dhaKLM operon from a sigma70 promoter and autorepresses dhaR transcription. Genetic and biochemical studies indicate that the enzyme subunits DhaL and DhaK act antagonistically as coactivator and corepressor of the transcription activator by mutually exclusive binding to the sensing domain of DhaR. In the presence of Dha, DhaL is dephosphorylated and DhaL::ADP displaces DhaK and stimulates DhaR activity. In the absence of Dha, DhaL::ADP is converted by the PTS to DhaL::ATP, which does not bind to DhaR.

  15. Regulation of transcription of cell division genes in the Escherichia coli dcw cluster.

    PubMed

    Vicente, M; Gomez, M J; Ayala, J A

    1998-04-01

    The Escherichia coli dcw cluster contains cell division genes, such as the phylogenetically ubiquitous ftsZ, and genes involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. Transcription in the cluster proceeds in the same direction as the progress of the replication fork along the chromosome. Regulation is exerted at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The absence of transcriptional termination signals may, in principle, allow extension of the transcripts initiated at the up-stream promoter (mraZ1p) even to the furthest down-stream gene (envA). Complementation tests suggest that they extend into ftsW in the central part of the cluster. In addition, the cluster contains other promoters individually regulated by cis- and trans-acting signals. Dissociation of the expression of the ftsZ gene, located after ftsQ and A near the 3' end of the cluster, from its natural regulatory signals leads to an alteration in the physiology of cell division. The complexities observed in the regulation of gene expression in the cluster may then have an important biological role. Among them, LexA-binding SOS boxes have been found at the 5' end of the cluster, preceding promoters which direct the expression of ftsI (coding for PBP3, the penicillin-binding protein involved in septum formation). A gearbox promoter, ftsQ1p, forms part of the signals regulating the transcription of ftsQ, A and Z. It is an inversely growth-dependent mechanism driven by RNA polymerase containing sigma s, the factor involved in the expression of stationary phase-specific genes. Although the dcw cluster is conserved to a different extent in a variety of bacteria, the regulation of gene expression, the presence or absence of individual genes, and even the essentiality of some of them, show variations in the phylogenetic scale which may reflect adaptation to specific life cycles.

  16. Influence of the sequence-dependent flexure of DNA on transcription in E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Collis, C M; Molloy, P L; Both, G W; Drew, H R

    1989-01-01

    In order to study the effects of DNA structure on cellular processes such as transcription, we have made a series of plasmids that locate several different kinds of DNA structure (stiff, flexible or curved) near the sites of cleavage by commonly-used restriction enzymes. One can use these plasmids to place any DNA region of interest (e.g., promoter, operator or enhancer) close to certain kinds of DNA structure that may influence its ability to work in a living cell. In the present example, we have placed a promoter from T7 virus next to the special DNA structures; the T7 promoter is then linked to a gene for a marker protein (chloramphenicol acetyl transferase). When plasmids bearing the T7 promoter are grown in cells of E. coli that contain T7 RNA polymerase, the special DNA structures seem to have little or no influence over the activity of the T7 promoter, contrary to our expectations. Yet when the same plasmids are grown in cells of E. coli that do not contain T7 RNA polymerase, some of the DNA structures show a surprising promoter activity of their own. In particular, the favourable flexibility or curvature of DNA, in the close vicinity of potential -35 and -10 promoter regions, seems to be a significant factor in determining where E. coli RNA polymerase starts RNA chains. We show directly, in one example, that loss of curvature between -35 and -10 regions is associated with a nearly-complete loss of promoter activity. These results, and others of their kind, show that the structural and/or vibrational properties of DNA play a much more important role in determining E. coli promoter activity than has previously been supposed. Images PMID:2685760

  17. Global RNA Half-Life Analysis in Escherichia coli Reveals Positional Patterns of Transcript Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Selinger, Douglas W.; Saxena, Rini Mukherjee; Cheung, Kevin J.; Church, George M.; Rosenow, Carsten

    2003-01-01

    Subgenic-resolution oligonucleotide microarrays were used to study global RNA degradation in wild-type Escherichia coli MG1655. RNA chemical half-lives were measured for 1036 open reading frames (ORFs) and for 329 known and predicted operons. The half-life of total mRNA was 6.8 min under the conditions tested. We also observed significant relationships between gene functional assignments and transcript stability. Unexpectedly, transcription of a single operon (tdcABCDEFG) was relatively rifampicin-insensitive and showed significant increases 2.5 min after rifampicin addition. This supports a novel mechanism of transcription for the tdc operon, whose promoter lacks any recognizable ς binding sites. Probe by probe analysis of all known and predicted operons showed that the 5′ ends of operons degrade, on average, more quickly than the rest of the transcript, with stability increasing in a 3′ direction, supporting and further generalizing the current model of a net 5′ to 3′ directionality of degradation. Hierarchical clustering analysis of operon degradation patterns revealed that this pattern predominates but is not exclusive. We found a weak but highly significant correlation between the degradation of adjacent operon regions, suggesting that stability is determined by a combination of local and operon-wide stability determinants. The 16 ORF dcw gene cluster, which has a complex promoter structure and a partially characterized degradation pattern, was studied at high resolution, allowing a detailed and integrated description of its abundance and degradation. We discuss the application of subgenic resolution DNA microarray analysis to study global mechanisms of RNA transcription and processing. PMID:12566399

  18. Transcription promotes guanine to thymine mutations in the non-transcribed strand of an Escherichia coli gene.

    PubMed

    Klapacz, Joanna; Bhagwat, Ashok S

    2005-07-12

    Transcription of DNA opens the chromatin, causes topological changes in DNA and transiently exposes the two strands to different biochemical environments. Consequently, it has long been argued that transcription may promote damage to DNA and there are data in Escherichia coli and yeast supporting a correlation between high transcription and mutations. We examined the transcription-dependence of the reversion of a nonsense codon (TGA) in E. coli and found that there was a strong dependence of mutations on transcription in strains defective in the repair of 8-oxoguanine in DNA. Under conditions of high transcription there was a three to five-fold increase in mutations that changed TGA in the non-transcribed strand to a sense codon. Furthermore, in both mutY and mutM mutY backgrounds the mutations were overwhelmingly G:C to T:A. In contrast, when the TGA was in the transcribed strand in relation with the inducible promoter, high transcription decreased the rate of reversion. Similar results were obtained in a strain defective in the transcription-repair coupling factor, Mfd, suggesting that transcription dependent increase in base substitutions does not require transcription-dependent DNA repair. However, Mfd does modulate the magnitude of the mutagenic effect of transcription. These data are consistent with a model in which the non-transcribed strand is more susceptible to oxidative damage during transcription than the transcribed strand. These results suggest that the magnitudes of individual base substitutions and their relative numbers in other studies of mutational spectra may also be affected by transcription.

  19. Engineering global transcription factor cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli for improved 1-butanol tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongfang; Chong, Huiqing; Ching, Chi Bun; Song, Hao; Jiang, Rongrong

    2012-05-01

    One major challenge in biofuel production, including biobutanol production, is the low tolerance of the microbial host towards increasing biofuel concentration during fermentation. Here, we have demonstrated that Escherichia coli 1-butanol tolerance can be greatly enhanced through random mutagenesis of global transcription factor cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). Four mutants (MT1-MT4) with elevated 1-butanol tolerance were isolated from error-prone PCR libraries through an enrichment screening. A DNA shuffling library was then constructed using MT1-MT4 as templates and one mutant (MT5) that exhibited the best tolerance ability among all variants was selected. In the presence of 0.8 % (v/v, 6.5 g/l) 1-butanol, the growth rate of MT5 was found to be 0.28 h(-1) while that of wild type was 0.20 h(-1). When 1-butanol concentration increased to 1.2 % (9.7 g/l), the growth rate of MT5 (0.18 h(-1)) became twice that of the wild type (0.09 h(-1)). Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbon test showed that cell surface of MT5 was less hydrophobic and its cell length became significantly longer in the presence of 1-butanol, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis revealed that several CRP regulated, 1-butanol stress response related genes (rpoH, ompF, sodA, manX, male, and marA) demonstrated differential expression in MT5 in the presence or absence of 1-butanol. In conclusion, direct manipulation of the transcript profile through engineering global transcription factor CRP can provide a useful tool in strain engineering.

  20. Identification of Candidate Adherent-Invasive E. coli Signature Transcripts by Genomic/Transcriptomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanhao; Rowehl, Leahana; Krumsiek, Julia M.; Orner, Erika P.; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Tarr, Phillip I.; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M.; Boedeker, Edgar C.; Xiong, Xuejian; Parkinson, John; Frank, Daniel N.; Li, Ellen; Gathungu, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) strains are detected more frequently within mucosal lesions of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD). The AIEC phenotype consists of adherence and invasion of intestinal epithelial cells and survival within macrophages of these bacteria in vitro. Our aim was to identify candidate transcripts that distinguish AIEC from non-invasive E. coli (NIEC) strains and might be useful for rapid and accurate identification of AIEC by culture-independent technology. We performed comparative RNA-Sequence (RNASeq) analysis using AIEC strain LF82 and NIEC strain HS during exponential and stationary growth. Differential expression analysis of coding sequences (CDS) homologous to both strains demonstrated 224 and 241 genes with increased and decreased expression, respectively, in LF82 relative to HS. Transition metal transport and siderophore metabolism related pathway genes were up-regulated, while glycogen metabolic and oxidation-reduction related pathway genes were down-regulated, in LF82. Chemotaxis related transcripts were up-regulated in LF82 during the exponential phase, but flagellum-dependent motility pathway genes were down-regulated in LF82 during the stationary phase. CDS that mapped only to the LF82 genome accounted for 747 genes. We applied an in silico subtractive genomics approach to identify CDS specific to AIEC by incorporating the genomes of 10 other previously phenotyped NIEC. From this analysis, 166 CDS mapped to the LF82 genome and lacked homology to any of the 11 human NIEC strains. We compared these CDS across 13 AIEC, but none were homologous in each. Four LF82 gene loci belonging to clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats region (CRISPR)—CRISPR-associated (Cas) genes were identified in 4 to 6 AIEC and absent from all non-pathogenic bacteria. As previously reported, AIEC strains were enriched for pdu operon genes. One CDS, encoding an excisionase, was shared by 9 AIEC strains. Reverse transcription

  1. Identification of Candidate Adherent-Invasive E. coli Signature Transcripts by Genomic/Transcriptomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanhao; Rowehl, Leahana; Krumsiek, Julia M; Orner, Erika P; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Tarr, Phillip I; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M; Boedeker, Edgar C; Xiong, Xuejian; Parkinson, John; Frank, Daniel N; Li, Ellen; Gathungu, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) strains are detected more frequently within mucosal lesions of patients with Crohn's disease (CD). The AIEC phenotype consists of adherence and invasion of intestinal epithelial cells and survival within macrophages of these bacteria in vitro. Our aim was to identify candidate transcripts that distinguish AIEC from non-invasive E. coli (NIEC) strains and might be useful for rapid and accurate identification of AIEC by culture-independent technology. We performed comparative RNA-Sequence (RNASeq) analysis using AIEC strain LF82 and NIEC strain HS during exponential and stationary growth. Differential expression analysis of coding sequences (CDS) homologous to both strains demonstrated 224 and 241 genes with increased and decreased expression, respectively, in LF82 relative to HS. Transition metal transport and siderophore metabolism related pathway genes were up-regulated, while glycogen metabolic and oxidation-reduction related pathway genes were down-regulated, in LF82. Chemotaxis related transcripts were up-regulated in LF82 during the exponential phase, but flagellum-dependent motility pathway genes were down-regulated in LF82 during the stationary phase. CDS that mapped only to the LF82 genome accounted for 747 genes. We applied an in silico subtractive genomics approach to identify CDS specific to AIEC by incorporating the genomes of 10 other previously phenotyped NIEC. From this analysis, 166 CDS mapped to the LF82 genome and lacked homology to any of the 11 human NIEC strains. We compared these CDS across 13 AIEC, but none were homologous in each. Four LF82 gene loci belonging to clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats region (CRISPR)--CRISPR-associated (Cas) genes were identified in 4 to 6 AIEC and absent from all non-pathogenic bacteria. As previously reported, AIEC strains were enriched for pdu operon genes. One CDS, encoding an excisionase, was shared by 9 AIEC strains. Reverse transcription

  2. ppGpp couples transcription to DNA repair in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kamarthapu, Venu; Epshtein, Vitaly; Benjamin, Bradley; Proshkin, Sergey; Mironov, Alexander; Cashel, Michael; Nudler, Evgeny

    2016-05-20

    The small molecule alarmone (p)ppGpp mediates bacterial adaptation to nutrient deprivation by altering the initiation properties of RNA polymerase (RNAP). ppGpp is generated in Escherichia coli by two related enzymes, RelA and SpoT. We show that ppGpp is robustly, but transiently, induced in response to DNA damage and is required for efficient nucleotide excision DNA repair (NER). This explains why relA-spoT-deficient cells are sensitive to diverse genotoxic agents and ultraviolet radiation, whereas ppGpp induction renders them more resistant to such challenges. The mechanism of DNA protection by ppGpp involves promotion of UvrD-mediated RNAP backtracking. By rendering RNAP backtracking-prone, ppGpp couples transcription to DNA repair and prompts transitions between repair and recovery states.

  3. The oxygen-responsive transcriptional regulator FNR of Escherichia coli: the search for signals and reactions.

    PubMed

    Unden, G; Schirawski, J

    1997-07-01

    The FNR (fumarate and nitrate reductase regulation) protein of Escherichia coli is an oxygen-responsive transcriptional regulator required for the switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. In the absence of oxygen, FNR changes from the inactive to the active state. The sensory and the regulatory functions reside in separate domains of FNR. The sensory domain contains a Fe-S cluster, which is of the [4Fe-4S]2+ type under anaerobic conditions. It is suggested that oxygen is supplied to the cytoplasmic FNR by diffusion and inactivates FNR by direct interaction. Reactivation under anoxic conditions requires cellular reductants. In vitro, the Fe-S cluster is converted to a [3Fe-4S]+ or a [2Fe-2S]2+ cluster by oxygen, resulting in FNR inactivation. After prolonged incubation with oxygen, the Fe-S cluster is destroyed. Reassembly of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster might require cellular proteins, such as the NifS-like protein of E. coli. In this review, the rationale for regulation of alternative metabolic pathways by FNR and other oxygen-dependent regulators is discussed. Only the terminal reductases of respiration, and not the dehydrogenases, are regulated in such a way as to achieve maximal H+/e- ratios and ATP yields.

  4. The Highly Conserved Escherichia coli Transcription Factor YhaJ Regulates Aromatic Compound Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Palevsky, Noa; Shemer, Benjamin; Connolly, James P. R.; Belkin, Shimshon

    2016-01-01

    The aromatic compound 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), a common impurity in 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) production, has been suggested as a tracer for the presence of TNT-based landmines due to its stability and high volatility. We have previously described an Escherichia coli bioreporter capable of detecting the presence of DNT vapors, harboring a fusion of the yqjF gene promoter to a reporter element. However, the DNT metabolite which is the direct inducer of yqjF, has not yet been identified, nor has the regulatory mechanism of the induction been clarified. We demonstrate here that the YhaJ protein, a member of the LysR type family, acts as a transcriptional regulator of yqjF activation, as well as of a panel of additional E. coli genes. This group of genes share a common sequence motif in their promoters, which is suggested here as a putative YhaJ-box. In addition, we have linked YhaJ to the regulation of quinol-like compound degradation in the cell, and identified yhaK as playing a role in the degradation of DNT. PMID:27713734

  5. Protein engineering of the transcriptional activator FhlA To enhance hydrogen production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Torres, Viviana; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2009-09-01

    Escherichia coli produces H(2) from formate via the formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex during mixed acid fermentation; the FHL complex consists of formate dehydrogenase H (encoded by fdhF) for forming 2H(+), 2e(-), and CO(2) from formate and hydrogenase 3 (encoded by hycGE) for synthesizing H(2) from 2H(+) and 2e(-). FHL protein production is activated by the sigma(54) transcriptional activator FhlA, which activates transcription of fdhF and the hyc, hyp, and hydN-hypF operons. Here, through random mutagenesis using error-prone PCR over the whole gene, as well as over the fhlA region encoding the first 388 amino acids of the 692-amino-acid protein, we evolved FhlA to increase H(2) production. The amino acid replacements in FhlA133 (Q11H, L14V, Y177F, K245R, M288K, and I342F) increased hydrogen production ninefold, and the replacements in FhlA1157 (M6T, S35T, L113P, S146C, and E363K) increased hydrogen production fourfold. Saturation mutagenesis at the codons corresponding to the amino acid replacements in FhlA133 and at position E363 identified the importance of position L14 and of E363 for the increased activity; FhlA with replacements L14G and E363G increased hydrogen production (fourfold and sixfold, respectively) compared to FhlA. Whole-transcriptome and promoter reporter constructs revealed that the mechanism by which the FhlA133 changes increase hydrogen production is by increasing transcription of all of the genes activated by FhlA (the FHL complex). With FhlA133, transcription of P(fdhF) and P(hyc) is less sensitive to formate regulation, and with FhlA363 (E363G), P(hyc) transcription increases but P(hyp) transcription decreases and hydrogen production is less affected by the repressor HycA.

  6. Transcript degradation and noise of small RNA-controlled genes in a switch activated network in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Tal, Asaf; Parasar, Bibudha; Dym, Alvah; Costantino, Nina; Muñoz-García, Javier; Court, Donald L; Stavans, Joel

    2016-08-19

    Post-transcriptional regulatory processes may change transcript levels and affect cell-to-cell variability or noise. We study small-RNA downregulation to elucidate its effects on noise in the iron homeostasis network of Escherichia coli In this network, the small-RNA RyhB undergoes stoichiometric degradation with the transcripts of target genes in response to iron stress. Using single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, we measured transcript numbers of the RyhB-regulated genes sodB and fumA in individual cells as a function of iron deprivation. We observed a monotonic increase of noise with iron stress but no evidence of theoretically predicted, enhanced stoichiometric fluctuations in transcript numbers, nor of bistable behavior in transcript distributions. Direct detection of RyhB in individual cells shows that its noise is much smaller than that of these two targets, when RyhB production is significant. A generalized two-state model of bursty transcription that neglects RyhB fluctuations describes quantitatively the dependence of noise and transcript distributions on iron deprivation, enabling extraction of in vivo RyhB-mediated transcript degradation rates. The transcripts' threshold-linear behavior indicates that the effective in vivo interaction strength between RyhB and its two target transcripts is comparable. Strikingly, the bacterial cell response exhibits Fur-dependent, switch-like activation instead of a graded response to iron deprivation.

  7. What Determines the Assembly of Transcriptional Network Motifs in Escherichia coli?

    PubMed Central

    Camas, Francisco M.; Poyatos, Juan F.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional networks are constituted by a collection of building blocks known as network motifs. Why do motifs appear? An adaptive model of motif emergence was recently questioned in favor of neutralist scenarios. Here, we provide a new picture of motif assembly in Escherichia coli which partially clarifies these contrasting explanations. This is based on characterizing the linkage between motifs and sensing or response specificity of their constituent transcriptional factors (TFs). We find that sensing specificity influences the distribution of autoregulation, while the tendency of a TF to establish feed-forward loops (FFLs) depends on response specificity, i.e., regulon size. Analysis of the latter pattern reveals that coregulation between large regulon-size TFs is common under a network neutral model, leading to the assembly of a great number of FFLs and bifans. In addition, neutral exclusive regulation also leads to a collection of single input modules -the fourth basic motif. On the whole, and even under the conservative neutralist scenario considered, a substantial group of regulatory structures revealed adaptive. These structures visibly function as fully-fledged working units. PMID:18987754

  8. Concurrent Growth Rate and Transcript Analyses Reveal Essential Gene Stringency in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Shan; Boberek, Jaroslaw M.; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Stach, Jem; Good, Liam

    2009-01-01

    Background Genes essential for bacterial growth are of particular scientific interest. Many putative essential genes have been identified or predicted in several species, however, little is known about gene expression requirement stringency, which may be an important aspect of bacterial physiology and likely a determining factor in drug target development. Methodology/Principal Findings Working from the premise that essential genes differ in absolute requirement for growth, we describe silencing of putative essential genes in E. coli to obtain a titration of declining growth rates and transcript levels by using antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and expressed antisense RNA. The relationship between mRNA decline and growth rate decline reflects the degree of essentiality, or stringency, of an essential gene, which is here defined by the minimum transcript level for a 50% reduction in growth rate (MTL50). When applied to four growth essential genes, both RNA silencing methods resulted in MTL50 values that reveal acpP as the most stringently required of the four genes examined, with ftsZ the next most stringently required. The established antibacterial targets murA and fabI were less stringently required. Conclusions RNA silencing can reveal stringent requirements for gene expression with respect to growth. This method may be used to validate existing essential genes and to quantify drug target requirement. PMID:19557168

  9. Transcription of ftsZ oscillates during the cell cycle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Garrido, T; Sánchez, M; Palacios, P; Aldea, M; Vicente, M

    1993-10-01

    The FtsZ protein is a key element controlling cell division in Escherichia coli. A powerful transcription titration assay was used to quantify the ftsZ mRNA present in synchronously dividing cells. The ftsZ mRNA levels oscillate during the cell cycle reaching a maximum at about the time DNA replication initiates. This cell cycle dependency is specifically due to the two proximal ftsZ promoters. A strain was constructed in which expression of ftsZ could be modulated by an exogenous inducer. In this strain cell size and cell division frequency were sensitive to the cellular FtsZ contents, demonstrating the rate-limiting role of this protein in cell division. Transcriptional activity of the ftsZ promoters was found to be independent of DnaA, indicating that DNA replication and cell division may be independently controlled at the time when new rounds of DNA replication are initiated. This suggests a parallelism between the prokaryotic cell cycle signals and the START point of eukaryotic cell cycles.

  10. Transcription of ftsZ oscillates during the cell cycle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, T; Sánchez, M; Palacios, P; Aldea, M; Vicente, M

    1993-01-01

    The FtsZ protein is a key element controlling cell division in Escherichia coli. A powerful transcription titration assay was used to quantify the ftsZ mRNA present in synchronously dividing cells. The ftsZ mRNA levels oscillate during the cell cycle reaching a maximum at about the time DNA replication initiates. This cell cycle dependency is specifically due to the two proximal ftsZ promoters. A strain was constructed in which expression of ftsZ could be modulated by an exogenous inducer. In this strain cell size and cell division frequency were sensitive to the cellular FtsZ contents, demonstrating the rate-limiting role of this protein in cell division. Transcriptional activity of the ftsZ promoters was found to be independent of DnaA, indicating that DNA replication and cell division may be independently controlled at the time when new rounds of DNA replication are initiated. This suggests a parallelism between the prokaryotic cell cycle signals and the START point of eukaryotic cell cycles. Images PMID:8404863

  11. Rapid Sampling of Escherichia coli After Changing Oxygen Conditions Reveals Transcriptional Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    von Wulffen, Joachim; Ulmer, Andreas; Jäger, Günter; Sawodny, Oliver; Feuer, Ronny

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is able to shift between anaerobic and aerobic metabolism by adapting its gene expression, e.g., of metabolic genes, to the new environment. The dynamics of gene expression that result from environmental shifts are limited, amongst others, by the time needed for regulation and transcription elongation. In this study, we examined gene expression dynamics after an anaerobic-to-aerobic shift on a short time scale (0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 min) by RNA sequencing with emphasis on delay times and transcriptional elongation rates (TER). Transient expression patterns and timing of differential expression, characterized by delay and elongation, were identified as key features of the dataset. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed early upregulation of respiratory and iron-related gene sets. We inferred specific TERs of 89 operons with a mean TER of 42.0 nt/s and mean delay time of 22.4 s. TERs correlate with sequence features, such as codon bias, whereas delay times correlate with the involvement of regulators. The presented data illustrate that at very short times after a shift in oxygenation, extensional changes of the transcriptome, such as temporary responses, can be observed. Besides regulation, TERs contribute to the dynamics of gene expression. PMID:28264512

  12. The RclR protein is a reactive chlorine-specific transcription factor in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Parker, Benjamin W; Schwessinger, Emily A; Jakob, Ursula; Gray, Michael J

    2013-11-08

    Reactive chlorine species (RCS) such as hypochlorous acid are powerful antimicrobial oxidants. Used extensively for disinfection in household and industrial settings (i.e. as bleach), RCS are also naturally generated in high quantities during the innate immune response. Bacterial responses to RCS are complex and differ substantially from the well characterized responses to other physiologically relevant oxidants, like peroxide or superoxide. Several RCS-sensitive transcription factors have been identified in bacteria, but most of them respond to multiple stressors whose damaging effects overlap with those of RCS, including reactive oxygen species and electrophiles. We have now used in vivo genetic and in vitro biochemical methods to identify and demonstrate that Escherichia coli RclR (formerly YkgD) is a redox-regulated transcriptional activator of the AraC family, whose highly conserved cysteine residues are specifically sensitive to oxidation by RCS. Oxidation of these cysteines leads to strong, highly specific activation of expression of genes required for survival of RCS stress. These results demonstrate the existence of a widely conserved bacterial regulon devoted specifically to RCS resistance.

  13. The Escherichia coli RNA polymerase alpha subunit and transcriptional activation by bacteriophage lambda CII protein.

    PubMed

    Gabig, M; Obuchowski, M; Ciesielska, A; Latała, B; Wegrzyn, A; Thomas, M S; Wegrzyn, G

    1998-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda is not able to lysogenise the Escherichia coli rpoA341 mutant. This mutation causes a single amino acid substitution Lys271Glu in the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase alpha subunit (alphaCTD). Our previous studies indicated that the impaired lysogenisation of the rpoA341 host is due to a defect in transcriptional activation by the phage CII protein and suggested a role for alphaCTD in this process. Here we used a series of truncation and point mutants in the rpoA gene placed on a plasmid to investigate the process of transcriptional activation by the cII gene product. Our results indicate that amino-acid residues 265, 268 and 271 in the a subunit may play an important role in the CII-mediated activation of the pE promoter (most probably residue 271) or may be involved in putative interactions between alphaCTD and an UP-like element near pE (most probably residues 265 and 268). Measurement of the activity of pE-lacZ, pI-lacZ and p(aQ)-lacZ fusions in the rpoA+ and rpoA341 hosts demonstrated that the mechanism of activation of these CII-dependent promoters may be in each case different.

  14. E. coli 6S RNA: a universal transcriptional regulator within the centre of growth adaptation.

    PubMed

    Geissen, René; Steuten, Benedikt; Polen, Tino; Wagner, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial 6S RNA has been shown to bind with high affinity to σ(70)-containing RNA polymerase, suppressing σ(70)-dependent transcription during stationary phase, when 6S RNA concentrations are highest. We recently reported a genome-wide transcriptional comparison of wild-type and 6S RNA deficient E. coli strains. Contrary to the expected σ(70)- and stationary phase-specific regulatory effect of 6S RNA it turned out that mRNA levels derived from many alternative sigma factors, including σ(38) or σ(32), were affected during exponential and stationary growth. Among the most noticeably down-regulated genes at stationary growth are ribosomal proteins and factors involved in translation. In addition, a striking number of mRNA levels coding for enzymes involved in the purine metabolism, for transporters and stress regulators are altered both during log- and stationary phase. During the study we discovered a link between 6S RNA and the general stress alarmone ppGpp, which has a higher basal level in cells deficient in 6S RNA. This finding points to a functional interrelation of 6S RNA and the global network of stress and growth adaptation.

  15. A transcription terminator in the groEx gene of symbiotic X-bacteria expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Eun; Choi, Sung Han; Ahn, Tae In

    2002-02-28

    The over-expressing groEx gene of symbiotic X-bacteria in Amoeba proteus has unique nucleotide motifs (Tx), containing two hairpins and a C-rich region at its 3'-end. To investigate the role of Tx as a transcription terminator, we mutated Tx and analyzed the effects on the expression of an upstream-located lacZ in E. coli. The level of beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) production in Tx deletion mutants was reduced to 23% of the control level. Site-directed mutation of the hairpin-1, C-rich region, and hairpin-2 reduced the beta-gal production to 28-64%, 33, and 20% of wild-type Tx, respectively. The amount of lacZ transcripts that were detected in RNA blots was proportional to the level of beta-gal. The Tx sequence had 97% termination efficiency in vivo, and the mutations in Tx resulted in read-through transcripts with significantly shortened half-life. In rho- E. coli, the level of the beta-gal production by Tx was reduced to 15% of that in rho+ E. coli. These results suggest that Tx is a Rho-dependent transcription terminator. Also, hairpin-2 is the most effective component among the three motifs of Tx for proper termination of the transcription and stability of mRNAs.

  16. Interaction of the RcsB Response Regulator with Auxiliary Transcription Regulators in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Pannen, Derk; Fabisch, Maria; Gausling, Lisa; Schnetz, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The Rcs phosphorelay is a two-component signal transduction system that is induced by cell envelope stress. RcsB, the response regulator of this signaling system, is a pleiotropic transcription regulator, which is involved in the control of various stress responses, cell division, motility, and biofilm formation. RcsB regulates transcription either as a homodimer or together with auxiliary regulators, such as RcsA, BglJ, and GadE in Escherichia coli. In this study, we show that RcsB in addition forms heterodimers with MatA (also known as EcpR) and with DctR. Our data suggest that the MatA-dependent transcription regulation is mediated by the MatA-RcsB heterodimer and is independent of RcsB phosphorylation. Furthermore, we analyzed the relevance of amino acid residues of the active quintet of conserved residues, and of surface-exposed residues for activity of RcsB. The data suggest that the activity of the phosphorylation-dependent dimers, such as RcsA-RcsB and RcsB-RcsB, is affected by mutation of residues in the vicinity of the phosphorylation site, suggesting that a phosphorylation-induced structural change modulates their activity. In contrast, the phosphorylation-independent heterodimers BglJ-RcsB and MatA-RcsB are affected by only very few mutations. Heterodimerization of RcsB with various auxiliary regulators and their differential dependence on phosphorylation add an additional level of control to the Rcs system that is operating at the output level. PMID:26635367

  17. Transcription of the ftsZ gene and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Robin, A; Joseleau-Petit, D; D'Ari, R

    1990-01-01

    The ftsZ gene of Escherichia coli, which lies in a cluster of cell division genes at 2 min on the genetic map, codes for a protein which is thought to play a key role in triggering cell division. Using an ftsZ::lacZ operon fusion, we have studied the transcription of the ftsZ gene under conditions in which cell division was either inhibited or synchronized in the bacterial population. In ftsZ, ftsA, ftsQ, and ftsI (or pbpB) mutants, there was no change in the differential rate of expression of the ftsZ gene in nonpermissive conditions, when cell division was completely blocked. Although the FtsZ protein is thought to be limiting for cell division, in synchronized cultures the ftsZ gene was expressed not only at the moment of septation initiation but throughout the cell cycle. Its expression, however, was not exponential but linear, with a rapid doubling in rate at a specific cell age; this age, about 20 min after division in a 60-min cycle, was different from the age at which the ftsZ::lacZ operon was duplicated. However, it was close to the age at which replication initiated and at which the rate of phospholipid synthesis doubled. During the transient division inhibition after a nutritional shift-up, ftsZ transcription again became linear, with two doublings in rate at intervals equal to the mass doubling time in the rich medium; it adopted the exponential rate typical of rich medium about 60 min after the shift-up, just before the bacterial population resumed cell division. The doubling in the rate of ftsZ transcription once per cycle in synchronized cultures and once per mass doubling time during the transition period after a nutritional shift-up reflects a new cell cycle event. PMID:2106510

  18. Transcript degradation and noise of small RNA-controlled genes in a switch activated network in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Tal, Asaf; Parasar, Bibudha; Dym, Alvah; Costantino, Nina; Muñoz-García, Javier; Court, Donald L.; Stavans, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulatory processes may change transcript levels and affect cell-to-cell variability or noise. We study small-RNA downregulation to elucidate its effects on noise in the iron homeostasis network of Escherichia coli. In this network, the small-RNA RyhB undergoes stoichiometric degradation with the transcripts of target genes in response to iron stress. Using single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, we measured transcript numbers of the RyhB-regulated genes sodB and fumA in individual cells as a function of iron deprivation. We observed a monotonic increase of noise with iron stress but no evidence of theoretically predicted, enhanced stoichiometric fluctuations in transcript numbers, nor of bistable behavior in transcript distributions. Direct detection of RyhB in individual cells shows that its noise is much smaller than that of these two targets, when RyhB production is significant. A generalized two-state model of bursty transcription that neglects RyhB fluctuations describes quantitatively the dependence of noise and transcript distributions on iron deprivation, enabling extraction of in vivo RyhB-mediated transcript degradation rates. The transcripts’ threshold-linear behavior indicates that the effective in vivo interaction strength between RyhB and its two target transcripts is comparable. Strikingly, the bacterial cell response exhibits Fur-dependent, switch-like activation instead of a graded response to iron deprivation. PMID:27085802

  19. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-04-26

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation.

  20. The metal core structures in the recombinant Escherichia coli transcriptional factor SoxR.

    PubMed

    Lo, Feng-Chun; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Liaw, Wen-Feng; Hsu, I-Jui; Tsai, Yi-Fang; Chan, Sunney I; Yu, Steve S-F

    2012-02-27

    X-ray absorption, circular dichroism, and EPR spectroscopy were employed to investigate the metal-core structures in the Escherichia coli transcriptional factor SoxR under reduced, oxidized, and nitrosylated conditions. The spectroscopic data revealed that the coordination environments of the metal active centers varied only very slightly between the reduced and oxidized states, similar to most other proteins containing iron-sulfur clusters. Upon nitrosylation of oxidized SoxR, however, we observed a low-temperature EPR spectrum characteristic of a protein dinitrosyl iron complex (DNIC), with an intensity corresponding to about two DNICs per iron sulfur cluster in the protein, according to spin quantification relative to a low-molecular-weight DNIC standard. In addition, there was no evidence for dichroic spectral features in the responsive region of the nitrosyl iron complexes, as well as for Fe-Fe back-scattering in the fitting of the Fe extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum. Instead the Fe EXAFS spectrum of the nitrosylated SoxR core exhibited the same first- and second-shell coordination environments characteristic of modeled small molecular DNICs, indicating that each of the [2 Fe-2 S] cores in the homodimeric SoxR was dissociated into two individual DNICs. Similar nitrosylation of the reduced mixed-valence SoxR for 1 min led to degradation of the iron-sulfur clusters to give several iron species, including one with EPR signals characteristic of a reduced Roussin's red ester (rRRE), a diamagnetic species, presumably Roussin's red ester (RRE), and a small amount of DNIC. We also undertook in vivo time-course studies of E. coli cells containing recombinant SoxR after rapid purging of the cells with exogenous NO gas. Rapid freeze-quenched EPR experiments demonstrated rapid formation of the SoxR rRRE species, followed by fast breakup of this precursor intermediate to form the stable protein-bound DNIC species. Accordingly, under nitrosative

  1. Region 4 of Rhizobium etli Primary Sigma Factor (SigA) Confers Transcriptional Laxity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Santillán, Orlando; Ramírez-Romero, Miguel A; Lozano, Luis; Checa, Alberto; Encarnación, Sergio M; Dávila, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Sigma factors are RNA polymerase subunits engaged in promoter recognition and DNA strand separation during transcription initiation in bacteria. Primary sigma factors are responsible for the expression of housekeeping genes and are essential for survival. RpoD, the primary sigma factor of Escherichia coli, a γ-proteobacteria, recognizes consensus promoter sequences highly similar to those of some α-proteobacteria species. Despite this resemblance, RpoD is unable to sustain transcription from most of the α-proteobacterial promoters tested so far. In contrast, we have found that SigA, the primary sigma factor of Rhizobium etli, an α-proteobacteria, is able to transcribe E. coli promoters, although it exhibits only 48% identity (98% coverage) to RpoD. We have called this the transcriptional laxity phenomenon. Here, we show that SigA partially complements the thermo-sensitive deficiency of RpoD285 from E. coli strain UQ285 and that the SigA region σ4 is responsible for this phenotype. Sixteen out of 74 residues (21.6%) within region σ4 are variable between RpoD and SigA. Mutating these residues significantly improves SigA ability to complement E. coli UQ285. Only six of these residues fall into positions already known to interact with promoter DNA and to comprise a helix-turn-helix motif. The remaining variable positions are located on previously unexplored sites inside region σ4, specifically into the first two α-helices of the region. Neither of the variable positions confined to these helices seem to interact directly with promoter sequence; instead, we adduce that these residues participate allosterically by contributing to correct region folding and/or positioning of the HTH motif. We propose that transcriptional laxity is a mechanism for ensuring transcription in spite of naturally occurring mutations from endogenous promoters and/or horizontally transferred DNA sequences, allowing survival and fast environmental adaptation of α-proteobacteria.

  2. Region 4 of Rhizobium etli Primary Sigma Factor (SigA) Confers Transcriptional Laxity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Santillán, Orlando; Ramírez-Romero, Miguel A.; Lozano, Luis; Checa, Alberto; Encarnación, Sergio M.; Dávila, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Sigma factors are RNA polymerase subunits engaged in promoter recognition and DNA strand separation during transcription initiation in bacteria. Primary sigma factors are responsible for the expression of housekeeping genes and are essential for survival. RpoD, the primary sigma factor of Escherichia coli, a γ-proteobacteria, recognizes consensus promoter sequences highly similar to those of some α-proteobacteria species. Despite this resemblance, RpoD is unable to sustain transcription from most of the α-proteobacterial promoters tested so far. In contrast, we have found that SigA, the primary sigma factor of Rhizobium etli, an α-proteobacteria, is able to transcribe E. coli promoters, although it exhibits only 48% identity (98% coverage) to RpoD. We have called this the transcriptional laxity phenomenon. Here, we show that SigA partially complements the thermo-sensitive deficiency of RpoD285 from E. coli strain UQ285 and that the SigA region σ4 is responsible for this phenotype. Sixteen out of 74 residues (21.6%) within region σ4 are variable between RpoD and SigA. Mutating these residues significantly improves SigA ability to complement E. coli UQ285. Only six of these residues fall into positions already known to interact with promoter DNA and to comprise a helix-turn-helix motif. The remaining variable positions are located on previously unexplored sites inside region σ4, specifically into the first two α-helices of the region. Neither of the variable positions confined to these helices seem to interact directly with promoter sequence; instead, we adduce that these residues participate allosterically by contributing to correct region folding and/or positioning of the HTH motif. We propose that transcriptional laxity is a mechanism for ensuring transcription in spite of naturally occurring mutations from endogenous promoters and/or horizontally transferred DNA sequences, allowing survival and fast environmental adaptation of α-proteobacteria. PMID

  3. Key Roles of the Downstream Mobile Jaw of Escherichia coli RNA Polymerase in Transcription Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Drennan, Amanda; Kraemer, Mark; Capp, Michael; Gries, Theodore; Ruff, Emily; Sheppard, Carol; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Artsimovitch, Irina; Record, M. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Differences in kinetics of transcription initiation by RNA polymerase (RNAP) at different promoters tailor the pattern of gene expression to cellular needs. After initial binding, large conformational changes occur in promoter DNA and RNAP to form initiation-capable complexes. To understand the mechanism and regulation of transcription initiation, the nature and sequence of these conformational changes must be determined. Escherichia coli RNAP uses binding free energy to unwind and separate 13 base pairs of λPR promoter DNA to form the unstable open intermediate I2, which rapidly converts to much more stable open complexes (I3, RPo). Conversion of I2 to RPo involves folding/assembly of several mobile RNAP domains on downstream duplex DNA. Here, we investigate effects of a 42-residue deletion in the mobile β’ jaw (ΔJAW) and truncation of promoter DNA beyond +12 (DT+12) on the steps of initiation. We find that in stable ΔJAW open complexes the downstream boundary of hydroxyl radical protection shortens by 5–10 base pairs, as compared to wild-type (WT) complexes. Dissociation kinetics of open complexes formed with ΔJAW RNAP and/or DT+12 DNA resemble those deduced for the structurally-uncharacterized intermediate I3. Overall rate constants (ka) for promoter binding and DNA opening by ΔJAW RNAP are much smaller than for WT RNAP. Values of ka for WT RNAP with DT+12 and full-length λPR are similar, though contributions of binding and isomerization steps differ. Hence, the jaw plays major roles both early and late in RPo formation, while downstream DNA functions primarily as the assembly platform after DNA opening. PMID:23116321

  4. PafR, a Novel Transcription Regulator, Is Important for Pathogenesis in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Mordechai; Watad, Mobarak; Smith, Sara N.; Alteri, Christopher J.; Gordon, Noa; Rosenshine, Ilan; Mobley, Harry L.

    2014-01-01

    The metV genomic island in the chromosome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) encodes a putative transcription factor and a sugar permease of the phosphotransferase system (PTS), which are predicted to compose a Bgl-like sensory system. The presence of these two genes, hereby termed pafR and pafP, respectively, has been previously shown to correlate with isolates causing clinical syndromes. We show here that deletion of both genes impairs the ability of the resulting mutant to infect the CBA/J mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection compared to that of the parent strain, CFT073. Expressing the two genes in trans in the two-gene knockout mutant complemented full virulence. Deletion of either gene individually generated the same phenotype as the double knockout, indicating that both pafR and pafP are important to pathogenesis. We screened numerous environmental conditions but failed to detect expression from the promoter that precedes the paf genes in vitro, suggesting that they are in vivo induced (ivi). Although PafR is shown here to be capable of functioning as a transcriptional antiterminator, its targets in the UPEC genome are not known. Using microarray analysis, we have shown that expression of PafR from a heterologous promoter in CFT073 affects expression of genes related to bacterial virulence, biofilm formation, and metabolism. Expression of PafR also inhibits biofilm formation and motility. Taken together, our results suggest that the paf genes are implicated in pathogenesis and that PafR controls virulence genes, in particular biofilm formation genes. PMID:25069986

  5. Mechanism of transcription initiation and promoter escape by E. coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Kate L; Felth, Lindsey C; Molzahn, Cristen M; Shkel, Irina; Wang, Si; Chhabra, Munish; Ruff, Emily F; Bieter, Lauren; Kraft, Joseph E; Record, M Thomas

    2017-04-11

    To investigate roles of the discriminator and open complex (OC) lifetime in transcription initiation by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP; α2ββ'ωσ(70)), we compare productive and abortive initiation rates, short RNA distributions, and OC lifetime for the λPR and T7A1 promoters and variants with exchanged discriminators, all with the same transcribed region. The discriminator determines the OC lifetime of these promoters. Permanganate reactivity of thymines reveals that strand backbones in open regions of long-lived λPR-discriminator OCs are much more tightly held than for shorter-lived T7A1-discriminator OCs. Initiation from these OCs exhibits two kinetic phases and at least two subpopulations of ternary complexes. Long RNA synthesis (constrained to be single round) occurs only in the initial phase (<10 s), at similar rates for all promoters. Less than half of OCs synthesize a full-length RNA; the majority stall after synthesizing a short RNA. Most abortive cycling occurs in the slower phase (>10 s), when stalled complexes release their short RNA and make another without escaping. In both kinetic phases, significant amounts of 8-nt and 10-nt transcripts are produced by longer-lived, λPR-discriminator OCs, whereas no RNA longer than 7 nt is produced by shorter-lived T7A1-discriminator OCs. These observations and the lack of abortive RNA in initiation from short-lived ribosomal promoter OCs are well described by a quantitative model in which ∼1.0 kcal/mol of scrunching free energy is generated per translocation step of RNA synthesis to overcome OC stability and drive escape. The different length-distributions of abortive RNAs released from OCs with different lifetimes likely play regulatory roles.

  6. Visualizing the phage T4 activated transcription complex of DNA and E. coli RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    James, Tamara D.; Cardozo, Timothy; Abell, Lauren E.; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Jenkins, Lisa M. Miller; Jha, Saheli S.; Hinton, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) to select the right promoter sequence at the right time is fundamental to the control of gene expression in all organisms. However, there is only one crystallized structure of a complete activator/RNAP/DNA complex. In a process called σ appropriation, bacteriophage T4 activates a class of phage promoters using an activator (MotA) and a co-activator (AsiA), which function through interactions with the σ70 subunit of RNAP. We have developed a holistic, structure-based model for σ appropriation using multiple experimentally determined 3D structures (Escherichia coli RNAP, the Thermus aquaticus RNAP/DNA complex, AsiA /σ70 Region 4, the N-terminal domain of MotA [MotANTD], and the C-terminal domain of MotA [MotACTD]), molecular modeling, and extensive biochemical observations indicating the position of the proteins relative to each other and to the DNA. Our results visualize how AsiA/MotA redirects σ, and therefore RNAP activity, to T4 promoter DNA, and demonstrate at a molecular level how the tactful interaction of transcriptional factors with even small segments of RNAP can alter promoter specificity. Furthermore, our model provides a rational basis for understanding how a mutation within the β subunit of RNAP (G1249D), which is far removed from AsiA or MotA, impairs σ appropriation. PMID:27458207

  7. Visualizing the phage T4 activated transcription complex of DNA and E. coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    James, Tamara D; Cardozo, Timothy; Abell, Lauren E; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Jenkins, Lisa M Miller; Jha, Saheli S; Hinton, Deborah M

    2016-09-19

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) to select the right promoter sequence at the right time is fundamental to the control of gene expression in all organisms. However, there is only one crystallized structure of a complete activator/RNAP/DNA complex. In a process called σ appropriation, bacteriophage T4 activates a class of phage promoters using an activator (MotA) and a co-activator (AsiA), which function through interactions with the σ(70) subunit of RNAP. We have developed a holistic, structure-based model for σ appropriation using multiple experimentally determined 3D structures (Escherichia coli RNAP, the Thermus aquaticus RNAP/DNA complex, AsiA /σ(70) Region 4, the N-terminal domain of MotA [MotA(NTD)], and the C-terminal domain of MotA [MotA(CTD)]), molecular modeling, and extensive biochemical observations indicating the position of the proteins relative to each other and to the DNA. Our results visualize how AsiA/MotA redirects σ, and therefore RNAP activity, to T4 promoter DNA, and demonstrate at a molecular level how the tactful interaction of transcriptional factors with even small segments of RNAP can alter promoter specificity. Furthermore, our model provides a rational basis for understanding how a mutation within the β subunit of RNAP (G1249D), which is far removed from AsiA or MotA, impairs σ appropriation.

  8. Transcriptional Modulation of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Virulence Genes in Response to Epithelial Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, Rita; Rasko, David A.; Sahl, Jason W.; Munson, George P.; Roy, Koushik; Luo, Qingwei; Sheikh, Alaullah; Kuhne, Kurt J.

    2013-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality due to diarrheal illness in developing countries. There is currently no effective vaccine against these important pathogens. Because genes modulated by pathogen-host interactions potentially encode putative vaccine targets, we investigated changes in gene expression and surface morphology of ETEC upon interaction with intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Pan-genome microarrays, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR), and transcriptional reporter fusions of selected promoters were used to study changes in ETEC transcriptomes. Flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate alterations in surface antigen expression and morphology following pathogen-host interactions. Following host cell contact, genes for motility, adhesion, toxin production, immunodominant peptides, and key regulatory molecules, including cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) and c-di-GMP, were substantially modulated. These changes were accompanied by visible changes in both ETEC architecture and the expression of surface antigens, including a novel highly conserved adhesin molecule, EaeH. The studies reported here suggest that pathogen-host interactions are finely orchestrated by ETEC and are characterized by coordinated responses involving the sequential deployment of multiple virulence molecules. Elucidation of the molecular details of these interactions could highlight novel strategies for development of vaccines for these important pathogens. PMID:23115039

  9. The highly conserved MraZ protein is a transcriptional regulator in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Eraso, Jesus M.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Orr, Galya; Margolin, William

    2014-05-05

    The mraZ and mraW genes are highly conserved in bacteria, both in sequence and location at the head of the division and cell wall (dcw) gene cluster. Although MraZ has structural similarity to the AbrB transition state regulator and the MazE antitoxin, and MraW is known to methylate ribosomal RNA, mraZ and mraW null mutants have no detectable growth phenotype in any species tested to date, hampering progress in understanding their physiological role. Here we show that overproduction of Escherichia coli MraZ perturbs cell division and the cell envelope, is more lethal at high levels or in minimal growth medium, and that MraW antagonizes these effects. MraZGFP localizes to the nucleoid, suggesting that it binds DNA. Indeed, purified MraZ directly binds a region upstream from its own promoter containing three direct repeats to regulate its own expression and that of downstream cell division and cell wall genes. MraZ-LacZ fusions are repressed by excess MraZ but not when DNA binding by MraZ is inhibited. RNAseq analysis indicates that MraZ is a global transcriptional regulator with numerous targets in addition to dcw genes. One of these targets, mioC, is directly bound by MraZ in a region with three direct repeats.

  10. Genome-wide transcription-coupled repair in Escherichia coli is mediated by the Mfd translocase

    PubMed Central

    Adebali, Ogun; Chiou, Yi-Ying; Hu, Jinchuan; Sancar, Aziz; Selby, Christopher P.

    2017-01-01

    We used high-throughput sequencing of short, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer-containing ssDNA oligos generated during repair of UV-induced damage to study that process at both mechanistic and systemic levels in Escherichia coli. Numerous important insights on DNA repair were obtained, bringing clarity to the respective roles of UvrD helicase and Mfd translocase in repair of UV-induced damage. Mechanistically, experiments showed that the predominant role of UvrD in vivo is to unwind the excised 13-mer from dsDNA and that mutation of uvrD results in remarkable protection of that oligo from exonuclease activity as it remains hybridized to the dsDNA. Genome-wide analysis of the transcribed strand/nontranscribed strand (TS/NTS) repair ratio demonstrated that deletion of mfd globally shifts the distribution of TS/NTS ratios downward by a factor of about 2 on average for the most highly transcribed genes. Even for the least transcribed genes, Mfd played a role in preferential repair of the transcribed strand. On the other hand, mutation of uvrD, if anything, slightly pushed the distribution of TS/NTS ratios to higher ratios. These results indicate that Mfd is the transcription repair-coupling factor whereas UvrD plays a role in excision repair by aiding the catalytic turnover of excision repair proteins. PMID:28167766

  11. Transcription analysis of the lexA gene of Escherichia coli: attenuation and cotranscription with the neighboring region.

    PubMed Central

    Miki, T; Shirabe, K; Ebina, Y; Nakazawa, A

    1984-01-01

    The lexA gene of Escherichia coli encodes a repressor of the genes whose expression is induced by the agents that result in DNA damage. In vivo transcripts of the lexA gene consisted of two species; mRNA-1 of 673 bases and mRNA-2 of approximately 3,000 bases. The transcription in vivo started at a site which was two-base pairs downstream from the in vitro initiation site reported previously. The majority of the transcription stopped at a series of T residues preceeded by a dyad symmetry located immediately after the lexA gene. A small fraction of the transcription passed through the termination site to form the mRNA of downstream gene(s) which would be related to the "SOS functions". Images PMID:6320118

  12. Simple enzymatic assays for the in vitro motor activity of transcription termination factor Rho from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Boudvillain, Marc; Walmacq, Céline; Schwartz, Annie; Jacquinot, Frédérique

    2010-01-01

    The transcription termination factor Rho from Escherichia coli is a ring-shaped homo-hexameric protein that preferentially interacts with naked cytosine-rich Rut (Rho utilization) regions of nascent RNA transcripts. Once bound to the RNA chain, Rho uses ATP as an energy source to produce mechanical work and disruptive forces that ultimately lead to the dissociation of the ternary transcription complex. Although transcription termination assays have been useful to study Rho activity in various experimental contexts, they do not report directly on Rho mechanisms and kinetics. Here, we describe complementary ATP-dependent RNA-DNA helicase and streptavidin displacement assays that can be used to monitor in vitro Rho's motor activity in a more direct and quantitative manner.

  13. Transcriptional organization and regulation of the Escherichia coli K30 group 1 capsule biosynthesis (cps) gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Andrea; Whitfield, Chris

    2003-02-01

    Escherichia coli group 1 capsules are important virulence determinants, yet little is known about the transcriptional organization or regulation of their biosynthetic (cps) operons. Transcription of the prototype serotype K30 cluster is modulated by the JUMPStart-RfaH antitermination mechanism, with the cps promoter being localized to a region immediately upstream of the JUMPStart sequence. A putative stem-loop structure located within the K30 cps cluster separates conserved genes with products that are required for surface expression of capsule from serotype-specific genes encoding enzymes for polymer repeat-unit synthesis and polymerization. This putative stem-loop structure significantly reduces transcription in a termination-probe vector and may contribute to differential expression of the cps genes. Previous work indicated that increased amounts of group 1 capsular polysaccharide synthesis resulted from the overexpression of the Rcs (regulator of capsule synthesis) proteins. However, neither overexpression of the transcriptional activator RcsB nor an rcsB::aadA chromosomal insertion altered the level of transcription measured by cps::lacZ fusions. In the group 1 strains examined, an RcsAB box was found immediately upstream of galF, a gene involved in the production of sugar nucleotide precursors. Overexpression of RcsB was found to result in a threefold increase in transcription of a galF::lacZ chromosomal fusion. Moreover, overexpression of GalF gave rise to a two- to threefold increase in cell-free as well as cell-associated capsule, without affecting cps::lacZ activity. These results indicate that transcription of the E. coli group 1 capsule cluster itself is not regulated by the Rcs system and may, in fact, be constitutive. However, the Rcs system can potentially influence levels of capsular polysaccharide production by increasing galF transcription and influencing the available pool of biosynthetic precursors.

  14. Mechanism for regulation of the putrescine utilization pathway by the transcription factor PuuR in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Naoki; Kurihara, Shin; Kitahara, Yuzuru; Asada, Kei; Kato, Kenji; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2012-07-01

    In Escherichia coli, putrescine is metabolized to succinate for use as a carbon and nitrogen source by the putrescine utilization pathway (Puu pathway). One gene in the puu gene cluster encodes a transcription factor, PuuR, which has a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. DNA microarray analysis of an E. coli puuR mutant, in which three amino acid residues in the helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif of PuuR were mutated to alanine to eliminate DNA binding of PuuR, suggested that PuuR is a negative regulator of puu genes. Results of gel shift and DNase I footprint analyses suggested that PuuR binds to the promoter regions of puuA and puuD. The binding of wild-type PuuR to a DNA probe containing PuuR recognition sites was diminished with increasing putrescine concentrations in vitro. These results suggest that PuuR regulates the intracellular putrescine concentration by the transcriptional regulation of genes in the Puu pathway, including puuR itself. The puu gene cluster is found in E. coli and closely related enterobacteria, but this gene cluster is uncommon in other bacterial groups. E. coli and related enterobacteria may have gained the Puu pathway as an adaptation for survival in the mammalian intestine, an environment in which polyamines exist at relatively high concentrations.

  15. Mechanism for Regulation of the Putrescine Utilization Pathway by the Transcription Factor PuuR in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Naoki; Kurihara, Shin; Kitahara, Yuzuru; Asada, Kei; Kato, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, putrescine is metabolized to succinate for use as a carbon and nitrogen source by the putrescine utilization pathway (Puu pathway). One gene in the puu gene cluster encodes a transcription factor, PuuR, which has a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. DNA microarray analysis of an E. coli puuR mutant, in which three amino acid residues in the helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif of PuuR were mutated to alanine to eliminate DNA binding of PuuR, suggested that PuuR is a negative regulator of puu genes. Results of gel shift and DNase I footprint analyses suggested that PuuR binds to the promoter regions of puuA and puuD. The binding of wild-type PuuR to a DNA probe containing PuuR recognition sites was diminished with increasing putrescine concentrations in vitro. These results suggest that PuuR regulates the intracellular putrescine concentration by the transcriptional regulation of genes in the Puu pathway, including puuR itself. The puu gene cluster is found in E. coli and closely related enterobacteria, but this gene cluster is uncommon in other bacterial groups. E. coli and related enterobacteria may have gained the Puu pathway as an adaptation for survival in the mammalian intestine, an environment in which polyamines exist at relatively high concentrations. PMID:22522900

  16. Escherichia coli under Ionic Silver Stress: An Integrative Approach to Explore Transcriptional, Physiological and Biochemical Responses

    PubMed Central

    Saulou-Bérion, Claire; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Enjalbert, Brice; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Fourquaux, Isabelle; Jamme, Frédéric; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel; Girbal, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    For a better understanding of the systemic effect of sub-lethal micromolar concentrations of ionic silver on Escherichia coli, we performed a multi-level characterization of cells under Ag+-mediated stress using an integrative biology approach combining physiological, biochemical and transcriptomic data. Physiological parameters, namely bacterial growth and survival after Ag+ exposure, were first quantified and related to the accumulation of intracellular silver, probed for the first time by nano secondary ion mass spectroscopy at sub-micrometer lateral resolution. Modifications in E. coli biochemical composition were evaluated under Ag+-mediated stress by in situ synchrotron Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy and a comprehensive transcriptome response was also determined. Using multivariate statistics, correlations between the physiological parameters, the extracellular concentration of AgNO3 and the intracellular silver content, gene expression profiles and micro-spectroscopic data were investigated. We identified Ag+-dependent regulation of gene expression required for growth (e.g. transporter genes, transcriptional regulators, ribosomal proteins), for ionic silver transport and detoxification (e.g. copA, cueO, mgtA, nhaR) and for coping with various types of stress (dnaK, pspA, metA,R, oxidoreductase genes). The silver-induced shortening of the acyl chain of fatty acids, mostly encountered in cell membrane, was highlighted by microspectroscopy and correlated with the down-regulated expression of genes involved in fatty acid transport (fadL) and synthesis/modification of lipid A (lpxA and arnA). The increase in the disordered secondary structure of proteins in the presence of Ag+ was assessed through the conformational shift shown for amides I and II, and further correlated with the up-regulated expression of peptidase (hfq) and chaperone (dnaJ), and regulation of transpeptidase expression (ycfS and ycbB). Interestingly, as these transpeptidases act on

  17. Tuning of Recombinant Protein Expression in Escherichia coli by Manipulating Transcription, Translation Initiation Rates, and Incorporation of Noncanonical Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Orr; Chemla, Yonatan; Heltberg, Mathias; Ozer, Eden; Marshall, Ryan; Noireaux, Vincent; Jensen, Mogens Høgh; Alfonta, Lital

    2017-03-09

    Protein synthesis in cells has been thoroughly investigated and characterized over the past 60 years. However, some fundamental issues remain unresolved, including the reasons for genetic code redundancy and codon bias. In this study, we changed the kinetics of the Eschrichia coli transcription and translation processes by mutating the promoter and ribosome binding domains and by using genetic code expansion. The results expose a counterintuitive phenomenon, whereby an increase in the initiation rates of transcription and translation lead to a decrease in protein expression. This effect can be rescued by introducing slow translating codons into the beginning of the gene, by shortening gene length or by reducing initiation rates. On the basis of the results, we developed a biophysical model, which suggests that the density of co-transcriptional-translation plays a role in bacterial protein synthesis. These findings indicate how cells use codon bias to tune translation speed and protein synthesis.

  18. Genome-wide screening of transcription factor deletion targets in Escherichia coli for enhanced production of lactate-based polyesters.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Ryosuke; Kodama, Yu; Matsumoto, Ken'ichiro; Ooi, Toshihiko; Taguchi, Seiichi

    2017-05-01

    Engineered Escherichia coli is a useful platform for production of lactate (LA)-based polyester poly[LA-co-3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB)] from renewable sugars. Here we screened all non-lethal transcription factor deletions of E. coli for efficient production of the polymer. This approach aimed at drawing out the latent potential of the host for efficient polymer production via indirect positive effects. Among 252 mutants from Keio Collection tested, eight mutants (ΔpdhR, ΔcspG, ΔyneJ, ΔchbR, ΔyiaU, ΔcreB, ΔygfI and ΔnanK) accumulated greater amount of polymer (6.2-10.1 g/L) compared to the parent strain E. coli BW25113 (5.1 g/L). The mutants increased polymer production per cell (1.1-1.5-fold) without significant change in cell density. The yield of the polymer from glucose was also higher for the selected mutants (0.34-0.38 g/g) than the parent strain (0.27 g/g). Therefore, the deletions of transcription factors should channel the carbon flux towards polymer production. It should be noted that the screening employed in this study identified beneficial mutants without analyzing causal relationship between the mutation and the enhanced polymer production. This approach, therefore, should be applicable to broad range of fermentation productions.

  19. Examination of the genome-wide transcriptional response of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to cinnamaldehyde exposure.

    PubMed

    Visvalingam, Jeyachchandran; Hernandez-Doria, Juan David; Holley, Richard A

    2013-02-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a natural antimicrobial that has been found to be effective against many food-borne pathogens, including Escherichia coli O157:H7. Although its antimicrobial effects have been well investigated, limited information is available on its effects at the molecular level. Sublethal treatment at 200 mg/liter cinnamaldehyde inhibited growth of E. coli O157:H7 at 37°C and for ≤2 h caused cell elongation, but from 2 to 4 h growth resumed and cells reverted to normal length. To understand this transient behavior, genome-wide transcriptional analysis of E. coli O157:H7 was performed at 2 and 4 h of exposure to cinnamaldehyde in conjunction with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) analysis for cinnamaldehyde and other cinnamic compounds. Drastically different gene expression profiles were obtained at 2 and 4 h. RP-HPLC analysis showed that cinnamaldehyde was structurally stable for at least 2 h. At 2 h of exposure, cinnamaldehyde induced expression of many oxidative stress-related genes and repressed expression of DNA, protein, O-antigen, and fimbrial synthetic genes. At 4 h, many cinnamaldehyde-induced repressive effects on E. coli O157:H7 gene expression were reversed, and cells became more motile and grew at a slightly higher rate. Data indicated that by 4 h, E. coli O157:H7 was able to convert cinnamaldehyde into the less toxic cinnamic alcohol using dehydrogenase/reductase enzymes (YqhD and DkgA). This is the first study to characterize the ability of E. coli O157:H7 to convert cinnamaldehyde into cinnamic alcohol which, in turn, showed that the antimicrobial activity of cinnamaldehyde is mainly attributable to its carbonyl aldehyde group.

  20. Examination of the Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to Cinnamaldehyde Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Visvalingam, Jeyachchandran; Hernandez-Doria, Juan David

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a natural antimicrobial that has been found to be effective against many food-borne pathogens, including Escherichia coli O157:H7. Although its antimicrobial effects have been well investigated, limited information is available on its effects at the molecular level. Sublethal treatment at 200 mg/liter cinnamaldehyde inhibited growth of E. coli O157:H7 at 37°C and for ≤2 h caused cell elongation, but from 2 to 4 h growth resumed and cells reverted to normal length. To understand this transient behavior, genome-wide transcriptional analysis of E. coli O157:H7 was performed at 2 and 4 h of exposure to cinnamaldehyde in conjunction with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) analysis for cinnamaldehyde and other cinnamic compounds. Drastically different gene expression profiles were obtained at 2 and 4 h. RP-HPLC analysis showed that cinnamaldehyde was structurally stable for at least 2 h. At 2 h of exposure, cinnamaldehyde induced expression of many oxidative stress-related genes and repressed expression of DNA, protein, O-antigen, and fimbrial synthetic genes. At 4 h, many cinnamaldehyde-induced repressive effects on E. coli O157:H7 gene expression were reversed, and cells became more motile and grew at a slightly higher rate. Data indicated that by 4 h, E. coli O157:H7 was able to convert cinnamaldehyde into the less toxic cinnamic alcohol using dehydrogenase/reductase enzymes (YqhD and DkgA). This is the first study to characterize the ability of E. coli O157:H7 to convert cinnamaldehyde into cinnamic alcohol which, in turn, showed that the antimicrobial activity of cinnamaldehyde is mainly attributable to its carbonyl aldehyde group. PMID:23183978

  1. Tailoring of global transcription sigma D factor by random mutagenesis to improve Escherichia coli tolerance towards low-pHs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xi; Jiang, Ling; Zhu, Liying; Xu, Qing; Xu, Xian; Huang, He

    2016-04-20

    Bioconversion processes of organic acid or acid hydrolysis of raw material for microbial metabolism often suffer limitations as a result of microbial sensitivity in low-pH conditions. We adopted a three-step method called RAndom Insertional-deletional Strand Exchange mutagenesis (RAISE) to engineer the components of global regulator Sigma D factor (RpoD) of Escherichia coli to improve its acid tolerance. The best strain Mutant VII was identified from random mutagenesis libraries based on the growth performance, which exhibited much higher growth rate than the control (0.22h(-1) vs. 0.15h(-1)) at pH as low as 3.17. Combined transcriptome and phenome analysis of E. coli was carried out to better understand the global effects of RpoD on the regulatory networks. Our analysis showed that 95 (2.1%) of all E. coli genes were induced and 178 (4.0%) genes were repressed, including those for trehalose biosynthesis, nucleotides biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, amino acid utilization, except for acid resistance. Also regulated were the master regulators (ArcA, EvgA, H-NS and RpoS) and gene/operon-specific transcription factors (GadX, GadW, AppY, YdeO, KdgR). These results demonstrated that RpoD acts as global regulator in the growth phase of E. coli and consequently improves acid tolerances.

  2. Transcriptional and functional responses of Escherichia coli O157:H7 growing in the lettuce rhizoplane.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhe; Fink, Ryan C; Sugawara, Masayuki; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    Lettuce and spinach are increasingly implicated in foodborne illness outbreaks due to contamination by Escherichia coli O157:H7. While this bacterium has been shown to colonize and survive on lettuce leaf surfaces, little is known about its interaction with the roots of growing lettuce plants. In these studies, a microarray analyses, mutant construction and confocal microscopy were used to gain an understanding of structure and function of bacterial genes involved in the colonization and growth of E. coli O157:H7 on lettuce roots. After three days of interaction with lettuce roots, 94 and 109 E. coli O157:H7 genes were significantly up- and down-regulated at least 1.5 fold, respectively. While genes involved in biofilm modulation (ycfR and ybiM) were significantly up-regulated, 40 of 109 (37%) of genes involved in protein synthesis were significantly repressed. E. coli O157:H7 was 2 logs less efficient in lettuce root colonization than was E. coli K12. We also unambiguously showed that a ΔycfR mutant of E. coli O157:H7 was unable to attach to or colonize lettuce roots. Taken together these results indicate that bacterial genes involved in attachment and biofilm formation are likely important for contamination of lettuce plants with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strains.

  3. Transcriptional regulation of drug efflux genes by EvgAS, a two-component system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Yoko; Oshima, Taku; Mori, Hirotada; Aono, Rikizo; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2003-10-01

    A constitutively active mutant of histidine kinase sensor EvgS was found to confer multi-drug resistance (MDR) to an acrA-deficient Escherichia coli, indicating the relationship between the two-component system EvgAS and the expression of the MDR system. The observed MDR also depended on an outer-membrane channel, TolC. Microarray and S1 mapping assays indicated that, in the presence of this constitutive mutant EvgS, the level of transcription increased for some MDR genes, including the drug efflux genes emrKY, yhiUV, acrAB, mdfA and tolC. Transcription in vitro of emrK increased by the addition of phosphorylated EvgA. Transcription activation of tolC by the activated EvgS was, however, dependent on both EvgAS and PhoPQ (Mg(2+)-responsive two-component system), in agreement with the presence of the binding site (PhoP box) for the regulator PhoP in the tolC promoter region. Transcription in vitro of yhiUV also appears to require an as-yet-unidentified additional transcriptional factor besides EvgA. Taken together we propose that the expression of the MDR system is under a complex regulatory network, including the phosphorylated EvgA serving as the master regulator.

  4. In vitro transcription of the Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 DNA by Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli RNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Sogo, J M; Lozano, M; Salas, M

    1984-01-01

    The Escherichia coli RNA polymerase bound to phage phi 29 DNA has been visualized by electron microscopy. Thirteen specific binding sites have been observed at 1.7,2.6,5.5,10.4,13.7,25.2,25.7,26.3,33.5,59.5,69.2,91.7 and 99.6 DNA length units and they have been named A1,A1I,A1II,A1III,A1IV,A2,A2I, A3, A4,B1,B1I,C1 and C2, respectively. The binding sites A1,A2,A3,B1,C1 and C2 coincide with those found with Bacillus subtilis RNA polymerase. The transcription of phage phi 29 DNA with B. subtilis or E. coli RNA polymerases has been studied. With the B. subtilis RNA polymerase eight transcripts were found, starting at positions corresponding to the binding sites A1, A1III, A2,A3,B1I,B2,C1 and C2, respectively. With the E. coli RNA polymerase the same transcripts were found and a new one starting at position corresponding to the A4 binding site. The RNAs starting at binding sites A1,A1III,A2,B1I, B2,C1 and C2 are transcribed from right to left, as expected for early RNA. The RNAs which initiate at positions A3 and A4 are transcribed from left to right and probably correspond to late RNAs. Images PMID:6322128

  5. Transcription of the Escherichia coli dcw cluster: evidence for distal upstream transcripts being involved in the expression of the downstream ftsZ gene.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, A; Palacios, P; Vicente, M

    2001-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains VIP596 and VIP597 have been constructed to compare the amount of transcription of the ftsZ gene derived from proximal promoters in the ddlB-ftsZ region with that originating in the upstream regions of the dcw cluster. Both strains have in common a beta-galactosidase reporter fusion located at the ddlB locus, but differ in that VIP597 has a transcription terminator Omega interposon located downstream from lacZ. In addition, these strains have the ddlB, ftsQ, ftsA and ftsZ genes under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter P(tac), allowing to control artificially ftsZ expression for normal cell division to take place. When beta-galactosidase activity was measured in VIP596 and VIP597 and compared to the levels measured in strain VIP407, in which the lacZ reporter fusion is located in the ftsZ gene, they were found to account for nearly 66% of the total transcription entering into ftsZ. This result indicates that the reduction in ftsZ transcription observed when the promoters in the ddlB-ftsA region are disconnected from the upstream sequences of the dcw cluster (as observed by Flärdh et al., Mol. Microbiol. 30 (1998) 305-316) in strain VIP490) is the direct consequence of the interruption in the transcription originated upstream and not due to the effect of such sequences on the promoters proximal to ftsZ.

  6. The acid-inducible asr gene in Escherichia coli: transcriptional control by the phoBR operon.

    PubMed

    Suziedeliené, E; Suziedélis, K; Garbenciūté, V; Normark, S

    1999-04-01

    Escherichia coli responds to external acidification (pH 4.0 to 5.0) by synthesizing a newly identified, approximately 450-nucleotide RNA component. At maximal levels of induction it is one of the most abundant small RNAs in the cell and is relatively stable bacterial RNA. The acid-inducible RNA was purified, and the gene encoding it, designated asr (for acid shock RNA), mapped at 35.98 min on the E. coli chromosome. Analysis of the asr DNA sequence revealed an open reading frame coding for a 111-amino-acid polypeptide with a deduced molecular mass of approximately 11.6 kDa. According to computer-assisted analysis, the predicted polypeptide contains a typical signal sequence of 30 amino acids and might represent either a periplasmic or an outer membrane protein. The asr gene cloned downstream from a T7 promoter was translated in vivo after transcription using a T7 RNA polymerase transcription system. Expression of a plasmid-encoded asr::lacZ fusion under a native asr promoter was reduced approximately 15-fold in a complex medium, such as Luria-Bertani medium, versus the minimal medium. Transcription of the chromosomal asr was abolished in the presence of a phoB-phoR (a two-component regulatory system, controlling the pho regulon inducible by phosphate starvation) deletion mutant. Acid-mediated induction of the asr gene in the Delta(phoB-phoR) mutant strain was restored by introduction of the plasmid with cloned phoB-phoR genes. Primer extension analysis of the asr transcript revealed a region similar to the Pho box (the consensus sequence found in promoters transcriptionally activated by the PhoB protein) upstream from the determined transcription start. The asr promoter DNA region was demonstrated to bind PhoB protein in vitro. We discuss our results in terms of how bacteria might employ the phoB-phoR regulatory system to sense an external acidity and regulate transcription of the asr gene.

  7. H-NS-mediated repression of CRISPR-based immunity in Escherichia coli K12 can be relieved by the transcription activator LeuO.

    PubMed

    Westra, Edze R; Pul, Umit; Heidrich, Nadja; Jore, Matthijs M; Lundgren, Magnus; Stratmann, Thomas; Wurm, Reinhild; Raine, Amanda; Mescher, Melina; Van Heereveld, Luc; Mastop, Marieke; Wagner, E Gerhart H; Schnetz, Karin; Van Der Oost, John; Wagner, Rolf; Brouns, Stan J J

    2010-09-01

    The recently discovered prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas defence system provides immunity against viral infections and plasmid conjugation. It has been demonstrated that in Escherichia coli transcription of the Cascade genes (casABCDE) and to some extent the CRISPR array is repressed by heat-stable nucleoid-structuring (H-NS) protein, a global transcriptional repressor. Here we elaborate on the control of the E. coli CRISPR/Cas system, and study the effect on CRISPR-based anti-viral immunity. Transformation of wild-type E. coli K12 with CRISPR spacers that are complementary to phage Lambda does not lead to detectable protection against Lambda infection. However, when an H-NS mutant of E. coli K12 is transformed with the same anti-Lambda CRISPR, this does result in reduced sensitivity to phage infection. In addition, it is demonstrated that LeuO, a LysR-type transcription factor, binds to two sites flanking the casA promoter and the H-NS nucleation site, resulting in derepression of casABCDE12 transcription. Overexpression of LeuO in E. coli K12 containing an anti-Lambda CRISPR leads to an enhanced protection against phage infection. This study demonstrates that in E. coli H-NS and LeuO are antagonistic regulators of CRISPR-based immunity.

  8. RNomics in Escherichia coli detects new sRNA species and indicates parallel transcriptional output in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Jörg; Bartels, Verena; Tang, Thean Hock; Churakov, Gennady; Slagter-Jäger, Jacoba G.; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Wagner, E. Gerhart H.

    2003-01-01

    Recent bioinformatics-aided searches have identified many new small RNAs (sRNAs) in the intergenic regions of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Here, a shot-gun cloning approach (RNomics) was used to generate cDNA libraries of small sized RNAs. Besides many of the known sRNAs, we found new species that were not predicted previously. The present work brings the number of sRNAs in E.coli to 62. Experimental transcription start site mapping showed that some sRNAs were encoded from independent genes, while others were processed from mRNA leaders or trailers, indicative of a parallel transcriptional output generating sRNAs co-expressed with mRNAs. Two of these RNAs (SroA and SroG) consist of known (THI and RFN) riboswitch elements. We also show that two recently identified sRNAs (RyeB and SraC/RyeA) interact, resulting in RNase III-dependent cleavage. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case of two non-coding RNAs interacting by a putative antisense mechanism. In addition, intracellular metabolic stabilities of sRNAs were determined, including ones from previous screens. The wide range of half-lives (<2 to >32 min) indicates that sRNAs cannot generally be assumed to be metabolically stable. The experimental characterization of sRNAs analyzed here suggests that the definition of an sRNA is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:14602901

  9. Dynamics of transcription driven by the tetA promoter, one event at a time, in live Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Muthukrishnan, Anantha-Barathi; Kandhavelu, Meenakshisundaram; Lloyd-Price, Jason; Kudasov, Fedor; Chowdhury, Sharif; Yli-Harja, Olli; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2012-09-01

    In Escherichia coli, tetracycline prevents translation. When subject to tetracycline, E. coli express TetA to pump it out by a mechanism that is sensitive, while fairly independent of cellular metabolism. We constructed a target gene, PtetA-mRFP1-96BS, with a 96 MS2-GFP binding site array in a single-copy BAC vector, whose expression is controlled by the tetA promoter. We measured the in vivo kinetics of production of individual RNA molecules of the target gene as a function of inducer concentration and temperature. From the distributions of intervals between transcription events, we find that RNA production by PtetA is a sub-Poissonian process. Next, we infer the number and duration of the prominent sequential steps in transcription initiation by maximum likelihood estimation. Under full induction and at optimal temperature, we observe three major steps. We find that the kinetics of RNA production under the control of PtetA, including number and duration of the steps, varies with induction strength and temperature. The results are supported by a set of logical pairwise Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. We conclude that the expression of TetA is controlled by a sequential mechanism that is robust, whereas sensitive to external signals.

  10. Enhancing succinic acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli by engineering its global transcription factor, catabolite repressor/activator (Cra)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li-Wen; Xia, Shi-Tao; Wei, Li-Na; Li, Hong-Mei; Yuan, Zhan-Peng; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2016-01-01

    This study was initiated to improve E. coli succinate production by engineering the E. coli global transcription factor, Cra (catabolite repressor/activator). Random mutagenesis libraries were generated through error-prone PCR of cra. After re-screening and mutation site integration, the best mutant strain was Tang1541, which provided a final succinate concentration of 79.8 ± 3.1 g/L: i.e., 22.8% greater than that obtained using an empty vector control. The genes and enzymes involved in phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation and the glyoxylate pathway were activated, either directly or indirectly, through the mutation of Cra. The parameters for interaction of Cra and DNA indicated that the Cra mutant was bound to aceBAK, thereby activating the genes involved in glyoxylate pathway and further improving succinate production even in the presence of its effector fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). It suggested that some of the negative effect of FBP on Cra might have been counteracted through the enhanced binding affinity of the Cra mutant for FBP or the change of Cra structure. This work provides useful information about understanding the transcriptional regulation of succinate biosynthesis. PMID:27811970

  11. Role of hha and ler in transcriptional regulation of the esp operon of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vijay K; Zuerner, Richard L

    2004-11-01

    The locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), which includes five major operons (LEE1 through LEE4 and tir), enables enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 to produce attaching and effacing lesions on host cells. Expression of LEE2, LEE3, and tir is positively regulated by ler, a gene located in LEE1. Transcriptional regulation of the esp operon (LEE4), however, is not well defined. Transposon mutagenesis was used to identify transcriptional regulators of the esp operon by screening for mutants with increased beta-galactosidase activity in an EHEC O157:H7 strain harboring an esp::lac transcriptional fusion. All mutants with significant increases in beta-galactosidase activity had transposon insertions in hha (hha::Tn). Specific complementation of the hha::Tn mutation with a plasmid-encoded copy of hha reduced beta-galactosidase activity to the level expressed in the parental esp::lac strain. Purified Hha, however, bound poorly to the esp promoter, suggesting that Hha might repress the transcription of a positive regulator of esp. Transposon mutagenesis of a Deltahha esp::lac strain expressing elevated levels of beta-galactosidase resulted in ler mutants with reduced beta-galactosidase activity. Purified Hha bound to the ler promoter with a higher affinity, and complementation of a Deltahha mutation in a Deltahha ler::lac strain repressed beta-galactosidase activity to the level expressed in a ler::lac strain. A positive regulatory role of ler in esp expression was demonstrated by specific binding of Ler to the esp promoter, reduced expression of beta-galactosidase in Deltaler esp::lac strains with and without hha, and severalfold-increased transcription of ler and espA in strains lacking hha. These results indicate that hha-mediated repression of ler causes reduced expression of the esp operon.

  12. Construction and characterization of plasmid and lambda phage vector systems for study of transcriptional control in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hirano, M; Shigesada, K; Imai, M

    1987-01-01

    We constructed a family of lambda phage and plasmid vectors which facilitate cloning and quantitative analysis of transcriptional regulator in both single and multiple copies. Their expression system was modified from the ara-trp-lac fusion operon of plasmid pMC81 [Casadaban and Cohen, J. Mol. Biol. 138 (1980) 179-207], which is designed to assay both promoters and terminators with a single vehicle. To eliminate transcriptional and translational polar effects liable to occur in the original fusion operon upon insertion of a foreign nucleotide sequence, intracistronic Rho-dependent terminators, that are present within the trpB gene and distal to the cloning site were deleted, and DNA spacers containing stop codons were introduced immediately before and after the cloning site. In analysis of the cloned trp regulatory region, the lambda phage system faithfully reproduced the tight regulation by tryptophan characteristic to the natural trp operon on the E. coli chromosome, whereas the plasmid counterpart exhibited a substantially relaxed response. Comparative studies on the relative strengths of various promoters and terminators have further demonstrated that the lambda phage vector system permits accurate assays of exceptionally strong promoters like Ptrp and lambda pL without disturbing the bacterial growth, while being sensitive enough for detecting low-level transcription under the control of weak promoters or potent terminators. Cloning with the lambda phage vector can be greatly facilitated by transferring the target regulatory site precloned with the plasmid onto the phage genome through in vivo recombination.

  13. The primary σ factor in Escherichia coli can access the transcription elongation complex from solution in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Seth R; Nair, Nikhil U; Wells, Christopher D; Nickels, Bryce E; Hochschild, Ann

    2015-01-01

    The σ subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) confers on the enzyme the ability to initiate promoter-specific transcription. Although σ factors are generally classified as initiation factors, σ can also remain associated with, and modulate the behavior of, RNAP during elongation. Here we establish that the primary σ factor in Escherichia coli, σ70, can function as an elongation factor in vivo by loading directly onto the transcription elongation complex (TEC) in trans. We demonstrate that σ70 can bind in trans to TECs that emanate from either a σ70-dependent promoter or a promoter that is controlled by an alternative σ factor. We further demonstrate that binding of σ70 to the TEC in trans can have a particularly large impact on the dynamics of transcription elongation during stationary phase. Our findings establish a mechanism whereby the primary σ factor can exert direct effects on the composition of the entire transcriptome, not just that portion that is produced under the control of σ70-dependent promoters. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10514.001 PMID:26371553

  14. Transcriptional Organization and In Vivo Role of the Escherichia coli rsd Gene, Encoding the Regulator of RNA Polymerase Sigma D

    PubMed Central

    Jishage, Miki; Ishihama, Akira

    1999-01-01

    The regulator of sigma D (Rsd) was identified as an RNA polymerase ς70-associated protein in stationary-phase Escherichia coli with the inhibitory activity of ς70-dependent transcription in vitro (M. Jishage and A. Ishihama, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95:4953–4958, 1998). Primer extension analysis of rsd mRNA indicated the presence of two promoters, ςS-dependent P1 and ς70-dependent P2 with the gearbox sequence. To get insight into the in vivo role of Rsd, the expression of a reporter gene fused to either the ς70- or ςS-dependent promoter was analyzed in the absence of Rsd or the presence of overexpressed Rsd. In the rsd null mutant, the ς70- and ςS-dependent gene expression was increased or decreased, respectively. On the other hand, the ς70- or ςS-dependent transcription was reduced or enhanced, respectively, after overexpression of Rsd. The repression of the ςS-dependent transcription in the rsd mutant is overcome by increased production of the ςS subunit. Together these observations support the prediction that Rsd is involved in replacement of the RNA polymerase ς subunit from ς70 to ςS during the transition from exponential growth to the stationary phase. PMID:10368152

  15. The post-transcriptional regulatory system CSR controls the balance of metabolic pools in upper glycolysis of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Morin, Manon; Ropers, Delphine; Letisse, Fabien; Laguerre, Sandrine; Portais, Jean-Charles; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Enjalbert, Brice

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic control in Escherichia coli is a complex process involving multilevel regulatory systems but the involvement of post-transcriptional regulation is uncertain. The post-transcriptional factor CsrA is stated as being the only regulator essential for the use of glycolytic substrates. A dozen enzymes in the central carbon metabolism (CCM) have been reported as potentially controlled by CsrA, but its impact on the CCM functioning has not been demonstrated. Here, a multiscale analysis was performed in a wild-type strain and its isogenic mutant attenuated for CsrA (including growth parameters, gene expression levels, metabolite pools, abundance of enzymes and fluxes). Data integration and regulation analysis showed a coordinated control of the expression of glycolytic enzymes. This also revealed the imbalance of metabolite pools in the csrA mutant upper glycolysis, before the phosphofructokinase PfkA step. This imbalance is associated with a glucose-phosphate stress. Restoring PfkA activity in the csrA mutant strain suppressed this stress and increased the mutant growth rate on glucose. Thus, the carbon storage regulator system is essential for the effective functioning of the upper glycolysis mainly through its control of PfkA. This work demonstrates the pivotal role of post-transcriptional regulation to shape the carbon metabolism.

  16. Temperature-Dependent Model of Multi-step Transcription Initiation in Escherichia coli Based on Live Single-Cell Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd-Price, Jason; Tran, Huy; Ribeiro, Andre S.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription kinetics is limited by its initiation steps, which differ between promoters and with intra- and extracellular conditions. Regulation of these steps allows tuning both the rate and stochasticity of RNA production. We used time-lapse, single-RNA microscopy measurements in live Escherichia coli to study how the rate-limiting steps in initiation of the Plac/ara-1 promoter change with temperature and induction scheme. For this, we compared detailed stochastic models fit to the empirical data in maximum likelihood sense using statistical methods. Using this analysis, we found that temperature affects the rate limiting steps unequally, as nonlinear changes in the closed complex formation suffice to explain the differences in transcription dynamics between conditions. Meanwhile, a similar analysis of the PtetA promoter revealed that it has a different rate limiting step configuration, with temperature regulating different steps. Finally, we used the derived models to explore a possible cause for why the identified steps are preferred as the main cause for behavior modifications with temperature: we find that transcription dynamics is either insensitive or responds reciprocally to changes in the other steps. Our results suggests that different promoters employ different rate limiting step patterns that control not only their rate and variability, but also their sensitivity to environmental changes. PMID:27792724

  17. Reconstructing genome-wide regulatory network of E. coli using transcriptome data and predicted transcription factor activities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene regulatory networks play essential roles in living organisms to control growth, keep internal metabolism running and respond to external environmental changes. Understanding the connections and the activity levels of regulators is important for the research of gene regulatory networks. While relevance score based algorithms that reconstruct gene regulatory networks from transcriptome data can infer genome-wide gene regulatory networks, they are unfortunately prone to false positive results. Transcription factor activities (TFAs) quantitatively reflect the ability of the transcription factor to regulate target genes. However, classic relevance score based gene regulatory network reconstruction algorithms use models do not include the TFA layer, thus missing a key regulatory element. Results This work integrates TFA prediction algorithms with relevance score based network reconstruction algorithms to reconstruct gene regulatory networks with improved accuracy over classic relevance score based algorithms. This method is called Gene expression and Transcription factor activity based Relevance Network (GTRNetwork). Different combinations of TFA prediction algorithms and relevance score functions have been applied to find the most efficient combination. When the integrated GTRNetwork method was applied to E. coli data, the reconstructed genome-wide gene regulatory network predicted 381 new regulatory links. This reconstructed gene regulatory network including the predicted new regulatory links show promising biological significances. Many of the new links are verified by known TF binding site information, and many other links can be verified from the literature and databases such as EcoCyc. The reconstructed gene regulatory network is applied to a recent transcriptome analysis of E. coli during isobutanol stress. In addition to the 16 significantly changed TFAs detected in the original paper, another 7 significantly changed TFAs have been detected by

  18. sRNA-Mediated Control of Transcription Termination in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Sedlyarova, Nadezda; Shamovsky, Ilya; Bharati, Binod K; Epshtein, Vitaly; Chen, Jiandong; Gottesman, Susan; Schroeder, Renée; Nudler, Evgeny

    2016-09-22

    Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) have been implicated in various aspects of post-transcriptional gene regulation. Here, we demonstrate that sRNAs also act at the level of transcription termination. We use the rpoS gene, which encodes a general stress sigma factor σ(S), as a model system, and show that sRNAs DsrA, ArcZ, and RprA bind the rpoS 5'UTR to suppress premature Rho-dependent transcription termination, both in vitro and in vivo. sRNA-mediated antitermination markedly stimulates transcription of rpoS during the transition to the stationary phase of growth, thereby facilitating a rapid adjustment of bacteria to global metabolic changes. Next generation RNA sequencing and bioinformatic analysis indicate that Rho functions as a global "attenuator" of transcription, acting at the 5'UTR of hundreds of bacterial genes, and that its suppression by sRNAs is a widespread mode of bacterial gene regulation.

  19. The role of the lid element in transcription by E. coli RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Toulokhonov, Innokenti; Landick, Robert

    2006-08-25

    The recently described crystal structures of multi-subunit RNA polymerases (RNAPs) reveal a conserved loop-like feature called the lid. The lid projects from the clamp domain and contacts the flap, thereby enclosing the RNA transcript in RNAP's RNA-exit channel and forming the junction between the exit channel and the main channel, which holds the RNA:DNA hybrid. In the initiating form of bacterial RNAP (holoenzyme containing sigma), the lid interacts with sigma region 3 and encloses an extended linker between sigma region 3 and sigma region 4 in place of the RNA in the exit channel. During initiation, the lid may be important for holding open the transcription bubble and may help displace the RNA from the template DNA strand. To test these ideas, we constructed and characterized a mutant RNAP from which the lid element was deleted. Deltalid RNAP exhibited dramatically reduced activity during initiation from -35-dependent and -35-independent promoters, verifying that the lid is important for stabilizing the open promoter complex during initiation. However, transcript elongation, RNA displacement, and, surprisingly, transcriptional termination all occurred normally in Deltalid RNAP. Importantly, Deltalid RNAP behaved differently from wild-type RNAP when transcribing single-stranded DNA templates where it synthesized long, persistent RNA:DNA hybrids, in contrast to efficient transcriptional arrest by wild-type RNAP.

  20. Transcriptional Analysis of Essential Genes of the Escherichia coli Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Gene Cluster by Functional Replacement with the Analogous Salmonella typhimurium Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Cronan, John E.

    1998-01-01

    The genes encoding several key fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes (called the fab cluster) are clustered in the order plsX-fabH-fabD-fabG-acpP-fabF at min 24 of the Escherichia coli chromosome. A difficulty in analysis of the fab cluster by the polar allele duplication approach (Y. Zhang and J. E. Cronan, Jr., J. Bacteriol. 178:3614–3620, 1996) is that several of these genes are essential for the growth of E. coli. We overcame this complication by use of the fab gene cluster of Salmonella typhimurium, a close relative of E. coli, to provide functions necessary for growth. The S. typhimurium fab cluster was isolated by complementation of an E. coli fabD mutant and was found to encode proteins with >94% homology to those of E. coli. However, the S. typhimurium sequences cannot recombine with the E. coli sequences required to direct polar allele duplication via homologous recombination. Using this approach, we found that although approximately 60% of the plsX transcripts initiate at promoters located far upstream and include the upstream rpmF ribosomal protein gene, a promoter located upstream of the plsX coding sequence (probably within the upstream gene, rpmF) is sufficient for normal growth. We have also found that the fabG gene is obligatorily cotranscribed with upstream genes. Insertion of a transcription terminator cassette (Ω-Cm cassette) between the fabD and fabG genes of the E. coli chromosome abolished fabG transcription and blocked cell growth, thus providing the first indication that fabG is an essential gene. Insertion of the Ω-Cm cassette between fabH and fabD caused greatly decreased transcription of the fabD and fabG genes and slower cellular growth, indicating that fabD has only a weak promoter(s). PMID:9642179

  1. Rho-independent transcription terminators inhibit RNase P processing of the secG leuU and metT tRNA polycistronic transcripts in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Bijoy K.; Kushner, Sidney R.

    2008-01-01

    The widely accepted model for the processing of tRNAs in Escherichia coli involves essential initial cleavages by RNase E within polycistronic transcripts to generate pre-tRNAs that subsequently become substrates for RNase P. However, recently we identified two polycistronic tRNA transcripts whose endonucleolytic processing was solely dependent on RNase P. Here we show that the processing of the secG leuU and metT leuW glnU glnW metU glnV glnX polycistronic transcripts takes place through a different type of maturation pathway. Specifically, RNase P separates the tRNA units within each operon following the endonucleolytic removal of the distal Rho-independent transcription terminator, primarily by RNase E. Failure to remove the Rho-independent transcription terminator inhibits RNase P processing of both transcripts leading to a decrease in mature tRNA levels and dramatically increased levels of full-length transcripts in an RNase E deletion strain. Furthermore, we show for the first time that RNase G also removes the Rho-independent transcription terminator associated with the secG leuU operon. Our data also demonstrate that the Rne-1 protein retains significant activity on tRNA substrates at the non-permissive temperature. Taken together it is clear that there are multiple pathways involved in the maturation of tRNAs in E. coli. PMID:18033800

  2. Enhancing E. coli isobutanol tolerance through engineering its global transcription factor cAMP receptor protein (CRP).

    PubMed

    Chong, Huiqing; Geng, Hefang; Zhang, Hongfang; Song, Hao; Huang, Lei; Jiang, Rongrong

    2014-04-01

    The limited isobutanol tolerance of Escherichia coli is a major drawback during fermentative isobutanol production. Different from classical strain engineering approaches, this work was initiated to improve E. coli isobutanol tolerance from its transcriptional level by engineering its global transcription factor cAMP receptor protein (CRP). Random mutagenesis libraries were generated by error-prone PCR of crp, and the libraries were subjected to isobutanol stress for selection. Variant IB2 (S179P, H199R) was isolated and exhibited much better growth (0.18 h(-1) ) than the control (0.05 h(-1) ) in 1.2% (v/v) isobutanol (9.6 g/L). Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis revealed that 58 and 308 genes in IB2 had differential expression (>2-fold, p < 0.05) in the absence and presence of 1% (v/v) isobutanol, respectively. When challenged with isobutanol, genes related to acid resistance (gadABCE, hdeABD), nitrate reduction (narUZYWV), flagella and fimbrial activity (lfhA, yehB, ycgR, fimCDF), and sulfate reduction and transportation (cysIJH, cysC, cysN) were the major functional groups that were up-regulated, whereas most of the down-regulated genes were enzyme (tnaA) and transporters (proVWX, manXYZ). As demonstrated by single-gene knockout experiments, gadX, nirB, rhaS, hdeB, and ybaS were found associated with strain isobutanol resistance. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in IB2 was only half of that of the control when facing stress, indicating that IB2 can withstand toxic isobutanol much better than the control.

  3. Preparation and testing of E. coli S30 in vitro transcription translation extracts.

    PubMed

    Zawada, James F

    2012-01-01

    Crude cell-free extracts are useful tools for investigating biochemical phenomena and exploiting complex enzymatic processes such as protein synthesis. Extracts derived from E. coli have been used for over 50 years to study the mechanism of protein synthesis. In addition, these S30 extracts are commonly used as a laboratory tool for protein production. The preparation of S30 extract has been streamlined over the years and now it is a relatively simple process. The procedure described here includes some suggestions for extracts to be used for ribosome display.

  4. Quorum sensing transcriptional regulator QseA is essential for the expression of multiple virulence regulons of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction and Objectives: QseA is one of several transcriptional regulators that regulates the virulence gene expression in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 through quorum sensing. QseA has been shown to regulate the expression of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), non-LEE...

  5. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 requires quorum sensing transcriptional regulators QseA and SdiA for colonization and persistence in the bovine intestinal tract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    QseA and SdiA are two of several transcriptional regulators that regulate virulence gene expression of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 via quorum sensing (QS). QseA regulates the expression of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). LEE encodes for a type III secretion (T3S) sys...

  6. The ATP hydrolyzing transcription activator phage shock protein F of Escherichia coli: identifying a surface that binds sigma 54.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Patricia; Wigneshweraraj, Siva R; Schumacher, Jörg; Zhang, Xiaodong; Chaney, Matthew; Buck, Martin

    2003-03-04

    Members of the protein family called ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA(+)) play a crucial role in transforming chemical energy into biological events. AAA(+) proteins are complex molecular machines and typically form ring-shaped oligomeric complexes that are crucial for ATPase activity and mechanism of action. The Escherichia coli transcription activator phage shock protein F (PspF) is an AAA(+) mechanochemical enzyme that functions to sense and relay the energy derived from nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis to catalyze transcription by the sigma(54)-RNA polymerase. Closed promoter complexes formed by the sigma(54)-RNA polymerase are substrates for the action of PspF. By using a protein fragmentation approach, we identify here at least one sigma(54)-binding surface in the PspF AAA(+) domain. Results suggest that ATP hydrolysis by PspF is coupled to the exposure of at least one sigma(54)-binding surface. This nucleotide hydrolysis-dependent presentation of a substrate binding surface can explain why complexes that form between sigma(54) and PspF are transient and could be part of a mechanism used generally by other AAA(+) proteins to regulate activity.

  7. The MazF-regulon: a toolbox for the post-transcriptional stress response in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sauert, Martina; Wolfinger, Michael T.; Vesper, Oliver; Müller, Christian; Byrgazov, Konstantin; Moll, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    Flexible adaptation to environmental stress is vital for bacteria. An energy-efficient post-transcriptional stress response mechanism in Escherichia coli is governed by the toxin MazF. After stress-induced activation the endoribonuclease MazF processes a distinct subset of transcripts as well as the 16S ribosomal RNA in the context of mature ribosomes. As these ‘stress-ribosomes’ are specific for the MazF-processed mRNAs, the translational program is changed. To identify this ‘MazF-regulon’ we employed Poly-seq (polysome fractionation coupled with RNA-seq analysis) and analyzed alterations introduced into the transcriptome and translatome after mazF overexpression. Unexpectedly, our results reveal that the corresponding protein products are involved in all cellular processes and do not particularly contribute to the general stress response. Moreover, our findings suggest that translational reprogramming serves as a fast-track reaction to harsh stress and highlight the so far underestimated significance of selective translation as a global regulatory mechanism in gene expression. Considering the reported implication of toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems in persistence, our results indicate that MazF acts as a prime effector during harsh stress that potentially introduces translational heterogeneity within a bacterial population thereby stimulating persister cell formation. PMID:26908653

  8. Global transcriptional regulation by H-NS and its biological influence on the virulence of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wan, Baoshan; Zhang, Qiufen; Tao, Jing; Zhou, Aiping; Yao, Yu-Feng; Ni, Jinjing

    2016-08-22

    As a global transcriptional regulator, H-NS, the histone-like nucleoid-associated DNA-binding and bridging protein, plays a wide range of biological roles in bacteria. In order to determine the role of H-NS in regulating gene transcription and further find out the biological significance of this protein in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), we conducted transcriptome analysis of hns mutant by RNA sequencing. A total of 983 genes were identified to be regulated by H-NS in EHEC. 213 and 770 genes were down-regulated and up-regulated in the deletion mutant of hns, respectively. Interestingly, 34 of 97 genes on virulence plasmid pO157 were down-regulated by H-NS. Although the deletion mutant of hns showed a decreased survival rate in macrophage compared with the wild type strain, it exhibited the higher ability to colonize mice gut and became more virulent to BALB/c mice. The BALB/c mice infected with the deletion mutant of hns showed a lower survival rate, and a higher bacterial burden in the gut, compared with those infected with wild type strain, especially when the gut microbiota was not disturbed by antibiotic administration. These findings suggest that H-NS plays an important role in virulence of EHEC by interacting with host gut microbiota.

  9. Transcriptional Control of Dual Transporters Involved in α-Ketoglutarate Utilization Reveals Their Distinct Roles in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wentong; Cai, Xuwang; Yang, Yongwu; Yan, Shigan; Zhang, Haibin

    2017-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are the primary causative agents of urinary tract infections. Some UPEC isolates are able to infect renal proximal tubule cells, and can potentially cause pyelonephritis. We have previously shown that to fulfill their physiological roles renal proximal tubule cells accumulate high concentrations of α-ketoglutarate (KG) and that gene cluster c5032–c5039 contribute to anaerobic utilization of KG by UPEC str. CFT073, thereby promoting its in vivo fitness. Given the importance of utilizing KG for UPEC, this study is designed to investigate the roles of two transporters KgtP and C5038 in KG utilization, their transcriptional regulation, and their contributions to UPEC fitness in vivo. Our phylogenetic analyses support that kgtP is a widely conserved locus in commensal and pathogenic E. coli, while UPEC-associated c5038 was acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Global anaerobic transcriptional regulators Fumarate and nitrate reduction (FNR) and ArcA induced c5038 expression in anaerobiosis, and C5038 played a major role in anaerobic growth on KG. KgtP was required for aerobic growth on KG, and its expression was repressed by FNR and ArcA under anaerobic conditions. Analyses of FNR and ArcA binding sites and results of EMS assays suggest that FNR and ArcA likely inhibit kgtP expression through binding to the –35 region of kgtP promoter and occluding the occupancy of RNA polymerases. Gene c5038 can be specifically induced by KG, whereas the expression of kgtP does not respond to KG, yet can be stimulated during growth on glycerol. In addition, c5038 and kgtP expression were further shown to be controlled by different alternative sigma factors RpoN and RpoS, respectively. Furthermore, dual-strain competition assays in a murine model showed that c5038 mutant but not kgtP mutant was outcompeted by the wild-type strain during the colonization of murine bladders and kidneys, highlighting the importance of C5038 under in vivo

  10. Metabolic transcription analysis of engineered Escherichia coli strains that overproduce L-phenylalanine

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Viveros, José Luis; Flores, Noemí; Juárez, Katy; Castillo-España, Patricia; Bolivar, Francisco; Gosset, Guillermo

    2007-01-01

    Background The rational design of L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) overproducing microorganisms has been successfully achieved by combining different genetic strategies such as inactivation of the phosphoenolpyruvate: phosphotransferase transport system (PTS) and overexpression of key genes (DAHP synthase, transketolase and chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase), reaching yields of 0.33 (g-Phe/g-Glc), which correspond to 60% of theoretical maximum. Although genetic modifications introduced into the cell for the generation of overproducing organisms are specifically targeted to a particular pathway, these can trigger unexpected transcriptional responses of several genes. In the current work, metabolic transcription analysis (MTA) of both L-Phe overproducing and non-engineered strains using Real-Time PCR was performed, allowing the detection of transcriptional responses to PTS deletion and plasmid presence of genes related to central carbon metabolism. This MTA included 86 genes encoding enzymes of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pentoses phosphate, tricarboxylic acid cycle, fermentative and aromatic amino acid pathways. In addition, 30 genes encoding regulatory proteins and transporters for aromatic compounds and carbohydrates were also analyzed. Results MTA revealed that a set of genes encoding carbohydrate transporters (galP, mglB), gluconeogenic (ppsA, pckA) and fermentative enzymes (ldhA) were significantly induced, while some others were down-regulated such as ppc, pflB, pta and ackA, as a consequence of PTS inactivation. One of the most relevant findings was the coordinated up-regulation of several genes that are exclusively gluconeogenic (fbp, ppsA, pckA, maeB, sfcA, and glyoxylate shunt) in the best PTS- L-Phe overproducing strain (PB12-ev2). Furthermore, it was noticeable that most of the TCA genes showed a strong up-regulation in the presence of multicopy plasmids by an unknown mechanism. A group of genes exhibited transcriptional responses to both PTS inactivation

  11. Evidence that rifampicin can stimulate readthrough of transcriptional terminators in Escherichia coli, including the attenuator of the rpoBC operon.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, A J; Ma, J C; Howe, K M; Garner, I; Hayward, R S

    1982-01-01

    The genes encoding the beta and beta' subunits of RNA polymerase in E.coli, rpoB and rpoC, lie downstream of at least two ribosomal protein genes, rplJ (encoding L10) and rplL (L7/12), in a common operon. All four genes are served by promoter PL10, and an attenuator (partial terminator) of transcription, t1, lies between rplJL and rpoBC. Treatment of E.coli with rifampicin, under conditions producing partial inhibition of general RNA synthesis, can stimulate transcription of rpoBC. We have investigated the locus of this effect by fusing PL10 and t1 separately to galK, in suitable plasmids. Our studies of these fusions, and similar fusions involving transcriptional terminators derived from coliphage T7, indicate that low concentrations of rifampicin cause increased readthrough of several different transcriptional terminators in E.coli in vivo, including rpo t1. We discuss whether or not this unspecific mechanism is solely responsible for the observed stimulatory effects of the drug on rpoBC transcription. PMID:6296775

  12. Transcriptional organization of the dnaN and recF genes of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Armengod, M E; García-Sogo, M; Lambíes, E

    1988-08-25

    The dnaN gene of Escherichia coli determines the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III, a multisubunit enzyme responsible for most of the replicative DNA synthesis. The dnaN gene maps between the dnaA and recF genes. We have characterized the regulatory region of the dnaN gene by screening DNA restriction fragments for promoter activity, S1 mapping of mRNAs, deletion analysis, and in vivo dnaN complementation tests. There are at least three dnaN promoters located in the second half of the dnaA coding region. The one closest to the dnaN structural gene is the weakest, but it provides sufficient dnaN expression for complementation when the gene is present on a multicopy plasmid. Deletion of sequences needed for initiation of dnaN translation or introduction of nonsense codons into dnaN causes reduction of recF expression. However, a deletion inactivating dnaN without changing the reading frame of the gene does not affect expression of the recF gene. These results indicate that the dnaN and recF genes are organized in an operon. We have previously shown the presence of termination signals within the dnaN coding region (Armengod, M.E., and Lambíes, E. (1986) Gene (Amst.) 43, 183-196). Therefore, we propose that the polarity produced by nonsense mutations in dnaN is primarily transcriptional. The uncoupling of transcription and translation of the dnaN gene (when translation is interrupted by premature nonsense codons or by other mechanisms) probably results in transcription termination at termination signals in dnaN.

  13. Activation of the Escherichia coli marA/soxS/rob regulon in response to transcriptional activator concentration.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert G; Bartlett, Emily S; Rosner, Judah L; Wall, Michael E

    2008-07-04

    The paralogous transcriptional activators MarA, SoxS, and Rob activate a common set of promoters, the marA/soxS/rob regulon of Escherichia coli, by binding a cognate site (marbox) upstream of each promoter. The extent of activation varies from one promoter to another and is only poorly correlated with the in vitro affinity of the activator for the specific marbox. Here, we examine the dependence of promoter activation on the level of activator in vivo by manipulating the steady-state concentrations of MarA and SoxS in Lon protease mutants and by measuring promoter activation using lacZ transcriptional fusions. We found that: (i) the MarA concentrations needed for half-maximal stimulation varied by at least 19-fold among the 10 promoters tested; (ii) most marboxes were not saturated when there were 24,000 molecules of MarA per cell; (iii) the correlation between the MarA concentration needed for half-maximal promoter activity in vivo and marbox binding affinity in vitro was poor; and (iv) the two activators differed in their promoter activation profiles. The marRAB and sodA promoters could both be saturated by MarA and SoxS in vivo. However, saturation by MarA resulted in greater marRAB and lesser sodA transcription than did saturation by SoxS, implying that the two activators interact with RNA polymerase in different ways at the different promoters. Thus, the concentration and nature of activator determine which regulon promoters are activated, as well as the extent of their activation.

  14. Regulatory Interactions of Csr Components: the RNA Binding Protein CsrA Activates csrB Transcription in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gudapaty, Seshagirirao; Suzuki, Kazushi; Wang, Xin; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2001-01-01

    The global regulator CsrA (carbon storage regulator) of Escherichia coli is a small RNA binding protein that represses various metabolic pathways and processes that are induced in the stationary phase of growth, while it activates certain exponential phase functions. Both repression and activation by CsrA involve posttranscriptional mechanisms, in which CsrA binding to mRNA leads to decreased or increased transcript stability, respectively. CsrA also binds to a small untranslated RNA, CsrB, forming a ribonucleoprotein complex, which antagonizes CsrA activity. We have further examined the regulatory interactions of CsrA and CsrB RNA. The 5′ end of the CsrB transcript was mapped, and a csrB::cam null mutant was constructed. CsrA protein and CsrB RNA levels were estimated throughout the growth curves of wild-type and isogenic csrA, csrB, rpoS, or csrA rpoS mutant strains. CsrA levels exhibited modest or negligible effects of these mutations. The intracellular concentration of CsrA exceeded the total CsrA-binding capacity of intracellular CsrB RNA. In contrast, CsrB levels were drastically decreased (∼10-fold) in the csrA mutants. CsrB transcript stability was unaffected by csrA. The expression of a csrB-lacZ transcriptional fusion containing the region from −242 to +4 bp of the csrB gene was decreased ∼20-fold by a csrA::kanR mutation in vivo but was unaffected by CsrA protein in vitro. These results reveal a significant, though most likely indirect, role for CsrA in regulating csrB transcription. Furthermore, our findings suggest that CsrA mediates an intriguing form of autoregulation, whereby its activity, but not its levels, is modulated through effects on an RNA antagonist, CsrB. PMID:11567002

  15. Stimulation of the lambda pR promoter by Escherichia coli SeqA protein requires downstream GATC sequences and involves late stages of transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Łyzeń, Robert; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Wegrzyn, Alicja; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka

    2006-10-01

    Escherichia coli SeqA protein is a major negative regulator of chromosomal DNA replication acting by sequestration, and thus inactivation, of newly formed oriC regions. However, other activities of this protein have been discovered recently, one of which is regulation of transcription. SeqA has been demonstrated to be a specific transcription factor acting at bacteriophage lambda promoters p(I), p(aQ) and p(R). While SeqA-mediated stimulation of p(I) and p(aQ) occurs by facilitating functions of another transcription activator protein, cII, a mechanism for stimulation of p(R) remains largely unknown. Here, it has been demonstrated that two GATC sequences, located 82 and 105 bp downstream of the p(R) transcription start site, are necessary for this stimulation both in vivo and in vitro. SeqA-mediated activation of p(R) was as effective on a linear DNA template as on a supercoiled one, indicating that alterations in DNA topology are not likely to facilitate the SeqA effect. In vitro transcription analysis demonstrated that the most important regulatory effect of SeqA in p(R) transcription occurs after open complex formation, namely during promoter clearance. SeqA did not influence the appearance and level of abortive transcripts or the pausing during transcription elongation. Interestingly, SeqA is one of few known prokaryotic transcription factors which bind downstream of the regulated promoter and still act as transcription activators.

  16. Hierarchical Post-transcriptional Regulation of Colicin E2 Expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Madeleine; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a crucial role in many bacterial pathways. In particular, the translation of mRNA can be regulated by trans-acting, small, non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) or mRNA-binding proteins, each of which has been successfully treated theoretically using two-component models. An important system that includes a combination of these modes of post-transcriptional regulation is the Colicin E2 system. DNA damage, by triggering the SOS response, leads to the heterogeneous expression of the Colicin E2 operon including the cea gene encoding the toxin colicin E2, and the cel gene that codes for the induction of cell lysis and release of colicin. Although previous studies have uncovered the system’s basic regulatory interactions, its dynamical behavior is still unknown. Here, we develop a simple, yet comprehensive, mathematical model of the colicin E2 regulatory network, and study its dynamics. Its post-transcriptional regulation can be reduced to three hierarchically ordered components: the mRNA including the cel gene, the mRNA-binding protein CsrA, and an effective sRNA that regulates CsrA. We demonstrate that the stationary state of this system exhibits a pronounced threshold in the abundance of free mRNA. As post-transcriptional regulation is known to be noisy, we performed a detailed stochastic analysis, and found fluctuations to be largest at production rates close to the threshold. The magnitude of fluctuations can be tuned by the rate of production of the sRNA. To study the dynamics in response to an SOS signal, we incorporated the LexA-RecA SOS response network into our model. We found that CsrA regulation filtered out short-lived activation peaks and caused a delay in lysis gene expression for prolonged SOS signals, which is also seen in experiments. Moreover, we showed that a stochastic SOS signal creates a broad lysis time distribution. Our model thus theoretically describes Colicin E2 expression dynamics in detail and

  17. Internal promoter in the ilvGEDA transcription unit of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, D H; Wallen, J W; Traub, L; Gray, J E; Kung, H F

    1985-01-01

    Segments of the ilvGEDA transcription unit have been cloned into the promoter tester plasmid pMC81. This vector contains cloning sites situated upstream of the lacZ gene coding for beta-galactosidase. Using this method we have quantitatively evaluated in vivo (i) the activity of previously described promoter, pG, preceding ilvG; (ii) the relative activity of pE promoter, previously postulated to be located between ilvG and ilvE; and (iii) the effect of the frameshift site present in the wild-type ilvG gene by comparison with mutant derivatives lacking this frameshift site. Isogenic derivatives of strain MC1000 were constructed by transduction with phage P1 grown on rho-120, delta(ilvGEDA), delta(ilvED), and ilvA538 hosts. The potential effects of these alleles that were previously postulated to affect ilvGEDA expression were assessed in vivo by monitoring beta-galactosidase production directed by ilv DNA fragments. Cloned ilv segments were also tested for activity in vitro with a DNA-directed coupled transcription and translation system. The production in vitro of ilv-directed ilv gene expression and beta-galactosidase expression with ara-ilv-lac fusions paralleled the in vivo activity.

  18. Internal promoter in the ilvGEDA transcription unit of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, D H; Wallen, J W; Traub, L; Gray, J E; Kung, H F

    1985-01-01

    Segments of the ilvGEDA transcription unit have been cloned into the promoter tester plasmid pMC81. This vector contains cloning sites situated upstream of the lacZ gene coding for beta-galactosidase. Using this method we have quantitatively evaluated in vivo (i) the activity of previously described promoter, pG, preceding ilvG; (ii) the relative activity of pE promoter, previously postulated to be located between ilvG and ilvE; and (iii) the effect of the frameshift site present in the wild-type ilvG gene by comparison with mutant derivatives lacking this frameshift site. Isogenic derivatives of strain MC1000 were constructed by transduction with phage P1 grown on rho-120, delta(ilvGEDA), delta(ilvED), and ilvA538 hosts. The potential effects of these alleles that were previously postulated to affect ilvGEDA expression were assessed in vivo by monitoring beta-galactosidase production directed by ilv DNA fragments. Cloned ilv segments were also tested for activity in vitro with a DNA-directed coupled transcription and translation system. The production in vitro of ilv-directed ilv gene expression and beta-galactosidase expression with ara-ilv-lac fusions paralleled the in vivo activity. Images PMID:3917997

  19. Timing of Gene Transcription in the Galactose Utilization System of Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Péter; Hunziker, Alexander; Erdőssy, János; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2010-01-01

    In the natural environment, bacterial cells have to adjust their metabolism to alterations in the availability of food sources. The order and timing of gene expression are crucial in these situations to produce an appropriate response. We used the galactose regulation in Escherichia coli as a model system for understanding how cells integrate information about food availability and cAMP levels to adjust the timing and intensity of gene expression. We simulated the feast-famine cycle of bacterial growth by diluting stationary phase cells in fresh medium containing galactose as the sole carbon source. We followed the activities of six promoters of the galactose system as cells grew on and ran out of galactose. We found that the cell responds to a decreasing external galactose level by increasing the internal galactose level, which is achieved by limiting galactose metabolism and increasing the expression of transporters. We show that the cell alters gene expression based primarily on the current state of the cell and not on monitoring the level of extracellular galactose in real time. Some decisions have longer term effects; therefore, the current state does subtly encode the history of food availability. In summary, our measurements of timing of gene expression in the galactose system suggest that the system has evolved to respond to environments where future galactose levels are unpredictable rather than regular feast and famine cycles. PMID:20923764

  20. Genome-wide transcriptional responses of Escherichia coli K-12 to continuous osmotic and heat stresses.

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, Thusitha S; Csonka, Laszlo N; Paliy, Oleg

    2008-05-01

    Osmotic stress is known to increase the thermotolerance and oxidative-stress resistance of bacteria by a mechanism that is not adequately understood. We probed the cross-regulation of continuous osmotic and heat stress responses by characterizing the effects of external osmolarity (0.3 M versus 0.0 M NaCl) and temperature (43 degrees C versus 30 degrees C) on the transcriptome of Escherichia coli K-12. Our most important discovery was that a number of genes in the SoxRS and OxyR oxidative-stress regulons were up-regulated by high osmolarity, high temperature, or a combination of both stresses. This result can explain the previously noted cross-protection of osmotic stress against oxidative and heat stresses. Most of the genes shown in previous studies to be induced during the early phase of adaptation to hyperosmotic shock were found to be also overexpressed under continuous osmotic stress. However, there was a poorer overlap between the heat shock genes that are induced transiently after high temperature shifts and the genes that we found to be chronically up-regulated at 43 degrees C. Supplementation of the high-osmolarity medium with the osmoprotectant glycine betaine, which reduces the cytoplasmic K(+) pool, did not lead to a universal reduction in the expression of osmotically induced genes. This finding does not support the hypothesis that K(+) is the central osmoregulatory signal in Enterobacteriaceae.

  1. Molybdenum-sensitive transcriptional regulation of the chlD locus of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.B.; Scott, D.J.; Amy, N.K.

    1987-05-01

    The chlD gene in Escherichia coli is required for the incorporation and utilization of molybdenum when the cells are grown with low concentrations of molybdate. The authors constructed chlD-lac operon fusions and measured expressions of the fusion, Mo cofactor, and nitrate reductase activities under a variety of growth conditions. The chlD-lac fusion was highly expressed when cells were grown with less than 10 nm molybdate. Increasing concentrations of molybdate caused loss of activity, with less than 5% of the activity remaining at 500 nM molybdate; when tungstate replaced molybdate, it had an identical affect on chlD expression. Expression of chlD-lac was increased in cells grown with nitrate. Strains with chlD-lac plus an additional mutation in a chl or nar gene were constructed to test whether the regulation of chlD-lac required the concerted action of gene products involved with Mo cofactor or nitrate reductase synthesis. Mutations in narL prevented the increase in activity in response to nitrate; mutations in chlB, narC, or narI resulted in partial constitutive expression of the chlD-lac fusion: the fusion was regulated by molybdate, but it no longer required the presence of nitrate for maximal activity. Mutations in chlA, chlE, or chlG which affect Mo cofactor metabolism, did not affect the expression of chlD-lac.

  2. Effects of select histidine to cysteine mutations on transcriptional regulation by Escherichia coli RcnR.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Khadine A; Hu, Heidi Q; Chivers, Peter T; Maroney, Michael J

    2013-01-08

    The RcnR metalloregulator represses the transcription of the Co(II) and Ni(II) exporter, RcnAB. Previous studies have shown that Co(II) and Ni(II) bind to RcnR in six-coordinate sites, resulting in derepression. Here, the roles of His60, His64, and His67 in specific metal recognition are examined. His60 and His64 correspond to ligands that are important for Cu(I) binding in the homologous Cu(I)-responsive metalloregulator, CsoR. These residues are known to be functionally important in RcnR transcriptional regulation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to examine the structure of bound cognate and noncognate metal ions, and lacZ reporter assays were used to assess the transcription of rcnA in response to metal binding in the three His → Cys mutations, H60C, H64C, and H67C. These studies confirm that both Ni(II) and Co(II) use His64 as a ligand. H64C-RcnR is also the only known mutant that retains a Co(II) response while eliminating the response to Ni(II) binding. XAS data indicate that His60 and His67 are potential Co(II) ligands. The effects of the mutations of His60, His64, and His67 on the structures of the noncognate metal ions [Zn(II) and Cu(I)] reveal that these residues have distinctive roles in binding noncognate metals. None of the His → Cys mutants in RcnR confer any response to Cu(I) binding, including H64C-RcnR, where the ligands involved in Cu(I) binding in CsoR are present. These data indicate that while the secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures of CsoR and RcnR are quite similar, small changes in primary sequence reveal that the specific mechanisms involved in metal recognition are quite different.

  3. Transcriptional control in the L-arabinose operon of Escherichia coli B-r.

    PubMed

    Cleary, P P; Englesberg, E

    1974-04-01

    The structural genes involved in l-arabinose metabolism are regulated by the protein product of the araC gene. This protein functions as both an activator and repressor of enzyme synthesis in this gene complex. Using lambdah80dara deoxyribonucleic acid in hybridization studies, we have shown that the ara operon, including structural genes araB, araA, and araD, is transcribed in the direction araB to araD and that initiation of transcription of these genes requires an active araC gene. The half-life of this message, approximately 3 min at 30 C, is the same in the presence or absence of the araC protein in the activator state. However, an unexplained 2-min lag in decay of ara messenger ribonucleic acid that does not occur in decay of lac messenger ribonucleic acid is observed. This lag period requires activated araC protein.

  4. In vitro base modification of Escherichia coli glutamate 2 transfer-RNA and phenylalanine transfer-RNA gene transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Shahan, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    Plasmids were constructed that contain an E. Coli tRNA{sub 2}{sup Glu} or tRNA{sup Phe} gene in a system transcribable by T7 or SP6 RNA polymerase. Selectively {sup 32}P-labeled transcripts of these plasmids were used to study tRNA base modification in vitro in crude extracts by nearest neighbor analysis. The synthesis of 5-methyl-aminomethyl-2-thiouridine (mnm{sup 5}s{sup 2}U) was studied. Complete synthesis of mnm{sup 5}s{sup 2}2U is not observed. Instead, 2-thiouridine (s{sup 2}U) is synthesized. Synthesis requires ATP, cysteine, Mg{sup +}, and monovalent cation concentrations below 50 mM. The reaction has a pH optimum above 7.0. Sulfide ion will substitute for cysteine in the reaction but sulfate, sulfite, methionine, homocysteine, and {beta}-mercaptopyruvate will not. Extracts from E. coli strains carrying either the asuE or asuF mutations have reduced s{sup 2}U synthetic activity which supports in vivo evidence that the wild type genes are involved in 2-thiolation of uridine. The enzyme is shown to be unstable both upon storage at -80{degree}C and during the modification reaction. A method was developed to study the synthesis of any one of four pseudouridines {psi} found at different positions of the tRNA cloverleaf. Synthesis of {psi} is observed at three of the four positions-positions 32, 39, and 55. The asuC mutation is shown to affect {psi} synthesis only at position 39 confirming that it is an allele of hisT and that the hisT mutations do not affect {psi} synthesis at position 32 in E. coli. Synthesis of {psi}32, {psi}39, and {psi}55 does not require any prior modification. Synthesis of dihydrouridine, 7-methylguanosine, and 3(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)uridine is also observed. Synthesis of 2-methyladenosine and {psi} 13 is not seen. Removal of part of the aminoacyl stem reduces synthesis of all modifications examined by 3{prime} fold or more.

  5. Global transcriptional response of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to growth transitions in glucose minimal medium

    PubMed Central

    Bergholz, Teresa M; Wick, Lukas M; Qi, Weihong; Riordan, James T; Ouellette, Lindsey M; Whittam, Thomas S

    2007-01-01

    Background: Global patterns of gene expression of Escherichia coli K-12 during growth transitions have been deeply investigated, however, comparable studies of E. coli O157:H7 have not been explored, particularly with respect to factors regulating virulence genes and genomic islands specific to this pathogen. To examine the impact of growth phase on the dynamics of the transcriptome, O157:H7 Sakai strain was cultured in MOPS minimal media (0.1% glucose), RNA harvested at 10 time points from early exponential to full stationary phase, and relative gene expression was measured by co-hybridization on high-density DNA microarrays. Expression levels of 14 genes, including those encoding Shiga toxins and other virulence factors associated with the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were confirmed by Q-PCR. Results: Analysis of variance (R/MAANOVA, Fs test) identified 442 (36%) of 1239 O157-specific ORFs and 2110 (59%) of 3647 backbone ORFs that changed in expression significantly over time. QT cluster analysis placed 2468 of the 2552 significant ORFs into 12 groups; each group representing a distinct expression pattern. ORFs from the largest cluster (n = 1078) decreased in expression from late exponential to early stationary phase: most of these ORFs are involved in functions associated with steady state growth. Also represented in this cluster are ORFs of the TAI island, encoding tellurite resistance and urease activity, which decreased ~4-fold. Most ORFs of the LEE pathogenicity island also decreased ~2-fold by early stationary phase. The ORFs encoding proteins secreted via the LEE encoded type III secretion system, such as tccP and espJ, also decreased in expression from exponential to stationary phase. Three of the clusters (n = 154) comprised genes that are transiently upregulated at the transition into stationary phase and included genes involved in nutrient scavenging. Upregulated genes with an increase in mRNA levels from late exponential to early stationary

  6. Regulation of type 1 fimbriae synthesis and biofilm formation by the transcriptional regulator LrhA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blumer, Caroline; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Lehnen, Daniela; Heintz, Margit; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Nagy, Gábor; Michaelis, Kai; Emödy, Levente; Polen, Tino; Rachel, Reinhard; Wendisch, Volker F; Unden, Gottfried

    2005-10-01

    Type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli facilitate attachment to the host mucosa and promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The transcriptional regulator LrhA, which is known as a repressor of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes, regulates biofilm formation and expression of type 1 fimbriae. Whole-genome expression profiling revealed that inactivation of lrhA results in an increased expression of structural components of type 1 fimbriae. In vitro, LrhA bound to the promoter regions of the two fim recombinases (FimB and FimE) that catalyse the inversion of the fimA promoter, and to the invertible element itself. Translational lacZ fusions with these genes and quantification of fimE transcript levels by real-time PCR showed that LrhA influences type 1 fimbrial phase variation, primarily via activation of FimE, which is required for the ON-to-OFF transition of the fim switch. Enhanced type 1 fimbrial expression as a result of lrhA disruption was confirmed by mannose-sensitive agglutination of yeast cells. Biofilm formation was stimulated by lrhA inactivation and completely suppressed upon LrhA overproduction. The effects of LrhA on biofilm formation were exerted via the changed levels of surface molecules, most probably both flagella and type 1 fimbriae. Together, the data show a role for LrhA as a repressor of type 1 fimbrial expression, and thus as a regulator of the initial stages of biofilm development and, presumably, bacterial adherence to epithelial host cells also.

  7. Characterization of FNR* mutant proteins indicates two distinct mechanisms for altering oxygen regulation of the Escherichia coli transcription factor FNR.

    PubMed Central

    Bates, D M; Lazazzera, B A; Kiley, P J

    1995-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the mechanism by which the Escherichia coli transcription factor FNR* is activated in response to anaerobiosis, we have analyzed FNR mutant proteins which, unlike the wild-type protein, stimulate gene expression in the presence of oxygen in vivo. Cell extracts containing seven different FNR* mutant proteins were tested in vitro for the ability to bind to the FNR consensus DNA site in a gel retardation assay under aerobic conditions. At the concentration of protein tested, only extracts which contained FNR* mutant proteins with amino acid substitutions at position 154 showed significant DNA binding. The three position-154 FNR* mutant proteins could be further distinguished from the other mutant proteins by analysis of the in vivo phenotypes of FNR* proteins containing amino acid substitutions at either of two essential cysteine residues. In the presence of oxygen, FNR* mutant proteins with amino acid substitutions at position 154 were the least affected when either Cys-23 or Cys-122 was substituted for Ser. On the basis of these in vivo and in vitro analyses, FNR* mutant proteins appear to segregate into at least two classes. Thus, it appears that each class of FNR* substitutions alters the normal pathway of FNR activation in response to oxygen deprivation by a different mechanism. PMID:7608069

  8. Mfd is required for rapid recovery of transcription following UV-induced DNA damage but not oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schalow, Brandy J; Courcelle, Charmain T; Courcelle, Justin

    2012-05-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a cellular process by which some forms of DNA damage are repaired more rapidly from transcribed strands of active genes than from nontranscribed strands or the overall genome. In humans, the TCR coupling factor, CSB, plays a critical role in restoring transcription following both UV-induced and oxidative DNA damage. It also contributes indirectly to the global repair of some forms of oxidative DNA damage. The Escherichia coli homolog, Mfd, is similarly required for TCR of UV-induced lesions. However, its contribution to the restoration of transcription and to global repair of oxidative damage has not been examined. Here, we report the first direct study of transcriptional recovery following UV-induced and oxidative DNA damage in E. coli. We observed that mutations in mfd or uvrA reduced the rate that transcription recovered following UV-induced damage. In contrast, no difference was detected in the rate of transcription recovery in mfd, uvrA, fpg, nth, or polB dinB umuDC mutants relative to wild-type cells following oxidative damage. mfd mutants were also fully resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and removed oxidative lesions from the genome at rates comparable to wild-type cells. The results demonstrate that Mfd promotes the rapid recovery of gene expression following UV-induced damage in E. coli. In addition, these findings imply that Mfd may be functionally distinct from its human CSB homolog in that it does not detectably contribute to the recovery of gene expression or global repair following oxidative damage.

  9. Control features within the rplJL-rpoBC transcription unit of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Barry, G; Squires, C L; Squires, C

    1979-10-01

    Gene fusions constructed in vitro have been used to examine transcription regulatory signals from the operon which encodes ribosomal proteins L10 and L7/12 and the RNA polymerase beta and beta' subunits (the rplJL-rpoBC operon). Portions of this operon, which were obtained by in vitro deletions, have been placed between the ara promoter and the lacZ gene in the gene-fusion plasmid pMC81 developed by M. Casadaban and S. Cohen. The effect of the inserted DNA segment on the expression of the lacZ gene (in the presence and absence of arabinose) permits the localization of regulatory signals to discrete regions of the rplJL-rpoBC operon. An element that reduces the level of distal gene expression to one-sixth is located on a fragment which spans the rplL-rpoB intercistronic region. This strongly supports the idea that there is an attenuator in this region. The terminator for the operon is located on a fragment which spans the 3' end of the rpoC gene. The major promoter for the operon precedes the rplJ gene [Yamamoto, M. & Nomura, M. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 3891-3895 and Linn, T. & Scaife, J. (1978) Nature (London) 276, 33-37] and was not examined in this study. However, a weak promoter is observed on the fragment that spans the rplJ-rplL intercistronic region. Other regions of the operon may also contain weak promoters. The contribution of these elements to the regulation of this complex operon is discussed.

  10. Transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair in Escherichia coli can be affected by changing the arginine at position 529 of the β subunit of RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Ann K.; Smith, Abigail J.; Savery, Nigel J.; Zamos, Portia; Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2008-01-01

    The proposed mechanism for transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TCR) invokes RNA polymerase (RNAP) blocked at a DNA lesion as a signal to initiate repair. In Escherichia coli, TCR requires the interaction of RNAP with a transcription-repair coupling factor encoded by the mfd gene. The interaction between RNAP and Mfd depends upon amino acids 117, 118, and 119 of the β subunit of RNAP; changing any one of these to alanine diminishes the interaction [1]. Using direct assays for TCR, and the lac operon of Escherichia coli containing UV induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) as substrate, we have found that a change from arginine to cysteine at amino acid 529 of the β subunit of the RNAP inactivates TCR, but does not prevent the interaction of RNAP with Mfd. Our results suggest that this interaction may be necessary but not sufficient to facilitate TCR. PMID:17532270

  11. Benzyl derivative facilitation of transcription in Escherichia coli at the ara and lac operon promoters: metabolite gene regulation (MGR).

    PubMed

    Kline, E L; West, R W; Ink, B S; Kline, P M; Rodriguez, R L

    1984-01-01

    A number of benzyl derivatives have been tested for their ability to induce the expression of the araBAD operon in an Escherichia coli K-12 strain. Those derivatives shown to be stimulatory include: benzoic acid (BA), para-amino benzoic acid (PABA), para-hydroxy benzoic acid (PHBA), ortho-amino benzoic acid (OABA), 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy phenylethylamine (MTA), and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenol acetic acid (HVA). The araC gene product was necessary to facilitate the induction. To further characterize if the inductive effect was mediated at the level of transcription, an araBAD-tetracycline resistant (Tcr) operon fusion plasmid (pAP-B) was employed. Benzyl derivatives which induce expression of the araBAD operon in situ also induced a Tcr phenotype with pAP-B. Both indole acetic acid (IAA) and imidazole (IM), which were previously shown to circumvent the necessity for cAMP in the induction of the araBAD operon, also induced a Tcr phenotype with pAP-B. Induction of lac or other cAMP responding operons with the inducing molecules at the chromosomal level was not detectable when assessed by carbon utilization. However, a lacZYA-Tcr operon fusion plasmid (pLPI) did respond to IAA and several of the inducing benzyl derivatives. Catabolite repression of chromosomal araBAD expression was reversed when the exogenous concentration of OABA was elevated. Similar effects on the Tcr phenotypes conferred by pAP-B and pLP1 were observed when OABA or several other inducing benzyl derivatives were present exogenously.

  12. Characterization of the [2Fe-2S] cluster of the Escherichia coli transcription factor IscR†

    PubMed Central

    Fleischhacker, Angela S.; Stubna, Audria; Hsueh, Kuang-Lung; Guo, Yisong; Teter, Sarah J.; Rose, Justin C.; Brunold, Thomas C.; Markley, John L.; Münck, Eckard; Kiley, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    IscR is a Fe-S cluster-containing transcription factor involved in a homeostatic mechanism that controls Fe-S cluster biogenesis in Escherichia coli. Although IscR has been proposed to act as a sensor of the cellular demands for Fe-S cluster biogenesis, the mechanism by which IscR performs this function is not known. In this study, we investigated the biochemical properties of the Fe-S cluster of IscR to gain insight into the proposed sensing activity. Mössbauer studies revealed that IscR contains predominantly a reduced [2Fe-2S]1+ cluster in vivo. However, upon anaerobic isolation of IscR some clusters became oxidized to the [2Fe-2S]2+ form. Cluster oxidation did not, however, alter the affinity of IscR for its binding site within the iscR promoter in vitro, indicating that cluster oxidation state is not important for regulation of DNA binding. Furthermore, characterization of anaerobically isolated IscR using resonance Raman, Mössbauer, and NMR spectroscopies leads to the proposal that the [2Fe-2S] cluster does not have full cysteinyl ligation. Mutagenesis studies indicate that, in addition to the three previously identified cysteine residues (Cys92, Cys98, and Cys104), the highly conserved residue His107 is essential for cluster ligation. Thus, these data suggest that IscR binds the cluster with an atypical ligation scheme of three cysteines and one histidine, a feature that may be relevant to the proposed function of IscR as a sensor of cellular Fe-S cluster status. PMID:22583201

  13. Characterization of the LysR-type transcriptional regulator YcjZ-like from Xylella fastidiosa overexpressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Santiago, André S; Santos, Clelton A; Mendes, Juliano S; Toledo, Marcelo A S; Beloti, Lilian L; Souza, Alessandra A; Souza, Anete P

    2015-09-01

    The Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c strain is a xylem-limited phytopathogen that is the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC). This bacterium is able to form a biofilm and occlude the xylem vessels of susceptible plants, which leads to significant agricultural and economic losses. Biofilms are associated with bacterial pathogenicity because they are very resistant to antibiotics and other metal-based chemicals that are used in agriculture. The X. fastidiosa YcjZ-like (XfYcjZ-like) protein belongs to the LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) family and is involved in various cellular functions that range from quorum sensing to bacterial survival. In the present study, we report the cloning, expression and purification of XfYcjZ-like, which was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The secondary folding of the recombinant and purified protein was assessed by circular dichroism, which revealed that XfYcjZ-like contains a typical α/β fold. An initial hydrodynamic characterization showed that XfYcjZ-like is a globular tetramer in solution. In addition, using a polyclonal antibody against XfYcjZ-like, we assessed the expression profile of this protein during the different developmental phases of X. fastidiosa in in vitro cultivated biofilm cells and demonstrated that XfYcjZ-like is upregulated in planktonic cells in response to a copper shock treatment. Finally, the ability of XfYcjZ-like to interact with its own predicted promoter was confirmed in vitro, which is a typical feature of LysR. Taken together, our findings indicated that the XfYcjZ-like protein is involved in both the organization of the architecture and the maturation of the bacterial biofilm and that it is responsive to oxidative stress.

  14. Transcriptional Regulation of the Outer Membrane Porin Gene ompW Reveals its Physiological Role during the Transition from the Aerobic to the Anaerobic Lifestyle of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Minfeng; Lai, Yong; Sun, Jian; Chen, Guanhua; Yan, Aixin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding bacterial physiology relies on elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions of those differentially expressed genes in response to environmental changes. A widespread Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein OmpW has been implicated in the adaptation to stresses in various species. It is recently found to be present in the regulon of the global anaerobic transcription factor FNR and ArcA in Escherichia coli. However, little is known about the physiological implications of this regulatory disposition. In this study, we demonstrate that transcription of ompW is indeed mediated by a series of global regulators involved in the anaerobiosis of E. coli. We show that FNR can both activate and repress the expression of ompW through its direct binding to two distinctive sites, -81.5 and -126.5 bp respectively, on ompW promoter. ArcA also participates in repression of ompW under anaerobic condition, but in an FNR dependent manner. Additionally, ompW is also subject to the regulation by CRP and NarL which senses the availability and types of carbon sources and respiration electron acceptors in the environment respectively, implying a role of OmpW in the carbon and energy metabolism of E. coli during its anaerobic adaptation. Molecular docking reveals that OmpW can bind fumarate, an alternative electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration, with sufficient affinity. Moreover, supplement of fumarate or succinate which belongs to the C4-dicarboxylates family of metabolite, to E. coli culture rescues OmpW-mediated colicin S4 killing. Taken together, we propose that OmpW is involved in anaerobic carbon and energy metabolism to mediate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyle in E. coli. PMID:27303386

  15. Transcriptional Regulation of the Outer Membrane Porin Gene ompW Reveals its Physiological Role during the Transition from the Aerobic to the Anaerobic Lifestyle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Minfeng; Lai, Yong; Sun, Jian; Chen, Guanhua; Yan, Aixin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding bacterial physiology relies on elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions of those differentially expressed genes in response to environmental changes. A widespread Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein OmpW has been implicated in the adaptation to stresses in various species. It is recently found to be present in the regulon of the global anaerobic transcription factor FNR and ArcA in Escherichia coli. However, little is known about the physiological implications of this regulatory disposition. In this study, we demonstrate that transcription of ompW is indeed mediated by a series of global regulators involved in the anaerobiosis of E. coli. We show that FNR can both activate and repress the expression of ompW through its direct binding to two distinctive sites, -81.5 and -126.5 bp respectively, on ompW promoter. ArcA also participates in repression of ompW under anaerobic condition, but in an FNR dependent manner. Additionally, ompW is also subject to the regulation by CRP and NarL which senses the availability and types of carbon sources and respiration electron acceptors in the environment respectively, implying a role of OmpW in the carbon and energy metabolism of E. coli during its anaerobic adaptation. Molecular docking reveals that OmpW can bind fumarate, an alternative electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration, with sufficient affinity. Moreover, supplement of fumarate or succinate which belongs to the C4-dicarboxylates family of metabolite, to E. coli culture rescues OmpW-mediated colicin S4 killing. Taken together, we propose that OmpW is involved in anaerobic carbon and energy metabolism to mediate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyle in E. coli.

  16. Contribution of individual promoters in the ddlB-ftsZ region to the transcription of the essential cell-division gene ftsZ in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Flärdh, K; Garrido, T; Vicente, M

    1997-06-01

    The essential cell-division gene ftsZ is transcribed in Escherichia coli from at least six promoters found within the coding regions of the upstream ddlB, ftsQ, and ftsA genes. The contribution of each one to the final yield of ftsZ transcription has been estimated using transcriptional lacZ fusions. The most proximal promoter, ftsZ2p, contributes less than 5% of the total transcription from the region that reaches ftsZ. The ftsZ4p and ftsZ3p promoters, both located inside ftsA, produce almost 37% of the transcription. An ftsAp promoter within the ftsQ gene yields nearly 12% of total transcription from the region. A large proportion of transcription (approximately 46%) derives from promoters ftsQ2p and ftsQ1p, which are located inside the upstream ddlB gene. Thus, the ftsQAZ genes are to a large extent transcribed as a polycistronic mRNA. However, we find that the ftsZ proximal region is necessary for full expression, which is in agreement with a recent report that mRNA cleavage by RNase E at the end of the ftsA cistron has a significant role in the contol of ftsZ expression.

  17. Control of cell division in Escherichia coli: regulation of transcription of ftsQA involves both rpoS and SdiA-mediated autoinduction.

    PubMed

    Sitnikov, D M; Schineller, J B; Baldwin, T O

    1996-01-09

    The conditioning of culture medium by the production of growth-regulatory substances is a well-established phenomenon with eukaryotic cells. It has recently been shown that many prokaryotes are also capable of modulating growth, and in some cases sensing cell density, by production of extracellular signaling molecules, thereby allowing single celled prokaryotes to function in some respects as multicellular organisms. As Escherichia coli shifts from exponential growth to stationary growth, many changes occur, including cell division leading to formation of short minicells and expression of numerous genes not expressed in exponential phase. An understanding of the coordination between the morphological changes associated with cell division and the physiological and metabolic changes is of fundamental importance to understanding regulation of the prokaryotic cell cycle. The ftsQA genes, which encode functions required for cell division in E. coli, are regulated by promoters P1 and P2, located upstream of the ftsQ gene. The P1 promoter is rpoS-stimulated and the second, P2, is regulated by a member of the LuxR subfamily of transcriptional activators, SdiA, exhibiting features characteristic of an autoinduction (quorum sensing) mechanism. The activity of SdiA is potentiated by N-acyl-homoserine lactones, which are the autoinducers of luciferase synthesis in luminous marine bacteria as well as of pathogenesis functions in several pathogenic bacteria. A compound(s) produced by E. coli itself during growth in Luria Broth stimulates transcription from P2 in an SdiA-dependent process. Another substance(s) enhances transcription of rpoS and (perhaps indirectly) of ftsQA via promoter P1. It appears that this bimodal control mechanism may comprise a fail-safe system, such that transcription of the ftsQA genes may be properly regulated under a variety of different environmental and physiological conditions.

  18. A purified truncated form of yeast Gal4 expressed in Escherichia coli and used to functionalize poly(lactic acid) nanoparticle surface is transcriptionally active in cellulo.

    PubMed

    Legaz, Sophie; Exposito, Jean-Yves; Borel, Agnès; Candusso, Marie-Pierre; Megy, Simon; Montserret, Roland; Lahaye, Vincent; Terzian, Christophe; Verrier, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Gal4/UAS system is a powerful tool for the analysis of numerous biological processes. Gal4 is a large yeast transcription factor that activates genes including UAS sequences in their promoter. Here, we have synthesized a minimal form of Gal4 DNA sequence coding for the binding and dimerization regions, but also part of the transcriptional activation domain. This truncated Gal4 protein was expressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. A structured and active form of this recombinant protein was purified and used to cover poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanoparticles. In cellulo, these Gal4-vehicles were able to activate the expression of a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene under the control of UAS sequences, demonstrating that the decorated Gal4 variant can be delivery into cells where it still retains its transcription factor capacities. Thus, we have produced in E. coli and purified a short active form of Gal4 that retains its functions at the surface of PLA-nanoparticles in cellular assay. These decorated Gal4-nanoparticles will be useful to decipher their tissue distribution and their potential after ingestion or injection in UAS-GFP recombinant animal models.

  19. Repurposing Synechocystis PCC6803 UirS-UirR as a UV-Violet/Green Photoreversible Transcriptional Regulatory Tool in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Prabha; Tabor, Jeffrey J

    2016-07-15

    We have previously engineered green/red and red/far red photoreversible E. coli phytochrome and cyanobacteriochrome (CBCR) two-component systems (TCSs) and utilized them to program tailor-made gene expression signals for gene circuit characterization. Here, we transport the UV-violet/green photoreversible CBCR TCS UirS-UirR from Synechocystis PCC6803 to E. coli. We demonstrate that the promoter of the small RNA csiR1, previously shown to be activated by inorganic carbon stress, is a UirS-UirR output. Additionally, in contrast to a recently proposed sequestration model, we show that the sensor histidine kinase UirS phosphorylates the response regulator UirR to activate PcsiR1 transcription in response to UV-violet light. Finally, we measure changes in UirS-UirR output minutes after a change in light input and exploit these rapid dynamics to program a challenging gene expression signal with high predictability. UirS-UirR is the first engineered transcriptional regulatory tool activated exclusively by UV-violet light, and the most blue shifted photoreversible transcriptional regulatory tool.

  20. CD14 and Complement Crosstalk and Largely Mediate the Transcriptional Response to Escherichia coli in Human Whole Blood as Revealed by DNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Corinna; Nygård, Ståle; Fure, Hilde; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Holden, Marit; Lappegård, Knut Tore; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Espevik, Terje; Hovig, Eivind; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-01-01

    Systemic inflammation like in sepsis is still lacking specific diagnostic markers and effective therapeutics. The first line of defense against intruding pathogens and endogenous damage signals is pattern recognition by e.g., complement and Toll-like receptors (TLR). Combined inhibition of a key complement component (C3 and C5) and TLR-co-receptor CD14 has been shown to attenuate certain systemic inflammatory responses. Using DNA microarray and gene annotation analyses, we aimed to decipher the effect of combined inhibition of C3 and CD14 on the transcriptional response to bacterial challenge in human whole blood. Importantly, combined inhibition reversed the transcriptional changes of 70% of the 2335 genes which significantly responded to heat-inactivated Escherichia coli by on average 80%. Single inhibition was less efficient (p<0.001) but revealed a suppressive effect of C3 on 21% of the responding genes which was partially counteracted by CD14. Furthermore, CD14 dependency of the Escherichia coli-induced response was increased in C5-deficient compared to C5-sufficient blood. The observed crucial distinct and synergistic roles for complement and CD14 on the transcriptional level correspond to their broad impact on the inflammatory response in human blood, and their combined inhibition may become inevitable in the early treatment of acute systemic inflammation. PMID:25706641

  1. Differential transcription profiles of long non-coding RNAs in primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells in response to meningitic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruicheng; Huang, Fei; Fu, Jiyang; Dou, Beibei; Xu, Bojie; Miao, Ling; Liu, Wentong; Yang, Xiaopei; Tan, Chen; Chen, Huanchun; Wang, Xiangru

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating studies have indicated the influence of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) on various biological processes as well as disease development and progression. However, the lncRNAs involved in bacterial meningitis and their regulatory effects are largely unknown. By RNA-sequencing, the transcriptional profiles of host lncRNAs in primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) in response to meningitic Escherichia coli were demonstrated. Here, 25,257 lncRNAs were identified, including 24,645 annotated lncRNAs and 612 newly found ones. A total of 895 lncRNAs exhibited significant differences upon infection, among which 382 were upregulated and 513 were downregulated (≥2-fold, p < 0.05). Via bioinformatic analysis, the features of these lncRNAs, their possible functions, and the potential regulatory relationships between lncRNAs and mRNAs were predicted. Moreover, we compared the transcriptional specificity of these differential lncRNAs among hBMECs, human astrocyte cell U251, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and demonstrated the novel regulatory effects of proinflammatory cytokines on these differential lncRNAs. To our knowledge, this is the first time the transcriptional profiles of host lncRNAs involved in E. coli-induced meningitis have been reported, which shall provide novel insight into the regulatory mechanisms behind bacterial meningitis involving lncRNAs, and contribute to better prevention and therapy of CNS infection. PMID:27958323

  2. Transcriptional Responses of Escherichia coli to a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of LolCDE, an Essential Component of the Lipoprotein Transport Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Christian; Dougherty, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Gram-negative bacteria, a dedicated machinery consisting of LolABCDE components targets lipoproteins to the outer membrane. We used a previously identified small-molecule inhibitor of the LolCDE complex of Escherichia coli to assess the global transcriptional consequences of interference with lipoprotein transport. Exposure of E. coli to the LolCDE inhibitor at concentrations leading to minimal and significant growth inhibition, followed by transcriptome sequencing, identified a small group of genes whose transcript levels were decreased and a larger group whose mRNA levels increased 10- to 100-fold compared to those of untreated cells. The majority of the genes whose mRNA concentrations were reduced were part of the flagellar assembly pathway, which contains an essential lipoprotein component. Most of the genes whose transcript levels were elevated encode proteins involved in selected cell stress pathways. Many of these genes are involved with envelope stress responses induced by the mislocalization of outer membrane lipoproteins. Although several of the genes whose RNAs were induced have previously been shown to be associated with the general perturbation of the cell envelope by antibiotics, a small subset was affected only by LolCDE inhibition. Findings from this work suggest that the efficiency of the Lol system function may be coupled to a specific monitoring system, which could be exploited in the development of reporter constructs suitable for use for screening for additional inhibitors of lipoprotein trafficking. IMPORTANCE Inhibition of the lipoprotein transport pathway leads to E. coli death and subsequent lysis. Early significant changes in the levels of RNA for a subset of genes identified to be associated with some periplasmic and envelope stress responses were observed. Together these findings suggest that disruption of this key pathway can have a severe impact on balanced outer membrane synthesis sufficient to affect viability. PMID

  3. The catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) is not required for indole-3-acetic acid to activate transcription of the araBAD operon of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Ebright, R H; Beckwith, J

    1985-01-01

    Kline et al. (1980) have reported that indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and four other indole derivatives are able to substitute for cAMP in activating expression of the ara regulon of E. coli. We have examined this phenomenon in detail, utilizing fusions between the structural gene for beta-galactosidase and the promoters for the araBAD, araE, and araFG operons. We confirm that IAA potently stimulates transcription from the araBAD promoter. The effect is highly specific to araBAD, as IAA has no, or only slight, effects on the araE and araFG operons. However, contrary to the results of Kline et al., we find that the action of IAA does not require CAP. Thus, IAA fully stimulates the transcription of araBAD in a strain which bears a complete deletion of the crp gene.

  4. RegulonDB version 7.0: transcriptional regulation of Escherichia coli K-12 integrated within genetic sensory response units (Gensor Units)

    PubMed Central

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Salgado, Heladia; Peralta-Gil, Martin; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; Solano-Lira, Hilda; Jimenez-Jacinto, Verónica; Weiss, Verena; García-Sotelo, Jair S.; López-Fuentes, Alejandra; Porrón-Sotelo, Liliana; Alquicira-Hernández, Shirley; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Alquicira-Hernández, Kevin; Martínez-Adame, Ruth; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Miranda-Ríos, Juan; Huerta, Araceli M.; Mendoza-Vargas, Alfredo; Collado-Torres, Leonardo; Taboada, Blanca; Vega-Alvarado, Leticia; Olvera, Maricela; Olvera, Leticia; Grande, Ricardo; Morett, Enrique; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2011-01-01

    RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx/) is the primary reference database of the best-known regulatory network of any free-living organism, that of Escherichia coli K-12. The major conceptual change since 3 years ago is an expanded biological context so that transcriptional regulation is now part of a unit that initiates with the signal and continues with the signal transduction to the core of regulation, modifying expression of the affected target genes responsible for the response. We call these genetic sensory response units, or Gensor Units. We have initiated their high-level curation, with graphic maps and superreactions with links to other databases. Additional connectivity uses expandable submaps. RegulonDB has summaries for every transcription factor (TF) and TF-binding sites with internal symmetry. Several DNA-binding motifs and their sizes have been redefined and relocated. In addition to data from the literature, we have incorporated our own information on transcription start sites (TSSs) and transcriptional units (TUs), obtained by using high-throughput whole-genome sequencing technologies. A new portable drawing tool for genomic features is also now available, as well as new ways to download the data, including web services, files for several relational database manager systems and text files including BioPAX format. PMID:21051347

  5. Expanded roles of leucine-responsive regulatory protein in transcription regulation of the Escherichia coli genome: Genomic SELEX screening of the regulation targets

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Natsumi; Maeda, Michihisa; Tanaka, Kan; Ishihama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a transcriptional regulator for the genes involved in transport, biosynthesis and catabolism of amino acids in Escherichia coli. In order to identify the whole set of genes under the direct control of Lrp, we performed Genomic SELEX screening and identified a total of 314 Lrp-binding sites on the E. coli genome. As a result, the regulation target of Lrp was predicted to expand from the hitherto identified genes for amino acid metabolism to a set of novel target genes for utilization of amino acids for protein synthesis, including tRNAs, aminoacyl-tRNA synthases and rRNAs. Northern blot analysis indicated alteration of mRNA levels for at least some novel targets, including the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes. Phenotype MicroArray of the lrp mutant indicated significant alteration in utilization of amino acids and peptides, whilst metabolome analysis showed variations in the concentration of amino acids in the lrp mutant. From these two datasets we realized a reverse correlation between amino acid levels and cell growth rate: fast-growing cells contain low-level amino acids, whilst a high level of amino acids exists in slow-growing cells. Taken together, we propose that Lrp is a global regulator of transcription of a large number of the genes involved in not only amino acid transport and metabolism, but also amino acid utilization. PMID:28348809

  6. Transcription analysis of stx1, marA, and eaeA genes in Escherichia coli O157:H7 treated with sodium benzoate.

    PubMed

    Critzer, Faith J; Dsouza, Doris H; Golden, David A

    2008-07-01

    Expression of the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) operon causes increased antimicrobial resistance in bacterial pathogens. The activator of this operon, MarA, can alter expression of >60 genes in Escherichia coli K-12. However, data on the expression of virulence and resistance genes when foodborne pathogens are exposed to antimicrobial agents are lacking. This study was conducted to determine transcription of marA (mar activator), stx1 (Shiga toxin 1), and eaeA (intimin) genes of E. coli O157:H7 EDL933 as affected by sodium benzoate. E. coli O157:H7 was grown in Luria-Bertani broth containing 0 (control) and 1% sodium benzoate at 37 degrees C for 24 h, and total RNA was extracted. Primers were designed for hemX (209 bp; housekeeping gene), marA (261 bp), and eaeA (223 bp) genes; previously reported primers were used for stx1. Tenfold dilutions of RNA were used in a real-time one-step reverse transcriptase PCR to determine transcription levels. All experiments were conducted in triplicate, and product detection was validated by gel electrophoresis. For marA and stx1, real-time one-step reverse transcriptase PCR products were detected at a 1-log-greater dilution in sodium benzoate-treated cells than in control cells, although cell numbers for each were similar (7.28 and 7.57 log CFU/ml, respectively). This indicates a greater (albeit slight) level of their transcription in treated cells than in control cells. No difference in expression of eaeA was observed. HemX is a putative uroporphyrinogen III methylase. The hemX gene was expressed at the same level in control and treated cells, validating hemX as an appropriate housekeeping marker. These data indicate that stx1 and marA genes could play a role in pathogen virulence and survival when treated with sodium benzoate, whereas eaeA expression is not altered. Understanding adaptations of E. coli O157:H7 during antimicrobial exposure is essential to better understand and implement methods to inhibit or control

  7. Genetic regulation of glycogen biosynthesis in Escherichia coli: in vitro effects of cyclic AMP and guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate and analysis of in vivo transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, T; Preiss, J

    1989-01-01

    Glycogen accumulation in Escherichia coli is inversely related to the growth rate and occurs most actively when cells enter the stationary phase. The levels of the three biosynthetic enzymes undergo corresponding changes under these conditions, suggesting that genetic control of enzyme biosynthesis may account for at least part of the regulation (J. Preiss, Annu. Rev. Microbiol. 38:419-458, 1984). We have begun to explore the molecular basis of this control by identifying factors which affect the expression of the glycogen genes and by determining the 5'-flanking regions required to mediate the regulatory effects. The in vitro coupled transcription-translation of two of the biosynthetic genes, glgC (ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase) and glgA (glycogen synthase), was enhanced up to 26- and 10-fold, respectively, by cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cAMP receptor protein (CRP). Guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate stimulated the expression of these genes 3.6- and 1.8-fold, respectively. The expression of glgB (glycogen branching enzyme) was affected weakly or negligibly by the above-mentioned compounds. Assays which measured the in vitro formation of the first dipeptide of glgC showed that a restriction fragment which contained 0.5 kilobases of DNA upstream from the initiation codon supported cAMP-CRP-activated expression. Sequence-specific binding of cAMP-CRP to a 243-base-pair restriction fragment from the region upstream from glgC was observed by virtue of the altered electrophoretic mobility of the bound DNA. S1 nuclease protection analysis identified 5' termini of four in vivo transcripts within 0.5 kilobases of the glgC coding region. The relative concentrations of transcripts were higher in the early stationary phase than in the exponential phase. Two mutants which overproduced the biosynthesis enzymes accumulated elevated levels of specific transcripts. The 5' termini of three of the transcripts were mapped to a high resolution. Their upstream sequences showed weak

  8. Transcriptional regulation of the ecp operon by EcpR, IHF, and H-NS in attaching and effacing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Santos, Verónica I; Medrano-López, Abraham; Saldaña, Zeus; Girón, Jorge A; Puente, José L

    2012-09-01

    Enteropathogenic (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) Escherichia coli are clinically important diarrheagenic pathogens that adhere to the intestinal epithelial surface. The E. coli common pili (ECP), or meningitis-associated and temperature-regulated (MAT) fimbriae, are ubiquitous among both commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains and play a role as colonization factors by promoting the interaction between bacteria and host epithelial cells and favoring interbacterial interactions in biofilm communities. The first gene of the ecp operon encodes EcpR (also known as MatA), a proposed regulatory protein containing a LuxR-like C-terminal helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA-binding motif. In this work, we analyzed the transcriptional regulation of the ecp genes and the role of EcpR as a transcriptional regulator. EHEC and EPEC ecpR mutants produce less ECP, while plasmids expressing EcpR increase considerably the expression of EcpA and production of ECP. The ecp genes are transcribed as an operon from a promoter located 121 bp upstream of the start codon of ecpR. EcpR positively regulates this promoter by binding to two TTCCT boxes distantly located upstream of the ecp promoter, thus enhancing expression of downstream ecp genes, leading to ECP production. EcpR mutants in the putative HTH DNA-binding domain are no longer able to activate ecp expression or bind to the TTCCT boxes. EcpR-mediated activation is aided by integration host factor (IHF), which is essential for counteracting the repression exerted by histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS) on the ecp promoter. This work demonstrates evidence about the interplay between a novel member of a diverse family of regulatory proteins and global regulators in the regulation of a fimbrial operon.

  9. High yields and soluble expression of superoxide dismutases in Escherichia coli due to the HIV-1 Tat peptide via increases in mRNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yangdong; Ye, Qiao; Wu, Min; Wu, Yonghong; Zhang, Chenggang; Yan, Weiqun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to validate the high yield and soluble expression of proteins carrying the transactivator of transcription (Tat) peptide tag, and further explored the potential mechanism by which the Tat tag increases expression. Escherichia coli superoxide dismutase (SOD) proteins, including SodA, SodB and SodC, were selected for analysis. As expected, the yields and the solubility of Tat-tagged proteins were higher than those of Tat-free proteins, and similar results were observed for the total SOD enzyme activity. Bacterial cells that overexpressed Tat-tagged proteins exhibited increased anti-paraquat activity compared with those expressing Tat-free proteins that manifested as SodA>SodC>SodB. When compared with an MG1655 wild-type strain, the growth of a ΔSodA mutant strain was found to be inhibited after paraquat treatment; the growth of ΔSodB and ΔSodC mutant strains was also slightly inhibited. The mRNA transcript level of genes encoding Tat-tagged proteins was higher than that of genes encoding Tat-free proteins. Furthermore, the α-helix and turn of Tat-tagged proteins were higher than those of Tat-free proteins, but the β-sheet and random coil content was lower. These results indicated that the incorporation of the Tat core peptide as a significant basic membrane transduction peptide in fusion proteins could increase mRNA transcripts and promote the high yield and soluble expression of heterologous proteins in E. coli. PMID:27741225

  10. Escherichia coli unsaturated fatty acid synthesis: complex transcription of the fabA gene and in vivo identification of the essential reaction catalyzed by FabB.

    PubMed

    Feng, Youjun; Cronan, John E

    2009-10-23

    Although the unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) synthetic pathway of Escherichia coli is the prototype of such pathways, several unresolved issues have accumulated over the years. The key players are the fabA and fabB genes. Earlier studies of fabA transcription showed that the gene was transcribed from two promoters, with one being positively regulated by the FadR protein. The other weaker promoter (which could not be mapped with the technology then available) was considered constitutive because its function was independent of FadR. However, the FabR negative regulator was recently shown to represses fabA transcription. We report that the weak promoter overlaps the FadR-dependent promoter and is regulated by FabR. This promoter is strictly conserved in all E. coli and Salmonella enterica genomes sequenced to date and is thought to provide insurance against inappropriate regulation of fabA transcription by exogenous saturated fatty acids. Also, the fabAup promoter, a mutant promoter previously isolated by selection for increased FabA activity, was shown to be a promoter created de novo by a four-base deletion within the gene located immediately upstream of fabA. Demonstration of the key UFA synthetic reaction catalyzed by FabB has been elusive, although it was known to catalyze an elongation reaction. Strains lacking FabB are UFA auxotrophs indicating that the enzyme catalyzes an essential step in UFA synthesis. Using thioesterases specific for hydrolysis of short chain acyl-ACPs, the intermediates of the UFA synthetic pathway have been followed in vivo for the first time. These experiments showed that a fabB mutant strain accumulated less cis-5-dodecenoic acid than the parental wild-type strain. These data indicate that the key reaction in UFA synthesis catalyzed by FabB is elongation of the cis-3-decenoyl-ACP produced by FabA.

  11. Genome-wide transcriptional profile of Escherichia coli in response to high levels of the second messenger 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Ortiz, M Marcela; Hyodo, Mamoru; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Membrillo-Hernández, Jorge

    2006-03-24

    Cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP; cGpGp) is a global second messenger controlling motility and adhesion in bacterial cells. Intracellular concentrations of c-di-GMP depend on two opposite activities: diguanylate cyclase, recently assigned to the widespread GGDEF domain, and c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase, associated with proteins harboring the EAL domain. To date, little is known about the targets of c-di-GMP in the cell or if it affects transcriptional regulation of certain genes. In order to expand our knowledge of the effect of this molecule on the bacterial metabolism, here we report on the Escherichia coli transcriptional profile under high levels of c-di-GMP. We show that an important number of genes encoding cell surface and membrane-bound proteins are altered in their transcriptional activity. On the other hand, genes encoding several transcriptional factors, such as Fur, RcsA, SoxS, and ZraR, are up-regulated, and others, such as GadE, GadX, GcvA, and MetR, are down-regulated. Transcription of motility and cell division genes were altered, and consistent with this was the physiological analysis of cells overexpressing yddV, a diguanylate cyclase; these cells displayed an abnormal cell division process when high levels of c-di-GMP were present. We also show evidence that the diguanylate cyclase gene yddV is co-transcribed with dos, a heme base oxygen sensor with c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase activity. A delta dos::kan mutation rendered the cells unable to divide properly, suggesting that dos and yddV may be part of a fine-tuning mechanism for regulating the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP.

  12. Mechanism of action of the Escherichia coli phage shock protein PspA in repression of the AAA family transcription factor PspF.

    PubMed

    Elderkin, Sarah; Jones, Susan; Schumacher, Jörg; Studholme, David; Buck, Martin

    2002-06-28

    The PspA protein, a negative regulator of the Escherichia coli phage shock psp operon, is produced when virulence factors are exported through secretins in many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria and its homologue in plants, VIPP1, plays a critical role in thylakoid biogenesis, essential for photosynthesis. Activation of transcription by the enhancer-dependent bacterial sigma(54) containing RNA polymerase occurs through ATP hydrolysis-driven protein conformational changes enabled by activator proteins that belong to the large AAA(+) mechanochemical protein family. We show that PspA directly and specifically acts upon and binds to the AAA(+) domain of the PspF transcription activator. Interactions involving PspF and nucleotide are changed by the action of PspA. These changes and the complexes that form between PspF and PspA can explain how PspA exerts its negative effects upon transcription activated by PspF, and are of significance when considering how activities of other AAA(+) proteins might be controlled.

  13. The impact of oregano (Origanum heracleoticum) essential oil and carvacrol on virulence gene transcription by Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Mith, Hasika; Clinquart, Antoine; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Delcenserie, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine, via reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis, the effect of oregano essential oil (Origanum heracleoticum) and carvacrol, its major component, on the expression of virulence-associated genes in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 ATCC strain 35150. Both oregano oil and carvacrol demonstrated their efficacy firstly, by inhibiting the transcription of the ler gene involved in upregulation of the LEE2, LEE3 and LEE4 promoters and of attaching and effacing lesions and secondly by decreasing both Shiga toxin and fliC genes expression. In addition, a decrease in luxS gene transcription involved in quorum sensing was observed. These results were dose dependent and showed a specific effect of O. heracleoticum and carvacrol in downregulating the expression of virulence genes in EHEC O157:H7. These findings suggest that oregano oil and carvacrol have the potential to mitigate the adverse health effects caused by virulence gene expression in EHEC O157:H7, through the use of these substances as natural antibacterial additives in foods or as an alternative to antibiotics.

  14. An Interplay among FIS, H-NS, and Guanosine Tetraphosphate Modulates Transcription of the Escherichia coli cspA Gene under Physiological Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Brandi, Anna; Giangrossi, Mara; Giuliodori, Anna M.; Falconi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    CspA, the most characterized member of the csp gene family of Escherichia coli, is highly expressed not only in response to cold stress, but also during the early phase of growth at 37°C. Here, we investigate at molecular level the antagonistic role played by the nucleoid proteins FIS and H-NS in the regulation of cspA expression under non-stress conditions. By means of both probing experiments and immunological detection, we demonstrate in vitro the existence of binding sites for these proteins on the cspA regulatory region, in which FIS and H-NS bind simultaneously to form composite DNA-protein complexes. While the in vitro promoter activity of cspA is stimulated by FIS and repressed by H-NS, a compensatory effect is observed when both proteins are added in the transcription assay. Consistently with these findings, inactivation of fis and hns genes reversely affect the in vivo amount of cspA mRNA. In addition, by means of strains expressing a high level of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate ((p)ppGpp) and in vitro transcription assays, we show that the cspA promoter is sensitive to (p)ppGpp inhibition. The (p)ppGpp-mediated expression of fis and hns genes is also analyzed, thus clarifying some aspects of the regulatory loop governing cspA transcription. PMID:27252944

  15. Investigations of Escherichia coli promoter sequences with artificial neural networks: New signals discovered upstream of the transcriptional startpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, A.G.; Engelbrecht, J.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper we present a novel method for using the learning ability of a neural network as a measure of information in local regions of input data. Using the method to analyze Escherichia coli promoters, we discover all previously described signals, and furthermore find new signals that are regularly spaced along the promoter region. The spacing of all signals correspond to the helical periodicity of DNA, meaning that the signals are all present on the same face of the DNA helix in the promoter region. This is consistent with a model where the RNA polymerase contacts the promoter on one side of the DNA, and suggests that the regions important for promoter recognition may include more positions on the DNA than usually assumed. We furthermore analyze the E.coli promoters by calculating the Kullback Leibler distance, and by constructing sequence logos.

  16. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein and RhaR Synergistically Activate Transcription from the l-Rhamnose-Responsive rhaSR Promoter in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wickstrum, Jason R.; Santangelo, Thomas J.; Egan, Susan M.

    2005-01-01

    The Escherichia coli rhaSR operon encodes two AraC family transcription activator proteins, RhaS and RhaR, which regulate expression of the l-rhamnose catabolic regulon in response to l-rhamnose availability. RhaR positively regulates rhaSR in response to l-rhamnose, and RhaR activation can be enhanced by the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) protein. CRP is a well-studied global transcription regulator that binds to DNA as a dimer and activates transcription in the presence of cAMP. We investigated the mechanism of CRP activation at rhaSR both alone and in combination with RhaR in vivo and in vitro. Base pair substitutions at potential CRP binding sites in the rhaSR-rhaBAD intergenic region demonstrate that CRP site 3, centered at position −111.5 relative to the rhaSR transcription start site, is required for the majority of the CRP-dependent activation of rhaSR. DNase I footprinting confirms that CRP binds to site 3; CRP binding to the other potential CRP sites at rhaSR was not detected. We show that, at least in vitro, CRP is capable of both RhaR-dependent and RhaR-independent activation of rhaSR from a total of three transcription start sites. In vitro transcription assays indicate that the carboxy-terminal domain of the alpha subunit (α-CTD) of RNA polymerase is at least partially dispensable for RhaR-dependent activation but that the α-CTD is required for CRP activation of rhaSR. Although CRP requires the presence of RhaR for efficient in vivo activation of rhaSR, DNase I footprinting assays indicated that cooperative binding between RhaR and CRP does not make a significant contribution to the mechanism of CRP activation at rhaSR. It therefore appears that CRP activates transcription from rhaSR as it would at simple class I promoters, albeit from a relatively distant position. PMID:16166533

  17. Correlation of Antagonistic Regulation of leuO Transcription with the Cellular Levels of BglJ-RcsB and LeuO in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Breddermann, Hannes; Schnetz, Karin

    2016-01-01

    LeuO is a conserved and pleiotropic transcription regulator, antagonist of the nucleoid-associated silencer protein H-NS, and important for pathogenicity and multidrug resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. Regulation of transcription of the leuO gene is complex. It is silenced by H-NS and its paralog StpA, and it is autoregulated. In addition, in Escherichia coli leuO is antagonistically regulated by the heterodimeric transcription regulator BglJ-RcsB and by LeuO. BglJ-RcsB activates leuO, while LeuO inhibits activation by BglJ-RcsB. Furthermore, LeuO activates expression of bglJ, which is likewise H-NS repressed. Mutual activation of leuO and bglJ resembles a double-positive feedback network, which theoretically can result in bi-stability and heterogeneity, or be maintained in a stable OFF or ON states by an additional signal. Here we performed quantitative and single-cell expression analyses to address the antagonistic regulation and feedback control of leuO transcription by BglJ-RcsB and LeuO using a leuO promoter mVenus reporter fusion and finely tunable bglJ and leuO expression plasmids. The data revealed uniform regulation of leuO expression in the population that correlates with the relative cellular concentration of BglJ and LeuO. The data are in agreement with a straightforward model of antagonistic regulation of leuO expression by the two regulators, LeuO and BglJ-RcsB, by independent mechanisms. Further, the data suggest that at standard laboratory growth conditions feedback regulation of leuO is of minor relevance and that silencing of leuO and bglJ by H-NS (and StpA) keeps these loci in the OFF state. PMID:27695690

  18. Characterization of TetD as a transcriptional activator of a subset of genes of the Escherichia coli SoxS/MarA/Rob regulon.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Kevin L; Becker, Stephen M; Wolf, Richard E

    2005-05-01

    In Escherichia coli, SoxS, MarA and Rob form a closely related subset of the AraC/XylS family of positive regulators, sharing approximately 42% amino acid sequence identity over the length of SoxS and the ability to activate transcription of a common set of target genes that provide resistance to redox-cycling compounds and antibiotics. On the basis of its approximately 43% amino acid sequence identity with SoxS, MarA and Rob, TetD, encoded by transposon Tn10, appears to be a fourth member of the subset. However, although its expression has been shown to be negatively regulated by TetC and not inducible by tetracycline, the physiological function of TetD is unknown. Accordingly, in the work presented here, we initiate a molecular characterization of TetD. We show that expression of TetD activates transcription of a subset of the SoxS/MarA/Rob regulon genes and confers resistance to redox-cycling compounds and antibiotics. We show that mutations in the putative TetD binding site of a TetD-activatable promoter and a mutation in the protein's N-terminal DNA recognition helix interfere with transcription activation, thereby indicating that TetD directly activates target gene transcription. Finally, we show that TetD, like SoxS and MarA, is intrinsically unstable; however, unlike SoxS and MarA, TetD is not degraded by Lon or any of the cell's known cytoplasmic ATP-dependent proteases. Thus, we conclude that TetD is a bona fide member of the SoxS/MarA/Rob subfamily of positive regulators.

  19. Transcription factor CecR (YbiH) regulates a set of genes affecting the sensitivity of Escherichia coli against cefoperazone and chloramphenicol.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Genomic SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) screening was performed for identification of the binding site of YbiH, an as yet uncharacterized TetR-family transcription factor, on the Escherichia coli genome. YbiH was found to be a unique single-target regulator that binds in vitro within the intergenic spacer located between the divergently transcribed ybiH-ybhGFSR and rhlE operons. YbhG is an inner membrane protein and YbhFSR forms a membrane-associated ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter while RhlE is a ribosome-associated RNA helicase. Gel shift assay and DNase footprinting analyses indicated one clear binding site of YbiH, including a complete palindromic sequence of AATTAGTT-AACTAATT. An in vivo reporter assay indicated repression of the ybiH operon and activation of the rhlE operon by YbiH. After phenotype microarray screening, YbiH was indicated to confer resistance to chloramphenicol and cefazoline (a first-generation cephalosporin). A systematic survey of the participation of each of the predicted YbiH-regulated genes in the antibiotic sensitivity indicated involvement of the YbhFSR ABC-type transporter in the sensitivity to cefoperazone (a third-generation cephalosporin) and of the membrane protein YbhG in the control of sensitivity to chloramphenicol. Taken together with the growth test in the presence of these two antibiotics and in vitro transcription assay, it was concluded that the hitherto uncharacterized YbiH regulates transcription of both the bidirectional transcription units, the ybiH-ybhGFSR operon and the rhlE gene, which altogether are involved in the control of sensitivity to cefoperazone and chloramphenicol. We thus propose to rename YbiH as CecR (regulator of cefoperazone and chloramphenicol sensitivity).

  20. Correlation of Antagonistic Regulation of leuO Transcription with the Cellular Levels of BglJ-RcsB and LeuO in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Breddermann, Hannes; Schnetz, Karin

    2016-01-01

    LeuO is a conserved and pleiotropic transcription regulator, antagonist of the nucleoid-associated silencer protein H-NS, and important for pathogenicity and multidrug resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. Regulation of transcription of the leuO gene is complex. It is silenced by H-NS and its paralog StpA, and it is autoregulated. In addition, in Escherichia coli leuO is antagonistically regulated by the heterodimeric transcription regulator BglJ-RcsB and by LeuO. BglJ-RcsB activates leuO, while LeuO inhibits activation by BglJ-RcsB. Furthermore, LeuO activates expression of bglJ, which is likewise H-NS repressed. Mutual activation of leuO and bglJ resembles a double-positive feedback network, which theoretically can result in bi-stability and heterogeneity, or be maintained in a stable OFF or ON states by an additional signal. Here we performed quantitative and single-cell expression analyses to address the antagonistic regulation and feedback control of leuO transcription by BglJ-RcsB and LeuO using a leuO promoter mVenus reporter fusion and finely tunable bglJ and leuO expression plasmids. The data revealed uniform regulation of leuO expression in the population that correlates with the relative cellular concentration of BglJ and LeuO. The data are in agreement with a straightforward model of antagonistic regulation of leuO expression by the two regulators, LeuO and BglJ-RcsB, by independent mechanisms. Further, the data suggest that at standard laboratory growth conditions feedback regulation of leuO is of minor relevance and that silencing of leuO and bglJ by H-NS (and StpA) keeps these loci in the OFF state.

  1. Syn, anti, and finally both conformations of cyclic AMP are involved in the CRP-dependent transcription initiation mechanism in E. coli lac operon.

    PubMed

    Tutar, Yusuf

    2008-06-01

    The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli regulates the activity of more than 150 genes. Allosteric changes in CRP structure accompanied by cAMP binding, initiate transcription through protein binding to specific DNA sequences. Initially, researchers proposed a two-site cAMP-binding model for CRP-dependent transcription activation since biophysical methods showed two transitions during titration experiments. Three conformational states were considered; apo-CRP, CRP:(cAMP)(1) and CRP:(cAMP)(2), and CRP:(cAMP)(1) was proposed as the active form in this initial model. X-ray data indicated an anti conformation and in contrast NMR experiments suggested a syn conformation for bound cAMPs. For years this paradigm about ligand conformation has been ambiguous. When CRP was crystallized with four bound cAMP in the last decade, two cAMPs were assigned to syn and the other two to anti conformations. Again three conformational states were suggested; apo-CRP, CRP:(cAMP)(2), and CRP:(cAMP)(4). This new structure changed the view of CRP allosteric activation from a two-site model to a four-site model in the literature and the new model has been supported by biochemical and genetic data so far. According to the accepted model, binding of the first two cAMP molecules displays positive cooperativity, however, binding of the last two cAMP molecules shows negative cooperativity. This resolved the conflict between dynamic and static experimental observations. However, this new model cannot explain the initiation mechanism as previously proposed because functionally active CRP has only one cAMP equivalent. Gene regulation and transcription factors are involved in regulating both prokaryotic and eukaryotic metabolism. Although gene regulation and expression are much more complex in eukaryotes, CRP-mediated transcription initiation is a model of general interest to life sciences and medicine. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize recent works and developments on

  2. Transcription of emrKY is regulated by the EvgA-EvgS two-component system in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Kato, A; Ohnishi, H; Yamamoto, K; Furuta, E; Tanabe, H; Utsumi, R

    2000-06-01

    Spontaneous mutations have been isolated in Escherichia coli that result in the constitutive expression of an emrKY promoter. These mutations were found to be single-nucleotide substitutions within the linker region of the sensor protein EvgS, which is part of a two-component regulatory system along with EvgA. In the linker mutants (evgSI and evgS4), emrKY expression became constitutive and MIC against sodium deoxycholate was 20 mg/ml, eight-fold higher than in the wild type. Furthermore, the start site of transcription from the promoter of emrKY was identified; EvgA was shown to bind at the -52 to -84 region by the footprinting experiment.

  3. CRISPathBrick: Modular Combinatorial Assembly of Type II-A CRISPR Arrays for dCas9-Mediated Multiplex Transcriptional Repression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Cress, Brady F; Toparlak, Ö Duhan; Guleria, Sanjay; Lebovich, Matthew; Stieglitz, Jessica T; Englaender, Jacob A; Jones, J Andrew; Linhardt, Robert J; Koffas, Mattheos A G

    2015-09-18

    Programmable control over an addressable global regulator would enable simultaneous repression of multiple genes and would have tremendous impact on the field of synthetic biology. It has recently been established that CRISPR/Cas systems can be engineered to repress gene transcription at nearly any desired location in a sequence-specific manner, but there remain only a handful of applications described to date. In this work, we report development of a vector possessing a CRISPathBrick feature, enabling rapid modular assembly of natural type II-A CRISPR arrays capable of simultaneously repressing multiple target genes in Escherichia coli. Iterative incorporation of spacers into this CRISPathBrick feature facilitates the combinatorial construction of arrays, from a small number of DNA parts, which can be utilized to generate a suite of complex phenotypes corresponding to an encoded genetic program. We show that CRISPathBrick can be used to tune expression of plasmid-based genes and repress chromosomal targets in probiotic, virulent, and commonly engineered E. coli strains. Furthermore, we describe development of pCRISPReporter, a fluorescent reporter plasmid utilized to quantify dCas9-mediated repression from endogenous promoters. Finally, we demonstrate that dCas9-mediated repression can be harnessed to assess the effect of downregulating both novel and computationally predicted metabolic engineering targets, improving the yield of a heterologous phytochemical through repression of endogenous genes. These tools provide a platform for rapid evaluation of multiplex metabolic engineering interventions.

  4. Transcription Analysis of Central Metabolism Genes in Escherichia coli. Possible Roles of σ38 in Their Expression, as a Response to Carbon Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Noemí; Olvera, Maricela; Sigala, Juan Carlos; Gosset, Guillermo; Morett, Enrique; Bolívar, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate transferase system (PTS) transports glucose in Escherichia coli. Previous work demonstrated that strains lacking PTS, such as PB11, grow slow on glucose. PB11 has a reduced expression of glycolytic, and upregulates poxB and acs genes as compared to the parental strain JM101, when growing on glucose. The products of the latter genes are involved in the production of AcetylCoA. Inactivation of rpoS that codes for the RNA polymerase σ38 subunit, reduces further (50%) growth of PB11, indicating that σ38 plays a central role in the expression of central metabolism genes in slowly growing cells. In fact, transcription levels of glycolytic genes is reduced in strain PB11rpoS− as compared to PB11. In this report we studied the role of σ70 and σ38 in the expression of the complete glycolytic pathway and poxB and acs genes in certain PTS− strains and their rpoS− derivatives. We determined the transcription start sites (TSSs) and the corresponding promoters, in strains JM101, PB11, its derivative PB12 that recovered its growth capacity, and in their rpoS− derivatives, by 5′RACE and pyrosequencing. In all these genes the presence of sequences resembling σ38 recognition sites allowed the proposition that they could be transcribed by both sigma factors, from overlapping putative promoters that initiate transcription at the same site. Fourteen new TSSs were identified in seventeen genes. Besides, more than 30 putative promoters were proposed and we confirmed ten previously reported. In vitro transcription experiments support the functionality of putative dual promoters. Alternatives that could also explain lower transcription levels of the rpoS− derivatives are discussed. We propose that the presence if real, of both σ70 and σ38 dependent promoters in all glycolytic genes and operons could allow a differential transcription of these central metabolism genes by both sigma subunits as an adaptation response to carbon

  5. Transcription Elongation Factor NusA Is a General Antagonist of Rho-dependent Termination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, M Zuhaib; Dey, Debashish; Sen, Ranjan

    2016-04-08

    NusA is an essential protein that binds to RNA polymerase and also to the nascent RNA and influences transcription by inducing pausing and facilitating the process of transcription termination/antitermination. Its participation in Rho-dependent transcription termination has been perceived, but the molecular nature of this involvement is not known. We hypothesized that, because both Rho and NusA are RNA-binding proteins and have the potential to target the same RNA, the latter is likely to influence the global pattern of the Rho-dependent termination. Analyses of the nascent RNA binding properties and consequent effects on the Rho-dependent termination functions of specific NusA-RNA binding domain mutants revealed an existence of Rho-NusA direct competition for the overlappingnut(NusA-binding site) andrut(Rho-binding site) sites on the RNA. This leads to delayed entry of Rho at therutsite that inhibits the latter's RNA release process. High density tiling microarray profiles of these NusA mutants revealed that a significant number of genes, together with transcripts from intergenic regions, are up-regulated. Interestingly, the majority of these genes were also up-regulated when the Rho function was compromised. These results provide strong evidence for the existence of NusA-binding sites in different operons that are also the targets of Rho-dependent terminations. Our data strongly argue in favor of a direct competition between NusA and Rho for the access of specific sites on the nascent transcripts in different parts of the genome. We propose that this competition enables NusA to function as a global antagonist of the Rho function, which is unlike its role as a facilitator of hairpin-dependent termination.

  6. Evaluation of the impact of quorum sensing transcriptional regulator SdiA on long-term persistence and fecal shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in weaned calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quorum sensing transcriptional regulator SdiA has been shown to enhance the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) in the acidic compartment of bovine rumen in response to N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) produced by the rumen bacteria. Bacteria that survive the rumen environment subsequentl...

  7. Structures of Escherichia coli DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) in complex with a non-GATC sequence: potential implications for methylation-independent transcriptional repression.

    PubMed

    Horton, John R; Zhang, Xing; Blumenthal, Robert M; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-04-30

    DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) is widespread and conserved among the γ-proteobacteria. Methylation of the Ade in GATC sequences regulates diverse bacterial cell functions, including gene expression, mismatch repair and chromosome replication. Dam also controls virulence in many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. An unexplained and perplexing observation about Escherichia coli Dam (EcoDam) is that there is no obvious relationship between the genes that are transcriptionally responsive to Dam and the promoter-proximal presence of GATC sequences. Here, we demonstrate that EcoDam interacts with a 5-base pair non-cognate sequence distinct from GATC. The crystal structure of a non-cognate complex allowed us to identify a DNA binding element, GTYTA/TARAC (where Y = C/T and R = A/G). This element immediately flanks GATC sites in some Dam-regulated promoters, including the Pap operon which specifies pyelonephritis-associated pili. In addition, Dam interacts with near-cognate GATC sequences (i.e. 3/4-site ATC and GAT). Taken together, these results imply that Dam, in addition to being responsible for GATC methylation, could also function as a methylation-independent transcriptional repressor.

  8. Structures of Escherichia coli DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) in complex with a non-GATC sequence: Potential implications for methylation-independent transcriptional repression

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, John R.; Zhang, Xing; Blumenthal, Robert M.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-04-06

    DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) is widespread and conserved among the γ-proteobacteria. Methylation of the Ade in GATC sequences regulates diverse bacterial cell functions, including gene expression, mismatch repair and chromosome replication. Dam also controls virulence in many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. An unexplained and perplexing observation about Escherichia coli Dam (EcoDam) is that there is no obvious relationship between the genes that are transcriptionally responsive to Dam and the promoter-proximal presence of GATC sequences. Here, we demonstrate that EcoDam interacts with a 5-base pair non-cognate sequence distinct from GATC. The crystal structure of a non-cognate complex allowed us to identify a DNA binding element, GTYTA/TARAC (where Y = C/T and R = A/G). This element immediately flanks GATC sites in some Dam-regulated promoters, including the Pap operon which specifies pyelonephritis-associated pili. In addition, Dam interacts with near-cognate GATC sequences (i.e. 3/4-site ATC and GAT). All together, these results imply that Dam, in addition to being responsible for GATC methylation, could also function as a methylation-independent transcriptional repressor.

  9. Structures of Escherichia coli DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) in complex with a non-GATC sequence: Potential implications for methylation-independent transcriptional repression

    DOE PAGES

    Horton, John R.; Zhang, Xing; Blumenthal, Robert M.; ...

    2015-04-06

    DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) is widespread and conserved among the γ-proteobacteria. Methylation of the Ade in GATC sequences regulates diverse bacterial cell functions, including gene expression, mismatch repair and chromosome replication. Dam also controls virulence in many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. An unexplained and perplexing observation about Escherichia coli Dam (EcoDam) is that there is no obvious relationship between the genes that are transcriptionally responsive to Dam and the promoter-proximal presence of GATC sequences. Here, we demonstrate that EcoDam interacts with a 5-base pair non-cognate sequence distinct from GATC. The crystal structure of a non-cognate complex allowed us to identify amore » DNA binding element, GTYTA/TARAC (where Y = C/T and R = A/G). This element immediately flanks GATC sites in some Dam-regulated promoters, including the Pap operon which specifies pyelonephritis-associated pili. In addition, Dam interacts with near-cognate GATC sequences (i.e. 3/4-site ATC and GAT). All together, these results imply that Dam, in addition to being responsible for GATC methylation, could also function as a methylation-independent transcriptional repressor.« less

  10. Sigma54-dependent transcription activator phage shock protein F of Escherichia coli: a fragmentation approach to identify sequences that contribute to self-association.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Patricia; Wigneshweraraj, Siva R; Zhang, Xiaodong; Buck, Martin

    2004-03-15

    Proteins that belong to the AAA (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) superfamily of mechanochemical enzymes are versatile and control a wide array of cellular functions. Many AAA proteins share the common property of self-association into oligomeric structures and use nucleotide binding and hydrolysis to regulate their biological output. The Escherichia coli transcription activator PspF (phage shock protein F) is a member of the sigma54-dependent transcriptional activators that belong to the AAA protein family. Nucleotide interactions condition the functional state of PspF, enabling it to self-associate and interact with its target, the sigma54-RNAP (RNA polymerase) closed complex. The self-association determinants within the AAA domain of sigma54-dependent activators remain poorly characterized. In the present study, we have used a fragment of the AAA domain of PspF as a probe to study the nucleotide-conditioned self-association of PspF. Results show that the PspF fragment acts in trans to inhibit specifically self-association of PspF. The PspF fragment prevented efficient binding of nucleotides to PspF, consistent with the observation that the site for nucleotide interactions within an oligomer of AAA proteins is created between two protomers. Using proximity-based footprinting and cross-linking techniques, we demonstrate that the sequences represented in this fragment are close to one protomer-protomer interface within a PspF oligomer. As the sequences represented in this PspF fragment also contain a highly conserved motif that interacts with the sigma54-RNAP closed complex, we suggest that PspF may be organized to link nucleotide interactions and self-association to sigma54-RNAP binding and transcription activation.

  11. Non-Invasive Analysis of Recombinant mRNA Stability in Escherichia coli by a Combination of Transcriptional Inducer Wash-Out and qRT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kucharova, Veronika; Strand, Trine Aakvik; Almaas, Eivind; Naas, Adrian E.; Brautaset, Trygve; Valla, Svein

    2013-01-01

    mRNA stability is one among many parameters that can potentially affect the level of recombinant gene expression in bacteria. Blocking of the entire prokaryotic transcription machinery by addition of rifampicin is commonly used in protocols for analysis of mRNA stability. Here we show that such treatment can be effectively replaced by a simple, non-invasive method based on removal of the relevant transcriptional inducers and that the mRNA decay can then be followed by qRT-PCR. To establish the methodology we first used the m-toluate-inducible XylS/Pm expression cassette as a model system and analyzed several examples of DNA modifications causing gene expression stimulation in Escherichia coli. The new method allowed us to clearly discriminate whether an improvement in mRNA stability contributes to observed increases in transcript amounts for each individual case. To support the experimental data a simple mathematical fitting model was developed to calculate relative decay rates. We extended the relevance of the method by demonstrating its application also for an IPTG-inducible expression cassette (LacI/Ptac) and by analyzing features of the bacteriophage T7-based expression system. The results suggest that the methodology is useful in elucidating factors controlling mRNA stability as well as other specific features of inducible expression systems. Moreover, as expression systems based on diffusible inducers are almost universally available, the concept can be most likely used to measure mRNA decay for any gene in any cell type that is heavily used in molecular biology research. PMID:23840466

  12. Cloning and functional expression in E. coli of a polyphenol oxidase transcript from Coreopsis grandiflora involved in aurone formation.

    PubMed

    Kaintz, Cornelia; Molitor, Christian; Thill, Jana; Kampatsikas, Ioannis; Michael, Claudia; Halbwirth, Heidi; Rompel, Annette

    2014-09-17

    Polyphenol oxidases are involved in aurone biosynthesis but the gene responsible for 4-deoxyaurone formation in Asteraceae was so far unknown. Three novel full-length cDNA sequences were isolated from Coreopsis grandiflora with sizes of 1.80kb (cgAUS1) and 1.85kb (cgAUS2a, 2b), encoding for proteins of 68-69kDa, respectively. cgAUS1 is preferably expressed in young petals indicating a specific role in pigment formation. The 58.9kDa AUS1 holoproenzyme, was recombinantly expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneity. The enzyme shows only diphenolase activity, catalyzing the conversion of chalcones to aurones and was characterized by SDS-PAGE and shot-gun type nanoUHPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

  13. Structural basis of transcription arrest by coliphage HK022 nun in an Escherichia coli RNA polymerase elongation complex.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin Young; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Chen, James; Campbell, Elizabeth A; Mustaev, Arkady; Chait, Brian T; Gottesman, Max E; Darst, Seth A

    2017-03-20

    Coliphage HK022 Nun blocks superinfection by coliphage λ by stalling RNA polymerase (RNAP) translocation specifically on λΔNA.To provide a structural framework to understand how Nun blocks RNAP translocation, we determined structures of Escherichia coli RNAP ternary elongation complexes (TECs) with and without Nun by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. Nun fits tightly into the TEC by taking advantage of gaps between the RNAP and the nucleic acids. The C-terminal segment of Nun interacts with the RNAP β and β' subunits inside the RNAP active site cleft as well as with nearly every element of the nucleic-acid scaffold, essentially crosslinking the RNAP and the nucleic acids to prevent translocation, a mechanism supported by the effects of Nun amino acid substitutions. The nature of Nun interactions inside the RNAP active site cleft suggests that RNAP clamp opening is required for Nun to establish its interactions, explaining why Nun acts on paused TECs.

  14. CydDC-mediated reductant export in Escherichia coli controls the transcriptional wiring of energy metabolism and combats nitrosative stress

    PubMed Central

    Holyoake, Louise V.; Hunt, Stuart; Sanguinetti, Guido; Cook, Gregory M.; Howard, Mark J.; Rowe, Michelle L.; Poole, Robert K.; Shepherd, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The glutathione/cysteine exporter CydDC maintains redox balance in Escherichia coli. A cydD mutant strain was used to probe the influence of CydDC upon reduced thiol export, gene expression, metabolic perturbations, intracellular pH homoeostasis and tolerance to nitric oxide (NO). Loss of CydDC was found to decrease extracytoplasmic thiol levels, whereas overexpression diminished the cytoplasmic thiol content. Transcriptomic analysis revealed a dramatic up-regulation of protein chaperones, protein degradation (via phenylpropionate/phenylacetate catabolism), β-oxidation of fatty acids and genes involved in nitrate/nitrite reduction. 1H NMR metabolomics revealed elevated methionine and betaine and diminished acetate and NAD+ in cydD cells, which was consistent with the transcriptomics-based metabolic model. The growth rate and ΔpH, however, were unaffected, although the cydD strain did exhibit sensitivity to the NO-releasing compound NOC-12. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the loss of CydDC-mediated reductant export promotes protein misfolding, adaptations to energy metabolism and sensitivity to NO. The addition of both glutathione and cysteine to the medium was found to complement the loss of bd-type cytochrome synthesis in a cydD strain (a key component of the pleiotropic cydDC phenotype), providing the first direct evidence that CydDC substrates are able to restore the correct assembly of this respiratory oxidase. These data provide an insight into the metabolic flexibility of E. coli, highlight the importance of bacterial redox homoeostasis during nitrosative stress, and report for the first time the ability of periplasmic low molecular weight thiols to restore haem incorporation into a cytochrome complex. PMID:26699904

  15. Structural basis of transcription arrest by coliphage HK022 Nun in an Escherichia coli RNA polymerase elongation complex

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jin Young; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Chen, James; Campbell, Elizabeth A; Mustaev, Arkady; Chait, Brian T; Gottesman, Max E; Darst, Seth A

    2017-01-01

    Coliphage HK022 Nun blocks superinfection by coliphage λ by stalling RNA polymerase (RNAP) translocation specifically on λ DNA. To provide a structural framework to understand how Nun blocks RNAP translocation, we determined structures of Escherichia coli RNAP ternary elongation complexes (TECs) with and without Nun by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. Nun fits tightly into the TEC by taking advantage of gaps between the RNAP and the nucleic acids. The C-terminal segment of Nun interacts with the RNAP β and β’ subunits inside the RNAP active site cleft as well as with nearly every element of the nucleic acid scaffold, essentially crosslinking the RNAP and the nucleic acids to prevent translocation, a mechanism supported by the effects of Nun amino acid substitutions. The nature of Nun interactions inside the RNAP active site cleft suggests that RNAP clamp opening is required for Nun to establish its interactions, explaining why Nun acts on paused TECs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25478.001 PMID:28318486

  16. RegulonDB (version 5.0): Escherichia coli K-12 transcriptional regulatory network, operon organization, and growth conditions

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Heladia; Gama-Castro, Socorro; Peralta-Gil, Martín; Díaz-Peredo, Edgar; Sánchez-Solano, Fabiola; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Jiménez-Jacinto, Verónica; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Segura-Salazar, Juan; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2006-01-01

    RegulonDB is the internationally recognized reference database of Escherichia coli K-12 offering curated knowledge of the regulatory network and operon organization. It is currently the largest electronically-encoded database of the regulatory network of any free-living organism. We present here the recently launched RegulonDB version 5.0 radically different in content, interface design and capabilities. Continuous curation of original scientific literature provides the evidence behind every single object and feature. This knowledge is complemented with comprehensive computational predictions across the complete genome. Literature-based and predicted data are clearly distinguished in the database. Starting with this version, RegulonDB public releases are synchronized with those of EcoCyc since our curation supports both databases. The complex biology of regulation is simplified in a navigation scheme based on three major streams: genes, operons and regulons. Regulatory knowledge is directly available in every navigation step. Displays combine graphic and textual information and are organized allowing different levels of detail and biological context. This knowledge is the backbone of an integrated system for the graphic display of the network, graphic and tabular microarray comparisons with curated and predicted objects, as well as predictions across bacterial genomes, and predicted networks of functionally related gene products. Access RegulonDB at . PMID:16381895

  17. Differential Regulation of rRNA and tRNA Transcription from the rRNA-tRNA Composite Operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Hiraku; Shimada, Tomohiro; Dey, Debashish; Quyyum, M. Zuhaib; Nakano, Masahiro; Ishiguro, Akira; Yoshida, Hideji; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Sen, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli contains seven rRNA operons, each consisting of the genes for three rRNAs (16S, 23S and 5S rRNA in this order) and one or two tRNA genes in the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA genes and one or two tRNA genes in the 3’ proximal region. All of these rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, into single large precursors that are afterward processed to individual rRNAs and tRNAs by a set of RNases. In the course of Genomic SELEX screening of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing RpoD sigma, a strong binding site was identified within 16S rRNA gene in each of all seven rRNA operons. The binding in vitro of RNAP RpoD holoenzyme to an internal promoter, referred to the promoter of riRNA (an internal RNA of the rRNA operon), within each 16S rRNA gene was confirmed by gel shift assay and AFM observation. Using this riRNA promoter within the rrnD operon as a representative, transcription in vitro was detected with use of the purified RpoD holoenzyme, confirming the presence of a constitutive promoter in this region. LacZ reporter assay indicated that this riRNA promoter is functional in vivo. The location of riRNA promoter in vivo as identified using a set of reporter plasmids agrees well with that identified in vitro. Based on transcription profile in vitro and Northern blot analysis in vivo, the majority of transcript initiated from this riRNA promoter was estimated to terminate near the beginning of 23S rRNA gene, indicating that riRNA leads to produce the spacer-coded tRNA. Under starved conditions, transcription of the rRNA operon is markedly repressed to reduce the intracellular level of ribosomes, but the levels of both riRNA and its processed tRNAGlu stayed unaffected, implying that riRNA plays a role in the continued steady-state synthesis of tRNAs from the spacers of rRNA operons. We then propose that the tRNA genes organized within the spacers of rRNA-tRNA composite operons are expressed

  18. Two mechanisms for putrescine-dependent transcriptional expression of the putrescine aminotransferase gene, ygjG, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Sik; Shin, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2014-09-01

    In this study, on evaluating the physiological function and mechanism of putrescine, we found that putrescine supplementation (1 mM) increases transcription of the putrescine aminotransferase gene, ygjG. Putrescine-dependent expression was confirmed by measuring β-galactosidase activity and with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. To understand the role of putrescine in ygjG expression, we genetically characterized and found that a knockout mutation in an alternative sigma factor, rpoS, abolished putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression. In the rpoS mutant, RpoS overexpression complemented the mutant phenotype. However, RpoS overexpression induced ygjG-lacZ expression with putrescine supplementation but not without supplementation. We also found that the loss of putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression induced by rpoS was completely restored under nitrogen-starvation conditions. The putrescine-dependent expression of ygjG-lacZ under this condition was clearly dependent on another alternative sigma factor, rpoN, and its cognate activator ntrC. These results show that rpoS is required for putrescine-dependent ygjG-lacZ expression, but the effect of putrescine on this expression is not caused by simple modulation of RpoS synthesis. Putrescine-dependent expression of ygjG-lacZ was controlled by at least two sigma factors: rpoS under excess nitrogen conditions and rpoN under nitrogen-starvation conditions. These results suggest that putrescine plays an important role in the nitrogen regulation system.

  19. A comparison of key aspects of gene regulation in Streptomyces coelicolor and Escherichia coli using nucleotide-resolution transcription maps produced in parallel by global and differential RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Romero, David A; Hasan, Ayad H; Lin, Yu-fei; Kime, Louise; Ruiz-Larrabeiti, Olatz; Urem, Mia; Bucca, Giselda; Mamanova, Lira; Laing, Emma E; van Wezel, Gilles P; Smith, Colin P; Kaberdin, Vladimir R; McDowall, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor is a model for studying bacteria renowned as the foremost source of natural products used clinically. Post-genomic studies have revealed complex patterns of gene expression and links to growth, morphological development and individual genes. However, the underlying regulation remains largely obscure, but undoubtedly involves steps after transcription initiation. Here we identify sites involved in RNA processing and degradation as well as transcription within a nucleotide-resolution map of the transcriptional landscape. This was achieved by combining RNA-sequencing approaches suited to the analysis of GC-rich organisms. Escherichia coli was analysed in parallel to validate the methodology and allow comparison. Previously, sites of RNA processing and degradation had not been mapped on a transcriptome-wide scale for E. coli. Through examples, we show the value of our approach and data sets. This includes the identification of new layers of transcriptional complexity associated with several key regulators of secondary metabolism and morphological development in S. coelicolor and the identification of host-encoded leaderless mRNA and rRNA processing associated with the generation of specialized ribosomes in E. coli. New regulatory small RNAs were identified for both organisms. Overall the results illustrate the diversity in mechanisms used by different bacterial groups to facilitate and regulate gene expression. PMID:25266672

  20. High-Yield Expression in E. coli and Refolding of the bZIP Domain of Activating Transcription Factor 5

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Natalie A.; Moreno, Matthew L.; Bauer, Rachel L.; Laurence, Jennifer S.

    2008-01-01

    Activating Transcription Factor 5 (ATF5) recently has been demonstrated to play a critical role in promoting the survival of human glioblastoma cells. Interference with the function of ATF5 in an in vivo rat model caused glioma cell death in primary tumors but did not affect the status of normal cells surrounding the tumor, suggesting ATF5 may prove an ideal target for anti-cancer therapy. In order to examine ATF5 as a pharmaceutical target, the protein must be produced and purified to sufficient quantity to begin analyses. Here, a procedure for expressing and refolding the bZIP domain of ATF5 in sufficient yield and final concentration to permit assay development and structural characterization of this target using solution NMR is reported. Two-dimensional NMR and circular dichrosim analyses indicate the protein exists in the partially α-helical, monomeric x-form conformation with only a small fraction of ATF5 participating in formation of higher-order structure, presumably coiled-coil homodimerization. Despite the persistence of monomers in solution even at high concentration, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that ATF5 is able to bind to the cAMP response element (CRE) DNA motif. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to confirm that ATF5 can participate in homodimer formation and that this dimerization is mediated by disulfide bond formation. PMID:18718539

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the transcriptional repressor PaaX, the main regulator of the phenylacetic acid degradation pathway in Escherichia coli W

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Altuve, Alzoray; Carrasco-López, César; Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M.; Sanz, Jesús M.; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    PaaX is the main regulator of the phenylacetic acid aerobic degradation pathway in bacteria and acts as a transcriptional repressor in the absence of its inducer phenylacetyl-coenzyme A. The natural presence and the recent accumulation of a variety of highly toxic aromatic compounds owing to human pollution has created considerable interest in the study of degradation pathways in bacteria, the most important microorganisms capable of recycling these compounds, in order to design and apply novel bioremediation strategies. PaaX from Escherichia coli W was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Crystals grew from a mixture of 0.9 M Li2SO4 and 0.5 M sodium citrate pH 5.8. These crystals, which belonged to the monoclinic space group C2 with unit-cell parameters a = 167.88, b = 106.23, c = 85.87 Å, β = 108.33°, allowed the collection of an X-ray data set to 2.3 Å resolution. PMID:22102047

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the transcriptional repressor PaaX, the main regulator of the phenylacetic acid degradation pathway in Escherichia coli W.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Altuve, Alzoray; Carrasco-López, César; Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M; Sanz, Jesús M; Hermoso, Juan A

    2011-10-01

    PaaX is the main regulator of the phenylacetic acid aerobic degradation pathway in bacteria and acts as a transcriptional repressor in the absence of its inducer phenylacetyl-coenzyme A. The natural presence and the recent accumulation of a variety of highly toxic aromatic compounds owing to human pollution has created considerable interest in the study of degradation pathways in bacteria, the most important microorganisms capable of recycling these compounds, in order to design and apply novel bioremediation strategies. PaaX from Escherichia coli W was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Crystals grew from a mixture of 0.9 M Li(2)SO(4) and 0.5 M sodium citrate pH 5.8. These crystals, which belonged to the monoclinic space group C2 with unit-cell parameters a = 167.88, b = 106.23, c = 85.87 Å, β = 108.33°, allowed the collection of an X-ray data set to 2.3 Å resolution.

  3. Changes in Gene Transcription Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide Treatment of Verotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Non-O157 Serotypes on Romaine Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Gui-Ying; Tang, Joshua; Bach, Susan; Kostrzynska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Disease outbreaks of verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) O157:H7 and non-O157 serotypes associated with leafy green vegetables are becoming a growing concern. A better understanding of the behavior of VTEC, particularly non-O157 serotypes, on lettuce under stress conditions is necessary for designing more effective control strategies. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can be used as a sanitizer to reduce the microbial load in leafy green vegetables, particularly in fresh produce destined for the organic market. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that H2O2 treatment of contaminated lettuce affects in the same manner transcription of stress-associated and virulence genes in VTEC strains representing O157 and non-O157 serotypes. Six VTEC isolates representing serotypes O26:H11, O103:H2, O104:H4, O111:NM, O145:NM, and O157:H7 were included in this study. The results indicate that 50 mM H2O2 caused a population reduction of 2.4–2.8 log10 (compared to non-treated control samples) in all six VTEC strains present on romaine lettuce. Following the treatment, the transcription of genes related to oxidative stress (oxyR and sodA), general stress (uspA and rpoS), starvation (phoA), acid stress (gadA, gadB, and gadW), and virulence (stx1A, stx2A, and fliC) were dramatically downregulated in all six VTEC serotypes (P ≤ 0.05) compared to not treated control samples. Therefore, VTEC O157:H7 and non-O157 serotypes on lettuce showed similar survival rates and gene transcription profiles in response to 50 mM H2O2 treatment. Thus, the results derived from this study provide a basic understanding of the influence of H2O2 treatment on the survival and virulence of VTEC O157:H7 and non-O157 serotypes on lettuce. PMID:28377761

  4. The effect of heating rate on Escherichia coli metabolism, physiological stress, transcriptional response, and production of temperature-induced recombinant protein: a scale-down study.

    PubMed

    Caspeta, Luis; Flores, Noemí; Pérez, Néstor O; Bolívar, Francisco; Ramírez, Octavio T

    2009-02-01

    At the laboratory scale, sudden step increases from 30 to 42 degrees C can be readily accomplished when expressing heterologous proteins in heat-inducible systems. However, for large scale-cultures only slow ramp-type increases in temperature are possible due to heat transfer limitations, where the heating rate decreases as the scale increases. In this work, the transcriptional and metabolic responses of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain to temperature-induced synthesis of pre-proinsulin in high cell density cultures were examined at different heating rates. Heating rates of 6, 1.7, 0.8, and 0.4 degrees C/min were tested in a scale-down approach to mimic fermentors of 0.1, 5, 20, and 100 m(3), respectively. The highest yield and concentration of recombinant protein was obtained for the slowest heating rate. As the heating rate increased, the yield and maximum recombinant protein concentration decreased, whereas a larger fraction of carbon skeletons was lost as acetate, lactate, and formate. Compared to 30 degrees C, the mRNA levels of selected heat-shock genes at 38 and 42 degrees C, as quantified by qRT-PCR, increased between 2- to over 42-fold when cultures were induced at 6, 1.7, and 0.8 degrees C/min, but no increase was observed at 0.4 degrees C/min. Only small increases (between 1.5- and 4-fold) in the expression of the stress genes spoT and relA were observed at 42 degrees C for cultures induced at 1.7 and 6 degrees C/min, suggesting that cells subjected to slow temperature increases can adapt to stress. mRNA levels of genes from the transcription-translation machinery (tufB, rpoA, and tig) decreased between 40% and 80% at 6, 1.7 and 0.8 degrees C/min, whereas a transient increase occurred for 0.4 degrees C/min at 42 degrees C. mRNA levels of the gene coding for pre-proinsulin showed a similar profile to transcripts of heat-shock genes, reflecting a probable analogous induction mechanism. Altogether, the results obtained indicate that slow heating rates

  5. Transcriptional control and essential roles of the Escherichia coli ccm gene products in formate-dependent nitrite reduction and cytochrome c synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Tanapongpipat, S; Reid, E; Cole, J A; Crooke, H

    1998-01-01

    The eight ccm genes located at minute 47 on the Escherichia coli chromosome, in the order ccmABCDEFGH, encode homologues of proteins which are essential for cytochrome c assembly in other bacteria. The ccm genes are immediately downstream from the napFDAGHBC genes encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase. CcmH was previously shown to be essential for cytochrome c assembly. Deletion analysis and a two-plasmid strategy have now been used to demonstrate that CcmA, B, D, E, F and G are also essential for cytochrome c assembly, and hence for cytochrome-c-dependent nitrite reduction. The ccm genes are transcribed from a ccmA promoter located within the adjacent gene, napC, which is the structural gene for a 24 kDa membrane-bound c-type cytochrome, NapC. Transcription from this ccmA promoter is induced approximately 5-fold during anaerobic growth, independently of a functional Fnr protein: it is also not regulated by the ArcB-ArcA two-component regulatory system. The ccmA promoter is an example of the 'extended -10 sequence' group of promoters with a TGX motif immediately upstream of the -10 sequence. Mutagenesis of the TG motif to TC, CT or CC resulted in loss of about 50% of the promoter activity. A weak second promoter is suggested to permit transcription of the downstream ccmEFGH genes in the absence of transcription readthrough from the upstream napF and ccmA promoters. The results are consistent with, but do not prove, the current view that CcmA, B, C and D are part of an essential haem transport mechanism, that CcmE, F and H are required for covalent haem attachment to cysteine-histidine motifs in cytochrome c apoproteins in the periplasm, and that CcmG is required for the reduction of cysteine residues on apocytochromes c in preparation for haem ligation. PMID:9716493

  6. Transcriptional and Physiological Characterizations of Escherichia coli MG1655 that have been grown under Low Shear Stress Environment for 1000 Generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouia, Fathi; Tirumalai, Madhan R.; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A.; Sams, Clarence F.; Ott, Mark C.; Pierson, Duane L.; Fofanov, Yuriy; Willson, Richard C.; Fox, George E.

    Human space travelers experience a unique environment that affects homeostasis and physio-logic adaptation. One of the important regulatory biology interactions affected by space flight is the alteration of the immune response. As such, the impairment of the immune system may lead to higher risk of bacterial and/or viral infection during human space flight missions. Mi-crobiological contaminants have been a source of concern over the years for NASA and there is evidence to suggest that microbes in space do not behave like they do on Earth. Previ-ous studies have examined the physiological response of bacteria when exposed to short-term microgravity either during spaceflight or in a Low Shear Modeled Microgravity (LSMMG) en-vironment. Exposure to these environments has been found to induce increased resistance to stresses and antibiotics, and in one case increase of virulence. As NASA increases the duration of space flight missions and is starting to envision human presence on the lunar surface and Mars, it becomes legitimate to question the long-term effects of microgravity on bacteria. The effect of long-term exposure to LSMMG on microbial gene expression and physiology in Escherichia coli (E. coli) is being examined using functional genomics, and molecular tech-niques. In previous E. coli short term studies, reproducible changes in transcription were seen but no direct responses to changes in the gravity vector were identified. Instead, absence of shear and a randomized gravity vector appeared to cause local extra-cellular environmental changes, which elicited cellular responses. In order to evaluate the long-term effects of micro-gravity on bacteria, E. coli was grown under simulated microgravity for 1000 generations and gene expression patterns and cellular physiology were analyzed in comparison with short-term exposure. The analysis revealed that the long-term response differed significantly from the short-term exposure and 357 genes were expressed

  7. E. Coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC E.coli (Escherichia coli) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Brand SoyNut Butter Read the Latest E. coli (Escherichia coli) General Information Protect Yourself Learn about E. coli ...

  8. New insights into the signaling mechanism of the pH-responsive, membrane-integrated transcriptional activator CadC of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Haneburger, Ina; Eichinger, Andreas; Skerra, Arne; Jung, Kirsten

    2011-03-25

    The membrane-integrated transcriptional regulator CadC of Escherichia coli activates expression of the cadBA operon at low external pH with concomitantly available lysine, providing adaptation to mild acidic stress. CadC is a representative of the ToxR-like proteins that combine sensory, signal transduction, and DNA-binding activities within a single polypeptide. Although several ToxR-like regulators such as CadC, as well as the main regulator of Vibrio cholerae virulence, ToxR itself, which activate gene expression at acidic pH, have been intensively investigated, their molecular activation mechanism is still unclear. In this study, a structure-guided mutational analysis was performed to elucidate the mechanism by which CadC detects acidification of the external milieu. Thus, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids (Asp-198, Asp-200, Glu-461, Glu-468, and Asp-471) was found to be crucial for pH detection. These amino acids form a negatively charged patch on the surface of the periplasmic domain of CadC that stretches across its two subdomains. The results of different combinations of amino acid replacements within this patch indicated that the N-terminal subdomain integrates and transduces the signals coming from both subdomains to the transmembrane domain. Alterations in the phospholipid composition did not influence pH-dependent cadBA expression, and therefore, interplay of the acidic surface patch with the negatively charged headgroups is unlikely. Models are discussed according to which protonation of these acidic amino acid side chains reduces repulsive forces between the two subdomains and/or between two monomers within a CadC dimer and thereby enables receptor activation upon lowering of the environmental pH.

  9. Promoter discrimination at class I MarA regulon promoters mediated by glutamic acid 89 of the MarA transcriptional activator of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert G; Rosner, Judah L

    2011-01-01

    Three paralogous transcriptional activators MarA, SoxS, and Rob, activate > 40 Escherichia coli promoters. To understand why MarA does not activate certain promoters as strongly as SoxS, we compared MarA, MarA mutants, and SoxS for their abilities to activate 16 promoters and to bind their cognate marbox binding sites. Replacement of the MarA glutamic acid residue 89 with alanine greatly increased the marbox binding and activation of many class I promoters. Like cells constitutive for SoxS, cells expressing the MarA with the E89A mutation were more resistant to superoxides than those harboring WT MarA. The activities of several other E89 substitutions ranked as follows: E89A > E89G > E89V > WT > E89D. Increased binding and activation occurred only at class I promoters when the 12th base of the promoter's marbox (a position at which there is no known interaction between the marbox and MarA) was not a T residue. Furthermore, WT MarA binding to a synthetic marbox in vitro was enhanced when the phosphate group between positions 12 and 13 was eliminated on one strand. The results demonstrate that relatively minor changes in a single amino acid side chain (e.g., alanine to valine or glutamic acid to aspartic acid) can strongly influence activity despite any evidence that the side chain is involved in positive interactions with either DNA or RNA polymerase. We present a model which attributes the differences in binding and activation to the interference between the β- and γ-carbons of the amino acid at position 89 and the phosphate group between positions 12 and 13.

  10. Different effects of transcriptional regulators MarA, SoxS and Rob on susceptibility of Escherichia coli to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs): Rob-dependent CAMP induction of the marRAB operon.

    PubMed

    Warner, Douglas M; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-02-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs), a component of the mammalian immune system, protect the host from bacterial infections. The roles of the Escherichia coli transcriptional regulators MarA, SoxS and Rob in susceptibility to these peptides were examined. Overexpression of marA, either in an antibiotic-resistant marR mutant or from a plasmid, decreased bacterial susceptibility to CAMPs. Overexpression of the soxS gene from a plasmid, which decreased susceptibility to antibiotics, unexpectedly caused no decrease in CAMP susceptibility; instead it produced increased susceptibility to different CAMPs. Deletion or overexpression of rob had little effect on CAMP susceptibility. The marRAB operon was upregulated when E. coli was incubated in sublethal amounts of CAMPs polymyxin B, LL-37 or human beta-defensin-1; however, this upregulation required Rob. Deletion of acrAB increased bacterial susceptibility to polymyxin B, LL-37 and human beta-defensin-1 peptides. Deletion of tolC yielded an even greater increase in susceptibility to these peptides and also led to increased susceptibility to human alpha-defensin-2. Inhibition of cellular proton-motive force increased peptide susceptibility for wild-type and acrAB deletion strains; however, it decreased susceptibility of tolC mutants. These findings demonstrate that CAMPs are both inducers of marA-mediated drug resistance through interaction with Rob and also substrates for efflux in E. coli. The three related transcriptional regulators show different effects on bacterial cell susceptibility to CAMPs.

  11. A basic/hydrophobic cleft of the T4 activator MotA interacts with the C-terminus of E. coli σ70 to activate middle gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Bonocora, Richard P.; Caignan, Gregori; Woodrell, Christopher; Werner, Milton H.; Hinton, Deborah M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Transcriptional activation often employs a direct interaction between an activator and RNA polymerase. For activation of its middle genes, bacteriophage T4 appropriates E. coli RNA polymerase through the action of two phage-encoded proteins, MotA and AsiA. Alone, AsiA inhibits transcription from a large class of host promoters by structurally remodeling region 4 of σ70, the primary specificity subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase. MotA interacts both with σ70 region 4 and with a DNA element present in T4 middle promoters. AsiA-induced remodeling is proposed to make the far C-terminus of σ70 region 4 accessible for MotA binding. Here, NMR chemical shift analysis indicates that MotA uses a “basic/hydrophobic” cleft to interact with the C-terminus of AsiA-remodeled σ70, but MotA does not interact with AsiA itself. Mutations within this cleft, at residues K3, K28, and Q76, both impair the interaction of MotA with σ70 region 4 and MotA-dependent activation. Furthermore, mutations at these residues greatly decrease phage viability. Most previously described activators that target σ70 directly use acidic residues to engage a basic surface of region 4. Our work supports accumulated evidence indicating that “σ appropriation” by MotA and AsiA uses a fundamentally different mechanism to activate transcription. PMID:18485078

  12. Two functions of the C-terminal domain of Escherichia coli Rob: mediating "sequestration-dispersal" as a novel off-on switch for regulating Rob's activity as a transcription activator and preventing degradation of Rob by Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Kevin L; Fitzpatrick, M Megan; Keen, Edward F; Wolf, Richard E

    2009-05-08

    In Escherichia coli, Rob activates transcription of the SoxRS/MarA/Rob regulon. Previous work revealed that Rob resides in three to four immunostainable foci, that dipyridyl and bile salts are inducers of its activity, and that inducers bind to Rob's C-terminal domain (CTD). We propose that sequestration inactivates Rob by blocking its access to the transcriptional machinery and that inducers activate Rob by mediating its dispersal, allowing interaction with RNA polymerase. To test "sequestration-dispersal" as a new mechanism for regulating the activity of transcriptional activators, we fused Rob's CTD to SoxS and used indirect immunofluorescence microscopy to determine the effect of inducers on SoxS-Rob's cellular localization. Unlike native SoxS, which is uniformly distributed throughout the cell, SoxS-Rob is sequestered without an inducer, but is rapidly dispersed when cells are treated with an inducer. In this manner, Rob's CTD serves as an anti-sigma factor in regulating the co-sigma-factor-like activity of SoxS when fused to it. Rob's CTD also protects its N-terminus from Lon protease, since Lon's normally rapid degradation of SoxS is blocked in the chimera. Accordingly, Rob's CTD has novel regulatory properties that can be bestowed on another E. coli protein.

  13. Protein-protein interactions between sigma(70) region 4 of RNA polymerase and Escherichia coli SoxS, a transcription activator that functions by the prerecruitment mechanism: evidence for "off-DNA" and "on-DNA" interactions.

    PubMed

    Zafar, M Ammar; Shah, Ishita M; Wolf, Richard E

    2010-08-06

    According to the prerecruitment hypothesis, Escherichia coli SoxS activates the transcription of the genes of the SoxRS regulon by forming binary complexes with RNA polymerase (RNAP) that scan the chromosome for class I and class II SoxS-dependent promoters. We showed previously that the alpha subunit's C-terminal domain plays a role in activating both classes of promoter by making protein-protein contacts with SoxS; some of these contacts are made in solution in the absence of promoter DNA, a critical prediction of the prerecruitment hypothesis. Here, we identified seven single-alanine substitutions of the region 4 of sigma(70) (sigma(70) R4) of RNAP that reduce SoxS activation of class II promoters. With genetic epistasis tests between these sigma(70) R4 mutants and positive control mutants of SoxS, we identified 10 pairs of amino acids that interact with each other in E. coli. Using the yeast two-hybrid system and affinity immobilization assays, we showed that SoxS and sigma(70) R4 can interact in solution (i.e., "off-DNA"). The interaction requires amino acids of the class I/II (but not the class II) positive control surface of SoxS, and five amino acids of sigma(70) R4 that reduce activation in E. coli also reduce the SoxS-sigma(70) R4 interaction in yeast. One of the epistatic interactions that occur in E. coli also occurs in the yeast two-hybrid system (i.e., off-DNA). Importantly, we infer that the five epistatic interactions occurring in E. coli that require an amino acid of the class II surface occur "on-DNA" at class II promoters. Finding that SoxS contacts sigma(70) R4 both off-DNA and on-DNA is consistent with the prerecruitment hypothesis. Moreover, SoxS is now the first example of an E. coli transcriptional activator that uses a single positive control surface to make specific protein-protein contacts with two different subunits of RNAP.

  14. The Cation-Responsive Protein NhaR of Escherichia coli Activates pgaABCD Transcription, Required for Production of the Biofilm Adhesin Poly-β-1,6-N-Acetyl-d-Glucosamine▿

    PubMed Central

    Goller, Carlos; Wang, Xin; Itoh, Yoshikane; Romeo, Tony

    2006-01-01

    The pgaABCD operon of Escherichia coli is required for production of the biofilm adhesin poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PGA). We establish here that NhaR, a DNA-binding protein of the LysR family of transcriptional regulators, activates transcription of this operon. Disruption of the nhaR gene decreased biofilm formation without affecting planktonic growth. PGA production was undetectable in an nhaR mutant strain. Expression of a pgaA′-′lacZ translational fusion was induced by NaCl and alkaline pH, but not by CaCl2 or sucrose, in an nhaR-dependent fashion. Primer extension and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analyses further revealed that NhaR affects the steady-state level of pga mRNA. A purified recombinant NhaR protein bound specifically and with high affinity within the pgaABCD promoter region; one apparent binding site overlaps the −35 element, and a second site lies immediately upstream of the first. This protein was necessary and sufficient for activation of in vitro transcription from the pgaA promoter. These results define a novel mechanism for regulation of biofilm formation in response to environmental conditions and suggest an expanded role for NhaR in promoting bacterial survival. PMID:16997959

  15. An excretory function for the Escherichia coli outer membrane pore TolC: upregulation of marA and soxS transcription and Rob activity due to metabolites accumulated in tolC mutants.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Judah L; Martin, Robert G

    2009-08-01

    Efflux pumps function to rid bacteria of xenobiotics, including antibiotics, bile salts, and organic solvents. TolC, which forms an outer membrane channel, is an essential component of several efflux pumps in Escherichia coli. We asked whether TolC has a role during growth in the absence of xenobiotics. Because tolC transcription is activated by three paralogous activators, MarA, SoxS, and Rob, we examined the regulation of these activators in tolC mutants. Using transcriptional fusions, we detected significant upregulation of marRAB and soxS transcription and Rob protein activity in tolC mutants. Three mechanisms could be distinguished: (i) activation of marRAB transcription was independent of marRAB, soxR, and rob functions; (ii) activation of soxS transcription required SoxR, a sensor of oxidants; and (iii) Rob protein was activated posttranscriptionally. This mechanism is similar to the mechanisms of upregulation of marRAB, soxS, and Rob by treatment with certain phenolics, superoxides, and bile salts, respectively. The transcription of other marA/soxS/rob regulon promoters, including tolC itself, was also elevated in tolC mutants. We propose that TolC is involved in the efflux of certain cellular metabolites, not only xenobiotics. As these metabolites accumulate during growth, they trigger the upregulation of MarA, SoxS, and Rob, which in turn upregulate tolC and help rid the bacteria of these metabolites, thereby restoring homeostasis.

  16. Independent and tight regulation of transcriptional units in Escherichia coli via the LacR/O, the TetR/O and AraC/I1-I2 regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Lutz, R; Bujard, H

    1997-03-15

    Based on parameters governing promoter activity and using regulatory elements of the lac, ara and tet operon transcription control sequences were composed which permit the regulation in Escherichia coli of several gene activities independently and quantitatively. The novel promoter PLtetO-1 allows the regulation of gene expression over an up to 5000-fold range with anhydrotetracycline (aTc) whereas with IPTG and arabinose the activity of Plac/ara-1 may be controlled 1800-fold. Escherichia coli host strains which produce defined amounts of the regulatory proteins, Lac and Tet repressor as well as AraC from chromosomally located expression units provide highly reproducible in vivo conditions. Controlling the expression of the genes encoding luciferase, the low abundance E.coli protein DnaJ and restriction endonuclease Cfr9I not only demonstrates that high levels of expression can be achieved but also suggests that under conditions of optimal repression only around one mRNA every 3rd generation is produced. This potential of quantitative control will open up new approaches in the study of gene function in vivo, in particular with low abundance regulatory gene products. The system will also provide new opportunities for the controlled expression of heterologous genes.

  17. Substitutions in the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase inhibitor T7 Gp2 that allow inhibition of transcription when the primary interaction interface between Gp2 and RNA polymerase becomes compromised.

    PubMed

    Shadrin, Andrey; Sheppard, Carol; Severinov, Konstantin; Matthews, Steve; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh

    2012-11-01

    The Escherichia coli-infecting bacteriophage T7 encodes a 7 kDa protein, called Gp2, which is a potent inhibitor of the host RNA polymerase (RNAp). Gp2 is essential for T7 phage development. The interaction site for Gp2 on the E. coli RNAp is the β' jaw domain, which is part of the DNA binding channel. The binding of Gp2 to the β' jaw antagonizes several steps associated with interactions between the RNAp and promoter DNA, leading to inhibition of transcription at the open promoter complex formation step. In the structure of the complex formed between Gp2 and a fragment of the β' jaw, amino acid residues in the β3 strand of Gp2 contribute to the primary interaction interface with the β' jaw. The 7009 E. coli strain is resistant to T7 because it carries a charge reversal point mutation in the β' jaw that prevents Gp2 binding. However, a T7 phage encoding a mutant form of Gp2, called Gp2(β), which carries triple amino acid substitutions E24K, F27Y and R56C, can productively infect this strain. By studying the molecular basis of inhibition of RNAp from the 7009 strain by Gp2(β), we provide several lines of evidence that the E24K and F27Y substitutions facilitate an interaction with RNAp when the primary interaction interface with the β' jaw is compromised. The proposed additional interaction interface between RNAp and Gp2 may contribute to the multipronged mechanism of transcription inhibition by Gp2.

  18. Intron insertion facilitates amplification of cloned virus cDNA in Escherichia coli while biological activity is reestablished after transcription in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, I E

    1996-01-01

    Insertion of introns into cloned cDNA of two isolates of the plant potyvirus pea seedborne mosaic virus facilitated plasmid amplification in Escherichia coli. Multiple stop codons in the inserted introns interrupted the open reading frame of the virus cDNA, thereby terminating undesired translation of virus proteins in E. coli. Plasmids containing the full-length virus sequences, placed under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the nopaline synthase termination signal, were stable and easy to amplify in E. coli if one or more introns were inserted into the virus sequence. These plasmids were infectious when inoculated mechanically onto Pisum sativum leaves. Examination of the cDNA-derived viruses confirmed that intron splicing of in vivo transcribed pre-mRNA had occurred as predicted, reestablishing the virus genome sequences. Symptom development and virus accumulation of the cDNA derived viruses and parental viruses were identical. It is proposed that intron insertion can be used to facilitate manipulation and amplification of cloned DNA fragments that are unstable in, or toxic to, E. coli. When transcribed in vivo in eukaryotic cells, the introns will be eliminated from the sequence and will not interfere with further analysis of protein expression or virus infection. PMID:8901593

  19. Hha controls Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm formation by differential regulation of global transcriptional regulators FlhDC and CsgD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a zoonotic pathogen that produces a broad-spectrum of diarrheal illnesses in infected humans. Although molecular mechanisms enabling EHEC O157:H7 to produce characteristic adherence on epithelial cells are well characterized, regulatory mechanisms...

  20. Comparative transcriptional profiling reveals differential expression of pathways directly and indirectly influencing biofilm formation in Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) is a frequent cause of foodborne disease outbreaks. O157 encodes virulence factors for colonizing and survival in reservoir animals and the environment. For example, genetic factors promoting biofilm formation are linked to survival of O157 in and outsid...

  1. SOS-Independent Induction of dinB Transcription by β-Lactam-Mediated Inhibition of Cell Wall Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Capilla, Tatiana; Baquero, María-Rosario; Gómez-Gómez, José-María; Ionel, Alina; Martín, Soledad; Blázquez, Jesús

    2005-01-01

    Transcription of the dinB gene, encoding DNA polymerase IV, is induced by the inhibition of cell wall synthesis at different levels. Using the β-lactam antibiotic ceftazidime, a PBP3 inhibitor, as a model, we have shown that this induction is independent of the LexA/RecA regulatory system. Induction of dinB transcription mediated by ceftazidime produces an increase in the reversion of a +1 Lac frameshift mutation. PMID:15687217

  2. The rpoA341 allele of Escherichia coli specifically impairs the transcription of a group of positively-regulated operons.

    PubMed

    Giffard, P M; Booth, I R

    1988-09-01

    The specificity of the transcription defect caused by the rpoA341(phs) allele has been investigated. Three apparently unlinked genetic systems have been found to be impaired in their transcription by this mutant allele of the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase. These three systems, the melAB operon, the cysA locus and the ara regulon, are apparently unrelated other than by their requirement for a regulon-specific positive regulator for the initiation of transcription. Expression of the gene for the positive regulator does not appear to be significantly affected in any of the three systems. However, mutations that render expression of the araBAD operon independent of the regulatory protein also confer insensitivity to the rpoA341 allele. The significance of these observations is discussed in the context of models of positive regulation.

  3. Substitution of a highly conserved histidine in the Escherichia coli heat shock transcription factor, sigma32, affects promoter utilization in vitro and leads to overexpression of the biofilm-associated flu protein in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kourennaia, Olga V; Dehaseth, Pieter L

    2007-12-01

    The heat shock sigma factor (sigma(32) in Escherichia coli) directs the bacterial RNA polymerase to promoters of a specific sequence to form a stable complex, competent to initiate transcription of genes whose products mitigate the effects of exposure of the cell to high temperatures. The histidine at position 107 of sigma(32) is at the homologous position of a tryptophan residue at position 433 of the main sigma factor of E. coli, sigma(70). This tryptophan is essential for the strand separation step leading to the formation of the initiation-competent RNA polymerase-promoter complex. The heat shock sigma factors of all gammaproteobacteria sequenced have a histidine at this position, while in the alpha- and deltaproteobacteria, it is a tryptophan. In vitro the alanine-for-histidine substitution at position 107 (H107A) destabilizes complexes between the GroE promoter and RNA polymerase containing sigma(32), implying that H107 plays a role in formation or maintenance of the strand-separated complex. In vivo, the H107A substitution in sigma(32) impedes recovery from heat shock (exposure to 42 degrees C), and it also leads to overexpression at lower temperatures (30 degrees C) of the Flu protein, which is associated with biofilm formation.

  4. E. Coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? E. Coli KidsHealth > For Kids > E. Coli A A A What's in this article? What ... Doctor Do? What Can Kids Do? en español E. coli What Is It? E. coli is a common ...

  5. Transcriptional control mediated by the ArcA two-component response regulator protein of Escherichia coli: characterization of DNA binding at target promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, A S; Lin, E C

    1996-01-01

    ArcA protein bearing an amino-terminal, oligohistidine extension has been purified, and its DNA binding activity has been characterized with or without prior incubation with carbamoyl phosphate. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I protection assays indicate that where the phosphorylated form of the ArcA protein (ArcA-P) is expected to act as a transcriptional repressor (e.g., of lctPRD and gltA-sdhCDAB), the effect is likely to be mediated by sequestration of cis-controlling transcriptional regulatory elements. In contrast, in the case of cydAB, for which ArcA-P is expected to function as a transcriptional activator, two discrete binding sites have been identified upstream of a known promoter, and activation from these sites is likely to be mediated by a mechanism typical of the type I class of prokaryotic transcriptional activators. An additional ArcA-P binding site has also been located downstream of the known promoter, and a distinct role for this site in the regulation of the cydAB operon during anoxic growth transitions is suggested. These results are discussed within the framework of an overall model of signaling by the Arc two-component signal transduction system in response to changes in aerobiosis. PMID:8892825

  6. Source-Related Effects of Wastewater on Transcription Factor (AhR, CAR and PXR)-Mediated Induction of Gene Expression in Cultured Rat Hepatocytes and Their Association with the Prevalence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Guruge, Keerthi S.; Yamanaka, Noriko; Sonobe, Miyuki; Fujizono, Wataru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Akiba, Masato; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Joshua, Derrick I.; Balakrishna, Keshava; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Extracts of wastewater collected from 4 sewage treatment plants (STPs) receiving effluents from different sources in South India were investigated for their levels of transcription factor-mediated gene induction in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. In addition, the relation between gene induction levels and the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) in wastewater was examined. STP-3, which treats only hospital wastewater, exhibited significantly greater induction potency of all 6 drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes examined, CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2B15, 3A1, and 3A2, whereas the wastewater at STP-1, which exclusively receives domestic sewage, showed significantly diminished levels of induction of 3 CYP genes when compared to the levels of CYP induction at STP-2, which receives mixed wastewater. Samples collected during the monsoon season showed a significantly altered gene induction capacity compared to that of samples from the pre-monsoon period. The data suggest that the toxicity of wastewater in STPs was not significantly diminished during the treatment process. The chemical-gene interaction data predicted that a vast number of chemicals present in the wastewater would stimulate the genes studied in the rat hepatocytes. The multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the prevalence of isolates resistant to cefotaxime, imipenem and streptomycin was significantly correlated with the levels of induction of at least three CYP-isozymes in STP wastewater. In addition, the resistance of isolates in treatment plants was not altered by the treatment steps, whereas the sampling season did have an impact on the resistance to specific antimicrobials. The identification of receptor-mediated gene regulation capacities offers important data not limited to the (synergistic) physiological role of chemicals in biological systems but may provide new insight into the link between the effects of known/unknown drugs and prevalence of

  7. Source-Related Effects of Wastewater on Transcription Factor (AhR, CAR and PXR)-Mediated Induction of Gene Expression in Cultured Rat Hepatocytes and Their Association with the Prevalence of Antimicrobial-Resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Guruge, Keerthi S; Yamanaka, Noriko; Sonobe, Miyuki; Fujizono, Wataru; Yoshioka, Miyako; Akiba, Masato; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Joshua, Derrick I; Balakrishna, Keshava; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Extracts of wastewater collected from 4 sewage treatment plants (STPs) receiving effluents from different sources in South India were investigated for their levels of transcription factor-mediated gene induction in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. In addition, the relation between gene induction levels and the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) in wastewater was examined. STP-3, which treats only hospital wastewater, exhibited significantly greater induction potency of all 6 drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes examined, CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2B15, 3A1, and 3A2, whereas the wastewater at STP-1, which exclusively receives domestic sewage, showed significantly diminished levels of induction of 3 CYP genes when compared to the levels of CYP induction at STP-2, which receives mixed wastewater. Samples collected during the monsoon season showed a significantly altered gene induction capacity compared to that of samples from the pre-monsoon period. The data suggest that the toxicity of wastewater in STPs was not significantly diminished during the treatment process. The chemical-gene interaction data predicted that a vast number of chemicals present in the wastewater would stimulate the genes studied in the rat hepatocytes. The multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the prevalence of isolates resistant to cefotaxime, imipenem and streptomycin was significantly correlated with the levels of induction of at least three CYP-isozymes in STP wastewater. In addition, the resistance of isolates in treatment plants was not altered by the treatment steps, whereas the sampling season did have an impact on the resistance to specific antimicrobials. The identification of receptor-mediated gene regulation capacities offers important data not limited to the (synergistic) physiological role of chemicals in biological systems but may provide new insight into the link between the effects of known/unknown drugs and prevalence of

  8. Integrated stress response of Escherichia coli to methylglyoxal: transcriptional readthrough from the nemRA operon enhances protection through increased expression of glyoxalase I.

    PubMed

    Ozyamak, Ertan; de Almeida, Camila; de Moura, Alessandro P S; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian R

    2013-06-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) elicits activation of K(+) efflux systems to protect cells against the toxicity of the electrophile. ChIP-chip targeting RNA polymerase, supported by a range of other biochemical measurements and mutant creation, was used to identify genes transcribed in response to MG and which complement this rapid response. The SOS DNA repair regulon is induced at cytotoxic levels of MG, even when exposure to MG is transient. Glyoxalase I alone among the core MG protective systems is induced in response to MG exposure. Increased expression is an indirect consequence of induction of the upstream nemRA operon, encoding an enzyme system that itself does not contribute to MG detoxification. Moreover, this induction, via nemRA only occurs when cells are exposed to growth inhibitory concentrations of MG. We show that the kdpFABCDE genes are induced and that this expression occurs as a result of depletion of cytoplasmic K(+) consequent upon activation of the KefGB K(+) efflux system. Finally, our analysis suggests that the transcriptional changes in response to MG are a culmination of the damage to DNA and proteins, but that some integrate specific functions, such as DNA repair, to augment the allosteric activation of the main protective system, KefGB.

  9. Integrated stress response of Escherichia coli to methylglyoxal: transcriptional readthrough from the nemRA operon enhances protection through increased expression of glyoxalase I

    PubMed Central

    Ozyamak, Ertan; Almeida, Camila; de Moura, Alessandro P S; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian R

    2013-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) elicits activation of K+ efflux systems to protect cells against the toxicity of the electrophile. ChIP-chip targeting RNA polymerase, supported by a range of other biochemical measurements and mutant creation, was used to identify genes transcribed in response to MG and which complement this rapid response. The SOS DNA repair regulon is induced at cytotoxic levels of MG, even when exposure to MG is transient. Glyoxalase I alone among the core MG protective systems is induced in response to MG exposure. Increased expression is an indirect consequence of induction of the upstream nemRA operon, encoding an enzyme system that itself does not contribute to MG detoxification. Moreover, this induction, via nemRA only occurs when cells are exposed to growth inhibitory concentrations of MG. We show that the kdpFABCDE genes are induced and that this expression occurs as a result of depletion of cytoplasmic K+ consequent upon activation of the KefGB K+ efflux system. Finally, our analysis suggests that the transcriptional changes in response to MG are a culmination of the damage to DNA and proteins, but that some integrate specific functions, such as DNA repair, to augment the allosteric activation of the main protective system, KefGB. PMID:23646895

  10. Ligand binding specificity of RutR, a member of the TetR family of transcription regulators in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen Le Minh, Phu; de Cima, Sergio; Bervoets, Indra; Maes, Dominique; Rubio, Vicente; Charlier, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    RutR is a member of the large family of TetR transcriptional regulators in Escherichiacoli. It was originally discovered as the regulator of the rutABCDEFG operon encoding a novel pathway for pyrimidine utilization, but its highest affinity target is the control region of the carAB operon, encoding carbamoylphosphate synthase. Unlike most other TetR-like regulators, RutR exerts both positive and negative effects on promoter activity. Furthermore, RutR exhibits a very narrow ligand binding specificity, unlike the broad effector specificity that characterizes some of the well-studied multidrug resistance regulators of the family. Here we focus on ligand binding and ligand specificity of RutR. We construct single alanine substitution mutants of amino acid residues of the ligand-binding pocket, study their effect on in vitro DNA binding in absence and presence of potential ligands, and analyse their effect on positive regulation of the carP1 promoter and negative autoregulation in vivo. Although RutR structures have been determined previously, they were deposited in the Protein Data Bank without accompanying publications. All of them have uracil bound in the effector-binding site, representing the inactive form of the regulator. We determined the crystal structure of an unliganded mutant RutR protein and provide a structural basis for the use of uracil as sole effector molecule and the exclusion of the very similar thymine from the ligand-binding pocket. PMID:25685666

  11. Genome-wide screen identifies Escherichia coli TCA cycle-related mutants with extended chronological lifespan dependent on acetate metabolism and the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ArcA

    PubMed Central

    Gonidakis, Stavros; Finkel, Steven E.; Longo, Valter D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Single-gene mutants with extended lifespan have been described in several model organisms. We performed a genome-wide screen for long-lived mutants in Escherichia coli which revealed strains lacking TCA cycle-related genes that exhibit longer stationary phase survival and increased resistance to heat stress compared to wild-type. Extended lifespan in the sdhA mutant, lacking subunit A of succinate dehydrogenase, is associated with reduced production of superoxide and increased stress resistance. On the other hand, the longer lifespan of the lipoic acid synthase mutant (lipA) is associated with reduced oxygen consumption and requires the acetate-producing enzyme pyruvate oxidase, as well as acetyl-CoA synthetase, the enzyme that converts extracellular acetate to acetyl-CoA. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ArcA, acting independently of acetate metabolism, is also required for maximum lifespan extension in the lipA and lpdA mutants, indicating that these mutations promote entry into a mode normally associated with a low-oxygen environment. Since analogous changes from respiration to fermentation have been observed in long-lived Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans strains, such metabolic alterations may represent an evolutionarily conserved strategy to extend lifespan. PMID:20707865

  12. Galangin suppresses the proliferation of β-catenin response transcription-positive cancer cells by promoting adenomatous polyposis coli/Axin/glycogen synthase kinase-3β-independent β-catenin degradation.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Jungsug; Oh, Jingyo; Cho, Munju; Bae, Soo Kyung; Song, Im-Sook; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Jeong, Yongsu; Kim, Dong-Eun; Chung, Young-Hwa; Oh, Sangtaek

    2011-06-01

    Galangin is a naturally occurring bioflavonoid with anticancer activity against certain human cancers, yet little is known about its mechanism of action. Here, we used a chemical biology approach to reveal that galangin suppresses β-catenin response transcription (CRT), which is aberrantly up-regulated in colorectal and liver cancers, by promoting the degradation of intracellular β-catenin. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activity or mutation of the GSK-3β-targeted sequence from β-catenin was unable to abrogate the galangin-mediated degradation of β-catenin. In addition, galangin down-regulated the intracellular β-catenin levels in cancer cells with inactivating mutations of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin, which are components of the β-catenin destruction complex. Galangin repressed the expression of β-catenin/T-cell factor-dependent genes, such as cyclin D1 and c-myc, and thus inhibited the proliferation of CRT-positive cancer cells. Structure-activity data indicated that the major structural requirements for galangin-mediated β-catenin degradation are hydroxyl groups at positions 3, 5, and 7. Our findings suggest that galangin exerts its anticancer activity by promoting APC/Axin/GSK-3β-independent proteasomal degradation of β-catenin.

  13. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  14. E. Coli

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Your Teeth El cuidado de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray E. Coli KidsHealth > For Kids > E. Coli Print A A A What's in ... recalls affecting contaminated vegetables or other products. But kids can ... inside. Don't swallow lake, ocean, or pool water. If the water contains ...

  15. Structure of the Escherichia coli Antitoxin MqsA (YgiT/b3021) Bound to Its Gene Promoter Reveals Extensive Domain Rearrangements and the Specificity of Transcriptional Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    B Brown; T Wood; W Peti; R Page

    2011-12-31

    Bacterial cultures, especially biofilms, produce a small number of persister cells, a genetically identical subpopulation of wild type cells that are metabolically dormant, exhibit multidrug tolerance, and are highly enriched in bacterial toxins. The gene most highly up-regulated in Escherichia coli persisters is mqsR, a ribonuclease toxin that, along with mqsA, forms a novel toxin-antitoxin (TA) system. Like all known TA systems, both the MqsR-MqsA complex and MqsA alone regulate their own transcription. Despite the importance of TA systems in persistence and biofilms, very little is known about how TA modules, and antitoxins in particular, bind and recognize DNA at a molecular level. Here, we report the crystal structure of MqsA bound to a 26-bp fragment from the mqsRA promoter. We show that MqsA binds DNA predominantly via its C-terminal helix-turn-helix domain, with direct binding of recognition helix residues Asn{sup 97} and Arg{sup 010} to the DNA major groove. Unexpectedly, the structure also revealed that the MqsA N-terminal domain interacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. This results in a more than 105{sup o} rotation of the N-terminal domains between the free and complexed states, an unprecedented rearrangement for an antitoxin. The structure also shows that MqsA bends the DNA by more than 55{sup o} in order to achieve symmetrical binding. Finally, using a combination of biochemical and NMR studies, we show that the DNA sequence specificity of MqsA is mediated by direct readout.

  16. Na+-induced transcription of nhaA, which encodes an Na+/H+ antiporter in Escherichia coli, is positively regulated by nhaR and affected by hns.

    PubMed Central

    Dover, N; Higgins, C F; Carmel, O; Rimon, A; Pinner, E; Padan, E

    1996-01-01

    nhaA encodes an Na+/H+ antiporter in Escherichia coli which is essential for adaptation to high salinity and alkaline pH in the presence of Na+. We used Northern (RNA) analysis to measure directly the cellular levels of nhaA mRNA. NhaR belongs to the LysR family of regulatory proteins. Consistent with our previous data with an nhaA'-'lacZ fusion, NhaR was found to be a positive regulator and Na+ was found to be a specific inducer of nhaA transcription. In the nhaA'-'lacZ fusion, maximal induction was observed at alkaline pH. In contrast, in the nhaA+ strain both the level of nhaA expression and the induction ratio were lower at alkaline pH. This difference may be due to the activity of NhaA in the wild-type strain as NhaA efficiently excreted Na+ at alkaline pH and reduced the intracellular concentration of Na+, the signal for induction. We also showed that although the global regulator rpoS was not involved in nhaA regulation, the global regulator hns played a role. Thus, the expression of nhaA'-'lacZ was derepressed in strains bearing hns mutations and transformation with a low-copy-number plasmid carrying hns repressed expression and restored Na+ induction. The derepression in hns strains was nhaR independent. Most interestingly, multicopy nhaR, which in an hns+ background acted only as an Na+-dependent positive regulator, acted as a repressor in an hns strain in the absence of Na+ but was activated in the presence of the ion. Hence, an interplay between nhaR and hns in the regulation of nhaA was suggested. PMID:8932307

  17. E. Coli Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is E. coli?E. coli is short for Escherichia coli -- bacteria (germs) that cause severe cramps and diarrhea. ... staff Tags: bacterial endotoxin, bloody diarrhea, enterohemorrhagic infection, Escherichia coli, food-borne illness, gastroenteritis, hemorrhagic colitis, HUS, thrombotic ...

  18. E. Coli and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... care provider. What is E. coli? E. coli (Escherichia coli) is a bacterium that lives in your colon ( ... 10):1411-1413. Jones B, et al. 2004. Escherichia coli: a growing problem in early onset neonatal sepsis. ...

  19. Escherichia Coli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  20. Weak Electromagnetic Field Effects on Gene Expression in E. coli.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and/or translation were altered by MFs. A cell-free E . coli system was used to determine whether or not MFs directly affect the translational or...inability to distinguish differences in transcription and translation in E . coli may be related to the coupled nature of these processes in the bacterial system.

  1. Isolation and characterization of transcription fidelity mutants.

    PubMed

    Strathern, Jeffrey N; Jin, Ding Jun; Court, Donald L; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2012-07-01

    Accurate transcription is an essential step in maintaining genetic information. Error-prone transcription has been proposed to contribute to cancer, aging, adaptive mutagenesis, and mutagenic evolution of retroviruses and retrotransposons. The mechanisms controlling transcription fidelity and the biological consequences of transcription errors are poorly understood. Because of the transient nature of mRNAs and the lack of reliable experimental systems, the identification and characterization of defects that increase transcription errors have been particularly challenging. In this review we describe novel genetic screens for the isolation of fidelity mutants in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli RNA polymerases. We obtained and characterized two distinct classes of mutants altering NTP misincorporation and transcription slippage both in vivo and in vitro. Our study not only validates the genetic schemes for the isolation of RNA polymerase mutants that alter fidelity, but also sheds light on the mechanism of transcription accuracy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chromatin in time and space.

  2. The 216-bp marB gene of the marRAB operon in Escherichia coli encodes a periplasmic protein which reduces the transcription rate of marA.

    PubMed

    Vinué, Laura; McMurry, Laura M; Levy, Stuart B

    2013-08-01

    The marRAB operon is conserved in seven genera of enteric bacteria (Escherichia, Shigella, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Salmonella, Cronobacter, and Citrobacter). MarA is a transcriptional regulator affecting many genes involved in resistance to stresses, and MarR is an autorepressor of the operon, but a role for the marB gene has been unclear. A recent work reported that deletion of marB causes resistance to certain stresses and increases the amount of marA transcript. We show here that the small (216 bp) marB gene encodes a protein, not an sRNA, because two different stop codons within the predicted open reading frame of marB prevented plasmid-borne marB from complementing ΔmarB::Kan. The ΔmarB::Kan mutation did not increase the stability of the marA transcript, suggesting that MarB does not destabilize the marA transcript but rather reduces its rate of transcription. Placing the putative signal sequence of MarB upstream of signal-sequence-less alkaline phosphatase guided the phosphatase to its normal periplasmic location. We conclude that MarB is a small periplasmic protein that represses the marRAB promoter by an indirect mechanism, possibly involving a signal to one of the cytoplasmic regulators of that promoter.

  3. Exonuclease IX of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Shafritz, K M; Sandigursky, M; Franklin, W A

    1998-01-01

    The bacteria Escherichia coli contains several exonucleases acting on both double- and single-stranded DNA and in both a 5'-->3' and 3'-->5' direction. These enzymes are involved in replicative, repair and recombination functions. We have identified a new exonuclease found in E.coli, termed exonuclease IX, that acts preferentially on single-stranded DNA as a 3'-->5' exonuclease and also functions as a 3'-phosphodiesterase on DNA containing 3'-incised apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites to remove the product trans -4-hydroxy-2-pentenal 5-phosphate. The enzyme showed essentially no activity as a deoxyribophosphodiesterase acting on 5'-incised AP sites. The activity was isolated as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein from a sequence of the E.coli genome that was 60% identical to a 260 bp region of the small fragment of the DNA polymerase I gene. The protein has a molecular weight of 28 kDa and is free of AP endonuclease and phosphatase activities. Exonuclease IX is expressed in E.coli , as demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR, and it may function in the DNA base excision repair and other pathways. PMID:9592142

  4. Thermoregulation of Shigella and Escherichia coli EIEC pathogenicity. A temperature-dependent structural transition of DNA modulates accessibility of virF promoter to transcriptional repressor H-NS.

    PubMed Central

    Falconi, M; Colonna, B; Prosseda, G; Micheli, G; Gualerzi, C O

    1998-01-01

    The expression of plasmid-borne virF of Shigella encoding a transcriptional regulator of the AraC family, is required to initiate a cascade of events resulting in activation of several operons encoding invasion functions. H-NS, one of the main nucleoid-associated proteins, controls the temperature-dependent expression of the virulence genes by repressing the in vivo transcription of virF only below a critical temperature (approximately 32 degrees C). This temperature-dependent transcriptional regulation has been reproduced in vitro and the targets of H-NS on the virF promoter were identified as two sites centred around -250 and -1 separated by an intrinsic DNA curvature. H-NS bound cooperatively to these two sites below 32 degrees C, but not at 37 degrees C. DNA supercoiling within the virF promoter region did not influence H-NS binding but was necessary for the H-NS-mediated transcriptional repression. Electrophoretic analysis between 4 and 60 degrees C showed that the virF promoter fragment, comprising the two H-NS sites, undergoes a specific and temperature-dependent conformational transition at approximately 32 degrees C. Our results suggest that this modification of the DNA target may modulate a cooperative interaction between H-NS molecules bound at two distant sites in the virF promoter region and thus represents the physical basis for the H-NS-dependent thermoregulation of virulence gene expression. PMID:9843508

  5. An improved vector system for constructing transcriptional lacZ fusions: analysis of regulation of the dnaA, dnaN, recF and gyrB genes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Macián, F; Pérez-Roger, I; Armengod, M E

    1994-07-22

    We describe a new vector system for the in vitro construction of transcriptional fusions to the lacZ gene, which is expressed from the translational start signals of galK. The galK ribosome-binding site (RBS) and its natural preceding region ensure a constant efficiency for lacZ translation and, thus, the beta-galactosidase (beta Gal) production of a given fusion is directly proportional to the in vivo transcriptional activity of the inserted DNA fragment. Single-copy lambda prophage versions of multicopy constructs can be made by in vivo recombination. We use this system to compare the transcriptional activities of the promoters present in the dnaA-dnaN-recF-gyrB cluster. The order of strength of these promoters is gyrB > dnaA > recF > dnaN. It is assumed that gyrB belongs to the dnaA-dnaN-recF operon, because the short recF-gyrB intercistronic region does not contain a terminator. By using this new vector system, we have detected strong termination signals within recF that are functional even when recF is translated at its normal rate. The low level of transcription coming to the end of recF, and the highest activity of the gyrB promoter, as well as results obtained with several gyrB::lacZ translational fusions, support the conclusion that gyrB is predominantly expressed from its own promoter under standard growth conditions. Finally, we have found that transcription from the dnaA promoters is constant at different growth rates. This supports the idea that autoregulation of the dnaA gene is responsible for the coupling of the DnaA protein synthesis to cell mass increase, and accumulation of DnaA protein governs the initiation of chromosome replication.

  6. Synthetic growth phenotypes of E.coli lacking ppGpp and transketolase A (tktA) are due to ppGpp-mediated transcriptional regulation of tktB

    PubMed Central

    Harinarayanan, Rajendran; Murphy, Helen; Cashel, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Summary Many physiological adjustments to nutrient changes involve ppGpp. Recent attempts to deduce ppGpp regulatory effects using proteomics or gene profiling can rigorously identify proteins or transcripts, but the functional significance is often unclear. Using a random screen for synthetic lethals we found a ppGpp-dependent functional pathway that operates through transketolase-B (TktB), and which is “buffered” in wildtype strain by the presence of an isozyme, transketolase-A (TktA). Transketolase activity is required in cells to make erythrose-4-phosphate, a precursor of aromatic amino acids and vitamins. By studying tktB-dependent nutritional requirements as well as measuring activities using PtalA-tktB′-lacZ transcriptional reporter fusion we show positive transcriptional regulation of the talA-tktB operon by ppGpp. Our results show the existence of RpoS-dependent and independent modes of positive regulation by ppGpp. Both routes of activation are magnified by elevating ppGpp levels with a spoT mutation (spoT-R39A) defective in hydrolase but not synthetase activity or with the stringent suppressor mutations rpoB-A532Δ or rpoB-T563P in the absence of ppGpp. PMID:18532980

  7. The Escherichia coli metallo-regulator RcnR represses rcnA and rcnR transcription through binding on a shared operator site: Insights into regulatory specificity towards nickel and cobalt.

    PubMed

    Blaha, Didier; Arous, Safia; Blériot, Camille; Dorel, Corinne; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Rodrigue, Agnès

    2011-03-01

    RcnA is an efflux pump responsible for Ni and Co detoxification in Escherichia coli. The expression of rcnA is induced by Ni and Co via the metallo-regulator RcnR. In the present work, the functioning of the promoter-operator region of rcnR and rcnA was investigated using primer extension and DNAse I footprinting experiments. We show that the promoters of rcnR and rcnA are convergent and that apo-RcnR binds on symmetrically located sequences in this intergenic region. Moreover, RcnR DNA binding is specifically modulated by one Ni or Co equivalent and not by other metals. In addition to rcnA, RcnR controls expression of its own gene in response to Ni and Co, but the two genes are differentially expressed.

  8. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nataro, James P.; Kaper, James B.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the predominant nonpathogenic facultative flora of the human intestine. Some E. coli strains, however, have developed the ability to cause disease of the gastrointestinal, urinary, or central nervous system in even the most robust human hosts. Diarrheagenic strains of E. coli can be divided into at least six different categories with corresponding distinct pathogenic schemes. Taken together, these organisms probably represent the most common cause of pediatric diarrhea worldwide. Several distinct clinical syndromes accompany infection with diarrheagenic E. coli categories, including traveler’s diarrhea (enterotoxigenic E. coli), hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (enterohemorrhagic E. coli), persistent diarrhea (enteroaggregative E. coli), and watery diarrhea of infants (enteropathogenic E. coli). This review discusses the current level of understanding of the pathogenesis of the diarrheagenic E. coli strains and describes how their pathogenic schemes underlie the clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and epidemiologic investigation of these important pathogens. PMID:9457432

  9. E. Coli Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults with weak immune systems. You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. Symptoms of ... pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 ...

  10. Molecular mechanism of promoter selection in gene transcription. I. Development of a rapid mixing-photocrosslinking technique to study the kinetics of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase binding to T7 DNA.

    PubMed

    Park, C S; Hillel, Z; Wu, C W

    1982-06-25

    A combined rapid mixing-photocrosslinking technique has been developed to investigate the kinetics of the interaction between Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and T7 DNA. The reactants were rapidly mixed in a modified Durrum stopped-flow apparatus, and the intermediates formed at different stages of the binding process were "frozen" by photocrosslinking with a UV light pulse of 10-mus duration at various times after mixing. The results indicate that the initial binding between RNA polymerase and T7 DNA is a diffusion-controlled reaction. Furthermore, the extents of initial contracts with DNA made with the beta, beta', and sigma subunits of RNA polymerase are roughly proportional to the sizes of these subunits, suggesting that complex formation occurs through random collision between the two reactants. After the initial complex formation, the rate of transfer of polymerase between individual DNA molecules is slow, implying that the polymerase molecules are undergoing predominantly intramolecular transfer during the promoter search. From the kinetic studies of subunit-DNA contacts during RNA polymerase binding to T7 DNA, it can be inferred that the beta, beta', and sigma subunits are directly participating in the promoter search process.

  11. A new way to start: nanoRNA-mediated priming of transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Bryce E

    2012-01-01

    A recent study provides evidence that RNA polymerase uses 2- to ~4-nt RNAs, species termed "nanoRNAs," to prime transcription initiation in Escherichia coli. Priming of transcription initiation with nanoRNAs represents a previously undocumented component of transcription start site selection and gene expression.

  12. New discoveries linking transcription to DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan E; Walker, Graham C

    2011-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the transcription elongation factor NusA is associated with all elongating RNA polymerases where it functions in transcription termination and antitermination. Here, we review our recent results implicating NusA in the recruitment of DNA repair and damage tolerance mechanisms to sites of stalled transcription complexes.

  13. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Transcription Termination by the Rho Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2012-01-01

    Transcription termination comes in two forms in "E. coli" cells. Rho-dependent termination requires the binding of a termination protein called Rho factor to the transcriptional machinery at the terminator region, whereas Rho-independent termination is achieved by conformational changes in the transcript itself. This article presents a test…

  14. Sequence requirements for Lon-dependent degradation of the Escherichia coli transcription activator SoxS: identification of the SoxS residues critical to proteolysis and specific inhibition of in vitro degradation by a peptide comprised of the N-terminal 21 amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ishita M; Wolf, Richard E

    2006-03-31

    When Escherichia coli encounter redox-cycling compounds that endogenously generate superoxide, the cell's defense response is initiated by the de novo synthesis of SoxS, which then activates transcription of the genes of the SoxRS regulon. Recently, we showed that after the oxidative stress is relieved, the SoxRS system resets by an active process wherein SoxS synthesis ceases and the intrinsically unstable SoxS protein is rapidly degraded, primarily by Lon protease. Here, we use deletion mutants and a library of alanine-stretch mutants of the entire protein to identify the SoxS features responsible for Lon-dependent proteolysis in vivo. We found that the 17 amino acid residues at the SoxS N terminus play the primary role in protease recognition and that the addition of the N-terminal 21 residues of SoxS to the otherwise stable green fluorescent protein is sufficient to signal the chimera for Lon-dependent degradation. With a minimal in vitro degradation system, we confirm the intrinsic instability of SoxS and the sequence requirements for Lon-dependent degradation. Lastly, we demonstrate that the addition of a peptide comprised of the 21 N-terminal amino acid residues of SoxS is able to inhibit specifically the in vitro proteolysis of SoxS.

  15. Dialogue between E. coli free radical pathways and the mitochondria of C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Govindan, J Amaranath; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Zhang, Xinrui; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Ruvkun, Gary

    2015-10-06

    The microbial world presents a complex palette of opportunities and dangers to animals, which have developed surveillance and response strategies to hints of microbial intent. We show here that the mitochondrial homeostatic response pathway of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to Escherichia coli mutations that activate free radical detoxification pathways. Activation of C. elegans mitochondrial responses could be suppressed by additional mutations in E. coli, suggesting that C. elegans responds to products of E. coli to anticipate challenges to its mitochondrion. Out of 50 C. elegans gene inactivations known to mediate mitochondrial defense, we found that 7 genes were required for C. elegans response to a free radical producing E. coli mutant, including the bZip transcription factor atfs-1 (activating transcription factor associated with stress). An atfs-1 loss-of-function mutant was partially resistant to the effects of free radical-producing E. coli mutant, but a constitutively active atfs-1 mutant growing on wild-type E. coli inappropriately activated the pattern of mitochondrial responses normally induced by an E. coli free radical pathway mutant. Carbonylated proteins from free radical-producing E. coli mutant may directly activate the ATFS-1/bZIP transcription factor to induce mitochondrial stress response: feeding C. elegans with H2O2-treated E. coli induces the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, and inhibition of a gut peptide transporter partially suppressed C. elegans response to free radical damaged E. coli.

  16. Dialogue between E. coli free radical pathways and the mitochondria of C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, J. Amaranath; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Zhang, Xinrui; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Ruvkun, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The microbial world presents a complex palette of opportunities and dangers to animals, which have developed surveillance and response strategies to hints of microbial intent. We show here that the mitochondrial homeostatic response pathway of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to Escherichia coli mutations that activate free radical detoxification pathways. Activation of C. elegans mitochondrial responses could be suppressed by additional mutations in E. coli, suggesting that C. elegans responds to products of E. coli to anticipate challenges to its mitochondrion. Out of 50 C. elegans gene inactivations known to mediate mitochondrial defense, we found that 7 genes were required for C. elegans response to a free radical producing E. coli mutant, including the bZip transcription factor atfs-1 (activating transcription factor associated with stress). An atfs-1 loss-of-function mutant was partially resistant to the effects of free radical-producing E. coli mutant, but a constitutively active atfs-1 mutant growing on wild-type E. coli inappropriately activated the pattern of mitochondrial responses normally induced by an E. coli free radical pathway mutant. Carbonylated proteins from free radical-producing E. coli mutant may directly activate the ATFS-1/bZIP transcription factor to induce mitochondrial stress response: feeding C. elegans with H2O2-treated E. coli induces the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, and inhibition of a gut peptide transporter partially suppressed C. elegans response to free radical damaged E. coli. PMID:26392561

  17. Transcriptional firing helps to drive NETosis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Meraj A.; Palaniyar, Nades

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are short-lived innate immune cells. These cells respond quickly to stimuli, and die within minutes to hours; the relevance of DNA transcription in dying neutrophils remains an enigma for several decades. Here we show that the transcriptional activity reflects the degree of DNA decondensation occurring in both NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox)-dependent and Nox-independent neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation or NETosis. Transcriptomics analyses show that transcription starts at multiple loci in all chromosomes earlier in the rapid Nox-independent NETosis (induced by calcium ionophore A23187) than Nox-dependent NETosis (induced by PMA). NETosis-specific kinase cascades differentially activate transcription of different sets of genes. Inhibitors of transcription, but not translation, suppress both types of NETosis. In particular, promoter melting step is important to drive NETosis (induced by PMA, E. coli LPS, A23187, Streptomyces conglobatus ionomycin). Extensive citrullination of histones in multiple loci occurs only during calcium-mediated NETosis, suggesting that citrullination of histone contributes to the rapid DNA decondensation seen in Nox-independent NETosis. Furthermore, blocking transcription suppresses both types of NETosis, without affecting the reactive oxygen species production that is necessary for antimicrobial functions. Therefore, we assign a new function for transcription in neutrophils: Transcriptional firing, regulated by NETosis-specific kinases, helps to drive NETosis. PMID:28176807

  18. Escherichia coli biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Beloin, Christophe; Roux, Agnès; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a predominant species among facultative anaerobic bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract. Both its frequent community lifestyle and the availability of a wide array of genetic tools contributed to establish E. coli as a relevant model organism for the study of surface colonization. Several key factors, including different extracellular appendages, are implicated in E. coli surface colonization and their expression and activity are finely regulated, both in space and time, to ensure productive events leading to mature biofilm formation. This chapter will present known molecular mechanisms underlying biofilm development in both commensal and pathogenic E. coli. PMID:18453280

  19. PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species which inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of man and warm-blooded animals. Because of the ubiquity of this bacterium in the intestinal flora, it serves as an important indicator organism of fecal contamination. E. coli, aside from serving a...

  20. Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli, a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is a part of the normal flora of the intestinal tract of humans and a variety of animals. E. coli strains are classified on the basis of antigenic differences in two surface components (serotyping), the somatic antigen (O) of the lipopoly...

  1. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Tânia A T; Elias, Waldir P; Scaletsky, Isabel C A; Guth, Beatriz E C; Rodrigues, Juliana F; Piazza, Roxane M F; Ferreira, Luís C S; Martinez, Marina B

    2016-12-01

    Most Escherichia coli strains live harmlessly in the intestines and rarely cause disease in healthy individuals. Nonetheless, a number of pathogenic strains can cause diarrhea or extraintestinal diseases both in healthy and immunocompromised individuals. Diarrheal illnesses are a severe public health problem and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and young children, especially in developing countries. E. coli strains that cause diarrhea have evolved by acquiring, through horizontal gene transfer, a particular set of characteristics that have successfully persisted in the host. According to the group of virulence determinants acquired, specific combinations were formed determining the currently known E. coli pathotypes, which are collectively known as diarrheagenic E. coli. In this review, we have gathered information on current definitions, serotypes, lineages, virulence mechanisms, epidemiology, and diagnosis of the major diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes.

  2. Comparative studies of transcriptional regulation mechanisms in a group of eight gamma-proteobacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Vladimir; González, Abel D; Vasconcelos, Ana T; Huerta, Araceli M; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2005-11-18

    Experimental data on the Escherichia coli transcriptional regulation has enabled the construction of statistical models to predict new regulatory elements within its genome. Far less is known about the transcriptional regulatory elements in other gamma-proteobacteria with sequenced genomes, so it is of great interest to conduct comparative genomic studies oriented to extracting biologically relevant information about transcriptional regulation in these less studied organisms using the knowledge from E. coli. In this work, we use the information stored in the TRACTOR_DB database to conduct a comparative study on the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in eight gamma-proteobacteria and 38 regulons. We assess the conservation of transcription factors binding specificity across all the eight genomes and show a correlation between the conservation of a regulatory site and the structure of the transcription unit it regulates. We also find a marked conservation of site-promoter distances across the eight organisms and a correspondence of the statistical significance of co-occurrence of pairs of transcription factor binding sites in the regulatory regions, which is probably related to a conserved architecture of higher-order regulatory complexes in the organisms studied. The results obtained in this study using the information on transcriptional regulation in E. coli enable us to conclude that not only transcription factor-binding sites are conserved across related species but also several of the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms previously identified in E. coli.

  3. Transcription termination maintains chromosome integrity.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Robert S; Gottesman, Max E

    2011-01-11

    DNA replication fork movement is impeded by collisions with transcription elongation complexes (TEC). We propose that a critical function of transcription termination factors is to prevent TEC from blocking DNA replication and inducing replication fork arrest, one consequence of which is DNA double-strand breaks. We show that inhibition of Rho-dependent transcription termination by bicyclomycin in Escherichia coli induced double-strand breaks. Cells deleted for Rho-cofactors nusA and nusG were hypersensitive to bicyclomycin, and had extensive chromosome fragmentation even in the absence of the drug. An RNA polymerase mutation that destabilizes TEC (rpoB*35) increased bicyclomycin resistance >40-fold. Double-strand break formation depended on DNA replication, and can be explained by replication fork collapse. Deleting recombination genes required for replication fork repair (recB and ruvC) increased sensitivity to bicyclomycin, as did loss of the replication fork reloading helicases rep and priA. We propose that Rho responds to a translocating replisome by releasing obstructing TEC.

  4. Power graph compression reveals dominant relationships in genetic transcription networks.

    PubMed

    Ahnert, Sebastian E

    2013-11-01

    We introduce a framework for the discovery of dominant relationship patterns in transcription networks, by compressing the network into a power graph with overlapping power nodes. Our application of this approach to the transcription networks of S. cerevisiae and E. coli, paired with GO term enrichment analysis, provides a highly informative overview of the most prominent relationships in the gene regulatory networks of these two organisms.

  5. Effects of Kasugamycin on the Translatome of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Christian; Lehr, Matthias; Zerulla, Karolin; Ludwig, Petra; Schweitzer, Jens; Polen, Tino; Wendisch, Volker F.; Soppa, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    It is long known that Kasugamycin inhibits translation of canonical transcripts containing a 5’-UTR with a Shine Dalgarno (SD) motif, but not that of leaderless transcripts. To gain a global overview of the influence of Kasugamycin on translation efficiencies, the changes of the translatome of Escherichia coli induced by a 10 minutes Kasugamycin treatment were quantified. The effect of Kasugamycin differed widely, 102 transcripts were at least twofold more sensitive to Kasugamycin than average, and 137 transcripts were at least twofold more resistant, and there was a more than 100-fold difference between the most resistant and the most sensitive transcript. The 5’-ends of 19 transcripts were determined from treated and untreated cultures, but Kasugamycin resistance did neither correlate with the presence or absence of a SD motif, nor with differences in 5’-UTR lengths or GC content. RNA Structure Logos were generated for the 102 Kasugamycin-sensitive and for the 137 resistant transcripts. For both groups a short Shine Dalgarno (SD) motif was retrieved, but no specific motifs associated with resistance or sensitivity could be found. Notably, this was also true for the region -3 to -1 upstream of the start codon and the presence of an extended SD motif, which had been proposed to result in Kasugamycin resistance. Comparison of the translatome results with the database RegulonDB showed that the transcript with the highest resistance was leaderless, but no further leaderless transcripts were among the resistant transcripts. Unexpectedly, it was found that translational coupling might be a novel feature that is associated with Kasugamycin resistance. Taken together, Kasugamycin has a profound effect on translational efficiencies of E. coli transcripts, but the mechanism of action is different than previously described. PMID:28081129

  6. Effects of Kasugamycin on the Translatome of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lange, Christian; Lehr, Matthias; Zerulla, Karolin; Ludwig, Petra; Schweitzer, Jens; Polen, Tino; Wendisch, Volker F; Soppa, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    It is long known that Kasugamycin inhibits translation of canonical transcripts containing a 5'-UTR with a Shine Dalgarno (SD) motif, but not that of leaderless transcripts. To gain a global overview of the influence of Kasugamycin on translation efficiencies, the changes of the translatome of Escherichia coli induced by a 10 minutes Kasugamycin treatment were quantified. The effect of Kasugamycin differed widely, 102 transcripts were at least twofold more sensitive to Kasugamycin than average, and 137 transcripts were at least twofold more resistant, and there was a more than 100-fold difference between the most resistant and the most sensitive transcript. The 5'-ends of 19 transcripts were determined from treated and untreated cultures, but Kasugamycin resistance did neither correlate with the presence or absence of a SD motif, nor with differences in 5'-UTR lengths or GC content. RNA Structure Logos were generated for the 102 Kasugamycin-sensitive and for the 137 resistant transcripts. For both groups a short Shine Dalgarno (SD) motif was retrieved, but no specific motifs associated with resistance or sensitivity could be found. Notably, this was also true for the region -3 to -1 upstream of the start codon and the presence of an extended SD motif, which had been proposed to result in Kasugamycin resistance. Comparison of the translatome results with the database RegulonDB showed that the transcript with the highest resistance was leaderless, but no further leaderless transcripts were among the resistant transcripts. Unexpectedly, it was found that translational coupling might be a novel feature that is associated with Kasugamycin resistance. Taken together, Kasugamycin has a profound effect on translational efficiencies of E. coli transcripts, but the mechanism of action is different than previously described.

  7. The effect of ribosomal protein S1 from Escherichia coli and Micrococcus luteus on protein synthesis in vitro by E. coli and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Farwell, M A; Roberts, M W; Rabinowitz, J C

    1992-11-01

    We have designed a set of nine plasmids containing the Bacillus pumilis cat gene with one of three Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences (weak, strong or stronger) and one of three initiation codons (AUG, GUG or UUG). These constructions have been used to determine the effect of ribosomal protein S1, SD and initiation codon sequences and Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S1 on translation in vitro by E. coli and B. subtilis ribosomes. Translation of these nine constructions was determined with three types of ribosomes: E. coli containing ribosomal protein S1, E. coli depleted of S1, and B. subtilis which is naturally free of S1. E. coli ribosomes were able to translate all nine transcripts with variable efficiencies. B. subtilis and S1-depleted E. coli ribosomes were similar to each other and differed from non-depleted E. coli ribosomes in that they required strong or stronger SD sequences and were unable to translate any of the weak transcripts. Addition of S1 from either E. coli or Micrococcus luteus, a Gram-positive bacterium, enabled S1-depleted E. coli ribosomes to translate mRNAs with weak SD sequences but had no effect on B. subtilis ribosomes. AUG was the preferred initiation codon for all ribosome types; however, B. subtilis ribosomes showed greater tolerance for the non-AUG codons than either type of E. coli ribosome. The presence of a strong or stronger SD sequence increased the efficiency by which E. coli ribosomes could utilize non-AUG codons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Transcriptional enhancers: Transcription, function and flexibility.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Philippa; Yosefzon, Yahav; Rudnizky, Sergei; Pnueli, Lilach

    2016-01-01

    Active transcriptional enhancers are often transcribed to eRNAs, whose changing levels mirror those of the target gene mRNA. We discuss some of the reported functions of these eRNAs and their likely diversity to allow utilization of distinct cis regulatory regions to enhance transcription in diverse developmental and cellular contexts.

  9. Biophysical models of transcription in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Sandeep

    Cells constantly face environmental challenges and deal with them by changing their gene expression patterns. They make decisions regarding which genes to express and which genes not to express based on intra-cellular and environmental cues. These decisions are often made by regulating the process of transcription. While the identities of the different molecules that take part in regulating transcription have been determined for a number of different genes, their dynamics inside the cell are still poorly understood. One key feature of these regulatory dynamics is that the numbers of the bio-molecules involved is typically small, resulting in large temporal fluctuations in transcriptional outputs (mRNA and protein). In this thesis I show that measurements of the cell-to-cell variability of the distribution of transcribing RNA polymerases along a gene provide a previously unexplored method for deciphering the mechanism of its transcription in vivo. First, I propose a simple kinetic model of transcription initiation and elongation from which I calculate transcribing RNA polymerase copy-number fluctuations. I test my theory against published data obtained for yeast genes and propose a novel mechanism of transcription. Rather than transcription being initiated through a single rate-limiting step, as was previously proposed, my single-cell analysis reveals the presence of at least two rate limiting steps. Second, I compute the distribution of inter-polymerase distance distribution along a gene and propose a method for analyzing inter-polymerase distance distributions acquired in experiments. By applying this method to images of polymerases transcribing ribosomal genes in E.coli I show that one model of regulation of these genes is consistent with inter-polymerase distance data while a number of other models are not. The analytical framework described in this thesis can be used to extract quantitative information about the dynamics of transcription from single

  10. Comprehensive Mapping of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Devon M.; Bonocora, Richard P.; Wade, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellar synthesis is a highly regulated process in all motile bacteria. In Escherichia coli and related species, the transcription factor FlhDC is the master regulator of a multi-tiered transcription network. FlhDC activates transcription of a number of genes, including some flagellar genes and the gene encoding the alternative Sigma factor FliA. Genes whose expression is required late in flagellar assembly are primarily transcribed by FliA, imparting temporal regulation of transcription and coupling expression to flagellar assembly. In this study, we use ChIP-seq and RNA-seq to comprehensively map the E. coli FlhDC and FliA regulons. We define a surprisingly restricted FlhDC regulon, including two novel regulated targets and two binding sites not associated with detectable regulation of surrounding genes. In contrast, we greatly expand the known FliA regulon. Surprisingly, 30 of the 52 FliA binding sites are located inside genes. Two of these intragenic promoters are associated with detectable noncoding RNAs, while the others either produce highly unstable RNAs or are inactive under these conditions. Together, our data redefine the E. coli flagellar regulatory network, and provide new insight into the temporal orchestration of gene expression that coordinates the flagellar assembly process. PMID:25275371

  11. Cockayne syndrome: defective repair of transcription?

    PubMed Central

    van Gool, A J; van der Horst, G T; Citterio, E; Hoeijmakers, J H

    1997-01-01

    In the past years, it has become increasingly evident that basal metabolic processes within the cell are intimately linked and influenced by one another. One such link that recently has attracted much attention is the close interplay between nucleotide excision DNA repair and transcription. This is illustrated both by the preferential repair of the transcribed strand of active genes (a phenomenon known as transcription-coupled repair, TCR) as well as by the distinct dual involvement of proteins in both processes. The mechanism of TCR in eukaryotes is still largely unknown. It was first discovered in mammals by the pioneering studies of Hanawalt and colleagues, and subsequently identified in yeast and Escherichia coli. In the latter case, one protein, the transcription repair-coupling factor, was found to accomplish this function in vitro, and a plausible model for its activity was proposed. While the E. coli model still functions as a paradigm for TCR in eukaryotes, recent observations prompt us to believe that the situation in eukaryotes is much more complex, involving dual functionality of multiple proteins. PMID:9250659

  12. Transcription in archaea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Ouzounis, C. A.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Using the sequences of all the known transcription-associated proteins from Bacteria and Eucarya (a total of 4,147), we have identified their homologous counterparts in the four complete archaeal genomes. Through extensive sequence comparisons, we establish the presence of 280 predicted transcription factors or transcription-associated proteins in the four archaeal genomes, of which 168 have homologs only in Bacteria, 51 have homologs only in Eucarya, and the remaining 61 have homologs in both phylogenetic domains. Although bacterial and eukaryotic transcription have very few factors in common, each exclusively shares a significantly greater number with the Archaea, especially the Bacteria. This last fact contrasts with the obvious close relationship between the archaeal and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms per se, and in particular, basic transcription initiation. We interpret these results to mean that the archaeal transcription system has retained more ancestral characteristics than have the transcription mechanisms in either of the other two domains.

  13. Escherichia coli Unsaturated Fatty Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Cronan, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Although the unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) synthetic pathway of Escherichia coli is the prototype of such pathways, several unresolved issues have accumulated over the years. The key players are the fabA and fabB genes. Earlier studies of fabA transcription showed that the gene was transcribed from two promoters, with one being positively regulated by the FadR protein. The other weaker promoter (which could not be mapped with the technology then available) was considered constitutive because its function was independent of FadR. However, the FabR negative regulator was recently shown to represses fabA transcription. We report that the weak promoter overlaps the FadR-dependent promoter and is regulated by FabR. This promoter is strictly conserved in all E. coli and Salmonella enterica genomes sequenced to date and is thought to provide insurance against inappropriate regulation of fabA transcription by exogenous saturated fatty acids. Also, the fabAup promoter, a mutant promoter previously isolated by selection for increased FabA activity, was shown to be a promoter created de novo by a four-base deletion within the gene located immediately upstream of fabA. Demonstration of the key UFA synthetic reaction catalyzed by FabB has been elusive, although it was known to catalyze an elongation reaction. Strains lacking FabB are UFA auxotrophs indicating that the enzyme catalyzes an essential step in UFA synthesis. Using thioesterases specific for hydrolysis of short chain acyl-ACPs, the intermediates of the UFA synthetic pathway have been followed in vivo for the first time. These experiments showed that a fabB mutant strain accumulated less cis-5-dodecenoic acid than the parental wild-type strain. These data indicate that the key reaction in UFA synthesis catalyzed by FabB is elongation of the cis-3-decenoyl-ACP produced by FabA. PMID:19679654

  14. Nucleotide sequence of an Escherichia coli chromosomal hemolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Felmlee, T; Pellett, S; Welch, R A

    1985-01-01

    We determined the DNA sequence of an 8,211-base-pair region encompassing the chromosomal hemolysin, molecularly cloned from an O4 serotype strain of Escherichia coli. All four hemolysin cistrons (transcriptional order, C, A, B, and D) were encoded on the same DNA strand, and their predicted molecular masses were, respectively, 19.7, 109.8, 79.9, and 54.6 kilodaltons. The identification of pSF4000-encoded polypeptides in E. coli minicells corroborated the assignment of the predicted polypeptides for hlyC, hlyA, and hlyD. However, based on the minicell results, two polypeptides appeared to be encoded on the hlyB region, one similar in size to the predicted molecular mass of 79.9 kilodaltons, and the other a smaller 46-kilodalton polypeptide. The four hemolysin gene displayed similar codon usage, which is atypical for E. coli. This reflects the low guanine-plus-cytosine content (40.2%) of the hemolysin DNA sequence and suggests the non-E. coli origin of the hemolysin determinant. In vitro-derived deletions of the hemolysin recombinant plasmid pSF4000 indicated that a region between 433 and 301 base pairs upstream of the putative start of hlyC is necessary for hemolysin synthesis. Based on the DNA sequence, a stem-loop transcription terminator-like structure (a 16-base-pair stem followed by seven uridylates) in the mRNA was predicted distal to the C-terminal end of hlyA. A model for the general transcriptional organization of the E. coli hemolysin determinant is presented. Images PMID:3891743

  15. Anaerobic regulation of citrate fermentation by CitAB in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Matsumoto, Fumika; Oshima, Taku; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Ogasawara, Naotake; Ishihama, Akira

    2008-11-01

    In Escherichia coli, CitB, a cognate response regulator of CitA, specifically bound to the promoter regions for mdh, citA, citC, and exuT. Transcription of these genes was induced by citrate under anaerobic conditions in a CitAB-dependent manner. Taking this together, we conclude that CitAB is the master regulatory system that activates the set of genes involved in citrate fermentation in E. coli.

  16. Transcriptional pausing at the translation start site operates as a critical checkpoint for riboswitch regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chauvier, Adrien; Picard-Jean, Frédéric; Berger-Dancause, Jean-Christophe; Bastet, Laurène; Naghdi, Mohammad Reza; Dubé, Audrey; Turcotte, Pierre; Perreault, Jonathan; Lafontaine, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    On the basis of nascent transcript sequencing, it has been postulated but never demonstrated that transcriptional pausing at translation start sites is important for gene regulation. Here we show that the Escherichia coli thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) thiC riboswitch contains a regulatory pause site in the translation initiation region that acts as a checkpoint for thiC expression. By biochemically probing nascent transcription complexes halted at defined positions, we find a narrow transcriptional window for metabolite binding, in which the downstream boundary is delimited by the checkpoint. We show that transcription complexes at the regulatory pause site favour the formation of a riboswitch intramolecular lock that strongly prevents TPP binding. In contrast, cotranscriptional metabolite binding increases RNA polymerase pausing and induces Rho-dependent transcription termination at the checkpoint. Early transcriptional pausing may provide a general mechanism, whereby transient transcriptional windows directly coordinate the sensing of environmental cues and bacterial mRNA regulation. PMID:28071751

  17. Transcription Regulation in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Alexandra M.; Walker, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    The known diversity of metabolic strategies and physiological adaptations of archaeal species to extreme environments is extraordinary. Accurate and responsive mechanisms to ensure that gene expression patterns match the needs of the cell necessitate regulatory strategies that control the activities and output of the archaeal transcription apparatus. Archaea are reliant on a single RNA polymerase for all transcription, and many of the known regulatory mechanisms employed for archaeal transcription mimic strategies also employed for eukaryotic and bacterial species. Novel mechanisms of transcription regulation have become apparent by increasingly sophisticated in vivo and in vitro investigations of archaeal species. This review emphasizes recent progress in understanding archaeal transcription regulatory mechanisms and highlights insights gained from studies of the influence of archaeal chromatin on transcription. PMID:27137495

  18. Specificity mechanisms in the control of transcription.

    PubMed

    von Hippel, P H; Rees, W A; Rippe, K; Wilson, K S

    1996-04-16

    In this overview we analyze and illustrate the principles underlying some of the specificity mechanisms that control the initiation, elongation, and termination phases of transcription. Thermodynamic mechanisms dominate in the first steps of initiation, where promoters at various levels of activation can be considered to be in competition for a limiting supply of core RNA polymerase. In the later stages of initiation, as well as in elongation and termination, the regulatory mechanisms that control specificity are largely kinetic, involving rate competition between branching reaction pathways where the outcome depends on the rates (and equilibria) of reaction and interconversion of different forms of the transcription complex. Elongation complexes are very stable at most positions along the DNA template, meaning that only RNA chain elongation (and editing) can occur at these positions. However, the stability of transcription complexes decreases abruptly when termination sequences are encountered, and here the outcome can be easily switched between elongation and termination (RNA release) by minor changes in the relative rates of these competing processes. Cis effectors, defined as sites at which regulatory proteins bind to upstream activation loci on either the DNA or the nascent RNA, play important roles in the control of both initiation and of the elongation-termination decision. Examples, drawn from studies of phage lambda N-dependent antitermination and E. coli rho-dependent termination processes, illustrate the flexibility and additivity of regulatory components within control mechanisms in transcription that involve multiple determinants. The generality of such regulatory principles are stressed.

  19. Structural insights into NusG regulating transcription elongation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    NusG is an essential transcription factor that plays multiple key regulatory roles in transcription elongation, termination and coupling translation and transcription. The core role of NusG is to enhance transcription elongation and RNA polymerase processivity. Here, we present the structure of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase complexed with NusG. The structure shows that the NusG N-terminal domain (NGN) binds at the central cleft of RNA polymerase surrounded by the β' clamp helices, the β protrusion, and the β lobe domains to close the promoter DNA binding channel and constrain the β' clamp domain, but with an orientation that is different from the one observed in the archaeal β' clamp–Spt4/5 complex. The structure also allows us to construct a reliable model of the complete NusG-associated transcription elongation complex, suggesting that the NGN domain binds at the upstream fork junction of the transcription elongation complex, similar to σ2 in the transcription initiation complex, to stabilize the junction, and therefore enhances transcription processivity. PMID:27899640

  20. Maintenance of Transcription-Translation Coupling by Elongation Factor P

    PubMed Central

    Elgamal, Sara

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Under conditions of tight coupling between translation and transcription, the ribosome enables synthesis of full-length mRNAs by preventing both formation of intrinsic terminator hairpins and loading of the transcription termination factor Rho. While previous studies have focused on transcription factors, we investigated the role of Escherichia coli elongation factor P (EF-P), an elongation factor required for efficient translation of mRNAs containing consecutive proline codons, in maintaining coupled translation and transcription. In the absence of EF-P, the presence of Rho utilization (rut) sites led to an ~30-fold decrease in translation of polyproline-encoding mRNAs. Coexpression of the Rho inhibitor Psu fully restored translation. EF-P was also shown to inhibit premature termination during synthesis and translation of mRNAs encoding intrinsic terminators. The effects of EF-P loss on expression of polyproline mRNAs were augmented by a substitution in RNA polymerase that accelerates transcription. Analyses of previously reported ribosome profiling and global proteomic data identified several candidate gene clusters where EF-P could act to prevent premature transcription termination. In vivo probing allowed detection of some predicted premature termination products in the absence of EF-P. Our findings support a model in which EF-P maintains coupling of translation and transcription by decreasing ribosome stalling at polyproline motifs. Other regulators that facilitate ribosome translocation through roadblocks to prevent premature transcription termination upon uncoupling remain to be identified. PMID:27624127

  1. Molecular analysis of cytolysin A (ClyA) in pathogenic Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Albrecht; von Rhein, Christine; Bauer, Susanne; Hüttinger, Christian; Goebel, Werner

    2004-08-01

    Cytolysin A (ClyA) of Escherichia coli is a pore-forming hemolytic protein encoded by the clyA (hlyE, sheA) gene that was first identified in E. coli K-12. In this study we examined various clinical E. coli isolates with regard to the presence and integrity of clyA. PCR and DNA sequence analyses demonstrated that 19 of 23 tested Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains, all 7 tested enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) strains, 6 of 8 enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) strains, and 4 of 7 tested enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) strains possess a complete clyA gene. The remaining STEC, EAEC, and ETEC strains and 9 of the 17 tested enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) strains were shown to harbor mutant clyA derivatives containing 1-bp frameshift mutations that cause premature termination of the coding sequence. The other eight EPEC strains and all tested uropathogenic and new-born meningitis-associated E. coli strains (n = 14 and 3, respectively) carried only nonfunctional clyA fragments due to the deletion of two sequences of 493 bp and 204 or 217 bp at the clyA locus. Expression of clyA from clinical E. coli isolates proved to be positively controlled by the transcriptional regulator SlyA. Several tested E. coli strains harboring a functional clyA gene produced basal amounts of ClyA when grown under standard laboratory conditions, but most of them showed a clyA-dependent hemolytic phenotype only when SlyA was overexpressed. The presented data indicate that cytolysin A can play a role only for some of the pathogenic E. coli strains.

  2. Investigation of E. coli Enterotoxins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    It has been determined that representative culture filtrates from two different strains (H197 and 74-114) of enterotoxigenic E . coli contain at least...for E . coli entorotoxin (soluble) and that trypsin-activated insol ECT is more antigenic than unactivated insol ECT. In contrast, it was determined...that cholera (ga) toxoid, with or without adjuvant, stimulates antitoxin capable of neutralizing both cholera and E . coli enterotoxins. It has been

  3. The chemical structure of DNA sequence signals for RNA transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, D. G.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed recognition sites for RNA transcription for E. coli NRA polymerase, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, and eukaryotic RNA polymerase Pol II are evaluated in the light of the requirements for efficient recognition. It is shown that although there is good experimental evidence that specific nucleic acid sequence patterns are involved in transcriptional regulation in bacteria and bacterial viruses, among the sequences now available, only in the case of the promoters recognized by bacteriophage T7 polymerase does it seem likely that the pattern is sufficient. It is concluded that the eukaryotic pattern that is investigated is not restrictive enough to serve as a recognition site.

  4. Unusually Situated Binding Sites for Bacterial Transcription Factors Can Have Hidden Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Haycocks, James R. J.; Grainger, David C.

    2016-01-01

    A commonly accepted paradigm of molecular biology is that transcription factors control gene expression by binding sites at the 5' end of a gene. However, there is growing evidence that transcription factor targets can occur within genes or between convergent genes. In this work, we have investigated one such target for the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. We show that CRP binds between two convergent genes. When bound, CRP regulates transcription of a small open reading frame, which we term aatS, embedded within one of the adjacent genes. Our work demonstrates that non-canonical sites of transcription factor binding can have hidden functionality. PMID:27258043

  5. Escherichia coli fliAZY operon.

    PubMed Central

    Mytelka, D S; Chamberlin, M J

    1996-01-01

    We have cloned the Escherichia coli fliAZY operon, which contains the fliA gene (the alternative sigma factor sigma F) and two novel genes, fliZ and fliY. Transcriptional mapping of this operon shows two start sites, one of which is preceded by a canonical E sigma F-dependent consensus and is dependent on sigma F for expression in vivo and in vitro. We have overexpressed and purified sigma F and demonstrated that it can direct core polymerase to E sigma F-dependent promoters. FliZ and FliY are not required for motility but may regulate sigma F activity, perhaps in response to a putative cell density signal that may be detected by FliY, a member of the bacterial extracellular solute-binding protein family 3. PMID:8550423

  6. DISTILLER: a data integration framework to reveal condition dependency of complex regulons in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lemmens, Karen; De Bie, Tijl; Dhollander, Thomas; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C; Thijs, Inge M; Schoofs, Geert; De Weerdt, Ami; De Moor, Bart; Vanderleyden, Jos; Collado-Vides, Julio; Engelen, Kristof; Marchal, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    We present DISTILLER, a data integration framework for the inference of transcriptional module networks. Experimental validation of predicted targets for the well-studied fumarate nitrate reductase regulator showed the effectiveness of our approach in Escherichia coli. In addition, the condition dependency and modularity of the inferred transcriptional network was studied. Surprisingly, the level of regulatory complexity seemed lower than that which would be expected from RegulonDB, indicating that complex regulatory programs tend to decrease the degree of modularity. PMID:19265557

  7. Computational prediction of functional abortive RNA in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Jeremy I; Hassoun, Soha; Nair, Nikhil U

    2017-03-24

    Failure by RNA polymerase to break contacts with promoter DNA results in release of bound RNA and re-initiation of transcription. These abortive RNAs were assumed to be non-functional but have recently been shown to affect termination in bacteriophage T7. Little is known about the functional role of these RNA in other genetic models. Using a computational approach, we investigated whether abortive RNA could exert function in E. coli. Fragments generated from 3780 transcription units were used as query sequences within their respective transcription units to search for possible binding sites. Sites that fell within known regulatory features were then ranked based upon the free energy of hybridization to the abortive. We further hypothesize about mechanisms of regulatory action for a select number of likely matches. Future experimental validation of these putative abortive-mRNA pairs may confirm our findings and promote exploration of functional abortive RNAs (faRNAs) in natural and synthetic systems.

  8. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. PMID:25611733

  9. Functional analysis of Thermus thermophilus transcription factor NusG

    PubMed Central

    Sevostyanova, Anastasiya; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Transcription elongation factors from the NusG family are ubiquitous from bacteria to humans and play diverse roles in the regulation of gene expression. These proteins consist of at least two domains. The N-terminal domains directly bind to the largest, β′ in bacteria, subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP), whereas the C-terminal domains interact with other cellular components and serve as platforms for the assembly of large nucleoprotein complexes. Escherichia coli NusG and its paralog RfaH modify RNAP into a fast, pause-resistant state but the detailed molecular mechanism of this modification remains unclear since no high-resolution structural data are available for the E. coli system. We wanted to investigate whether Thermus thermophilus (Tth) NusG can be used as a model for structural studies of this family of regulators. Here, we show that Tth NusG slows down rather than facilitates transcript elongation by its cognate RNAP. On the other hand, similarly to the E. coli regulators, Tth NusG apparently binds near the upstream end of the transcription bubble, competes with σA, and favors forward translocation by RNAP. Our data suggest that the mechanism of NusG recruitment to RNAP is universally conserved even though the regulatory outcomes among its homologs may appear distinct. PMID:20639538

  10. ASTP Onboard Voice Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The transcription is presented of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project voice communications as recorded on the command module data storage equipment. Data from this recorder are telemetered (dumped) to Space Tracking and Data Network sites for retransmission to the Johnson Space Center. The transcript is divided into three columns -- time, speaker, and text. The Greenwich mean time column consists of three two-digit numbers representing hours, minutes, and seconds (e.g., 22 34 14) for the Julian dates shown at the top of the page on which a new day begins. The speaker column indicates the source of a transmission; the text column contains the verbatim transcript of the communications.

  11. ANIMAL ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    PubMed Central

    Dubreuil, J. Daniel; Isaacson, Richard E.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common cause of E. coli diarrhea in farm animals. ETEC are characterized by the ability to produce two types of virulence factors; adhesins that promote binding to specific enterocyte receptors for intestinal colonization and enterotoxins responsible for fluid secretion. The best-characterized adhesins are expressed in the context of fimbriae, such as the F4 (also designated K88), F5 (K99), F6 (987P), F17 and F18 fimbriae. Once established in the animal small intestine, ETEC produces enterotoxin(s) that lead to diarrhea. The enterotoxins belong to two major classes; heat-labile toxin that consist of one active and five binding subunits (LT), and heat-stable toxins that are small polypeptides (STa, STb, and EAST1). This chapter describes the disease and pathogenesis of animal ETEC, the corresponding virulence genes and protein products of these bacteria, their regulation and targets in animal hosts, as well as mechanisms of action. Furthermore, vaccines, inhibitors, probiotics and the identification of potential new targets identified by genomics are presented in the context of animal ETEC. PMID:27735786

  12. Investigation of E. coli Enterotoxins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In the course of investigating E . coli enterotoxins, it was discovered that trypsin treatment of partially purified enterotoxin from strain H197 (078...loops) did exhibit elevated PF titers compared with uninoculated controls. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that E . coli enterotoxins

  13. DNA supercoiling during transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  14. Transcription and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, P. M.; Goding, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    The normal growth, development and function of an organism requires precise and co-ordinated control of gene expression. A major part of this control is exerted by regulating messenger RNA (mRNA) production and involves complex interactions between an array of transcriptionally active proteins and specific regulatory DNA sequences. The combination of such proteins and DNA sequences is specific for given gene or group of genes in a particular cell type and the proteins regulating the same gene may vary between cell types. In addition the expression or activity of these regulatory proteins may be modified depending on the state of differentiation of a cell or in response to an external stimulus. Thus, the differentiation of embryonic cells into diverse tissues is achieved and the mature structure and function of the organism is maintained. This review focusses on the role of perturbations of these transcriptional controls in neoplasia. Deregulation of transcription may result in the failure to express genes responsible for cellular differentiation, or alternatively, in the transcription of genes involved in cell division, through the inappropriate expression or activation of positively acting transcription factors and nuclear oncogenes. Whether the biochemical abnormalities that lead to the disordered growth and differentiation of a malignant tumour affect cell surface receptors, membrane or cytoplasmic signalling proteins or nuclear transcription factors, the end result is the inappropriate expression of some genes and failure to express others. Current research is starting to elucidate which of the elements of this complicated system are important in neoplasia. PMID:1645561

  15. Expression of a synthetic pertussis toxin operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pozza, T D; Yan, H; Walker, M J

    1997-06-01

    Bordetella pertussis is the causative agent of whooping cough, a severe disease of infants characterised by repeated of paroxysmal coughing. Pertussis toxin (PT) is a major virulence factor of B. pertussis and is a typical A/B bacterial toxin consisting of five subunits S1-S5 in a ratio of 1:1:1:2:1. The PT subunit genes are organized into an operon which is not expressed in Escherichia coli, thus hampering the use of this organism for vaccine production. We have expressed the five PT subunits individually in E. coli by replacing the wild-type transcriptional and translational signals, and in the case of the S4 subunit the leader peptide has been exchanged with a modified E. coli beta-lactamase leader sequence. We have developed a stepwise cloning method to construct a synthetic PT operon which simultaneously expresses the five PT subunits in E. coli. Western blot analysis indicated that in E. coli KS476 containing the synthetic PT operon, S4 and S5 were completely processed, S1 was partially processed, whilst the majority of S2 and S3 remained unprocessed. Periplasmic extracts contained soluble S1 and S3; however, the processed form of S2, S4 and S5 were not detected, suggesting that these subunits may be membrane associated or in an insoluble form. This work should allow an investigation of the potential of E. coli to produce detoxified PT in a background free of other pertussis virulence factors that may contribute to the side-effects of some vaccine preparations currently in use.

  16. Bleomycin increases amikacin and streptomycin resistance in Escherichia coli harboring transposon Tn5.

    PubMed Central

    Blazquez, J; Martinez, J L; Baquero, F

    1993-01-01

    The antitumor antibiotic bleomycin acts as a transcriptional inducer of the neo-ble-str operon of the transposon Tn5, increasing the resistance level to streptomycin and amikacin in Tn5-containing Escherichia coli. The mechanism may involve a recA-independent induction mediated by DNA damage. Images PMID:7694544

  17. Novel Mechanism of Escherichia coli Porin Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Keller, Maria; Vuong, Phu; Misra, Rajeev

    2006-01-01

    A novel mechanism of Escherichia coli porin regulation was discovered from multicopy suppressors that permitted growth of cells expressing a mutant OmpC protein in the absence of DegP. Analyses of two suppressors showed that both substantially lowered OmpC expression. Suppression activities were confined to a short DNA sequence, which we designated ipeX for inhibition of porin expression, and to DNA containing a 3′-truncated ompR gene. The major effect of ipeX on ompC expression was exerted posttranscriptionally, whereas the truncated OmpR protein reduced ompC transcription. ipeX was localized within an untranslated region of 247 base pairs between the stop codon of nmpC—a remnant porin gene from the cryptic phage qsr′ (DLP12) genome—and its predicted Rho-independent transcriptional terminator. Interestingly, another prophage, PA-2, which encodes a porin similar to NmpC, known as Lc, has sequences downstream from lc identical to that of ipeX. PA-2 lysogenization leads to Lc expression and OmpC inhibition. Our data show that the synthesis of the lc transcript, whose 3′ end contains the corresponding ipeX sequence, inhibits OmpC expression. Overexpression of ipeX RNA inhibited both OmpC and OmpF expression but not that of OmpA. ompC-phoA chimeric gene constructs revealed a 248-bp untranslated region of ompC required for ipeX-mediated inhibition. However, no sequence complementarity was found between ipeX and this region of ompC, indicating that inhibition may not involve simple base pairing between the two RNA molecules. The effect of ipeX on ompC, but not on ompF, was independent of the RNA chaperone Hfq. PMID:16385048

  18. Thiophene metabolism by E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the mechanism of degradation of sulfur containing heterocyclic molecules by mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We previously isolated multiple mutants of E. coli which were selected for improved oxidation of furan and thiophene derivatives. We have focused on the thdA mutation in our subsequent research as it appears to be of central importance in thiophene oxidation. We hope that analysis of the thd gene of E. coli will lead to improvement of our thiophene metabolizing bacterial strains.

  19. Induction of YdeO, a regulator for acid resistance genes, by ultraviolet irradiation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Ishihama, Akira; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi

    2012-01-01

    YdeO, an AraC-type transcription factor, is an important regulator in the induction of acid-resistance genes in Escherichia coli. In this study, we found that ydeO expression was induced 20 min after exposure to UV irradiation. This required the evgA and gadE genes in vivo. YdeO, induced by UV, controls the expression of a total of 21 genes. This accompanies SOS response in E. coli.

  20. Mean-field vs. Stochastic Models for Transcriptional Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blossey, Ralf; Giuraniuc, Claudiu

    2009-03-01

    We introduce a minimal model description for the dynamics of transcriptional regulatory networks. It is studied within a mean-field approximation, i.e., by deterministic ode's representing the reaction kinetics, and by stochastic simulations employing the Gillespie algorithm. We elucidate the different results both approaches can deliver, depending on the network under study, and in particular depending on the level of detail retained in the respective description. Two examples are addressed in detail: the repressilator, a transcriptional clock based on a three-gene network realized experimentally in E. coli, and a bistable two-gene circuit under external driving, a transcriptional network motif recently proposed to play a role in cellular development.

  1. Mean-field versus stochastic models for transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blossey, R.; Giuraniuc, C. V.

    2008-09-01

    We introduce a minimal model description for the dynamics of transcriptional regulatory networks. It is studied within a mean-field approximation, i.e., by deterministic ODE’s representing the reaction kinetics, and by stochastic simulations employing the Gillespie algorithm. We elucidate the different results that both approaches can deliver, depending on the network under study, and in particular depending on the level of detail retained in the respective description. Two examples are addressed in detail: The repressilator, a transcriptional clock based on a three-gene network realized experimentally in E. coli, and a bistable two-gene circuit under external driving, a transcriptional network motif recently proposed to play a role in cellular development.

  2. Inhibiting translation elongation can aid genome duplication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Myka, Kamila K; Hawkins, Michelle; Syeda, Aisha H; Gupta, Milind K; Meharg, Caroline; Dillingham, Mark S; Savery, Nigel J; Lloyd, Robert G; McGlynn, Peter

    2016-12-11

    Conflicts between replication and transcription challenge chromosome duplication. Escherichia coli replisome movement along transcribed DNA is promoted by Rep and UvrD accessory helicases with Δrep ΔuvrD cells being inviable under rapid growth conditions. We have discovered that mutations in a tRNA gene, aspT, in an aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, AspRS, and in a translation factor needed for efficient proline-proline bond formation, EF-P, suppress Δrep ΔuvrD lethality. Thus replication-transcription conflicts can be alleviated by the partial sacrifice of a mechanism that reduces replicative barriers, namely translating ribosomes that reduce RNA polymerase backtracking. Suppression depends on RelA-directed synthesis of (p)ppGpp, a signalling molecule that reduces replication-transcription conflicts, with RelA activation requiring ribosomal pausing. Levels of (p)ppGpp in these suppressors also correlate inversely with the need for Rho activity, an RNA translocase that can bind to emerging transcripts and displace transcription complexes. These data illustrate the fine balance between different mechanisms in facilitating gene expression and genome duplication and demonstrate that accessory helicases are a major determinant of this balance. This balance is also critical for other aspects of bacterial survival: the mutations identified here increase persistence indicating that similar mutations could arise in naturally occurring bacterial populations facing antibiotic challenge.

  3. Regulation of Transcript Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria lack subcellular compartments and harbor a single RNA polymerase that synthesizes both structural and protein-coding RNAs, which are cotranscriptionally processed by distinct pathways. Nascent rRNAs fold into elaborate secondary structures and associate with ribosomal proteins, whereas nascent mRNAs are translated by ribosomes. During elongation, nucleic acid signals and regulatory proteins modulate concurrent RNA-processing events, instruct RNA polymerase where to pause and terminate transcription, or act as roadblocks to the moving enzyme. Communications among complexes that carry out transcription, translation, repair, and other cellular processes ensure timely execution of the gene expression program and survival under conditions of stress. This network is maintained by auxiliary proteins that act as bridges between RNA polymerase, ribosome, and repair enzymes, blurring boundaries between separate information-processing steps and making assignments of unique regulatory functions meaningless. Understanding the regulation of transcript elongation thus requires genome-wide approaches, which confirm known and reveal new regulatory connections. PMID:26132790

  4. Selection Shapes Transcriptional Logic and Regulatory Specialization in Genetic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fogelmark, Karl; Peterson, Carsten; Troein, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Background Living organisms need to regulate their gene expression in response to environmental signals and internal cues. This is a computational task where genes act as logic gates that connect to form transcriptional networks, which are shaped at all scales by evolution. Large-scale mutations such as gene duplications and deletions add and remove network components, whereas smaller mutations alter the connections between them. Selection determines what mutations are accepted, but its importance for shaping the resulting networks has been debated. Methodology To investigate the effects of selection in the shaping of transcriptional networks, we derive transcriptional logic from a combinatorially powerful yet tractable model of the binding between DNA and transcription factors. By evolving the resulting networks based on their ability to function as either a simple decision system or a circadian clock, we obtain information on the regulation and logic rules encoded in functional transcriptional networks. Comparisons are made between networks evolved for different functions, as well as with structurally equivalent but non-functional (neutrally evolved) networks, and predictions are validated against the transcriptional network of E. coli. Principal Findings We find that the logic rules governing gene expression depend on the function performed by the network. Unlike the decision systems, the circadian clocks show strong cooperative binding and negative regulation, which achieves tight temporal control of gene expression. Furthermore, we find that transcription factors act preferentially as either activators or repressors, both when binding multiple sites for a single target gene and globally in the transcriptional networks. This separation into positive and negative regulators requires gene duplications, which highlights the interplay between mutation and selection in shaping the transcriptional networks. PMID:26927540

  5. Transformation and characterization of an arsenic gene operon from urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter (UPTC) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, M; Kuribayashi, T; Yamamoto, S; Millar, B C; Moore, J E

    2016-01-01

    An arsenate susceptibility test was performed with transformed and cultured Escherichia coli DH5α cells, which carried recombinant DNA of full-length arsenic (ars) operon, namely a putative membrane permease, ArsP; a transcriptional repressor, ArsR; an arsenate reductase, ArsC; and an arsenical-resistance membrane transporter, Acr3, from the Japanese urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter lari (UPTC) CF89-12. The E. coli DH5α transformant showed reduced susceptibility to arsenate (~1536 μg/mL), compared to the control. Thus, these ars four-genes from the UPTC CF89-12 strain cells could confer a reduced susceptibility to arsenate in the transformed and E. coli DH5α cells. E. coli transformants with truncated ars operons, acr3 (acr3) and arsC-acr3 (∆arsC-acr3), of the ars operon, showed an MIC value of 384 μg/mL (~384 μg/mL), similar to the E. coli cells which carried the pGEM-T vector (control). Reverse transcription PCR confirmed in vivo transcription of recombinant full-length ars operon and deletion variants (∆acr3 and ∆arsC-acr3) in the transformed E. coli cells.

  6. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  7. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  8. Transcriptional analysis of the acid-inducible asr gene in enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    Seputiene, Vaida; Suziedelis, Kestutis; Normark, Staffan; Melefors, Ojar; Suziedeliene, Edita

    2004-09-01

    We show here that transcription of the asr gene in Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae is strongly dependent on the acidification level of the growth medium, with maximal induction at pH 4.0-4.5 as determined by Northern hybridization analysis. Previous gene array analyses have also shown that asr is the most acid-induced gene in the E. coli genome. Sequence alignment of the asr promoters from different enterobacterial species identified a highly conserved region located at position -70 to -30 relative to the asr transcriptional start site. By deletion of various segments of this region in the E. coli asr promoter it was shown that sequences upstream from the -40 position were important for induction. Transcription from the E. coli asr promoter was demonstrated to be growth-phase-dependent and to require the alternative sigma factor RpoS (sigma(S)) in stationary phase. Transcription of the asr gene was also found to be subject to negative control by the nucleoid protein H-NS.

  9. Autogenous Regulation of Splicing of the Transcript of a Yeast Ribosomal Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabeva, Mariana D.; Post-Beittenmiller, Martha A.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    1986-08-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  10. Functional genetic expression of eukaryotic DNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Struhl, K; Cameron, J R; Davis, R W

    1976-01-01

    We have isolated a segment of DNA from the eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) as a viable molecular hybrid of bacteriophage lambda DNA which, when integrated into the chromosome of an E. coli histidine auxotroph, allows this bacterium to grow in the absence of histidine. The nonrevertable, histidine auxotroph lacks the enzymatic activity of imidazole glycerol phosphate (IGP) dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.19). From genetic experiments, we conclude that expression of the segment of yeast DNA results in the production of a diffusible substance and that transcription necessary for the complementation is most likely initiated from the segment of eukaryotic DNA. Images PMID:775490

  11. Synthesis of calf prochymosin (prorennin) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Emtage, J S; Angal, S; Doel, M T; Harris, T J; Jenkins, B; Lilley, G; Lowe, P A

    1983-01-01

    A gene for calf prochymosin (prorennin) has been reconstructed from chemically synthesized oligodeoxyribonucleotides and cloned DNA copies of preprochymosin mRNA. This gene has been inserted into a bacterial expression plasmid containing the Escherichia coli tryptophan promoter and a bacterial ribosome binding site. Induction of transcription from the tryptophan promoter results in prochymosin synthesis at a level of up to 5% of total protein. The enzyme has been purified from bacteria by extraction with urea and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and converted to enzymatically active chymosin by acidification and neutralization. Bacterially produced chymosin is as effective in clotting milk as the natural enzyme isolated from calf stomach. Images PMID:6304731

  12. Mapping yeast transcriptional networks.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G

    2013-09-01

    The term "transcriptional network" refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  13. Transcription of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Tabak, H F; Grivell, L A; Borst, P

    1983-01-01

    While mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the simplest DNA in nature, coding for rRNAs and tRNAs, results of DNA sequence, and transcript analysis have demonstrated that both the synthesis and processing of mitochondrial RNAs involve remarkably intricate events. At one extreme, genes in animal mtDNAs are tightly packed, both DNA strands are completely transcribed (symmetric transcription), and the appearance of specific mRNAs is entirely dependent on processing at sites signalled by the sequences of the tRNAs, which abut virtually every gene. At the other extreme, gene organization in yeast (Saccharomyces) is anything but compact, with long stretches of AT-rich DNA interspaced between coding sequences and no obvious logic to the order of genes. Transcription is asymmetric and several RNAs are initiated de novo. Nevertheless, extensive RNA processing occurs due largely to the presence of split genes. RNA splicing is complex, is controlled by both mitochondrial and nuclear genes, and in some cases is accompanied by the formation of RNAs that behave as covalently closed circles. The present article reviews current knowledge of mitochondrial transcription and RNA processing in relation to possible mechanisms for the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression.

  14. Fungal CSL transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Převorovský, Martin; Půta, František; Folk, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Background The CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1) transcription factor family members are well-known components of the transmembrane receptor Notch signaling pathway, which plays a critical role in metazoan development. They function as context-dependent activators or repressors of transcription of their responsive genes, the promoters of which harbor the GTG(G/A)GAA consensus elements. Recently, several studies described Notch-independent activities of the CSL proteins. Results We have identified putative CSL genes in several fungal species, showing that this family is not confined to metazoans. We have analyzed their sequence conservation and identified the presence of well-defined domains typical of genuine CSL proteins. Furthermore, we have shown that the candidate fungal protein sequences contain highly conserved regions known to be required for sequence-specific DNA binding in their metazoan counterparts. The phylogenetic analysis of the newly identified fungal CSL proteins revealed the existence of two distinct classes, both of which are present in all the species studied. Conclusion Our findings support the evolutionary origin of the CSL transcription factor family in the last common ancestor of fungi and metazoans. We hypothesize that the ancestral CSL function involved DNA binding and Notch-independent regulation of transcription and that this function may still be shared, to a certain degree, by the present CSL family members from both fungi and metazoans. PMID:17629904

  15. Focus on Refugees. Transcript.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandel, Sarah; And Others

    This is the transcript of the "Focus on Refugees," proqram conducted by the Overseas Development Council. Remarks from the following participants are included: (1) Sarah Brandel, Associate Fellow at the Overseas Development Council; (2) Gary Perkins, Chief of Mission of the Washington Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees…

  16. Genetic and biochemical analysis of peptide transport in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    E. coli peptide transport mutants have been isolated based on their resistance to toxic tripeptides. These genetic defects were found to map in two distinct chromosomal locations. The transport systems which require expression of the trp-linked opp genes and the oppE gene(s) for activity were shown to have different substrate preferences. Growth of E. coli in medium containing leucine results in increased entry of exogenously supplied tripeptides into the bacterial cell. This leucine-mediated elevation of peptide transport required expression of the trp-linked opp operon and was accompanied by increased sensitivity to toxic tripeptides, by an enhanced capacity to utilize nutritional peptides, and by an increase in both the velocity and apparent steady-state level of L-(U-/sup 14/C)alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine accumulation for E. coli grown in leucine-containing medium relative to these parameters of peptide transport measured with bacteria grown in media lacking leucine. Direct measurement of opp operon expression by pulse-labeling experiments demonstrated that growth of E. coli in the presence of leucine resulted in increased synthesis of the oppA-encoded periplasmic binding protein. The transcriptional regulation of the trp-linked opp operon of E. coli was investigated using lambda placMu51-generated lac operon fusions. Synthesis of ..beta..-galactosidase by strains harboring oppA-lac, oppB-lac, and oppD-lac fusions occurred at a basal level when the fusion-containing strains were grown in minimal medium.

  17. Rolling Circle Transcription of Ribozymes Targeted to ras and mdr-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    ssDNA) to direct transcription of an tion-PCR, and recyclization were carried out to optimize active hammerhead ribozyme in E. coli cells. transcription...transcription I hammerhead ribozyme I in vitro selection and 12.5 units/ml RNase inhibitor (Promega), in a total reaction volume of 15 tk1. After a...sequence encoding a ssDNA, and splint ssDNA were ethanol-precipitated and used as hammerhead ribozyme . templates to begin the next round of in vitro

  18. Direct interactions between the coiled-coil tip of DksA and the trigger loop of RNA polymerase mediate transcriptional regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E. coli DksA is in a class of transcription factors that modify RNA polymerase (RNAP) in all three kingdoms of life. DksA potentiates the effects of the global regulator ppGpp and the initiating NTP, controlling transcription initiation without binding to DNA. Incorporating benzoyl-phenylalanine (Bp...

  19. Statistical mechanical model of coupled transcription from multiple promoters due to transcription factor titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydenfelt, Mattias; Cox, Robert Sidney, III; Garcia, Hernan; Phillips, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) with regulatory action at multiple promoter targets is the rule rather than the exception, with examples ranging from the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) in E. coli that regulates hundreds of different genes simultaneously to situations involving multiple copies of the same gene, such as plasmids, retrotransposons, or highly replicated viral DNA. When the number of TFs heavily exceeds the number of binding sites, TF binding to each promoter can be regarded as independent. However, when the number of TF molecules is comparable to the number of binding sites, TF titration will result in correlation (“promoter entanglement”) between transcription of different genes. We develop a statistical mechanical model which takes the TF titration effect into account and use it to predict both the level of gene expression for a general set of promoters and the resulting correlation in transcription rates of different genes. Our results show that the TF titration effect could be important for understanding gene expression in many regulatory settings.

  20. Thiophenone Attenuates Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O103:H2 Virulence by Interfering with AI-2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Valen Rukke, Håkon; Benneche, Tore; Aamdal Scheie, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Interference with bacterial quorum sensing communication provides an anti-virulence strategy to control pathogenic bacteria. Here, using the Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) O103:H2, we showed for the first time that thiophenone TF101 reduced expression of lsrB; the gene encoding the AI-2 receptor. Combined results of transcriptional and phenotypic analyses suggested that TF101 interfere with AI-2 signalling, possibly by competing with AI-2 for binding to LsrB. This is supported by in silico docking prediction of thiophenone TF101 in the LsrB pocket. Transcriptional analyses furthermore showed that thiophenone TF101 interfered with expression of the virulence genes eae and fimH. In addition, TF101 reduced AI-2 induced E. coli adhesion to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. TF101, on the other hand, did not affect epinephrine or norepinephrine enhanced E. coli adhesion. Overall, our results showed that thiophenone TF101 interfered with virulence expression in E. coli O103:H2, suggestedly by interfering with AI-2 mediated quorum sensing. We thus conclude that thiophenone TF101 might represent a promising future anti-virulence agent in the fight against pathogenic E. coli. PMID:27309855

  1. Free RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Michael; Dennis, Patrick P; Ehrenberg, Mans; Bremer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    The frequencies of transcription initiation of regulated and constitutive genes depend on the concentration of free RNA polymerase holoenzyme [Rf] near their promoters. Although RNA polymerase is largely confined to the nucleoid, it is difficult to determine absolute concentrations of [Rf] at particular locations within the nucleoid structure. However, relative concentrations of free RNA polymerase at different growth rates, [Rf]rel, can be estimated from the activities of constitutive promoters. Previous studies indicated that the rrnB P2 promoter is constitutive and that [Rf]rel in the vicinity of rrnB P2 increases with increasing growth rate. Recently it has become possible to directly visualize Rf in growing Escherichia coli cells. Here we examine some of the important issues relating to gene expression based on these new observations. We conclude that: (i) At a growth rate of 2 doublings/h, there are about 1000 free and 2350 non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules per average cell (12 and 28%, respectively, of 8400 total) which are in rapid equilibrium. (ii) The reversibility of the non-specific binding generates more than 1000 free RNA polymerase molecules every second in the immediate vicinity of the DNA. Of these, most rebind non-specifically to the DNA within a few ms; the frequency of non-specific binding is at least two orders of magnitude greater than specific binding and transcript initiation. (iii) At a given amount of RNA polymerase per cell, [Rf] and the density of non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules along the DNA both vary reciprocally with the amount of DNA in the cell. (iv) At 2 doublings/h an E. coli cell contains, on the average, about 1 non-specifically bound RNA polymerase per 9 kbp of DNA and 1 free RNA polymerase per 20 kbp of DNA. However some DNA regions (i.e. near active rRNA operons) may have significantly higher than average [Rf].

  2. Functional specialization of transcription elongation factors

    PubMed Central

    Belogurov, Georgiy A; Mooney, Rachel A; Svetlov, Vladimir; Landick, Robert; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2009-01-01

    Elongation factors NusG and RfaH evolved from a common ancestor and utilize the same binding site on RNA polymerase (RNAP) to modulate transcription. However, although NusG associates with RNAP transcribing most Escherichia coli genes, RfaH regulates just a few operons containing ops, a DNA sequence that mediates RfaH recruitment. Here, we describe the mechanism by which this specificity is maintained. We observe that RfaH action is indeed restricted to those several operons that are devoid of NusG in vivo. We also show that RfaH and NusG compete for their effects on transcript elongation and termination in vitro. Our data argue that RfaH recognizes its DNA target even in the presence of NusG. Once recruited, RfaH remains stably associated with RNAP, thereby precluding NusG binding. We envision a pathway by which a specialized regulator has evolved in the background of its ubiquitous paralogue. We propose that RfaH and NusG may have opposite regulatory functions: although NusG appears to function in concert with Rho, RfaH inhibits Rho action and activates the expression of poorly translated, frequently foreign genes. PMID:19096362

  3. Transcription-coupled repair: an update.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Graciela

    2016-11-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a versatile pathway that removes helix-distorting DNA lesions from the genomes of organisms across the evolutionary scale, from bacteria to humans. The serial steps in NER involve recognition of lesions, adducts or structures that disrupt the DNA double helix, removal of a short oligonucleotide containing the offending lesion, synthesis of a repair patch copying the opposite undamaged strand, and ligation, to restore the DNA to its original form. Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of NER dedicated to the repair of lesions that, by virtue of their location on the transcribed strands of active genes, encumber elongation by RNA polymerases. In this review, I report on recent findings that contribute to the elucidation of TCR mechanisms in the bacterium Escherichia coli, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human cells. I review general models for the biochemical pathways and how and when cells might choose to utilize TCR or other pathways for repair or bypass of transcription-blocking DNA alterations.

  4. Lack of dependance of transcription-induced cytosine deaminations on protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mokkapati, Sanath Kumar; Bhagwat, Ashok S

    2002-10-31

    Transcription-induced mutations (TIM) is a phenomenon in Escherichia coli in which transcription promotes C to T and other mutations in a strand-specific manner. Because the processes of transcription and translation are coupled in prokaryotes and some models regarding creating a hypermutagenic state in E. coli require new protein synthesis, we tested the possibility that TIM was dependent on efficient synthesis of proteins. We used puromycin to reversibly inhibit protein synthesis and found that it had little effect on mRNA synthesis, plasmid copy-number or TIM. Our results show that TIM is not dependent on efficient translation of mRNA and this helps eliminate certain models concerning the mechanism underlying TIM.

  5. Escherichia coli O104:H4 Pathogenesis: an Enteroaggregative E. coli/Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli Explosive Cocktail of High Virulence.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    A major outbreak caused by Escherichia coli of serotype O104:H4 spread throughout Europe in 2011. This large outbreak was caused by an unusual strain that is most similar to enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) of serotype O104:H4. A significant difference, however, is the presence of a prophage encoding the Shiga toxin, which is characteristic of enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) strains. This combination of genomic features, associating characteristics from both EAEC and EHEC, represents a new pathotype. The 2011 E. coli O104:H4 outbreak of hemorrhagic diarrhea in Germany is an example of the explosive cocktail of high virulence and resistance that can emerge in this species. A total of 46 deaths, 782 cases of hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and 3,128 cases of acute gastroenteritis were attributed to this new clone of EAEC/EHEC. In addition, recent identification in France of similar O104:H4 clones exhibiting the same virulence factors suggests that the EHEC O104:H4 pathogen has become endemically established in Europe after the end of the outbreak. EAEC strains of serotype O104:H4 contain a large set of virulence-associated genes regulated by the AggR transcription factor. They include, among other factors, the pAA plasmid genes encoding the aggregative adherence fimbriae, which anchor the bacterium to the intestinal mucosa (stacked-brick adherence pattern on epithelial cells). Furthermore, sequencing studies showed that horizontal genetic exchange allowed for the emergence of the highly virulent Shiga toxin-producing EAEC O104:H4 strain that caused the German outbreak. This article discusses the role these virulence factors could have in EAEC/EHEC O104:H4 pathogenesis.

  6. Nucleolus-like compartmentalization of the transcription machinery in fast-growing bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ding Jun; Mata Martin, Carmen; Sun, Zhe; Cagliero, Cedric; Zhou, Yan Ning

    2017-02-01

    We have learned a great deal about RNA polymerase (RNA Pol), transcription factors, and the transcriptional regulation mechanisms in prokaryotes for specific genes, operons, or transcriptomes. However, we have only begun to understand how the transcription machinery is three-dimensionally (3D) organized into bacterial chromosome territories to orchestrate the transcription process and to maintain harmony with the replication machinery in the cell. Much progress has been made recently in our understanding of the spatial organization of the transcription machinery in fast-growing Escherichia coli cells using state-of-the-art superresolution imaging techniques. Co-imaging of RNA polymerase (RNA Pol) with DNA and transcription elongation factors involved in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, and ribosome biogenesis has revealed similarities between bacteria and eukaryotes in the spatial organization of the transcription machinery for growth genes, most of which are rRNA genes. Evidence supports the notion that RNA Pol molecules are concentrated, forming foci at the clustering of rRNA operons resembling the eukaryotic nucleolus. RNA Pol foci are proposed to be active transcription factories for both rRNA genes expression and ribosome biogenesis to support maximal growth in optimal growing conditions. Thus, in fast-growing bacterial cells, RNA Pol foci mimic eukaryotic Pol I activity, and transcription factories resemble nucleolus-like compartmentation. In addition, the transcription and replication machineries are mostly segregated in space to avoid the conflict between the two major cellular functions in fast-growing cells.

  7. Reconstruction and expression of chimeric anti-HBx antibody in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G; Liu, K D; Tang, Z Y; Chen, Y H; Wu, X F; Schroeder, C H

    1997-01-01

    The variable regions of murine monoclonal anti-HBx immunoglobulin and the constant region of human antibody were cloned by reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The heavy-chain and light-chain variable regions were connected and coexpressed with human constant region C-r3 and C-k3 in the reconstructed vector of E. coli. The products showed high specificity and binding ability with HBx. Which is closely associated with hepatocarcinogenesis. This makes it possible to humanize the mouse monoclonal antibodies and express the fusion protein in E.coli for potential radioimmunotherapy in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

  8. Machine Transcription--Practically Speaking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clippinger, Dorinda A.

    1984-01-01

    Draws transcription teaching principles from Gagne's theories about learning. Recommends 12-16 weeks of instruction, pre-transcription development of related skills, frequent feedback, and use of teaching materials that are arranged to take advantage of learning cycles. (SK)

  9. Antisense transcription as a tool to tune gene expression.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Jennifer A N; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-01-14

    A surprise that has emerged from transcriptomics is the prevalence of genomic antisense transcription, which occurs counter to gene orientation. While frequent, the roles of antisense transcription in regulation are poorly understood. We built a synthetic system in Escherichia coli to study how antisense transcription can change the expression of a gene and tune the response characteristics of a regulatory circuit. We developed a new genetic part that consists of a unidirectional terminator followed by a constitutive antisense promoter and demonstrate that this part represses gene expression proportionally to the antisense promoter strength. Chip-based oligo synthesis was applied to build a large library of 5,668 terminator-promoter combinations that was used to control the expression of three repressors (PhlF, SrpR, and TarA) in a simple genetic circuit (NOT gate). Using the library, we demonstrate that antisense promoters can be used to tune the threshold of a regulatory circuit without impacting other properties of its response function. Finally, we determined the relative contributions of antisense RNA and transcriptional interference to repressing gene expression and introduce a biophysical model to capture the impact of RNA polymerase collisions on gene repression. This work quantifies the role of antisense transcription in regulatory networks and introduces a new mode to control gene expression that has been previously overlooked in genetic engineering.

  10. Identification and characterization of transcription networks in environmentally significant species

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Charles E.; McCue, Lee Ann

    2005-11-30

    Understanding the regulation of gene expression, transcription regulation in particular, is one of the grand challenges of molecular biology. Transcription regulation is arguably the most important foundation of cellular function, since it exerts the most fundamental control of the abundance of virtually all of a cell's functional macromolecules. Nevertheless, this process, perhaps because of its difficulty, has been the subject of only a limited number of genomic level analyses. We have undertaken bioinformatics projects to address this issue by developing (1) a cross-species comparison method (i.e. phylogenetic footprinting) for the identification of transcription factor binding sites, (2) a Bayesian clustering method to identify regulons, (3) an improved scanning algorithm that uses a position weight matrix and several related species sequence data to locate transcription factor binding sites, and (4) a method to predict cognate binding sites for transcription factors of unknown specificity. These bioinformatics methods were developed using the model proteobacterium Escherichia coli, with further applications to the genomes of environmentally significant microbes (Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Shewanella oneidensis) in later years of the grant.

  11. Bacterial RNA polymerase can retain σ70 throughout transcription.

    PubMed

    Harden, Timothy T; Wells, Christopher D; Friedman, Larry J; Landick, Robert; Hochschild, Ann; Kondev, Jane; Gelles, Jeff

    2016-01-19

    Production of a messenger RNA proceeds through sequential stages of transcription initiation and transcript elongation and termination. During each of these stages, RNA polymerase (RNAP) function is regulated by RNAP-associated protein factors. In bacteria, RNAP-associated σ factors are strictly required for promoter recognition and have historically been regarded as dedicated initiation factors. However, the primary σ factor in Escherichia coli, σ(70), can remain associated with RNAP during the transition from initiation to elongation, influencing events that occur after initiation. Quantitative studies on the extent of σ(70) retention have been limited to complexes halted during early elongation. Here, we used multiwavelength single-molecule fluorescence-colocalization microscopy to observe the σ(70)-RNAP complex during initiation from the λ PR' promoter and throughout the elongation of a long (>2,000-nt) transcript. Our results provide direct measurements of the fraction of actively transcribing complexes with bound σ(70) and the kinetics of σ(70) release from actively transcribing complexes. σ(70) release from mature elongation complexes was slow (0.0038 s(-1)); a substantial subpopulation of elongation complexes retained σ(70) throughout transcript elongation, and this fraction depended on the sequence of the initially transcribed region. We also show that elongation complexes containing σ(70) manifest enhanced recognition of a promoter-like pause element positioned hundreds of nucleotides downstream of the promoter. Together, the results provide a quantitative framework for understanding the postinitiation roles of σ(70) during transcription.

  12. The Sm-like RNA chaperone Hfq mediates transcription antitermination at Rho-dependent terminators

    PubMed Central

    Rabhi, Makhlouf; Espéli, Olivier; Schwartz, Annie; Cayrol, Bastien; Rahmouni, A Rachid; Arluison, Véronique; Boudvillain, Marc

    2011-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the essential motor protein Rho promotes transcription termination in a tightly controlled manner that is not fully understood. Here, we show that the general post-transcriptional regulatory protein Hfq associates with Rho to regulate Rho function. The Hfq:Rho complex can be further stabilized by RNA bridging both factors in a configuration that inhibits the ATP hydrolysis and duplex unwinding activities of Rho and that mediates transcription antitermination at Rho-dependent terminators in vitro and in vivo. Antitermination at a prototypical terminator (λtR1) requires Hfq binding to an A/U-rich transcript region directly upstream from the terminator. Antitermination is modulated by trans-acting factors (NusG or nucleic acid competitors) that affect Hfq association with Rho or RNA. These data unveil a new Hfq function and a novel transcription regulatory mechanism with potentially important implications for bacterial RNA metabolism, gene silencing, and pathogenicity. PMID:21673658

  13. Studying Gene Expression: Database Searches and Promoter Fusions to Investigate Transcriptional Regulation in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Vaz, Betsy M.; Makarevitch, Irina; Stensland, Shane

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory project was designed to illustrate how to search biological databases and utilize the information provided by these resources to investigate transcriptional regulation in Escherichia coli. The students searched several databases (NCBI Genomes, RegulonDB and EcoCyc) to learn about gene function, regulation, and the organization of transcriptional units. A fluorometer and GFP promoter fusions were used to obtain fluorescence data and measure changes in transcriptional activity. The class designed and performed experiments to investigate the regulation of genes necessary for biosynthesis of amino acids and how expression is affected by environmental signals and transcriptional regulators. Assessment data showed that this activity enhanced students’ knowledge of databases, reporter genes and transcriptional regulation. PMID:23653697

  14. Non-transcriptional regulatory processes shape transcriptional network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ray, J Christian J; Tabor, Jeffrey J; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2011-10-11

    Information about the extra- or intracellular environment is often captured as biochemical signals that propagate through regulatory networks. These signals eventually drive phenotypic changes, typically by altering gene expression programmes in the cell. Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks has given a compelling picture of bacterial physiology, but transcriptional network maps alone often fail to describe phenotypes. Cellular response dynamics are ultimately determined by interactions between transcriptional and non-transcriptional networks, with dramatic implications for physiology and evolution. Here, we provide an overview of non-transcriptional interactions that can affect the performance of natural and synthetic bacterial regulatory networks.

  15. Characterization of a Novel Microcin That Kills Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and O26

    PubMed Central

    Eberhart, Lauren J.; Deringer, James R.; Brayton, Kelly A.; Sawant, Ashish A.; Besser, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    A novel phenotype was recently identified in which specific strains of Escherichia coli inhibit competing E. coli strains via a mechanism that was designated “proximity-dependent inhibition” (PDI). PDI-expressing (PDI+) E. coli is known to inhibit susceptible (PDI−) E. coli strains, including several enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) and enterotoxigenic (ETEC) E. coli strains. In this study, every strain from a genetically diverse panel of E. coli O157:H7 (n = 25) and additional strains of E. coli serovar O26 were susceptible to the PDI phenotype. LIVE/DEAD staining was consistent with inhibition by killing of susceptible cells. Comparative genome analysis identified the genetic component of PDI, which is composed of a plasmid-borne (Incl1) operon encoding a putative microcin and associated genes for transport, immunity, and microcin activation. Transfer of the plasmid to a PDI− strain resulted in transfer of the phenotype, and deletion of the genes within the operon resulted in loss of the inhibition phenotype. Deletion of chromosomally encoded tolC also resulted in loss of the inhibitory phenotype, and this confirmed that the putative microcin is most likely secreted via a type I secretion pathway. Deletion of an unrelated plasmid gene did not affect the PDI phenotype. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR demonstrated that microcin expression is correlated with logarithmic-phase growth. The ability to inhibit a diversity of E. coli strains indicates that this microcin may influence gut community composition and could be useful for control of important enteric pathogens. PMID:22773653

  16. Experimental evolution of E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mengshi

    The evolution from unicellular to multicellular behavior is an essential step in the history of life. Our aim is to investigate the emergence of collective behavior in the model organism Escherichia coli (E. coli) and its selection advantages, such as better utilization of public goods. Our preliminary results suggest that the evolution of collective behavior may be a natural response to stressed conditions. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: mengshi0928@gmail.com.

  17. Global regulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, S E; Daniels, D L; Blattner, F R

    1993-01-01

    Global transcription responses of Escherichia coli to various stimuli or genetic defects were studied by measuring mRNA levels in about 400 segments of the genome. Measuring mRNA levels was done by analyzing hybridization to DNA dot blots made with overlapping lambda clones spanning the genome of E. coli K-12. Conditions examined included isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction, heat shock, osmotic shock, starvation for various nutrients, entrance of cells into the stationary phase of growth, anaerobic growth in a tube, growth in the gnotobiotic mouse gut, and effects of pleiotropic mutations rpoH, himA, topA, and crp. Most mapped genes known to be regulated by a particular situation were successfully detected. In addition, many chromosomal regions containing no previously known regulated genes were discovered that responded to various stimuli. This new method for studying globally regulated genetic systems in E. coli combines detection, cloning, and physical mapping of a battery of coregulated genes in one step. Images PMID:8458845

  18. Production of 2-methyl-1-butanol in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cann, Anthony F; Liao, James C

    2008-11-01

    Recent progress has been made in the production of higher alcohols by harnessing the power of natural amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Here, we describe the first strain of Escherichia coli developed to produce the higher alcohol and potential new biofuel 2-methyl-1-butanol (2MB). To accomplish this, we explored the biodiversity of enzymes catalyzing key parts of the isoleucine biosynthetic pathway, finding that AHAS II (ilvGM) from Salmonella typhimurium and threonine deaminase (ilvA) from Corynebacterium glutamicum improve 2MB production the most. Overexpression of the native threonine biosynthetic operon (thrABC) on plasmid without the native transcription regulation also improved 2MB production in E. coli. Finally, we knocked out competing pathways upstream of threonine production (DeltametA, Deltatdh) to increase its availability for further improvement of 2MB production. This work led to a strain of E. coli that produces 1.25 g/L 2MB in 24 h, a total alcohol content of 3 g/L, and with yields of up to 0.17 g 2MB/g glucose.

  19. Heterologous biosynthesis and manipulation of alkanes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ying-Xiu; Xiao, Wen-Hai; Zhang, Jin-Lai; Xie, Ze-Xiong; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-11-01

    Biosynthesis of alkanes in microbial foundries offers a sustainable and green supplement to traditional fossil fuels. The dynamic equilibrium of fatty aldehydes, key intermediates, played a critical role in microbial alkanes production, due to the poor catalytic capability of aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO). In our study, exploration of competitive pathway together with multi-modular optimization was utilized to improve fatty aldehydes balance and consequently enhance alkanes formation in Escherichia coli. Endogenous fatty alcohol formation was supposed to be competitive with alkane production, since both of the two routes consumed the same intermediate-fatty aldehyde. Nevertheless, in our case, alkanes production in E. coli was enhanced from trace amount to 58.8mg/L by the facilitation of moderate fatty alcohol biosynthesis, which was validated by deletion of endogenous aldehyde reductase (AHR), overexpression of fatty alcohol oxidase (FAO) and consequent transcriptional assay of aar, ado and adhP genes. Moreover, alkanes production was further improved to 81.8mg/L, 86.6mg/L or 101.7mg/L by manipulation of fatty acid biosynthesis, lipids degradation or electron transfer system modules, which directly referenced to fatty aldehydes dynamic pools. A titer of 1.31g/L alkanes was achieved in 2.5L fed-batch fermentation, which was the highest reported titer in E. coli. Our research has offered a reference for chemical overproduction in microbial cell factories facilitated by exploring competitive pathway.

  20. Characterization of the YdeO regulon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Oshima, Taku; Ishihama, Akira; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacteria are able to survive under stressful conditions within animals, such as acidic conditions in the stomach, bile salts during transfer to the intestine and anaerobic conditions within the intestine. The glutamate-dependent (GAD) system plays a major role in acid resistance in Escherichia coli, and expression of the GAD system is controlled by the regulatory cascade consisting of EvgAS > YdeO > GadE. To understand the YdeO regulon in vivo, we used ChIP-chip to interrogate the E. coli genome for candidate YdeO binding sites. All of the seven operons identified by ChIP-chip as being potentially regulated by YdeO were confirmed as being under the direct control of YdeO using RT-qPCR, EMSA, DNaseI-footprinting and reporter assays. Within this YdeO regulon, we identified four stress-response transcription factors, DctR, NhaR, GadE, and GadW and enzymes for anaerobic respiration. Both GadE and GadW are involved in regulation of the GAD system and NhaR is an activator for the sodium/proton antiporter gene. In conjunction with co-transcribed Slp, DctR is involved in protection against metabolic endoproducts under acidic conditions. Taken all together, we suggest that YdeO is a key regulator of E. coli survival in both acidic and anaerobic conditions.

  1. Expression pattern of recombinant organophosphorus hydrolase from Flavobacterium sp. ATCC 27551 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Yunyoung; Rhee, In-Koo; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2013-09-01

    Concerned with the influence of tagging system on the expression of heterogeneous protein in Escherichia coli, we attempted to express the organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) of Flavobacterium sp. ATCC 27551 in E. coli. Recombinant OPH was overproduced successfully in E. coli when modified without the use of a tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease cleavage sequence. In addition, though there has never been a report on the extracellular secretion of recombinant OPH harboring native Tat signal peptides in E. coli, the produced protein was observed to be secreted extracellularly. Through the use of reverse transcriptional quantitative real-time PCR and comparison of the predicted folding rate, it was determined that OPH expression may be affected by the existence of a TEV protease cleavage sequence at the C-terminus during the process of translated protein folding, leading to the suppressed OPH activity. With the potential compatibility between native Tat signal peptides of OPH and E. coli Tat pathway secretion system, we report a successful expression of recombinant OPH harboring native Tat signal peptides in E. coli, for the first time.

  2. Serogroups of Escherichia coli from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ramteke, P W; Tewari, Suman

    2007-07-01

    Fifty seven isolates of thermotolerant E. coli were recovered from 188 drinking water sources, 45 (78.9%) were typable of which 15 (26.3%) were pathogenic serotypes. Pathogenic serogroup obtained were 04 (Uropathogenic E. coli, UPEC), 025 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC), 086 (Enteropathogenic E. coli, EPEC), 0103 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 0157 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 08 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC) and 0113 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC). All the pathogenic serotypes showed resistance to bacitracin and multiple heavy metal ions. Resistance to streptomycin and cotrimazole was detected in two strains whereas resistance to cephaloridine, polymixin-B and ampicillin was detected in one strain each. Transfer of resistances to drugs and metallic ions was observed in 9 out of 12 strains studied. Resistances to bacitracin were transferred in all nine strains. Among heavy metals resistance to As(3+) followed by Cr(6+) were transferred more frequently.

  3. In-stream Escherichia coli Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, P.; Soupir, M.

    2013-12-01

    Elevated levels of pathogenic bacteria indicators such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) in streams are a serious concern. Controlling E. coli levels in streams requires improving our existing understanding of fate and transport of E. coli at watershed scale. In-stream E. coli concentrations are potentially linked to non-point pollution sources (i.e., agricultural land). Water of a natural stream can receive E. coli by either through overland flow (via runoff from cropland) or resuspension from the streambed to the water column. Calculating in-stream total E. coli loads requires estimation of particle attached bacteria as well free floating E. coli transport. Currently water quality models commonly used for predicting E. coli levels in stream water have limited capability for predicting E. coli levels in the water column as well as in the streambed sediment. The challenges in calculating in-stream E. coli levels include difficulties in modeling the complex interactions between sediment particles and E. coli. Here we have developed a watershed scale model (integrated with Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)), which involves calculation of particle attached E. coli, to predict in-stream E. coli concentrations. The proposed model predicts E. coli levels in streambed bed sediment as well as in the water column. An extensive in-stream E. coli monitoring was carried out to verify the model predictions, and results indicate that the model performed well. The study proposed here will improve understanding on in-stream bacterial contamination, and help improving existing water quality models for predicting pathogenic bacteria levels in ambient water bodies.

  4. Transcription, translation, and the evolution of specialists and generalists.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shaobin; Miller, Stephen P; Dykhuizen, Daniel E; Dean, Antony M

    2009-12-01

    We used DNA microarrays to measure transcription and iTRAQ 2D liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (a mass-tag labeling proteomic technique) to measure protein expression in 14 strains of Escherichia coli adapted for hundreds of generations to growth-limiting concentrations of either lactulose, methylgalactoside, or a 72:28 mixture of the two. The two ancestors, TD2 and TD10, differ only in their lac operons and have similar transcription and protein expression profiles. Changes in transcription and protein expression are observed at 30-250 genes depending on the evolved strain. Lactulose specialists carry duplications of the lac operon and show increased transcription and translation at lac. Methylgalactoside specialists are galS(-) and so constitutively transcribe and translate mgl, which encodes a transporter of methylgalactoside. However, there are two strains that carry lac duplications, are galS(-), and show increased transcription and translation at both operons. One is a generalist, the other a lactulose specialist. The generalist fails to sweep to fixation because its lac(+), galS(+) competitor expresses the csg adhesin and sticks to the chemostat wall, thereby preventing complete washout. Transcription and translation are sometimes decoupled. Lactulose-adapted strains show increased protein expression at fru, a fructose transporter, without evidence of increased transcription. This suggests that fructose, produced by the action of beta-galactosidase on lactulose, may leach from cells before being recouped. Reduced expression, at "late" flagella genes and the constitutive gat operon, is an adaptation to starvation. A comparison with two other long-term evolution experiments suggests that certain aspects of adaptation are predictable, some are characteristic of an experimental system, whereas others seem erratic.

  5. Investigation of ’Escherichia coli’ Enterotoxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    E . coli diarrheal disease in man and domestic animals. Fundamentally, the design of the vaccine is based on the well- documented ability of cholera antitoxin to neutralize both cholera and heat- labile E . coli enterotoxins and on the ability of certain E . coli antigens to enhance the immune response to cholera toxoid and possibly whole-cell Cholera Vaccine, as

  6. "In Vitro" Synthesis and Activity of Reporter Proteins in an "Escherichia coli" S30 Extract System: An Undergraduate Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Pamela J.

    2005-01-01

    This undergraduate laboratory experiment integrates multiple techniques ("in vitro" synthesis, enzyme assays, Western blotting) to determine the production and detection sensitivity of two common reporter proteins (beta-galactosidase and luciferase) within an "Escherichia coli" S30 transcription/translation extract. Comparison of the data suggests…

  7. Thermodynamic modeling of variations in the rate of RNA chain elongation of E. coli rrn operons.

    PubMed

    Fange, David; Mellenius, Harriet; Dennis, Patrick P; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2014-01-07

    Previous electron-microscopic imaging has shown high RNA polymerase occupation densities in the 16S and 23S encoding regions and low occupation densities in the noncoding leader, spacer, and trailer regions of the rRNA (rrn) operons in E. coli. This indicates slower transcript elongation within the coding regions and faster elongation within the noncoding regions of the operon. Inactivation of four of the seven rrn operons increases the transcript initiation frequency at the promoters of the three intact operons and reduces the time for RNA polymerase to traverse the operon. We have used the DNA sequence-dependent standard free energy variation of the transcription complex to model the experimentally observed changes in the elongation rate along the rrnB operon. We also model the stimulation of the average transcription rate over the whole operon by increasing rate of transcript initiation. Monte Carlo simulations, taking into account initiation of transcription, translocation, and backward and forward tracking of RNA polymerase, partially reproduce the observed transcript elongation rate variations along the rrn operon and fully account for the increased average rate in response to increased frequency of transcript initiation.

  8. Phage Genetic Sites Involved in λ Growth Inhibition by the Escherichia Coli Rap Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, P.; Guarneros, G.

    1989-01-01

    The rap mutation of Escherichia coli prevents the growth of bacteriophage λ. We have isolated phage mutants that compensate for the host deficiency. The mutations, named bar, were genetically located to three different loci of the λ genome: barI in the attP site, barII in the cIII ea10 region, and barIII within or very near the imm434 region. The level of λ leftward transcription correlates with rap exclusion. Phage λ mutants partially defective in the pL promoter or in pL-transcript antitermination showed a Bar(-) phenotype. Conversely, mutants constitutive for transcription from the pI or pL promoters were excluded more stringently by rap bacteria. We conclude that rap exclusion depends on the magnitude of transcription through the wild type bar loci in the phage genome. PMID:2523838

  9. The complex choreography of transcription-coupled repair.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Graciela; Ganesan, Ann K

    2014-07-01

    A quarter of a century has elapsed since the discovery of transcription-coupled repair (TCR), and yet our fascination with this process has not diminished. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a versatile pathway that removes helix-distorting DNA lesions from the genomes of organisms across the evolutionary scale, from bacteria to humans. TCR, defined as a subpathway of NER, is dedicated to the repair of lesions that, by virtue of their location on the transcribed strands of active genes, encumber elongation by RNA polymerases. In this review, we will report on newly identified proteins, protein modifications, and protein complexes that participate in TCR in Escherichia coli and in human cells. We will discuss general models for the biochemical pathways and how and when cells might choose to utilize TCR or other pathways for repair or bypass of transcription-blocking DNA alterations.

  10. Predicting non-coding RNA genes in Escherichia coli with boosted genetic programming.

    PubMed

    Saetrom, Pål; Sneve, Ragnhild; Kristiansen, Knut I; Snøve, Ola; Grünfeld, Thomas; Rognes, Torbjørn; Seeberg, Erling

    2005-01-01

    Several methods exist for predicting non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes in Escherichia coli (E.coli). In addition to about sixty known ncRNA genes excluding tRNAs and rRNAs, various methods have predicted more than thousand ncRNA genes, but only 95 of these candidates were confirmed by more than one study. Here, we introduce a new method that uses automatic discovery of sequence patterns to predict ncRNA genes. The method predicts 135 novel candidates. In addition, the method predicts 152 genes that overlap with predictions in the literature. We test sixteen predictions experimentally, and show that twelve of these are actual ncRNA transcripts. Six of the twelve verified candidates were novel predictions. The relatively high confirmation rate indicates that many of the untested novel predictions are also ncRNAs, and we therefore speculate that E.coli contains more ncRNA genes than previously estimated.

  11. Over-expression of phage HK022 Nun protein is toxic for Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Uc-Mass, Augusto; Khodursky, Arkady; Brown, Lewis; Gottesman, Max E.

    2008-01-01

    The Nun protein of coliphage HK022 excludes superinfecting λ phage. Nun recognizes and binds to the N utilization (nut) sites on phage λ nascent RNA and induces transcription termination. Over-expression of Nun from a high-copy plasmid is toxic for E.coli, despite the fact that nut sites are not encoded in the E.coli genome. Cells expressing Nun cannot exit stationary phase. Toxicity is related to transcription termination, since host and nun mutations that block termination also suppress cell killing. Nun inhibits expression of wild-type lacZ, but not lacZ expressed from the Crp/cAMP–independent lacUV5 promoter. Microarray and proteomics analyses show Nun down-regulates crp and tnaA. Crp over-expression and high indole concentrations partially reverse Nun-mediated toxicity and restore lacZ expression. PMID:18571198

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of Shiga-toxigenic bacteriophage carriage reveals a profound regulatory effect on acid resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Veses-Garcia, Marta; Liu, Xuan; Rigden, Daniel J; Kenny, John G; McCarthy, Alan J; Allison, Heather E

    2015-12-01

    Shiga-toxigenic bacteriophages are converting lambdoid phages that impart the ability to produce Shiga toxin to their hosts. Little is known about the function of most of the genes carried by these phages or the impact that lysogeny has on the Escherichia coli host. Here we use next-generation sequencing to compare the transcriptomes of E. coli strains infected with an Stx phage, before and after triggering of the bacterial SOS response that initiates the lytic cycle of the phage. We were able to discriminate between bacteriophage genes expressed in the lysogenic and lytic cycles, and we describe transcriptional changes that occur in the bacterial host as a consequence of Stx phage carriage. Having identified upregulation of the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) operon, confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we used phenotypic assays to establish the ability of the Stx prophage to confer a greater acid resistance phenotype on the E. coli host. Known phage regulators were overexpressed in E. coli, and the acid resistance of the recombinant strains was tested. The phage-encoded transcriptional regulator CII was identified as the controller of the acid response in the lysogen. Infection of an E. coli O157 strain, from which integrated Stx prophages were previously removed, showed increased acid resistance following infection with a nontoxigenic phage, ϕ24B. In addition to demonstrating this link between Stx phage carriage and E. coli acid resistance, with its implications for survival postingestion, the data set provides a number of other potential insights into the impact of lambdoid phage carriage on the biology of E. coli.

  13. Quorum quenching analysis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli: network topology and inhibition mechanism effect on the optimized inhibitor dose.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Andrés Fernando González; Covo, Virginia; Medina, Luis Miguel; Vives-Florez, Martha; Achenie, Luke

    2009-06-01

    The discovery of quorum sensing as a mechanism for regulating specific phenotypes in bacteria based on population density has conveyed attention to find molecules capable of interfering quorum sensing networks (QSN) in a process coined quorum quenching. Here, we examined the dynamics of Escherichia coli AI-2 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa QSN exposed to signal degraders or competitors for binding transcriptional regulators. Stability analysis was performed for E. coli and P. aeruginosa finding no multistability in E. coli. However, our model allowed to discern that quenchers influence P. aeruginosa QSN multistability by reducing the interval of the amount of molecules of the extracellular signal that originate several steady states. We proposed a simulated annealing algorithm to optimize the quencher dose based on stochastic kinetics. E. coli QSN requires around 640 while P. aeruginosa QSN needs 253 quencher molecules per microorganism. This dose was found to be negatively influenced by the quencher-signal affinity.

  14. Clinical Implications of Enteroadherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M.P.; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli enteropathogenic E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including non-intimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called “enteroadherent E. coli ” categories subsequently produced toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  15. The small noncoding DsrA RNA is an acid resistance regulator in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lease, Richard A; Smith, Dorie; McDonough, Kathleen; Belfort, Marlene

    2004-09-01

    DsrA RNA is a small (87-nucleotide) regulatory RNA of Escherichia coli that acts by RNA-RNA interactions to control translation and turnover of specific mRNAs. Two targets of DsrA regulation are RpoS, the stationary-phase and stress response sigma factor (sigmas), and H-NS, a histone-like nucleoid protein and global transcription repressor. Genes regulated globally by RpoS and H-NS include stress response proteins and virulence factors for pathogenic E. coli. Here, by using transcription profiling via DNA arrays, we have identified genes induced by DsrA. Steady-state levels of mRNAs from many genes increased with DsrA overproduction, including multiple acid resistance genes of E. coli. Quantitative primer extension analysis verified the induction of individual acid resistance genes in the hdeAB, gadAX, and gadBC operons. E. coli K-12 strains, as well as pathogenic E. coli O157:H7, exhibited compromised acid resistance in dsrA mutants. Conversely, overproduction of DsrA from a plasmid rendered the acid-sensitive dsrA mutant extremely acid resistant. Thus, DsrA RNA plays a regulatory role in acid resistance. Whether DsrA targets acid resistance genes directly by base pairing or indirectly via perturbation of RpoS and/or H-NS is not known, but in either event, our results suggest that DsrA RNA may enhance the virulence of pathogenic E. coli.

  16. Whole-Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli Serotype O157:H7 Strain PA20

    PubMed Central

    Paoli, George C.; Zhang, Xinmin; Dudley, Edward G.; Figler, Hillary M.; Cottrell, Bryan J.; Andreozzi, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 strain PA20 is a Pennsylvania Department of Health clinical isolate. It has been used to study biofilm formation in O157:H7 clinical isolates, where the high incidence of prophage insertions in the mlrA transcription factor disrupts traditional csgD biofilm regulation. Here, we report the complete PA20 genome sequence. PMID:28082498

  17. MarA-mediated transcriptional repression of the rob promoter.

    PubMed

    Schneiders, Thamarai; Levy, Stuart B

    2006-04-14

    The Escherichia coli transcriptional regulator MarA affects functions that include antibiotic resistance, persistence, and survival. MarA functions as an activator or repressor of transcription utilizing similar degenerate DNA sequences (marboxes) with three different binding site configurations with respect to the RNA polymerase-binding sites. We demonstrate that MarA down-regulates rob transcripts both in vivo and in vitro via a MarA-binding site within the rob promoter that is positioned between the -10 and -35 hexamers. As for the hdeA and purA promoters, which are repressed by MarA, the rob marbox is also in the "backward" orientation. Protein-DNA interactions show that SoxS and Rob, like MarA, bind the same marbox in the rob promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift analyses with a MarA-specific antibody demonstrate that MarA and RNA polymerase form a ternary complex with the rob promoter DNA. Transcription experiments in vitro and potassium permanganate footprinting analysis show that MarA affects the RNA polymerase-mediated closed to open complex formation at the rob promoter.

  18. Transcriptional Network Growing Models Using Motif-Based Preferential Attachment.

    PubMed

    Abdelzaher, Ahmed F; Al-Musawi, Ahmad F; Ghosh, Preetam; Mayo, Michael L; Perkins, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding relationships between architectural properties of gene-regulatory networks (GRNs) has been one of the major goals in systems biology and bioinformatics, as it can provide insights into, e.g., disease dynamics and drug development. Such GRNs are characterized by their scale-free degree distributions and existence of network motifs - i.e., small-node subgraphs that occur more abundantly in GRNs than expected from chance alone. Because these transcriptional modules represent "building blocks" of complex networks and exhibit a wide range of functional and dynamical properties, they may contribute to the remarkable robustness and dynamical stability associated with the whole of GRNs. Here, we developed network-construction models to better understand this relationship, which produce randomized GRNs by using transcriptional motifs as the fundamental growth unit in contrast to other methods that construct similar networks on a node-by-node basis. Because this model produces networks with a prescribed lower bound on the number of choice transcriptional motifs (e.g., downlinks, feed-forward loops), its fidelity to the motif distributions observed in model organisms represents an improvement over existing methods, which we validated by contrasting their resultant motif and degree distributions against existing network-growth models and data from the model organism of the bacterium Escherichia coli. These models may therefore serve as novel testbeds for further elucidating relationships between the topology of transcriptional motifs and network-wide dynamical properties.

  19. Transcription of a yeast ribosomal RNA minigene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Quincey, R V; Arnold, R E

    1984-01-01

    A transcription system using intact yeast has been developed for investigating which sequences are implicated in the initiation of transcription of yeast rRNA genes. The system employs an rRNA minigene that consists of the initiation and termination sites for rRNA biosynthesis separated by approx. 700 base pairs of vector DNA in the Escherichia coli-yeast shuttle vector, pJDB207. Two recombinants containing this minigene were constructed; one retained all of the nontranscribed spacer DNA upstream from the initiation site, the other retained 208 base pairs of this DNA. Transcripts of this structurally unique minigene in RNA from yeast transformed with these recombinants were readily detected by nuclease S1 mapping. These transcripts were initiated at the site used by the host rRNA genes, were approx. 3-fold more abundant in the recombinant retaining all of the nontranscribed spacer and were less abundant when the yeast was not growing. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6097222

  20. Apolipoprotein A1 in channel catfish: Transcriptional analysis, antimicrobial activity, and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) determine transcriptional profiles of apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) in collected channel catfish tissues after infection with A. hydrophila by bath immersion; 2) investigate whether recombinant channel catfish apolipoprotein A1 produced in E. coli expression syst...

  1. Priority of pentose utilization at the level of transcription: arabinose, xylose, and ribose operons.

    PubMed

    Kang, H Y; Song, S; Park, C

    1998-06-30

    When E. coli cells were grown in minimal medium supplemented with D-ribose and D-xylose, a diauxic growth preferring D-xylose was observed. Transcription of the ribose (rbs) operon was repressed in the presence of D-xylose, phenotypically similar to catabolite repression by D-glucose, although D-ribose did not affect transcription of the xylose (xyl) operon. Complementation analysis with xylR revealed that the repression of the rbs operon by D-xylose is exerted at the transcriptional level through XylR, suggesting a novel mechanism for catabolite repression. Furthermore, it was shown that L-arabinose reduced transcriptions of both xyl and rbs operons, whereas the arabinose operon was not affected by D-xylose or D-ribose, suggesting a priority mechanism for pentose utilization.

  2. Concentration- and chromosome-organization-dependent regulator unbinding from DNA for transcription regulation in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tai-Yen; Santiago, Ace George; Jung, Won; Krzemiński, Łukasz; Yang, Feng; Martell, Danya J.; Helmann, John D.; Chen, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Binding and unbinding of transcription regulators at operator sites constitute a primary mechanism for gene regulation. While many cellular factors are known to regulate their binding, little is known on how cells can modulate their unbinding for regulation. Using nanometer-precision single-molecule tracking, we study the unbinding kinetics from DNA of two metal-sensing transcription regulators in living Escherichia coli cells. We find that they show unusual concentration-dependent unbinding kinetics from chromosomal recognition sites in both their apo and holo forms. Unexpectedly, their unbinding kinetics further varies with the extent of chromosome condensation, and more surprisingly, varies in opposite ways for their apo-repressor versus holo-activator forms. These findings suggest likely broadly relevant mechanisms for facile switching between transcription activation and deactivation in vivo and in coordinating transcription regulation of resistance genes with the cell cycle. PMID:26145755

  3. Understanding the Role of Housekeeping and Stress-Related Genes in Transcription-Regulatory Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Allison; Kavraki, Lydia; Balázsi, Gábor

    2008-03-01

    Despite the increasing number of completely sequenced genomes, much remains to be learned about how living cells process environmental information and respond to changes in their surroundings. Accumulating evidence indicates that eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes can be classified in two distinct categories that we will call class I and class II. Class I genes are housekeeping genes, often characterized by stable, noise resistant expression levels. In contrast, class II genes are stress-related genes and often have noisy, unstable expression levels. In this work we analyze the large scale transcription-regulatory networks (TRN) of E. coli and S. cerevisiae and preliminary data on H. sapien. We find that stable, housekeeping genes (class I) are preferentially utilized as transcriptional inputs while stress related, unstable genes (class II) are utilized as transcriptional integrators. This might be the result of convergent evolution that placed the appropriate genes in the appropriate locations within transcriptional networks according to some fundamental principles that govern cellular information processing.

  4. Substitutions in Bacteriophage T4 AsiA and Escherichia coli ς70 That Suppress T4 motA Activation Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cicero, Marco P.; Sharp, Meghan M.; Gross, Carol A.; Kreuzer, Kenneth N.

    2001-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 middle-mode transcription requires two phage-encoded proteins, the MotA transcription factor and AsiA coactivator, along with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme containing the ς70 subunit. A motA positive control (pc) mutant, motA-pc1, was used to select for suppressor mutations that alter other proteins in the transcription complex. Separate genetic selections isolated two AsiA mutants (S22F and Q51E) and five ς70 mutants (Y571C, Y571H, D570N, L595P, and S604P). All seven suppressor mutants gave partial suppressor phenotypes in vivo as judged by plaque morphology and burst size measurements. The S22F mutant AsiA protein and glutathione S-transferase fusions of the five mutant ς70 proteins were purified. All of these mutant proteins allowed normal levels of in vitro transcription when tested with wild-type MotA protein, but they failed to suppress the mutant MotA-pc1 protein in the same assay. The ς70 substitutions affected the 4.2 region, which binds the −35 sequence of E. coli promoters. In the presence of E. coli RNA polymerase without T4 proteins, the L595P and S604P substitutions greatly decreased transcription from standard E. coli promoters. This defect could not be explained solely by a disruption in −35 recognition since similar results were obtained with extended −10 promoters. The generalized transcriptional defect of these two mutants correlated with a defect in binding to core RNA polymerase, as judged by immunoprecipitation analysis. The L595P mutant, which was the most defective for in vitro transcription, failed to support E. coli growth. PMID:11244069

  5. Purification in an active form of the phage phi 29 protein p4 that controls the viral late transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Barthelemy, I; Lázaro, J M; Méndez, E; Mellado, R P; Salas, M

    1987-01-01

    The phage phi 29 protein p4, that controls viral late transcription, was highly purified from Escherichia coli cells harbouring a gene 4-containing plasmid. This protein, representing about 6% of the total cellular protein, was obtained in a highly purified form. The protein was characterized as p4 by amino acid analysis and NH2-terminal sequence determination. The purified protein was active in an in vitro transcription assay, allowing specific initiation of transcription at the phi 29 A3 late promoter in the presence of Bacillus subtilis sigma 43-RNA polymerase holoenzyme. Images PMID:3671066

  6. Effects of sound exposure on the growth and intracellular macromolecular synthesis of E. coli k-12

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongzhu; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Microbes, as one of the primary producers of the biosphere, play an important role in ecosystems. Exploring the mechanism of adaptation and resistance of microbial population to various environmental factors has come into focus in the fields of modern microbial ecology and molecular ecology. However, facing the increasingly serious problem of acoustic pollution, very few efforts have been put forth into studying the relation of single cell organisms and sound field exposure. Herein, we studied the biological effects of sound exposure on the growth of E. coli K-12 with different acoustic parameters. The effects of sound exposure on the intracellular macromolecular synthesis and cellular morphology of E. coli K-12 were also analyzed and discussed. Experimental results indicated that E. coli K-12 exposed to sound waves owned a higher biomass and a faster specific growth rate compared to the control group. Also, the average length of E. coli K-12 cells increased more than 27.26%. The maximum biomass and maximum specific growth rate of the stimulation group by 8000 Hz, 80dB sound wave was about 1.7 times and 2.5 times that of the control group, respectively. Moreover, it was observed that E. coli K-12 can respond rapidly to sound stress at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels by promoting the synthesis of intracellular RNA and total protein. Some potential mechanisms may be involved in the responses of bacterial cells to sound stress. PMID:27077011

  7. Observed surface lysine acetylation of human carbonic anhydrase II expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Brian P; Lomelino, Carrie L; Salguero, Antonieta L; Driscoll, Jenna M; Pinard, Melissa A; McKenna, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Acetylation of surface lysine residues of proteins has been observed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), an organism that has been extensively utilized for recombinant protein expression. This post-translational modification is shown to be important in various processes such as metabolism, stress-response, transcription, and translation. As such, utilization of E. coli expression systems for protein production may yield non-native acetylation events of surface lysine residues. Here we present the crystal structures of wild-type and a variant of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) that have been expressed in E. coli and exhibit surface lysine acetylation and we speculate on the effect this has on the conformational stability of each enzyme. Both structures were determined to 1.6 Å resolution and show clear electron density for lysine acetylation. The lysine acetylation does not distort the structure and the surface lysine acetylation events most likely do not interfere with the biological interpretation. However, there is a reduction in conformational stability in the hCA II variant compared to wild type (∼4°C decrease). This may be due to other lysine acetylation events that have occurred but are not visible in the crystal structure due to intrinsic disorder. Therefore, surface lysine acetylation events may affect overall protein stability and crystallization, and should be considered when using E. coli expression systems. PMID:26266677

  8. Tellurite-exposed Escherichia coli exhibits increased intracellular {alpha}-ketoglutarate

    SciTech Connect

    Reinoso, Claudia A.; Auger, Christopher; Appanna, Vasu D.; Vasquez, Claudio C.

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tellurite-exposed E. coli exhibits decreased {alpha}-KG dehydrogenase activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells lacking {alpha}-KGDH genes are more sensitive to ROS than isogenic, wt E. coli. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KG accumulation may serve to face tellurite-mediated oxidative damage in E. coli. -- Abstract: The tellurium oxyanion tellurite is toxic to most organisms because of its ability to generate oxidative stress. However, the detailed mechanism(s) how this toxicant interferes with cellular processes have yet to be fully understood. As part of our effort to decipher the molecular interactions of tellurite with living systems, we have evaluated the global metabolism of {alpha}-ketoglutarate a known antioxidant in Escherichia coli. Tellurite-exposed cells displayed reduced activity of the KG dehydrogenase complex (KGDHc), resulting in increased intracellular KG content. This complex's reduced activity seems to be due to decreased transcription in the stressed cells of sucA, a gene that encodes the E1 component of KGDHc. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the increase in total reactive oxygen species and superoxide observed upon tellurite exposure was more evident in wild type cells than in E. coli with impaired KGDHc activity. These results indicate that KG may be playing a pivotal role in combating tellurite-mediated oxidative damage.

  9. Effects of sound exposure on the growth and intracellular macromolecular synthesis of E. coli k-12.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shaobin; Zhang, Yongzhu; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Microbes, as one of the primary producers of the biosphere, play an important role in ecosystems. Exploring the mechanism of adaptation and resistance of microbial population to various environmental factors has come into focus in the fields of modern microbial ecology and molecular ecology. However, facing the increasingly serious problem of acoustic pollution, very few efforts have been put forth into studying the relation of single cell organisms and sound field exposure. Herein, we studied the biological effects of sound exposure on the growth of E. coli K-12 with different acoustic parameters. The effects of sound exposure on the intracellular macromolecular synthesis and cellular morphology of E. coli K-12 were also analyzed and discussed. Experimental results indicated that E. coli K-12 exposed to sound waves owned a higher biomass and a faster specific growth rate compared to the control group. Also, the average length of E. coli K-12 cells increased more than 27.26%. The maximum biomass and maximum specific growth rate of the stimulation group by 8000 Hz, 80dB sound wave was about 1.7 times and 2.5 times that of the control group, respectively. Moreover, it was observed that E. coli K-12 can respond rapidly to sound stress at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels by promoting the synthesis of intracellular RNA and total protein. Some potential mechanisms may be involved in the responses of bacterial cells to sound stress.

  10. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  11. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-24

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  12. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics. PMID:28233824

  13. The Stress Response of Escherichia coli under Microgravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, S.; Matin, A.

    At the onset of adverse environmental conditions, bacteria induce a controlled stress response to enable survival. Escherichia coli induces stress-specific reactions in response to a variety of environmental strains. A family of proteins termed sigma (s) factors is pivotal to the regulation of stress responses in bacteria. In particular Sigma S (ss) regulates several stress responses in E. coli and serves as an important global stress regulatory protein. Under optimal growth conditions, levels of ss are maintained at low cellular concentrations primarily via a proteolytic regulatory mechanism. At the onset of stress, ss levels increase due to increased stability of the molecule, facilitating transcriptional initiation and up regulation of specific stress related proteins. Concentrations of ss can therefore be indicative of cellular stress levels. Recent work by Kendrick et al demonstrated that Salmonella species grown under conditions of simulated microgravity display increased virulence - a stress-related phenotype. Using E. coli as a model system we aim to investigate the stress response elicited by the organism under conditions of simulated microgravity (SMG). SMG is generated in specially constructed rotary cell culture systems termed HARVs (High Aspect Ratio Vessels- Synthecon Inc.). By rotating at constant velocity around a vertical axis an environment is produced in which the gravitational vectors are randomized over the surface of the cell, resulting in an overall-time-averaged gravitational vector of 10-2 x g (4). E. coli cultures grown in HARVs under conditions of normal gravity (NG) and SMG repeatedly display slower growth kinetics under SMG. Western analysis of cells at exponential and stationary phase of growth from both cultures reveal similar levels of ss exist in exponential phase under both SMG and NG conditions. However, during stationary phase, levels of ss are at least 2-fold higher under conditions of SMG as compared to NG. Translational fusion

  14. Intestinal Colonization by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    E . coli is mediated by specific types of pili. These pili are antigenic and can be used in diagnosing enterotoxigenic E . coli infections. They are also good protective antigens. When pregnant dams are vaccinated parenterally or orally with pili on live piliated bacteria, they secrete antibodies against the pili in their milk. Neonates suckling dams so vaccinated are passively protected against fatal challenge by enterotoxigenic E . coli . Pili are also good candidate protective antigens for the development of vaccines to protect by

  15. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO LIVE E. COLI ORGANISMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    shock and shock produced by injection of live E . coli organisms in dogs. A primary purpose of our research has been to determine the effects of...intravenous injections of living E . coli organisms in dogs and monkeys and compare them with responses produced by endotoxin. Hemodynamic changes...pathologic alterations, and metabolic abnormalities have been evaluated in animals receiving lethal and sublethal injections of live E . coli organisms and comparable dosages of purified endotoxin.

  16. Time-series analysis of the transcriptome and proteome of Escherichia coli upon glucose repression.

    PubMed

    Borirak, Orawan; Rolfe, Matthew D; de Koning, Leo J; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; Bekker, Martijn; Dekker, Henk L; Roseboom, Winfried; Green, Jeffrey; de Koster, Chris G; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2015-10-01

    Time-series transcript- and protein-profiles were measured upon initiation of carbon catabolite repression in Escherichia coli, in order to investigate the extent of post-transcriptional control in this prototypical response. A glucose-limited chemostat culture was used as the CCR-free reference condition. Stopping the pump and simultaneously adding a pulse of glucose, that saturated the cells for at least 1h, was used to initiate the glucose response. Samples were collected and subjected to quantitative time-series analysis of both the transcriptome (using microarray analysis) and the proteome (through a combination of 15N-metabolic labeling and mass spectrometry). Changes in the transcriptome and corresponding proteome were analyzed using statistical procedures designed specifically for time-series data. By comparison of the two sets of data, a total of 96 genes were identified that are post-transcriptionally regulated. This gene list provides candidates for future in-depth investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved in post-transcriptional regulation during carbon catabolite repression in E. coli, like the involvement of small RNAs.

  17. Presence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, Enteroinvasive E. coli, Enteropathogenic E. coli, and Enterotoxigenic E. coli on tomatoes from public markets in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aldapa, Carlos A; Torres-Vitela, M Del Refugio; Acevedo-Sandoval, Otilio A; Rangel-Vargas, Esmeralda; Villarruel-López, Angélica; Castro-Rosas, Andjavier

    2013-09-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes (DEP) are important foodborne pathogens in various countries, including Mexico. However, no data exist on the presence of DEP on fresh tomatoes (Solanum lycopericum) from Mexico. The frequency of fecal coliforms (FC), E. coli, and DEP were determined for two tomato varieties. One hundred samples of a saladette tomato variety and 100 samples of a red round tomato variety were collected from public markets in Pachuca, Mexico. Each tomato sample consisted of four whole tomatoes. For the 100 saladette samples, coliform bacterial, FC, E. coli, and DEP were identified in 100, 70, 60, and 10% of samples, respectively. For the 100 red round samples, coliform bacterial, FC, E. coli, and DEP were identified in 100, 75, 65, and 11% of samples, respectively. Identified DEP included Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). STEC were isolated from 6% of saladette samples and 5% of red round samples. ETEC were isolated from 3% of saladette samples and 4% of red round samples. EPEC were isolated from 2% of saladette samples and 3% of red round samples, and EIEC were isolated from 1% of saladette samples. Both STEC and ETEC were identified in two saladette samples and 1 red round sample. E. coli O157:H7 was not detected in any STEC-positive samples.

  18. Evidence-based annotation of transcripts and proteins in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Price, Morgan N; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Liu, Haichuan; Witkowska, H Ewa; Arkin, Adam P

    2011-10-01

    We used high-resolution tiling microarrays and 5' RNA sequencing to identify transcripts in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, a model sulfate-reducing bacterium. We identified the first nucleotide position for 1,124 transcripts, including 54 proteins with leaderless transcripts and another 72 genes for which a major transcript initiates within the upstream protein-coding gene, which confounds measurements of the upstream gene's expression. Sequence analysis of these promoters showed that D. vulgaris prefers -10 and -35 boxes different from those preferred by Escherichia coli. A total of 549 transcripts ended at intrinsic (rho-independent) terminators, but most of the other transcripts seemed to have variable ends. We found low-level antisense expression of most genes, and the 5' ends of these transcripts mapped to promoter-like sequences. Because antisense expression was reduced for highly expressed genes, we suspect that elongation of nonspecific antisense transcripts is suppressed by transcription of the sense strand. Finally, we combined the transcript results with comparative analysis and proteomics data to make 505 revisions to the original annotation of 3,531 proteins: we removed 255 (7.5%) proteins, changed 123 (3.6%) start codons, and added 127 (3.7%) proteins that had been missed. Tiling data had higher coverage than shotgun proteomics and hence led to most of the corrections, but many errors probably remain. Our data are available at http://genomics.lbl.gov/supplemental/DvHtranscripts2011/.

  19. Phenotypic bistability in Escherichia coli's central carbon metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kotte, Oliver; Volkmer, Benjamin; Radzikowski, Jakub L; Heinemann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations in intracellular molecule abundance can lead to distinct, coexisting phenotypes in isogenic populations. Although metabolism continuously adapts to unpredictable environmental changes, and although bistability was found in certain substrate-uptake pathways, central carbon metabolism is thought to operate deterministically. Here, we combine experiment and theory to demonstrate that a clonal Escherichia coli population splits into two stochastically generated phenotypic subpopulations after glucose-gluconeogenic substrate shifts. Most cells refrain from growth, entering a dormant persister state that manifests as a lag phase in the population growth curve. The subpopulation-generating mechanism resides at the metabolic core, overarches the metabolic and transcriptional networks, and only allows the growth of cells initially achieving sufficiently high gluconeogenic flux. Thus, central metabolism does not ensure the gluconeogenic growth of individual cells, but uses a population-level adaptation resulting in responsive diversification upon nutrient changes. PMID:24987115

  20. RNA Sequencing Identifies New RNase III Cleavage Sites in Escherichia coli and Reveals Increased Regulation of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Gina C; Cameron, Jeffrey C; Pfleger, Brian F

    2017-03-28

    Ribonucleases facilitate rapid turnover of RNA, providing cells with another mechanism to adjust transcript and protein levels in response to environmental conditions. While many examples have been documented, a comprehensive list of RNase targets is not available. To address this knowledge gap, we compared levels of RNA sequencing coverage of Escherichia coli and a corresponding RNase III mutant to expand the list of known RNase III targets. RNase III is a widespread endoribonuclease that binds and cleaves double-stranded RNA in many critical transcripts. RNase III cleavage at novel sites found in aceEF, proP, tnaC, dctA, pheM, sdhC, yhhQ, glpT, aceK, and gluQ accelerated RNA decay, consistent with previously described targets wherein RNase III cleavage initiates rapid degradation of secondary messages by other RNases. In contrast, cleavage at three novel sites in the ahpF, pflB, and yajQ transcripts led to stabilized secondary transcripts. Two other novel sites in hisL and pheM overlapped with transcriptional attenuators that likely serve to ensure turnover of these highly structured RNAs. Many of the new RNase III target sites are located on transcripts encoding metabolic enzymes. For instance, two novel RNase III sites are located within transcripts encoding enzymes near a key metabolic node connecting glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was increased in an rnc deletion mutant compared to the wild-type (WT) strain in early stationary phase, confirming the novel link between RNA turnover and regulation of pathway activity. Identification of these novel sites suggests that mRNA turnover may be an underappreciated mode of regulating metabolism.IMPORTANCE The concerted action and overlapping functions of endoribonucleases, exoribonucleases, and RNA processing enzymes complicate the study of global RNA turnover and recycling of specific transcripts. More information about RNase specificity and activity is needed to make

  1. Influence of Long Time Storage in Mineral Water on RNA Stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli after Heat Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Cenciarini, Claire; Courtois, Sophie; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Background Research of RNA viability markers was previously studied for many bacterial species. Few and different targets of each species have been checked and motley results can be found in literature. No research has been done about Pseudomonas aeruginosa in this way. Methodology/Principal Findings Disappearance of 48 transcripts was analyzed by two-steps reverse transcription and real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) after heat-killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa previously stored in mineral water or not. Differential results were obtained for each target. 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, groEL, and rpmE were showed as the most persistent transcripts and rplP, rplV, rplE and rpsD were showed as the most labile transcripts after P. aeruginosa death. However, the labile targets appeared more persistent in bacteria previously stored in mineral water than freshly cultivated (non stored). These nine transcripts were also analyzed in Escherichia coli after heat-killing and different to opposite results were obtained, notably for groEL which was the most labile transcript of E. coli. Moreover, opposite results were obtained between mineral water stored and freshly cultivated E. coli. Conclusions and Significance This study highlights four potential viability markers for P. aeruginosa and four highly persistent transcripts. In a near future, these targets could be associated to develop an efficient viability kit. The present study also suggests that it would be difficult to determine universal RNA viability markers for environmental bacteria, since opposite results were obtained depending on the bacterial species and the physiological conditions. PMID:18941615

  2. Transcription of Trypanosoma brucei maxicircles

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, E.F.; Hajduk, S.L.

    1987-05-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite which developmentally regulates mitochondrial activity. In the mammal T. brucei produces ATP entirely by glycolysis while cytochrome mediated respiration resumes in the life-stage in the midgut of the insect vector. Using quantitative S1 nuclease protection assays two types of regulation of the steady state levels of the mitochondrial transcripts were found. Transcription of cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase, and the rRNA genes is repressed in early bloodstream developmental stages, undergoes dramatic activation in later bloodstream stages, and finally a lesser activation in the insect developmental stage. Transcription of NADH dehydrogenase genes, however, is unregulated. Mitochondrial transcripts with a 5' triphosphate terminus, representing the site of transcription initiation, were capped using guanylyl transferase. The in vitro capped RNA hybridized to only one of eight mitochondrial restriction fragments on a Southern blot, however, hybridization of Southern blots with RNA from ..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P-UTP pulsed mitochondria labelled all restriction fragments equally. These results suggest that each DNA strand has a single promoter which directs the transcription of a full-length RNA which is subsequently processed. Different mitochondrial genes, despite being expressed on the same precursor RNA molecule, are independently regulated by both transcription initiation and RNA processing.

  3. AthaMap, integrating transcriptional and post-transcriptional data

    PubMed Central

    Bülow, Lorenz; Engelmann, Stefan; Schindler, Martin; Hehl, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for the whole Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap has now been extended to include data on post-transcriptional regulation. A total of 403 173 genomic positions of small RNAs have been mapped in the A. thaliana genome. These identify 5772 putative post-transcriptionally regulated target genes. AthaMap tools have been modified to improve the identification of common TFBS in co-regulated genes by subtracting post-transcriptionally regulated genes from such analyses. Furthermore, AthaMap was updated to the TAIR7 genome annotation, a graphic display of gene analysis results was implemented, and the TFBS data content was increased. AthaMap is freely available at http://www.athamap.de/. PMID:18842622

  4. The dynamic nature and territory of transcriptional machinery in the bacterial chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ding J.; Cagliero, Cedric; Martin, Carmen M.; Izard, Jerome; Zhou, Yan N.

    2015-01-01

    Our knowledge of the regulation of genes involved in bacterial growth and stress responses is extensive; however, we have only recently begun to understand how environmental cues influence the dynamic, three-dimensional distribution of RNA polymerase (RNAP) in Escherichia coli on the level of single cell, using wide-field fluorescence microscopy and state-of-the-art imaging techniques. Live-cell imaging using either an agarose-embedding procedure or a microfluidic system further underscores the dynamic nature of the distribution of RNAP in response to changes in the environment and highlights the challenges in the study. A general agreement between live-cell and fixed-cell images has validated the formaldehyde-fixing procedure, which is a technical breakthrough in the study of the cell biology of RNAP. In this review we use a systems biology perspective to summarize the advances in the cell biology of RNAP in E. coli, including the discoveries of the bacterial nucleolus, the spatial compartmentalization of the transcription machinery at the periphery of the nucleoid, and the segregation of the chromosome territories for the two major cellular functions of transcription and replication in fast-growing cells. Our understanding of the coupling of transcription and bacterial chromosome (or nucleoid) structure is also summarized. Using E. coli as a simple model system, co-imaging of RNAP with DNA and other factors during growth and stress responses will continue to be a useful tool for studying bacterial growth and adaptation in changing environment. PMID:26052320

  5. Transcription regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiquan; Ma, Yingfang; Wang, Yitian; Yang, Haixia; Shen, Wei; Chen, Xianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Phage diversity significantly contributes to ecology and evolution of new bacterial species through horizontal gene transfer. Therefore, it is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying phage-host interactions. After initial infection, the phage utilizes the transcriptional machinery of the host to direct the expression of its own genes. This review presents a view on the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages, and its contribution to phage diversity and classification. Through this review, we aim to broaden the understanding of phage-host interactions while providing a reference source for researchers studying the regulation of phage transcription. PMID:25482231

  6. Physiological Response to Membrane Protein Overexpression in E. coli*

    PubMed Central

    Gubellini, Francesca; Verdon, Grégory; Karpowich, Nathan K.; Luff, Jon D.; Boël, Grégory; Gauthier, Nils; Handelman, Samuel K.; Ades, Sarah E.; Hunt, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Overexpression represents a principal bottleneck in structural and functional studies of integral membrane proteins (IMPs). Although E. coli remains the leading organism for convenient and economical protein overexpression, many IMPs exhibit toxicity on induction in this host and give low yields of properly folded protein. Different mechanisms related to membrane biogenesis and IMP folding have been proposed to contribute to these problems, but there is limited understanding of the physical and physiological constraints on IMP overexpression and folding in vivo. Therefore, we used a variety of genetic, genomic, and microscopy techniques to characterize the physiological responses of Escherichia coli MG1655 cells to overexpression of a set of soluble proteins and IMPs, including constructs exhibiting different levels of toxicity and producing different levels of properly folded versus misfolded product on induction. Genetic marker studies coupled with transcriptomic results indicate only minor perturbations in many of the physiological systems implicated in previous studies of IMP biogenesis. Overexpression of either IMPs or soluble proteins tends to block execution of the standard stationary-phase transcriptional program, although these effects are consistently stronger for the IMPs included in our study. However, these perturbations are not an impediment to successful protein overexpression. We present evidence that, at least for the target proteins included in our study, there is no inherent obstacle to IMP overexpression in E. coli at moderate levels suitable for structural studies and that the biochemical and conformational properties of the proteins themselves are the major obstacles to success. Toxicity associated with target protein activity produces selective pressure leading to preferential growth of cells harboring expression-reducing and inactivating mutations, which can produce chemical heterogeneity in the target protein population, potentially

  7. Rhodobacter sphaeroides LexA has dual activity: optimising and repressing recA gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tapias, Angels; Fernández, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C.; Barbé, Jordi

    2002-01-01

    Transcription of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides recA promoter (PrecA) is induced upon DNA damage in a lexA-dependent manner. In vivo experiments demonstrate that LexA protein represses and might also activate transcription of PrecA. Purified R.sphaeroides LexA protein specifically binds the SOS boxes located within the PrecA region. In vitro transcription analysis, using Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP), indicated that the presence of LexA may stimulate and repress transcription of PrecA. EMSA and DNase I footprinting experiments show that LexA and RNAP can bind simultaneously to PrecA. At low LexA concentrations it enhances RNAP binding to PrecA, stimulates open complex formation and strand separation beyond the transcription start site. At high LexA concentrations, however, RNAP-promoted strand separation is not observed beyond the +5 region. LexA might repress transcription by interfering with the clearance process instead of blocking the access of RNAP to the promoter region. Based on these findings we propose that the R.sphaeroides LexA protein performs fine tuning of the SOS response, which might provide a physiological advantage by enhancing transcription of SOS genes and delaying full activation of the response. PMID:11917014

  8. Discoordinate gene expression in the dnaA-dnaN operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, A; Messer, W

    1988-07-01

    The dnaN gene of Escherichia coli encodes the beta-subunit of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme. Previous work has established that dnaN lies immediately downstream of dnaA and that both genes may be cotranscribed from the dnaA promoters; no promoter for dnaN has been described. We investigated the in vivo regulation of transcription of the dnaN gene by transcriptional fusions to the galK gene, translational fusion to the lacZ gene and S1 mapping analysis. We found that there are at least three dnaN promoters residing entirely in the reading frame of the preceding dnaA gene, and that transcription from these promoters can occur independently of dnaA transcription which, however, extends at least up to dnaN. Furthermore, we found evidence for the inducibility of the dnaN promoters in a dam background under conditions of simultaneously reduced dnaA transcription. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that although dnaA and dnaN are organized in an operon considerable discoordinate transcription can occur, thus uncoupling dnaN and dnaA regulation, when needed.

  9. Effects of codon usage versus putative 5'-mRNA structure on the expression of Fusarium solani cutinase in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Karl E; Mahmood, Nadir A; Iverson, Brent L; Georgiou, George

    2003-01-01

    Matching the codon usage of recombinant genes to that of the expression host is a common strategy for increasing the expression of heterologous proteins in bacteria. However, while developing a cytoplasmic expression system for Fusarium solani cutinase in Escherichia coli, we found that altering codons to those preferred by E. coli led to significantly lower expression compared to the wild-type fungal gene, despite the presence of several rare E. coli codons in the fungal sequence. On the other hand, expression in the E. coli periplasm using a bacterial PhoA leader sequence resulted in high levels of expression for both the E. coli optimized and wild-type constructs. Sequence swapping experiments as well as calculations of predicted mRNA secondary structure provided support for the hypothesis that differential cytoplasmic expression of the E. coli optimized versus wild-type cutinase genes is due to differences in 5(') mRNA secondary structures. In particular, our results indicate that increased stability of 5(') mRNA secondary structures in the E. coli optimized transcript prevents efficient translation initiation in the absence of the phoA leader sequence. These results underscore the idea that potential 5(') mRNA secondary structures should be considered along with codon usage when designing a synthetic gene for high level expression in E. coli.

  10. Organization and transcription of the division cell wall (dcw) cluster in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Francis, F; Ramirez-Arcos, S; Salimnia, H; Victor, C; Dillon, J R

    2000-06-27

    A cluster of genes involved in cell division and cell wall (dcw) biosynthesis was identified in Neisseria gonorrhoeae using genomic analysis and through verification of gene order by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. The gonococcal dcw cluster consists of 17 genes, in the order 5'-mraZ-mraW-ftsI-murE-hyp1-murF- mraY-hyp2-murD-ftsW-murG-murC-ddl -ft sQ-ftsA-ftsZ-hyp3-3'. The gene organization of the dcw cluster of N. gonorrhoeae is more similar to that observed in Gram-negative rods such as Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae than in Gram-positive bacteria. The cluster is characterized by several intergenic spaces. Compared with E. coli, two genes, ftsL and envA, are absent in the gonococcal dcw cluster and three hypothetical genes are novel to the cluster. The cluster is flanked by two transcriptional terminators consisting of paired neisserial uptake sequences and also includes four internal terminators, three of which are paired neisserial uptake sequences. We also found that a repeated sequence on the gonococcal genome, commonly called a Correia element, acts as the fourth transcriptional terminator. All termination sequences were shown to be fully functional by using reverse transcription PCR experiments. Transcriptional start sites upstream of ftsQ, ftsA and ftsZ were determined by primer extension and six promoters were identified; three promoters were located upstream of ftsZ in the intergenic space, two were upstream of ftsA within ftsQ and one was upstream of ftsQ within ddl. Some of these promoters were preferentially used under anaerobic conditions. The location of these promoters differed from those described in E. coli indicating dissimilar transcriptional regulation.

  11. Coupling transcription and alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing regulation not only depends on the interaction of splicing factors with splicing enhancers and silencers in the pre-mRNA, but also on the coupling between transcription and splicing. This coupling is possible because splicing is often cotranscriptional and promoter identity and occupation may affect alternative splicing. We discuss here the different mechanisms by which transcription regulates alternative splicing. These include the recruitment of splicing factors to the transcribing polymerase and "kinetic coupling", which involves changes in the rate of transcriptional elongation that in turn affect the timing in which splice sites are presented to the splicing machinery. The recruitment mechanism may depend on the particular features of the carboxyl terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, whereas kinetic coupling seems to be linked to how changes in chromatin structure and other factors affect transcription elongation.

  12. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  13. Nucleolar localization of myc transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, V C; Wold, B

    1993-01-01

    In situ hybridization has revealed a striking subnuclear distribution of c-myc RNA transcripts. A major fraction of the sense-strand nuclear c-myc transcripts was localized to the nucleoli. myc intron 1-containing RNAs were noticeably absent from nucleoli, accumulating instead in the nucleoplasm. The localization of myc RNA to nucleoli was shown to be common to a number of diverse cell types, including primary Sertoli cells and several cell lines. Furthermore, nucleolar localization was not restricted to c-myc and N-myc and myoD transcripts also displayed this phenomenon. In contrast, gamma-actin or lactate dehydrogenase transcripts did not display nucleolar localization. These observations suggest a new role for the nucleolus in transport and/or turnover of potential mRNAs. Images PMID:7684491

  14. Comparative genomics and evolution of transcriptional regulons in Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kazakov, Alexey E.; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Stepanova, Vita V.; Novichkov, Pavel S.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomics approaches are broadly used for analysis of transcriptional regulation in bacterial genomes. In this work, we identified binding sites and reconstructed regulons for 33 orthologous groups of transcription factors (TFs) in 196 reference genomes from 21 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. Overall, we predict over 10 600 TF binding sites and identified more than 15 600 target genes for 1896 TFs constituting the studied orthologous groups of regulators. These include a set of orthologues for 21 metabolism-associated TFs from Escherichia coli and/or Shewanella that are conserved in five or more taxonomic groups and several additional TFs that represent non-orthologous substitutions of the metabolic regulators in some lineages of Proteobacteria. By comparing gene contents of the reconstructed regulons, we identified the core, taxonomy-specific and genome-specific TF regulon members and classified them by their metabolic functions. Detailed analysis of ArgR, TyrR, TrpR, HutC, HypR and other amino-acid-specific regulons demonstrated remarkable differences in regulatory strategies used by various lineages of Proteobacteria. The obtained genomic collection of in silico reconstructed TF regulons contains a large number of new regulatory interactions that await future experimental validation. The collection provides a framework for future evolutionary studies of transcriptional regulatory networks in Bacteria. It can be also used for functional annotation of putative metabolic transporters and enzymes that are abundant in the reconstructed regulons. PMID:28348857

  15. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  16. Third International E. coli genome meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    Proceedings of the Third E. Coli Genome Meeting are provided. Presentations were divided into sessions entitled (1) Large Scale Sequencing, Sequence Analysis; (2) Databases; (3) Sequence Analysis; (4) Sequence Divergence in E. coli Strains; (5) Repeated Sequences and Regulatory Motifs; (6) Mutations, Rearrangements and Stress Responses; and (7) Origins of New Genes. The document provides a collection of abstracts of oral and poster presentations.

  17. E. coli survival in waters: temperature dependence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important for evaluating microbial contamination and in making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature; this dependency is routinely expressed using an analog of the Q10 model. This suggestion...

  18. NrdR Controls Differential Expression of the Escherichia coli Ribonucleotide Reductase Genes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Torrents, Eduard; Grinberg, Inna; Gorovitz-Harris, Batia; Lundström, Hanna; Borovok, Ilya; Aharonowitz, Yair; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Cohen, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli possesses class Ia, class Ib, and class III ribonucleotide reductases (RNR). Under standard laboratory conditions, the aerobic class Ia nrdAB RNR genes are well expressed, whereas the aerobic class Ib nrdEF RNR genes are poorly expressed. The class III RNR is normally expressed under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions. In this paper, we show that the E. coli YbaD protein differentially regulates the expression of the three sets of genes. YbaD is a homolog of the Streptomyces NrdR protein. It is not essential for growth and has been renamed NrdR. Previously, Streptomyces NrdR was shown to transcriptionally regulate RNR genes by binding to specific 16-bp sequence motifs, NrdR boxes, located in the regulatory regions of its RNR operons. All three E. coli RNR operons contain two such NrdR box motifs positioned in their regulatory regions. The NrdR boxes are located near to or overlap with the promoter elements. DNA binding experiments showed that NrdR binds to each of the upstream regulatory regions. We constructed deletions in nrdR (ybaD) and showed that they caused high-level induction of transcription of the class Ib RNR genes but had a much smaller effect on induction of transcription of the class Ia and class III RNR genes. We propose a model for differential regulation of the RNR genes based on binding of NrdR to the regulatory regions. The model assumes that differences in the positions of the NrdR binding sites, and in the sequences of the motifs themselves, determine the extent to which NrdR represses the transcription of each RNR operon. PMID:17496099

  19. Directed Evolution of Dunaliella salina Ds-26-16 and Salt-Tolerant Response in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuan; Dong, Yanping; Hong, Xiao; Pang, Xiaonan; Chen, Defu; Chen, Xiwen

    2016-01-01

    Identification and evolution of salt tolerant genes are crucial steps in developing salt tolerant crops or microorganisms using biotechnology. Ds-26-16, a salt tolerant gene that was isolated from Dunaliella salina, encodes a transcription factor that can confer salt tolerance to a number of organisms including Escherichia coli (E. coli), Haematococcus pluvialis and tobacco. To further improve its salt tolerance, a random mutagenesis library was constructed using deoxyinosine triphosphate-mediated error-prone PCR technology, and then screened using an E. coli expression system that is based on its broad-spectrum salt tolerance. Seven variants with enhanced salt tolerance were obtained. Variant EP-5 that contained mutation S32P showed the most improvement with the E. coli transformant enduring salt concentrations up to 1.54 M, in comparison with 1.03 M for the wild type gene. Besides, Ds-26-16 and EP-5 also conferred E. coli transformant tolerance to freezing, cold, heat, Cu2+ and alkaline. Homology modeling revealed that mutation S32P in EP-5 caused the conformational change of N- and C-terminal α-helixes. Expression of Ds-26-16 and EP-5 maintained normal cellular morphology, increased the intracellular antioxidant enzymatic activity, reduced malondialdehyde content, and stimulated Nitric Oxide synthesis, thus enhancing salt tolerance to E. coli transformants. PMID:27801872

  20. The transcriptional landscape of the mammalian genome.

    PubMed

    Carninci, P; Kasukawa, T; Katayama, S; Gough, J; Frith, M C; Maeda, N; Oyama, R; Ravasi, T; Lenhard, B; Wells, C; Kodzius, R; Shimokawa, K; Bajic, V B; Brenner, S E; Batalov, S; Forrest, A R R; Zavolan, M; Davis, M J; Wilming, L G; Aidinis, V; Allen, J E; Ambesi-Impiombato, A; Apweiler, R; Aturaliya, R N; Bailey, T L; Bansal, M; Baxter, L; Beisel, K W; Bersano, T; Bono, H; Chalk, A M; Chiu, K P; Choudhary, V; Christoffels, A; Clutterbuck, D R; Crowe, M L; Dalla, E; Dalrymple, B P; de Bono, B; Della Gatta, G; di Bernardo, D; Down, T; Engstrom, P; Fagiolini, M; Faulkner, G; Fletcher, C F; Fukushima, T; Furuno, M; Futaki, S; Gariboldi, M; Georgii-Hemming, P; Gingeras, T R; Gojobori, T; Green, R E; Gustincich, S; Harbers, M; Hayashi, Y; Hensch, T K; Hirokawa, N; Hill, D; Huminiecki, L; Iacono, M; Ikeo, K; Iwama, A; Ishikawa, T; Jakt, M; Kanapin, A; Katoh, M; Kawasawa, Y; Kelso, J; Kitamura, H; Kitano, H; Kollias, G; Krishnan, S P T; Kruger, A; Kummerfeld, S K; Kurochkin, I V; Lareau, L F; Lazarevic, D; Lipovich, L; Liu, J; Liuni, S; McWilliam, S; Madan Babu, M; Madera, M; Marchionni, L; Matsuda, H; Matsuzawa, S; Miki, H; Mignone, F; Miyake, S; Morris, K; Mottagui-Tabar, S; Mulder, N; Nakano, N; Nakauchi, H; Ng, P; Nilsson, R; Nishiguchi, S; Nishikawa, S; Nori, F; Ohara, O; Okazaki, Y; Orlando, V; Pang, K C; Pavan, W J; Pavesi, G; Pesole, G; Petrovsky, N; Piazza, S; Reed, J; Reid, J F; Ring, B Z; Ringwald, M; Rost, B; Ruan, Y; Salzberg, S L; Sandelin, A; Schneider, C; Schönbach, C; Sekiguchi, K; Semple, C A M; Seno, S; Sessa, L; Sheng, Y; Shibata, Y; Shimada, H; Shimada, K; Silva, D; Sinclair, B; Sperling, S; Stupka, E; Sugiura, K; Sultana, R; Takenaka, Y; Taki, K; Tammoja, K; Tan, S L; Tang, S; Taylor, M S; Tegner, J; Teichmann, S A; Ueda, H R; van Nimwegen, E; Verardo, R; Wei, C L; Yagi, K; Yamanishi, H; Zabarovsky, E; Zhu, S; Zimmer, A; Hide, W; Bult, C; Grimmond, S M; Teasdale, R D; Liu, E T; Brusic, V; Quackenbush, J; Wahlestedt, C; Mattick, J S; Hume, D A; Kai, C; Sasaki, D; Tomaru, Y; Fukuda, S; Kanamori-Katayama, M; Suzuki, M; Aoki, J; Arakawa, T; Iida, J; Imamura, K; Itoh, M; Kato, T; Kawaji, H; Kawagashira, N; Kawashima, T; Kojima, M; Kondo, S; Konno, H; Nakano, K; Ninomiya, N; Nishio, T; Okada, M; Plessy, C; Shibata, K; Shiraki, T; Suzuki, S; Tagami, M; Waki, K; Watahiki, A; Okamura-Oho, Y; Suzuki, H; Kawai, J; Hayashizaki, Y

    2005-09-02

    This study describes comprehensive polling of transcription start and termination sites and analysis of previously unidentified full-length complementary DNAs derived from the mouse genome. We identify the 5' and 3' boundaries of 181,047 transcripts with extensive variation in transcripts arising from alternative promoter usage, splicing, and polyadenylation. There are 16,247 new mouse protein-coding transcripts, including 5154 encoding previously unidentified proteins. Genomic mapping of the transcriptome reveals transcriptional forests, with overlapping transcription on both strands, separated by deserts in which few transcripts are observed. The data provide a comprehensive platform for the comparative analysis of mammalian transcriptional regulation in differentiation and development.

  1. 5' sequences are important positive and negative determinants of the longevity of Chlamydomonas chloroplast gene transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, M L; Klein, U; Bogorad, L

    1993-01-01

    We have found that sequences in the 5' leader of the Chlamydomonas chloroplast rbcL gene, when fused 5' to foreign genes, destabilize transcripts of these chimeric genes in the chloroplast of transgenic Chlamydomonas but that 5' sequences of the rbcL structural gene prevent this destabilization. Transcripts of the chloroplast rbcL gene are about equally abundant at all times in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii growing on an alternating 12-h light/12-h dark cycle. However, Chlamydomonas chloroplast transformants, harboring chimeric genes containing the same rbcL promoter with 63 or 92 bp of the rbcL 5' leader sequence fused upstream of the Escherichia coli uidA (beta-glucuronidase, GUS) gene, accumulated GUS transcripts only in the dark. Transcripts disappeared rapidly upon illumination of the cells. The same phenomenon was exhibited by transcripts of chimeric genes in which the GUS gene coding sequence was replaced by other unrelated genes. The precipitous light-induced drop in GUS transcript abundance was found to be due to an approximately 16-fold increase in the rate of degradation of GUS transcripts in light rather than to a decrease in the rate of transcription of the GUS gene. Transcripts of a chimeric rbcL-GUS construct in which the leader sequence of the rbcL gene was replaced by 103 bp of the leader sequence of the atpB gene were stable in illuminated cells. The destabilizing effect of the rbcL 5' leader sequence was reversed by adding 257 bp of the 5' coding region of the rbcL gene. The results show that chloroplast transcript levels in illuminated Chlamydomonas cells--and perhaps in other cases--can be determined, at least to some extent, by sequences and interactions of sequences transcribed from the 5' ends of genes. Images PMID:8434017

  2. Escherichia coli and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bettelheim, Karl A.; Goldwater, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the association of strains of Escherichia coli with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and the possible role these bacteria play in this enigmatic condition. The review addresses evidence for E. coli in SIDS infants, potential sources of E. coli in the environment, colonization by commensal and pathogenic strains, the variety of currently accepted pathotypes, and how these pathotypes could compromise intestinal integrity and induce inflammation. Both intestinal and extraintestinal pathotypes are compared in relation to the apparent liability in which virulence traits can be gained or lost by strains of E. coli. The way in which E. coli infections fit with current views on infant sleeping position and other SIDS risk factors is highlighted. PMID:26191064

  3. Transcriptional regulation by post-transcriptional modification--role of phosphorylation in Sp1 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shijian

    2012-10-15

    Sp1 is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor involved in the regulation of a large number of genes including housekeeping genes as well as actively regulated genes. Although Sp1 was discovered nearly three decades ago, its functional diversity is still not completely understood. One of the ways that make Sp1 versatile in transcriptional regulation is its post-transcriptional modification, which alters Sp1 structure in different cells and at different times. Compared to other types of modifications of the Sp1 protein, phosphorylation has been studied far more extensively. This review focuses on the inducers, pathways, enzymes, and biological effects of Sp1 phosphorylation. Recent data are beginning to reveal the biological significance and universal presence of Sp1 phosphorylation-related cell/molecular responses. Studies in this field provide a quick glance at how a simple chemical modification of a transcription factor could produce significant functional diversity of the protein.

  4. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Protects Escherichia coli from Tellurite-Mediated Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Juan M.; Arenas, Felipe A.; Vásquez, Claudio C.

    2011-01-01

    The tellurium oxyanion tellurite induces oxidative stress in most microorganisms. In Escherichia coli, tellurite exposure results in high levels of oxidized proteins and membrane lipid peroxides, inactivation of oxidation-sensitive enzymes and reduced glutathione content. In this work, we show that tellurite-exposed E. coli exhibits transcriptional activation of the zwf gene, encoding glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), which in turn results in augmented synthesis of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). Increased zwf transcription under tellurite stress results mainly from reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and not from a depletion of cellular glutathione. In addition, the observed increase of G6PDH activity was paralleled by accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), suggesting a metabolic flux shift toward the pentose phosphate shunt. Upon zwf overexpression, bacterial cells also show increased levels of antioxidant molecules (NADPH, GSH), better-protected oxidation-sensitive enzymes and decreased amounts of oxidized proteins and membrane lipids. These results suggest that by increasing NADPH content, G6PDH plays an important role in E. coli survival under tellurite stress. PMID:21984934

  5. RNA polymerase supply and flux through the lac operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sendy, Bandar; Lee, David J.; Bryant, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, followed by quantification of immunoprecipitated DNA, can be used to measure RNA polymerase binding to any DNA segment in Escherichia coli. By calibrating measurements against the signal from a single RNA polymerase bound at a single promoter, we can calculate both promoter occupancy levels and the flux of transcribing RNA polymerase through transcription units. Here, we have applied the methodology to the E. coli lactose operon promoter. We confirm that promoter occupancy is limited by recruitment and that the supply of RNA polymerase to the lactose operon promoter depends on its location in the E. coli chromosome. Measurements of RNA polymerase binding to DNA segments within the lactose operon show that flux of RNA polymerase through the operon is low, with, on average, over 18 s elapsing between the passage of transcribing polymerases. Similar low levels of flux were found when semi-synthetic promoters were used to drive transcript initiation, even when the promoter elements were changed to ensure full occupancy of the promoter by RNA polymerase. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672157

  6. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia induced cytosine deaminase expression in microencapsulated E. coli for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Ennis, Riley C; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-06-10

    Engineered bacterial cells that are designed to express therapeutic enzymes under the transcriptional control of remotely inducible promoters can mediate the de novo conversion of non-toxic prodrugs to their cytotoxic forms. In situ cellular expression of enzymes provides increased stability and control of enzyme activity as compared to isolated enzymes. We have engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli), designed to express cytosine deaminase at elevated temperatures, under the transcriptional control of thermo-regulatory λpL-cI857 promoter cassette which provides a thermal switch to trigger enzyme synthesis. Enhanced cytosine deaminase expression was observed in cultures incubated at 42°C as compared to 30°C, and enzyme expression was further substantiated by spectrophotometric assays indicating enhanced conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil. The engineered cells were subsequently co-encapsulated with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in immunoprotective alginate microcapsules, and cytosine deaminase expression was triggered remotely by alternating magnetic field-induced hyperthermia. The combination of 5-fluorocytosine with AMF-activated microcapsules demonstrated tumor cell cytotoxicity comparable to direct treatment with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Such enzyme-prodrug therapy, based on engineered and immunoisolated E. coli, may ultimately yield an improved therapeutic index relative to monotherapy, as AMF mediated hyperthermia might be expected to pre-sensitize tumors to chemotherapy under appropriate conditions.

  7. Pathway of assembly of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from Anabaena 7210 expressed in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevitz, M.; Somerville, C.R.; McIntosh, L.

    1985-10-01

    The authors have placed the genes encoding ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the Anabaena 7120 operon under transcriptional control of the lac promoter carried on the Escherichia coli plasmid pUC19. The genes encoding both the large and small subunit polypeptides (rbcL and rbcS) are transcribed and translated so that approx. = 0.6% of the soluble protein in E. coli extracts is a fully functional holoenzyme with a sedimentation coefficient of approximately 18S, which contains stoichiometric amounts of the two subunits. However, expression of the large subunit polypeptide vastly exceeds that of the small subunit because the majority of transcripts terminate in the intergenic region between the rbcL and rbcS genes. As a result, excess large subunit is synthesized and accumulates in E. coli as an insoluble and catalytically inactive form. Because small subunit is found only in the high molecular weight soluble form of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, the authors propose that the small subunit promotes assembly of the hexadecameric form of the enzyme via heterodimers of large and small subunits.

  8. RNA polymerase supply and flux through the lac operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sendy, Bandar; Lee, David J; Busby, Stephen J W; Bryant, Jack A

    2016-11-05

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, followed by quantification of immunoprecipitated DNA, can be used to measure RNA polymerase binding to any DNA segment in Escherichia coli By calibrating measurements against the signal from a single RNA polymerase bound at a single promoter, we can calculate both promoter occupancy levels and the flux of transcribing RNA polymerase through transcription units. Here, we have applied the methodology to the E. coli lactose operon promoter. We confirm that promoter occupancy is limited by recruitment and that the supply of RNA polymerase to the lactose operon promoter depends on its location in the E. coli chromosome. Measurements of RNA polymerase binding to DNA segments within the lactose operon show that flux of RNA polymerase through the operon is low, with, on average, over 18 s elapsing between the passage of transcribing polymerases. Similar low levels of flux were found when semi-synthetic promoters were used to drive transcript initiation, even when the promoter elements were changed to ensure full occupancy of the promoter by RNA polymerase.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'.

  9. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for microbial production of L-methionine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Feng; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Jin, Li-Qun; Tang, Xiao-Ling; Shen, Zhen-Yang; Yin, Huan-Huan; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2017-04-01

    L-methionine has attracted a great deal of attention for its nutritional, pharmaceutical, and clinical applications. In this study, Escherichia coli W3110 was engineered via deletion of a negative transcriptional regulator MetJ and over-expression of homoserine O-succinyltransferase MetA together with efflux transporter YjeH, resulting in L-methionine overproduction which is up to 413.16 mg/L. The partial inactivation of the L-methionine import system MetD via disruption of metI made the engineered E. coli ΔmetJ ΔmetI/pTrcA*H more tolerant to high L-ethionine concentration and accumulated L-methionine to a level 43.65% higher than that of E. coli W3110 ΔmetJ/pTrcA*H. Furthermore, deletion of lysA, which blocks the lysine biosynthesis pathway, led to a further 8.5-fold increase in L-methionine titer of E. coli ΔmetJ ΔmetI ΔlysA/pTrcA*H. Finally, addition of Na2 S2 O3 to the media led to an increase of fermentation titer of 11.45%. After optimization, constructed E. coli ΔmetJ ΔmetI ΔlysA/pTrcA*H was able to produce 9.75 g/L L-methionine with productivity of 0.20 g/L/h in a 5 L bioreactor. This novel metabolically tailored strain of E. coli provides an efficient platform for microbial production of L-methionine. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 843-851. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Metal-specific control of gene expression mediated by Bradyrhizobium japonicum Mur and Escherichia coli Fur is determined by the cellular context.

    PubMed

    Hohle, Thomas H; O'Brian, Mark R

    2016-07-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum Mur and Escherichia coli Fur are manganese- and iron-responsive transcriptional regulators, respectively, that belong to the same protein family. Here, we show that neither Mur nor Fur discriminate between Fe(2+) and Mn(2+) in vitro nor is there a metal preference for conferral of DNA-binding activity on the purified proteins. When expressed in E. coli, B. japonicum Mur responded to iron, but not manganese, as determined by in vivo promoter occupancy and transcriptional repression activity. Moreover, E. coli Fur activity was manganese-dependent in B. japonicum. Total and chelatable iron levels were higher in E. coli than in B. japonicum under identical growth conditions, and Mur responded to iron in a B. japonicum iron export mutant that accumulated high levels of the metal. However, elevated manganese content in E. coli did not confer activity on Fur or Mur, suggesting a regulatory pool of manganese in B. japonicum that is absent in E. coli. We conclude that the metal selectivity of Mur and Fur depends on the cellular context in which they function, not on intrinsic properties of the proteins. Also, the novel iron sensing mechanism found in the rhizobia may be an evolutionary adaptation to the cellular manganese status.

  11. Structures of the Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domain explain differences in expression of the OxyR regulon in Escherichia coli and P. gingivalis

    SciTech Connect

    Svintradze, David V.; Peterson, Darrell L.; Collazo-Santiago, Evys A.; Lewis, Janina P.; Wright, H. Tonie

    2013-10-01

    Differences in OxyR regulated expression of oxidative stress genes between Escherichia coli and Porphyromonas gingivalis are explained by very minor differences in structure and amino-acid sequence of the respective oxidized and reduced OxyR regulatory domains. These differences affect OxyR quaternary structures and are predicted from model building of full length OxyR–DNA complexes to confer distinct modes of DNA binding on this transcriptional regulator. OxyR transcriptionally regulates Escherichia coli oxidative stress response genes through a reversibly reducible cysteine disulfide biosensor of cellular redox status. Structural changes induced by redox changes in these cysteines are conformationally transmitted to the dimer subunit interfaces, which alters dimer and tetramer interactions with DNA. In contrast to E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain structures, crystal structures of Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domains show minimal differences in dimer configuration on changes in cysteine disulfide redox status. This locked configuration of the P. gingivalis OxyR regulatory-domain dimer closely resembles the oxidized (activating) form of the E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain dimer. It correlates with the observed constitutive activation of some oxidative stress genes in P. gingivalis and is attributable to a single amino-acid insertion in P. gingivalis OxyR relative to E. coli OxyR. Modelling of full-length P. gingivalis, E. coli and Neisseria meningitidis OxyR–DNA complexes predicts different modes of DNA binding for the reduced and oxidized forms of each.

  12. Survival and expression of acid resistance genes in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli acid adapted in pineapple juice and exposed to synthetic gastric fluid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The aim of this research was to examine relative transcriptional expression of acid resistance (AR) genes, rpoS, gadA and adiA, in O157:H7 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotypes after adaptation to pineapple juice (PJ) and subsequently to determine survival with e...

  13. Phage insertion in mlrA and variations in rpoS limit curli expression and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilm formation in Escherichia coli is a tightly controlled process requiring the expression of adhesive curli fibers and certain polysaccharides such as cellulose. The transcriptional regulator CsgD is central to biofilm formation, controlling the expression of the curli structural and export pro...

  14. Thermodynamic Modeling of Variations in the Rate of RNA Chain Elongation of E. coli rrn Operons

    PubMed Central

    Fange, David; Mellenius, Harriet; Dennis, Patrick P.; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2014-01-01

    Previous electron-microscopic imaging has shown high RNA polymerase occupation densities in the 16S and 23S encoding regions and low occupation densities in the noncoding leader, spacer, and trailer regions of the rRNA (rrn) operons in E. coli. This indicates slower transcript elongation within the coding regions and faster elongation within the noncoding regions of the operon. Inactivation of four of the seven rrn operons increases the transcript initiation frequency at the promoters of the three intact operons and reduces the time for RNA polymerase to traverse the operon. We have used the DNA sequence-dependent standard free energy variation of the transcription complex to model the experimentally observed changes in the elongation rate along the rrnB operon. We also model the stimulation of the average transcription rate over the whole operon by increasing rate of transcript initiation. Monte Carlo simulations, taking into account initiation of transcription, translocation, and backward and forward tracking of RNA polymerase, partially reproduce the observed transcript elongation rate variations along the rrn operon and fully account for the increased average rate in response to increased frequency of transcript initiation. PMID:24411237

  15. Inducible spy Transcription Acts as a Sensor for Envelope Stress of Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Seok; Lee, Sang Dae

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica infects a broad range of host animals, and zoonostic infection threatens both public health and the livestock and meat processing industries. Many antimicrobials have been developed to target Salmonella envelope that performs essential bacterial functions; however, there are very few analytical methods that can be used to validate the efficacy of these antimicrobials. In this study, to develop a potential biosensor for Salmonella envelope stress, we examined the transcription of the S. enterica serovar typhimurium spy gene, the ortholog of which in Escherichia coli encodes Spy (spheroplast protein y). Spy is a chaperone protein expressed and localized in the periplasm of E. coli during spheroplast formation, or by exposure to protein denaturing conditions. spy expression in S. typhimurium was examined by constructing a spy-gfp transcriptional fusion. S. typhimurium spy transcription was strongly induced during spheroplast formation, and also when exposed to membrane-disrupting agents, including ethanol and the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B. Moreover, spy induction required the activity of regulator proteins BaeR and CpxR, which are part of the major envelope stress response systems BaeS/BaeR and CpxA/CpxR, respectively. Results suggest that monitoring spy transcription may be useful to determine whether a molecule particularly cause envelope stress in Salmonella. PMID:28316480

  16. Influence of major-groove chemical modifications of DNA on transcription by bacterial RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Raindlová, Veronika; Janoušková, Martina; Slavíčková, Michaela; Perlíková, Pavla; Boháčová, Soňa; Milisavljevič, Nemanja; Šanderová, Hana; Benda, Martin; Barvík, Ivan; Krásný, Libor; Hocek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    DNA templates containing a set of base modifications in the major groove (5-substituted pyrimidines or 7-substituted 7-deazapurines bearing H, methyl, vinyl, ethynyl or phenyl groups) were prepared by PCR using the corresponding base-modified 2′-deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs). The modified templates were used in an in vitro transcription assay using RNA polymerase from Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. Some modified nucleobases bearing smaller modifications (H, Me in 7-deazapurines) were perfectly tolerated by both enzymes, whereas bulky modifications (Ph at any nucleobase) and, surprisingly, uracil blocked transcription. Some middle-sized modifications (vinyl or ethynyl) were partly tolerated mostly by the E. coli enzyme. In all cases where the transcription proceeded, full length RNA product with correct sequence was obtained indicating that the modifications of the template are not mutagenic and the inhibition is probably at the stage of initiation. The results are promising for the development of bioorthogonal reactions for artificial chemical switching of the transcription. PMID:27001521

  17. Expression and Genetic Activation of Cyclic Di-GMP-Specific Phosphodiesterases in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Alberto; Hee, Chee-Seng; Ozaki, Shogo; Mazur, Adam; Boehm, Alex; Schirmer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular levels of the bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) are controlled by antagonistic activities of diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases. The phosphodiesterase PdeH was identified as a key regulator of motility in Escherichia coli, while deletions of any of the other 12 genes encoding potential phosphodiesterases did not interfere with motility. To analyze the roles of E. coli phosphodiesterases, we demonstrated that most of these proteins are expressed under laboratory conditions. We next isolated suppressor mutations in six phosphodiesterase genes, which reinstate motility in the absence of PdeH by reducing cellular levels of c-di-GMP. Expression of all mutant alleles also led to a reduction of biofilm formation. Thus, all of these proteins are bona fide phosphodiesterases that are capable of interfering with different c-di-GMP-responsive output systems by affecting the global c-di-GMP pool. This argues that E. coli possesses several phosphodiesterases that are inactive under laboratory conditions because they lack appropriate input signals. Finally, one of these phosphodiesterases, PdeL, was studied in more detail. We demonstrated that this protein acts as a transcription factor to control its own expression. Motile suppressor alleles led to a strong increase of PdeL activity and elevated pdeL transcription, suggesting that enzymatic activity and transcriptional control are coupled. In agreement with this, we showed that overall cellular levels of c-di-GMP control pdeL transcription and that this control depends on PdeL itself. We thus propose that PdeL acts both as an enzyme and as a c-di-GMP sensor to couple transcriptional activity to the c-di-GMP status of the cell. IMPORTANCE Most bacteria possess multiple diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases. Genetic studies have proposed that these enzymes show signaling specificity by contributing to distinct cellular processes without much cross talk. Thus, spatial

  18. Structure of Escherichia Coli Tryptophanase

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Yip, P.; Howell, P.

    2006-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the {alpha}-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the {alpha}-proton of the substrate for {beta}-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal.

  19. Structure of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Ku, Shao Yang; Yip, Patrick; Howell, P Lynne

    2006-07-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the alpha-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the alpha-proton of the substrate for beta-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal.

  20. The Role of α-CTD in the Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation of the Bacillus subtilis Cells

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Satohiko; Ishikawa, Shu; Chumsakul, Onuma; Ogasawara, Naotake; Oshima, Taku

    2015-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the RNA polymerase (RNAP) α-subunit is well conserved throughout the Eubacteria. Its C-terminal domain (α-CTD) is important for the transcriptional regulation of specific promoters in both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, through interactions with transcription factors and/or a DNA element called the “UP element”. However, there is only limited information regarding the α-CTD regulated genes in B. subtilis and the importance of this subunit in the transcriptional regulation of B. subtilis. Here, we established strains and the growth conditions in which the α-subunit of RNAP was replaced with a C-terminally truncated version. Transcriptomic and ChAP-chip analyses revealed that α-CTD deficiency reduced the transcription and RNAP binding of genes related to the utilization of secondary carbon sources, transition state responses, and ribosome synthesis. In E. coli, it is known that α-CTD also contributes to the expression of genes related to the utilization of secondary carbon sources and ribosome synthesis. Our results suggest that the biological importance of α-CTD is conserved in B. subtilis and E. coli, but that its specific roles have diversified between these two bacteria. PMID:26154296

  1. The Catabolite Repressor Protein-Cyclic AMP Complex Regulates csgD and Biofilm Formation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, David A; Evans, Margery L; Greene, Sarah E; Pinkner, Jerome S; Hultgren, Scott J; Chapman, Matthew R

    2016-12-15

    The extracellular matrix protects Escherichia coli from immune cells, oxidative stress, predation, and other environmental stresses. Production of the E. coli extracellular matrix is regulated by transcription factors that are tuned to environmental conditions. The biofilm master regulator protein CsgD upregulates curli and cellulose, the two major polymers in the extracellular matrix of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) biofilms. We found that cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates curli, cellulose, and UPEC biofilms through csgD The alarmone cAMP is produced by adenylate cyclase (CyaA), and deletion of cyaA resulted in reduced extracellular matrix production and biofilm formation. The catabolite repressor protein (CRP) positively regulated csgD transcription, leading to curli and cellulose production in the UPEC isolate, UTI89. Glucose, a known inhibitor of CyaA activity, blocked extracellular matrix formation when added to the growth medium. The mutant strains ΔcyaA and Δcrp did not produce rugose biofilms, pellicles, curli, cellulose, or CsgD. Three putative CRP binding sites were identified within the csgD-csgB intergenic region, and purified CRP could gel shift the csgD-csgB intergenic region. Additionally, we found that CRP binded upstream of kpsMT, which encodes machinery for K1 capsule production. Together our work shows that cAMP and CRP influence E. coli biofilms through transcriptional regulation of csgD IMPORTANCE The catabolite repressor protein (CRP)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) complex influences the transcription of ∼7% of genes on the Escherichia coli chromosome (D. Zheng, C. Constantinidou, J. L. Hobman, and S. D. Minchin, Nucleic Acids Res 32:5874-5893, 2004, https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkh908). Glucose inhibits E. coli biofilm formation, and ΔcyaA and Δcrp mutants show impaired biofilm formation (D. W. Jackson, J.W. Simecka, and T. Romeo, J Bacteriol 184:3406-3410, 2002, https://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.184.12.3406-3410.2002). We determined that the c

  2. Transcriptional Signatures in Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    While selective neuronal death has been an influential theme in Huntington's disease (HD), there is now a preponderance of evidence that significant neuronal dysfunction precedes frank neuronal death. The best evidence for neuronal dysfunction is the observation that gene expression is altered in HD brain, suggesting that transcriptional dysregulation is a central mechanism. Studies of altered gene expression began with careful observations of post-mortem human HD brain and subsequently were accelerated by the development of transgenic mouse models. The application of DNA microarray technology has spurred tremendous progress with respect to the altered transcriptional processes that occur in HD, through gene expression studies of both transgenic mouse models as well as cellular models of HD. Gene expression profiles are remarkably comparable across these models, bolstering the idea that transcriptional signatures reflect an essential feature of disease pathogenesis. Finally, gene expression studies have been applied to human HD, thus not only validating the approach of using model systems, but also solidifying the idea that altered transcription is a key mechanism in HD pathogenesis. In the future, gene expression profiling will be used as a readout in clinical trials aimed at correcting transcriptional dysregulation in Huntington's disease. PMID:17467140

  3. Kinetic Modelling of Transcription Elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Maoileidigh, Daibhid; Tadigotla, Vasisht; Sengupta, Anirvan; Epshtein, Vitaly; Ebright, Richard; Nudler, Evgeny; Ruckenstein, Andrei

    2006-03-01

    Transcription is the first step in gene expression and it is at this stage that most of genetic regulation occurs. The enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) walks along DNA creating an RNA transcript at a highly non-uniform rate. We discuss how many non-intuitive features of the system may be experimentally and physically motivated and present first a model, which agrees qualitatively with a host of experimental evidence. We also examine intrinsic pauses where it is thought that the RNAP will move backwards along the DNA template without changing the length of the RNA transcript. We describe a simplified kinetic scheme for the recovery of intrinsic pauses with the same degree of predictive power as our thermodynamic model (presented separately). The separation of timescales between the movement of the RNAP and global changes in the RNA secondary structure is seen to be crucial for the function of RNAP. This is essentially a model of a Brownian ratchet where RNAP executes a 1D random walk in a sequence dependent potential over a range determined by the co-transcriptional RNA fold for each transcript length

  4. Transcriptional gene silencing in humans

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Marc S.; Morris, Kevin V.

    2016-01-01

    It has been over a decade since the first observation that small non-coding RNAs can functionally modulate epigenetic states in human cells to achieve functional transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). TGS is mechanistically distinct from the RNA interference (RNAi) gene-silencing pathway. TGS can result in long-term stable epigenetic modifications to gene expression that can be passed on to daughter cells during cell division, whereas RNAi does not. Early studies of TGS have been largely overlooked, overshadowed by subsequent discoveries of small RNA-directed post-TGS and RNAi. A reappraisal of early work has been brought about by recent findings in human cells where endogenous long non-coding RNAs function to regulate the epigenome. There are distinct and common overlaps between the proteins involved in small and long non-coding RNA transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, suggesting that the early studies using small non-coding RNAs to modulate transcription were making use of a previously unrecognized endogenous mechanism of RNA-directed gene regulation. Here we review how non-coding RNA plays a role in regulation of transcription and epigenetic gene silencing in human cells by revisiting these earlier studies and the mechanistic insights gained to date. We also provide a list of mammalian genes that have been shown to be transcriptionally regulated by non-coding RNAs. Lastly, we explore how TGS may serve as the basis for development of future therapeutic agents. PMID:27060137

  5. Genome engineering Escherichia coli for L-DOPA overproduction from glucose

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Tao; Cheng, Bi-Yan; Liu, Jian-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Genome engineering has become a powerful tool for creating useful strains in research and industry. In this study, we applied singleplex and multiplex genome engineering approaches to construct an E. coli strain for the production of L-DOPA from glucose. We first used the singleplex genome engineering approach to create an L-DOPA-producing strain, E. coli DOPA-1, by deleting transcriptional regulators (tyrosine repressor tyrR and carbon storage regulator A csrA), altering glucose transport from the phosphotransferase system (PTS) to ATP-dependent uptake and the phosphorylation system overexpressing galactose permease gene (galP) and glucokinase gene (glk), knocking out glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (zwf) and prephenate dehydratase and its leader peptide genes (pheLA) and integrating the fusion protein chimera of the downstream pathway of chorismate. Then, multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE) based on 23 targets was used to further improve L-DOPA production. The resulting strain, E. coli DOPA-30N, produced 8.67 g/L of L-DOPA in 60 h in a 5 L fed-batch fermentation. This titer is the highest achieved in metabolically engineered E. coli having PHAH activity from glucose. PMID:27417146

  6. Induction of protein expression within Escherichia coli vector for entry into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingwen; Lee, Choon-Weng; Sim, Edmund Ui-Hang; Narayanan, Kumaran

    2014-02-01

    Direct protein delivery into the cytosol of mammalian cells by invasive Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterial vector will bypass the need to achieve nuclear entry and transcription of DNA, a major hurdle that is known to seriously limit gene transfer. The bacterial vector is induced to express the protein during its growth phase, before presentation for entry into mammalian cells and release of its content into the cellular environment. For this class of vector, crossing the plasma membrane becomes the primary step that determines the success of protein delivery. Yet, how the mechanics of protein expression within the vector affect its entry into the host is poorly understood. We found the vector's effectiveness to enter HeLa cells diminished together with its viability when phage N15 protelomerase (TelN) expression was induced continuously in the invasive E. coli despite producing an abundant amount of functional protein. By comparison, shorter induction, even as little as 3 hr, produced sufficient amounts of functional TelN and showed more effective invasion of HeLa cells, comparable to that of uninduced invasive E. coli. These results demonstrate that brief induction of protein expression during vector growth is essential for optimal entry into mammalian cells, an important step for achieving bacteria-mediated protein delivery.

  7. UV disinfection induces a VBNC state in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shenghua; Ye, Chengsong; Lin, Huirong; Lv, Lu; Yu, Xin

    2015-02-03

    The occurrence of a viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state in bacteria may dramatically underestimate the health risks associated with drinking water. Therefore, the potential for UV treatment to induce a VBNC state in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. UV disinfection effectively reduced the culturability of E. coli and P. aeruginosa, with the destruction of nucleic acids demonstrated using gadA long gene fragment qPCR amplification. Following UV radiation, copy numbers for the high transcriptional levels of the 16S rRNA gene varied insignificantly in both strains, confirming results from plate counting assays indicating that VBNC states were induced in both strains. Furthermore, the virulence genes gadA and oprL remained highly expressed, suggesting that the VBNC bacteria still displayed pathogenicity. Propidium monoazide qPCR indicated that cell membranes remained intact even at a UV dose of 300 mJ/cm(2). The RT-qPCR results after UV and chlorine treatments in E. coli were significantly different (8.41 and 5.59 log units, respectively), further confirming the induction of VBNC bacteria induced by UV radiation. Finally, resuscitation was achieved, with E. coli showing greater resuscitation ability than P. aeruginosa. These results systematically revealed the potential health risks of UV disinfection and strongly suggest a combined disinfection strategy.

  8. A novel nucleoid protein of Escherichia coli induced under anaerobiotic growth conditions

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, Jun; Yoshimura, Shige H.; Takeyasu, Kunio; Ishihama, Akira

    2010-01-01

    A systematic search was performed for DNA-binding sequences of YgiP, an uncharacterized transcription factor of Escherichia coli, by using the Genomic SELEX. A total of 688 YgiP-binding loci were identified after genome-wide profiling of SELEX fragments with a high-density microarray (SELEX-chip). Gel shift and DNase-I footprinting assays indicated that YgiP binds to multiple sites along DNA probes with a consensus GTTNATT sequence. Atomic force microscope observation indicated that at low concentrations, YgiP associates at various sites on DNA probes, but at high concentrations, YgiP covers the entire DNA surface supposedly through protein–protein contact. The intracellular concentration of YgiP is very low in growing E. coli cells under aerobic conditions, but increases more than 100-fold to the level as high as the major nucleoid proteins under anaerobic conditions. An E. coli mutant lacking ygiP showed retarded growth under anaerobic conditions. High abundance and large number of binding sites together indicate that YgiP is a nucleoid-associated protein with both architectural and regulatory roles as the nucleoid proteins Fis and IHF. We then propose that YgiP is a novel nucleoid protein of E. coli under anaerobiosis and propose to rename it Dan (DNA-binding protein under anaerobic conditions). PMID:20156994

  9. Toxicity of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles against Escherichia coli and HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sk Tofajjen; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2013-09-15

    The present study endeavours to assess the toxic effect of synthesized CdS nanoparticles (NPs) on Escherichia coli and HeLa cells. The CdS NPs were characterized by DLS, XRD, TEM and AFM studies and the average size of NPs was revealed as ∼3 nm. On CdS NPs exposure bacterial cells changed morphological features to filamentous form and damage of the cell surface was found by AFM study. The expression of two conserved cell division components namely ftsZ and ftsQ in E. coli was decreased both at transcriptional and translational levels upon CdS NPs exposure. CdS NPs inhibited proper cell septum formation without affecting the nucleoid segregation. Viability of HeLa cells declined with increasing concentration of CdS NPs and the IC₅₀ value was found to be 4 μg/mL. NPs treated HeLa cells showed changed morphology with condensed and fragmented nuclei. Increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found both in E. coli and HeLa cells on CdS NPs exposure. The inverse correlation between declined cell viabilities and elevated ROS level suggested that oxidative stress seems to be the key event by which NPs induce toxicity both in E. coli and HeLa cells.

  10. The evolution of the Escherichia coli phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Roy R; Henderson, Ian R

    2012-03-01

    Escherichia coli is familiar to biologists as a classical model system, ubiquitous in molecular biology laboratories around the world. Outside of the laboratory, E. coli strains exist as an almost universal component of the lower-gut flora of humans and animals. Although usually a commensal, E. coli has an alter ego as a pathogen, and is associated with diarrhoeal disease and extra-intestinal infections. The study of E. coli diversity predates the availability of molecular data, with strains initially distinguished by serotyping and metabolic profiling, and genomic diversity illustrated by DNA hybridisation. The quantitative study of E. coli diversity began with the application of multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), and has progressed with the accumulation of nucleotide sequence data, from single genes through multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to whole genome sequencing. Phylogenetic methods have shed light on the processes of genomic evolution in this extraordinarily diverse species, and revealed the origins of pathogenic E. coli strains, including members of the phylogenetically indistinguishable "genus"Shigella. In May and June 2011, an outbreak of haemorrhagic uraemic syndrome in Germany was linked to a strain of enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O104:H4. Application of high-throughput sequencing technologies allowed the genome and origins of the outbreak strain to be characterised in real time as the outbreak was in progress.

  11. Detection of viable but nonculturable Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacteria in drinking water and river water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanming; Gilchrist, Ainslie; Zhang, Jing; Li, Xing-Fang

    2008-03-01

    A sensitive method for specific detection of viable Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells, including viable but nonculturable (VBNC) cells, in water samples was developed. This method involved capture of the bacterial cells on a low-protein-binding membrane and direct extraction and purification of RNA followed by reverse transcription-PCR and electronic microarray detection of the rfbE and fliC genes of E. coli O157:H7. It detected as few as 1 CFU of E. coli O157:H7 in diluted cultures, 3 to 4 CFU/liter in tap water, 7 CFU/liter in river water, and 50 VBNC cells in 1 liter of river water, demonstrating the best limit of detection reported to date for VBNC cells in environmental water samples.

  12. Gene 5. 5 protein of bacteriophaze T7 inhibits the nucleoid protein H-NS of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q.; Richardson, C.C. )

    1993-03-01

    Gene 5.5 of coliphage T7 is one of the most highly expressed genes during T7 infection. Gene 5.5 protein, purified from cells overexpressing the cloned gene, purifies with the nucleoid protein H-NS of Escherichia coli during three chromatographic steps. A fusion protein of gene 5.5 protein and maltose binding protein also purifies with H-NS. The fusion protein binds to the DNA-H-NS complex and abolishes H-NS-mediated inhibition of transcription by Escherichia coli and T7 RNA polymerases in vitro. Expression of gene 5.5 also relieves the repression of the Escherichia coli proU promoter by H-NS in vivo. The change of leucine to proline at residue 30 of gene 5.5 protein abolishes the interaction between gene 5.5 protein and H-NS. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Tannin-Rich Fraction from Pomegranate Rind Inhibits Quorum Sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum and Biofilm Formation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qinnan; Wang, Lingfang; Gao, Jianxue; Liu, Xiaobo; Feng, Yuqing; Wu, Qian; Baloch, Allah Bux; Cui, Lu; Xia, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Pomegranate rind has been found to inhibit numerous pathogens, mostly attributed to its tannin fraction. The present study was conducted to investigate the quorum sensing (QS) inhibition effect of tannin-rich fraction from pomegranate rind (TFPR) by using an indicator strain Chromobacterium violaceum. Meanwhile, its effect on biofilm formation and motility of Escherichia coli was evaluated. It was shown that TFPR inhibited QS-regulated violacein pigment production. Biofilm formation and motility of E. coli were also hindered by TFPR. Transcriptional analysis further showed that TFPR repressed expressions of curli genes (csgB and csgD) and various motility genes (fimA, fimH, flhD, motB, qseB, and qseC). Our findings indicated that TFPR has potential application for controlling E. coli contaminations or biofilms in the food industry.

  14. The cost of expression of Escherichia coli lac operon proteins is in the process, not in the products.

    PubMed

    Stoebel, Daniel M; Dean, Antony M; Dykhuizen, Daniel E

    2008-03-01

    Transcriptional regulatory networks allow bacteria to express proteins only when they are needed. Adaptive hypotheses explaining the evolution of regulatory networks assume that unneeded expression is costly and therefore decreases fitness, but the proximate cause of this cost is not clear. We show that the cost in fitness to Escherichia coli strains constitutively expressing the lactose operon when lactose is absent is associated with the process of making the lac gene products, i.e., associated with the acts of transcription and/or translation. These results reject the hypotheses that regulation exists to prevent the waste of amino acids in useless protein or the detrimental activity of unnecessary proteins. While the cost of the process of protein expression occurs in all of the environments that we tested, the expression of the lactose permease could be costly or beneficial, depending on the environment. Our results identify the basis of a single selective pressure likely acting across the entire E. coli transcriptome.

  15. 46 CFR 502.165 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... incremental cost of transcription above the regular copy transcription cost borne by the Commission, in... full cost of transcription being borne by the Commission. (B) In the event a request for daily copy is... of transcription over and above that borne by the Commission, i.e., the incremental cost between...

  16. 46 CFR 502.165 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... incremental cost of transcription above the regular copy transcription cost borne by the Commission, in... full cost of transcription being borne by the Commission. (B) In the event a request for daily copy is... of transcription over and above that borne by the Commission, i.e., the incremental cost between...

  17. 46 CFR 502.165 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... incremental cost of transcription above the regular copy transcription cost borne by the Commission, in... full cost of transcription being borne by the Commission. (B) In the event a request for daily copy is... of transcription over and above that borne by the Commission, i.e., the incremental cost between...

  18. 46 CFR 502.165 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... incremental cost of transcription above the regular copy transcription cost borne by the Commission, in... full cost of transcription being borne by the Commission. (B) In the event a request for daily copy is... of transcription over and above that borne by the Commission, i.e., the incremental cost between...

  19. 46 CFR 502.165 - Official transcript.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... incremental cost of transcription above the regular copy transcription cost borne by the Commission, in... full cost of transcription being borne by the Commission. (B) In the event a request for daily copy is... of transcription over and above that borne by the Commission, i.e., the incremental cost between...

  20. Transcription and splicing: when the twain meet.

    PubMed

    Brody, Yehuda; Shav-Tal, Yaron

    2011-01-01

    Splicing can occur co-transcriptionally. What happens when the splicing reaction lags after the completed transcriptional process? We found that elongation rates are independent of ongoing splicing on the examined genes and suggest that when transcription has completed but splicing has not, the splicing machinery is retained at the site of transcription, independently of the polymerase.

  1. Effect of bile on growth, peritoneal absorption, and blood clearance of Escherichia coli in E coli peritonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, R.; Schalen, C.; Tranberg, K.G. )

    1991-06-01

    The effect of intraperitoneal bile on growth, peritoneal absorption, and clearance of Escherichia coli was determined in E coli peritonitis in the rat. In E coli peritonitis, intraperitoneal bacterial counts gradually decreased, whereas they increased (after 2 hours) with subsequent development of bacteremia in E coli plus bile peritonitis. After an intraperitoneal injection of labeled bacteria, blood radioactivity was only initially lower in E coli plus bile peritonitis compared with E coli peritonitis. Clearance from blood was lower in E coli plus bile peritonitis than in E coli peritonitis. Organ localization was similar in E coli peritonitis and E coli plus bile peritonitis with decreased splenic, increased pulmonary, and unchanged hepatic uptakes compared with controls. Impaired peritoneal absorption of bacteria, together with impaired local host defense, is likely to enhance the noxious effect of bile in E coli peritonitis.

  2. Autogenous Regulation of Escherichia coli Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Expression Revisited▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Briani, Federica; Zangrossi, Sandro; Merlino, Giuseppe; Marchi, Paolo; Dehò, Gianni

    2009-01-01

    The Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase; encoded by pnp), a phosphorolytic exoribonuclease, posttranscriptionally regulates its own expression at the level of mRNA stability and translation. Its primary transcript is very efficiently processed by RNase III, an endonuclease that makes a staggered double-strand cleavage about in the middle of a long stem-loop in the 5′-untranslated region. The processed pnp mRNA is then rapidly degraded in a PNPase-dependent manner. Two non-mutually exclusive models have been proposed to explain PNPase autogenous regulation. The earlier one suggested that PNPase impedes translation of the RNase III-processed pnp mRNA, thus exposing the transcript to degradative pathways. More recently, this has been replaced by the current model, which maintains that PNPase would simply degrade the promoter proximal small RNA generated by the RNase III endonucleolytic cleavage, thus destroying the double-stranded structure at the 5′ end that otherwise stabilizes the pnp mRNA. In our opinion, however, the first model was not completely ruled out. Moreover, the RNA decay pathway acting upon the pnp mRNA after disruption of the 5′ double-stranded structure remained to be determined. Here we provide additional support to the current model and show that the RNase III-processed pnp mRNA devoid of the double-stranded structure at its 5′ end is not translatable and is degraded by RNase E in a PNPase-independent manner. Thus, the role of PNPase in autoregulation is simply to remove, in concert with RNase III, the 5′ fragment of the cleaved structure that both allows translation and prevents the RNase E-mediated PNPase-independent degradation of the pnp transcript. PMID:19136586

  3. Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to new ligands.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Noah D; Garruss, Alexander S; Moretti, Rocco; Chan, Sum; Arbing, Mark A; Cascio, Duilio; Rogers, Jameson K; Isaacs, Farren J; Kosuri, Sriram; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Church, George M; Raman, Srivatsan

    2016-02-01

    Genetic regulatory proteins inducible by small molecules are useful synthetic biology tools as sensors and switches. Bacterial allosteric transcription factors (aTFs) are a major class of regulatory proteins, but few aTFs have been redesigned to respond to new effectors beyond natural aTF-inducer pairs. Altering inducer specificity in these proteins is difficult because substitutions that affect inducer binding may also disrupt allostery. We engineered an aTF, the Escherichia coli lac repressor, LacI, to respond to one of four new inducer molecules: fucose, gentiobiose, lactitol and sucralose. Using computational protein design, single-residue saturation mutagenesis or random mutagenesis, along with multiplex assembly, we identified new variants comparable in specificity and induction to wild-type LacI with its inducer, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The ability to create designer aTFs will enable applications including dynamic control of cell metabolism, cell biology and synthetic gene circuits.

  4. Pervasive transcription: detecting functional RNAs in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lybecker, Meghan; Bilusic, Ivana; Raghavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive, or genome-wide, transcription has been reported in all domains of life. In bacteria, most pervasive transcription occurs antisense to protein-coding transcripts, although recently a new class of pervasive RNAs was identified that originates from within annotated genes. Initially considered to be non-functional transcriptional noise, pervasive transcription is increasingly being recognized as important in regulating gene expression. The function of pervasive transcription is an extensively debated question in the field of transcriptomics and regulatory RNA biology. Here, we highlight the most recent contributions addressing the purpose of pervasive transcription in bacteria and discuss their implications.

  5. High levels of transcription stimulate transversions at GC base pairs in yeast.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew P; Begins, Kaitlyn J; Crall, William C; Holmes, Margaret P; Lippert, Malcolm J

    2013-01-01

    High-levels of transcription through a gene stimulate spontaneous mutation rate, a phenomenon termed transcription-associated mutation (TAM). While transcriptional effects on specific mutation classes have been identified using forward mutation and frameshift-reversion assays, little is yet known about transcription-associated base substitutions in yeast. To address this issue, we developed a new base substitution reversion assay (the lys2-TAG allele). We report a 22-fold increase in overall reversion rate in the high- relative to the low-transcription strain (from 2.1- to 47- × 10(-9) ). While all detectable base substitution types increased in the high-transcription strain, G→T and G→C transversions increased disproportionately by 58- and 52-fold, respectively. To assess a potential role of DNA damage in the TAM events, we measured mutation rates and spectra in individual strains defective in the repair of specific DNA lesions or null for the error-prone translesion DNA polymerase zeta (Pol zeta). Results exclude a role of 8-oxoGuanine, general oxidative damage, or apurinic/apyrimidinic sites in the generation of TAM G→T and G→C transversions. In contrast, the TAM transversions at GC base pairs depend on Pol zeta for occurrence implicating DNA damage, other than oxidative lesions or AP sites, in the TAM mechanism. Results further indicate that transcription-dependent G→T transversions in yeast differ mechanistically from equivalent events in E. coli reported by others. Given their occurrences in repair-proficient cells, transcription-associated G→T and G→C events represent a novel type of transcription-associated mutagenesis in normal cells with potentially important implications for evolution and genetic disease.

  6. Escherichia coli O157:H7 gene expression in the presence of catecholamine norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Scot E

    2007-08-01

    Various forms of host stresses (e.g. physiological, psychological) are thought to influence susceptibility to pathogenic microorganisms. Catecholamines such as norepinephrine are released into the GI environment during acute stress and may influence the infective process of bacterial pathogens associated with the GI tract. To examine the effects of norepinephrine on expression of virulence factors in Escherichia coli O157:H7, the clinical-type isolate EDL933 (ATCC 43895) was grown in serum-Standard American Petroleum Institute media in the presence or absence of norepinephrine. After 5 h of exposure to norepinephrine, treatment and control cultures (not exposed to norepinephrine) were harvested, their RNA isolated, and gene expression evaluated. There was a dramatic increase in the expression of virulence factor transcripts including stx1, stx2, and eae. Also induced were transcripts involved in iron metabolism. Conversely, there was comparative repression of iron acquisition and phage shock protein-related transcripts in the presence of norepinephrine. Novel observations from these data suggested that exposure to norepinephrine induced glutamate decarboxylase acid resistance as well as an SOS response in E. coli O157:H7. The results corroborate many of the previous findings detailed in the literature and provide new observations that could expand the scope of microbial endocrinology.

  7. Structure and gene expression of the E. coli Mn-superoxide dismutase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Y; Avila, H

    1986-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase is an enzyme which converts superoxide O2- to hydrogen peroxide. Using a single synthetic oligonucleotide 33mer, we screened the E. coli DNA library and isolated a clone containing the E. coli manganese-superoxide dismutase gene. We determined the DNA sequence. The analysis of the DNA sequence and in vivo as well as in vitro transcription has shown the following. The DNA sequence suggests two possible promoters. However, only one of them seems active during normal aerobic growth. Purified RNA polymerase initiates in vitro transcription from the same promoter. It is not clear whether the second promoter is functional. It is possible that this promoter could be activated under different growth conditions. There is an inverted repeat sequence which could form a stem-loop structure downstream of the translation stop codon TAA of the Mn-SOD gene. The results of the analysis of in vivo and in vitro RNA have shown that this is the transcription termination signal. Thus, the Mn-SOD gene constitutes a single gene operon. There is an almost perfect 19 base palindrome at the -35 region. The position and the size of the palindrome suggest that this could be a regulatory site. Images PMID:3520487

  8. Involvement of the Cpx signal transduction pathway of E. coli in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Dorel, C; Vidal, O; Prigent-Combaret, C; Vallet, I; Lejeune, P

    1999-09-01

    In a genetic screening directed to identify genes involved in biofilm formation, mutations in the cpxA gene were found to reduce biofilm formation by affecting microbial adherence to solid surfaces. This effect was detected in Escherichia coli K12 as well as in E. coli strains isolated from patients with catheter-related bacteremia. We show that the negative effect of the cpxA mutation on biofilm formation results from a decreased transcription of the curlin encoding csgA gene. The effect of the cpxA mutation could not be observed in cpxR- mutants, suggesting that they affect the same regulatory pathway. The cpxA101 mutation abolishes cpxA phosphatase activity and results in the accumulation of phosphorylated CpxR. Features of the strain carrying the cpxA101 mutation are a reduced ability to form biofilm and low levels of csgA transcription. Our results indicate that the cpxA gene increases the levels of csgA transcription by dephosphorylation of CpxR, which acts as a negative regulator at csgA. Thus, we propose the existence of a new signal transduction pathway involved in the adherence process in addition to the EnvZ-OmpR two-component system.

  9. Low level of cross-resistance between triclosan and antibiotics in Escherichia coli K-12 and E. coli O55 compared to E. coli O157.

    PubMed

    Braoudaki, Maria; Hilton, Anthony Craig

    2004-06-15

    Misuse of biocides has encouraged the emergence of resistance and cross-resistance in certain strains. This study investigated resistance of triclosan-adapted Escherichia coli K-12 and E. coli O55 to antimicrobial agents and compared these to E. coli O157:H7. Cross-resistance in E. coli K-12 and E. coli O55 was observed however to a lesser extent than in E. coli O157:H7. Triclosan-adapted E. coli K-12 demonstrated cross-resistance to chloramphenicol, whereas triclosan-adapted E. coli O55 exhibited resistance to trimethoprim. In comparison, E. coli O157:H7 was resistant to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, trimethoprim, benzalkonium chloride and chlorohexidine suggesting strain specific rather than general resistance mechanisms.

  10. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. Results To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. Multiple variations in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR), numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. PsrA for fatty acid degradation) and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp). Conclusions We tentatively defined the first reference collection of ~100 transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The resulting regulatory network contains ~600 regulated genes per genome that are mostly involved in metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, metals, and stress responses. Several reconstructed regulons including NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism were experimentally validated in S. oneidensis MR-1. Analysis of

  11. Transcriptional regulation and DNA methylation in plastids during transitional conversion of chloroplasts to chromoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, H; Ngernprasirtsiri, J; Akazawa, T

    1990-01-01

    During transitional conversion of chloroplasts to chromoplasts in ripening tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruits, transcripts for several plastid genes for photosynthesis decreased to undetectable levels. Run-on transcription of plastids indicated that transcriptional regulation operated as a predominant factor. We found that most of the genes in chloroplasts were actively transcribed in vitro by Escherichia coli and soluble plastid RNA polymerases, but some genes in chromoplasts seemed to be silent when assayed by the in vitro systems. The regulatory step, therefore, was ascribed to DNA templates. The analysis of modified base composition revealed the presence of methylated bases in chromoplast DNA, in which 5-methylcytosine was most abundant. The presence of 5-methylcytosine detected by isoschizomeric endonucleases and Southern hybridization was correlated with the undetectable transcription activity of each gene in the run-on assay and in vitro transcription experiments. It is thus concluded that the suppression of transcription mediated by DNA methylation is one of the mechanisms governing gene expression in plastids converting from chloroplasts to chromoplasts. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2303026

  12. Growth phase-dependent transcription of the Streptomyces ramocissimus tuf1 gene occurs from two promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, L N; van Wezel, G P; Bibb, M J; Kraal, B

    1997-01-01

    The str operon of Streptomyces ramocissimus contains the genes for ribosomal proteins S12 (rpsL) and S7 (rpsG) and for the polypeptide chain elongation factors G (EF-G) (fus) and Tu (EF-Tu) (tuf). This kirromycin producer contains three tuf or tuf-like genes; tuf1 encodes the regular EF-Tu and is located immediately downstream of fus. In vivo and in vitro transcription analysis revealed a transcription start site directly upstream of S. ramocissimus tuf1, in addition to the operon promoter rpsLp. Transcription from these promoters appeared to be growth phase dependent, diminishing drastically upon entry into stationary phase and at the onset of production of the EF-Tu-targeted antibiotic kirromycin. In surface-grown cultures, a second round of tuf1 transcription, coinciding with aerial mycelium formation and kirromycin production, was observed. The tuf1-specific promoter (tuf1p) was located in the intercistronic region between fus and tuf1 by high-resolution S1 mapping, in vitro transcription, and in vivo promoter probing. During logarithmic growth, the tuf1p and rpsLp transcripts are present at comparable levels. In contrast to Escherichia coli, which has two almost identical tuf genes, the gram-positive S. ramocissimus contains only tuf1 for its regular EF-Tu. High levels of EF-Tu may therefore be achieved by the compensatory activity of tuf1p. PMID:9171408

  13. Reconstruction of transcriptional network from microarray data using combined mutual information and network-assisted regression.

    PubMed

    Wang, X-D; Qi, Y-X; Jiang, Z-L

    2011-03-01

    Many methods had been developed on inferring transcriptional network from gene expression. However, it is still necessary to design new method that discloses more detailed and exact network information. Using network-assisted regression, the authors combined the averaged three-way mutual information (AMI3) and non-linear ordinary differential equation (ODE) model to infer the transcriptional network, and to obtain both the topological structure and the regulatory dynamics. Synthetic and experimental data were used to evaluate the performance of the above approach. In comparison with the previous methods based on mutual information, AMI3 obtained higher precision with the same sensitivity. To describe the regulatory dynamics between transcription factors and target genes, network-assisted regression and regression without network, respectively, were applied in the steady-state and time series microarray data. The results revealed that comparing with regression without network, network-assisted regression increased the precision, but decreased the fitting goodness. Then, the authors reconstructed the transcriptional network of Escherichia coli and simulated the regulatory dynamics of genes. Furthermore, the authors' approach identified potential transcription factors regulating yeast cell cycle. In conclusion, network-assisted regression, combined AMI3 and ODE model, was a more precisely to infer the topological structure and the regulatory dynamics of transcriptional network from microarray data. [Includes supplementary material].

  14. Proteomic Analyses Reveal the Mechanism of Dunaliella salina Ds-26-16 Gene Enhancing Salt Tolerance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanlong; Hu, Bin; Du, Shipeng; Gao, Shan; Chen, Xiwen; Chen, Defu

    2016-01-01

    We previously screened the novel gene Ds-26-16 from a 4 M salt-stressed Dunaliella salina cDNA library and discovered that this gene conferred salt tolerance to broad-spectrum organisms, including E. coli (Escherichia coli), Haematococcus pluvialis and tobacco. To determine the mechanism of this gene conferring salt tolerance, we studied the proteome of E. coli overexpressing the full-length cDNA of Ds-26-16 using the iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) approach. A total of 1,610 proteins were identified, which comprised 39.4% of the whole proteome. Of the 559 differential proteins, 259 were up-regulated and 300 were down-regulated. GO (gene ontology) and KEGG (Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes) enrichment analyses identified 202 major proteins, including those involved in amino acid and organic acid metabolism, energy metabolism, carbon metabolism, ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenging, membrane proteins and ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporters, and peptidoglycan synthesis, as well as 5 up-regulated transcription factors. Our iTRAQ data suggest that Ds-26-16 up-regulates the transcription factors in E. coli to enhance salt resistance through osmotic balance, energy metabolism, and oxidative stress protection. Changes in the proteome were also observed in E. coli overexpressing the ORF (open reading frame) of Ds-26-16. Furthermore, pH, nitric oxide and glycerol content analyses indicated that Ds-26-16 overexpression increases nitric oxide content but has no effect on glycerol content, thus confirming that enhanced nitric oxide synthesis via lower intercellular pH was one of the mechanisms by which Ds-26-16 confers salt tolerance to E. coli. PMID:27135411

  15. Escherichia coli avoids high dissolved oxygen stress by activation of SoxRS and manganese-superoxide dismutase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were reported to cause oxidative stress to E. coli cells associated with reduced or inhibited growth. The high ROS concentrations described in these reports were generated by exposing the bacteria to H2O2 and superoxide-generating chemicals which are non-physiological growth conditions. However, the effect of molecular oxygen on oxidative stress response has not been evaluated. Since the use of oxygen-enriched air is a common strategy to support high density growth of E. coli, it was important to investigate the effect of high dissolved oxygen concentrations on the physiology and growth of E. coli and the way it responds to oxidative stress. Results To determine the effect of elevated oxygen concentrations on the growth characteristics, specific gene expression and enzyme activity in E. coli, the parental and SOD-deficient strain were evaluated when the dissolved oxygen (dO2) level was increased from 30% to 300%. No significant differences in the growth parameters were observed in the parental strain except for a temporary decrease of the respiration and acetate accumulation profile. By performing transcriptional analysis, it was determined that the parental strain responded to the oxidative stress by activating the SoxRS regulon. However, following the dO2 switch, the SOD-deficient strain activated both the SoxRS and OxyR regulons but it was unable to resume its initial growth rate. Conclusion The transcriptional analysis and enzyme activity results indicated that when E. coli is exposed to dO2 shift, the superoxide stress regulator SoxRS is activated and causes the stimulation of the superoxide dismutase system. This enables the E. coli to protect itself from the poisoning effects of oxygen. The OxyR protecting system was not activated, indicating that H2O2 did not increase to stressing levels. PMID:23497217

  16. Deoxyribonucleic acid-ribonucleic acid hybridization studies on the L-Arabinose operon of Escherichia coli B-r.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, G; Singer, J; Heffernan, L

    1971-10-01

    An increase in the rate of synthesis of ara-specific messenger ribonucleic acid as measured by deoxyribonucleic acid-ribonucleic acid hybridization has been detected in the induced wild-type (ara(+)) strain of Escherichia coli B/r as compared with the uninduced control, thus providing evidence that regulation of the positively controlled l-arabinose operon is at the level of transcription.

  17. Subventricular zone microglia transcriptional networks.

    PubMed

    Starossom, Sarah C; Imitola, Jaime; Wang, Yue; Cao, Li; Khoury, Samia J

    2011-07-01

    Microglia play an important role in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system. There is evidence of microglial diversity with distinct phenotypes exhibiting either neuroprotection and repair or neurotoxicity. However the precise molecular mechanisms underlying this diversity are still unknown. Using a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) we performed transcriptional profiling of isolated subventricular zone microglia from the acute and chronic disease phases of EAE. We found that microglia exhibit disease phase specific gene expression signatures, that correspond to unique gene ontology functions and genomic networks. Our data demonstrate for the first time, distinct transcriptional networks of microglia activation in vivo, that suggests a role as mediators of injury or repair.

  18. Chromatin and Transcription in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rando, Oliver J.; Winston, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which chromatin structure controls eukaryotic transcription has been an intense area of investigation for the past 25 years. Many of the key discoveries that created the foundation for this field came from studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including the discovery of the role of chromatin in transcriptional silencing, as well as the discovery of chromatin-remodeling factors and histone modification activities. Since that time, studies in yeast have continued to contribute in leading ways. This review article summarizes the large body of yeast studies in this field. PMID:22345607

  19. A self-inducible heterologous protein expression system in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Briand, L.; Marcion, G.; Kriznik, A.; Heydel, J. M.; Artur, Y.; Garrido, C.; Seigneuric, R.; Neiers, F.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important experimental, medical and industrial cell factory for recombinant protein production. The inducible lac promoter is one of the most commonly used promoters for heterologous protein expression in E. coli. Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) is currently the most efficient molecular inducer for regulating this promoter’s transcriptional activity. However, limitations have been observed in large-scale and microplate production, including toxicity, cost and culture monitoring. Here, we report the novel SILEX (Self-InducibLe Expression) system, which is a convenient, cost-effective alternative that does not require cell density monitoring or IPTG induction. We demonstrate the broad utility of the presented self-inducible method for a panel of diverse proteins produced in large amounts. The SILEX system is compatible with all classical culture media and growth temperatures and allows protein expression modulation. Importantly, the SILEX system is proven to be efficient for protein expression screening on a microplate scale. PMID:27611846

  20. An efficient plasmid vector for constitutive high-level expression of foreign genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Woo; Hong, Won-kyung; Rairakhwada, Dina; Seo, Pil-Soo; Choi, Min Ho; Song, Ki-Bang; Rhee, Sang-Ki; Kim, Chul Ho

    2009-06-01

    The levansucrase gene (lsrA) from Rahnella aquatilis was strongly expressed in a constitutive manner in Escherichia coli when cloned into a pBluescript KS-based pRL1CP plasmid vector. The native promoter upstream of lsrA and the lacZ promoter cooperatively enhanced the expression of lsrA to a level that was comparable to that of the T7 promoter, which is used in commercial pET expression vector system. A putative rho-independent transcription termination signal downstream of lsrA was crucial for gene expression. This plasmid vector also proved to be applicable for efficient expression of other foreign genes in E. coli.

  1. Fluorescence probes for studying the mechanisms of transcription activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyduk, Tomasz; Callaci, Sandhya

    1994-08-01

    Regulation of transcription involves a complex interplay between protein-ligand, protein-DNA, and protein-protein interactions. Fluorescence probes seem to be very well suited to study such complex systems since the selectivity and sensitivity of fluorescence makes possible to select only a part of the system for observation leaving the rest of it transparent to the technique. We have used fluorescence spectroscopy to study the activation of E.coli RNA polymerase by cAMP receptor protein (CRP). The cAMP interactions with CRP, domain flexibility in CRP molecule, the structure of CRP-DNA complex, and interaction of CRP with RNA-polymerase have been studied. Here we report the preparation and properties of 5-OH-Trp derivative of the sigma subunit of E.coli RNA polymerase. This subunit is responsible for specific promoter recognition. The obtained results show that the biological activities of the derivative are identical as observed for the native protein. Comparison of fluorescence properties of the 5-OH-Trp sigma derivative free and bound to the core RNA polymerase suggests a conformational change in the sigma protein induced by this interaction. These data show that replacement of Trp residues with 5-OH-Trp can be a very useful approach to prepare specific fluorescence derivatives of multimeric proteins.

  2. Engineering the Controlled Assembly of Filamentous Injectisomes in E. coli K-12 for Protein Translocation into Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Ruano-Gallego, David; Álvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2015-09-18

    Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems (T3SS) assemble large needle-like protein complexes in the bacterial envelope, called injectisomes, for translocation of protein effectors into host cells. The application of these "molecular syringes" for the injection of proteins into mammalian cells is hindered by their structural and genomic complexity, requiring multiple polypeptides encoded along with effectors in various transcriptional units (TUs) with intricate regulation. In this work, we have rationally designed the controlled expression of the filamentous injectisomes found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the nonpathogenic strain E. coli K-12. All structural components of EPEC injectisomes, encoded in a genomic island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), were engineered in five TUs (eLEEs) excluding effectors, promoters and transcriptional regulators. These eLEEs were placed under the control of the IPTG-inducible promoter Ptac and integrated into specific chromosomal sites of E. coli K-12 using a marker-less strategy. The resulting strain, named synthetic injector E. coli (SIEC), assembles filamentous injectisomes similar to those in EPEC. SIEC injectisomes form pores in the host plasma membrane and are able to translocate T3-substrate proteins (e.g., translocated intimin receptor, Tir) into the cytoplasm of HeLa cells reproducing the phenotypes of intimate attachment and polymerization of actin-pedestals elicited by EPEC bacteria. Hence, SIEC strain allows the controlled expression of functional filamentous injectisomes for efficient translocation of proteins with T3S-signals into mammalian cells.

  3. Engineering an Acinetobacter regulon for biosensing and high-throughput enzyme screening in E. coli via flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Ramesh K.; Kern, Theresa L.; Fox, David T.; M. Strauss, Charlie E.

    2014-01-01

    We created a single cell sorting system to screen for enzyme activity in Escherichia coli producing 3,4 dihydroxy benzoate (34DHB). To do so, we engineered a transcription factor regulon controlling the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) for induction by 34DHB. An autoregulated transcription factor, pcaU, was borrowed from Acinetobacter sp ADP1 to E. coli and its promoter region adapted for activity in E. Coli. The engineered pcaU regulon was inducible at >5 μM exogenous 34DHB, making it a sensitive biosensor for this industrially significant nylon precursor. Addition of a second plasmid provided IPTG inducible expression of dehydroshikimate dehydratase enzyme (AsbF), which converts endogenous dehydroshikimate to 34DHB. This system produced GFP fluorescence in an IPTG dose-dependent manner, and was easily detected in single cell on flow cytometer despite a moderate catalytic efficiency of AsbF. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), individual cells carrying the active AsbF could be isolated even when diluted into a decoy population of cells carrying a mutant (inactivated) AsbF variant at one part in a million. The same biosensor was also effective for further optimization of itself. FACS on E. coli carrying randomized loci in the promoter showed several variants with enhanced response to 34DHB. PMID:24861620

  4. Advances in genoserotyping and subtyping of Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E. coli plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. E. coli have traditionally been serotyped using antisera a...

  5. Survival of pathogenic Escherichia coli on basil, lettuce, and spinach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contamination of lettuce, spinach and basil with pathogenic E. coli has caused numerous illnesses over the past decade. E. coli O157:H7, E. coli O104:H4 and avian pathogenic E. coli (APECstx- and APECstx+) were inoculated on basil plants and in promix soiless substrate using drip and overhead ir...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  11. A Spatial Control for Correct Timing of Gene Expression during the Escherichia coli Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuan; Fan, Lifei; Shi, Yixin; Odsbu, Ingvild; Morigen

    2016-01-01

    Temporal transcriptions of genes are achieved by different mechanisms such as dynamic interaction of activator and repressor proteins with promoters, and accumulation and/or degradation of key regulators as a function of cell cycle. We find that the TorR protein localizes to the old poles of the Escherichia coli cells, forming a functional focus. The TorR focus co-localizes with the nucleoid in a cell-cycle-dependent manner, and consequently regulates transcription of a number of genes. Formation of one TorR focus at the old poles of cells requires interaction with the MreB and DnaK proteins, and ATP, suggesting that TorR delivery requires cytoskeleton organization and ATP. Further, absence of the protein–protein interactions and ATP leads to loss in function of TorR as a transcription factor. We propose a mechanism for timing of cell-cycle-dependent gene transcription, where a transcription factor interacts with its target genes during a specific period of the cell cycle by limiting its own spatial distribution. PMID:28025549

  12. Global Regulation by Horizontally Transferred Regulators Establishes the Pathogenicity of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Miyahara, Akira; Oshima, Taku; Tashiro, Kosuke; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Kuhara, Satoru; Ogasawara, Naotake; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Tobe, Toru

    2008-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli is an emerging pathogen that causes diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Much of the genomic information that affects virulence is acquired by horizontal transfer. Genes necessary for attaching and effacing lesions are located in the locus for enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island. LEE gene transcription is positively regulated by Ler, which is also encoded by the LEE, and by Pch regulators, which are encoded at other loci. Here we identified genes whose transcription profiles were similar to those of the LEE genes, by comparing the effects of altering ler and pch transcript levels. We assigned these genes into two classes, according to their transcription profiles. By determining the binding profiles for Ler and Pch, we showed that both were involved in regulating one class of genes, but only Pch was involved in regulating the other class. Binding sites were found in the coding region as well as the promoter region of regulated genes, which include genes common to K12 strains as well as 0157-specific genes, suggesting that both act as a global regulator. These results indicate that Ler and Pch orchestrate the transcription of virulence genes, which are captured by horizontal transfer and scattered throughout the chromosome. PMID:18222925

  13. Electrophoretic Mobilities of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Wild-Type Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Darren A.; Rice, Eugene W.; Johnson, Clifford H.; Fox, Kim R.

    1999-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of a number of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and wild-type E. coli strains were measured. The effects of pH and ionic strength on the EPMs were investigated. The EPMs of E. coli O157:H7 strains differed from those of wild-type strains. As the suspension pH decreased, the EPMs of both types of strains increased. PMID:10388724

  14. Translation of vph mRNA in Streptomyces lividans and Escherichia coli after removal of the 5' untranslated leader.

    PubMed

    Wu, C J; Janssen, G R

    1996-10-01

    The Streptomyces vinaceus viomycin phosphotransferase (vph) mRNA contains an untranslated leader with a conventional Shine-Dalgarno homology. The vph leader was removed by ligation of the vph coding sequence to the transcriptional start site of a Streptomyces or an Escherichia coli promoter, such that transcription would initiate at the first position of the vph start codon. Analysis of mRNA demonstrated that transcription initiated primarily at the A of the vph AUG translational start codon in both Streptomyces lividans and E. coli; cells expressing the unleadered vph mRNA were resistant to viomycin indicating that the Shine-Dalgarno sequence, or other features contained within the leader, was not necessary for vph translation. Addition of four nucleotides (5'-AUGC-3') onto the 5' end of the unleadered vph mRNA resulted in translation initiation from the vph start codon and the AUG triplet contained within the added sequence. Translational fusions of vph sequence to a Tn5 neo reporter gene indicated that the first 16 codons of vph coding sequence were sufficient to specify the translational start site and reading frame for expression of neomycin resistance in both E. coli and S. lividans.

  15. Helix 69 of E. coli 23S ribosomal RNA as a peptide nucleic acid target.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Marta; Markowska-Zagrajek, Agnieszka; Wojciechowska, Monika; Grzela, Renata; Wituła, Tomasz; Trylska, Joanna

    2017-04-07

    A fragment of 23S ribosomal RNA (nucleotides 1906-1924 in E. coli), termed Helix 69, forms a hairpin that is essential for ribosome function. Helix 69 forms a conformationally flexible inter-subunit connection with helix 44 of 16S ribosomal RNA, and the nucleotide A1913 of Helix 69 influences decoding accuracy. Nucleotides U1911 and U1917 are post-transcriptionally modified with pseudouridines () and U1915 with 3-methyl-. We investigated Helix 69 as a target for a complementary synthetic oligonucleotide - peptide nucleic acid (PNA). We determined thermodynamic properties of Helix 69 and its complexes with PNA. We also verified the performance of PNA targeted at Helix 69 in inhibiting translation in cell-free extracts and growth of E. coli cells. First, we examined the interactions of a PNA oligomer complementary to the G1907-A1919 fragment of Helix 69 with the sequences corresponding to human and bacterial species (with or without pseudouridine modifications). PNA invades the Helix 69 hairpin creating stable complexes and PNA binding to the pseudouridylated bacterial sequence is stronger than to Helix 69 without any modifications. Second, we confirmed the binding of PNA to 23S rRNA and 70S ribosomes. Third, we verified the efficiency of translation inhibition of these PNA oligomers in the cell-free translation/transcription E. coli system, which turned out to be in a similar range as tetracycline. Next, we confirmed that PNA conjugated to the (KFF)3K transporter peptide inhibited E. coli growth in micromolar concentrations. Overall, targeting Helix 69 with PNA or other sequence-specific oligomers could be a promising way to inhibit bacterial translation.

  16. Biofuels from E. Coli: Engineering E. coli as an Electrofuels Chassis for Isooctane Production

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-16

    Electrofuels Project: Ginkgo Bioworks is bypassing photosynthesis and engineering E. coli to directly use carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce biofuels. E. coli doesn’t naturally metabolize CO2, but Ginkgo Bioworks is manipulating and incorporating the genes responsible for CO2 metabolism into the microorganism. By genetically modifying E. coli, Ginkgo Bioworks will enhance its rate of CO2 consumption and liquid fuel production. Ginkgo Bioworks is delivering CO2 to E. coli as formic acid, a simple industrial chemical that provides energy and CO2 to the bacterial system.

  17. First international E. coli genome meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This volume is a collection of abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of studies reported at the First International E. Coli Genome Meeting, held September 10-14, 1992 at the University of Wisconsin.

  18. First international E. coli genome meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This volume is a collection of abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions of studies reported at the First International E. Coli Genome Meeting, held September 10-14, 1992 at the University of Wisconsin.

  19. Structure of Water in Escherichia Coli B

    DTIC Science & Technology

    structure broadening of the NMR water spectrum. Using bacteria grown in the special chemically defined medium, we showed that the water in E. coli B was highly ordered and was very different from ’free’ water and from polywater .

  20. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  1. Transcriptional networks in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Kenichi; Somssich, Imre E

    2015-05-01

    Next to numerous abiotic stresses, plants are constantly exposed to a variety of pathogens within their environment. Thus, their ability to survive and prosper during the course of evolution was strongly dependent on adapting efficient strategies to perceive and to respond to such potential threats. It is therefore not surprising that modern plants have a highly sophisticated immune repertoire consisting of diverse signal perception and intracellular signaling pathways. This signaling network is intricate and deeply interconnected, probably reflecting the diverse lifestyles and infection strategies used by the multitude of invading phytopathogens. Moreover it allows signal communication between developmental and defense programs thereby ensuring that plant growth and fitness are not significantly retarded. How plants integrate and prioritize the incoming signals and how this information is transduced to enable appropriate immune responses is currently a major research area. An important finding has been that pathogen-triggered cellular responses involve massive transcriptional reprogramming within the host. Additional key observations emerging from such studies are that transcription factors (TFs) are often sites of signal convergence and that signal-regulated TFs act in concert with other context-specific TFs and transcriptional co-regulators to establish sensory transcription regulatory networks required for plant immunity.

  2. Regulating transcription traffic around DSBs.

    PubMed

    Plosky, Brian S

    2015-05-07

    If a double-strand break (DSB) occurs and either a DNA polymerase or RNA polymerase is coming along, how do we save the train? In this issue of Molecular Cell, Ui et al. (2015) describe a connection between an elongation factor and a repressive complex to prevent transcription in proximity to a DSB.

  3. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  4. Native valve Escherichia coli endocarditis following urosepsis.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, D; Ramakrishnan, S; Patro, K C; Devaraj, S; Krishnamurthy, V; Kothari, Y; Satyaki, N

    2013-05-01

    Gram-negative organisms are a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Escherichia coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infection and gram-negative septicemia involves endocardium rarely. In this case report, we describe infection of native mitral valve by E. coli following septicemia of urinary tract origin in a diabetic male; subsequently, he required prosthetic tissue valve replacement indicated by persistent sepsis and congestive cardiac failure.

  5. Biodegradation of Aromatic Compounds by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Eduardo; Ferrández, Abel; Prieto, María A.; García, José L.

    2001-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli has long been recognized as the best-understood living organism, little was known about its abilities to use aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. This review gives an extensive overview of the current knowledge of the catabolism of aromatic compounds by E. coli. After giving a general overview of the aromatic compounds that E. coli strains encounter and mineralize in the different habitats that they colonize, we provide an up-to-date status report on the genes and proteins involved in the catabolism of such compounds, namely, several aromatic acids (phenylacetic acid, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid) and amines (phenylethylamine, tyramine, and dopamine). Other enzymatic activities acting on aromatic compounds in E. coli are also reviewed and evaluated. The review also reflects the present impact of genomic research and how the analysis of the whole E. coli genome reveals novel aromatic catabolic functions. Moreover, evolutionary considerations derived from sequence comparisons between the aromatic catabolic clusters of E. coli and homologous clusters from an increasing number of bacteria are also discussed. The recent progress in the understanding of the fundamentals that govern the degradation of aromatic compounds in E. coli makes this bacterium a very useful model system to decipher biochemical, genetic, evolutionary, and ecological aspects of the catabolism of such compounds. In the last part of the review, we discuss strategies and concepts to metabolically engineer E. coli to suit specific needs for biodegradation and biotransformation of aromatics and we provide several examples based on selected studies. Finally, conclusions derived from this review may serve as a lead for future research and applications. PMID:11729263

  6. Biodegradation of aromatic compounds by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Díaz, E; Ferrández, A; Prieto, M A; García, J L

    2001-12-01

    Although Escherichia coli has long been recognized as the best-understood living organism, little was known about its abilities to use aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. This review gives an extensive overview of the current knowledge of the catabolism of aromatic compounds by E. coli. After giving a general overview of the aromatic compounds that E. coli strains encounter and mineralize in the different habitats that they colonize, we provide an up-to-date status report on the genes and proteins involved in the catabolism of such compounds, namely, several aromatic acids (phenylacetic acid, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid) and amines (phenylethylamine, tyramine, and dopamine). Other enzymatic activities acting on aromatic compounds in E. coli are also reviewed and evaluated. The review also reflects the present impact of genomic research and how the analysis of the whole E. coli genome reveals novel aromatic catabolic functions. Moreover, evolutionary considerations derived from sequence comparisons between the aromatic catabolic clusters of E. coli and homologous clusters from an increasing number of bacteria are also discussed. The recent progress in the understanding of the fundamentals that govern the degradation of aromatic compounds in E. coli makes this bacterium a very useful model system to decipher biochemical, genetic, evolutionary, and ecological aspects of the catabolism of such compounds. In the last part of the review, we discuss strategies and concepts to metabolically engineer E. coli to suit specific needs for biodegradation and biotransformation of aromatics and we provide several examples based on selected studies. Finally, conclusions derived from this review may serve as a lead for future research and applications.

  7. Entire sequence of the colonization factor coli surface antigen 6-encoding plasmid pCss165 from an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Wajima, Takeaki; Sabui, Subrata; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar; Hamabata, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    Coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) is one of the most prevalent colonization factors among enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolated in developing countries. Although it is known that CS6 is encoded by a plasmid, there are no reports on the sequence analysis of the CS6-encoding plasmid or genes exhibiting similar behavior to CS6. Here, we report the isolation of the CS6-encoding plasmid, pCss165Kan, from 4266 ΔcssB::kanamycin (Km) and its complete nucleotide sequence. This plasmid consisted of 165,311bp and 222 predicted coding sequences. Remarkably, there were many insertion sequence (IS) elements, which comprised 24.4% of the entire sequence. Virulence-associated genes such as heat-stable enterotoxin, homologues of ATP-binding cassette transporter in enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and ETEC autotransporter A were also present, although the ETEC autotransporter A gene was disrupted by the integration of IS629. We found that 2 transcriptional regulators belonging to the AraC family were not involved in CS6 expression. Interestingly, pCss165 had conjugative transfer genes, as well as 3 toxin-antitoxin systems that potentially exclude other plasmid-free host bacteria. These genes might be involved in the prevalence of CS6 among ETEC isolates.

  8. Systems Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyeong Rok; Shin, Jae Ho; Cho, Jae Sung; Yang, Dongsoo; Lee, Sang Yup

    2017-03-01

    Systems metabolic engineering, which recently emerged as metabolic engineering integrated with systems biology, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering, allows engineering of microorganisms on a systemic level for the production of valuable chemicals far beyond its native capabilities. Here, we review the strategies for systems metabolic engineering and particularly its applications in Escherichia coli. First, we cover the various tools developed for genetic manipulation in E. coli to increase the production titers of desired chemicals. Next, we detail the strategies for systems metabolic engineering in E. coli, covering the engineering of the native metabolism, the expansion of metabolism with synthetic pathways, and the process engineering aspects undertaken to achieve higher production titers of desired chemicals. Finally, we examine a couple of notable products as case studies produced in E. coli strains developed by systems metabolic engineering. The large portfolio of chemical products successfully produced by engineered E. coli listed here demonstrates the sheer capacity of what can be envisioned and achieved with respect to microbial production of chemicals. Systems metabolic engineering is no longer in its infancy; it is now widely employed and is also positioned to further embrace next-generation interdisciplinary principles and innovation for its upgrade. Systems metabolic engineering will play increasingly important roles in developing industrial strains including E. coli that are capable of efficiently producing natural and nonnatural chemicals and materials from renewable nonfood biomass.

  9. Succinate production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Thakker, Chandresh; Martínez, Irene; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N.

    2012-01-01

    Succinate has been recognized as an important platform chemical that can be produced from biomass. While a number of organisms are capable of succinate production naturally, this review focuses on the engineering of Escherichia coli for production of the four-carbon dicarboxylic acid. Important features of a succinate production system are to achieve optimal balance of reducing equivalents generated by consumption of the feedstock, while maximizing the amount of carbon that is channeled to the product. Aerobic and anaerobic production strains have been developed and applied to production from glucose as well as other abundant carbon sources. Metabolic engineering methods and strain evolution have been used and supplemented by the recent application of systems biology and in silico modeling tools to construct optimal production strains. The metabolic capacity of the production strain, as well as the requirement for efficient recovery of succinate and the reliability of the performance under scale-up are important in the overall process. The costs of the overall biorefinery compatible process will determine the economical commercialization of succinate and its impact in larger chemical markets. PMID:21932253

  10. E. coli on the move

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calne, S.

    2012-04-01

    Lynn Grove High School in Great Yarmouth, UK has been awarded a Royal Society partnership grant. Lynn Grove pupils aged between 11 and 16 years will carry out an investigation collaborating with scientists at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, UK to investigate the distribution of E.coli and other coliform bacteria within a school. The information will be used as an evidence base to educate pupils about the transmission of microbes and about methods of control. Through this work pupils will gain an appreciation of the diversity of microbial biochemistry and the chemistry behind chromogenic detection methodologies for specific bacterial enzymes. Inferences from the use of diagnostic selective media will be confirmed by carrying out DNA isolation and PCR to identify the genes responsible for the biochemical reactions. PCR will also be used to identify species of coliforms by reference to genomic sequence databases. These techniques will allow pupils to look into an unseen world in a way which has direct relevance to their everyday lives. Furthermore this partnership study will demonstrate to pupils that solving scientific questions requires the integration of a variety of scientific disciplines. The project will run from January 2012 until June 2012. We will present our preliminary results from the investigation and outline our future plans.

  11. Complex Regulatory Network Controls Initial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation in Escherichia coli via Regulation of the csgD Gene

    PubMed Central

    Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Brombacher, Eva; Vidal, Olivier; Ambert, Arnaud; Lejeune, Philippe; Landini, Paolo; Dorel, Corinne

    2001-01-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop. PMID:11717281

  12. Complex regulatory network controls initial adhesion and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli via regulation of the csgD gene.

    PubMed

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Brombacher, E; Vidal, O; Ambert, A; Lejeune, P; Landini, P; Dorel, C

    2001-12-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop.

  13. Silencing of antibiotic resistance in E. coli with engineered phage bearing small regulatory RNAs.

    PubMed

    Libis, Vincent K; Bernheim, Aude G; Basier, Clovis; Jaramillo-Riveri, Sebastián; Deyell, Matthew; Aghoghogbe, Idonnya; Atanaskovic, Iva; Bencherif, Amel Camélia; Benony, Marguerite; Koutsoubelis, Nicolas; Löchner, Anne C; Marinkovic, Zoran S; Zahra, Sarah; Zegman, Yonatan; Lindner, Ariel B; Wintermute, Edwin H

    2014-12-19

    In response to emergent antibiotic resistance, new strategies are needed to enhance the effectiveness of existing antibiotics. Here, we describe a phagemid-delivered, RNA-mediated system capable of directly knocking down antibiotic resistance phenotypes. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) were designed to specifically inhibit translation of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase and kanamycin phosphotransferase. Nonlytic phagemids coding for sRNA expression were able to infect and restore chloramphenicol and kanamycin sensitivity to populations of otherwise resistant E. coli. This modular system could easily be extended to other bacteria with resistance profiles that depend on specific transcripts.

  14. Antibiotic resistance gene cassettes derived from the omega interposon for use in E. coli and Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Blondelet-Rouault, M H; Weiser, J; Lebrihi, A; Branny, P; Pernodet, J L

    1997-05-06

    Three antibiotic resistance gene cassettes, derived from the omega interposon (Prentki and Krisch (1984) Gene 29, 303-313) were constructed. These cassettes carry different antibiotic resistance genes, conferring resistance to geneticin, hygromycin or viomycin, flanked by short inverted repeats containing transcription and translation termination signals and synthetic polylinkers. These cassettes were designated omega aac, omega hyg and omega vph. Resistance phenotypes conferred by these constructions are selectable in E. coli and Streptomyces. These cassettes can be used for insertional mutagenesis or for vector construction.

  15. Molecular cloning of the Pseudomonas carboxypeptidase G2 gene and its expression in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Minton, N P; Atkinson, T; Sherwood, R F

    1983-01-01

    The gene coding for carboxypeptidase G2 was cloned from Pseudomonas sp. strain RS-16 into Escherichia coli W5445 by inserting Sau3A-generated DNA fragments into the BamHI site of pBR322. The plasmid isolated, pNM1, was restriction mapped, and the position of the gene on the 5.8-megadalton insert was pinpointed by subcloning. The expression of carboxypeptidase in E. coli was 100-fold lower than in the Pseudomonas sp. strain. When the cloned gene was subcloned into the Pseudomonas vector pKT230 and introduced into Pseudomonas putida 2440, a 30-fold increase in expression over that obtained in E. coli was observed. High expression (up to 5% soluble protein) was obtained in E. coli by subcloning a 3.1-megadalton Bg/II fragment into the BamHI site of pAT153. The increased expression was orientation dependent and is presumed to be due to transcriptional readthrough from the Tc promoter of the vector. Production of carboxypeptidase was shown to be induced (two-fold) by the presence of folic acid, and the mature protein was shown to be located in the periplasmic space of E. coli. Images PMID:6358192

  16. Chemotaxis of Escherichia coli to Norepinephrine (NE) Requires Conversion of NE to 3,4-Dihydroxymandelic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Pasupuleti, Sasikiran; Sule, Nitesh; Cohn, William B.; MacKenzie, Duncan S.

    2014-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE), the primary neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous system, has been reported to be a chemoattractant for enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). Here we show that nonpathogenic E. coli K-12 grown in the presence of 2 μM NE is also attracted to NE. Growth with NE induces transcription of genes encoding the tyramine oxidase, TynA, and the aromatic aldehyde dehydrogenase, FeaB, whose respective activities can, in principle, convert NE to 3,4-dihydroxymandelic acid (DHMA). Our results indicate that the apparent attractant response to NE is in fact chemotaxis to DHMA, which was found to be a strong attractant for E. coli. Only strains of E. coli K-12 that produce TynA and FeaB exhibited an attractant response to NE. We demonstrate that DHMA is sensed by the serine chemoreceptor Tsr and that the chemotaxis response requires an intact serine-binding site. The threshold concentration for detection is ≤5 nM DHMA, and the response is inhibited at DHMA concentrations above 50 μM. Cells producing a heterodimeric Tsr receptor containing only one functional serine-binding site still respond like the wild type to low concentrations of DHMA, but their response persists at higher concentrations. We propose that chemotaxis to DHMA generated from NE by bacteria that have already colonized the intestinal epithelium may recruit E. coli and other enteric bacteria that possess a Tsr-like receptor to preferred sites of infection. PMID:25182492

  17. Development and characterization of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro coupled transcription-translation assay system for evaluation of translation inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Corey; Sutcliffe, Joyce A.; Grossman, Trudy H.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial transcription and translation have proven to be effective targets for broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapies owing to the critical role they play in bacterial propagation and the overall conservation of the associated machinery involved. Escherichia coli is the most common source of S30 extract used in bacterial in vitro coupled transcription-translation assays, however, transcription-translation assays in other important pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae have been described (Murray et al., 2001; Dandliker et al., 2003). Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important and difficult-to-treat Gram-negative pathogen. In a drug discovery program, to de-risk any potential species specificity of novel inhibitors, we developed and optimized a robust method for the preparation of S30 extract from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. Further, a P. aeruginosa transcription-translation assay using a firefly luciferase reporter plasmid was validated and compared to an E. coli S30-based system using a wide range of antibiotics encompassing multiple classes of translation inhibitors. Results showed a similar ranking of the activities of known inhibitors, illustrative of the high degree of conservation between the transcription-translation pathways in both organisms. PMID:22677604

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis CRP/FNR family transcription regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Akif, Mohd; Akhter, Yusuf; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Mande, Shekhar C.

    2006-09-01

    The CRP/FNR family transcription factor from M. tuberculosis H37Rv has been crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} in the absence of cAMP. The crystals show the presence of a dimeric molecule in the asymmetric unit. CRP/FNR family members are transcription factors that regulate the transcription of many genes in Escherichia coli and other organisms. Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv contains a probable CRP/FNR homologue encoded by the open reading frame Rv3676. The deletion of this gene is known to cause growth defects in cell culture, in bone marrow-derived macrophages and in a mouse model of tuberculosis. The mycobacterial gene Rv3676 shares ∼32% sequence identity with prototype E. coli CRP. The structure of the protein might provide insight into transcriptional regulation in the pathogen by this protein. The M. tuberculosis CRP/FNR transcription regulator was crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.1, b = 84.6, c = 101.2 Å. The crystal diffracted to a resolution of 2.9 Å. Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function calculations reveal the presence of two monomers in the asymmetric unit.

  19. Investigating transcription reinitiation through in vitro approaches.

    PubMed

    Dieci, Giorgio; Fermi, Beatrice; Bosio, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    By influencing the number of RNA molecules repeatedly synthesized from the same gene, the control of transcription reinitiation has the potential to shape the transcriptome. Transcription reinitiation mechanisms have been mainly addressed in vitro, through approaches based on both crude and reconstituted systems. These studies support the notion that transcription reinitiation and its regulation rely on dedicated networks of molecular interactions within transcription machineries. At the same time, comparison with in vivo transcription rates suggests that additional mechanisms, factors and conditions must exist in the nucleus, whose biochemical elucidation is a fascinating challenge for future in vitro transcription studies.

  20. RNA polymerase II transcription: structure and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Bushnell, David A; Kornberg, Roger D

    2013-01-01

    A minimal RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcription system comprises the polymerase and five general transcription factors (GTFs) TFIIB, -D, -E, -F, and -H. The addition of Mediator enables a response to regulatory factors. The GTFs are required for promoter recognition and the initiation of transcription. Following initiation, pol II alone is capable of RNA transcript elongation and of proofreading. Structural studies reviewed here reveal roles of GTFs in the initiation process and shed light on the transcription elongation mechanism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Polymerase II Transcript Elongation.

  1. Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effect of global regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Leuze, Michael Rex; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Syed, Mustafa H; Beliaev, Alexander S; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TFs) that influence the expression of many genes. Global regulators, including CRP (cAMP Receptor Protein), ArcA, and FNR, can modulate the transcriptional activity of multiple operons. The similarity of a regulatory element s sequence to a TF s consensus binding site (BS) and the position of the regulatory element in an operon promoter are considered the most important determinants of this TF s regulatory influence. In this study we explore the hypothesis that the number of TFBS half-sites (where a half-site is one half of the palindromic BS consensus sequence, which we shall refer to as a binding motif or a BM) of a global regulator in an operon s promoter plays an important role in the operon s transcriptional regulation. We examine empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP regulon in Shewanella oneidenses MR 1 and Escherichia coli, and of the ArcA regulon in S. oneidenses MR 1. We compare the power of CRP BM counts and of full, symmetrical CRP TFBS characteristics, namely similarity to consensus and location, to predict CRP-induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full-length TFBS quality or location. Regression analysis indicates that IHF (Integration Host Factor) and ArcA have synergistic effects on CRP-induced gene transcription, positive and negative, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that the fine-tuning of bacterial transcriptional activity by CRP may involves not only the bending of the operon promoter, facilitated by CRP in cooperation with the histone-like protein IHF, but also the cumulative binding affinity of multiple weak BMs.

  2. Xenopus transcription factor IIIA-dependent DNA renaturation.

    PubMed

    Fiser-Littell, R M; Hanas, J S

    1988-11-15

    Kinetic and titration analyses are used to elucidate the mechanism by which Xenopus transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), a protein required for 5 S RNA synthesis by RNA polymerase III, promotes DNA renaturation. TFIIIA promotes 50% renaturation of complementary strands (303 bases) in 45 s. Analyses of the renaturation kinetics indicate the rate-limiting step in this TFIIIA-dependent reaction is first order. TFIIIA-dependent DNA renaturation is a stoichiometric rather than a catalytic process. The renaturation rates for specific and nonspecific DNA are very similar, indicating lack of sequence specificity in this TFIIIA-dependent process. In the nanomolar concentration range of protein and DNA, renaturation occurs at a ratio of about one TFIIIA molecule/single strand (303 bases). Elevated reaction temperatures strongly stimulate TFIIIA-dependent DNA renaturation; at 45 degrees C, renaturation of the 303-base pair fragment nears completion in about 5 s. The ability of TFIIIA to rapidly promote DNA renaturation is unique when compared with Escherichia coli recA protein, single-stranded DNA binding protein, or bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein. This mechanism by which TFIIIA promotes DNA renaturation is compatible with features of 5 S RNA gene transcription.

  3. How Changes in Anti-SD Sequences Would Affect SD Sequences in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Abolbaghaei, Akram; Silke, Jordan R; Xia, Xuhua

    2017-03-31

    The 3' end of the small ribosomal RNAs (ssu rRNA) in bacteria is directly involved in the selection and binding of mRNA transcripts during translation initiation via well-documented interactions between a Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence located upstream of the initiation codon and an anti-SD (aSD) sequence at the 3' end of the ssu rRNA. Consequently, the 3' end of ssu rRNA (3'TAIL) is strongly conserved among bacterial species because a change in the region may impact the translation of many protein-coding genes. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis differ in their 3' ends of ssu rRNA, being GAUCACCUCCUUA3' in E. coli and GAUCACCUCCUUUCU3' or GAUCACCUCCUUUCUA3' in B. subtilis Such differences in 3'TAIL lead to species-specific SDs (designated SDEc for E. coli and SDBs for B. subtilis) that can form strong and well-positioned SD/aSD pairing in one species but not in the other. Selection mediated by the species-specific 3'TAIL is expected to favour SDBs against SDEc in B. subtilis but favour SDEc against SDBs in E. coli Among well-positioned SDs, SDEc is used more in E. coli than in B. subtilis, and SDBs more in B. subtilis than in E. coli Highly expressed genes and genes of high translation efficiency tend to have longer SDs than lowly expressed genes and genes with low translation efficiency in both species, but more so in B. subtilis than in E. coli Both species overuse SDs matching the bolded part of 3'TAIL shown above. The 3'TAIL difference contributes to host-specificity of phages.

  4. On the trail of EHEC/EAEC--unraveling the gene regulatory networks of human pathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pauling, Josch; Röttger, Richard; Neuner, Andreas; Salgado, Heladia; Collado-Vides, Julio; Kalaghatgi, Prabhav; Azevedo, Vasco; Tauch, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Baumbach, Jan

    2012-07-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli, such as Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) and Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), are globally widespread bacteria. Some may cause the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Varying strains cause epidemics all over the world. Recently, we observed an epidemic outbreak of a multi-resistant EHEC strain in Western Europe, mainly in Germany. The Robert Koch Institute reports >4300 infections and >50 deaths (July, 2011). Farmers lost several million EUR since the origin of infection was unclear. Here, we contribute to the currently ongoing research with a computer-aided study of EHEC transcriptional regulatory interactions, a network of genetic switches that control, for instance, pathogenicity, survival and reproduction of bacterial cells. Our strategy is to utilize knowledge of gene regulatory networks from the evolutionary relative E. coli K-12, a harmless strain mainly used for wet lab studies. In order to provide high-potential candidates for human pathogenic E. coli bacteria, such as EHEC, we developed the integrated online database and an analysis platform EhecRegNet. We utilize 3489 known regulations from E. coli K-12 for predictions of yet unknown gene regulatory interactions in 16 human pathogens. For these strains we predict 40,913 regulatory interactions. EhecRegNet is based on the identification of evolutionarily conserved regulatory sites within the DNA of the harmless E. coli K-12 and the pathogens. Identifying and characterizing EHEC's genetic control mechanism network on a large scale will allow for a better understanding of its survival and infection strategies. This will support the development of urgently needed new treatments. EhecRegNet is online via http://www.ehecregnet.de.

  5. The relationship between sequence-specific termination of DNA replication and transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, B K; Sahoo, T; Bastia, D

    1996-01-01

    In Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis replication fork arrest occurs in the terminus at sequence-specific sites by the binding of replication terminator proteins to the fork arrest sites. The protein-DNA complex causes polar arrest of the replication forks by inhibiting the activity of the replicative helicases in only one orientation of the terminus with respect to the replication origin. This activity has been named as polar contrahelicase. In this paper we report on a second novel activity of the terminator proteins of E.coli and B.subtilis, namely the ability of the proteins to block RNA chain elongation by several prokaryotic RNA polymerases in a polar mode. The replication terminator proteins ter and RTP of E.coli and B.subtilis respectively, impeded RNA chain elongation catalyzed by T7, SP6 and E.coli RNA polymerases in a polar mode at the replication arrest sites. The RNA chain anti-elongation and the contrahelicase activities were isopolar. Whereas one monomer of ter was necessary and sufficient to block RNA chain elongation, two interacting dimers of RTP were needed to effect the same blockage. The biological significance of the RNA chain anti-elongation activity is manifested in the functional inactivation of a replication arrest site by invasion of RNA chains from outside, and the consequent need to preserve replication arrest activity by restricting the passage of transcription through the terminus-terminator protein complex. Images PMID:8665860

  6. Occurrence and regulation of the ferric citrate transport system in Escherichia coli B, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Photorhabdus luminescens.

    PubMed

    Mahren, Susanne; Schnell, Heidrun; Braun, Volkmar

    2005-11-01

    In Escherichia coli K-12, transcription of the ferric citrate transport genes fecABCDE is initiated by binding of diferric dicitrate to the outer membrane protein FecA which elicits a signaling cascade from the cell surface to the cytoplasm. The FecI sigma factor is only active in the presence of FecR, which transfers the signal across the cytoplasmic membrane. In other bacteria, fecIRA homologues control iron transport gene transcription by siderophores other than citrate. However, in most cases, the FecI homologues are active in the absence of the FecR homologues, which might function as anti-sigma factors. Since not all E. coli