Science.gov

Sample records for collaborative virtual environment

  1. Collaborative virtual environments art exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinsky, Margaret; Anstey, Josephine; Pape, Dave E.; Aguilera, Julieta C.; Kostis, Helen-Nicole; Tsoupikova, Daria

    2005-03-01

    This panel presentation will exhibit artwork developed in CAVEs and discuss how art methodologies enhance the science of VR through collaboration, interaction and aesthetics. Artists and scientists work alongside one another to expand scientific research and artistic expression and are motivated by exhibiting collaborative virtual environments. Looking towards the arts, such as painting and sculpture, computer graphics captures a visual tradition. Virtual reality expands this tradition to not only what we face, but to what surrounds us and even what responds to our body and its gestures. Art making that once was isolated to the static frame and an optimal point of view is now out and about, in fully immersive mode within CAVEs. Art knowledge is a guide to how the aesthetics of 2D and 3D worlds affect, transform, and influence the social, intellectual and physical condition of the human body through attention to psychology, spiritual thinking, education, and cognition. The psychological interacts with the physical in the virtual in such a way that each facilitates, enhances and extends the other, culminating in a "go together" world. Attention to sharing art experience across high-speed networks introduces a dimension of liveliness and aliveness when we "become virtual" in real time with others.

  2. Evaluation Framework for Collaborative Educational Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsiatsos, Thrasyvoulos; Andreas, Konstantinidis; Pomportsis, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we will focus on a specific category of Collaborative Virtual Environments that aims to support Collaborative Learning. We call these environments Collaborative Educational Virtual Environments. Our aim is to analyze the evaluation process through the study of relevant bibliography and by doing so reveal the existing research gap…

  3. Elearn: A Collaborative Educational Virtual Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michailidou, Anna; Economides, Anastasios A.

    Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) that support collaboration are one of the new technologies that have attracted great interest. VLEs are learning management software systems composed of computer-mediated communication software and online methods of delivering course material. This paper presents ELearn, a collaborative VLE for teaching…

  4. A Virtual Mission Operations Center: Collaborative Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medina, Barbara; Bussman, Marie; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Virtual Mission Operations Center - Collaborative Environment (VMOC-CE) intent is to have a central access point for all the resources used in a collaborative mission operations environment to assist mission operators in communicating on-site and off-site in the investigation and resolution of anomalies. It is a framework that as a minimum incorporates online chat, realtime file sharing and remote application sharing components in one central location. The use of a collaborative environment in mission operations opens up the possibilities for a central framework for other project members to access and interact with mission operations staff remotely. The goal of the Virtual Mission Operations Center (VMOC) Project is to identify, develop, and infuse technology to enable mission control by on-call personnel in geographically dispersed locations. In order to achieve this goal, the following capabilities are needed: Autonomous mission control systems Automated systems to contact on-call personnel Synthesis and presentation of mission control status and history information Desktop tools for data and situation analysis Secure mechanism for remote collaboration commanding Collaborative environment for remote cooperative work The VMOC-CE is a collaborative environment that facilitates remote cooperative work. It is an application instance of the Virtual System Design Environment (VSDE), developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Systems Engineering Services & Advanced Concepts (SESAC) Branch. The VSDE is a web-based portal that includes a knowledge repository and collaborative environment to serve science and engineering teams in product development. It is a "one stop shop" for product design, providing users real-time access to product development data, engineering and management tools, and relevant design specifications and resources through the Internet. The initial focus of the VSDE has been to serve teams working in the early portion of the system

  5. A Virtual Mission Operations Center - Collaborative Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medina, Barbara; Bussman, Marie

    2002-01-01

    Development of technologies that enable significant reductions in the cost of space mission operations is critical if constellations, formations, federations and sensor webs, are to be economically feasible. One approach to cost reduction is to infuse automation technologies into mission operations centers so that fewer personnel are needed for mission support. But missions are more culturally and politically adverse to the risks of automation. Reducing the mission risk associated with increased use of automation within a MOC is therefore of great importance. The belief that mission risk increases as more automation is used stems from the fact that there is inherently less direct human oversight to investigate and resolve anomalies in an unattended MOC. The Virtual Missions Operations Center - Collaborative Environment (VMOC-CE) project was launched to address this concern. The goal of the VMOC-CE project is to identify, develop, and infuse technology to enable mission operations between onsite operators and on-call personnel in geographically dispersed locations. VMOC-CE enables missions to more readily adopt automation because off-site operators and engineers can more easily identify, investigate, and resolve anomalies without having to be present in the MOC. The VMOC-CE intent is to have a single access point for all resources used in a collaborative mission operations environment. Team members will be able to interact during spacecraft operations, specifically for resolving anomalies, utilizing a desktop computer and the Internet. Mission operations management can use the VMOC-CE as a tool to participate in and monitor status of anomaly resolution or other mission operations issues. In this paper we present the VMOC-CE project, system capabilities and technologies, operations concept, and results of its pilot in support of the Earth Science Mission Operations System (ESMOS).

  6. Learning in 3D Virtual Environments: Collaboration and Knowledge Spirals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Brian G.; Martin, Barbara N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to determine if learning occurred within a 3D virtual learning environment by determining if elements of collaboration and Nonaka and Takeuchi's (1995) knowledge spiral were present. A key portion of this research was the creation of a Virtual Learning Environment. This 3D VLE utilized the Torque Game Engine…

  7. Virtual Cities as a Collaborative Educational Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Daniel Nehme; de Oliveira, Otto Lopes Braitback; Remião, Joelma Adriana Abrão; Silveira, Paloma Dias; Martins, Márcio André Rodrigues; Axt, Margarete

    The CIVITAS (Virtual Cities with Technologies for Learning and Simulating) project presents a research, teaching and extension approach directed to the construction of cities imagined by students in the first years of elementary school, with an emphasis to the fourth grade. The teacher ventures on a deviation from the official curriculum proposed to reflect upon the invention of cities along with the children. Within this context, the game Città is introduced as an environment that allows the creation of digital real/virtual/imagined cities, and enables different forms of interaction among the students through networked computers. The cooperative situations, made possible by the access to the game, are tools for teachers and students to think about the information that operate as general rules and words of order with the invention of the city/knowledge.

  8. Online Teacher Development: Collaborating in a Virtual Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernest, Pauline; Guitert Catasús, Montse; Hampel, Regine; Heiser, Sarah; Hopkins, Joseph; Murphy, Linda; Stickler, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years, educational institutions have been making increasing use of virtual environments to set up collaborative activities for learners. While it is recognized that teachers play an important role in facilitating learner collaboration online, they may not have the necessary skills to do so successfully. Thus, a small-scale professional…

  9. A study on haptic collaborative game in shared virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Keke; Liu, Guanyang; Liu, Lingzhi

    2013-03-01

    A study on collaborative game in shared virtual environment with haptic feedback over computer networks is introduced in this paper. A collaborative task was used where the players located at remote sites and played the game together. The player can feel visual and haptic feedback in virtual environment compared to traditional networked multiplayer games. The experiment was desired in two conditions: visual feedback only and visual-haptic feedback. The goal of the experiment is to assess the impact of force feedback on collaborative task performance. Results indicate that haptic feedback is beneficial for performance enhancement for collaborative game in shared virtual environment. The outcomes of this research can have a powerful impact on the networked computer games.

  10. Virtual Collaborative Simulation Environment for Integrated Product and Process Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulli, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Deneb Robotics is a leader in the development of commercially available, leading edge three- dimensional simulation software tools for virtual prototyping,, simulation-based design, manufacturing process simulation, and factory floor simulation and training applications. Deneb has developed and commercially released a preliminary Virtual Collaborative Engineering (VCE) capability for Integrated Product and Process Development (IPPD). This capability allows distributed, real-time visualization and evaluation of design concepts, manufacturing processes, and total factory and enterprises in one seamless simulation environment.

  11. Telearch - Integrated visual simulation environment for collaborative virtual archaeology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurillo, Gregorij; Forte, Maurizio

    Archaeologists collect vast amounts of digital data around the world; however, they lack tools for integration and collaborative interaction to support reconstruction and interpretation process. TeleArch software is aimed to integrate different data sources and provide real-time interaction tools for remote collaboration of geographically distributed scholars inside a shared virtual environment. The framework also includes audio, 2D and 3D video streaming technology to facilitate remote presence of users. In this paper, we present several experimental case studies to demonstrate the integration and interaction with 3D models and geographical information system (GIS) data in this collaborative environment.

  12. Educational Visualizations in 3D Collaborative Virtual Environments: A Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fominykh, Mikhail; Prasolova-Forland, Ekaterina

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Collaborative virtual environments (CVEs) have become increasingly popular in educational settings and the role of 3D content is becoming more and more important. Still, there are many challenges in this area, such as lack of empirical studies that provide design for educational activities in 3D CVEs and lack of norms of how to support…

  13. Distributed collaborative environments for virtual capability-based planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuay, William K.

    2003-09-01

    Distributed collaboration is an emerging technology that will significantly change how decisions are made in the 21st century. Collaboration involves two or more geographically dispersed individuals working together to share and exchange data, information, knowledge, and actions. The marriage of information, collaboration, and simulation technologies provides the decision maker with a collaborative virtual environment for planning and decision support. This paper reviews research that is focusing on the applying open standards agent-based framework with integrated modeling and simulation to a new Air Force initiative in capability-based planning and the ability to implement it in a distributed virtual environment. Virtual Capability Planning effort will provide decision-quality knowledge for Air Force resource allocation and investment planning including examining proposed capabilities and cost of alternative approaches, the impact of technologies, identification of primary risk drivers, and creation of executable acquisition strategies. The transformed Air Force business processes are enabled by iterative use of constructive and virtual modeling, simulation, and analysis together with information technology. These tools are applied collaboratively via a technical framework by all the affected stakeholders - warfighter, laboratory, product center, logistics center, test center, and primary contractor.

  14. A virtual environment for medical radiation collaborative learning.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Pete; Trapp, Jamie V; Kastanis, Lazaros; Pack, Darren; Parker, Jacqui C

    2015-06-01

    A software-based environment was developed to provide practical training in medical radiation principles and safety. The Virtual Radiation Laboratory application allowed students to conduct virtual experiments using simulated diagnostic and radiotherapy X-ray generators. The experiments were designed to teach students about the inverse square law, half value layer and radiation protection measures and utilised genuine clinical and experimental data. Evaluation of the application was conducted in order to ascertain the impact of the software on students' understanding, satisfaction and collaborative learning skills and also to determine potential further improvements to the software and guidelines for its continued use. Feedback was gathered via an anonymous online survey consisting of a mixture of Likert-style questions and short answer open questions. Student feedback was highly positive with 80 % of students reporting increased understanding of radiation protection principles. Furthermore 72 % enjoyed using the software and 87 % of students felt that the project facilitated collaboration within small groups. The main themes arising in the qualitative feedback comments related to efficiency and effectiveness of teaching, safety of environment, collaboration and realism. Staff and students both report gains in efficiency and effectiveness associated with the virtual experiments. In addition students particularly value the visualisation of "invisible" physical principles and increased opportunity for experimentation and collaborative problem-based learning. Similar ventures will benefit from adopting an approach that allows for individual experimentation while visualizing challenging concepts. PMID:25999124

  15. A virtual environment for medical radiation collaborative learning.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Pete; Trapp, Jamie V; Kastanis, Lazaros; Pack, Darren; Parker, Jacqui C

    2015-06-01

    A software-based environment was developed to provide practical training in medical radiation principles and safety. The Virtual Radiation Laboratory application allowed students to conduct virtual experiments using simulated diagnostic and radiotherapy X-ray generators. The experiments were designed to teach students about the inverse square law, half value layer and radiation protection measures and utilised genuine clinical and experimental data. Evaluation of the application was conducted in order to ascertain the impact of the software on students' understanding, satisfaction and collaborative learning skills and also to determine potential further improvements to the software and guidelines for its continued use. Feedback was gathered via an anonymous online survey consisting of a mixture of Likert-style questions and short answer open questions. Student feedback was highly positive with 80 % of students reporting increased understanding of radiation protection principles. Furthermore 72 % enjoyed using the software and 87 % of students felt that the project facilitated collaboration within small groups. The main themes arising in the qualitative feedback comments related to efficiency and effectiveness of teaching, safety of environment, collaboration and realism. Staff and students both report gains in efficiency and effectiveness associated with the virtual experiments. In addition students particularly value the visualisation of "invisible" physical principles and increased opportunity for experimentation and collaborative problem-based learning. Similar ventures will benefit from adopting an approach that allows for individual experimentation while visualizing challenging concepts.

  16. Collaborative virtual reality environments for computational science and design.

    SciTech Connect

    Papka, M. E.

    1998-02-17

    The authors are developing a networked, multi-user, virtual-reality-based collaborative environment coupled to one or more petaFLOPs computers, enabling the interactive simulation of 10{sup 9} atom systems. The purpose of this work is to explore the requirements for this coupling. Through the design, development, and testing of such systems, they hope to gain knowledge that allows computational scientists to discover and analyze their results more quickly and in a more intuitive manner.

  17. Virtual laboratories: Collaborative environments and facilities-on-line

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.E. Jr.; Cavallini, J.S.; Seweryniak, G.R.; Kitchens, T.A.; Hitchcock, D.A.; Scott, M.A.; Welch, L.C.; Aiken, R.J. |; Stevens, R.L.

    1995-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has major research laboratories in a number of locations in the US, typically co-located with large research instruments or research facilities valued at tens of millions to even billions of dollars. Present budget exigencies facing the entire nation are felt very deeply at DOE, just as elsewhere. Advances over the last few years in networking and computing technologies make virtual collaborative environments and conduct of experiments over the internetwork structure a possibility. The authors believe that development of these collaborative environments and facilities-on-line could lead to a ``virtual laboratory`` with tremendous potential for decreasing the costs of research and increasing the productivity of their capital investment in research facilities. The majority of these cost savings would be due to increased productivity of their research efforts, better utilization of resources and facilities, and avoiding duplication of expensive facilities. A vision of how this might all fit together and a discussion of the infrastructure necessary to enable these developments is presented.

  18. Cognitive Aspects of Collaboration in 3d Virtual Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juřík, V.; Herman, L.; Kubíček, P.; Stachoň, Z.; Šašinka, Č.

    2016-06-01

    Human-computer interaction has entered the 3D era. The most important models representing spatial information — maps — are transferred into 3D versions regarding the specific content to be displayed. Virtual worlds (VW) become promising area of interest because of possibility to dynamically modify content and multi-user cooperation when solving tasks regardless to physical presence. They can be used for sharing and elaborating information via virtual images or avatars. Attractiveness of VWs is emphasized also by possibility to measure operators' actions and complex strategies. Collaboration in 3D environments is the crucial issue in many areas where the visualizations are important for the group cooperation. Within the specific 3D user interface the operators' ability to manipulate the displayed content is explored regarding such phenomena as situation awareness, cognitive workload and human error. For such purpose, the VWs offer a great number of tools for measuring the operators' responses as recording virtual movement or spots of interest in the visual field. Study focuses on the methodological issues of measuring the usability of 3D VWs and comparing them with the existing principles of 2D maps. We explore operators' strategies to reach and interpret information regarding the specific type of visualization and different level of immersion.

  19. Study on Collaborative Object Manipulation in Virtual Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayangsari, Maria Niken; Yong-Moo, Kwon

    This paper presents comparative study on network collaboration performance in different immersion. Especially, the relationship between user collaboration performance and degree of immersion provided by the system is addressed and compared based on several experiments. The user tests on our system include several cases: 1) Comparison between non-haptics and haptics collaborative interaction over LAN, 2) Comparison between non-haptics and haptics collaborative interaction over Internet, and 3) Analysis of collaborative interaction between non-immersive and immersive display environments.

  20. Scientific Visualization for Atmospheric Data Analysis in Collaborative Virtual Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelke, Wito; Flatken, Markus; Garcia, Arturo S.; Bar, Christian; Gerndt, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    1 INTRODUCTION The three year European research project CROSS DRIVE (Collaborative Rover Operations and Planetary Science Analysis System based on Distributed Remote and Interactive Virtual Environments) started in January 2014. The research and development within this project is motivated by three use case studies: landing site characterization, atmospheric science and rover target selection [1]. Currently the implementation for the second use case is in its final phase [2]. Here, the requirements were generated based on the domain experts input and lead to development and integration of appropriate methods for visualization and analysis of atmospheric data. The methods range from volume rendering, interactive slicing, iso-surface techniques to interactive probing. All visualization methods are integrated in DLR's Terrain Rendering application. With this, the high resolution surface data visualization can be enriched with additional methods appropriate for atmospheric data sets. This results in an integrated virtual environment where the scientist has the possibility to interactively explore his data sets directly within the correct context. The data sets include volumetric data of the martian atmosphere, precomputed two dimensional maps and vertical profiles. In most cases the surface data as well as the atmospheric data has global coverage and is of time dependent nature. Furthermore, all interaction is synchronized between different connected application instances, allowing for collaborative sessions between distant experts. 2 VISUALIZATION TECHNIQUES Also the application is currently used for visualization of data sets related to Mars the techniques can be used for other data sets as well. Currently the prototype is capable of handling 2 and 2.5D surface data as well as 4D atmospheric data. Specifically, the surface data is presented using an LoD approach which is based on the HEALPix tessellation of a sphere [3, 4, 5] and can handle data sets in the order of

  1. Virtual Collaborative Learning Environments for Music: Networked Drumsteps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Conor; Bligh, James; Jennings, Kevin; Tangney, Brendan

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on a tool for meaningful, collaborative, interaction in a constructionist music composition environment. In particular, it describes the design and implementation of ''Networked DrumSteps'', an application that allows multiple users in different locations to collaborate in the process of music composition, but without the use of…

  2. Scientific Visualization for Atmospheric Data Analysis in Collaborative Virtual Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelke, Wito; Flatken, Markus; Garcia, Arturo S.; Bar, Christian; Gerndt, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    1 INTRODUCTION The three year European research project CROSS DRIVE (Collaborative Rover Operations and Planetary Science Analysis System based on Distributed Remote and Interactive Virtual Environments) started in January 2014. The research and development within this project is motivated by three use case studies: landing site characterization, atmospheric science and rover target selection [1]. Currently the implementation for the second use case is in its final phase [2]. Here, the requirements were generated based on the domain experts input and lead to development and integration of appropriate methods for visualization and analysis of atmospheric data. The methods range from volume rendering, interactive slicing, iso-surface techniques to interactive probing. All visualization methods are integrated in DLR's Terrain Rendering application. With this, the high resolution surface data visualization can be enriched with additional methods appropriate for atmospheric data sets. This results in an integrated virtual environment where the scientist has the possibility to interactively explore his data sets directly within the correct context. The data sets include volumetric data of the martian atmosphere, precomputed two dimensional maps and vertical profiles. In most cases the surface data as well as the atmospheric data has global coverage and is of time dependent nature. Furthermore, all interaction is synchronized between different connected application instances, allowing for collaborative sessions between distant experts. 2 VISUALIZATION TECHNIQUES Also the application is currently used for visualization of data sets related to Mars the techniques can be used for other data sets as well. Currently the prototype is capable of handling 2 and 2.5D surface data as well as 4D atmospheric data. Specifically, the surface data is presented using an LoD approach which is based on the HEALPix tessellation of a sphere [3, 4, 5] and can handle data sets in the order of

  3. Perfecting scientists’ collaboration and problem-solving skills in the virtual team environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perfecting Scientists’ Collaboration and Problem-Solving Skills in the Virtual Team Environment Numerous factors have contributed to the proliferation of conducting work in virtual teams at the domestic, national, and global levels: innovations in technology, critical developments in software, co-lo...

  4. A Virtual Collaborative Environment for Mars Surveyor Landing Site Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V.C.; Deardorff, D. G.; Briggs, G. A.; Hand, K. P.; Sandstrom, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    Over the past year and a half, the Center for Mars Exploration (CMEX) at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) has been working with the Mars Surveyor Project Office at JPL to promote interactions among the planetary community and to coordinate landing site activities for the Mars Surveyor Project Office. To date, CMEX has been responsible for organizing the first two Mars Surveyor Landing Site workshops, web-archiving resulting information from these workshops, aiding in science evaluations of candidate landing sites, and serving as a liaison between the community and the Project. Most recently, CMEX has also been working with information technologists at Ames to develop a state-of-the-art collaborative web site environment to foster interaction of interested members of the planetary community with the Mars Surveyor Program and the Project Office. The web site will continue to evolve over the next several years as new tools and features are added to support the ongoing Mars Surveyor missions.

  5. Interaction Forms in Successful Collaborative Learning in Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuopala, Essi; Hyvönen, Pirkko; Järvelä, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Despite the numerous studies on social interaction in collaborative learning, little is known about interaction forms in successful computer-supported collaborative learning situations. The purpose of this study was to explore and understand student interaction in successful collaborative learning during a university course which was mediated by…

  6. Perfecting Scientists' Collaboration and Problem-Solving Skills in the Virtual Team Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabro, A.; Jabro, J.

    2012-04-01

    PPerfecting Scientists' Collaboration and Problem-Solving Skills in the Virtual Team Environment Numerous factors have contributed to the proliferation of conducting work in virtual teams at the domestic, national, and global levels: innovations in technology, critical developments in software, co-located research partners and diverse funding sources, dynamic economic and political environments, and a changing workforce. Today's scientists must be prepared to not only perform work in the virtual team environment, but to work effectively and efficiently despite physical and cultural barriers. Research supports that students who have been exposed to virtual team experiences are desirable in the professional and academic arenas. Research supports establishing and maintaining established protocols for communication behavior prior to task discussion provides for successful team outcomes. Research conducted on graduate and undergraduate virtual teams' behaviors led to the development of successful pedagogic practices and assessment strategies.

  7. The Effect of Audio and Visual Aids on Task Performance in Distributed Collaborative Virtual Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Sehat; Richard, Paul; Otman, Samir; Mallem, Malik

    2009-03-01

    Collaborative virtual environments (CVE) has recently gained the attention of many researchers due to its numerous potential application domains. Cooperative virtual environments, where users simultaneously manipulate objects, is one of the subfields of CVEs. In this paper we present a framework that enables two users to cooperatively manipulate objects in virtual environment, while setting on two separate machines connected through local network. In addition the article presents the use of sensory feedback (audio and visual) and investigates their effects on the cooperation and user's performance. Six volunteers subject had to cooperatively perform a peg-in-hole task. Results revealed that visual and auditory aid increase users' performance. However majority of the users preferred visual feedback to audio. We hope this framework will greatly help in the development of CAD systems that allow the designers to collaboratively design while being distant. Similarly other application domains may be cooperative assembly, surgical training and rehabilitation systems.

  8. Collaboration Modality, Cognitive Load, and Science Inquiry Learning in Virtual Inquiry Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlandson, Benjamin E.; Nelson, Brian C.; Savenye, Wilhelmina C.

    2010-01-01

    Educational multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) have been shown to be effective platforms for situated science inquiry curricula. While researchers find MUVEs to be supportive of collaborative scientific inquiry processes, the complex mix of multi-modal messages present in MUVEs can lead to cognitive overload, with learners unable to…

  9. Multi-User Virtual Environments Fostering Collaboration in Formal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Blas, Nicoletta; Paolini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    This paper is about how serious games based on MUVEs in formal education can foster collaboration. More specifically, it is about a large case-study with four different programs which took place from 2002 to 2009 and involved more than 9,000 students, aged between 12 and 18, from various nations (18 European countries, Israel and the USA). These…

  10. ARENA - A Collaborative Immersive Environment for Virtual Fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasnitschka, T.

    2012-12-01

    Whenever a geoscientific study area is not readily accessible, as is the case on the deep seafloor, it is difficult to apply traditional but effective methods of fieldwork, which often require physical presence of the observer. The Artificial Research Environment for Networked Analysis (ARENA), developed at GEOMAR | Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel within the Cluster of Excellence "The Future Ocean", provides a backend solution to robotic research on the seafloor by means of an immersive simulation environment for marine research: A hemispherical screen of 6m diameter covering the entire lower hemisphere surrounds a group of up to four researchers at once. A variety of open source (e.g. Microsoft Research World Wide Telescope) and commercial software platforms allow the interaction with e.g. in-situ recorded video, vector maps, terrain, textured geometry, point cloud and volumetric data in four dimensions. Data can be put into a holistic, georeferenced context and viewed on scales stretching from centimeters to global. Several input devices from joysticks to gestures and vocalized commands allow interaction with the simulation, depending on individual preference. Annotations added to the dataset during the simulation session catalyze the following quantitative evaluation. Both the special simulator design, making data perception a group experience, and the ability to connect remote instances or scaled down versions of ARENA over the Internet are significant advantages over established immersive simulation environments.

  11. Implementing Advanced Characteristics of X3D Collaborative Virtual Environments for Supporting e-Learning: The Case of EVE Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouras, Christos; Triglianos, Vasileios; Tsiatsos, Thrasyvoulos

    2014-01-01

    Three dimensional Collaborative Virtual Environments are a powerful form of collaborative telecommunication applications, enabling the users to share a common three-dimensional space and interact with each other as well as with the environment surrounding them, in order to collaboratively solve problems or aid learning processes. Such an…

  12. Virtual Collaborative Environments for System of Systems Engineering and Applications for ISAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, David A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes an system of systems or metasystems approach and models developed to help prepare engineering organizations for distributed engineering environments. These changes in engineering enterprises include competition in increasingly global environments; new partnering opportunities caused by advances in information and communication technologies, and virtual collaboration issues associated with dispersed teams. To help address challenges and needs in this environment, a framework is proposed that can be customized and adapted for NASA to assist in improved engineering activities conducted in distributed, enhanced engineering environments. The approach is designed to prepare engineers for such distributed collaborative environments by learning and applying e-engineering methods and tools to a real-world engineering development scenario. The approach consists of two phases: an e-engineering basics phase and e-engineering application phase. The e-engineering basics phase addresses skills required for e-engineering. The e-engineering application phase applies these skills in a distributed collaborative environment to system development projects.

  13. Virtual Learning Spaces in the Web: An Agent-Based Architecture of Personalized Collaborative Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunez Esquer, Gustavo; Sheremetov, Leonid

    This paper reports on the results and future research work within the paradigm of Configurable Collaborative Distance Learning, called Espacios Virtuales de Apredizaje (EVA). The paper focuses on: (1) description of the main concepts, including virtual learning spaces for knowledge, collaboration, consulting, and experimentation, a "multi-book"…

  14. Working Collaboratively in Virtual Learning Environments: Using Second Life with Korean High School Students in History Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Mi Hwa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the impact of the use of a virtual environment for learning Korean history on high school students' learning outcomes and attitudes toward virtual worlds (collaboration, engagement, general use of SL [Second Life], and immersion). In addition, this experiment examined the relationships…

  15. Framework for Deploying a Virtualized Computing Environment for Collaborative and Secure Data Analytics

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Adrian; Green, Laura; Faulk, Ciearro; Galla, Stephen; Meyer, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Large amounts of health data generated by a wide range of health care applications across a variety of systems have the potential to offer valuable insight into populations and health care systems, but robust and secure computing and analytic systems are required to leverage this information. Framework: We discuss our experiences deploying a Secure Data Analysis Platform (SeDAP), and provide a framework to plan, build and deploy a virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) to enable innovation, collaboration and operate within academic funding structures. It outlines 6 core components: Security, Ease of Access, Performance, Cost, Tools, and Training. Conclusion: A platform like SeDAP is not simply successful through technical excellence and performance. It’s adoption is dependent on a collaborative environment where researchers and users plan and evaluate the requirements of all aspects. PMID:27683665

  16. Framework for Deploying a Virtualized Computing Environment for Collaborative and Secure Data Analytics

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Adrian; Green, Laura; Faulk, Ciearro; Galla, Stephen; Meyer, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Large amounts of health data generated by a wide range of health care applications across a variety of systems have the potential to offer valuable insight into populations and health care systems, but robust and secure computing and analytic systems are required to leverage this information. Framework: We discuss our experiences deploying a Secure Data Analysis Platform (SeDAP), and provide a framework to plan, build and deploy a virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) to enable innovation, collaboration and operate within academic funding structures. It outlines 6 core components: Security, Ease of Access, Performance, Cost, Tools, and Training. Conclusion: A platform like SeDAP is not simply successful through technical excellence and performance. It’s adoption is dependent on a collaborative environment where researchers and users plan and evaluate the requirements of all aspects.

  17. The Proposed Model of Collaborative Virtual Learning Environment for Introductory Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Othman, Mahfudzah; Othman, Muhaini

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the proposed model of the collaborative virtual learning system for the introductory computer programming course which uses one of the collaborative learning techniques known as the "Think-Pair-Share". The main objective of this study is to design a model for an online learning system that facilitates the collaborative…

  18. Utilising a Collaborative Macro-Script to Enhance Student Engagement: A Mixed Method Study in a 3D Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouta, Hara; Retalis, Symeon; Paraskeva, Fotini

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effect of using an online 3D virtual environment in teaching Mathematics in Primary Education. In particular, it explores the extent to which student engagement--behavioral, affective and cognitive--is fostered by such tools in order to enhance collaborative learning. For the study we used a purpose-created 3D virtual…

  19. The Development of Virtual Educational Environments to Support Inter-School Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Ken

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of inter-school electronic networks has added a new dimension to education in Canada that has many implications for students who attend schools in rural communities. Collaborative internet-based teaching and learning and the creation of virtual classes within regional intranets now complement traditional on-site instruction in…

  20. Collaborative Virtual Environments as Means to Increase the Level of Intersubjectivity in a Distributed Cognition System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ligorio, M. Beatrice; Cesareni, Donatella; Schwartz, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Virtual environments are able to extend the space of interaction beyond the classroom. In order to analyze how distributed cognition functions in such an extended space, we suggest focusing on the architecture of intersubjectivity. The Euroland project--a virtual land created and populated by seven classrooms supported by a team of…

  1. Cross-standard user description in mobile, medical oriented virtual collaborative environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganji, Rama Rao; Mitrea, Mihai; Joveski, Bojan; Chammem, Afef

    2015-03-01

    By combining four different open standards belonging to the ISO/IEC JTC1/SC29 WG11 (a.k.a. MPEG) and W3C, this paper advances an architecture for mobile, medical oriented virtual collaborative environments. The various users are represented according to MPEG-UD (MPEG User Description) while the security issues are dealt with by deploying the WebID principles. On the server side, irrespective of their elementary types (text, image, video, 3D, …), the medical data are aggregated into hierarchical, interactive multimedia scenes which are alternatively represented into MPEG-4 BiFS or HTML5 standards. This way, each type of content can be optimally encoded according to its particular constraints (semantic, medical practice, network conditions, etc.). The mobile device should ensure only the displaying of the content (inside an MPEG player or an HTML5 browser) and the capturing of the user interaction. The overall architecture is implemented and tested under the framework of the MEDUSA European project, in partnership with medical institutions. The testbed considers a server emulated by a PC and heterogeneous user devices (tablets, smartphones, laptops) running under iOS, Android and Windows operating systems. The connection between the users and the server is alternatively ensured by WiFi and 3G/4G networks.

  2. Collaborative Virtual Gaming Worlds in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitton, Nicola; Hollins, Paul

    2008-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use of virtual gaming worlds in education, supported by the increased use of multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) and massively multi-player online role-playing games (MMORPGs) for collaborative learning. However, this paper argues that collaborative gaming worlds have been in use much longer and are much wider…

  3. Rocinante, a virtual collaborative visualizer

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.J.; Ice, L.G.

    1996-12-31

    With the goal of improving the ability of people around the world to share the development and use of intelligent systems, Sandia National Laboratories` Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center is developing new Virtual Collaborative Engineering (VCE) and Virtual Collaborative Control (VCC) technologies. A key area of VCE and VCC research is in shared visualization of virtual environments. This paper describes a Virtual Collaborative Visualizer (VCV), named Rocinante, that Sandia developed for VCE and VCC applications. Rocinante allows multiple participants to simultaneously view dynamic geometrically-defined environments. Each viewer can exclude extraneous detail or include additional information in the scene as desired. Shared information can be saved and later replayed in a stand-alone mode. Rocinante automatically scales visualization requirements with computer system capabilities. Models with 30,000 polygons and 4 Megabytes of texture display at 12 to 15 frames per second (fps) on an SGI Onyx and at 3 to 8 fps (without texture) on Indigo 2 Extreme computers. In its networked mode, Rocinante synchronizes its local geometric model with remote simulators and sensory systems by monitoring data transmitted through UDP packets. Rocinante`s scalability and performance make it an ideal VCC tool. Users throughout the country can monitor robot motions and the thinking behind their motion planners and simulators.

  4. Measuring Flow Experience in an Immersive Virtual Environment for Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Schaik, P.; Martin, S.; Vallance, M.

    2012-01-01

    In contexts other than immersive virtual environments, theoretical and empirical work has identified flow experience as a major factor in learning and human-computer interaction. Flow is defined as a "holistic sensation that people feel when they act with total involvement". We applied the concept of flow to modeling the experience of…

  5. Designing and Evaluating Collaboration in a Virtual Game Environment for Vocational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamalainen, Raija

    2008-01-01

    Especially in vocational education, attention should be paid not only to the use of new technological solutions but also to collaborative learning and cooperative working methods in order to develop students' skills for their future jobs. This study involves a design experiment including the design process of a new game environment, description of…

  6. A hardware and software architecture to deal with multimodal and collaborative interactions in multiuser virtual reality environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Tseu, A.; Férey, N.; Touraine, D.; Bourdot, P.

    2014-02-01

    Most advanced immersive devices provide collaborative environment within several users have their distinct head-tracked stereoscopic point of view. Combining with common used interactive features such as voice and gesture recognition, 3D mouse, haptic feedback, and spatialized audio rendering, these environments should faithfully reproduce a real context. However, even if many studies have been carried out on multimodal systems, we are far to definitively solve the issue of multimodal fusion, which consists in merging multimodal events coming from users and devices, into interpretable commands performed by the application. Multimodality and collaboration was often studied separately, despite of the fact that these two aspects share interesting similarities. We discuss how we address this problem, thought the design and implementation of a supervisor that is able to deal with both multimodal fusion and collaborative aspects. The aim of this supervisor is to ensure the merge of user's input from virtual reality devices in order to control immersive multi-user applications. We deal with this problem according to a practical point of view, because the main requirements of this supervisor was defined according to a industrial task proposed by our automotive partner, that as to be performed with multimodal and collaborative interactions in a co-located multi-user environment. In this task, two co-located workers of a virtual assembly chain has to cooperate to insert a seat into the bodywork of a car, using haptic devices to feel collision and to manipulate objects, combining speech recognition and two hands gesture recognition as multimodal instructions. Besides the architectural aspect of this supervisor, we described how we ensure the modularity of our solution that could apply on different virtual reality platforms, interactive contexts and virtual contents. A virtual context observer included in this supervisor in was especially designed to be independent to the

  7. Securing collaborative environments

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Deborah; Jackson, Keith; Thompson, Mary

    2002-05-16

    The diverse set of organizations and software components involved in a typical collaboratory make providing a seamless security solution difficult. In addition, the users need support for a broad range of frequency and locations for access to the collaboratory. A collaboratory security solution needs to be robust enough to ensure that valid participants are not denied access because of its failure. There are many tools that can be applied to the task of securing collaborative environments and these include public key infrastructure, secure sockets layer, Kerberos, virtual and real private networks, grid security infrastructure, and username/password. A combination of these mechanisms can provide effective secure collaboration capabilities. In this paper, we discuss the requirements of typical collaboratories and some proposals for applying various security mechanisms to collaborative environments.

  8. Importance of Diversified Leadership Roles in Improving Team Effectiveness in a Virtual Collaboration Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Charlie C.; Wu, Jiinpo; Yang, Samuel C.; Tsou, Hsin-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Virtual teams enabled by information and communications technologies (ICT) are increasingly being adopted not only by for-profit organizations but also by education institutions as well. This study investigates what contributes to the success of virtual learning teams. Specifically, we examine the issue of leadership in virtual learning teams. The…

  9. Faculty Perceptions of Instruction in Collaborative Virtual Immersive Learning Environments in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janson, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Use of 3D (three-dimensional) avatars in a synchronous virtual world for educational purposes has only been adopted for about a decade. Universities are offering synchronous, avatar-based virtual courses for credit - within 3D worlds (Luo & Kemp, 2008). Faculty and students immerse themselves, via avatars, in virtual worlds and communicate…

  10. Collaborative virtual experience based on reconfigurable simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, Qonita M.; Kwon, Yong-Moo; Ko, Heedong

    2006-10-01

    Virtual Reality simulation enables immersive 3D experience of a Virtual Environment. A simulation-based Virtual Environment can be used to map real world phenomena onto virtual experience. With a reconfigurable simulation, users can reconfigure the parameters of the involved objects, so that they can see different effects from the different configurations. This concept is suitable for a classroom learning of physics law. This research studies the Virtual Reality simulation of Newton's physics law on rigid body type of objects. With network support, collaborative interaction is enabled so that people from different places can interact with the same set of objects in immersive Collaborative Virtual Environment. The taxonomy of the interaction in different levels of collaboration is described as: distinct objects and same object, in which there are same object - sequentially, same object - concurrently - same attribute, and same object - concurrently - distinct attributes. The case studies are the interaction of users in two cases: destroying and creating a set of arranged rigid bodies. In Virtual Domino, users can observe physics law while applying force to the domino blocks in order to destroy the arrangements. In Virtual Dollhouse, users can observe physics law while constructing a dollhouse using existing building blocks, under gravity effects.

  11. CROSS DRIVE: A Collaborative and Distributed Virtual Environment for Exploitation of Atmospherical and Geological Datasets of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cencetti, Michele

    2016-07-01

    European space exploration missions have produced huge data sets of potentially immense value for research as well as for planning and operating future missions. For instance, Mars Exploration programs comprise a series of missions with launches ranging from the past to beyond present, which are anticipated to produce exceptional volumes of data which provide prospects for research breakthroughs and advancing further activities in space. These collected data include a variety of information, such as imagery, topography, atmospheric, geochemical datasets and more, which has resulted in and still demands, databases, versatile visualisation tools and data reduction methods. Such rate of valuable data acquisition requires the scientists, researchers and computer scientists to coordinate their storage, processing and relevant tools to enable efficient data analysis. However, the current position is that expert teams from various disciplines, the databases and tools are fragmented, leaving little scope for unlocking its value through collaborative activities. The benefits of collaborative virtual environments have been implemented in various industrial fields allowing real-time multi-user collaborative work among people from different disciplines. Exploiting the benefits of advanced immersive virtual environments (IVE) has been recognized as an important interaction paradigm to facilitate future space exploration. The current work is mainly aimed towards the presentation of the preliminary results coming from the CROSS DRIVE project. This research received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 607177 and is mainly aimed towards the implementation of a distributed virtual workspace for collaborative scientific discovery, mission planning and operations. The purpose of the CROSS DRIVE project is to lay foundations of collaborative European workspaces for space science. It will demonstrate the feasibility and

  12. Collaborative Project Work Development in a Virtual Environment with Low-Intermediate Undergraduate Colombian Students (Desarrollo de trabajo colaborativo en un ambiente virtual con estudiantes colombianos de pregrado de nivel intermedio-bajo)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas Vacca, Yakelin

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory, descriptive, and interpretive study in which the roles of discussion boards, the students, the teacher, and the monitors were explored as they constructed a collaborative class project in a virtual environment. This research was conducted in the virtual program of a Colombian public university. Data were…

  13. A Collaborative Virtual Environment for Situated Language Learning Using VEC3D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ya-Chun; Yang, Mau-Tsuen

    2008-01-01

    A 3D virtually synchronous communication architecture for situated language learning has been designed to foster communicative competence among undergraduate students who have studied English as a foreign language (EFL). We present an innovative approach that offers better e-learning than the previous virtual reality educational applications. The…

  14. The Affordance of Online Multiuser Virtual Environments (MUVE) for Creative Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Seung Wan

    2013-01-01

    Creativity is an important criterion for evaluating conceptual and design abilities of architects and their praxis. However, in recent years, the world has grown more complex. New problems have emerged that are often outside the architect's capacity. Given this challenge, architects collaborate with colleagues from architecture and other related…

  15. Collaborative Virtual Environments for Mars Science Analysis and Rover Target Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerndt, A.; Gwinner, K.; Fernando, T.; Roberts, D.; Musso, I.; Basso, V.; Giuranna, M.; Vandaele, A. C.; Kasaba, Y.

    2015-10-01

    The CROSS DRIVE project aims to develop an innovative collaborative workspace infrastructure for space missions that will allow distributed scientific and engineering teams to collectively analyse and interpret scientific data as well as execute operations of planetary spacecraft. It aims to mobilise a team of best European expertise in the field of Mars science data collection and analysis to propose and study synergic combinations of data sets and their benchmarking.

  16. A Study of the Relationship of Communication Technology Configurations in Virtual Research Environments and Effectiveness of Collaborative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Iftekhar

    2009-01-01

    Virtual Research Environments (VRE) are electronic meeting places for interaction among scientists created by combining software tools and computer networking. Virtual teams are enjoying increased importance in the conduct of scientific research because of the rising cost of traditional scientific scholarly communication, the growing importance of…

  17. Exploring the Social Competence of Students with Autism Spectrum Conditions in a Collaborative Virtual Learning Environment--The Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Yufang; Ye, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Social reciprocity deficits are a core feature of the autism spectrum conditions (ASCs). Many individual with ASCs have difficulty with social interaction due to a frequent lack of social competence. This study focuses on using a virtual learning environment to help the deficiencies of social competence for people with ASCs, and to increase their…

  18. The Open Dataset on Students' Perceptions of Virtual Learning Environments in Ireland: Collaborating to Listen to the Student Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risquez, Angelica; Raftery, Damien; Costello, Eamon

    2015-01-01

    The Irish inter-institutional virtual learning environments (VLEs) open dataset stems from ongoing work with a rolling longitudinal survey of students' usage of VLEs which has been ongoing in 12 higher education institutions since 2008. The project has collected over 21,000 student responses to date through the growth of an extended network of…

  19. Virtual Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follows, Scott B.

    1999-01-01

    Illustrates the possibilities and educational benefits of virtual learning environments (VLEs), based on experiences with "Thirst for Knowledge," a VLE that simulates the workplace of a major company. While working in this virtual office world, students walk through the building, attend meetings, read reports, receive e-mail, answer the telephone,…

  20. Information Seeking in a Virtual Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byron, Suzanne M.; Young, Jon I.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the applicability of Kuhlthau's Information Search Process Model in the context of a virtual learning environment at the University of North Texas that used virtual collaborative software. Highlights include cognitive and affective aspects of information seeking; computer experience and confidence; and implications for future research.…

  1. Virtual System Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vallee, Geoffroy R; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Ong, Hong Hoe; Tikotekar, Anand A; Engelmann, Christian; Bland, Wesley B; Aderholdt, Ferrol; Scott, Stephen L

    2008-01-01

    Distributed and parallel systems are typically managed with "static" settings: the operating system (OS) and the runtime environment (RTE) are specified at a given time and cannot be changed to fit an application's needs. This means that every time application developers want to use their application on a new execution platform, the application has to be ported to this new environment, which may be expensive in terms of application modifications and developer time. However, the science resides in the applications and not in the OS or the RTE. Therefore, it should be beneficial to adapt the OS and the RTE to the application instead of adapting the applications to the OS and the RTE. This document presents the concept of Virtual System Environments (VSE), which enables application developers to specify and create a virtual environment that properly fits their application's needs. For that four challenges have to be addressed: (i) definition of the VSE itself by the application developers, (ii) deployment of the VSE, (iii) system administration for the platform, and (iv) protection of the platform from the running VSE. We therefore present an integrated tool for the definition and deployment of VSEs on top of traditional and virtual (i.e., using system-level virtualization) execution platforms. This tool provides the capability to choose the degree of delegation for system administration tasks and the degree of protection from the application (e.g., using virtual machines). To summarize, the VSE concept enables the customization of the OS/RTE used for the execution of application by users without compromising local system administration rules and execution platform protection constraints.

  2. Scratchpads 2.0: a Virtual Research Environment supporting scholarly collaboration, communication and data publication in biodiversity science

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Vincent S.; Rycroft, Simon D.; Brake, Irina; Scott, Ben; Baker, Edward; Livermore, Laurence; Blagoderov, Vladimir; Roberts, David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The Scratchpad Virtual Research Environment (http://scratchpads.eu/) is a flexible system for people to create their own research networks supporting natural history science. Here we describe Version 2 of the system characterised by the move to Drupal 7 as the Scratchpad core development framework and timed to coincide with the fifth year of the project’s operation in late January 2012. The development of Scratchpad 2 reflects a combination of technical enhancements that make the project more sustainable, combined with new features intended to make the system more functional and easier to use. A roadmap outlining strategic plans for development of the Scratchpad project over the next two years concludes this article. PMID:22207806

  3. Virtual Environments for Data Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Volker

    Data preservation in a wider sense includes also the ability to analyse data of past experiments. Because operation systems, such as Linux and Windows, are evolving rapidly, software packages can be outdated and not usable anymore already a few years after they have been written. Creating an image of the operation system is a way to be able to launch the analysis software on a computing infrastructure independent on the local operation system used. At the same time, virtualization also allows to launch the same software in collaborations across several institutes with very different computing infrastructure. At the François Arago Centre of the APC in Paris we provide user support for virtualization and computing environment access to the scientific community

  4. Sharing visualization experiences among remote virtual environments

    SciTech Connect

    Disz, T.L.; Papka, M.E.; Pellegrino, M.; Stevens, R.

    1995-12-31

    Virtual reality has become an increasingly familiar part of the science of visualization and communication of information. This, combined with the increase in connectivity of remote sites via high-speed networks, allows for the development of a collaborative distributed virtual environment. Such an environment enables the development of supercomputer simulations with virtual reality visualizations that can be displayed at multiple sites, with each site interacting, viewing, and communicating about the results being discovered. The early results of an experimental collaborative virtual reality environment are discussed in this paper. The issues that need to be addressed in the implementation, as well as preliminary results are covered. Also provided are a discussion of plans and a generalized application programmers interface for CAVE to CAVE will be provided.

  5. Virtual Representations in 3D Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shonfeld, Miri; Kritz, Miki

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the extent to which virtual worlds can serve as online collaborative learning environments for students by increasing social presence and engagement. 3D environments enable learning, which simulates face-to-face encounters while retaining the advantages of online learning. Students in Education departments created avatars…

  6. Virtual Teaming: Faculty Collaboration in Online Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almjeld, Jen; Rybas, Natalia; Rybas, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This collaborative article chronicles the experiences of three faculty at three universities utilizing wiki technology to transform themselves and their students into a virtual team. Rooted in workplace approaches to distributed teaming, the project expands notions of classroom collaboration to include planning, administration, and assessment of a…

  7. Incorporating Brokers within Collaboration Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekar, A.; Moore, R.; de Torcy, A.

    2013-12-01

    A collaboration environment, such as the integrated Rule Oriented Data System (iRODS - http://irods.diceresearch.org), provides interoperability mechanisms for accessing storage systems, authentication systems, messaging systems, information catalogs, networks, and policy engines from a wide variety of clients. The interoperability mechanisms function as brokers, translating actions requested by clients to the protocol required by a specific technology. The iRODS data grid is used to enable collaborative research within hydrology, seismology, earth science, climate, oceanography, plant biology, astronomy, physics, and genomics disciplines. Although each domain has unique resources, data formats, semantics, and protocols, the iRODS system provides a generic framework that is capable of managing collaborative research initiatives that span multiple disciplines. Each interoperability mechanism (broker) is linked to a name space that enables unified access across the heterogeneous systems. The collaboration environment provides not only support for brokers, but also support for virtualization of name spaces for users, files, collections, storage systems, metadata, and policies. The broker enables access to data or information in a remote system using the appropriate protocol, while the collaboration environment provides a uniform naming convention for accessing and manipulating each object. Within the NSF DataNet Federation Consortium project (http://www.datafed.org), three basic types of interoperability mechanisms have been identified and applied: 1) drivers for managing manipulation at the remote resource (such as data subsetting), 2) micro-services that execute the protocol required by the remote resource, and 3) policies for controlling the execution. For example, drivers have been written for manipulating NetCDF and HDF formatted files within THREDDS servers. Micro-services have been written that manage interactions with the CUAHSI data repository, the Data

  8. User requirements for geo-collaborative work with spatio-temporal data in a web-based virtual globe environment.

    PubMed

    Yovcheva, Zornitza; van Elzakker, Corné P J M; Köbben, Barend

    2013-11-01

    Web-based tools developed in the last couple of years offer unique opportunities to effectively support scientists in their effort to collaborate. Communication among environmental researchers often involves not only work with geographical (spatial), but also with temporal data and information. Literature still provides limited documentation when it comes to user requirements for effective geo-collaborative work with spatio-temporal data. To start filling this gap, our study adopted a User-Centered Design approach and first explored the user requirements of environmental researchers working on distributed research projects for collaborative dissemination, exchange and work with spatio-temporal data. Our results show that system design will be mainly influenced by the nature and type of data users work with. From the end-users' perspective, optimal conversion of huge files of spatio-temporal data for further dissemination, accuracy of conversion, organization of content and security have a key role for effective geo-collaboration.

  9. User requirements for geo-collaborative work with spatio-temporal data in a web-based virtual globe environment.

    PubMed

    Yovcheva, Zornitza; van Elzakker, Corné P J M; Köbben, Barend

    2013-11-01

    Web-based tools developed in the last couple of years offer unique opportunities to effectively support scientists in their effort to collaborate. Communication among environmental researchers often involves not only work with geographical (spatial), but also with temporal data and information. Literature still provides limited documentation when it comes to user requirements for effective geo-collaborative work with spatio-temporal data. To start filling this gap, our study adopted a User-Centered Design approach and first explored the user requirements of environmental researchers working on distributed research projects for collaborative dissemination, exchange and work with spatio-temporal data. Our results show that system design will be mainly influenced by the nature and type of data users work with. From the end-users' perspective, optimal conversion of huge files of spatio-temporal data for further dissemination, accuracy of conversion, organization of content and security have a key role for effective geo-collaboration. PMID:23164199

  10. Middle School Students in Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Erin Drankwalter

    2010-01-01

    This ethnographic study examined middle school students engaged in a virtual learning environment used in concert with face-to-face instruction in order to complete a collaborative research project. Thirty-eight students from three eighth grade classes participated in this study where data were collected through observation of student work within…

  11. Real-Time Collaboration of Virtual Laboratories through the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jara, Carlos A.; Candelas, Francisco A.; Torres, Fernando; Dormido, Sebastian; Esquembre, Francisco; Reinoso, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    Web-based learning environments are becoming increasingly popular in higher education. One of the most important web-learning resources is the virtual laboratory (VL), which gives students an easy way for training and learning through the Internet. Moreover, on-line collaborative communication represents a practical method to transmit the…

  12. The virtual environment display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environment technology is a display and control technology that can surround a person in an interactive computer generated or computer mediated virtual environment. It has evolved at NASA-Ames since 1984 to serve NASA's missions and goals. The exciting potential of this technology, sometimes called Virtual Reality, Artificial Reality, or Cyberspace, has been recognized recently by the popular media, industry, academia, and government organizations. Much research and development will be necessary to bring it to fruition.

  13. Improving Virtual Team Collaboration Outcomes through Collaboration Process Structuring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittman, Dawn R.; Hawkes, Mark; Deokar, Amit V.; Sarnikar, Surendra

    2010-01-01

    The ability to collaborate in a virtual team is a necessary skill set for today's knowledge workers and students to be effective in their work. Past research indicates that knowledge workers and students need to establish a formal process to perform work, develop clear goals and objectives, and facilitate better communication among team members.…

  14. Virtual Environments in Scientific Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Cooper, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    Virtual environment technology is a new way of approaching the interface between computers and humans. Emphasizing display and user control that conforms to the user's natural ways of perceiving and thinking about space, virtual environment technologies enhance the ability to perceive and interact with computer generated graphic information. This enhancement potentially has a major effect on the field of scientific visualization. Current examples of this technology include the Virtual Windtunnel being developed at NASA Ames Research Center. Other major institutions such as the National Center for Supercomputing Applications and SRI International are also exploring this technology. This talk will be describe several implementations of virtual environments for use in scientific visualization. Examples include the visualization of unsteady fluid flows (the virtual windtunnel), the visualization of geodesics in curved spacetime, surface manipulation, and examples developed at various laboratories.

  15. Information Virtulization in Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Virtual Environments provide a natural setting for a wide range of information visualization applications, particularly wlieit the information to be visualized is defined on a three-dimensional domain (Bryson, 1996). This chapter provides an overview of the issues that arise when designing and implementing an information visualization application in a virtual environment. Many design issues that arise, such as, e.g., issues of display, user tracking are common to any application of virtual environments. In this chapter we focus on those issues that are special to information visualization applications, as issues of wider concern are addressed elsewhere in this book.

  16. EdMOO: One Approach to a Multimedia Collaborative Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holkner, Bernard

    The nature of the multiuser object oriented (MOO) environment lends itself to flexible and rich interactive collaboration space providing interactive discussion, mail, mailing list, and news features to its virtual denizens. EdMOO (HREF1) was created in mid-1995 as an environment for teachers to experience the text based virtual reality…

  17. The Doubtful Guest? A Virtual Research Environment for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laterza, Vito; Carmichael, Patrick; Procter, Richard

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe a novel "Virtual Research Environment" (VRE) based on the Sakai Virtual Collaboration Environment and designed to support education research. This VRE has been used for the past two years by projects of the UK Economic and Social Research Council's Teaching and Learning Research Programme, 10 of which were…

  18. A Comparison of Reasoning Processes in a Collaborative Modelling Environment: Learning about genetics problems using virtual chat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pata, Kai; Sarapuu, Tago

    2006-09-01

    This study investigated the possible activation of different types of model-based reasoning processes in two learning settings, and the influence of various terms of reasoning on the learners’ problem representation development. Changes in 53 students’ problem representations about genetic issue were analysed while they worked with different modelling tools in a synchronous network-based environment. The discussion log-files were used for the “microgenetic” analysis of reasoning types. For studying the stages of students’ problem representation development, individual pre-essays and post-essays and their utterances during two reasoning phases were used. An approach for mapping problem representations was developed. Characterizing the elements of mental models and their reasoning level enabled the description of five hierarchical categories of problem representations. Learning in exploratory and experimental settings was registered as the shift towards more complex stages of problem representations in genetics. The effect of different types of reasoning could be observed as the divergent development of problem representations within hierarchical categories.

  19. Learners and Collaborative Learning in Virtual Worlds: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanewald, Ria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present selected literature on learners and collaborative learning in virtual worlds. Research in virtual worlds on collaborative learners is gradually emerging and will gain in significance, particularly in online and distance education environments. It will be argued that the design and functionality of virtual…

  20. Virtual Environments in Biology Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikropoulos, Tassos A.; Katsikis, Apostolos; Nikolou, Eugenia; Tsakalis, Panayiotis

    2003-01-01

    This article reports on the design, development and evaluation of an educational virtual environment for biology teaching. In particular it proposes a highly interactive three-dimensional synthetic environment involving certain learning tasks for the support of teaching plant cell biology and the process of photosynthesis. The environment has been…

  1. Case-Based Learning in Virtual Groups--Collaborative Problem Solving Activities and Learning Outcomes in a Virtual Professional Training Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, Birgitta; Hasenbein, Melanie; Mandl, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the collaborative problem solving activities and learning outcomes of five groups that worked on two different complex cases in a virtual professional training course. In this asynchronous virtual learning environment, all knowledge management content was delivered virtually and collaboration took place through forums. To…

  2. A workout for virtual bodybuilders (design issues for embodiment in multi-actor virtual environments)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Steve; Bowers, John; Fahlen, Lennart E.; Greenhalgh, Chris; Snowdon, Dave

    1994-01-01

    This paper explores the issue of user embodiment within collaborative virtual environments. By user embodiment we mean the provision of users with appropriate body images so as to represent them to others and also to themselves. By collaborative virtual environments we mean multi-user virtual reality systems which support cooperative work (although we argue that the results of our exploration may also be applied to other kinds of collaborative systems). The main part of the paper identifies a list of embodiment design issues including: presence, location, identity, activity, availability, history of activity, viewpoint, action point, gesture, facial expression, voluntary versus involuntary expression, degree of presence, reflecting capabilities, manipulating the user's view of others, representation across multiple media, autonomous and distributed body parts, truthfulness and efficiency. Following this, we show how these issues are reflected in our own DIVE and MASSIVE prototype collaborative virtual environments.

  3. Virtual Teams and E-Collaboration Technology: A Case Study Investigating the Dynamics of Virtual Team Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattison, Theresa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent the use of e-collaboration tools when used as a primary channel of communication affected virtual team members' trust and motivation, in a spatially dispersed environment. Structured interviews were conducted with 18 project managers, who were responsible for leading virtual projects…

  4. Improving Virtual Collaborative Learning through Canonical Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Peter; Lehr, Christian; Gersch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Virtual collaboration continues to gain in significance and is attracting attention also as virtual collaborative learning (VCL) in education. This paper addresses aspects of VCL that we identified as critical in a series of courses named "Net Economy": (1) technical infrastructure, (2) motivation and collaboration, and (3) assessment…

  5. Collaborative environments for capability-based planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuay, William K.

    2005-05-01

    Distributed collaboration is an emerging technology for the 21st century that will significantly change how business is conducted in the defense and commercial sectors. Collaboration involves two or more geographically dispersed entities working together to create a "product" by sharing and exchanging data, information, and knowledge. A product is defined broadly to include, for example, writing a report, creating software, designing hardware, or implementing robust systems engineering and capability planning processes in an organization. Collaborative environments provide the framework and integrate models, simulations, domain specific tools, and virtual test beds to facilitate collaboration between the multiple disciplines needed in the enterprise. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is conducting a leading edge program in developing distributed collaborative technologies targeted to the Air Force's implementation of systems engineering for a simulation-aided acquisition and capability-based planning. The research is focusing on the open systems agent-based framework, product and process modeling, structural architecture, and the integration technologies - the glue to integrate the software components. In past four years, two live assessment events have been conducted to demonstrate the technology in support of research for the Air Force Agile Acquisition initiatives. The AFRL Collaborative Environment concept will foster a major cultural change in how the acquisition, training, and operational communities conduct business.

  6. Stroke Rehabilitation Using Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Fu, Michael J; Knutson, Jayme S; Chae, John

    2015-11-01

    This review covers the rationale, mechanisms, and availability of commercially available virtual environment-based interventions for stroke rehabilitation. It describes interventions for motor, speech, cognitive, and sensory dysfunction. Also discussed are the important features and mechanisms that allow virtual environments to facilitate motor relearning. A common challenge is the inability to translate success in small trials to efficacy in larger populations. The heterogeneity of stroke pathophysiology has been blamed, and experts advocate for the study of multimodal approaches. Therefore, this article also introduces a framework to help define new therapy combinations that may be necessary to address stroke heterogeneity.

  7. Stroke Rehabilitation using Virtual Environments

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Michael J.; Knutson, Jayme; Chae, John

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis This review covers the rationale, mechanisms, and availability of commercially available virtual environment-based interventions for stroke rehabilitation. It describes interventions for motor, speech, cognitive, and sensory dysfunction. Also discussed are the important features and mechanisms that allow virtual environments to facilitate motor relearning. A common challenge facing the field is inability to translate success in small trials to efficacy in larger populations. The heterogeneity of stroke pathophysiology has been blamed and experts advocate for the study of multimodal approaches. Therefore, this article also introduces a framework to help define new therapy combinations that may be necessary to address stroke heterogeneity. PMID:26522910

  8. Virtual environment tactile system

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald

    1996-01-01

    A method for providing a realistic sense of touch in virtual reality by means of programmable actuator assemblies is disclosed. Each tactile actuator assembly consists of a number of individual actuators whose movement is controlled by a computer and associated drive electronics. When an actuator is energized, the rare earth magnet and the associated contactor, incorporated within the actuator, are set in motion by the opposing electromagnetic field of a surrounding coil. The magnet pushes the contactor forward to contact the skin resulting in the sensation of touch. When the electromagnetic field is turned off, the rare earth magnet and the contactor return to their neutral positions due to the magnetic equilibrium caused by the interaction with the ferrous outer sleeve. The small size and flexible nature of the actuator assemblies permit incorporation into a glove, boot or body suit. The actuator has additional applications, such as, for example, as an accelerometer, an actuator for precisely controlled actuations or to simulate the sensation of braille letters.

  9. Virtual environment tactile system

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, R.

    1996-12-10

    A method for providing a realistic sense of touch in virtual reality by means of programmable actuator assemblies is disclosed. Each tactile actuator assembly consists of a number of individual actuators whose movement is controlled by a computer and associated drive electronics. When an actuator is energized, the rare earth magnet and the associated contactor, incorporated within the actuator, are set in motion by the opposing electromagnetic field of a surrounding coil. The magnet pushes the contactor forward to contact the skin resulting in the sensation of touch. When the electromagnetic field is turned off, the rare earth magnet and the contactor return to their neutral positions due to the magnetic equilibrium caused by the interaction with the ferrous outer sleeve. The small size and flexible nature of the actuator assemblies permit incorporation into a glove, boot or body suit. The actuator has additional applications, such as, for example, as an accelerometer, an actuator for precisely controlled actuations or to simulate the sensation of braille letters. 28 figs.

  10. Building a Collaborative Network To Support Michigan Community Colleges in a Global Market. Michigan Community College Virtual Learning Collaborative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Community Coll. Association, Lansing.

    This report describes the Michigan Community College Virtual Learning Collaborative (MCCVLC), an innovative educational environment that provides learners access to high-quality courses through a variety of technologies. The following describe the collaborative's guiding principles: (1) faculty and staff at all Michigan community colleges will…

  11. Risk Analysis Virtual ENvironment

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-10

    RAVEN has 3 major functionalities: 1. Provides a Graphical User Interface for the pre- and post-processing of the RELAP-7 input and output. 2. Provides the capability to model nuclear power plants control logic for the RELAP-7 code and dynamic control of the accident scenario evolution. This capability is based on a software structure that realizes a direct connection between the RELAP-7 solver engine (MOOSE) and a python environment where the variables describing the plant status are accessible in a scripting environment. RAVEN support the generation of the probabilistic scenario control by supplying a wide range of probability and cumulative distribution functions and their inverse functions. 3. Provides a general environment to perform probability risk analysis for RELAP-7, RELAP-5 and any generic MOOSE based applications. The probabilistic analysis is performed by sampling the input space of the coupled code parameters and it is enhanced by using modern artificial intelligence algorithms that accelerate the identification of the areas of major risk (in the input parameter space). This environment also provides a graphical visualization capability to analyze the outcomes. Among other approaches, the classical Monte Carlo and Latin Hypercube sampling algorithms are available. For the acceleration of the convergence of the sampling methodologies, Support Vector Machines, Bayesian regression, and collocation stochastic polynomials chaos are implemented. The same methodologies here described could be used to solve optimization and uncertainties propagation problems using the RAVEN framework.

  12. Risk Analysis Virtual ENvironment

    2014-02-10

    RAVEN has 3 major functionalities: 1. Provides a Graphical User Interface for the pre- and post-processing of the RELAP-7 input and output. 2. Provides the capability to model nuclear power plants control logic for the RELAP-7 code and dynamic control of the accident scenario evolution. This capability is based on a software structure that realizes a direct connection between the RELAP-7 solver engine (MOOSE) and a python environment where the variables describing the plant statusmore » are accessible in a scripting environment. RAVEN support the generation of the probabilistic scenario control by supplying a wide range of probability and cumulative distribution functions and their inverse functions. 3. Provides a general environment to perform probability risk analysis for RELAP-7, RELAP-5 and any generic MOOSE based applications. The probabilistic analysis is performed by sampling the input space of the coupled code parameters and it is enhanced by using modern artificial intelligence algorithms that accelerate the identification of the areas of major risk (in the input parameter space). This environment also provides a graphical visualization capability to analyze the outcomes. Among other approaches, the classical Monte Carlo and Latin Hypercube sampling algorithms are available. For the acceleration of the convergence of the sampling methodologies, Support Vector Machines, Bayesian regression, and collocation stochastic polynomials chaos are implemented. The same methodologies here described could be used to solve optimization and uncertainties propagation problems using the RAVEN framework.« less

  13. Cognitive Styles and Virtual Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Nigel

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of navigation through virtual information environments focuses on the need for robust user models that take into account individual differences. Considers Pask's information processing styles and strategies; deep (transformational) and surface (reproductive) learning; field dependence/independence; divergent/convergent thinking;…

  14. Virtual Control Systems Environment (VCSE)

    ScienceCinema

    Atkins, Will

    2016-07-12

    Will Atkins, a Sandia National Laboratories computer engineer discusses cybersecurity research work for process control systems. Will explains his work on the Virtual Control Systems Environment project to develop a modeling and simulation framework of the U.S. electric grid in order to study and mitigate possible cyberattacks on infrastructure.

  15. Virtual Control Systems Environment (VCSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, Will

    2012-10-08

    Will Atkins, a Sandia National Laboratories computer engineer discusses cybersecurity research work for process control systems. Will explains his work on the Virtual Control Systems Environment project to develop a modeling and simulation framework of the U.S. electric grid in order to study and mitigate possible cyberattacks on infrastructure.

  16. Quality in virtual education environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbera, Elena

    2004-01-01

    The emergence of the Internet has changed the way we teach and learn. This paper provides a general overview of the state of the quality of virtual education environments. First of all, some problems with the quality criteria applied in this field and the need to develop quality seals are presented. Likewise, the dimensions and subdimensions of an…

  17. Sonic intelligence as a virtual therapeutic environment.

    PubMed

    Tarnanas, Ioannis; Adam, Dimitrios

    2003-06-01

    This paper reports on the results of a research project, on comparing one virtual collaborative environment with a first-person visual immersion (first-perspective interaction) and a second one where the user interacts through a sound-kinetic virtual representation of himself (avatar), as a stress-coping environment in real-life situations. Recent developments in coping research are proposing a shift from a trait-oriented approach of coping to a more situation-specific treatment. We defined as real-life situation a target-oriented situation that demands a complex coping skills inventory of high self-efficacy and internal or external "locus of control" strategies. The participants were 90 normal adults with healthy or impaired coping skills, 25-40 years of age, randomly spread across two groups. There was the same number of participants across groups and gender balance within groups. All two groups went through two phases. In Phase I, Solo, one participant was assessed using a three-stage assessment inspired by the transactional stress theory of Lazarus and the stress inoculation theory of Meichenbaum. In Phase I, each participant was given a coping skills measurement within the time course of various hypothetical stressful encounters performed in two different conditions and a control group. In Condition A, the participant was given a virtual stress assessment scenario relative to a first-person perspective (VRFP). In Condition B, the participant was given a virtual stress assessment scenario relative to a behaviorally realistic motion controlled avatar with sonic feedback (VRSA). In Condition C, the No Treatment Condition (NTC), the participant received just an interview. In Phase II, all three groups were mixed and exercised the same tasks but with two participants in pairs. The results showed that the VRSA group performed notably better in terms of cognitive appraisals, emotions and attributions than the other two groups in Phase I (VRSA, 92%; VRFP, 85%; NTC, 34

  18. Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, June G.

    2002-01-01

    The feature story in this issue, "Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment," focuses on the growing emphasis on teamwork in the workplace. It discusses how the concept of empowering employees in the workplace is evolving and the benefits--faster decision making, lower costs and absenteeism, higher productivity and quality, and increased…

  19. Aerospace applications of virtual environment technology.

    PubMed

    Loftin, R B

    1996-11-01

    The uses of virtual environment technology in the space program are examined with emphasis on training for the Hubble Space Telescope Repair and Maintenance Mission in 1993. Project ScienceSpace at the Virtual Environment Technology Lab is discussed.

  20. Aerospace applications of virtual environment technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, R. B.

    1996-01-01

    The uses of virtual environment technology in the space program are examined with emphasis on training for the Hubble Space Telescope Repair and Maintenance Mission in 1993. Project ScienceSpace at the Virtual Environment Technology Lab is discussed.

  1. Computer Assisted Virtual Environment - CAVE

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Phillip; Podgorney, Robert; Weingartner, Shawn; Whiting, Eric

    2014-01-14

    Research at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies is taking on another dimension with a 3-D device known as a Computer Assisted Virtual Environment. The CAVE uses projection to display high-end computer graphics on three walls and the floor. By wearing 3-D glasses to create depth perception and holding a wand to move and rotate images, users can delve into data.

  2. Computer Assisted Virtual Environment - CAVE

    ScienceCinema

    Erickson, Phillip; Podgorney, Robert; Weingartner, Shawn; Whiting, Eric

    2016-07-12

    Research at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies is taking on another dimension with a 3-D device known as a Computer Assisted Virtual Environment. The CAVE uses projection to display high-end computer graphics on three walls and the floor. By wearing 3-D glasses to create depth perception and holding a wand to move and rotate images, users can delve into data.

  3. EVA: Collaborative Distributed Learning Environment Based in Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheremetov, Leonid; Tellez, Rolando Quintero

    In this paper, a Web-based learning environment developed within the project called Virtual Learning Spaces (EVA, in Spanish) is presented. The environment is composed of knowledge, collaboration, consulting, experimentation, and personal spaces as a collection of agents and conventional software components working over the knowledge domains. All…

  4. EVA: An Interactive Web-Based Collaborative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheremetov, Leonid; Arenas, Adolfo Guzman

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a Web-based learning environment developed within the project called Virtual Learning Spaces (EVA, in Spanish) is described. The environment is composed of knowledge, collaboration, consulting and experimentation spaces as a collection of agents and conventional software components working over the knowledge domains. All user…

  5. Shared virtual environments for telerehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Popescu, George V; Burdea, Grigore; Boian, Rares

    2002-01-01

    Current VR telerehabilitation systems use offline remote monitoring from the clinic and patient-therapist videoconferencing. Such "store and forward" and video-based systems cannot implement medical services involving patient therapist direct interaction. Real-time telerehabilitation applications (including remote therapy) can be developed using a shared Virtual Environment (VE) architecture. We developed a two-user shared VE for hand telerehabilitation. Each site has a telerehabilitation workstation with a videocamera and a Rutgers Master II (RMII) force feedback glove. Each user can control a virtual hand and interact hapticly with virtual objects. Simulated physical interactions between therapist and patient are implemented using hand force feedback. The therapist's graphic interface contains several virtual panels, which allow control over the rehabilitation process. These controls start a videoconferencing session, collect patient data, or apply therapy. Several experimental telerehabilitation scenarios were successfully tested on a LAN. A Web-based approach to "real-time" patient telemonitoring--the monitoring portal for hand telerehabilitation--was also developed. The therapist interface is implemented as a Java3D applet that monitors patient hand movement. The monitoring portal gives real-time performance on off-the-shelf desktop workstations. PMID:15458115

  6. System Management Software for Virtual Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vallee, Geoffroy R; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Scott, Stephen L

    2007-01-01

    Recently there has been an increased interest in the use of system-level virtualization using mature solutions such as Xen, QEMU, or VMWare. These virtualization platforms are being used in distributed and parallel environments including high performance computing. The use of virtual machines within such environments introduces new challenges to system management. These include tedious tasks such as deploying para-virtualized host operating systems to support virtual machine execution or virtual overlay networks to connect these virtual machines. Additionally, there is the problem of machine definition and deployment, which is complicated by differentiation in the underlying virtualization technology. This paper discusses tools for the deployment and management of both host operating systems and virtual machines in clusters. We begin with an overview of system-level virtualization and move on to a description of tools that we have developed to aid with these environments. These tools extend prior work in the area of cluster installation, configuration and management.

  7. Interpersonal distance in immersive virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Bailenson, Jeremy N; Blascovich, Jim; Beall, Andrew C; Loomis, Jack M

    2003-07-01

    Digital immersive virtual environment technology (IVET) enables behavioral scientists to conduct ecologically realistic experiments with near-perfect experimental control. The authors employed IVET to study the interpersonal distance maintained between participants and virtual humans. In Study 1, participants traversed a three-dimensional virtual room in which a virtual human stood. In Study 2, a virtual human approached participants. In both studies, participant gender, virtual human gender, virtual human gaze behavior, and whether virtual humans were allegedly controlled by humans (i.e., avatars) or computers (i.e., agents) were varied. Results indicated that participants maintained greater distance from virtual humans when approaching their fronts compared to their backs. In addition, participants gave more personal space to virtual agents who engaged them in mutual gaze. Moreover, when virtual humans invaded their personal space, participants moved farthest from virtual human agents. The advantages and disadvantages of IVET for the study of human behavior are discussed.

  8. Future Evolution of Virtual Worlds as Communication Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisco, Giulio

    Extensive experience creating locations and activities inside virtual worlds provides the basis for contemplating their future. Users of virtual worlds are diverse in their goals for these online environments; for example, immersionists want them to be alternative realities disconnected from real life, whereas augmentationists want them to be communication media supporting real-life activities. As the technology improves, the diversity of virtual worlds will increase along with their significance. Many will incorporate more advanced virtual reality, or serve as major media for long-distance collaboration, or become the venues for futurist social movements. Key issues are how people can create their own virtual worlds, travel across worlds, and experience a variety of multimedia immersive environments. This chapter concludes by noting the view among some computer scientists that future technologies will permit uploading human personalities to artificial intelligence avatars, thereby enhancing human beings and rendering the virtual worlds entirely real.

  9. The Impact of Using Synchronous Collaborative Virtual Tangram in Children's Geometric

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chiu-Pin; Shao, Yin-juan; Wong, Lung-Hsiang; Li, Yin-Jen; Niramitranon, Jitti

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a collaborative and manipulative virtual Tangram puzzle to facilitate children to learn geometry in the computer-supported collaborative learning environment with Tablet PCs. In promoting peer interactions and stimulating students' higher-order thinking and creativity toward geometric problem-solving, we designed a…

  10. AudioMUD: a multiuser virtual environment for blind people.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jaime; Hassler, Tiago

    2007-03-01

    A number of virtual environments have been developed during the last years. Among them there are some applications for blind people based on different type of audio, from simple sounds to 3-D audio. In this study, we pursued a different approach. We designed AudioMUD by using spoken text to describe the environment, navigation, and interaction. We have also introduced some collaborative features into the interaction between blind users. The core of a multiuser MUD game is a networked textual virtual environment. We developed AudioMUD by adding some collaborative features to the basic idea of a MUD and placed a simulated virtual environment inside the human body. This paper presents the design and usability evaluation of AudioMUD. Blind learners were motivated when interacted with AudioMUD and helped to improve the interaction through audio and interface design elements. PMID:17436871

  11. AudioMUD: a multiuser virtual environment for blind people.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jaime; Hassler, Tiago

    2007-03-01

    A number of virtual environments have been developed during the last years. Among them there are some applications for blind people based on different type of audio, from simple sounds to 3-D audio. In this study, we pursued a different approach. We designed AudioMUD by using spoken text to describe the environment, navigation, and interaction. We have also introduced some collaborative features into the interaction between blind users. The core of a multiuser MUD game is a networked textual virtual environment. We developed AudioMUD by adding some collaborative features to the basic idea of a MUD and placed a simulated virtual environment inside the human body. This paper presents the design and usability evaluation of AudioMUD. Blind learners were motivated when interacted with AudioMUD and helped to improve the interaction through audio and interface design elements.

  12. Virtual environments for scene of crime reconstruction and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Toby L. J.; Murta, Alan D.; Gibson, Simon

    2000-02-01

    This paper describes research conducted in collaboration with Greater Manchester Police (UK), to evalute the utility of Virtual Environments for scene of crime analysis, forensic investigation, and law enforcement briefing and training. We present an illustrated case study of the construction of a high-fidelity virtual environment, intended to match a particular real-life crime scene as closely as possible. We describe and evaluate the combination of several approaches including: the use of the Manchester Scene Description Language for constructing complex geometrical models; the application of a radiosity rendering algorithm with several novel features based on human perceptual consideration; texture extraction from forensic photography; and experiments with interactive walkthroughs and large-screen stereoscopic display of the virtual environment implemented using the MAVERIK system. We also discuss the potential applications of Virtual Environment techniques in the Law Enforcement and Forensic communities.

  13. Virtual Teaming and Collaboration Technology: A Study of Influences on Virtual Project Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broils, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to explore the relationships between the independent variables, contextual factors for virtual teams and collaboration technology, and the dependent variable, virtual project outcomes. The problem leading to the need for the study is a lower success rate for virtual projects compared to…

  14. Advanced engineering environment collaboration project.

    SciTech Connect

    Lamph, Jane Ann; Pomplun, Alan R.; Kiba, Grant W.; Dutra, Edward G.; Dankiewicz, Robert J.; Marburger, Scot J.

    2008-12-01

    The Advanced Engineering Environment (AEE) is a model for an engineering design and communications system that will enhance project collaboration throughout the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). Sandia National Laboratories and Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) worked together on a prototype project to evaluate the suitability of a portion of PTC's Windchill 9.0 suite of data management, design and collaboration tools as the basis for an AEE. The AEE project team implemented Windchill 9.0 development servers in both classified and unclassified domains and used them to test and evaluate the Windchill tool suite relative to the needs of the NWC using weapons project use cases. A primary deliverable was the development of a new real time collaborative desktop design and engineering process using PDMLink (data management tool), Pro/Engineer (mechanical computer aided design tool) and ProductView Lite (visualization tool). Additional project activities included evaluations of PTC's electrical computer aided design, visualization, and engineering calculations applications. This report documents the AEE project work to share information and lessons learned with other NWC sites. It also provides PTC with recommendations for improving their products for NWC applications.

  15. Intelligent Motion and Interaction Within Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R. (Editor); Slater, Mel (Editor); Alexander, Thomas (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    What makes virtual actors and objects in virtual environments seem real? How can the illusion of their reality be supported? What sorts of training or user-interface applications benefit from realistic user-environment interactions? These are some of the central questions that designers of virtual environments face. To be sure simulation realism is not necessarily the major, or even a required goal, of a virtual environment intended to communicate specific information. But for some applications in entertainment, marketing, or aspects of vehicle simulation training, realism is essential. The following chapters will examine how a sense of truly interacting with dynamic, intelligent agents may arise in users of virtual environments. These chapters are based on presentations at the London conference on Intelligent Motion and Interaction within a Virtual Environments which was held at University College, London, U.K., 15-17 September 2003.

  16. Optimal Experience in Virtual Environments among College Level Developmental Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Melissa L.; Ice, Phil

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined optimal experience and the antecedents of flow as reported by college-level developmental reading students using "Second Life", a multi-user virtual environment. In an educational context, "Second Life" provided a space for demonstrating 21st century skills including communication, collaboration, problem-solving, and…

  17. Virtual laboratories: new opportunities for collaborative water science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceola, S.; Arheimer, B.; Baratti, E.; Blöschl, G.; Capell, R.; Castellarin, A.; Freer, J.; Han, D.; Hrachowitz, M.; Hundecha, Y.; Hutton, C.; Lindström, G.; Montanari, A.; Nijzink, R.; Parajka, J.; Toth, E.; Viglione, A.; Wagener, T.

    2015-04-01

    Reproducibility and repeatability of experiments are the fundamental prerequisites that allow researchers to validate results and share hydrological knowledge, experience and expertise in the light of global water management problems. Virtual laboratories offer new opportunities to enable these prerequisites since they allow experimenters to share data, tools and pre-defined experimental procedures (i.e. protocols). Here we present the outcomes of a first collaborative numerical experiment undertaken by five different international research groups in a virtual laboratory to address the key issues of reproducibility and repeatability. Moving from the definition of accurate and detailed experimental protocols, a rainfall-runoff model was independently applied to 15 European catchments by the research groups and model results were collectively examined through a web-based discussion. We found that a detailed modelling protocol was crucial to ensure the comparability and reproducibility of the proposed experiment across groups. Our results suggest that sharing comprehensive and precise protocols and running the experiments within a controlled environment (e.g. virtual laboratory) is as fundamental as sharing data and tools for ensuring experiment repeatability and reproducibility across the broad scientific community and thus advancing hydrology in a more coherent way.

  18. Social Interaction Development through Immersive Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Jason; Wendt, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if participants could improve their social interaction skills by participating in a virtual immersive environment. The participants used a developing virtual reality head-mounted display to engage themselves in a fully-immersive environment. While in the environment, participants had an opportunity…

  19. The Evolution of Constructivist Learning Environments: Immersion in Distributed, Virtual Worlds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dede, Chris

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the evolution of constructivist learning environments and examines the collaboration of simulated software models, virtual environments, and evolving mental models via immersion in artificial realities. A sidebar gives a realistic example of a student navigating through cyberspace. (JMV)

  20. A Virtual Geant4 Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Go

    2015-12-01

    We describe the development of an environment for Geant4 consisting of an application and data that provide users with a more efficient way to access Geant4 applications without having to download and build the software locally. The environment is platform neutral and offers the users near-real time performance. In addition, the environment consists of data and Geant4 libraries built using low-level virtual machine (LLVM) tools which can produce bitcode that can be embedded in HTML and accessed via a browser. The bitcode is downloaded to the local machine via the browser and can then be configured by the user. This approach provides a way of minimising the risk of leaking potentially sensitive data used to construct the Geant4 model and application in the medical domain for treatment planning. We describe several applications that have used this approach and compare their performance with that of native applications. We also describe potential user communities that could benefit from this approach.

  1. Ergonomic aspects of a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Ahasan, M R; Väyrynen, S

    1999-01-01

    A virtual environment is an interactive graphic system mediated through computer technology that allows a certain level of reality or a sense of presence to access virtual information. To create reality in a virtual environment, ergonomics issues are explored in this paper, aiming to develop the design of presentation formats with related information, that is possible to attain and to maintain user-friendly application. PMID:10602643

  2. A Framework for Intelligent Virtual Training Environment: The Steps from Specification to Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouras, Christos; Triantafillou, Vassilis; Tsiatsos, Thrasyvoulos

    2002-01-01

    Discusses collaborative virtual learning environments and presents a system architecture to support such environments, defined by user needs and using state-of-the-art technologies. Includes a description of INVITE (Intelligent Distributed Virtual Training Environment), a project funded by the European Commission. (Author/LRW)

  3. Digital Immersive Virtual Environments and Instructional Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blascovich, Jim; Beall, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews theory and research relevant to the development of digital immersive virtual environment-based instructional computing systems. The review is organized within the context of a multidimensional model of social influence and interaction within virtual environments that models the interaction of four theoretical factors: theory…

  4. VERS: a virtual environment for reconstructive surgery planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Kevin N.

    1997-05-01

    The virtual environment for reconstructive surgery (VERS) project at the NASA Ames Biocomputation Center is applying virtual reality technology to aid surgeons in planning surgeries. We are working with a craniofacial surgeon at Stanford to assemble and visualize the bone structure of patients requiring reconstructive surgery either through developmental abnormalities or trauma. This project is an extension of our previous work in 3D reconstruction, mesh generation, and immersive visualization. The current VR system, consisting of an SGI Onyx RE2, FakeSpace BOOM and ImmersiveWorkbench, Virtual Technologies CyberGlove and Ascension Technologies tracker, is currently in development and has already been used to visualize defects preoperatively. In the near future it will be used to more fully plan the surgery and compute the projected result to soft tissue structure. This paper presents the work in progress and details the production of a high-performance, collaborative, and networked virtual environment.

  5. Shared virtual environments for aerospace training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, R. Bowen; Voss, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Virtual environments have the potential to significantly enhance the training of NASA astronauts and ground-based personnel for a variety of activities. A critical requirement is the need to share virtual environments, in real or near real time, between remote sites. It has been hypothesized that the training of international astronaut crews could be done more cheaply and effectively by utilizing such shared virtual environments in the early stages of mission preparation. The Software Technology Branch at NASA's Johnson Space Center has developed the capability for multiple users to simultaneously share the same virtual environment. Each user generates the graphics needed to create the virtual environment. All changes of object position and state are communicated to all users so that each virtual environment maintains its 'currency.' Examples of these shared environments will be discussed and plans for the utilization of the Department of Defense's Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) protocols for shared virtual environments will be presented. Finally, the impact of this technology on training and education in general will be explored.

  6. Two implementations of shared virtual space environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Disz, T. L.

    1998-01-13

    While many issues in the area of virtual reality (VR) research have been addressed in recent years, the constant leaps forward in technology continue to push the field forward. VR research no longer is focused only on computer graphics, but instead has become even more interdisciplinary, combining the fields of networking, distributed computing, and even artificial intelligence. In this article we discuss some of the issues associated with distributed, collaborative virtual reality, as well as lessons learned during the development of two distributed virtual reality applications.

  7. Virtual agents in a simulated virtual training environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achorn, Brett; Badler, Norman L.

    1993-01-01

    A drawback to live-action training simulations is the need to gather a large group of participants in order to train a few individuals. One solution to this difficulty is the use of computer-controlled agents in a virtual training environment. This allows a human participant to be replaced by a virtual, or simulated, agent when only limited responses are needed. Each agent possesses a specified set of behaviors and is capable of limited autonomous action in response to its environment or the direction of a human trainee. The paper describes these agents in the context of a simulated hostage rescue training session, involving two human rescuers assisted by three virtual (computer-controlled) agents and opposed by three other virtual agents.

  8. Enhancing Student Collaboration in Global Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohut, Gary F.

    2012-01-01

    With the growth in the global economy and the rapid development of communication and information technologies, global virtual teams are quickly becoming the norm in the workplace. Research indicates, however, that many students have little or no experience working in such teams. Students who learn through these experiences benefit from higher task…

  9. Virtual environments from panoramic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, David P.; Deacon, Andrew

    1998-12-01

    A number of recent projects have demonstrated the utility of Internet-enabled image databases for the documentation of complex, inaccessible and potentially hazardous environments typically encountered in the petrochemical and nuclear industries. Unfortunately machine vision and image processing techniques have not, to date, enabled the automatic extraction geometrical data from such images and thus 3D CAD modeling remains an expensive and laborious manual activity. Recent developments in panoramic image capture and presentation offer an alternative intermediate deliverable which, in turn, offers some of the benefits of a 3D model at a fraction of the cost. Panoramic image display tools such as Apple's QuickTime VR (QTVR) and Live Spaces RealVR provide compelling and accessible digital representations of the real world and justifiably claim to 'put the reality in Virtual Reality.' This paper will demonstrate how such technologies can be customized, extended and linked to facility management systems delivered over a corporate intra-net to enable end users to become familiar with remote sites and extract simple dimensional data. In addition strategies for the integration of such images with documents gathered from 2D or 3D CAD and Process and Instrumentation Diagrams (P&IDs) will be described as will techniques for precise 'As-Built' modeling using the calibrated images from which panoramas have been derived and the use of textures from these images to increase the realism of rendered scenes. A number of case studies relating to both nuclear and process engineering will demonstrate the extent to which such solution are scaleable in order to deal with the very large volumes of image data required to fully document the large, complex facilities typical of these industry sectors.

  10. The Impact of Avatar Self-Representation on Collaboration in Virtual Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Paul; Maryott, James

    2009-01-01

    Despite the growing use of virtual worlds in distance education, no studies have shown how self-representation in these environments impacts collaboration in multicultural learning groups. In this article, Paul Wallace and Jim Maryott report on a preliminary study in Micronesia designed to investigate the impact of negative social attitudes based…

  11. Prospects for Digital Campus with Extensive Applications of Virtual Collaborative Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishide, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes extensive applications of virtual collaborative space in order to enhance the efficiency and capability of Digital Campus. The usability of Digital Campus has been experimented in different learning environments and evaluated by questionnaire as that the presence technology and a sense of solidarity influence the participants'…

  12. Virtual environment architecture for rapid application development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstein, Georges G.; Southard, David A.; Lee, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the MITRE Virtual Environment Architecture (VEA), a product of nearly two years of investigations and prototypes of virtual environment technology. This paper discusses the requirements for rapid prototyping, and an architecture we are developing to support virtual environment construction. VEA supports rapid application development by providing a variety of pre-built modules that can be reconfigured for each application session. The modules supply interfaces for several types of interactive I/O devices, in addition to large-screen or head-mounted displays.

  13. Building Team Collaboration in the Virtual Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, Wallace; Hasler-Waters, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a study of a web-based, teambuilding instructional module that included activities designed to improve collaboration skills among team members conducting online projects. This module was formatively evaluated using 24 graduate students who were enrolled in an online course that assigned two online team…

  14. Collaborative Wikipedia Projects in the Virtual Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, A. J.; Wolt, J. D.; Hurd, H. S.

    2013-01-01

    Wikipedia is a web-based, free-content encyclopedia that is openly editable and, thus, provides a unique platform for collaborations. Wikipedia projects are increasingly being integrated into upper-level courses across the country to explore advanced concepts, communicate science, and provide high-quality information to the public. Here we outline…

  15. Simulation fidelity of a virtual environment display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemire, Kenneth; Jacoby, Richard H.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1994-01-01

    We assessed the degree to which a virtual environment system produced a faithful simulation of three-dimensional space by investigating the influence of a pitched optic array on the perception of gravity-referenced eye level (GREL). We compared the results with those obtained in a physical environment. In a within-subjects factorial design, 12 subjects indicated GREL while viewing virtual three-dimensional arrays at different static orientations. A physical array biased GREL more than did a geometrically identical virtual pitched array. However, addition of two sets of orthogonal parallel lines (a grid) to the virtual pitched array resulted in as large a bias as that obtained with the physical pitched array. The increased bias was caused by longitudinal, but not the transverse, components of the grid. We discuss implications of our results for spatial orientation models and for designs of virtual displays.

  16. Effects of Collaborative Activities on Group Identity in Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Hyungsung; Seo, Sumin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of collaborative activities on group identity in a virtual world such as "Second Life." To achieve this purpose, this study adopted events that promoted participants' interactions using tools inherent in "Second Life." The interactive tools given to the control group in…

  17. Training Teachers for Virtual Collaboration: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinagre, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the development of teachers' competences when trained in virtual collaboration. In order to do so, we analyse the data gathered from a group of nine in-service teachers who were trained in a forum and a wiki to become future telecollaborative teachers (TTs). During the course, participants worked in small groups and they…

  18. The Potential for Scientific Collaboration in Virtual Ecosystems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magerko, Brian

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the potential benefits of creating "virtual ecosystems" from real-world data. These ecosystems are intended to be realistic virtual representations of environments that may be costly or difficult to access in person. They can be constructed as 3D worlds rendered from stereo video data, augmented with scientific data, and then…

  19. Using Five Stage Model to Design of Collaborative Learning Environments in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orhan, Sevil; Karaman, M. Kemal

    2014-01-01

    Specifically Second Life (SL) among virtual worlds draws attention of researchers to form collaborative learning environments (Sutcliffe & Alrayes, 2012) since it could be used as a rich platform to simulate a real environment containing many collaborative learning characteristics and interaction tools within itself. Five Stage Model (FSM)…

  20. Network-based collaborative research environment LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; McDonald, M.J.

    1997-09-01

    The Virtual Collaborative Environment (VCE) and Distributed Collaborative Workbench (DCW) are new technologies that make it possible for diverse users to synthesize and share mechatronic, sensor, and information resources. Using these technologies, university researchers, manufacturers, design firms, and others can directly access and reconfigure systems located throughout the world. The architecture for implementing VCE and DCW has been developed based on the proposed National Information Infrastructure or Information Highway and a tool kit of Sandia-developed software. Further enhancements to the VCE and DCW technologies will facilitate access to other mechatronic resources. This report describes characteristics of VCE and DCW and also includes background information about the evolution of these technologies.

  1. Virtually Ostracized: Studying Ostracism in Immersive Virtual Environments

    PubMed Central

    Wesselmann, Eric D.; Law, Alvin Ty; Williams, Kipling D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Electronic-based communication (such as Immersive Virtual Environments; IVEs) may offer new ways of satisfying the need for social connection, but they also provide ways this need can be thwarted. Ostracism, being ignored and excluded, is a common social experience that threatens fundamental human needs (i.e., belonging, control, self-esteem, and meaningful existence). Previous ostracism research has made use of a variety of paradigms, including minimal electronic-based interactions (e.g., Cyberball) and communication (e.g., chatrooms and Short Message Services). These paradigms, however, lack the mundane realism that many IVEs now offer. Further, IVE paradigms designed to measure ostracism may allow researchers to test more nuanced hypotheses about the effects of ostracism. We created an IVE in which ostracism could be manipulated experimentally, emulating a previously validated minimal ostracism paradigm. We found that participants who were ostracized in this IVE experienced the same negative effects demonstrated in other ostracism paradigms, providing, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the negative effects of ostracism in virtual environments. Though further research directly exploring these effects in online virtual environments is needed, this research suggests that individuals encountering ostracism in other virtual environments (such as massively multiplayer online role playing games; MMORPGs) may experience negative effects similar to those of being ostracized in real life. This possibility may have serious implications for individuals who are marginalized in their real life and turn to IVEs to satisfy their need for social connection. PMID:22897472

  2. Collaborative virtual organisation and infrastructure for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Barry; Affentranger, Roman

    2013-07-01

    A virtual organisation approach was applied to collaborative drug discovery integrating experimental and computational design approaches. Scientists Against Malaria was formed with the goal of designing novel antimalarial drug candidates. The collaboration of nine founding partners carried out computational and laboratory work that produced significant volumes of data and metadata, the interpretation for the analysis of which, as well as the related decision making, was challenging. During the first phase the partners developed this 'green-field' project from initiation through to target selection and modelling, computational screening, biological materials and assay preparation, culminating in the completion of initial experimental testing. A support infrastructure involving a semantic collaborative laboratory framework, interoperating with a cloud of web services through an ontology describing the virtual and experimental screening data, was designed and tested.

  3. Distributed virtual environment for emergency medical training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.; Garcia, Brian W.; Godsell-Stytz, Gayl M.

    1997-07-01

    In many professions where individuals must work in a team in a high stress environment to accomplish a time-critical task, individual and team performance can benefit from joint training using distributed virtual environments (DVEs). One professional field that lacks but needs a high-fidelity team training environment is the field of emergency medicine. Currently, emergency department (ED) medical personnel train by using words to create a metal picture of a situation for the physician and staff, who then cooperate to solve the problems portrayed by the word picture. The need in emergency medicine for realistic virtual team training is critical because ED staff typically encounter rarely occurring but life threatening situations only once in their careers and because ED teams currently have no realistic environment in which to practice their team skills. The resulting lack of experience and teamwork makes diagnosis and treatment more difficult. Virtual environment based training has the potential to redress these shortfalls. The objective of our research is to develop a state-of-the-art virtual environment for emergency medicine team training. The virtual emergency room (VER) allows ED physicians and medical staff to realistically prepare for emergency medical situations by performing triage, diagnosis, and treatment on virtual patients within an environment that provides them with the tools they require and the team environment they need to realistically perform these three tasks. There are several issues that must be addressed before this vision is realized. The key issues deal with distribution of computations; the doctor and staff interface to the virtual patient and ED equipment; the accurate simulation of individual patient organs' response to injury, medication, and treatment; and an accurate modeling of the symptoms and appearance of the patient while maintaining a real-time interaction capability. Our ongoing work addresses all of these issues. In this

  4. Controlling social stress in virtual reality environments.

    PubMed

    Hartanto, Dwi; Kampmann, Isabel L; Morina, Nexhmedin; Emmelkamp, Paul G M; Neerincx, Mark A; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy has been proposed as a viable alternative in the treatment of anxiety disorders, including social anxiety disorder. Therapists could benefit from extensive control of anxiety eliciting stimuli during virtual exposure. Two stimuli controls are studied in this study: the social dialogue situation, and the dialogue feedback responses (negative or positive) between a human and a virtual character. In the first study, 16 participants were exposed in three virtual reality scenarios: a neutral virtual world, blind date scenario, and job interview scenario. Results showed a significant difference between the three virtual scenarios in the level of self-reported anxiety and heart rate. In the second study, 24 participants were exposed to a job interview scenario in a virtual environment where the ratio between negative and positive dialogue feedback responses of a virtual character was systematically varied on-the-fly. Results yielded that within a dialogue the more positive dialogue feedback resulted in less self-reported anxiety, lower heart rate, and longer answers, while more negative dialogue feedback of the virtual character resulted in the opposite. The correlations between on the one hand the dialogue stressor ratio and on the other hand the means of SUD score, heart rate and audio length in the eight dialogue conditions showed a strong relationship: r(6) = 0.91, p = 0.002; r(6) = 0.76, p = 0.028 and r(6) = -0.94, p = 0.001 respectively. Furthermore, more anticipatory anxiety reported before exposure was found to coincide with more self-reported anxiety, and shorter answers during the virtual exposure. These results demonstrate that social dialogues in a virtual environment can be effectively manipulated for therapeutic purposes.

  5. Controlling Social Stress in Virtual Reality Environments

    PubMed Central

    Hartanto, Dwi; Kampmann, Isabel L.; Morina, Nexhmedin; Emmelkamp, Paul G. M.; Neerincx, Mark A.; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy has been proposed as a viable alternative in the treatment of anxiety disorders, including social anxiety disorder. Therapists could benefit from extensive control of anxiety eliciting stimuli during virtual exposure. Two stimuli controls are studied in this study: the social dialogue situation, and the dialogue feedback responses (negative or positive) between a human and a virtual character. In the first study, 16 participants were exposed in three virtual reality scenarios: a neutral virtual world, blind date scenario, and job interview scenario. Results showed a significant difference between the three virtual scenarios in the level of self-reported anxiety and heart rate. In the second study, 24 participants were exposed to a job interview scenario in a virtual environment where the ratio between negative and positive dialogue feedback responses of a virtual character was systematically varied on-the-fly. Results yielded that within a dialogue the more positive dialogue feedback resulted in less self-reported anxiety, lower heart rate, and longer answers, while more negative dialogue feedback of the virtual character resulted in the opposite. The correlations between on the one hand the dialogue stressor ratio and on the other hand the means of SUD score, heart rate and audio length in the eight dialogue conditions showed a strong relationship: r(6) = 0.91, p = 0.002; r(6) = 0.76, p = 0.028 and r(6) = −0.94, p = 0.001 respectively. Furthermore, more anticipatory anxiety reported before exposure was found to coincide with more self-reported anxiety, and shorter answers during the virtual exposure. These results demonstrate that social dialogues in a virtual environment can be effectively manipulated for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24671006

  6. The Impact of Virtual Collaboration and Collaboration Technologies on Knowledge Transfer and Team Performance in Distributed Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngoma, Ngoma Sylvestre

    2013-01-01

    Virtual teams are increasingly viewed as a powerful determinant of competitive advantage in geographically distributed organizations. This study was designed to provide insights into the interdependencies between virtual collaboration, collaboration technologies, knowledge transfer, and virtual team performance in an effort to understand whether…

  7. ComputerApplications and Virtual Environments (CAVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) can provide cost effective methods to design and evaluate components and systems for maintenance and refurbishment operations. The Marshall Space Flight Centerr (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama began to utilize VR for design analysis in the X-34 experimental reusable space vehicle. Analysts at MSFC's Computer Applications and Virtual Environments (CAVE) used Head Mounted Displays (HMD) (pictured), spatial trackers and gesture inputs as a means to animate or inhabit a properly sized virtual human model. These models were used in a VR scenario as a way to determine functionality of space and maintenance requirements for the virtual X-34. The primary functions of the virtual X-34 mockup was to support operations development and design analysis for engine removal, the engine compartment and the aft fuselage. This capability provided general visualization support to engineers and designers at MSFC and to the System Design Freeze Review at Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC). The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  8. Computer Applications and Virtual Environments (CAVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) can provide cost effective methods to design and evaluate components and systems for maintenance and refurbishment operations. Marshall SPace Flight Center (MSFC) is begirning to utilize VR for design analysis in the X-34 experimental reusable space vehicle. Analysts at MSFC's Computer Applications and Virtual Environments (CAVE) used Head Mounted Displays (HMD) (pictured), spatial trackers and gesture inputs as a means to animate or inhabit a properly sized virtual human model. These models are used in a VR scenario as a way to determine functionality of space and maintenance requirements for the virtual X-34. The primary functions of the virtual X-34 mockup is to support operations development and design analysis for engine removal, the engine compartment and the aft fuselage. This capability provides general visualization support to engineers and designers at MSFC and to the System Design Freeze Review at Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC).

  9. ComputerApplications and Virtual Environments (CAVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) can provide cost effective methods to design and evaluate components and systems for maintenance and refurbishment operations. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama began to utilize VR for design analysis in the X-34 experimental reusable space vehicle. Analysts at MSFC's Computer Applications and Virtual Environments (CAVE) used Head Mounted Displays (HMD) (pictured), spatial trackers and gesture inputs as a means to animate or inhabit a properly sized virtual human model. These models were used in a VR scenario as a way to determine functionality of space and maintenance requirements for the virtual X-34. The primary functions of the virtual X-34 mockup was to support operations development and design analysis for engine removal, the engine compartment and the aft fuselage. This capability providedgeneral visualization support to engineers and designers at MSFC and to the System Design Freeze Review at Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC). The X-34 program was cancelled in 2001.

  10. Peer Interaction in Three Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staarman, Judith Kleine; Krol, Karen; Meijden, Henny van der

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to gain insight into the occurrence of different types of peer interaction and particularly the types of interaction beneficial for learning in different collaborative learning environments. Based on theoretical notions related to collaborative learning and peer interaction, a coding scheme was developed to analyze the…

  11. Virtual Reality Training Environments: Contexts and Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Stephen W.; Kenney, Patrick J.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the contexts where virtual reality (VR) training environments might be appropriate; examines the advantages and disadvantages of VR as a training technology; and presents a case study of a VR training environment used at the NASA Johnson Space Center in preparation for the repair of the Hubble Space Telescope. (AEF)

  12. Virtual pharmaceutical companies: collaborating flexibly in pharmaceutical development.

    PubMed

    Forster, Simon P; Stegmaier, Julia; Spycher, Rene; Seeger, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Research and development (R&D) collaborations represent one approach chosen by the pharmaceutical industry to tackle current challenges posed by declining internal R&D success rates and fading of the blockbuster model. In recent years, a flexible concept to collaborate in R&D has emerged: virtual pharmaceutical companies (VPCs). These differ from other R&D companies, such as biotech start-ups, collaborating with big pharmaceutical companies, because they solely comprise experienced teams of managers. VPCs have only been described anecdotally in literature. Thus, we present here the characteristics of a VPC and suggest how big pharma can leverage the concept of VPCs by introducing five possible modes of collaboration. We find that one mode, investing, is particularly promising for big pharma. PMID:24291787

  13. Virtual pharmaceutical companies: collaborating flexibly in pharmaceutical development.

    PubMed

    Forster, Simon P; Stegmaier, Julia; Spycher, Rene; Seeger, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Research and development (R&D) collaborations represent one approach chosen by the pharmaceutical industry to tackle current challenges posed by declining internal R&D success rates and fading of the blockbuster model. In recent years, a flexible concept to collaborate in R&D has emerged: virtual pharmaceutical companies (VPCs). These differ from other R&D companies, such as biotech start-ups, collaborating with big pharmaceutical companies, because they solely comprise experienced teams of managers. VPCs have only been described anecdotally in literature. Thus, we present here the characteristics of a VPC and suggest how big pharma can leverage the concept of VPCs by introducing five possible modes of collaboration. We find that one mode, investing, is particularly promising for big pharma.

  14. A Multi-User Virtual Environment for Building and Assessing Higher Order Inquiry Skills in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketelhut, Diane Jass; Nelson, Brian C.; Clarke, Jody; Dede, Chris

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated novel pedagogies for helping teachers infuse inquiry into a standards-based science curriculum. Using a multi-user virtual environment (MUVE) as a pedagogical vehicle, teams of middle-school students collaboratively solved problems around disease in a virtual town called River City. The students interacted with "avatars" of…

  15. A collaborative model for developing and maintaining virtual patients for medical education.

    PubMed

    Berman, Norman B; Fall, Leslie H; Chessman, Alexander W; Dell, Michael R; Lang, Valerie J; Leong, Shou Ling; Nixon, L James; Smith, Sherilyn

    2011-01-01

    There is great interest in using computer-assisted instruction in medical education, but getting computer-assisted instruction materials used broadly is difficult to achieve. We describe a successful model for the development and maintenance of a specific type of computer-assisted instruction - virtual patients - in medical education. The collaborative model's seven key components are described and compared to other models of diffusion of innovation and curriculum development. The collaborative development model that began in one medical discipline is now extended to two additional disciplines, through partnerships with their respective clerkship director organizations. We believe that the ability to achieve broad use of virtual patients, and to transition the programs from successfully relying on grant funding to financially self-sustaining, resulted directly from the collaborative development and maintenance process. This process can be used in other learning environments and for the development of other types of computer-assisted instruction programs.

  16. Visualizing vascular structures in virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wischgoll, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In order to learn more about the cause of coronary heart diseases and develop diagnostic tools, the extraction and visualization of vascular structures from volumetric scans for further analysis is an important step. By determining a geometric representation of the vasculature, the geometry can be inspected and additional quantitative data calculated and incorporated into the visualization of the vasculature. To provide a more user-friendly visualization tool, virtual environment paradigms can be utilized. This paper describes techniques for interactive rendering of large-scale vascular structures within virtual environments. This can be applied to almost any virtual environment configuration, such as CAVE-type displays. Specifically, the tools presented in this paper were tested on a Barco I-Space and a large 62x108 inch passive projection screen with a Kinect sensor for user tracking.

  17. Increasing performance in KVM virtualization within a Tier-1 environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chierici, Andrea; Salomoni, Davide

    2012-12-01

    This work shows the optimizations we have been investigating and implementing at the KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) virtualization layer in the INFN Tier-1 at CNAF, based on more than a year of experience in running thousands of virtual machines in a production environment used by several international collaborations. These optimizations increase the adaptability of virtualization solutions to demanding applications like those run in our institute (High-Energy Physics). We will show performance differences among different filesystems (like ext3 vs ext4) when used as KVM host local storage. We will provide guidelines for solid state disks (SSD) adoption, for deployment of SR-IOV (Single Root I/O Virtualization) enabled hardware and what is the best solution to distribute and instantiate read-only virtual machine images. This work has been driven by the project called Worker Nodes on Demand Service (WNoDeS), a framework designed to offer local, grid or cloud-based access to computing and storage resources, preserving maximum compatibility with existing computing center policies and workflows.

  18. Virtual Laboratory Enabling Collaborative Research in Applied Vehicle Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Cronin, Catherine K.; Scott, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    The virtual laboratory is a new technology, based on the internet, that has had wide usage in a variety of technical fields because of its inherent ability to allow many users to participate simultaneously in instruction (education) or in the collaborative study of a common problem (real-world application). The leadership in the Applied Vehicle Technology panel has encouraged the utilization of this technology in its task groups for some time and its parent organization, the Research and Technology Agency, has done the same for its own administrative use. This paper outlines the application of the virtual laboratory to those fields important to applied vehicle technologies, gives the status of the effort, and identifies the benefit it can have on collaborative research. The latter is done, in part, through a specific example, i.e. the experience of one task group.

  19. Foreign language learning in immersive virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Benjamin; Sheldon, Lee; Si, Mei; Hand, Anton

    2012-03-01

    Virtual reality has long been used for training simulations in fields from medicine to welding to vehicular operation, but simulations involving more complex cognitive skills present new design challenges. Foreign language learning, for example, is increasingly vital in the global economy, but computer-assisted education is still in its early stages. Immersive virtual reality is a promising avenue for language learning as a way of dynamically creating believable scenes for conversational training and role-play simulation. Visual immersion alone, however, only provides a starting point. We suggest that the addition of social interactions and motivated engagement through narrative gameplay can lead to truly effective language learning in virtual environments. In this paper, we describe the development of a novel application for teaching Mandarin using CAVE-like VR, physical props, human actors and intelligent virtual agents, all within a semester-long multiplayer mystery game. Students travel (virtually) to China on a class field trip, which soon becomes complicated with intrigue and mystery surrounding the lost manuscript of an early Chinese literary classic. Virtual reality environments such as the Forbidden City and a Beijing teahouse provide the setting for learning language, cultural traditions, and social customs, as well as the discovery of clues through conversation in Mandarin with characters in the game.

  20. Development of virtual environment for treating acrophobia.

    PubMed

    Ku, J; Jang, D; Shin, M; Jo, H; Ahn, H; Lee, J; Cho, B; Kim, S I

    2001-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a new technology that makes humans communicate with computer. It allows the user to see, hear, feel and interact in a three-dimensional virtual world created graphically. Virtual Reality Therapy (VRT), based on this sophisticated technology, has been recently used in the treatment of subjects diagnosed with acrophobia, a disorder that is characterized by marked anxiety upon exposure to heights, avoidance of heights, and a resulting interference in functioning. Conventional virtual reality system for the treatment of acrophobia has a limitation in scope that it is based on over-costly devices or somewhat unrealistic graphic scene. The goal of this study was to develop a inexpensive and more realistic virtual environment for the exposure therapy of acrophobia. We constructed two types virtual environment. One is constituted a bungee-jump tower in the middle of a city. It includes the open lift surrounded by props beside tower that allowed the patient to feel sense of heights. Another is composed of diving boards which have various heights. It provides a view of a lower diving board and people swimming in the pool to serve the patient stimuli upon exposure to heights.

  1. NASA Team Collaboration Pilot: Enabling NASA's Virtual Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Most NASA projects and work activities are accomplished by teams of people. These teams are often geographically distributed - across NASA centers and NASA external partners, both domestic and international. NASA "virtual" teams are stressed by the challenge of getting team work done - across geographic boundaries and time zones. To get distributed work done, teams rely on established methods - travel, telephones, Video Teleconferencing (NASA VITS), and email. Time is our most critical resource - and team members are hindered by the overhead of travel and the difficulties of coordinating work across their virtual teams. Modern, Internet based team collaboration tools offer the potential to dramatically improve the ability of virtual teams to get distributed work done.

  2. [Treatment of acrophobia in a virtual environment].

    PubMed

    Kuntze, M F; Störmer, R; Mager, R; Müller-Spahn, F; Bullinger, A

    2003-05-01

    Specific phobias are one of the most frequent mental health problems and can lead to years of personal suffering. The most effective treatment is exposure therapy. Our aim was to proof the feasibility and efficacy of virtual environments in treating acrophobia patients using a manually guided exposure therapy. Our pilot study was designed as a crossover intervention with a waiting list condition as a control group. After treatment, our results show that exposure in virtual environments is a feasible technique, can provoke anxiety, and leads to a therapeutic effect.

  3. A Collaborative Research Environment for Heliophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, R. D.; Berghmans, D.; Csillaghy, A.

    2012-04-01

    Heliophysics is the study of the effect of the Sun on the Solar System; it is a relatively new science that combines the solar, heliospheric, geophysics and planetary communities. The subject is an example of the increasing desire to address science problems that span disciplinary boundaries and provides a good example of the issues involved. The communities that constitute heliophysics have grown up independently and there are differences in the way that their data are stored and used. Although a number of capabilities relevant to heliophysics have been established under auspices of various projects and organisations, the fact that they have not followed any underlying strategy is now inhibiting our ability to do this type of science. The Heliophysics Integrated Observatory (HELIO), a research infrastructure funded under Capacities programme of the EC's 7th Framework Programme (FP7), was designed around a service-oriented architecture with needed capabilities that support metadata curation and search, data location and retrieval, and data processing and storage being established as independent services. In addition, a number of virtual observatories have been established that address aspects of the overall problem of heliophysics within the NASA's Heliophysics Science Division. We examine the capabilities of these resources and look at where their strengths and weaknesses lie. We identify some of the steps that are needed to improve interoperability between the initiatives and consider how they could be brought together to form a Collaborative Research Environment for Heliophysics (CREH). The Coordination Action for the integration of Solar System Infrastructure and Science (CASSIS) has the objective of exploring ways to improve interoperability for all aspects of Solar System Science. CASSIS is funded under Capacities specific programme of the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) and grew out of the HELIO, Europlanet RI and SOTERIA projects; it

  4. Collaborative Learning Processes in an Asynchronous Environment: An Analysis through Discourse and Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirado, Ramon; Aguaded, Ignacio; Hernando, Angel

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses an experience in collaborative learning in an asynchronous writing environment through discussion forums on a WebCt platform of the University of Huelva's virtual campus, and was part of an innovative teaching project in 2007-08. The main objectives are to describe the processes of collaborative knowledge construction and the…

  5. Collaborating, teaching and learning in a cyberspace community: a virtual AGE experience.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Catherine J; Weinreich, Donna M

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes one outcome of a collaborative teaching and learning partnership between two Universities via a Web-based environment. A description and evaluation of a semester-long project combining students from two different universities is examined. A total of 22 students participated as members of six different virtual health-care teams. Each team was charged with (1) creating a team contract; (2) completing an electronic patient medical record; and (3) a patient care plan. Students posted to discussion threads regularly using learning objects developed by faculty for Virtual AGE (vAGE-Active Gerontology Education). The successes and lessons learned for both students and faculty are discussed. PMID:18032303

  6. Ophthalmic microsurgical robot and associated virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Hunter, I W; Jones, L A; Sagar, M A; Lafontaine, S R; Hunter, P J

    1995-03-01

    An ophthalmic virtual environment has been developed as part of a teleoperated microsurgical robot built to perform surgery on the eye. The virtual environment is unique in that it incorporates a detailed continuum model of the anatomical structures of the eye, its mechanics and optical properties, together with a less detailed geometric-mechanical model of the face. In addition to providing a realistic visual display of the eye being operated on, the virtual environment simulates tissue properties during manipulation and cutting and the forces involved are determined by solving a mechanical finite element model of the tissue. These forces are then fed back to the operator via a force reflecting master and so the surgeon can experience both the visual and mechanical sensations associated with performing surgery. The virtual environment can be used to enhance the images produced by the camera on the microsurgical slave robot during surgery and as a surgical simulator in which it replaces these images with computer graphics generated from the eye model.

  7. The integrated virtual environment rehabilitation treadmill system.

    PubMed

    Feasel, Jeff; Whitton, Mary C; Kassler, Laura; Brooks, Frederick P; Lewek, Michael D

    2011-06-01

    Slow gait speed and interlimb asymmetry are prevalent in a variety of disorders. Current approaches to locomotor retraining emphasize the need for appropriate feedback during intensive, task-specific practice. This paper describes the design and feasibility testing of the integrated virtual environment rehabilitation treadmill (IVERT) system intended to provide real-time, intuitive feedback regarding gait speed and asymmetry during training. The IVERT system integrates an instrumented, split-belt treadmill with a front-projection, immersive virtual environment. The novel adaptive control system uses only ground reaction force data from the treadmill to continuously update the speeds of the two treadmill belts independently, as well as to control the speed and heading in the virtual environment in real time. Feedback regarding gait asymmetry is presented 1) visually as walking a curved trajectory through the virtual environment and 2) proprioceptively in the form of different belt speeds on the split-belt treadmill. A feasibility study involving five individuals with asymmetric gait found that these individuals could effectively control the speed of locomotion and perceive gait asymmetry during the training session. Although minimal changes in overground gait symmetry were observed immediately following a single training session, further studies should be done to determine the IVERT's potential as a tool for rehabilitation of asymmetric gait by providing patients with congruent visual and proprioceptive feedback.

  8. Using Immersive Virtual Environments for Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, R.; Cruz-Neira, C.

    1998-01-01

    Immersive virtual environments (VEs) technology has matured to the point where it can be utilized as a scientific and engineering problem solving tool. In particular, VEs are starting to be used to design and evaluate safety-critical systems that involve human operators, such as flight and driving simulators, complex machinery training, and emergency rescue strategies.

  9. Virtual environments for telerobotic shared control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Brian K.

    1994-01-01

    The use of a virtual environment to bring about telerobotic shared control is discussed. A knowledge base, referred to as the World Model, is used to aid the system in its decision making. Information from the World Model is displayed visually in order to aid the human side of human-computer interface.

  10. Virtual Learning Environments: Three Implementation Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Christina

    2005-01-01

    Universities worldwide offer web-based courses distributed by virtual learning environments (VLEs). A common theoretical framework for implementing VLEs is the pedagogical perspective of instructional design. In this paper, three perspectives of implementation from information systems implementation research and organization theory are presented:…

  11. Training in virtual and real environments.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, R V; Afenya, M B

    1995-01-01

    Transfer of training between real and virtual environments was examined using a pick-and place task with two different difficulty levels. The task was to minimize the time to move cans from one color coded location in the first row to the same color coded location in the back row and then to reverse the process. In the first task, the front and back disk colors were aligned, and in the second disk order, the front and back disk colors were randomly placed on the table. Subjects trained in one environment were then tested in the other and their performance compared with that of subjects being trained in that environment. Some virtual world-trained subjects showed small but significant improvement in performance compared with the untrained subjects for the real world task for both disk arrangements. The differences in performance between the two groups decreased with trial number until no difference was seen at the end of the sessions. None of the real world-trained subjects showed any significant improvement when performing the task in the virtual world compared with the untrained subjects. These results suggest that transfer-of-training from virtual to real world tasks can take place under certain conditions.

  12. National Culture in Practice: Its Impact on Knowledge Sharing in Global Virtual Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Kangning

    2009-01-01

    Issues concerning global virtual collaboration have received considerable attention in both the academic and practical world; however, little research has been conducted on knowledge-sharing activities in global virtual collaboration, which is a key process to achieve collaboration effectiveness. Due to national culture having been seen as one of…

  13. Enhancing Trust in SOA Based Collaborative Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boursas, Latifa; Bourimi, Mohamed; Hommel, Wolfgang; Kesdogan, Dogan

    Considering trust and privacy requirements for online and collaborative distance learning environments, this paper discusses potential extensions of SOA based applications to simultaneously support authentication and authorization services, and offering mutual trust to both learners and service providers. This study shows that the security mechanisms integrated in the SOA platform can be effectively extended and correlated with a trust model.

  14. New approaches to virtual environment surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Twombly, A.; Lee, A. W.; Cheng, R.; Senger, S.

    1999-01-01

    This research focused on two main problems: 1) low cost, high fidelity stereoscopic imaging of complex tissues and organs; and 2) virtual cutting of tissue. A further objective was to develop these images and virtual tissue cutting methods for use in a telemedicine project that would connect remote sites using the Next Generation Internet. For goal one we used a CT scan of a human heart, a desktop PC with an OpenGL graphics accelerator card, and LCD stereoscopic glasses. Use of multiresolution meshes ranging from approximately 1,000,000 to 20,000 polygons speeded interactive rendering rates enormously while retaining general topography of the dataset. For goal two, we used a CT scan of an infant skull with premature closure of the right coronal suture, a Silicon Graphics Onyx workstation, a Fakespace Immersive WorkBench and CrystalEyes LCD glasses. The high fidelity mesh of the skull was reduced from one million to 50,000 polygons. The cut path was automatically calculated as the shortest distance along the mesh between a small number of hand selected vertices. The region outlined by the cut path was then separated from the skull and translated/rotated to assume a new position. The results indicate that widespread high fidelity imaging in virtual environment is possible using ordinary PC capabilities if appropriate mesh reduction methods are employed. The software cutting tool is applicable to heart and other organs for surgery planning, for training surgeons in a virtual environment, and for telemedicine purposes.

  15. Co-creation and Co-innovation in a Collaborative Networked Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klen, Edmilson Rampazzo

    Leveraged by the advances in communication and information Technologies, producers and consumers are developing a new behavior. Together with the new emerging collaborative manifestations this behavior may directly impact the way products are developed. This powerful combination indicates that consumers will be involved in a very early stage in product development processes supporting even more the creation and innovation of products. This new way of collaboration gives rise to a new collaborative networked environment based on co-creation and co-innovation. This work will present some evolutionary steps that point to the development of this environment where prosumer communities and virtual organizations interact and collaborate.

  16. Human-Computer Interaction and Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    The proceedings of the Workshop on Human-Computer Interaction and Virtual Environments are presented along with a list of attendees. The objectives of the workshop were to assess the state-of-technology and level of maturity of several areas in human-computer interaction and to provide guidelines for focused future research leading to effective use of these facilities in the design/fabrication and operation of future high-performance engineering systems.

  17. Platform for setting up interactive virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Danilo; Dias, Paulo; Santos, Daniel; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2014-02-01

    This paper introduces pSIVE, a platform that allows the easy setting up of Virtual Environments, with interactive information (for instance, a video or a document about a machine that is present in the virtual world) to be accessed for different 3D elements. The main goal is to create for evaluation and training on a virtual factory - but generic enough to be applied in different contexts by non-expert users (academic and touristic for instance). We show some preliminary results obtained from two different scenarios: first a production line of a factory with contextualized information associated to different elements which aimed the training of employees. Second a testing environment, to compare and assess two different selection styles that were integrated in pSIVE and to allow different users to interact with an environment created with pSIVE to collect opinions about the system. The conclusions show that the overall satisfaction was high and the comments will be considered in further platform development.

  18. Ergonomics of virtual environments for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Spagnolli, Anna; Gamberini, Luciano; Cottone, Paolo; Mantovani, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Usability is defined by the International Standards Organization as "the effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction with which a certain user may achieve a specific objective in a particular environment" (ISO DIS 9241-11). This definition highlights the need for considering the specific destination of a certain technology and reflects the current trends in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). In compliance with these remarks, the evaluation will be described here of a Virtual Environment (VE) for the treatment of male sexual dysfunctions; the common assumption will be avoided according to which a VE is a space separated from its "real" surroundings [6, 7] and the full environment where the Virtual session takes place will be addressed instead. After a description of the conceptual framework adopted, the paper will dwell on one method among those deployed for the evaluation, namely the analysis of "situated actions". Four aspects will be dealt with: (a) the interplay of various concurrent settings during the virtual session; (b) the users' comprehension of the symbols used in the VE; (c) the structure of the relationship between users and guide; (d) the breakdowns during the human-VE interaction. The goals and the intended meanings of the simulation as set by the designers became the main parameters for the evaluation. PMID:15295153

  19. A Virtual Bioinformatics Knowledge Environment for Early Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crichton, Daniel; Srivastava, Sudhir; Johnsey, Donald

    2003-01-01

    Discovery of disease biomarkers for cancer is a leading focus of early detection. The National Cancer Institute created a network of collaborating institutions focused on the discovery and validation of cancer biomarkers called the Early Detection Research Network (EDRN). Informatics plays a key role in enabling a virtual knowledge environment that provides scientists real time access to distributed data sets located at research institutions across the nation. The distributed and heterogeneous nature of the collaboration makes data sharing across institutions very difficult. EDRN has developed a comprehensive informatics effort focused on developing a national infrastructure enabling seamless access, sharing and discovery of science data resources across all EDRN sites. This paper will discuss the EDRN knowledge system architecture, its objectives and its accomplishments.

  20. Virtual VMASC: A 3D Game Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manepalli, Suchitra; Shen, Yuzhong; Garcia, Hector M.; Lawsure, Kaleen

    2010-01-01

    The advantages of creating interactive 3D simulations that allow viewing, exploring, and interacting with land improvements, such as buildings, in digital form are manifold and range from allowing individuals from anywhere in the world to explore those virtual land improvements online, to training military personnel in dealing with war-time environments, and to making those land improvements available in virtual worlds such as Second Life. While we haven't fully explored the true potential of such simulations, we have identified a requirement within our organization to use simulations like those to replace our front-desk personnel and allow visitors to query, naVigate, and communicate virtually with various entities within the building. We implemented the Virtual VMASC 3D simulation of the Virginia Modeling Analysis and Simulation Center (VMASC) office building to not only meet our front-desk requirement but also to evaluate the effort required in designing such a simulation and, thereby, leverage the experience we gained in future projects of this kind. This paper describes the goals we set for our implementation, the software approach taken, the modeling contribution made, and the technologies used such as XNA Game Studio, .NET framework, Autodesk software packages, and, finally, the applicability of our implementation on a variety of architectures including Xbox 360 and PC. This paper also summarizes the result of our evaluation and the lessons learned from our effort.

  1. Building and Supporting Student Team Collaboration in the Virtual Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasler-Waters, Lisa; Napier, Wallace

    2002-01-01

    Provides information, strategies, and activities designed specifically to aid instructors and students in developing collaborative group processes that promote teamwork in an online environment. Outlines an instructional module that was developed and formatively tested with graduate students, and describes a workshop designed for faculty members…

  2. A Framework for Implementing Virtual Collaborative Networks - Case Study on Automobile Components Production Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvinnia, Elham; Khayami, Raouf; Ziarati, Koorush

    Virtual collaborative networks are composed of small companies which take most advantage from the market opportunity and are able to compete with large companies. So some frameworks have been introduced for implementing this type of collaboration; although none of them has been standardized completely. In this paper we specify some instances that need to be standardized for implementing virtual enterprises. Then, a framework is suggested for implementing virtual collaborative networks. Finally, based on that suggestion, as a case study, we design a virtual collaborative network in automobile components production industry.

  3. Framework solutions for complete collaborative environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Vance M.; Maddox, Derek

    2000-06-01

    Collaboration of experts from different domains within an enterprise has always posed logistical and knowledge management challenges to managers and members of the collaboration. Scheduling meetings, arranging travel, getting data and information into the right hands at the right time all require time, money and energy that could be better spent on product development. Advances in information technology have made it easier to communicate to solve, or at least mitigate, some of these problems using e-mail, audio conferencing, and database management software, but a great detail of human intervention is still required to make these collaborations operate smoothly. Over the past ten years enterprises have come to require more than just total asset visibility and human communication capabilities. To design and field products better, faster and cheaper more human creativity and energy must be focused on the products and less on the operation of the collaboration. The collaborative environment solutions of the future must not only provide the communication and knowledge management that exist today, but also provide seamless access to resources and information, product and process modeling and the advanced decision support that results from the availability of necessary resources and information.

  4. Tools and collaborative environments for bioinformatics research

    PubMed Central

    Giugno, Rosalba; Pulvirenti, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Advanced research requires intensive interaction among a multitude of actors, often possessing different expertise and usually working at a distance from each other. The field of collaborative research aims to establish suitable models and technologies to properly support these interactions. In this article, we first present the reasons for an interest of Bioinformatics in this context by also suggesting some research domains that could benefit from collaborative research. We then review the principles and some of the most relevant applications of social networking, with a special attention to networks supporting scientific collaboration, by also highlighting some critical issues, such as identification of users and standardization of formats. We then introduce some systems for collaborative document creation, including wiki systems and tools for ontology development, and review some of the most interesting biological wikis. We also review the principles of Collaborative Development Environments for software and show some examples in Bioinformatics. Finally, we present the principles and some examples of Learning Management Systems. In conclusion, we try to devise some of the goals to be achieved in the short term for the exploitation of these technologies. PMID:21984743

  5. Virtual environment application with partial gravity simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, David M.; Vanchau, Michael N.

    1994-01-01

    To support manned missions to the surface of Mars and missions requiring manipulation of payloads and locomotion in space, a training facility is required to simulate the conditions of both partial and microgravity. A partial gravity simulator (Pogo) which uses pneumatic suspension is being studied for use in virtual reality training. Pogo maintains a constant partial gravity simulation with a variation of simulated body force between 2.2 and 10 percent, depending on the type of locomotion inputs. this paper is based on the concept and application of a virtual environment system with Pogo including a head-mounted display and glove. The reality engine consists of a high end SGI workstation and PC's which drive Pogo's sensors and data acquisition hardware used for tracking and control. The tracking system is a hybrid of magnetic and optical trackers integrated for this application.

  6. Scripting human animations in a virtual environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Michael E.; Pandya, Abhilash K.; Maida, James C.

    1994-01-01

    The current deficiencies of virtual environment (VE) are well known: annoying lag time in drawing the current view, drastically simplified environments to reduce that time lag, low resolution and narrow field of view. Animation scripting is an application of VE technology which can be carried out successfully despite these deficiencies. The final product is a smoothly moving high resolution animation displaying detailed models. In this system, the user is represented by a human computer model with the same body proportions. Using magnetic tracking, the motions of the model's upper torso, head and arms are controlled by the user's movements (18 degrees of freedom). The model's lower torso and global position and orientation are controlled by a spaceball and keypad (12 degrees of freedom). Using this system human motion scripts can be extracted from the user's movements while immersed in a simplified virtual environment. Recorded data is used to define key frames; motion is interpolated between them and post processing adds a more detailed environment. The result is a considerable savings in time and a much more natural-looking movement of a human figure in a smooth and seamless animation.

  7. Distributed collaborative environments for predictive battlespace awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuay, William K.

    2003-09-01

    The past decade has produced significant changes in the conduct of military operations: asymmetric warfare, the reliance on dynamic coalitions, stringent rules of engagement, increased concern about collateral damage, and the need for sustained air operations. Mission commanders need to assimilate a tremendous amount of information, make quick-response decisions, and quantify the effects of those decisions in the face of uncertainty. Situational assessment is crucial in understanding the battlespace. Decision support tools in a distributed collaborative environment offer the capability of decomposing complex multitask processes and distributing them over a dynamic set of execution assets that include modeling, simulations, and analysis tools. Decision support technologies can semi-automate activities, such as analysis and planning, that have a reasonably well-defined process and provide machine-level interfaces to refine the myriad of information that the commander must fused. Collaborative environments provide the framework and integrate models, simulations, and domain specific decision support tools for the sharing and exchanging of data, information, knowledge, and actions. This paper describes ongoing AFRL research efforts in applying distributed collaborative environments to predictive battlespace awareness.

  8. Collaborative Science Learning in Three-Dimensional Immersive Virtual Worlds: Pre-Service Teachers' Experiences in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nussli, Natalie; Oh, Kevin; McCandless, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to help pre-service teachers experience and evaluate the potential of Second Life, a three-dimensional immersive virtual environment, for potential integration into their future teaching. By completing collaborative assignments in Second Life, nineteen pre-service general education teachers explored an…

  9. Collaborative Work Environment for Operational Conjunction Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, F.; Christy, S.

    Conjunction Messages (CM) provided by JSpOC are complete and valuable data to evaluate the level of risk of conjunctions, decide and choose avoidance actions. Nevertheless, conjunction assessment remains a difficult task which requires Middle Man between the CM provider (JSpOC) and Owner/Operators. Operational collision threat characterization is now an essential component of space mission operations. Most spacecraft operators have some sort of a process to evaluate and mitigate high-risk conjunction events. As the size of the space object catalog increases, satellite operators will be faced with more conjunction events to evaluate. Thus more sophisticated collision threat characterization and collision avoidance strategies must be implemented thought Middle Man entities. CAESAR (Conjunction Analysis and Evaluation Service, Alerts and Recommendations) is the French Middle Man. CAESAR relies on a collaborative work environment between all members of CAESAR team and its subscribers. For CAESAR, the collaborative work environment is based on JAC software and a dedicated secure webserver SpOD Space Operational Data. JAC software is not the Main Flight Dynamics (FD) software used by CAESAR team, but it is a light friendly CM dedicated software to be used on a laptop by on-call teams or support dialogue between Middle Man and FD teams. The dedicated secure webserver is a key element to share data and information between actors. This paper presents the main feedbacks from CAESAR team operational experience with regards to its collaborative work environment components: - JAC software which is not a classical Flight Dynamics software, its MMI is designed to be very quickly taken over (by teams not using it on daily basis) while also offering all the expertise levels required by the Middle Man team. JAC is used by CAESAR on-call team and all FD teams who subscribed to CAESAR. JAC is also distributed by CNES and therefore already used by some operational teams for Conjunction

  10. SHARED VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS FOR COLLECTIVE TRAINING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, R. Bowen

    2000-01-01

    Historically NASA has trained teams of astronauts by bringing them to the Johnson Space Center in Houston to undergo generic training, followed by mission-specific training. This latter training begins after a crew has been selected for a mission (perhaps two years before the launch of that mission). While some Space Shuttle flights have included an astronaut from a foreign country, the International Space Station will be consistently crewed by teams comprised of astronauts from two or more of the partner nations. The cost of training these international teams continues to grow in both monetary and personal terms. Thus, NASA has been seeking alternative training approaches for the International Space Station program. Since 1994 we have been developing, testing, and refining shared virtual environments for astronaut team training, including the use of virtual environments for use while in or in transit to the task location. In parallel with this effort, we have also been preparing applications for training teams of military personnel engaged in peacekeeping missions. This paper will describe the applications developed to date, some of the technological challenges that have been overcome in their development, and the research performed to guide the development and to measure the efficacy of these shared environments as training tools.

  11. Virtual environments for nuclear power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.; Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; King, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    In the design and operation of nuclear power plants, the visualization process inherent in virtual environments (VE) allows for abstract design concepts to be made concrete and simulated without using a physical mock-up. This helps reduce the time and effort required to design and understand the system, thus providing the design team with a less complicated arrangement. Also, the outcome of human interactions with the components and system can be minimized through various testing of scenarios in real-time without the threat of injury to the user or damage to the equipment. If implemented, this will lead to a minimal total design and construction effort for nuclear power plants (NPP).

  12. Use of a virtual environment to facilitate instruction of an interprofessional home assessment.

    PubMed

    Sabus, Carla; Sabata, Dory; Antonacci, David

    2011-01-01

    Technology has become a ubiquitous part of our society and is largely embedded in today's educational system. 3D virtual reality technology can be used to simulate environments and activities and may be used as an instructional technology. The purpose of this research was to better understand the utility of a web-based virtual environment as a teaching tool to represent clinical assessment and interventions in the home environment. Specifically, students' learning outcomes related to interprofessional collaboration, patient-centered decision-making, and appreciation of the environmental and social context of functional mobility and occupational performance will be described through descriptive analysis. Thirty-four physical therapist students and 35 occupational therapist students participated in an instructor-guided virtual assessment of a client's function in a home environment utilizing a virtual environment, Second Life®. Teams formulated task-specific, functional client goals and home modification recommendations. Students revisited a solution virtual environment to view and evaluate recommendations in a follow-up instructor-guided tour. Students completed a web-based survey capturing student perception of the experience. Team assignments were analyzed based on a rubric representing learning objectives. Descriptive analysis was conducted on the survey. Assignment analysis revealed contextual and client-centered recommendations. Student surveys revealed that students found the virtual environment supportive of learning. Student surveys and reflection statements were supportive of the interprofessional collaboration. Use of a virtual environment in instruction allows an authentic means of representing interprofessional home assessment. The virtual environment allowed a temporal depiction of home environment issues and solutions providing the unique opportunity for students to evaluate home recommendations.

  13. Learn to Use and Use to Learn: Technology in Virtual Collaboration Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpova, Elena; Correia, Ana-Paula; Baran, Evrim

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how global learning teams utilized technology in a virtual collaboration to solve complex problems. The study offers an in-depth explanation of why and how the learning teams used technology to support computer-mediated communication. A model of technology application at different stages of virtual collaborative process is…

  14. Factors Influencing the Acceptance of Collaboration Technology within the Context of Virtual Teamwork Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godin, Joy J.; Leader, Lars F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the factors that influence electronic collaboration technology acceptance and predicted usage for virtual team collaboration projects in higher education courses. The research combined the unified theory of acceptance and usage of technology (UTAUT) with a virtual team-training model. All 108 participants…

  15. Evaluation of navigation interfaces in virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestre, Daniel R.

    2014-02-01

    When users are immersed in cave-like virtual reality systems, navigational interfaces have to be used when the size of the virtual environment becomes larger than the physical extent of the cave floor. However, using navigation interfaces, physically static users experience self-motion (visually-induced vection). As a consequence, sensorial incoherence between vision (indicating self-motion) and other proprioceptive inputs (indicating immobility) can make them feel dizzy and disoriented. We tested, in two experimental studies, different locomotion interfaces. The objective was twofold: testing spatial learning and cybersickness. In a first experiment, using first-person navigation with a flystick ®, we tested the effect of sensorial aids, a spatialized sound or guiding arrows on the ground, attracting the user toward the goal of the navigation task. Results revealed that sensorial aids tended to impact negatively spatial learning. Moreover, subjects reported significant levels of cybersickness. In a second experiment, we tested whether such negative effects could be due to poorly controlled rotational motion during simulated self-motion. Subjects used a gamepad, in which rotational and translational displacements were independently controlled by two joysticks. Furthermore, we tested first- versus third-person navigation. No significant difference was observed between these two conditions. Overall, cybersickness tended to be lower, as compared to experiment 1, but the difference was not significant. Future research should evaluate further the hypothesis of the role of passively perceived optical flow in cybersickness, but manipulating the virtual environment'sperrot structure. It also seems that video-gaming experience might be involved in the user's sensitivity to cybersickness.

  16. Cloudspace: virtual environments in the VO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, M. J.; Williams, R. D.

    2008-08-01

    The grid community is moving towards providing on-demand computing in the form of virtual workspaces - abstracted execution environments that are dynamically made available to authorized clients. In part this is a reaction to market forces represented by such commercial initiatives as Amazon EC2 and in part a solution to hot service deployment. One danger, though, is that a multiplicity of implementations will lead to a lack of interoperability. Such a concern in the VO regarding distributed data storage led to the development of VOSpace, a lightweight abstraction layer that sits on top of existing storage solutions such as SRB. In this paper, we introduce Cloudspace, a resource-oriented extension of VOSpace, that incorporates UWS, the VO pattern for managing asynchronous services, to form a natural habitat for virtual environments in the VO. A notable feature of the Cloudspace concept is that distributed data and computing can be managed seamlessly through a single mechanism thus making the astronomer's life easier as we move into a new era of sophisticated computational astronomy.

  17. Learning through Place-Making: Virtual Environments and Future Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Maryanne Susan

    2010-01-01

    This study examines a project through which elementary school and high school students collaborated with university Architecture/New Media students in building models of virtual, immersive libraries. It presents the project in the context of multiple and cross-disciplinary fields currently investigating the use of virtual and immersive…

  18. Automated Knowledge Annotation for Dynamic Collaborative Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Marshall, Eric J.; McGrath, Liam R.

    2009-05-19

    This paper describes the Knowledge Encapsulation Framework (KEF), a suite of tools to enable automated knowledge annotation for modeling and simulation projects. This framework can be used to capture evidence (e.g., facts extracted from journal articles and government reports), discover new evidence (from similar peer-reviewed material as well as social media), enable discussions surrounding domain-specific topics and provide automatically generated semantic annotations for improved corpus investigation. The current KEF implementation is presented within a wiki environment, providing a simple but powerful collaborative space for team members to review, annotate, discuss and align evidence with their modeling frameworks.

  19. Race in virtual environments: competitive versus cooperative games with black or white avatars.

    PubMed

    Vang, Mao H; Fox, Jesse

    2014-04-01

    Often, virtual environments and video games have established goals, and to achieve them, users must either compete or cooperate with others. The common ingroup identity model predicts that individuals maintain multiple identities at any given time based on roles, demographics, and contextual factors, and that they interpret others based on similarity (i.e., perceived ingroup) or dissimilarity (i.e., perceived outgroup) to these identities. In this experiment, we manipulated two aspects of a virtual partner's identity-race and task collaboration-to determine how users would perceive others in a virtual world. White participants (N=99) played an anagram game competitively (outgroup) or cooperatively (ingroup) in a virtual environment with a black (outgroup) or white (ingroup) virtual partner. Contrary to hypotheses, performing either task led to more positive evaluations of black avatars than white avatars.

  20. Next Generation Integrated Environment for Collaborative Work Across Internets

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey B. Newman

    2009-02-24

    We are now well-advanced in our development, prototyping and deployment of a high performance next generation Integrated Environment for Collaborative Work. The system, aimed at using the capability of ESnet and Internet2 for rapid data exchange, is based on the Virtual Room Videoconferencing System (VRVS) developed by Caltech. The VRVS system has been chosen by the Internet2 Digital Video (I2-DV) Initiative as a preferred foundation for the development of advanced video, audio and multimedia collaborative applications by the Internet2 community. Today, the system supports high-end, broadcast-quality interactivity, while enabling a wide variety of clients (Mbone, H.323) to participate in the same conference by running different standard protocols in different contexts with different bandwidth connection limitations, has a fully Web-integrated user interface, developers and administrative APIs, a widely scalable video network topology based on both multicast domains and unicast tunnels, and demonstrated multiplatform support. This has led to its rapidly expanding production use for national and international scientific collaborations in more than 60 countries. We are also in the process of creating a 'testbed video network' and developing the necessary middleware to support a set of new and essential requirements for rapid data exchange, and a high level of interactivity in large-scale scientific collaborations. These include a set of tunable, scalable differentiated network services adapted to each of the data streams associated with a large number of collaborative sessions, policy-based and network state-based resource scheduling, authentication, and optional encryption to maintain confidentiality of inter-personal communications. High performance testbed video networks will be established in ESnet and Internet2 to test and tune the implementation, using a few target application-sets.

  1. Tracing the Change in Discourse in a Collaborative Dynamic Geometry Environment: From Visual to More Mathematical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oner, Diler

    2016-01-01

    This case study investigated the development of group cognition by tracing the change in mathematical discourse of a team of three middle-school students as they worked on a construction problem within a virtual collaborative dynamic geometry environment. Sfard's commognitive framework was employed to examine how the student team's word choice,…

  2. Using a Virtual Learning Environment to Manage Group Projects: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Yvonne; Marcus-Quinn, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) are increasingly used by Higher Education Institutions to manage and enhance teaching and learning, and research. Discussion, chat, scheduling, and other collaboration tools make VLEs especially useful systems for designing and managing complex group projects. In the spring semester of 2006, students at the…

  3. Navigating Massively Multiplayer Online Games: Evaluating 21st Century Skills for Learning within Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCreery, Michael P.; Schrader, P. G.; Krach, S. Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    There is a substantial and growing interest in immersive virtual spaces as contexts for 21st century skills like problem solving, communication, and collaboration. However, little consideration has been given to the ways in which users become proficient in these environments or what types of target behaviors are associated with 21st century…

  4. SciEthics Interactive: Science and Ethics Learning in a Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadolny, Larysa; Woolfrey, Joan; Pierlott, Matthew; Kahn, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Learning in immersive 3D environments allows students to collaborate, build, and interact with difficult course concepts. This case study examines the design and development of the TransGen Island within the SciEthics Interactive project, a National Science Foundation-funded, 3D virtual world emphasizing learning science content in the context of…

  5. The Global Classroom Project: Learning a Second Language in a Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knutzen, Brant; Kennedy, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the progress of a pilot project exploring the integration of a collaborative virtual learning environment (Second Life) with the instruction of English courses at Lingnan University in Hong Kong. An educational partnership was developed with two TESOL teacher-training courses at Texas A&M University in the US. The project…

  6. The Virtual Company: Toward a Self-Directed, Competence-Based Learning Environment in Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westera, Wim; Sloep, Peter B.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the concept of a Virtual Company--a collaborative, distributed learning environment built on the notions of competence-based, constructivist, open learning, and distance education. It features an authentic, role-playing game that is strongly modeled upon the functional structures of real-life companies. Outlines the set-up of a Virtual…

  7. EVEREST: a virtual research environment for the Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaves, H. M.; Marelli, F.; Albani, M.

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing requirement for researchers to work collaboratively using common resources whilst being geographically dispersed. By creating a virtual research environment (VRE) using a service oriented architecture (SOA) tailored to the needs of Earth Science (ES) communities, the EVEREST project will provide a range of both generic and domain specific data management services to support a dynamic approach to collaborative research. EVER-EST will provide the means to overcome existing barriers to sharing of Earth Science data and information allowing research teams to discover, access, share and process heterogeneous data, algorithms, results and experiences within and across their communities, including those domains beyond Earth Science. Data providers will be also able to monitor user experiences and collect feedback through the VRE, improving their capacity to adapt to the changing requirements of their end-users. The EVER-EST e-infrastructure will be validated by four virtual research communities (VRC) covering different multidisciplinary ES domains: including ocean monitoring, selected natural hazards (flooding, ground instability and extreme weather events), land monitoring and risk management (volcanoes and seismicity). Each of the VRC represents a different collaborative use case for the VRE according to its own specific requirements for data, software, best practice and community engagement. The diverse use cases will demonstrate how the VRE can be used for a range of activities from straight forward data/software sharing to investigating ways to improve cooperative working. Development of the EVEREST VRE will leverage on the results of several previous projects which have produced state-of-the-art technologies for scientific data management and curation as well those initiatives which have developed models, techniques and tools for the preservation of scientific methods and their implementation in computational forms such as scientific workflows.

  8. Virtuality and efficiency - overcoming past antinomy in the remote collaboration experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Joao; Bjorkli, Knut; Clavo, David Martin; Baron, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Several recent initiatives have been put in place by the CERN IT Department to improve the user experience in remote dispersed meetings and remote collaboration at large in the LHC communities worldwide. We will present an analysis of the factors which were historically limiting the efficiency of remote dispersed meetings and describe the consequent actions which were undertaken at CERN to overcome these limitations. After giving a status update of the different equipment available at CERN to enable the virtual sessions and the various collaborative tools which are currently proposed to users, we will focus on the evolution of this market: how can the new technological trends (among others, HD videoconferencing, Telepresence, Unified Communications, etc.) impact positively the user experience and how to attain the best usage of them. Finally, by projecting ourselves in the future, we will give some hints as to how to answer the difficult question of selecting the next generation of collaborative tools: which set of tools among the various offers (systems like Vidyo H264 SVC, next generation EVO, Groupware offers, standard H323 systems, etc.) is best suited for our environment and how to unify this set for the common user. This will finally allow us to definitively overcome the past antinomy between virtuality and efficiency.

  9. Mobile Virtual Environments in Pervasive Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazem, Shaimaa; Abdel-Hamid, Ayman; Gračanin, Denis; Adams, Kevin P.

    Recently, human computer interaction has shifted from traditional desktop computing to the pervasive computing paradigm where users are engaged with everywhere and anytime computing devices. Mobile virtual environments (MVEs) are an emerging research area that studies the deployment of virtual reality applications on mobile devices. MVEs present additional challenges to application developers due to the restricted resources of the mobile devices, in addition to issues that are specific to wireless computing, such as limited bandwidth, high error rate and handoff intervals. Moreover, adaptive resource allocation is a key issue in MVEs where user interactions affect system resources, which, in turn, affects the user’s experience. Such interplay between the user and the system can be modelled using game theory. This chapter presents MVEs as a real-time interactive distributed system, and investigates the challenges in designing and developing a remote rendering prefetching application for mobile devices. Furthermore, we introduce game theory as a tool for modelling decision-making in MVEs by describing a game between the remote rendering server and the mobile client.

  10. Locating Elementary Teachers' Professional Communities in a Structured Collaboration Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Szu Yang

    2016-01-01

    As teacher collaboration becomes an increasingly common goal in school organization, teachers' experiences and perspectives in a Structured Collaboration Environment remain under-examined. This qualitative case study explored how teachers participated in collaborative work, the outcomes of collaboration, and supports and obstacles to productive…

  11. Knowledge Sharing in Virtual Teams: The Impact on Trust, Collaboration, and Team Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsharo, Mohammad K.

    2013-01-01

    Virtual teams are utilized by organizations to gather experts to collaborate online in order to accomplish organizational tasks. However, the characteristics of these teams create challenges to effective collaboration and effective team outcome. Collaboration is an essential component of teamwork, the notion of forming teams in organizations is…

  12. Olfactory Stimuli Increase Presence in Virtual Environments

    PubMed Central

    Munyan, Benson G.; Neer, Sandra M.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Jentsch, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Exposure therapy (EXP) is the most empirically supported treatment for anxiety and trauma-related disorders. EXP consists of repeated exposure to a feared object or situation in the absence of the feared outcome in order to extinguish associated anxiety. Key to the success of EXP is the need to present the feared object/event/situation in as much detail and utilizing as many sensory modalities as possible, in order to augment the sense of presence during exposure sessions. Various technologies used to augment the exposure therapy process by presenting multi-sensory cues (e.g., sights, smells, sounds). Studies have shown that scents can elicit emotionally charged memories, but no prior research has examined the effect of olfactory stimuli upon the patient’s sense of presence during simulated exposure tasks. Methods 60 adult participants navigated a mildly anxiety-producing virtual environment (VE) similar to those used in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Participants had no autobiographical memory associated with the VE. State anxiety, Presence ratings, and electrodermal (EDA) activity were collected throughout the experiment. Results Utilizing a Bonferroni corrected Linear Mixed Model, our results showed statistically significant relationships between olfactory stimuli and presence as assessed by both the Igroup Presence Questionnaire (IPQ: R2 = 0.85, (F(3,52) = 6.625, p = 0.0007) and a single item visual-analogue scale (R2 = 0.85, (F(3,52) = 5.382, p = 0.0027). State anxiety was unaffected by the presence or absence of olfactory cues. EDA was unaffected by experimental condition. Conclusion Olfactory stimuli increase presence in virtual environments that approximate those typical in exposure therapy, but did not increase EDA. Additionally, once administered, the removal of scents resulted in a disproportionate decrease in presence. Implications for incorporating the use of scents to increase the efficacy of exposure therapy is discussed. PMID

  13. Dynamic shared state maintenance in distributed virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza-Lup, Felix George

    Advances in computer networks and rendering systems facilitate the creation of distributed collaborative environments in which the distribution of information at remote locations allows efficient communication. Particularly challenging are distributed interactive Virtual Environments (VE) that allow knowledge sharing through 3D information. The purpose of this work is to address the problem of latency in distributed interactive VE and to develop a conceptual model for consistency maintenance in these environments based on the participant interaction model. An area that needs to be explored is the relationship between the dynamic shared state and the interaction with the virtual entities present in the shared scene. Mixed Reality (MR) and VR environments must bring the human participant interaction into the loop through a wide range of electronic motion sensors, and haptic devices. Part of the work presented here defines a novel criterion for categorization of distributed interactive VE and introduces, as well as analyzes, an adaptive synchronization algorithm for consistency maintenance in such environments. As part of the work, a distributed interactive Augmented Reality (AR) testbed and the algorithm implementation details are presented. Currently the testbed is part of several research efforts at the Optical Diagnostics and Applications Laboratory including 3D visualization applications using custom built head-mounted displays (HMDs) with optical motion tracking and a medical training prototype for endotracheal intubation and medical prognostics. An objective method using quaternion calculus is applied for the algorithm assessment. In spite of significant network latency, results show that the dynamic shared state can be maintained consistent at multiple remotely located sites. In further consideration of the latency problems and in the light of the current trends in interactive distributed VE applications, we propose a hybrid distributed system architecture for

  14. MICE: a mouse imaging collaboration environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanski, Jacek; Flask, Chris; Wilson, David; Johnson, David; Muzic, Raymond F., Jr.; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2006-03-01

    With the ever-increasing complexity of science and engineering, many important research problems are being addressed by collaborative, multidisciplinary teams. We present a web-based collaborative environment for small animal imaging research, called the Mouse Imaging Collaboration Environment (MICE). MICE provides an effective and user-friendly tool for managing and sharing of the terabytes of high-resolution and high-dimension image data generated at small animal imaging core facilities. We describe the design of MICE and our experience in the implementation and deployment of a beta-version baseline-MICE. The baseline-MICE provides an integrated solution from image data acquisition to end-user access and long-term data storage at our UH/Case Small Animal Imaging Resource Center. As image data is acquired from scanners, it is pushed to the MICE server which automatically stores it in a directory structure according to its DICOM metadata. The directory structure reflects imaging modality, principle investigators, animal models, scanning dates and study details. Registered end-users access this imaging data through an authenticated web-interface. Thumbnail images are created by custom scripts running on the MICE server while data down-loading is achieved through standard web-browser ftp. MICE provides a security infrastructure that manages user roles, their access privileges such as read/write, and the right to modify the access privileges. Additional data security measures include a two server paradigm with the Web access server residing outside a network firewall to provide access through the Internet, and the imaging data server - a large RAID storage system supporting flexible backup policies - residing behind the protected firewall with a dedicated link to the Web access server. Direct network link to the RAID storage system outside the firewall other than this dedicated link is not permitted. Establishing the initial image directory structure and letting the

  15. A Collaborative Decision Environment for UAV Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Ortenzio, Matthew V.; Enomoto, Francis Y.; Johan, Sandra L.

    2005-01-01

    NASA is developing Intelligent Mission Management (IMM) technology for science missions employing long endurance unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV's). The IMM groundbased component is the Collaborative Decision Environment (CDE), a ground system that provides the Mission/Science team with situational awareness, collaboration, and decisionmaking tools. The CDE is used for pre-flight planning, mission monitoring, and visualization of acquired data. It integrates external data products used for planning and executing a mission, such as weather, satellite data products, and topographic maps by leveraging established and emerging Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards to acquire external data products via the Internet, and an industry standard geographic information system (GIs) toolkit for visualization As a Science/Mission team may be geographically dispersed, the CDE is capable of providing access to remote users across wide area networks using Web Services technology. A prototype CDE is being developed for an instrument checkout flight on a manned aircraft in the fall of 2005, in preparation for a full deployment in support of the US Forest Service and NASA Ames Western States Fire Mission in 2006.

  16. Developing an Advanced Environment for Collaborative Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becerra-Fernandez, Irma; Stewart, Helen; DelAlto, Martha; DelAlto, Martha; Knight, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge management in general tries to organize and make available important know-how, whenever and where ever is needed. Today, organizations rely on decision-makers to produce "mission critical" decisions that am based on inputs from multiple domains. The ideal decision-maker has a profound understanding of specific domains that influence the decision-making process coupled with the experience that allows them to act quickly and decisively on the information. In addition, learning companies benefit by not repeating costly mistakes, and by reducing time-to-market in Research & Development projects. Group-decision making tools can help companies make better decisions by capturing the knowledge from groups of experts. Furthermore, companies that capture their customers preferences can improve their customer service, which translates to larger profits. Therefore collaborative computing provides a common communication space, improves sharing of knowledge, provides a mechanism for real-time feedback on the tasks being performed, helps to optimize processes, and results in a centralized knowledge warehouse. This paper presents the research directions. of a project which seeks to augment an advanced collaborative web-based environment called Postdoc, with workflow capabilities. Postdoc is a "government-off-the-shelf" document management software developed at NASA-Ames Research Center (ARC).

  17. Development of Virtual Geographic Environments and Geography Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fengru; Lin, Hui; Chen, Bin

    Geographic environment is a combination of natural and cultural environments under which humans survive. Virtual Geographic Environment (VGE) is a new multi-disciplinary initiative that links geosciences, geographic information sciences and information technologies. A VGE is a virtual representation of the natural world that enables a person to explore and interact with vast amounts of natural and cultural information on the physical and cultural environment in cyberspace. Virtual Geography and Experimental Geography are the two closest fields that associate with the development of VGE from the perspective of geography. This paper discusses the background of VGE, introduces its research progress, and addresses key issues of VGE research and the significance for geography research from Experimental Geography and Virtual Geography. VGE can be an extended research object for the research of Virtual Geography and enrich the contents of future geography, while VGE can also be an extended research method for Experimental Geography that geographers can operate virtual geographic experiments based on VGE platforms.

  18. Secured Advanced Federated Environment (SAFE): A NASA Solution for Secure Cross-Organization Collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Edward; Spence, Matthew Chew; Pell, Barney; Stewart, Helen; Korsmeyer, David; Liu, Joseph; Chang, Hsin-Ping; Viernes, Conan; Gogorth, Andre

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges and security issues inherent in building complex cross-organizational collaborative projects and software systems within NASA. By applying the design principles of compartmentalization, organizational hierarchy and inter-organizational federation, the Secured Advanced Federated Environment (SAFE) is laying the foundation for a collaborative virtual infrastructure for the NASA community. A key element of SAFE is the Micro Security Domain (MSD) concept, which balances the need to collaborate and the need to enforce enterprise and local security rules. With the SAFE approach, security is an integral component of enterprise software and network design, not an afterthought.

  19. Affordable virtual environments: building a virtual beach for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Sherstyuk, Andrei; Aschwanden, Christoph; Saiki, Stanley

    2005-01-01

    Virtual Reality has been used for clinical application for about 10 years and has proved to be an effective tool for treating various disorders. In this paper, we want to share our experience in building a 3D, motion tracked, immersive VR system for pain treatment and biofeedback research. PMID:15718779

  20. Virtual Environments Supporting Learning and Communication in Special Needs Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Sue V. G.

    2007-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) describes a set of technologies that allow users to explore and experience 3-dimensional computer-generated "worlds" or "environments." These virtual environments can contain representations of real or imaginary objects on a small or large scale (from modeling of molecular structures to buildings, streets, and scenery of a…

  1. Design Characteristics of Virtual Learning Environments: State of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Daniel; Strohmeier, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Virtual learning environments constitute current information systems' category for electronically supported training and development in (higher) education(al) and vocational training settings. Frequently expected advantages of using virtual learning environments refer, for instance, to the efficiency, individuality, ubiquity, timeliness and…

  2. Virtual Learning Environment for Interactive Engagement with Advanced Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Mads Kock; Skyum, Birk; Heck, Robert; Müller, Romain; Bason, Mark; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-01-01

    A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment "StudentResearcher," which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum…

  3. Full Immersive Virtual Environment Cave[TM] in Chemistry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limniou, M.; Roberts, D.; Papadopoulos, N.

    2008-01-01

    By comparing two-dimensional (2D) chemical animations designed for computer's desktop with three-dimensional (3D) chemical animations designed for the full immersive virtual reality environment CAVE[TM] we studied how virtual reality environments could raise student's interest and motivation for learning. By using the 3ds max[TM], we can visualize…

  4. Internet-based distributed collaborative environment for engineering education and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiuli

    2001-07-01

    This research investigates the use of the Internet for engineering education, design, and analysis through the presentation of a Virtual City environment. The main focus of this research was to provide an infrastructure for engineering education, test the concept of distributed collaborative design and analysis, develop and implement the Virtual City environment, and assess the environment's effectiveness in the real world. A three-tier architecture was adopted in the development of the prototype, which contains an online database server, a Web server as well as multi-user servers, and client browsers. The environment is composed of five components, a 3D virtual world, multiple Internet-based multimedia modules, an online database, a collaborative geometric modeling module, and a collaborative analysis module. The environment was designed using multiple Intenet-based technologies, such as Shockwave, Java, Java 3D, VRML, Perl, ASP, SQL, and a database. These various technologies together formed the basis of the environment and were programmed to communicate smoothly with each other. Three assessments were conducted over a period of three semesters. The Virtual City is open to the public at www.vcity.ou.edu. The online database was designed to manage the changeable data related to the environment. The virtual world was used to implement 3D visualization and tie the multimedia modules together. Students are allowed to build segments of the 3D virtual world upon completion of appropriate undergraduate courses in civil engineering. The end result is a complete virtual world that contains designs from all of their coursework and is viewable on the Internet. The environment is a content-rich educational system, which can be used to teach multiple engineering topics with the help of 3D visualization, animations, and simulations. The concept of collaborative design and analysis using the Internet was investigated and implemented. Geographically dispersed users can build the

  5. Virtual Virtuosos: A Case Study in Learning Music in Virtual Learning Environments in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberich-Artal, Enric; Sangra, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the development of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) has contributed to the generation of a number of interesting initiatives in the field of music education and training in virtual learning environments. However, music education initiatives employing virtual learning environments have replicated and perpetuated the…

  6. Spatial updating in superimposed real and virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoang Irene; Wang, Ranxiao Frances; Crowell, James A

    2009-01-01

    Wang (2004) showed that people do not always simultaneously update their relationships to real and imagined environments in a dual-environment situation. Employing the same paradigm, we examined whether spatial updating operates on virtual reality as it does on a real or fictitious environment. Participants learned target locations in a real room and a virtual kitchen. Then they turned to face targets either in the room or in the kitchen, while blindfolded, and pointed to the targets before and after turning. Participants kept track of their orientation in both environments equally efficiently, regardless of explicit instructions. In contrast, when the real environment was described verbally but not directly perceived, participants automatically updated the virtual kitchen but not the room. These results suggest that people automatically update a virtual environment as they do a real one when the two environments are superimposed. The automaticity of spatial updating is discussed.

  7. Multimedia virtualized environment for shoulder pain rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Chen

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] Researchers imported games and virtual reality training to help participants train their shoulders in a relaxed environment. [Subjects and Methods] This study included the use of Kinect somatosensory device with Unity software to develop 3-dimensional situational games. The data collected from this training process can be uploaded via the Internet to a cloud or server for participants to perform self-inspection. The data can be a reference for the medical staff to assess training effectiveness for those with impairments and plan patient rehabilitation courses. [Results] In the training activities, 8 subjects with normal shoulder function demonstrated that the system has good stability and reproducibility. Six subjects with impaired shoulder underwent 6 weeks of training. During the third week of training, average performance stabilized. The t-test comparing 1-2 weeks to 3-4 weeks and 5-6 weeks showed significant differences. [Conclusion] Using games as training methods improved patient concentration, interest in participation and allowed patients to forget about their body discomfort. The equipment utilized in this study is inexpensive, easy to obtain, and the system is easy to install. People can perform simple self-training both at home or in the office. PMID:27190481

  8. Pictorial communication in virtual and real environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Papers about the communication between human users and machines in real and synthetic environments are presented. Individual topics addressed include: pictorial communication, distortions in memory for visual displays, cartography and map displays, efficiency of graphical perception, volumetric visualization of 3D data, spatial displays to increase pilot situational awareness, teleoperation of land vehicles, computer graphics system for visualizing spacecraft in orbit, visual display aid for orbital maneuvering, multiaxis control in telemanipulation and vehicle guidance, visual enhancements in pick-and-place tasks, target axis effects under transformed visual-motor mappings, adapting to variable prismatic displacement. Also discussed are: spatial vision within egocentric and exocentric frames of reference, sensory conflict in motion sickness, interactions of form and orientation, perception of geometrical structure from congruence, prediction of three-dimensionality across continuous surfaces, effects of viewpoint in the virtual space of pictures, visual slant underestimation, spatial constraints of stereopsis in video displays, stereoscopic stance perception, paradoxical monocular stereopsis and perspective vergence. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  9. Engineering virtual-environment-based training simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jense, Hans; Kuijper, Frido

    1998-04-01

    While the potential of Virtual Environments (VE's) for training simulators has been recognized right from the start of the emergence of the technology, to date most VE systems that claim to be training simulators have been developed in an adhoc fashion. Based on requirements of the Royal Netherlands Army and Air Force, we have recently developed VE based training simulators following basic systems engineering practice. This paper reports on our approach in general, and specifically focuses on two examples. The first is a distributed VE system for training Forward Air Controllers (FAC's). This system comprises an immersive VE for the FAC trainee, as well as a number of other components, all interconnected in a network infrastructure utilizing the DIS/HLA standard protocols for distributed simulation. The prototype VE FAC simulator is currently being used in the training program of the Netherlands Integrated Air/Ground Operations School. Feedback from the users is being collected as input for a follow-on development activity. A second development is aimed at the evaluation of VE technology for training gunnery procedures with the Stinger man-portable air-defense system. In this project, a system is being developed that enables us to evaluate a number of different configurations with respect to both human and systems performance characteristics.

  10. Site remediation in a virtual environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, W.; Jacobsen, J.; Holland, P.

    1994-01-01

    We describe the process used in combining an existing computer simulation with both Virtual Reality (VR) input and output devices, and conventional visualization tools, so as to make the simulation easier to use and the results easier to understand. VR input technology facilitates direct user manipulation of three dimensional simulation parameters. Commercially available visualization tools provide a flexible environment for representing abstract scientific data. VR output technology provides a more flexible and convincing way to view the visualization results than is afforded in contemporary visualization software. The desired goal of this process is a prototype system that minimizes man-machine interface barriers, as well as enhanced control over the simulation itself, so as to maximize the use of scientific judgement and intuition. In environmental remediation, the goal is to clean up contaminants either by removing them or rendering them non-toxic. A computer model simulates water or chemical flooding to mobilize and extract hydrocarbon contaminants from a volume of saturated soil/rock. Several wells are drilled in the vicinity of the contaminant, water and/or chemicals are injected into some of the wells, and fluid containing the mobilized hydrocarbons is pumped out of the remaining wells. The user is tasked with finding well locations and pumping rates that maximize recovery of the contaminants while minimizing drilling and pumping costs to clean up the site of interest.

  11. Emergency Response Virtual Environment for Safe Schools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasfy, Ayman; Walker, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    An intelligent emergency response virtual environment (ERVE) that provides emergency first responders, response planners, and managers with situational awareness as well as training and support for safe schools is presented. ERVE incorporates an intelligent agent facility for guiding and assisting the user in the context of the emergency response operations. Response information folders capture key information about the school. The system enables interactive 3D visualization of schools and academic campuses, including the terrain and the buildings' exteriors and interiors in an easy to use Web..based interface. ERVE incorporates live camera and sensors feeds and can be integrated with other simulations such as chemical plume simulation. The system is integrated with a Geographical Information System (GIS) to enable situational awareness of emergency events and assessment of their effect on schools in a geographic area. ERVE can also be integrated with emergency text messaging notification systems. Using ERVE, it is now possible to address safe schools' emergency management needs with a scaleable, seamlessly integrated and fully interactive intelligent and visually compelling solution.

  12. Multimedia virtualized environment for shoulder pain rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Chen

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Researchers imported games and virtual reality training to help participants train their shoulders in a relaxed environment. [Subjects and Methods] This study included the use of Kinect somatosensory device with Unity software to develop 3-dimensional situational games. The data collected from this training process can be uploaded via the Internet to a cloud or server for participants to perform self-inspection. The data can be a reference for the medical staff to assess training effectiveness for those with impairments and plan patient rehabilitation courses. [Results] In the training activities, 8 subjects with normal shoulder function demonstrated that the system has good stability and reproducibility. Six subjects with impaired shoulder underwent 6 weeks of training. During the third week of training, average performance stabilized. The t-test comparing 1–2 weeks to 3–4 weeks and 5–6 weeks showed significant differences. [Conclusion] Using games as training methods improved patient concentration, interest in participation and allowed patients to forget about their body discomfort. The equipment utilized in this study is inexpensive, easy to obtain, and the system is easy to install. People can perform simple self-training both at home or in the office. PMID:27190481

  13. Studying chemical reactivity in a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Haag, Moritz P; Reiher, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Chemical reactivity of a set of reactants is determined by its potential (electronic) energy (hyper)surface. The high dimensionality of this surface renders it difficult to efficiently explore reactivity in a large reactive system. Exhaustive sampling techniques and search algorithms are not straightforward to employ as it is not clear which explored path will eventually produce the minimum energy path of a reaction passing through a transition structure. Here, the chemist's intuition would be of invaluable help, but it cannot be easily exploited because (1) no intuitive and direct tool for the scientist to manipulate molecular structures is currently available and because (2) quantum chemical calculations are inherently expensive in terms of computational effort. In this work, we elaborate on how the chemist can be reintroduced into the exploratory process within a virtual environment that provides immediate feedback and intuitive tools to manipulate a reactive system. We work out in detail how this immersion should take place. We provide an analysis of modern semi-empirical methods which already today are candidates for the interactive study of chemical reactivity. Implications of manual structure manipulations for their physical meaning and chemical relevance are carefully analysed in order to provide sound theoretical foundations for the interpretation of the interactive reactivity exploration. PMID:25340884

  14. Virtual Collaboration Readiness Measurement a Case Study in the Automobile Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziarati, Koorush; Khayami, Raouf; Parvinnia, Elham; Afroozi Milani, Ghazal

    In end of the last century information and communication technology caused a veritable evolution in the world of business and commerce. Globalization has changed all the commerce equations and business plans. Old companies have to change their strategies if they want to survive after this technological revolution. A new form of collaboration between the distributed and networked organizations has emerged as the "Virtual Organization" paradigm. A company can not join a virtual organization before obtaining a virtual maturity. This maturity shows the readiness of the company to begin a virtual collaboration. In this paper, based on the coherent and formal definition of virtual organizations, the criteria for measuring the readiness of companies are proposed. Our criteria are confirmed, modified or combined by using the factor analysis method on a sufficient number of virtual companies in the automobile manufacturing industry.

  15. Considerations for Designing Instructional Virtual Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennen, Vanessa Paz; Branch, Robert C.

    Virtual reality is an immersive, interactive medium that manipulates the senses in order provide users with simulated experiences in computer-generated worlds. The visual design of virtual reality is an important issue, but literature has tended to stress the medium's instructional potential rather than setting forth a protocol for designing…

  16. Virtual Reality: A New Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrington, Gary; Loge, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    Discusses virtual reality (VR) technology and its possible uses in military training, medical education, industrial design and development, the media industry, and education. Three primary applications of VR in the learning process--visualization, simulation, and construction of virtual worlds--are described, and pedagogical and moral issues are…

  17. Does Gender Matter? Collaborative Learning in a Virtual Corporate Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomcsik, Rachel E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how gender identity construction in virtuality and actuality affect collaborative learning in a corporate community of practice. As part of a virtual ethnographic design, participants were employees from a major American corporation who were interested specifically in social networking applications. The…

  18. Establishing a virtual learning environment: a nursing experience.

    PubMed

    Wood, Anya; McPhee, Carolyn

    2011-11-01

    The use of virtual worlds has exploded in popularity, but getting started may not be easy. In this article, the authors, members of the corporate nursing education team at University Health Network, outline their experience with incorporating virtual technology into their learning environment. Over a period of several months, a virtual hospital, including two nursing units, was created in Second Life®, allowing more than 500 nurses to role-play in a safe environment without the fear of making a mistake. This experience has provided valuable insight into the best ways to develop and learn in a virtual environment. The authors discuss the challenges of installing and building the Second Life® platform and provide guidelines for preparing users and suggestions for crafting educational activities. This article provides a starting point for organizations planning to incorporate virtual worlds into their learning environment.

  19. Establishing a virtual learning environment: a nursing experience.

    PubMed

    Wood, Anya; McPhee, Carolyn

    2011-11-01

    The use of virtual worlds has exploded in popularity, but getting started may not be easy. In this article, the authors, members of the corporate nursing education team at University Health Network, outline their experience with incorporating virtual technology into their learning environment. Over a period of several months, a virtual hospital, including two nursing units, was created in Second Life®, allowing more than 500 nurses to role-play in a safe environment without the fear of making a mistake. This experience has provided valuable insight into the best ways to develop and learn in a virtual environment. The authors discuss the challenges of installing and building the Second Life® platform and provide guidelines for preparing users and suggestions for crafting educational activities. This article provides a starting point for organizations planning to incorporate virtual worlds into their learning environment. PMID:21780735

  20. EVER-EST: a virtual research environment for Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marelli, Fulvio; Albani, Mirko; Glaves, Helen

    2016-04-01

    There is an increasing requirement for researchers to work collaboratively using common resources whilst being geographically dispersed. By creating a virtual research environment (VRE) using a service oriented architecture (SOA) tailored to the needs of Earth Science (ES) communities, the EVEREST project will provide a range of both generic and domain specific data management services to support a dynamic approach to collaborative research. EVER-EST will provide the means to overcome existing barriers to sharing of Earth Science data and information allowing research teams to discover, access, share and process heterogeneous data, algorithms, results and experiences within and across their communities, including those domains beyond Earth Science. Researchers will be able to seamlessly manage both the data involved in their computationally intensive disciplines and the scientific methods applied in their observations and modelling, which lead to the specific results that need to be attributable, validated and shared both within the community and more widely e.g. in the form of scholarly communications. Central to the EVEREST approach is the concept of the Research Object (RO) , which provides a semantically rich mechanism to aggregate related resources about a scientific investigation so that they can be shared together using a single unique identifier. Although several e-laboratories are incorporating the research object concept in their infrastructure, the EVER-EST VRE will be the first infrastructure to leverage the concept of Research Objects and their application in observational rather than experimental disciplines. Development of the EVEREST VRE will leverage the results of several previous projects which have produced state-of-the-art technologies for scientific data management and curation as well those which have developed models, techniques and tools for the preservation of scientific methods and their implementation in computational forms such as

  1. Evaluation of Intelligent Grouping Based on Learners' Collaboration Competence Level in Online Collaborative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muuro, Maina Elizaphan; Oboko, Robert; Wagacha, Waiganjo Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we explore the impact of an intelligent grouping algorithm based on learners' collaborative competency when compared with (a) instructor based Grade Point Average (GPA) method level and (b) random method, on group outcomes and group collaboration problems in an online collaborative learning environment. An intelligent grouping…

  2. Virtual global positioning system for distributed interactive simulation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary; Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.

    1997-07-01

    A major shortfall in the fidelity of current military distributed virtual environments (DVEs) is the lack of virtual global positioning system (GPS) timing and position signals for entities within the environment. The DVE's usefulness is reduced because positional errors and positional accuracy that would be available in the real world are not present in the DVE. This, in turn, affects the validity of the results of training, analysis, and evaluations involving systems that rely on GPS. The magnitude of the affect depends on the degree that the systems involved in the DVE rely on GPS in the real world. The project reported in this paper addresses this deficit in current military DVEs. The capability we developed to provide a virtual GPS-based navigation capability within a DVE is based upon three components. These components are a complete virtual GPS satellite constellation, a means for broadcasting GPS signals using the Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) simulation protocols, and a software system, the Virtual GPS Receiver (VGPSR), to calculate simulation entity position using the virtual GPS time and position signals. The virtual GPS satellites are propagated in their orbits using the solar system modeler (SM). The SM also performs the simulated GPS signal broadcast by transmitting a DIS protocol data unit (PDU) with the data that would appear within a real world GPS satellite broadcast. The VGPSR is a plug-in module available for simulation applications that require virtual GPS navigation. To demonstrate the capability of this system, we used the VGPSR in conjunction with the virtual cockpit to simulate virtual weapons deployment. We present the design of the VGPSR and the design of the modules added to the SM for GPS broadcast. We describe the calculations the system performs to calculate position in the virtual environment and we describe the accuracy and performance the system achieves when calculating virtual environment position using our system. We

  3. A specification of 3D manipulation in virtual environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, S. Augustine; Furuta, Richard

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the modeling of three basic kinds of 3-D manipulations in the context of a logical hand device and our virtual panel architecture. The logical hand device is a useful software abstraction representing hands in virtual environments. The virtual panel architecture is the 3-D component of the 2-D window systems. Both of the abstractions are intended to form the foundation for adaptable 3-D manipulation.

  4. Developing Subject-Related Web Sites Collaboratively: The Virtual Business Information Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abels, Eileen G.; White, Marilyn Domas; Kim, Soojung

    2007-01-01

    This article is a case study of the Virtual Business Information Center (VBIC), a collaborative effort since 1998 of the College of Information Studies, Robert H. Smith School of Business, and the University of Maryland Libraries. The case study traces its development, implementation, and evaluation and addresses collaboration among academic…

  5. The Informal Workplace Learning Experiences of Virtual Team Members: A Look at the Role of Collaborative Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Frankie S.

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study explored how collaborative technologies influence the informal learning experiences of virtual team members. Inputs revealed as critical to virtual informal learning were integrated, collaborative technological systems; positive relationships and trust; and organizational support and virtual team management. These inputs…

  6. Nature and origins of virtual environments - A bibliographical essay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S. R.

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environments presented via head-mounted, computer-driven displays provide a new media for communication. They may be analyzed by considering: (1) what may be meant by an environment; (2) what is meant by the process of virtualization; and (3) some aspects of human performance that constrain environmental design. Their origins are traced from previous work in vehicle simulation and multimedia research. Pointers are provided to key technical references, in the dispersed, archival literature, that are relevant to the development and evaluation of virtual-environment interface systems.

  7. Active Learning through the Use of Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayrose, James

    2012-01-01

    Immersive Virtual Reality (VR) has seen explosive growth over the last decade. Immersive VR attempts to give users the sensation of being fully immersed in a synthetic environment by providing them with 3D hardware, and allowing them to interact with objects in virtual worlds. The technology is extremely effective for learning and exploration, and…

  8. Game-Like Language Learning in 3-D Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berns, Anke; Gonzalez-Pardo, Antonio; Camacho, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents our recent experiences with the design of game-like applications in 3-D virtual environments as well as its impact on student motivation and learning. Therefore our paper starts with a brief analysis of the motivational aspects of videogames and virtual worlds (VWs). We then go on to explore the possible benefits of both in the…

  9. Large-Scale Networked Virtual Environments: Architecture and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamotte, Wim; Quax, Peter; Flerackers, Eddy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Scalability is an important research topic in the context of networked virtual environments (NVEs). This paper aims to describe the ALVIC (Architecture for Large-scale Virtual Interactive Communities) approach to NVE scalability. Design/methodology/approach: The setup and results from two case studies are shown: a 3-D learning environment…

  10. Declarative Knowledge Acquisition in Immersive Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Rustin

    2016-01-01

    The author investigated the interaction effect of immersive virtual reality (VR) in the classroom. The objective of the project was to develop and provide a low-cost, scalable, and portable VR system containing purposely designed and developed immersive virtual learning environments for the US Army. The purpose of the mixed design experiment was…

  11. Virtual Worlds; Real Learning: Design Principles for Engaging Immersive Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu (u. Sjarpm)

    2012-01-01

    The EMDT master's program at Full Sail University embarked on a small project to use a virtual environment to teach graduate students. The property used for this project has evolved our several iterations and has yielded some basic design principles and pedagogy for virtual spaces. As a result, students are emerging from the program with a better grasp of future possibilities.

  12. Spatial Integration under Contextual Control in a Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molet, Mikael; Gambet, Boris; Bugallo, Mehdi; Miller, Ralph R.

    2012-01-01

    The role of context was examined in the selection and integration of independently learned spatial relationships. Using a dynamic 3D virtual environment, participants learned one spatial relationship between landmarks A and B which was established in one virtual context (e.g., A is left of B) and a different spatial relationship which was…

  13. Designing a Virtual-Reality-Based, Gamelike Math Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xinhao; Ke, Fengfeng

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the design issues related to a virtual-reality-based, gamelike learning environment (VRGLE) developed via OpenSimulator, an open-source virtual reality server. The researchers collected qualitative data to examine the VRGLE's usability, playability, and content integration for math learning. They found it important…

  14. Impact of Virtual Work Environment on Traditional Team Domains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geroy, Gary D.; Olson, Joel; Hartman, Jackie

    2002-01-01

    Examines a virtual work team to determine the domains of the team and the effect the virtual work environment had on the domains. Discusses results of a literature review and a phenomenological heuristic case study, including the effects of post-modern philosophy and postindustrial society on changes in the marketplace. (Contains 79 references.)…

  15. Ecological validity of virtual environments to assess human navigation ability

    PubMed Central

    van der Ham, Ineke J. M.; Faber, Annemarie M. E.; Venselaar, Matthijs; van Kreveld, Marc J.; Löffler, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Route memory is frequently assessed in virtual environments. These environments can be presented in a fully controlled manner and are easy to use. Yet they lack the physical involvement that participants have when navigating real environments. For some aspects of route memory this may result in reduced performance in virtual environments. We assessed route memory performance in four different environments: real, virtual, virtual with directional information (compass), and hybrid. In the hybrid environment, participants walked the route outside on an open field, while all route information (i.e., path, landmarks) was shown simultaneously on a handheld tablet computer. Results indicate that performance in the real life environment was better than in the virtual conditions for tasks relying on survey knowledge, like pointing to start and end point, and map drawing. Performance in the hybrid condition however, hardly differed from real life performance. Performance in the virtual environment did not benefit from directional information. Given these findings, the hybrid condition may offer the best of both worlds: the performance level is comparable to that of real life for route memory, yet it offers full control of visual input during route learning. PMID:26074831

  16. Inspiring Equal Contribution and Opportunity in a 3D Multi-User Virtual Environment: Bringing Together Men Gamers and Women Non-Gamers in Second Life[R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deNoyelles, Aimee; Seo, Kay Kyeong-Ju

    2012-01-01

    A 3D multi-user virtual environment holds promise to support and enhance student online learning communities due to its ability to promote global synchronous interaction and collaboration, rich multisensory experience and expression, and elaborate design capabilities. Second Life[R], a multi-user virtual environment intended for adult users 18 and…

  17. Social Media and Population Health Virtual Exchange for Senior Nursing Students: An International Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Procter, Paula M; Brixey, Juliana J; Honey, Michelle L L; Todhunter, Fern

    2016-01-01

    The authors have all engaged in using social media with students as a means for collaboration across national and international boundaries for various educational purposes. Following the explosion of big data in health the authors are now moving this concept forward within undergraduate and postgraduate nursing curricula for the development of population health virtual exchanges. Nursing has a global presence and yet it appears as though students have little knowledge of the health and social care needs and provision outside their local environment. This development will allow for explorative exchange amongst students in three countries, enhancing their understanding of their own and the selected international population health needs and solutions through asking and responding to questions amongst the learning community involved. The connection of the students will be recorded for their use in reflection; of particular interest will be the use of information included by the students to answer questions about their locality. PMID:27332439

  18. Social Media and Population Health Virtual Exchange for Senior Nursing Students: An International Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Procter, Paula M; Brixey, Juliana J; Honey, Michelle L L; Todhunter, Fern

    2016-01-01

    The authors have all engaged in using social media with students as a means for collaboration across national and international boundaries for various educational purposes. Following the explosion of big data in health the authors are now moving this concept forward within undergraduate and postgraduate nursing curricula for the development of population health virtual exchanges. Nursing has a global presence and yet it appears as though students have little knowledge of the health and social care needs and provision outside their local environment. This development will allow for explorative exchange amongst students in three countries, enhancing their understanding of their own and the selected international population health needs and solutions through asking and responding to questions amongst the learning community involved. The connection of the students will be recorded for their use in reflection; of particular interest will be the use of information included by the students to answer questions about their locality.

  19. Preparation and presentation of cultural content in virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zara, Jiri

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a web-based application for preparation and presentation of various two and three dimensional cultural showpieces in a virtual environment. Specific task modules built on a common database provide tools for designing spatial models of a real or a fully virtual gallery, exhibit management, arrangement of exhibits within the virtual space, and final web presentation using standard VRML browser and Java applet. The whole application serves for different kinds of users gallery owners, artists, and visitors. A use of virtual reality paradigms for image presentation purposes is discussed here, too.

  20. Virtual Reality: The Future of Animated Virtual Instructor, the Technology and Its Emergence to a Productive E-Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiman, Juhanita

    This paper discusses the use of Virtual Reality (VR) in e-learning environments where an intelligent three-dimensional (3D) virtual person plays the role of an instructor. With the existence of this virtual instructor, it is hoped that the teaching and learning in the e-environment will be more effective and productive. This virtual 3D animated…

  1. Guest Editor's introduction: Special issue on distributed virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Rodger

    1998-09-01

    Distributed virtual environments (DVEs) combine technology from 3D graphics, virtual reality and distributed systems to provide an interactive 3D scene that supports multiple participants. Each participant has a representation in the scene, often known as an avatar, and is free to navigate through the scene and interact with both the scene and other viewers of the scene. Changes to the scene, for example, position changes of one avatar as the associated viewer navigates through the scene, or changes to objects in the scene via manipulation, are propagated in real time to all viewers. This ensures that all viewers of a shared scene `see' the same representation of it, allowing sensible reasoning about the scene. Early work on such environments was restricted to their use in simulation, in particular in military simulation. However, over recent years a number of interesting and potentially far-reaching attempts have been made to exploit the technology for a range of other uses, including: Social spaces. Such spaces can be seen as logical extensions of the familiar text chat space. In 3D social spaces avatars, representing participants, can meet in shared 3D scenes and in addition to text chat can use visual cues and even in some cases spatial audio. Collaborative working. A number of recent projects have attempted to explore the use of DVEs to facilitate computer-supported collaborative working (CSCW), where the 3D space provides a context and work space for collaboration. Gaming. The shared 3D space is already familiar, albeit in a constrained manner, to the gaming community. DVEs are a logical superset of existing 3D games and can provide a rich framework for advanced gaming applications. e-commerce. The ability to navigate through a virtual shopping mall and to look at, and even interact with, 3D representations of articles has appealed to the e-commerce community as it searches for the best method of presenting merchandise to electronic consumers. The technology

  2. Headphone and Head-Mounted Visual Displays for Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Duran R.; Ellis, Stephen R.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Trejo, Leonard J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A realistic auditory environment can contribute to both the overall subjective sense of presence in a virtual display, and to a quantitative metric predicting human performance. Here, the role of audio in a virtual display and the importance of auditory-visual interaction are examined. Conjectures are proposed regarding the effectiveness of audio compared to visual information for creating a sensation of immersion, the frame of reference within a virtual display, and the compensation of visual fidelity by supplying auditory information. Future areas of research are outlined for improving simulations of virtual visual and acoustic spaces. This paper will describe some of the intersensory phenomena that arise during operator interaction within combined visual and auditory virtual environments. Conjectures regarding audio-visual interaction will be proposed.

  3. Methods and systems relating to an augmented virtuality environment

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, Curtis W; Anderson, Matthew O; McKay, Mark D; Wadsworth, Derek C; Boyce, Jodie R; Hruska, Ryan C; Koudelka, John A; Whetten, Jonathan; Bruemmer, David J

    2014-05-20

    Systems and methods relating to an augmented virtuality system are disclosed. A method of operating an augmented virtuality system may comprise displaying imagery of a real-world environment in an operating picture. The method may further include displaying a plurality of virtual icons in the operating picture representing at least some assets of a plurality of assets positioned in the real-world environment. Additionally, the method may include displaying at least one virtual item in the operating picture representing data sensed by one or more of the assets of the plurality of assets and remotely controlling at least one asset of the plurality of assets by interacting with a virtual icon associated with the at least one asset.

  4. Human Machine Interfaces for Teleoperators and Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durlach, Nathaniel I. (Compiler); Sheridan, Thomas B. (Compiler); Ellis, Stephen R. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    In Mar. 1990, a meeting organized around the general theme of teleoperation research into virtual environment display technology was conducted. This is a collection of conference-related fragments that will give a glimpse of the potential of the following fields and how they interplay: sensorimotor performance; human-machine interfaces; teleoperation; virtual environments; performance measurement and evaluation methods; and design principles and predictive models.

  5. An interactive virtual environment for finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, S.; Canfield, T.; Kokinis, J.; Disz, T.

    1995-06-01

    Virtual environments (VE) provide a powerful human-computer interface that opens the door to exciting new methods of interaction with high-performance computing applications in several areas of research. The authors are interested in the use of virtual environments as a user interface to real-time simulations used in rapid prototyping procedures. Consequently, the authors are developing methods for coupling finite element models of complex mechanical systems with a VE interface for real-time interaction.

  6. Building a Team Collaboration in the Virtual Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, Wallace; Waters, Lisa

    Two investigators developed a Web-based teambuilding instructional and activities module to improve the collaboration skills of team members involved in online collaboration. This module was formatively evaluated using 24 graduate students who were enrolled in an online course that assigned two online team projects during the Fall 2000 semester.…

  7. Developing collaborative environments - A Holistic software development methodology

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.; MITCHINER,JOHN L.

    2000-03-08

    Sandia National Laboratories has been developing technologies to support person-to-person collaboration and the efforts of teams in the business and research communities. The technologies developed include knowledge-based design advisors, knowledge management systems, and streamlined manufacturing supply chains. These collaborative environments in which people can work together sharing information and knowledge have required a new approach to software development. The approach includes an emphasis on the requisite change in business practice that often inhibits user acceptance of collaborative technology. Leveraging the experience from this work, they have established a multidisciplinary approach for developing collaborative software environments. They call this approach ``A Holistic Software Development Methodology''.

  8. Designing user models in a virtual cave environment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.; Hudson, R.; Gokhale, N.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, the results of a first study into the use of virtual reality for human factor studies and design of simple and complex models of control systems, components, and processes are described. The objective was to design a model in a virtual environment that would reflect more characteristics of the user`s mental model of a system and fewer of the designer`s. The technology of a CAVE{trademark} virtual environment and the methodology of Neuro Linguistic Programming were employed in this study.

  9. Ontological implications of being in immersive virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morie, Jacquelyn F.

    2008-02-01

    The idea of Virtual Reality once conjured up visions of new territories to explore, and expectations of awaiting worlds of wonder. VR has matured to become a practical tool for therapy, medicine and commercial interests, yet artists, in particular, continue to expand the possibilities for the medium. Artistic virtual environments created over the past two decades probe the phenomenological nature of these virtual environments. When we inhabit a fully immersive virtual environment, we have entered into a new form of Being. Not only does our body continue to exist in the real, physical world, we are also embodied within the virtual by means of technology that translates our bodied actions into interactions with the virtual environment. Very few states in human existence allow this bifurcation of our Being, where we can exist simultaneously in two spaces at once, with the possible exception of meta-physical states such as shamanistic trance and out-of-body experiences. This paper discusses the nature of this simultaneous Being, how we enter the virtual space, what forms of persona we can don there, what forms of spaces we can inhabit, and what type of wondrous experiences we can both hope for and expect.

  10. Intelligent Tutors in Immersive Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Peng; Slator, Brian M.; Vender, Bradley; Jin, Wei; Kariluoma, Matti; Borchert, Otto; Hokanson, Guy; Aggarwal, Vaibhav; Cosmano, Bob; Cox, Kathleen T.; Pilch, André; Marry, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Research into virtual role-based learning has progressed over the past decade. Modern issues include gauging the difficulty of designing a goal system capable of meeting the requirements of students with different knowledge levels, and the reasonability and possibility of taking advantage of the well-designed formula and techniques served in other…

  11. Tasks for Easily Modifiable Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swier, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies of learner interaction in virtual worlds have tended to select basic tasks involving open-ended communication. There is evidence that such tasks are supportive of language acquisition, however it may also be beneficial to consider more complex tasks. Research in task-based learning has identified features such as non-linguistic…

  12. A new security model for collaborative environments

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Deborah; Lorch, Markus; Thompson, Mary; Perry, Marcia

    2003-06-06

    Prevalent authentication and authorization models for distributed systems provide for the protection of computer systems and resources from unauthorized use. The rules and policies that drive the access decisions in such systems are typically configured up front and require trust establishment before the systems can be used. This approach does not work well for computer software that moderates human-to-human interaction. This work proposes a new model for trust establishment and management in computer systems supporting collaborative work. The model supports the dynamic addition of new users to a collaboration with very little initial trust placed into their identity and supports the incremental building of trust relationships through endorsements from established collaborators. It also recognizes the strength of a users authentication when making trust decisions. By mimicking the way humans build trust naturally the model can support a wide variety of usage scenarios. Its particular strength lies in the support for ad-hoc and dynamic collaborations and the ubiquitous access to a Computer Supported Collaboration Workspace (CSCW) system from locations with varying levels of trust and security.

  13. Vroom: designing an augmented environment for remote collaboration in digital cinema production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolis, Todd; Cornish, Tracy

    2013-03-01

    As media technologies become increasingly affordable, compact and inherently networked, new generations of telecollaborative platforms continue to arise which integrate these new affordances. Virtual reality has been primarily concerned with creating simulations of environments that can transport participants to real or imagined spaces that replace the "real world". Meanwhile Augmented Reality systems have evolved to interleave objects from Virtual Reality environments into the physical landscape. Perhaps now there is a new class of systems that reverse this precept to enhance dynamic media landscapes and immersive physical display environments to enable intuitive data exploration through collaboration. Vroom (Virtual Room) is a next-generation reconfigurable tiled display environment in development at the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) at the University of California, San Diego. Vroom enables freely scalable digital collaboratories, connecting distributed, high-resolution visualization resources for collaborative work in the sciences, engineering and the arts. Vroom transforms a physical space into an immersive media environment with large format interactive display surfaces, video teleconferencing and spatialized audio built on a highspeed optical network backbone. Vroom enables group collaboration for local and remote participants to share knowledge and experiences. Possible applications include: remote learning, command and control, storyboarding, post-production editorial review, high resolution video playback, 3D visualization, screencasting and image, video and multimedia file sharing. To support these various scenarios, Vroom features support for multiple user interfaces (optical tracking, touch UI, gesture interface, etc.), support for directional and spatialized audio, giga-pixel image interactivity, 4K video streaming, 3D visualization and telematic production. This paper explains the design process that

  14. The GRIFFIN Collaborative Virtual Community for Architectural Knowledge Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, Patricia; Farenhorst, Rik; Avgeriou, Paris; de Boer, Remco C.; Clerc, Viktor; Jansen, Anton; van Vliet, Hans

    Modern software architecting increasingly often takes place in geographically distributed contexts involving teams of professionals and customers with different backgrounds and roles. So far, attention and effort have been mainly dedicated to individuals sharing already formalized knowledge and less to social, informal collaboration. Furthermore, in Web 2.0 contexts, little to no attention has been given to practitioners carrying out complex, collaborative, and knowledge-intensive tasks in organizational contexts.

  15. New tools to support collaboration and virtual organizations.

    PubMed

    Frame, I; Austen, K F; Calleja, M; Dove, M T; White, T O H; Wilson, D J

    2009-03-13

    We describe the use of new eScience tools to support collaboration, including the use of XML data representations to support shared viewing of the information content of data, metadata tools for documenting data and Web 2.0 social networking tools for documenting ideas and the collaboration process. This latter work has led to the development of the http://SciSpace.net Web resource.

  16. Virtual Environments: Issues and Opportunities for Researching Inclusive Educational Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehy, Kieron

    This chapter argues that virtual environments offer new research areas for those concerned with inclusive education. Further, it proposes that they also present opportunities for developing increasingly inclusive research processes. This chapter considers how researchers might approach researching some of these affordances. It discusses the relationship between specific features of inclusive pedagogy, derived from an international systematic literature review, and the affordances of different forms of virtual characters and environments. Examples are drawn from research in Second LifeTM (SL), virtual tutors and augmented reality. In doing this, the chapter challenges a simplistic notion of isolated physical and virtual worlds and, in the context of inclusion, between the practice of research and the research topic itself. There are a growing number of virtual worlds in which identified educational activities are taking place, or whose activities are being noted for their educational merit. These encompasses non-themed worlds such as SL and Active Worlds, game based worlds such as World of Warcraft and Runescape, and even Club Penguin, a themed virtual where younger players interact through a variety of Penguin themed environments and activities. It has been argued that these spaces, outside traditional education, are able to offer pedagogical insights (Twining 2009) i.e. that these global virtual communities have been identified as being useful as creative educational environments (Delwiche 2006; Sheehy 2009). This chapter will explore how researchers might use these spaces to investigative and create inclusive educational experiences for learners. In order to do this the chapter considers three interrelated issues: What is inclusive education?; How might inclusive education influence virtual world research? And, what might inclusive education look like in virtual worlds?

  17. Automating Expertise in Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaVoie, Noelle; Streeter, Lynn; Lochbaum, Karen; Wroblewski, David; Boyce, Lisa; Krupnick, Charles; Psotka, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a set of tools for improving online collaborative learning including an automated expert that monitors and moderates discussions, and additional tools to evaluate contributions, semantically search all posted comments, access a library of hundreds of digital books and provide reports to instructors. The technology behind these…

  18. Cognitive Virtualization: Combining Cognitive Models and Virtual Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Tuan Q. Tran; David I. Gertman; Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; Ronald L. Boring; Alan R. Mecham

    2007-08-01

    3D manikins are often used in visualizations to model human activity in complex settings. Manikins assist in developing understanding of human actions, movements and routines in a variety of different environments representing new conceptual designs. One such environment is a nuclear power plant control room, here they have the potential to be used to simulate more precise ergonomic assessments of human work stations. Next generation control rooms will pose numerous challenges for system designers. The manikin modeling approach by itself, however, may be insufficient for dealing with the desired technical advancements and challenges of next generation automated systems. Uncertainty regarding effective staffing levels; and the potential for negative human performance consequences in the presence of advanced automated systems (e.g., reduced vigilance, poor situation awareness, mistrust or blind faith in automation, higher information load and increased complexity) call for further research. Baseline assessment of novel control room equipment(s) and configurations needs to be conducted. These design uncertainties can be reduced through complementary analysis that merges ergonomic manikin models with models of higher cognitive functions, such as attention, memory, decision-making, and problem-solving. This paper will discuss recent advancements in merging a theoretical-driven cognitive modeling framework within a 3D visualization modeling tool to evaluate of next generation control room human factors and ergonomic assessment. Though this discussion primary focuses on control room design, the application for such a merger between 3D visualization and cognitive modeling can be extended to various areas of focus such as training and scenario planning.

  19. The Earth System CoG Collaboration Environment: Connecting Resources in the Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S.; DeLuca, C.; Cinquini, L.; Overeem, I.; Edwards, P. N.; Jablonowski, C.; Rood, R. B.; Balaji, V.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth System CoG collaboration environment supports Earth science research and product development in virtual organizations comprised of multiple projects and communities. It provides data, metadata, and visualization services along with tools for collaboration, and can be used to host individual projects or to profile projects hosted elsewhere. All projects on CoG are described using a project ontology - an organized common vocabulary - that exposes information needed for collaboration and decision-making. Projects can be linked into a network, and the underlying ontology enables views of this information across the network. This access to information, and the community-driven evolution of a project ontology that includes a description of management and governance roles, bodies, and processes, promote the creation of active and knowledgeable project governance, at both individual and aggregate project levels. A description of the environment along with results of recent use by an model intercomparison project (MIP) and international software project will be presented.

  20. Assessing a Collaborative Online Environment for Music Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biasutti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The current pilot study tested the effectiveness of an e-learning environment built to enable students to compose music collaboratively. The participants interacted online by using synchronous and asynchronous resources to develop a project in which they composed a new music piece in collaboration. After the learning sessions, individual…

  1. Creating a Collaborative Environment. Using Culture, Training, and Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plugge, L. A.; Kirschner, P. A.; Beckers, J.

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 204 Dutch employees trained via web-based applications indicated that, if the goal is to increase collaborative work, training should take place in a collaborative environment. Organizational culture change and a supportive infrastructure are required. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  2. A Framework for Collaborative Learning in Dynamic Group Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanev, Kamen; Kimura, Shigeo; Orr, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we propose a framework for Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) employing dynamic groups, where at different stages students work independently, interact with each other in pairs, and conduct joint work in larger groups with varying numbers of participants. A Dynamic Group Environment for Collaborative Learning…

  3. Intelligent Assistance for Teachers in Collaborative E-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casamayor, Agustin; Amandi, Analia; Campo, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative learning environments provide a set of tools for students acting in groups to interact and accomplish an assigned task. In this kind of systems, students are free to express and communicate with each other, which usually lead to collaboration and communication problems that may require the intervention of a teacher. In this article,…

  4. Role Management in a Privacy-Enhanced Collaborative Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenz, Anja; Borcea-Pfitzmann, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Facing the dilemma between collaboration and privacy is a continual challenge for users. In this setting, the purpose of this paper is to discuss issues of a highly flexible role management integrated in a privacy-enhanced collaborative environment (PECE). Design/methodology/approach: The general framework was provided by former findings…

  5. Embodied collaboration support system for 3D shape evaluation in virtual space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Masashi; Watanabe, Tomio

    2005-12-01

    Collaboration mainly consists of two tasks; one is each partner's task that is performed by the individual, the other is communication with each other. Both of them are very important objectives for all the collaboration support system. In this paper, a collaboration support system for 3D shape evaluation in virtual space is proposed on the basis of both studies in 3D shape evaluation and communication support in virtual space. The proposed system provides the two viewpoints for each task. One is the viewpoint of back side of user's own avatar for the smooth communication. The other is that of avatar's eye for 3D shape evaluation. Switching the viewpoints satisfies the task conditions for 3D shape evaluation and communication. The system basically consists of PC, HMD and magnetic sensors, and users can share the embodied interaction by observing interaction between their avatars in virtual space. However, the HMD and magnetic sensors, which are put on the users, would restrict the nonverbal communication. Then, we have tried to compensate the loss of nodding of partner's avatar by introducing the speech-driven embodied interactive actor InterActor. Sensory evaluation by paired comparison of 3D shapes in the collaborative situation in virtual space and in real space and the questionnaire are performed. The result demonstrates the effectiveness of InterActor's nodding in the collaborative situation.

  6. The Sociability of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreijins, Karel; Kirschner, Paul A.; Jochems, Wim

    2002-01-01

    Discusses computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments in asynchronous distributed learning groups and proposes an intelligent CSCL environment based upon a theoretical framework that suggests embedding certain properties in the environment to act as social contextual facilitators to initiate and sustain learners' social…

  7. Virtual Planetary Analysis Environment for Remote Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keely, Leslie; Beyer, Ross; Edwards. Laurence; Lees, David

    2009-01-01

    All of the data for NASA's current planetary missions and most data for field experiments are collected via orbiting spacecraft, aircraft, and robotic explorers. Mission scientists are unable to employ traditional field methods when operating remotely. We have developed a virtual exploration tool for remote sites with data analysis capabilities that extend human perception quantitatively and qualitatively. Scientists and mission engineers can use it to explore a realistic representation of a remote site. It also provides software tools to "touch" and "measure" remote sites with an immediacy that boosts scientific productivity and is essential for mission operations.

  8. Virtual building environments (VBE) - Applying information modeling to buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Bazjanac, Vladimir

    2004-06-21

    A Virtual Building Environment (VBE) is a ''place'' where building industry project staffs can get help in creating Building Information Models (BIM) and in the use of virtual buildings. It consists of a group of industry software that is operated by industry experts who are also experts in the use of that software. The purpose of a VBE is to facilitate expert use of appropriate software applications in conjunction with each other to efficiently support multidisciplinary work. This paper defines BIM and virtual buildings, and describes VBE objectives, set-up and characteristics of operation. It informs about the VBE Initiative and the benefits from a couple of early VBE projects.

  9. From GUI to Gallery: A Study of Online Virtual Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guynup, Stephen Lawrence

    This paper began as an attempt to clarify and classify the development of Web3D environments from 1995 to the present. In that process, important facts came to light. A large proportion of these sites were virtual galleries and museums. Second, these same environments covered a wide array of architectural interpretations and represented some of…

  10. Utilizing Virtual and Personal Learning Environments for Optimal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Krista, Ed.; Cheney, Amy, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of emerging technologies in higher education presents a new set of challenges and opportunities for educators. With a growing need for customized lesson plans in online education, educators are rethinking the design and development of their learning environments. "Utilizing Virtual and Personal Learning Environments for…

  11. DIVE: a scaleable network architecture for distributed virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frécon, Emmanuel; Stenius, Mårten

    1998-09-01

    We introduce the network software architecture of the distributed interactive virtual environment platform. The platform is designed to scale with a large number of simultaneous participants, while ensuring maximum interaction at each site. Scalability is achieved by making extensive use of multicast techniques and by partitioning the virtual space into smaller regions. We also present an application-level backbone that can connect islands of multicast-aware networks together.

  12. Examining the Impact of Collaboration Technology Training Support on Virtual Team Collaboration Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Businesses and governmental agencies are increasingly reliant on virtual teams composed of team members in different location. However, such virtual teams face all the interpersonal challenges inherent in working in a group, plus additional challenges that are a consequence from communicating through electronic methods. Numerous technological…

  13. Visual landmarks facilitate rodent spatial navigation in virtual reality environments

    PubMed Central

    Youngstrom, Isaac A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2012-01-01

    Because many different sensory modalities contribute to spatial learning in rodents, it has been difficult to determine whether spatial navigation can be guided solely by visual cues. Rodents moving within physical environments with visual cues engage a variety of nonvisual sensory systems that cannot be easily inhibited without lesioning brain areas. Virtual reality offers a unique approach to ask whether visual landmark cues alone are sufficient to improve performance in a spatial task. We found that mice could learn to navigate between two water reward locations along a virtual bidirectional linear track using a spherical treadmill. Mice exposed to a virtual environment with vivid visual cues rendered on a single monitor increased their performance over a 3-d training regimen. Training significantly increased the percentage of time avatars controlled by the mice spent near reward locations in probe trials without water rewards. Neither improvement during training or spatial learning for reward locations occurred with mice operating a virtual environment without vivid landmarks or with mice deprived of all visual feedback. Mice operating the vivid environment developed stereotyped avatar turning behaviors when alternating between reward zones that were positively correlated with their performance on the probe trial. These results suggest that mice are able to learn to navigate to specific locations using only visual cues presented within a virtual environment rendered on a single computer monitor. PMID:22345484

  14. Communication, Collaboration, and Enhancing the Learning Experience: Developing a Collaborative Virtual Enquiry Service in University Libraries in the North of England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolly, Liz; White, Sue

    2016-01-01

    This article uses the case study of developing a collaborative "out-of-hours" virtual enquiry service by members of the Northern Collaboration Group of academic libraries in the north of England to explore the importance of communication and collaboration between academic library services in enhancing student learning. Set within the…

  15. Compiling and using input-output frameworks through collaborative virtual laboratories.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, Manfred; Geschke, Arne; Wiedmann, Thomas; Lane, Joe; Anderson, Neal; Baynes, Timothy; Boland, John; Daniels, Peter; Dey, Christopher; Fry, Jacob; Hadjikakou, Michalis; Kenway, Steven; Malik, Arunima; Moran, Daniel; Murray, Joy; Nettleton, Stuart; Poruschi, Lavinia; Reynolds, Christian; Rowley, Hazel; Ugon, Julien; Webb, Dean; West, James

    2014-07-01

    Compiling, deploying and utilising large-scale databases that integrate environmental and economic data have traditionally been labour- and cost-intensive processes, hindered by the large amount of disparate and misaligned data that must be collected and harmonised. The Australian Industrial Ecology Virtual Laboratory (IELab) is a novel, collaborative approach to compiling large-scale environmentally extended multi-region input-output (MRIO) models. The utility of the IELab product is greatly enhanced by avoiding the need to lock in an MRIO structure at the time the MRIO system is developed. The IELab advances the idea of the "mother-daughter" construction principle, whereby a regionally and sectorally very detailed "mother" table is set up, from which "daughter" tables are derived to suit specific research questions. By introducing a third tier - the "root classification" - IELab users are able to define their own mother-MRIO configuration, at no additional cost in terms of data handling. Customised mother-MRIOs can then be built, which maximise disaggregation in aspects that are useful to a family of research questions. The second innovation in the IELab system is to provide a highly automated collaborative research platform in a cloud-computing environment, greatly expediting workflows and making these computational benefits accessible to all users. Combining these two aspects realises many benefits. The collaborative nature of the IELab development project allows significant savings in resources. Timely deployment is possible by coupling automation procedures with the comprehensive input from multiple teams. User-defined MRIO tables, coupled with high performance computing, mean that MRIO analysis will be useful and accessible for a great many more research applications than would otherwise be possible. By ensuring that a common set of analytical tools such as for hybrid life-cycle assessment is adopted, the IELab will facilitate the harmonisation of fragmented

  16. Compiling and using input-output frameworks through collaborative virtual laboratories.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, Manfred; Geschke, Arne; Wiedmann, Thomas; Lane, Joe; Anderson, Neal; Baynes, Timothy; Boland, John; Daniels, Peter; Dey, Christopher; Fry, Jacob; Hadjikakou, Michalis; Kenway, Steven; Malik, Arunima; Moran, Daniel; Murray, Joy; Nettleton, Stuart; Poruschi, Lavinia; Reynolds, Christian; Rowley, Hazel; Ugon, Julien; Webb, Dean; West, James

    2014-07-01

    Compiling, deploying and utilising large-scale databases that integrate environmental and economic data have traditionally been labour- and cost-intensive processes, hindered by the large amount of disparate and misaligned data that must be collected and harmonised. The Australian Industrial Ecology Virtual Laboratory (IELab) is a novel, collaborative approach to compiling large-scale environmentally extended multi-region input-output (MRIO) models. The utility of the IELab product is greatly enhanced by avoiding the need to lock in an MRIO structure at the time the MRIO system is developed. The IELab advances the idea of the "mother-daughter" construction principle, whereby a regionally and sectorally very detailed "mother" table is set up, from which "daughter" tables are derived to suit specific research questions. By introducing a third tier - the "root classification" - IELab users are able to define their own mother-MRIO configuration, at no additional cost in terms of data handling. Customised mother-MRIOs can then be built, which maximise disaggregation in aspects that are useful to a family of research questions. The second innovation in the IELab system is to provide a highly automated collaborative research platform in a cloud-computing environment, greatly expediting workflows and making these computational benefits accessible to all users. Combining these two aspects realises many benefits. The collaborative nature of the IELab development project allows significant savings in resources. Timely deployment is possible by coupling automation procedures with the comprehensive input from multiple teams. User-defined MRIO tables, coupled with high performance computing, mean that MRIO analysis will be useful and accessible for a great many more research applications than would otherwise be possible. By ensuring that a common set of analytical tools such as for hybrid life-cycle assessment is adopted, the IELab will facilitate the harmonisation of fragmented

  17. Virtual Golden Foods Corporation: Generic Skills in a Virtual Crisis Environment (A Pilot Study)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godat, Meredith

    2007-01-01

    Workplace learning in a crisis-rich environment is often difficult if not impossible to integrate into programs so that students are able to experience and apply crisis management practices and principles. This study presents the results of a pilot project that examined the effective use of a virtual reality (VR) environment as a tool to teach…

  18. Building a Virtual Environment for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Constance; Feenan, Kevin; Setliff, Glenn; Pereira, Katherine; Hassell, Nancy; Beresford, Henry F.; Epps, Shelly; Nicollerat, Janet; Tatum, William; Feinglos, Mark; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    The authors developed an immersive diabetes community to provide diabetes self-management education and support for adults with type 2 diabetes. In this article the authors describe the procedures used to develop this virtual environment (VE). Second Life Impacts Diabetes Education & Self-Management (SLIDES), the VE for our diabetes community was built in Second Life. Social Cognitive Theory, behavioral principles and key aspects of virtual environments related to usability were applied in the development in this VE. Collaboration between researchers, clinicians and information technology (IT) specialists occurred throughout the development process. An interactive community was successfully built and utilized to provide diabetes self-management education and support. VEs for health applications may be innovative and enticing, yet it must be kept in mind that there are substantial effort, expertise, and usability factors that must be considered in the development of these environments for health care consumers. PMID:25699133

  19. Development of visual 3D virtual environment for control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirose, Michitaka; Myoi, Takeshi; Amari, Haruo; Inamura, Kohei; Stark, Lawrence

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environments for software visualization may enable complex programs to be created and maintained. A typical application might be for control of regional electric power systems. As these encompass broader computer networks than ever, construction of such systems becomes very difficult. Conventional text-oriented environments are useful in programming individual processors. However, they are obviously insufficient to program a large and complicated system, that includes large numbers of computers connected to each other; such programming is called 'programming in the large.' As a solution for this problem, the authors are developing a graphic programming environment wherein one can visualize complicated software in virtual 3D world. One of the major features of the environment is the 3D representation of concurrent process. 3D representation is used to supply both network-wide interprocess programming capability (capability for 'programming in the large') and real-time programming capability. The authors' idea is to fuse both the block diagram (which is useful to check relationship among large number of processes or processors) and the time chart (which is useful to check precise timing for synchronization) into a single 3D space. The 3D representation gives us a capability for direct and intuitive planning or understanding of complicated relationship among many concurrent processes. To realize the 3D representation, a technology to enable easy handling of virtual 3D object is a definite necessity. Using a stereo display system and a gesture input device (VPL DataGlove), our prototype of the virtual workstation has been implemented. The workstation can supply the 'sensation' of the virtual 3D space to a programmer. Software for the 3D programming environment is implemented on the workstation. According to preliminary assessments, a 50 percent reduction of programming effort is achieved by using the virtual 3D environment. The authors expect that the 3D

  20. A Qualitative Case Study Analysis for a Potential Model for a K-12 Professional Development Using Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santacroce-Tejedor, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine three e-learning technologies based on a pedagogical framework for virtual learning environments, and to explore how these technologies could be used to facilitate extended professional learning opportunities whereby K-12 educators could communicate, collaborate, and reflect on their practice. This…

  1. Communication Modes, Persuasiveness, and Decision-Making Quality: A Comparison of Audio Conferencing, Video Conferencing, and a Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Nicholas S.

    2011-01-01

    Geographically dispersed teams rely on information and communication technologies (ICTs) to communicate and collaborate. Three ICTs that have received attention are audio conferencing (AC), video conferencing (VC), and, recently, 3D virtual environments (3D VEs). These ICTs offer modes of communication that differ primarily in the number and type…

  2. Assessment of radiation awareness training in immersive virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whisker, Vaughn E., III

    The prospect of new nuclear power plant orders in the near future and the graying of the current workforce create a need to train new personnel faster and better. Immersive virtual reality (VR) may offer a solution to the training challenge. VR technology presented in a CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) provides a high-fidelity, one-to-one scale environment where areas of the power plant can be recreated and virtual radiation environments can be simulated, making it possible to safely expose workers to virtual radiation in the context of the actual work environment. The use of virtual reality for training is supported by many educational theories; constructivism and discovery learning, in particular. Educational theory describes the importance of matching the training to the task. Plant access training and radiation worker training, common forms of training in the nuclear industry, rely on computer-based training methods in most cases, which effectively transfer declarative knowledge, but are poor at transferring skills. If an activity were to be added, the training would provide personnel with the opportunity to develop skills and apply their knowledge so they could be more effective when working in the radiation environment. An experiment was developed to test immersive virtual reality's suitability for training radiation awareness. Using a mixed methodology of quantitative and qualitative measures, the subjects' performances before and after training were assessed. First, subjects completed a pre-test to measure their knowledge prior to completing any training. Next they completed unsupervised computer-based training, which consisted of a PowerPoint presentation and a PDF document. After completing a brief orientation activity in the virtual environment, one group of participants received supplemental radiation awareness training in a simulated radiation environment presented in the CAVE, while a second group, the control group, moved directly to the

  3. RoboLab and virtual environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.

    1994-01-01

    A useful adjunct to the manned space station would be a self-contained free-flying laboratory (RoboLab). This laboratory would have a robot operated under telepresence from the space station or ground. Long duration experiments aboard RoboLab could be performed by astronauts or scientists using telepresence to operate equipment and perform experiments. Operating the lab by telepresence would eliminate the need for life support such as food, water and air. The robot would be capable of motion in three dimensions, have binocular vision TV cameras, and two arms with manipulators to simulate hands. The robot would move along a two-dimensional grid and have a rotating, telescoping periscope section for extension in the third dimension. The remote operator would wear a virtual reality type headset to allow the superposition of computer displays over the real-time video of the lab. The operators would wear exoskeleton type arms to facilitate the movement of objects and equipment operation. The combination of video displays, motion, and the exoskeleton arms would provide a high degree of telepresence, especially for novice users such as scientists doing short-term experiments. The RoboLab could be resupplied and samples removed on other space shuttle flights. A self-contained RoboLab module would be designed to fit within the cargo bay of the space shuttle. Different modules could be designed for specific applications, i.e., crystal-growing, medicine, life sciences, chemistry, etc. This paper describes a RoboLab simulation using virtual reality (VR). VR provides an ideal simulation of telepresence before the actual robot and laboratory modules are constructed. The easy simulation of different telepresence designs will produce a highly optimum design before construction rather than the more expensive and time consuming hardware changes afterwards.

  4. The ALIVE Project: Astronomy Learning in Immersive Virtual Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, K. C.; Sahami, K.; Denn, G.

    2008-06-01

    The Astronomy Learning in Immersive Virtual Environments (ALIVE) project seeks to discover learning modes and optimal teaching strategies using immersive virtual environments (VEs). VEs are computer-generated, three-dimensional environments that can be navigated to provide multiple perspectives. Immersive VEs provide the additional benefit of surrounding a viewer with the simulated reality. ALIVE evaluates the incorporation of an interactive, real-time ``virtual universe'' into formal college astronomy education. In the experiment, pre-course, post-course, and curriculum tests will be used to determine the efficacy of immersive visualizations presented in a digital planetarium versus the same visual simulations in the non-immersive setting of a normal classroom, as well as a control case using traditional classroom multimedia. To normalize for inter-instructor variability, each ALIVE instructor will teach at least one of each class in each of the three test groups.

  5. Virtual Learning Environment for Interactive Engagement with Advanced Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Mads Kock; Skyum, Birk; Heck, Robert; Müller, Romain; Bason, Mark; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-06-01

    A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment StudentResearcher, which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum mechanics at the advanced university level. StudentResearcher is built upon the experiences gathered from workshops with the citizen science game Quantum Moves at the high-school and university level, where the games were used extensively to illustrate the basic concepts of quantum mechanics. The first test of this new virtual learning environment was a 2014 course in advanced quantum mechanics at Aarhus University with 47 enrolled students. We found increased learning for the students who were more active on the platform independent of their previous performances.

  6. Supporting tactical intelligence using collaborative environments and social networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollocko, Arthur B.; Farry, Michael P.; Stark, Robert F.

    2013-05-01

    Modern military environments place an increased emphasis on the collection and analysis of intelligence at the tactical level. The deployment of analytical tools at the tactical level helps support the Warfighter's need for rapid collection, analysis, and dissemination of intelligence. However, given the lack of experience and staffing at the tactical level, most of the available intelligence is not exploited. Tactical environments are staffed by a new generation of intelligence analysts who are well-versed in modern collaboration environments and social networking. An opportunity exists to enhance tactical intelligence analysis by exploiting these personnel strengths, but is dependent on appropriately designed information sharing technologies. Existing social information sharing technologies enable users to publish information quickly, but do not unite or organize information in a manner that effectively supports intelligence analysis. In this paper, we present an alternative approach to structuring and supporting tactical intelligence analysis that combines the benefits of existing concepts, and provide detail on a prototype system embodying that approach. Since this approach employs familiar collaboration support concepts from social media, it enables new-generation analysts to identify the decision-relevant data scattered among databases and the mental models of other personnel, increasing the timeliness of collaborative analysis. Also, the approach enables analysts to collaborate visually to associate heterogeneous and uncertain data within the intelligence analysis process, increasing the robustness of collaborative analyses. Utilizing this familiar dynamic collaboration environment, we hope to achieve a significant reduction of time and skill required to glean actionable intelligence in these challenging operational environments.

  7. Object Creation and Human Factors Evaluation for Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Patricia F.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to provide test objects for simulated environments utilized by the recently established Army/NASA Virtual Innovations Lab (ANVIL) at Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Al. The objective of the ANVIL lab is to provide virtual reality (VR) models and environments and to provide visualization and manipulation methods for the purpose of training and testing. Visualization equipment used in the ANVIL lab includes head-mounted and boom-mounted immersive virtual reality display devices. Objects in the environment are manipulated using data glove, hand controller, or mouse. These simulated objects are solid or surfaced three dimensional models. They may be viewed or manipulated from any location within the environment and may be viewed on-screen or via immersive VR. The objects are created using various CAD modeling packages and are converted into the virtual environment using dVise. This enables the object or environment to be viewed from any angle or distance for training or testing purposes.

  8. Cognitive Presence in Virtual Collaborative Learning: Assessing and Improving Critical Thinking in Online Discussion Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckmann, Jennifer; Weber, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to introduce a virtual collaborative learning setting called "Net Economy", which we established as part of an international learning network of currently six universities, and present our approach to continuously improve the course in each cycle. Design/ Methodology/Approach: Using the community of…

  9. The Ulwazi Concept--Virtual Interactive and Collaborative Classrooms of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyers, R. N.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to demonstrate that two schools which were geographically separated could be digitally included using broadband radio connections, interactive white-boards and other technologies to enable virtual interactive and collaborative lessons. The project was established to overcome a transport problem of bussing learners from…

  10. Cognitive Presence in Virtual Collaborative Learning: Assessing and Improving Critical Thinking in Online Discussion Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckmann, Jennifer; Weber, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The paper introduces a virtual collaborative learning setting called "Net Economy," which we established as part of an international learning network of currently seven universities. Using the Community of Inquiry framework as guidance and Canonical Action Research (CAR) as the chosen research design, the discussion forum of the online…

  11. The Essence of Using Collaborative Technology for Virtual Team Members: A Study Using Interpretative Phenomenology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houck, Christiana L.

    2013-01-01

    This interpretative phenomenological study used semi-structured interviews of 10 participants to gain a deeper understanding of the experience for virtual team members using collaborative technology. The participants were knowledge workers from global software companies working on cross-functional project teams at a distance. There were no…

  12. Creating a Virtual Information Organization: Collaborative Relationships between Libraries and Computing Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creth, Sheila D.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of changes in higher education as a result of advances in information technology focuses on the relationship between academic libraries and computing centers. Highlights include collaborative relationships; virtual information organizations; libraries as knowledge management centers; support for curriculum development; teaching…

  13. Collaboration and Knowledge Sharing Using 3D Virtual World on "Second Life"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahim, Noor Faridah A.

    2013-01-01

    A collaborative and knowledge sharing virtual activity on "Second Life" using a learner-centred teaching methodology was initiated between Temasek Polytechnic and The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (HK PolyU) in the October 2011 semester. This paper highlights the author's experience in designing and implementing this e-learning…

  14. A Social Network Analysis of Teaching and Research Collaboration in a Teachers' Virtual Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Xiaofan; Hu, Xiaoyong; Hu, Qintai; Liu, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    Analysing the structure of a social network can help us understand the key factors influencing interaction and collaboration in a virtual learning community (VLC). Here, we describe the mechanisms used in social network analysis (SNA) to analyse the social network structure of a VLC for teachers and discuss the relationship between face-to-face…

  15. A Survey of Students' Experiences on Collaborative Virtual Learning Activities Based on Five-Stage Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaman, M. Kemal; Özen, Sevil Orhan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to design collaborative virtual learning (CVL) activities by using a five-stage model (FSM) and survey of students' experiences. The study group consisted of 14 voluntary students in the Turkish Teaching Department. In this case study, data were collected through observations, recordings in Second Life (SL) and interviews.…

  16. Fostering Collaboration in CALL: Benefits and Challenges of Using Virtual Language Resource Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Liliana Cuesta; Alvarez, Claudia Patricia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a qualitative study on collaborative CALL design and implementation carried out with two groups of postgraduate language-teacher trainees who designed and piloted nine virtual language resource centres (VLRC) at 16 educational institutions of different levels and contents for an academic year. The project was…

  17. Tools for Virtual Collaboration Designed for High Resolution Hydrologic Research with Continental-Scale Data Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Christopher; Leonard, Lorne; Shi, Yuning; Bhatt, Gopal; Hanson, Paul; Gil, Yolanda; Yu, Xuan

    2015-04-01

    Using a series of recent examples and papers we explore some progress and potential for virtual (cyber-) collaboration inspired by access to high resolution, harmonized public-sector data at continental scales [1]. The first example describes 7 meso-scale catchments in Pennsylvania, USA where the watershed is forced by climate reanalysis and IPCC future climate scenarios (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). We show how existing public-sector data and community models are currently able to resolve fine-scale eco-hydrologic processes regarding wetland response to climate change [2]. The results reveal that regional climate change is only part of the story, with large variations in flood and drought response associated with differences in terrain, physiography, landuse and/or hydrogeology. The importance of community-driven virtual testbeds are demonstrated in the context of Critical Zone Observatories, where earth scientists from around the world are organizing hydro-geophysical data and model results to explore new processes that couple hydrologic models with land-atmosphere interaction, biogeochemical weathering, carbon-nitrogen cycle, landscape evolution and ecosystem services [3][4]. Critical Zone cyber-research demonstrates how data-driven model development requires a flexible computational structure where process modules are relatively easy to incorporate and where new data structures can be implemented [5]. From the perspective of "Big-Data" the paper points out that extrapolating results from virtual observatories to catchments at continental scales, will require centralized or cloud-based cyberinfrastructure as a necessary condition for effectively sharing petabytes of data and model results [6]. Finally we outline how innovative cyber-science is supporting earth-science learning, sharing and exploration through the use of on-line tools where hydrologists and limnologists are sharing data and models for simulating the coupled impacts of catchment

  18. Framework for Building Collaborative Research Environment

    DOE PAGES

    Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Palanisamy, Giriprakash; San Gil, Inigo

    2014-10-25

    Wide range of expertise and technologies are the key to solving some global problems. Semantic web technology can revolutionize the nature of how scientific knowledge is produced and shared. The semantic web is all about enabling machine-machine readability instead of a routine human-human interaction. Carefully structured data, as in machine readable data is the key to enabling these interactions. Drupal is an example of one such toolset that can render all the functionalities of Semantic Web technology right out of the box. Drupal’s content management system automatically stores the data in a structured format enabling it to be machine. Withinmore » this paper, we will discuss how Drupal promotes collaboration in a research setting such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Long Term Ecological Research Center (LTER) and how it is effectively using the Semantic Web in achieving this.« less

  19. Framework for Building Collaborative Research Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Palanisamy, Giriprakash; San Gil, Inigo

    2014-10-25

    Wide range of expertise and technologies are the key to solving some global problems. Semantic web technology can revolutionize the nature of how scientific knowledge is produced and shared. The semantic web is all about enabling machine-machine readability instead of a routine human-human interaction. Carefully structured data, as in machine readable data is the key to enabling these interactions. Drupal is an example of one such toolset that can render all the functionalities of Semantic Web technology right out of the box. Drupal’s content management system automatically stores the data in a structured format enabling it to be machine. Within this paper, we will discuss how Drupal promotes collaboration in a research setting such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Long Term Ecological Research Center (LTER) and how it is effectively using the Semantic Web in achieving this.

  20. From Multi-User Virtual Environment to 3D Virtual Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingstone, Daniel; Kemp, Jeremy; Edgar, Edmund

    2008-01-01

    While digital virtual worlds have been used in education for a number of years, advances in the capabilities and spread of technology have fed a recent boom in interest in massively multi-user 3D virtual worlds for entertainment, and this in turn has led to a surge of interest in their educational applications. In this paper we briefly review the…

  1. The Ames Virtual Environment Workstation: Implementation issues and requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Scott S.; Jacoby, R.; Bryson, S.; Stone, P.; Mcdowall, I.; Bolas, M.; Dasaro, D.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Coler, C.; Kerr, D.

    1991-01-01

    This presentation describes recent developments in the implementation of a virtual environment workstation in the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division of NASA's Ames Research Center. Introductory discussions are presented on the primary research objectives and applications of the system and on the system's current hardware and software configuration. Principle attention is then focused on unique issues and problems encountered in the workstation's development with emphasis on its ability to meet original design specifications for computational graphics performance and for associated human factors requirements necessary to provide compelling sense of presence and efficient interaction in the virtual environment.

  2. Spatial considerations for instructional development in a virtual environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Laurie; Pontecorvo, Michael; Grant, Frances; Stiles, Randy

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we discuss spatial considerations for instructional development in a virtual environment. For both the instructional developer and the student, the important spatial criteria are perspective, orientation, scale, level of visual detail, and granularity of simulation. Developing a representation that allows an instructional developer to specify spatial criteria and enables intelligent agents to reason about a given instructional problem is of paramount importance to the success of instruction delivered in a virtual environment, especially one that supports dynamic exploration or spans more than one scale of operation.

  3. Predicting Innovation Acceptance by Simulation in Virtual Environments (Theoretical Foundations)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Noel; Duran, Roberto; Aguayo, Humberto; Flores, Myrna

    This paper extends the current development of a methodology for Computer Aided Innovation. It begins with a presentation of concepts related to the perceived capabilities of virtual environments in the Innovation Cycle. The main premise establishes that it is possible to predict the acceptance of a new product in a specific market, by releasing an early prototype in a virtual scenario to quantify its general reception and to receive early feedback from potential customers. The paper continues to focus this research on a synergistic extension of techniques that have their origins in optimization and innovation disciplines. TRIZ (Theory of Inventive Problem Solving), extends the generation of variants with Evolutionary Algorithms (EA) and finally to present the designer and the intended customer, creative and innovative alternatives. All of this developed on a virtual software interface (Virtual World). The work continues with a general description of the project as a step forward to improve the overall strategy.

  4. The Virtual Cell Modeling and Simulation Software Environment

    PubMed Central

    Moraru, Ion I.; Schaff, James C.; Slepchenko, Boris M.; Blinov, Michael; Morgan, Frank; Lakshminarayana, Anuradha; Gao, Fei; Li, Ye; Loew, Leslie M.

    2009-01-01

    The Virtual Cell (VCell; http://vcell.org/) is a problem solving environment, built on a central database, for analysis, modeling and simulation of cell biological processes. VCell integrates a growing range of molecular mechanisms, including reaction kinetics, diffusion, flow, membrane transport, lateral membrane diffusion and electrophysiology, and can associate these with geometries derived from experimental microscope images. It has been developed and deployed as a web-based, distributed, client-server system, with more than a thousand world-wide users. VCell provides a separation of layers (core technologies and abstractions) representing biological models, physical mechanisms, geometry, mathematical models and numerical methods. This separation clarifies the impact of modeling decisions, assumptions, and approximations. The result is a physically consistent, mathematically rigorous, spatial modeling and simulation framework. Users create biological models and VCell will automatically (i) generate the appropriate mathematical encoding for running a simulation, and (ii) generate and compile the appropriate computer code. Both deterministic and stochastic algorithms are supported for describing and running non-spatial simulations; a full partial differential equation solver using the finite volume numerical algorithm is available for reaction-diffusion-advection simulations in complex cell geometries including 3D geometries derived from microscope images. Using the VCell database, models and model components can be reused and updated, as well as privately shared among collaborating groups, or published. Exchange of models with other tools is possible via import/export of SBML, CellML, and MatLab formats. Furthermore, curation of models is facilitated by external database binding mechanisms for unique identification of components and by standardized annotations compliant with the MIRIAM standard. VCell is now open source, with its native model encoding language

  5. Estimating Distance in Real and Virtual Environments: Does Order Make a Difference?

    PubMed Central

    Ziemer, Christine J.; Plumert, Jodie M.; Cremer, James F.; Kearney, Joseph K.

    2010-01-01

    This investigation examined how the order in which people experience real and virtual environments influences their distance estimates. Participants made two sets of distance estimates in one of the following conditions: 1) real environment first, virtual environment second; 2) virtual environment first, real environment second; 3) real environment first, real environment second; or 4) virtual environment first, virtual environment second. In Experiment 1, participants imagined how long it would take to walk to targets in real and virtual environments. Participants’ first estimates were significantly more accurate in the real than in the virtual environment. When the second environment was the same as the first environment (real-real and virtual-virtual), participants’ second estimates were also more accurate in the real than in the virtual environment. When the second environment differed from the first environment (real-virtual and virtual-real), however, participants’ second estimates did not differ significantly across the two environments. A second experiment in which participants walked blindfolded to targets in the real environment and imagined how long it would take to walk to targets in the virtual environment replicated these results. These subtle, yet persistent order effects suggest that memory can play an important role in distance perception. PMID:19525540

  6. A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior

    2004-12-22

    , immersive environment. The Virtual Engineering Framework (VEF), in effect a prototype framework, was developed through close collaboration with NETL supported research teams from Iowa State University Virtual Reality Applications Center (ISU-VRAC) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). The VEF is open source, compatible across systems ranging from inexpensive desktop PCs to large-scale, immersive facilities and provides support for heterogeneous distributed computing of plant simulations. The ability to compute plant economics through an interface that coupled the CMU IECM tool to the VEF was demonstrated, and the ability to couple the VEF to Aspen Plus, a commercial flowsheet modeling tool, was demonstrated. Models were interfaced to the framework using VES-Open. Tests were performed for interfacing CAPE-Open-compliant models to the framework. Where available, the developed models and plant simulations have been benchmarked against data from the open literature. The VEF has been installed at NETL. The VEF provides simulation capabilities not available in commercial simulation tools. It provides DOE engineers, scientists, and decision makers with a flexible and extensible simulation system that can be used to reduce the time, technical risk, and cost to develop the next generation of advanced, coal-fired power systems that will have low emissions and high efficiency. Furthermore, the VEF provides a common simulation system that NETL can use to help manage Advanced Power Systems Research projects, including both combustion- and gasification-based technologies.

  7. Immersive virtual environments in cue exposure.

    PubMed

    Kuntze, M F; Stoermer, R; Mager, R; Roessler, A; Mueller-Spahn, F; Bullinger, A H

    2001-08-01

    Cue reactivity to drug-related stimuli is a frequently observed phenomenon in drug addiction. Cue reactivity refers to a classical conditioned response pattern that occurs when an addicted subject is exposed to drug-related stimuli. This response consists of physiological and cognitive reactions. Craving, a subjective desire to use the drug of choice, is believed to play an important role in the occurrence of relapse in the natural setting. Besides craving, other subjective cue-elicited reactions have been reported, including withdrawal symptoms, drug-agonistic effects, and mood swings. Physiological reactions that have been investigated include skin conductance, heart rate, salivation, and body temperature. Conditioned reactivity to cues is an important factor in addiction to alcohol, nicotine, opiates, and cocaine. Cue exposure treatment (CET) refers to a manualized, repeated exposure to drug-related cues, aimed at the reduction of cue reactivity by extinction. In CET, different stimuli are presented, for example, slides, video tapes, pictures, or paraphernalia in nonrealistic, experimental settings. Most often assessments consist in subjective ratings by craving scales. Our pilot study will show that immersive virtual reality (IVR) is as good or even better in eliciting subjective and physiological craving symptoms as classical devices. PMID:11708729

  8. Constraint, Intelligence, and Control Hierarchy in Virtual Environments. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Thomas B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper seeks to deal directly with the question of what makes virtual actors and objects that are experienced in virtual environments seem real. (The term virtual reality, while more common in public usage, is an oxymoron; therefore virtual environment is the preferred term in this paper). Reality is difficult topic, treated for centuries in those sub-fields of philosophy called ontology- "of or relating to being or existence" and epistemology- "the study of the method and grounds of knowledge, especially with reference to its limits and validity" (both from Webster s, 1965). Advances in recent decades in the technologies of computers, sensors and graphics software have permitted human users to feel present or experience immersion in computer-generated virtual environments. This has motivated a keen interest in probing this phenomenon of presence and immersion not only philosophically but also psychologically and physiologically in terms of the parameters of the senses and sensory stimulation that correlate with the experience (Ellis, 1991). The pages of the journal Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments have seen much discussion of what makes virtual environments seem real (see, e.g., Slater, 1999; Slater et al. 1994; Sheridan, 1992, 2000). Stephen Ellis, when organizing the meeting that motivated this paper, suggested to invited authors that "We may adopt as an organizing principle for the meeting that the genesis of apparently intelligent interaction arises from an upwelling of constraints determined by a hierarchy of lower levels of behavioral interaction. "My first reaction was "huh?" and my second was "yeah, that seems to make sense." Accordingly the paper seeks to explain from the author s viewpoint, why Ellis s hypothesis makes sense. What is the connection of "presence" or "immersion" of an observer in a virtual environment, to "constraints" and what types of constraints. What of "intelligent interaction," and is it the intelligence of the

  9. The European disorder of sex development registry: a virtual research environment.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S F; Rodie, M; Jiang, J; Sinnott, R O

    2010-09-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSD) are a rare group of conditions which require further research. Effective research into understanding the aetiology, as well as long-term outcome of these rare conditions, requires multicentre collaboration often across national boundaries. The EU-funded EuroDSD programme (www.eurodsd.eu) is one such collaboration involving clinical centres and clinical and genetic experts across Europe. At the heart of the EuroDSD collaboration is a European DSD registry and a targeted virtual research environment (VRE) that supports the sharing of DSD data. Security, ethics and information governance are cornerstones of this infrastructure. This paper describes the infrastructure that has been developed, the inherent challenges in security, availability and dependability that must be overcome for the enterprise to succeed and provides a sample of the data that are stored in the registry along with a summary analysis of the current data sets. PMID:20501980

  10. Measuring Perceived Sociability of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreijns, Karel; Kirschner, Paul A.; Jochems, Wim; van Buuren, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Most asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments can be characterized as "functional" environments because they focus on functional, task-specific support, often disregarding explicit support for the social (emotional) aspects of learning in groups which are acknowledged by many educational researchers to be…

  11. International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, Jens

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign. Since 2012, in an effort coordinated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, UFD has advanced active collaboration with several international geologic disposal programs in Europe and Asia. Such collaboration allows the UFD Campaign to benefit from a deep knowledge base with regards to alternative repository environments developed over decades, and to utilize international investments in research facilities (such as underground research laboratories), saving millions of R&D dollars that have been and are being provided by other countries. To date, UFD’s International Disposal R&D Program has established formal collaboration agreements with five international initiatives and several international partners, and national lab scientists associated with UFD have conducted specific collaborative R&D activities that align well with its R&D priorities.

  12. Measuring Collaborative Consultation Practices in Natural Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basu, Semonti; Salisbury, Christine L.; Thorkildsen, Theresa A.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the development of the "Triadic Intervention and Evaluation Rating Scale" (TIERS), a 33-item instrument designed to evaluate patterns of parent, service provider, and child interactions during early intervention sessions conducted in natural environments. Twenty-eight parent-provider-child triads were videotaped in home and…

  13. A Collaborative Model for Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbosa, Jorge; Barbosa, Debora; Rabello, Solon

    2016-01-01

    Use of mobile devices and widespread adoption of wireless networks have enabled the emergence of Ubiquitous Computing. Application of this technology to improving education strategies gave rise to Ubiquitous e-Learning, also known as Ubiquitous Learning. There are several approaches to organizing ubiquitous learning environments, but most of them…

  14. Perceiving interpersonally-mediated risk in virtual environments

    PubMed Central

    Portnoy, David B.; Smoak, Natalie D.; Marsh, Kerry L.

    2009-01-01

    Using virtual reality (VR) to examine risky behavior that is mediated by interpersonal contact, such as agreeing to have sex, drink, or smoke with someone, offers particular promise and challenges. Social contextual stimuli that might trigger impulsive responses can be carefully controlled in virtual environments (VE), and yet manipulations of risk might be implausible to participants if they do not feel sufficiently immersed in the environment. The current study examined whether individuals can display adequate evidence of presence in a VE that involved potential interpersonally-induced risk: meeting a potential dating partner. Results offered some evidence for the potential of VR for the study of such interpersonal risk situations. Participants’ reaction to the scenario and risk-associated responses to the situation suggested that the embodied nature of virtual reality override the reality of the risk’s impossibility, allowing participants to experience adequate situational embedding, or presence. PMID:20228871

  15. Using Highly Interactive Virtual Environments for Safeguards Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, Bradley S; Alcala, Benjamin S; Alcala, Scott; Eipeldauer, Mary D; Weil, Logan B

    2010-01-01

    Highly interactive virtual environment (HIVE) is a term that refers to interactive educational simulations, serious games and virtual worlds. Studies indicate that learning with the aid of interactive environments produces better retention and depth of knowledge by promoting improved trainee engagement and understanding. Virtual reality or three dimensional (3D) visualization is often used to promote the understanding of something when personal observation, photographs, drawings, and/or sketches are not possible or available. Subjects and situations, either real or hypothetical, can be developed using a 3D model. Models can be tailored to the audience allowing safeguards and security features to be demonstrated for educational purposes in addition to engineering evaluation and performance analysis. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has begun evaluating the feasibility of HIVEs for improving safeguards activities such as training, mission planning, and evaluating worker task performance. This paper will discuss the development workflow of HIVEs and present some recent examples.

  16. VIBE: A virtual biomolecular environment for interactive molecular modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Neira, C.; Langley, R.; Bash, P.A.

    1996-12-31

    Virtual reality tightly coupled to high performance computing and communications ushers in a new era for the study of molecular recognition and the rational design of pharmaceutical compounds. We have created a Virtual Biomolecular Environment (VIBE), which consists of (1) massively parallel computing to simulate the physical and chemical properties of a molecular system, (2) the Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) for immersive display and interaction with the molecular system, and (3) a high-speed network interface to exchange data between the simulation and the CAVE. VIBE enables molecular scientists to have a visual, auditory, and haptic experience with a chemical system, while simultaneously manipulating its physical properties by steering, in real-time, a simulation executed on a supercomputer. We demonstrate the characteristics of VIBE using an HIV protease-cyclic urea inhibitor complex. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Cognitive Collaboration Found in Cardiac Physiology: Study in Classroom Environment.

    PubMed

    Ahonen, Lauri; Cowley, Benjamin; Torniainen, Jari; Ukkonen, Antti; Vihavainen, Arto; Puolamäki, Kai

    2016-01-01

    It is known that periods of intense social interaction result in shared patterns in collaborators' physiological signals. However, applied quantitative research on collaboration is hindered due to scarcity of objective metrics of teamwork effectiveness. Indeed, especially in the domain of productive, ecologically-valid activity such as programming, there is a lack of evidence for the most effective, affordable and reliable measures of collaboration quality. In this study we investigate synchrony in physiological signals between collaborating computer science students performing pair-programming exercises in a class room environment. We recorded electrocardiography over the course of a 60 minute programming session, using lightweight physiological sensors. We employ correlation of heart-rate variability features to study social psychophysiological compliance of the collaborating students. We found evident physiological compliance in collaborating dyads' heart-rate variability signals. Furthermore, dyads' self-reported workload was associated with the physiological compliance. Our results show viability of a novel approach to field measurement using lightweight devices in an uncontrolled environment, and suggest that self-reported collaboration quality can be assessed via physiological signals. PMID:27416036

  18. Measuring Performance of Virtual Learning Environment System in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, William; Higson, Helen E.; Dey, Prasanta K.; Xu, Xiaowei; Bahsoon, Rami

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to measure the performance of commercial virtual learning environment (VLE) systems, which helps the decision makers to select the appropriate system for their institutions. Design/methodology/approach: This paper develops an integrated multiple criteria decision making approach, which combines the analytic…

  19. Design Characteristics of Virtual Learning Environments: An Expert Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Daniel; Strohmeier, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Virtual learning environments (VLE) constitute the current information systems' (IS) category for electronically supported corporate training and development. Frequently supposed advantages of using VLE refer, for instance, to the efficiency, individuality, ubiquity, timeliness and task orientation of learning. However, a crucial precondition of…

  20. What Are the Learning Affordances of 3-D Virtual Environments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalgarno, Barney; Lee, Mark J. W.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the potential learning benefits of three-dimensional (3-D) virtual learning environments (VLEs). Drawing on published research spanning two decades, it identifies a set of unique characteristics of 3-D VLEs, which includes aspects of their representational fidelity and aspects of the learner-computer interactivity they…

  1. The Influence of Advice in a Virtual Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulford, Briony D.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of asynchronous discussion in a virtual learning environment, Blackboard, on subsequent coursework grades was examined with 166 psychology students to determine whether asking questions of the tutor online, and/or reading the questions and the given advice, influenced the grades on the report they were writing. A repeated-measures…

  2. Virtual Environment Interpersonal Trust Scale: Validity and Reliability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usta, Ertugrul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is in the process of interpersonal communication in virtual environments is available from the trust problem is to develop a measurement tool. Trust in the process of distance education today, and has been a factor to be investigated. People, who take distance education course, they could may remain within the process…

  3. Virtual Learning Environments in Teacher Education: A Journal, a Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) in teacher education have a short history which is little longer than that of this journal. Twenty years ago they were the province of early adopters only and limited to email and, more unusually, asynchronous conferencing. Today, VLEs are widespread and mainstream, sophisticated and officially sanctioned…

  4. Virtual Environment Training: Auxiliary Machinery Room (AMR) Watchstation Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hriber, Dennis C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a project implemented at Newport News Shipbuilding that used Virtual Environment Training to improve the performance of submarine crewmen. Highlights include development of the Auxiliary Machine Room (AMR) Watchstation Trainer; Digital Video Interactive (DVI); screen layout; test design and evaluation; user reactions; authoring language;…

  5. Designing Assessments and Assessing Designs in Virtual Educational Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Daniel T.; Ingram-Goble, Adam A.; Jameson, Ellen M.

    2009-01-01

    This study used innovative assessment practices to obtain and document broad learning outcomes for a 15-hour game-based curriculum in Quest Atlantis, a multi-user virtual environment that supports school-based participation in socio scientific inquiry in ecological sciences. Design-based methods were used to refine and align the enactment of…

  6. Creating a Virtual Learning Environment for Gifted and Talented Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulrine, Christopher F.

    2007-01-01

    This article illustrates how teachers can infuse best practices from both gifted and talented education and information technology to benefit gifted and talented students through the creation of a virtual classroom learning environment. The author has used this assignment in an assistive technology course as an assignment for teacher preparation…

  7. Live Virtual Constructive Distributed Test Environment Characterization Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Jim; Kim, Sam K.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents message latencies observed over various Live, Virtual, Constructive, (LVC) simulation environment configurations designed to emulate possible system architectures for the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project integrated tests. For each configuration, four scenarios with progressively increasing air traffic loads were used to determine system throughput and bandwidth impacts on message latency.

  8. Teacher Practice in Multi User Virtual Environments: A Fourth Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calandra, Brendan; Puvirajah, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Practicing teaching is an important aspect of teacher education, however, its implementation can be limited due to the constraints and risks related to practicing in actual schools. There is evidence in the literature of Multi User Virtual Environments (MUVEs) being used as spaces for training, especially in fields where the costs associated with…

  9. Multiple Intelligences in Virtual and Traditional Skill Instructional Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKethan, Robert; Rabinowitz, Erik; Kernodle, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine (a) how Multiple Intelligence (MI) strengths correlate to learning in virtual and traditional environments and (b) the effectiveness of learning with and without an authority figure in attendance. Participants (N=69) were randomly assigned to four groups, administered the Multiple Intelligences…

  10. Can Virtual Environments Enhance the Learning of Historical Chronology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Nigel; Boyd-Davis, Stephen; Moar, Magnus; Korallo, Liliya; Chappell, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Historical time and chronological sequence are usually conveyed to pupils via the presentation of semantic information on printed worksheets, events being rote-memorised according to date. We explored the use of virtual environments in which successive historical events were depicted as "places" in time-space, encountered sequentially in a…

  11. Evaluating Virtual Learning Environments: What Are We Measuring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Mary C.; Campello, Silvio Barreto

    2003-01-01

    A basic framework is proposed to distinguish between the many ways in which Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) can be evaluated. This includes the purpose of the evaluation, the type of methods that might be used and the measures employed. The framework is not intended to cover all applications but offers one means of structuring a review of…

  12. Minimizing Input-to-Output Latency in Virtual Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelstein, Bernard D.; Ellis, Stephen R.; Hill, Michael I.

    2009-01-01

    A method and apparatus were developed to minimize latency (time delay ) in virtual environment (VE) and other discrete- time computer-base d systems that require real-time display in response to sensor input s. Latency in such systems is due to the sum of the finite time requi red for information processing and communication within and between sensors, software, and displays.

  13. Learning Objects and Virtual Learning Environments Technical Evaluation Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Dagiene, Valentina

    2009-01-01

    The main scientific problems investigated in this article deal with technical evaluation of quality attributes of the main components of e-Learning systems (referred here as DLEs--Digital Libraries of Educational Resources and Services), i.e., Learning Objects (LOs) and Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs). The main research object of the work is…

  14. Avatars Go to Class: A Virtual Environment Soil Science Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamo, M.; Namuth-Covert, D.; Guru, A.; Nugent, G.; Phillips, L.; Sandall, L.; Kettler, T.; McCallister, D.

    2011-01-01

    Web 2.0 technology is expanding rapidly from social and gaming uses into the educational applications. Specifically, the multi-user virtual environment (MUVE), such as SecondLife, allows educators to fill the gap of first-hand experience by creating simulated realistic evolving problems/games. In a pilot study, a team of educators at the…

  15. Virtual Environments and Autism: A Developmental Psychopathological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajendran, G.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders supposedly have an affinity with information and communication technology (ICT), making it an ideally suited media for this population. Virtual environments (VEs)--both two-dimensional and immersive--represent a particular kind of ICT that might be of special benefit. Specifically, this paper discusses…

  16. The Potential and Uniqueness of Virtual Environments for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Leslie A.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual environments (VEs) are growing in popularity among educators and have unique potential for online learning. This paper describes the unique characteristics of VEs that make them an effective venue for online learning due to increased environmental presence. Unique characteristics of VEs include nature of visual stimuli, control of the…

  17. Teaching Social Skills in a Virtual Environment: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Jason; Parks-Savage, Agatha; Rehfuss, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory study which examines the use of virtual environment technology as a tool to teach elementary school children social skills. Small group interventions were assessed to determine how the participants were measurably different on 7 different dependent variables: problem behaviors, academic competence,…

  18. EXPLORING ENVIRONMENTAL DATA IN A HIGHLY IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL REALITY ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geography inherently fills a 3D space and yet we struggle with displaying geography using, primaarily, 2D display devices. Virtual environments offer a more realistically-dimensioned display space and this is being realized in the expanding area of research on 3D Geographic Infor...

  19. Language Learning in Virtual Reality Environments: Past, Present, and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Tsun-Ju; Lan, Yu-Ju

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the research trends in language learning in a virtual reality environment by conducting a content analysis of findings published in the literature from 2004 to 2013 in four top ranked computer-assisted language learning journals: "Language Learning & Technology," "CALICO Journal," "Computer…

  20. Personalized Messages That Promote Science Learning in Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Roxana; Mayer, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    College students learned how to design the roots, stem, and leaves of plants to survive in five different virtual reality environments through an agent-based multimedia educational game. For each student, the agent used personalized speech (e.g., including I and you) or nonpersonalized speech (e.g., 3rd-person monologue), and the game was…

  1. A Framework for Pedagogical Evaluation of Virtual Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britain, Sandy; Liber, Oleg

    Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) are learning management software systems that synthesize the functionality of computer-mediated communications software and online methods of delivering course materials. This report focuses on how to evaluate the properties, capabilities and orientation of different systems from an educational perspective, and…

  2. Personalized Virtual Learning Environment from the Detection of Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez Cartas, M. L.; Cruz Pérez, N.; Deliche Quesada, D.; Mateo Quero, S.

    2013-01-01

    Through the previous detection of existing learning styles in a classroom, a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) has been designed for students of several Engineering degrees, using the Learning Management System (LMS) utilized in the University of Jaen, ILIAS. Learning styles of three different Knowledge Areas; Chemical Engineering, Materials…

  3. Avatars, Pedagogical Agents, and Virtual Environments: Social Learning Systems Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ausburn, Lynna J.; Martens, Jon; Dotterer, Gary; Calhoun, Pat

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a review of literature that introduces major concepts and issues in using avatars and pedagogical agents in first- and second-person virtual environments (VEs) for learning online. In these VEs, avatars and pedagogical agents represent self and other learners/participants or serve as personal learning "guides". The…

  4. Individual Differences in a Spatial-Semantic Virtual Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chaomei

    2000-01-01

    Presents two empirical case studies concerning the role of individual differences in searching through a spatial-semantic virtual environment. Discusses information visualization in information systems; cognitive factors, including associative memory, spatial ability, and visual memory; user satisfaction; and cognitive abilities and search…

  5. PGDnet: A New Problem-Solving Virtual Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Emilio; Rodriguez-Marciel, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to provide information about the virtual learning environment known as PGDnet (the Spanish acronym for "Plataforma de Gestion Docente" or Educational Management Platform in English), which was developed by the innovative education group at the Technical University of Madrid known as "Nuevas metodologias docentes en…

  6. Designing for Real-World Scientific Inquiry in Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketelhut, Diane Jass; Nelson, Brian C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Most policy doctrines promote the use of scientific inquiry in the K-12 classroom, but good inquiry is hard to implement, particularly for schools with fiscal and safety constraints and for teachers struggling with understanding how to do so. Purpose: In this paper, we present the design of a multi-user virtual environment (MUVE)…

  7. DELIVERing Library Resources to the Virtual Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secker, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Examines a project to integrate digital libraries and virtual learning environments (VLE) focusing on requirements for online reading list systems. Design/methodology/approach: Conducted a user needs analysis using interviews and focus groups and evaluated three reading or resource list management systems. Findings: Provides a technical…

  8. Wayfinding Behaviour in Down Syndrome: A Study with Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courbois, Yannick; Farran, Emily K.; Lemahieu, Axelle; Blades, Mark; Mengue-Topio, Hursula; Sockeel, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess wayfinding abilities in individuals with Down syndrome (DS). The ability to learn routes though a virtual environment (VE) and to make a novel shortcut between two locations was assessed in individuals with DS (N = 10) and control participants individually matched on mental age (MA) or chronological age (CA).…

  9. Blended University Teaching Using Virtual Learning Environments: Conceptions and Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lameras, Petros; Levy, Philippa; Paraskakis, Iraklis; Webber, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a phenomenographic investigation into blended university teaching using virtual learning environments (VLEs). Interviews with 25 Computer Science teachers in Greek universities illuminated a spectrum of teachers' conceptions and approaches from "teacher-focused and content-oriented", through "student-focused and…

  10. Predicting Virtual Learning Environment Adoption: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penjor, Sonam; Zander, Pär-Ola

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the significance of Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations (DOI) theory with regard to the use of a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) at the Royal University of Bhutan (RUB). The focus is on different adoption types and characteristics of users. Rogers' DOI theory is applied to investigate the influence of five predictors…

  11. Identifying Different Registers of Digital Literacy in Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knutsson, Ola; Blasjo, Mona.; Hallsten, Stina; Karlstrom, Petter

    2012-01-01

    In this paper social semiotics, and systemic functional linguistics in particular, are used in order to identify registers of digital literacy in the use of virtual learning environments. The framework of social semiotics provides means to systemize and discuss digital literacy as a linguistic and semiotic issue. The following research question…

  12. Simulation of Physical Experiments in Immersive Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Wasfy, Tamer M.

    2001-01-01

    An object-oriented event-driven immersive Virtual environment is described for the creation of virtual labs (VLs) for simulating physical experiments. Discussion focuses on a number of aspects of the VLs, including interface devices, software objects, and various applications. The VLs interface with output devices, including immersive stereoscopic screed(s) and stereo speakers; and a variety of input devices, including body tracking (head and hands), haptic gloves, wand, joystick, mouse, microphone, and keyboard. The VL incorporates the following types of primitive software objects: interface objects, support objects, geometric entities, and finite elements. Each object encapsulates a set of properties, methods, and events that define its behavior, appearance, and functions. A container object allows grouping of several objects. Applications of the VLs include viewing the results of the physical experiment, viewing a computer simulation of the physical experiment, simulation of the experiments procedure, computational steering, and remote control of the physical experiment. In addition, the VL can be used as a risk-free (safe) environment for training. The implementation of virtual structures testing machines, virtual wind tunnels, and a virtual acoustic testing facility is described.

  13. Virtual images inspired consolidate collaborative representation-based classification method for face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shigang; Zhang, Xinxin; Peng, Yali; Cao, Han

    2016-07-01

    The collaborative representation-based classification method performs well in the field of classification of high-dimensional images such as face recognition. It utilizes training samples from all classes to represent a test sample and assigns a class label to the test sample using the representation residuals. However, this method still suffers from the problem that limited number of training sample influences the classification accuracy when applied to image classification. In this paper, we propose a modified collaborative representation-based classification method (MCRC), which exploits novel virtual images and can obtain high classification accuracy. The procedure to produce virtual images is very simple but the use of them can bring surprising performance improvement. The virtual images can sufficiently denote the features of original face images in some case. Extensive experimental results doubtlessly demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively improve the classification accuracy. This is mainly attributed to the integration of the collaborative representation and the proposed feature-information dominated virtual images.

  14. NASA Virtual Glovebox: An Immersive Virtual Desktop Environment for Training Astronauts in Life Science Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twombly, I. Alexander; Smith, Jeffrey; Bruyns, Cynthia; Montgomery, Kevin; Boyle, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The International Space Station will soon provide an unparalleled research facility for studying the near- and longer-term effects of microgravity on living systems. Using the Space Station Glovebox Facility - a compact, fully contained reach-in environment - astronauts will conduct technically challenging life sciences experiments. Virtual environment technologies are being developed at NASA Ames Research Center to help realize the scientific potential of this unique resource by facilitating the experimental hardware and protocol designs and by assisting the astronauts in training. The Virtual GloveboX (VGX) integrates high-fidelity graphics, force-feedback devices and real- time computer simulation engines to achieve an immersive training environment. Here, we describe the prototype VGX system, the distributed processing architecture used in the simulation environment, and modifications to the visualization pipeline required to accommodate the display configuration.

  15. Guest Editor's introduction: Special issue on distributed virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Rodger

    1998-09-01

    Distributed virtual environments (DVEs) combine technology from 3D graphics, virtual reality and distributed systems to provide an interactive 3D scene that supports multiple participants. Each participant has a representation in the scene, often known as an avatar, and is free to navigate through the scene and interact with both the scene and other viewers of the scene. Changes to the scene, for example, position changes of one avatar as the associated viewer navigates through the scene, or changes to objects in the scene via manipulation, are propagated in real time to all viewers. This ensures that all viewers of a shared scene `see' the same representation of it, allowing sensible reasoning about the scene. Early work on such environments was restricted to their use in simulation, in particular in military simulation. However, over recent years a number of interesting and potentially far-reaching attempts have been made to exploit the technology for a range of other uses, including: Social spaces. Such spaces can be seen as logical extensions of the familiar text chat space. In 3D social spaces avatars, representing participants, can meet in shared 3D scenes and in addition to text chat can use visual cues and even in some cases spatial audio. Collaborative working. A number of recent projects have attempted to explore the use of DVEs to facilitate computer-supported collaborative working (CSCW), where the 3D space provides a context and work space for collaboration. Gaming. The shared 3D space is already familiar, albeit in a constrained manner, to the gaming community. DVEs are a logical superset of existing 3D games and can provide a rich framework for advanced gaming applications. e-commerce. The ability to navigate through a virtual shopping mall and to look at, and even interact with, 3D representations of articles has appealed to the e-commerce community as it searches for the best method of presenting merchandise to electronic consumers. The technology

  16. BIM based virtual environment for fire emergency evacuation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Li, Haijiang; Rezgui, Yacine; Bradley, Alex; Ong, Hoang N

    2014-01-01

    Recent building emergency management research has highlighted the need for the effective utilization of dynamically changing building information. BIM (building information modelling) can play a significant role in this process due to its comprehensive and standardized data format and integrated process. This paper introduces a BIM based virtual environment supported by virtual reality (VR) and a serious game engine to address several key issues for building emergency management, for example, timely two-way information updating and better emergency awareness training. The focus of this paper lies on how to utilize BIM as a comprehensive building information provider to work with virtual reality technologies to build an adaptable immersive serious game environment to provide real-time fire evacuation guidance. The innovation lies on the seamless integration between BIM and a serious game based virtual reality (VR) environment aiming at practical problem solving by leveraging state-of-the-art computing technologies. The system has been tested for its robustness and functionality against the development requirements, and the results showed promising potential to support more effective emergency management. PMID:25197704

  17. BIM Based Virtual Environment for Fire Emergency Evacuation

    PubMed Central

    Rezgui, Yacine; Ong, Hoang N.

    2014-01-01

    Recent building emergency management research has highlighted the need for the effective utilization of dynamically changing building information. BIM (building information modelling) can play a significant role in this process due to its comprehensive and standardized data format and integrated process. This paper introduces a BIM based virtual environment supported by virtual reality (VR) and a serious game engine to address several key issues for building emergency management, for example, timely two-way information updating and better emergency awareness training. The focus of this paper lies on how to utilize BIM as a comprehensive building information provider to work with virtual reality technologies to build an adaptable immersive serious game environment to provide real-time fire evacuation guidance. The innovation lies on the seamless integration between BIM and a serious game based virtual reality (VR) environment aiming at practical problem solving by leveraging state-of-the-art computing technologies. The system has been tested for its robustness and functionality against the development requirements, and the results showed promising potential to support more effective emergency management. PMID:25197704

  18. BIM based virtual environment for fire emergency evacuation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Li, Haijiang; Rezgui, Yacine; Bradley, Alex; Ong, Hoang N

    2014-01-01

    Recent building emergency management research has highlighted the need for the effective utilization of dynamically changing building information. BIM (building information modelling) can play a significant role in this process due to its comprehensive and standardized data format and integrated process. This paper introduces a BIM based virtual environment supported by virtual reality (VR) and a serious game engine to address several key issues for building emergency management, for example, timely two-way information updating and better emergency awareness training. The focus of this paper lies on how to utilize BIM as a comprehensive building information provider to work with virtual reality technologies to build an adaptable immersive serious game environment to provide real-time fire evacuation guidance. The innovation lies on the seamless integration between BIM and a serious game based virtual reality (VR) environment aiming at practical problem solving by leveraging state-of-the-art computing technologies. The system has been tested for its robustness and functionality against the development requirements, and the results showed promising potential to support more effective emergency management.

  19. Supporting Scientific Analysis within Collaborative Problem Solving Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Velvin R.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Collaborative problem solving environments for scientists should contain the analysis tools the scientists require in addition to the remote collaboration tools used for general communication. Unfortunately, most scientific analysis tools have been designed for a "stand-alone mode" and cannot be easily modified to work well in a collaborative environment. This paper addresses the questions, "What features are desired in a scientific analysis tool contained within a collaborative environment?", "What are the tool design criteria needed to provide these features?", and "What support is required from the architecture to support these design criteria?." First, the features of scientific analysis tools that are important for effective analysis in collaborative environments are listed. Next, several design criteria for developing analysis tools that will provide these features are presented. Then requirements for the architecture to support these design criteria are listed. Sonic proposed architectures for collaborative problem solving environments are reviewed and their capabilities to support the specified design criteria are discussed. A deficiency in the most popular architecture for remote application sharing, the ITU T. 120 architecture, prevents it from supporting highly interactive, dynamic, high resolution graphics. To illustrate that the specified design criteria can provide a highly effective analysis tool within a collaborative problem solving environment, a scientific analysis tool that contains the specified design criteria has been integrated into a collaborative environment and tested for effectiveness. The tests were conducted in collaborations between remote sites in the US and between remote sites on different continents. The tests showed that the tool (a tool for the visual analysis of computer simulations of physics) was highly effective for both synchronous and asynchronous collaborative analyses. The important features provided by the tool (and

  20. Cognitive Collaboration Found in Cardiac Physiology: Study in Classroom Environment

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Benjamin; Torniainen, Jari; Ukkonen, Antti; Vihavainen, Arto; Puolamäki, Kai

    2016-01-01

    It is known that periods of intense social interaction result in shared patterns in collaborators’ physiological signals. However, applied quantitative research on collaboration is hindered due to scarcity of objective metrics of teamwork effectiveness. Indeed, especially in the domain of productive, ecologically-valid activity such as programming, there is a lack of evidence for the most effective, affordable and reliable measures of collaboration quality. In this study we investigate synchrony in physiological signals between collaborating computer science students performing pair-programming exercises in a class room environment. We recorded electrocardiography over the course of a 60 minute programming session, using lightweight physiological sensors. We employ correlation of heart-rate variability features to study social psychophysiological compliance of the collaborating students. We found evident physiological compliance in collaborating dyads’ heart-rate variability signals. Furthermore, dyads’ self-reported workload was associated with the physiological compliance. Our results show viability of a novel approach to field measurement using lightweight devices in an uncontrolled environment, and suggest that self-reported collaboration quality can be assessed via physiological signals. PMID:27416036

  1. Instructional Design Practices in the Design and Development of Digital Humanities Virtual Environments (DH-VEs)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Valerie Hunter

    2011-01-01

    Virtual environments, virtual worlds, simulations, 3D models are loaded with potential, promise, and problems. While learning in virtual settings is still being researched, instructional designers are challenged as to which instructional design practices are best suited for virtual environments (VEs). The problem is there is a lack of a conceptual…

  2. Virtual Environments Using Video Capture for Social Phobia with Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    White, Richard; Clarke, Timothy; Turner, Ruth; Fowler, David

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A novel virtual environment (VE) system was developed and used as an adjunct to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with six socially anxious patients recovering from psychosis. The novel aspect of the VE system is that it uses video capture so the patients can see a life-size projection of themselves interacting with a specially scripted and digitally edited filmed environment played in real time on a screen in front of them. Within-session process outcomes (subjective units of distress and belief ratings on individual behavioral experiments), as well as patient feedback, generated the hypothesis that this type of virtual environment can potentially add value to CBT by helping patients understand the role of avoidance and safety behaviors in the maintenance of social anxiety and paranoia and by boosting their confidence to carry out “real-life” behavioral experiments. PMID:23659722

  3. Using Virtual Reality Environment to Improve Joint Attention Associated with Pervasive Developmental Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Yufang; Huang, Ruowen

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study is using data glove to practice Joint attention skill in virtual reality environment for people with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD). The virtual reality environment provides a safe environment for PDD people. Especially, when they made errors during practice in virtual reality environment, there is no suffering or…

  4. A Process Study of the Development of Virtual Research Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, I.; Cooper, K.; McGrath, R.; Griego, G.; Poole, M. S.; Hanisch, R. J.

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, cyberinfrastructures have been deployed to create virtual research environments (VREs) - such as the Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) - to enhance the quality and speed of scientific research, and to foster global scientific communities. Our study utilizes process methodology to study the evolution of VREs. This approach focuses on a series of events that bring about or lead to some outcome, and attempts to specify the generative mechanism that could produce the event series. This paper briefly outlines our approach and describes initial results of a case study of the VAO, one of the participating VREs. The case study is based on interviews with seven individuals participating in the VAO, and analysis of project documents and online resources. These sources are hand tagged to identify events related to the thematic tracks, to yield a narrative of the project. Results demonstrate the event series of an organization through traditional methods augmented by virtual sources.

  5. From planes to brains: parallels between military development of virtual reality environments and virtual neurological surgery.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Paul J; Agarwal, Nitin; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2012-01-01

    Military explorations of the practical role of simulators have served as a driving force for much of the virtual reality technology that we have today. The evolution of 3-dimensional and virtual environments from the early flight simulators used during World War II to the sophisticated training simulators in the modern military followed a path that virtual surgical and neurosurgical devices have already begun to parallel. By understanding the evolution of military simulators as well as comparing and contrasting that evolution with current and future surgical simulators, it may be possible to expedite the development of appropriate devices and establish their validity as effective training tools. As such, this article presents a historical perspective examining the progression of neurosurgical simulators, the establishment of effective and appropriate curricula for using them, and the contributions that the military has made during the ongoing maturation of this exciting treatment and training modality.

  6. Assessment of radiation awareness training in immersive virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whisker, Vaughn E., III

    The prospect of new nuclear power plant orders in the near future and the graying of the current workforce create a need to train new personnel faster and better. Immersive virtual reality (VR) may offer a solution to the training challenge. VR technology presented in a CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) provides a high-fidelity, one-to-one scale environment where areas of the power plant can be recreated and virtual radiation environments can be simulated, making it possible to safely expose workers to virtual radiation in the context of the actual work environment. The use of virtual reality for training is supported by many educational theories; constructivism and discovery learning, in particular. Educational theory describes the importance of matching the training to the task. Plant access training and radiation worker training, common forms of training in the nuclear industry, rely on computer-based training methods in most cases, which effectively transfer declarative knowledge, but are poor at transferring skills. If an activity were to be added, the training would provide personnel with the opportunity to develop skills and apply their knowledge so they could be more effective when working in the radiation environment. An experiment was developed to test immersive virtual reality's suitability for training radiation awareness. Using a mixed methodology of quantitative and qualitative measures, the subjects' performances before and after training were assessed. First, subjects completed a pre-test to measure their knowledge prior to completing any training. Next they completed unsupervised computer-based training, which consisted of a PowerPoint presentation and a PDF document. After completing a brief orientation activity in the virtual environment, one group of participants received supplemental radiation awareness training in a simulated radiation environment presented in the CAVE, while a second group, the control group, moved directly to the

  7. Rapid prototyping 3D virtual world interfaces within a virtual factory environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosta, Charles Paul; Krolak, Patrick D.

    1993-01-01

    On-going work into user requirements analysis using CLIPS (NASA/JSC) expert systems as an intelligent event simulator has led to research into three-dimensional (3D) interfaces. Previous work involved CLIPS and two-dimensional (2D) models. Integral to this work was the development of the University of Massachusetts Lowell parallel version of CLIPS, called PCLIPS. This allowed us to create both a Software Bus and a group problem-solving environment for expert systems development. By shifting the PCLIPS paradigm to use the VEOS messaging protocol we have merged VEOS (HlTL/Seattle) and CLIPS into a distributed virtual worlds prototyping environment (VCLIPS). VCLIPS uses the VEOS protocol layer to allow multiple experts to cooperate on a single problem. We have begun to look at the control of a virtual factory. In the virtual factory there are actors and objects as found in our Lincoln Logs Factory of the Future project. In this artificial reality architecture there are three VCLIPS entities in action. One entity is responsible for display and user events in the 3D virtual world. Another is responsible for either simulating the virtual factory or communicating with the real factory. The third is a user interface expert. The interface expert maps user input levels, within the current prototype, to control information for the factory. The interface to the virtual factory is based on a camera paradigm. The graphics subsystem generates camera views of the factory on standard X-Window displays. The camera allows for view control and object control. Control or the factory is accomplished by the user reaching into the camera views to perform object interactions. All communication between the separate CLIPS expert systems is done through VEOS.

  8. Students' Groupwork Management in Online Collaborative Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Jianzhong; Du, Jianxia; Fan, Xitao

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates empirical models of groupwork management in online collaborative learning environments, based on the data from 298 students (86 groups) in United States. Data revealed that, at the group level, groupwork management was positively associated with feedback and help seeking. Data further revealed that, at the individual…

  9. VisSearch: A Collaborative Web Searching Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Young-Jin

    2005-01-01

    VisSearch is a collaborative Web searching environment intended for sharing Web search results among people with similar interests, such as college students taking the same course. It facilitates students' Web searches by visualizing various Web searching processes. It also collects the visualized Web search results and applies an association rule…

  10. Finite element visualization in the cave virtual reality environment

    SciTech Connect

    Plaskacz, E.J.; Kuhn, M.A.

    1996-03-01

    Through the use of the post-processing software, Virtual Reality visualization (VRviz), and the Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE), finite element representations can be viewed as they would be in real life. VRviz is a program written in ANSI C to translate the mathematical results generated by finite element analysis programs into a virtual representation. This virtual representation is projected into the CAVE environment and the results are animated. The animation is fully controllable. A user is able to translate the image, rotate about any axis and scale the image at any time. The user is also able to freeze the animation at any time step and control the image update rate. This allows the user to navigate around, or even inside, the image in order to effectively analyze possible failure points and redesign as necessary. Through the use of the CAVE and the real life image that is being produced by VRviz, engineers are able to save considerable time, money, and effort in the design process.

  11. Designing Assessments and Assessing Designs in Virtual Educational Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey, Daniel T.; Ingram-Goble, Adam A.; Jameson, Ellen M.

    2009-04-01

    This study used innovative assessment practices to obtain and document broad learning outcomes for a 15-hour game-based curriculum in Quest Atlantis, a multi-user virtual environment that supports school-based participation in socio scientific inquiry in ecological sciences. Design-based methods were used to refine and align the enactment of virtual narrative and scientific investigations to a challenging problem solving assessment and indirectly to achievement test items that were independent of the curriculum. In study one, one-sixth grade teacher used the curriculum in two of his classes and obtained larger gains in understanding and achievement than his two other classes, which used an expository text to learn the same concepts and skills. Further treatment refinements were carried out, and two forms of virtual formative feedback were introduced. In study two, the same teacher used the curriculum in all four of his classes; the revised curriculum resulted in even larger gains in understanding and achievement. Gains averaged 1.1 SD and 0.4 SD, respectively, with greater gains shown for students who engaged more with formative feedback. Principles for assessing designs and designing assessments in virtual environments are presented.

  12. The virtual library in action: Collaborative international control of high-energy physics pre-print

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitz, P.A.; Addis, L.; Galic, H.; Johnson, T.

    1996-02-01

    This paper will discuss how control of the grey literature in high-energy physics pre-prints developed through a collaborative effort of librarians and physicists. It will highlight the critical steps in the development process and describe one model of a rapidly evolving virtual library for high-energy physics information. In conclusion, this paper will extend this physics model to other areas of grey literature management.

  13. Nomad devices for interactions in immersive virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Paul; Kemeny, Andras; Merienne, Frédéric; Chardonnet, Jean-Rémy; Thouvenin, Indira Mouttapa; Posselt, Javier; Icart, Emmanuel

    2013-03-01

    Renault is currently setting up a new CAVE™, a 5 rear-projected wall virtual reality room with a combined 3D resolution of 100 Mpixels, distributed over sixteen 4k projectors and two 2k projector as well as an additional 3D HD collaborative powerwall. Renault's CAVE™ aims at answering needs of the various vehicle conception steps [1]. Starting from vehicle Design, through the subsequent Engineering steps, Ergonomic evaluation and perceived quality control, Renault has built up a list of use-cases and carried out an early software evaluation in the four sided CAVE™ of Institute Image, called MOVE. One goal of the project is to study interactions in a CAVE™, especially with nomad devices such as IPhone or IPad to manipulate virtual objects and to develop visualization possibilities. Inspired by nomad devices current uses (multi-touch gestures, IPhone UI look'n'feel and AR applications), we have implemented an early feature set taking advantage of these popular input devices. In this paper, we present its performance through measurement data collected in our test platform, a 4-sided homemade low-cost virtual reality room, powered by ultra-short-range and standard HD home projectors.

  14. Versatile, Immersive, Creative and Dynamic Virtual 3-D Healthcare Learning Environments: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The author provides a critical overview of three-dimensional (3-D) virtual worlds and “serious gaming” that are currently being developed and used in healthcare professional education and medicine. The relevance of this e-learning innovation for teaching students and professionals is debatable and variables influencing adoption, such as increased knowledge, self-directed learning, and peer collaboration, by academics, healthcare professionals, and business executives are examined while looking at various Web 2.0/3.0 applications. There is a need for more empirical research in order to unearth the pedagogical outcomes and advantages associated with this e-learning technology. A brief description of Roger’s Diffusion of Innovations Theory and Siemens’ Connectivism Theory for today’s learners is presented as potential underlying pedagogical tenets to support the use of virtual 3-D learning environments in higher education and healthcare. PMID:18762473

  15. Incorporating a collaborative web-based virtual laboratory in an undergraduate bioinformatics course.

    PubMed

    Weisman, David

    2010-01-01

    Face-to-face bioinformatics courses commonly include a weekly, in-person computer lab to facilitate active learning, reinforce conceptual material, and teach practical skills. Similarly, fully-online bioinformatics courses employ hands-on exercises to achieve these outcomes, although students typically perform this work offsite. Combining a face-to-face lecture course with a web-based virtual laboratory presents new opportunities for collaborative learning of the conceptual material, and for fostering peer support of technical bioinformatics questions. To explore this combination, an in-person lecture-only undergraduate bioinformatics course was augmented with a remote web-based laboratory, and tested with a large class. This study hypothesized that the collaborative virtual lab would foster active learning and peer support, and tested this hypothesis by conducting a student survey near the end of the semester. Respondents broadly reported strong benefits from the online laboratory, and strong benefits from peer-provided technical support. In comparison with traditional in-person teaching labs, students preferred the virtual lab by a factor of two. Key aspects of the course architecture and design are described to encourage further experimentation in teaching collaborative online bioinformatics laboratories. PMID:21567782

  16. VERDEX: A virtual environment demonstrator for remote driving applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    One of the key areas of the National Advanced Robotics Centre's enabling technologies research program is that of the human system interface, phase 1 of which started in July 1989 and is currently addressing the potential of virtual environments to permit intuitive and natural interactions between a human operator and a remote robotic vehicle. The aim of the first 12 months of this program (to September, 1990) is to develop a virtual human-interface demonstrator for use later as a test bed for human factors experimentation. This presentation will describe the current state of development of the test bed, and will outline some human factors issues and problems for more general discussion. In brief, the virtual telepresence system for remote driving has been designed to take the following form. The human operator will be provided with a helmet-mounted stereo display assembly, facilities for speech recognition and synthesis (using the Marconi Macrospeak system), and a VPL DataGlove Model 2 unit. The vehicle to be used for the purposes of remote driving is a Cybermotion Navmaster K2A system, which will be equipped with a stereo camera and microphone pair, mounted on a motorized high-speed pan-and-tilt head incorporating a closed-loop laser ranging sensor for camera convergence control (currently under contractual development). It will be possible to relay information to and from the vehicle and sensory system via an umbilical or RF link. The aim is to develop an interactive audio-visual display system capable of presenting combined stereo TV pictures and virtual graphics windows, the latter featuring control representations appropriate for vehicle driving and interaction using a graphical 'hand,' slaved to the flex and tracking sensors of the DataGlove and an additional helmet-mounted Polhemus IsoTrack sensor. Developments planned for the virtual environment test bed include transfer of operator control between remote driving and remote manipulation, dexterous end

  17. Workshop Report on Virtual Worlds and Immersive Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephanie R.; Cowan-Sharp, Jessy; Dodson, Karen E.; Damer, Bruce; Ketner, Bob

    2009-01-01

    The workshop revolved around three framing ideas or scenarios about the evolution of virtual environments: 1. Remote exploration: The ability to create high fidelity environments rendered from external data or models such that exploration, design and analysis that is truly interoperable with the physical world can take place within them. 2. We all get to go: The ability to engage anyone in being a part of or contributing to an experience (such as a space mission), no matter their training or location. It is the creation of a new paradigm for education, outreach, and the conduct of science in society that is truly participatory. 3. Become the data: A vision of a future where boundaries between the physical and the virtual have ceased to be meaningful. What would this future look like? Is this plausible? Is it desirable? Why and why not?

  18. The right view from the wrong location: depth perception in stereoscopic multi-user virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Brice; Burton, Melissa; Kelly, Jonathan W; Gilbert, Stephen; Winer, Eliot

    2012-04-01

    Stereoscopic depth cues improve depth perception and increase immersion within virtual environments (VEs). However, improper display of these cues can distort perceived distances and directions. Consider a multi-user VE, where all users view identical stereoscopic images regardless of physical location. In this scenario, cues are typically customized for one "leader" equipped with a head-tracking device. This user stands at the center of projection (CoP) and all other users ("followers") view the scene from other locations and receive improper depth cues. This paper examines perceived depth distortion when viewing stereoscopic VEs from follower perspectives and the impact of these distortions on collaborative spatial judgments. Pairs of participants made collaborative depth judgments of virtual shapes viewed from the CoP or after displacement forward or backward. Forward and backward displacement caused perceived depth compression and expansion, respectively, with greater compression than expansion. Furthermore, distortion was less than predicted by a ray-intersection model of stereo geometry. Collaboration times were significantly longer when participants stood at different locations compared to the same location, and increased with greater perceived depth discrepancy between the two viewing locations. These findings advance our understanding of spatial distortions in multi-user VEs, and suggest a strategy for reducing distortion.

  19. Virtual radiation fields -- A virtual environment tool for radiological analysis and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, T.W.; Dalton, G.R.; Tulenko, J.S.

    1997-02-01

    A virtual reality system was developed for computational and graphical modeling and simulation of radiation environments. This system, called Virtual Radiation Fields (VRF), demonstrates the usefulness of radiological analysis in simulation-based design for predicting radiation doses for robotic equipment and personnel working in a radiation environment. The system was developed for use in determining the radiation doses for robotic equipment to be used in tank-waste retrieval operations at the Hanford National Laboratory. As a reference case, specific application is made to simulate cleanup operations for Hanford tank C-106. A three-dimensional model representation of the tank and its predicted radiation levels are presented and analyzed. Tank cleanup operations were simulated to understand how radiation levels change during the cleanup phase and to predict cumulative radiation doses to robotic equipment to aid in the development of maintenance and replacement schedules.

  20. Human Machine Interfaces for Teleoperators and Virtual Environments Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    In a teleoperator system the human operator senses, moves within, and operates upon a remote or hazardous environment by means of a slave mechanism (a mechanism often referred to as a teleoperator). In a virtual environment system the interactive human machine interface is retained but the slave mechanism and its environment are replaced by a computer simulation. Video is replaced by computer graphics. The auditory and force sensations imparted to the human operator are similarly computer generated. In contrast to a teleoperator system, where the purpose is to extend the operator's sensorimotor system in a manner that facilitates exploration and manipulation of the physical environment, in a virtual environment system, the purpose is to train, inform, alter, or study the human operator to modify the state of the computer and the information environment. A major application in which the human operator is the target is that of flight simulation. Although flight simulators have been around for more than a decade, they had little impact outside aviation presumably because the application was so specialized and so expensive.

  1. Fire training in a virtual-reality environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Eckhard; Rossmann, Jurgen; Bucken, Arno

    2005-03-01

    Although fire is very common in our daily environment - as a source of energy at home or as a tool in industry - most people cannot estimate the danger of a conflagration. Therefore it is important to train people in combating fire. Beneath training with propane simulators or real fires and real extinguishers, fire training can be performed in virtual reality, which means a pollution-free and fast way of training. In this paper we describe how to enhance a virtual-reality environment with a real-time fire simulation and visualisation in order to establish a realistic emergency-training system. The presented approach supports extinguishing of the virtual fire including recordable performance data as needed in teletraining environments. We will show how to get realistic impressions of fire using advanced particle-simulation and how to use the advantages of particles to trigger states in a modified cellular automata used for the simulation of fire-behaviour. Using particle systems that interact with cellular automata it is possible to simulate a developing, spreading fire and its reaction on different extinguishing agents like water, CO2 or oxygen. The methods proposed in this paper have been implemented and successfully tested on Cosimir, a commercial robot-and VR-simulation-system.

  2. Virtual environment assessment for laser-based vision surface profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElSoussi, Adnane; Al Alami, Abed ElRahman; Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.

    2015-03-01

    Oil and gas businesses have been raising the demand from original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to implement a reliable metrology method in assessing surface profiles of welds before and after grinding. This certainly mandates the deviation from the commonly used surface measurement gauges, which are not only operator dependent, but also limited to discrete measurements along the weld. Due to its potential accuracy and speed, the use of laser-based vision surface profiling systems have been progressively rising as part of manufacturing quality control. This effort presents a virtual environment that lends itself for developing and evaluating existing laser vision sensor (LVS) calibration and measurement techniques. A combination of two known calibration techniques is implemented to deliver a calibrated LVS system. System calibration is implemented virtually and experimentally to scan simulated and 3D printed features of known profiles, respectively. Scanned data is inverted and compared with the input profiles to validate the virtual environment capability for LVS surface profiling and preliminary assess the measurement technique for weld profiling applications. Moreover, this effort brings 3D scanning capability a step closer towards robust quality control applications in a manufacturing environment.

  3. Effects on Training Using Illumination in Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maida, James C.; Novak, M. S. Jennifer; Mueller, Kristian

    1999-01-01

    Camera based tasks are commonly performed during orbital operations, and orbital lighting conditions, such as high contrast shadowing and glare, are a factor in performance. Computer based training using virtual environments is a common tool used to make and keep CTW members proficient. If computer based training included some of these harsh lighting conditions, would the crew increase their proficiency? The project goal was to determine whether computer based training increases proficiency if one trains for a camera based task using computer generated virtual environments with enhanced lighting conditions such as shadows and glare rather than color shaded computer images normally used in simulators. Previous experiments were conducted using a two degree of freedom docking system. Test subjects had to align a boresight camera using a hand controller with one axis of rotation and one axis of rotation. Two sets of subjects were trained on two computer simulations using computer generated virtual environments, one with lighting, and one without. Results revealed that when subjects were constrained by time and accuracy, those who trained with simulated lighting conditions performed significantly better than those who did not. To reinforce these results for speed and accuracy, the task complexity was increased.

  4. Cognitive factors associated with immersion in virtual environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psotka, Joseph; Davison, Sharon

    1993-01-01

    Immersion into the dataspace provided by a computer, and the feeling of really being there or 'presence', are commonly acknowledged as the uniquely important features of virtual reality environments. How immersed one feels appears to be determined by a complex set of physical components and affordances of the environment, and as yet poorly understood psychological processes. Pimentel and Teixeira say that the experience of being immersed in a computer-generated world involves the same mental shift of 'suspending your disbelief for a period of time' as 'when you get wrapped up in a good novel or become absorbed in playing a computer game'. That sounds as if it could be right, but it would be good to get some evidence for these important conclusions. It might be even better to try to connect these statements with theoretical positions that try to do justice to complex cognitive processes. The basic precondition for understanding Virtual Reality (VR) is understanding the spatial representation systems that localize our bodies or egocenters in space. The effort to understand these cognitive processes is being driven with new energy by the pragmatic demands of successful virtual reality environments, but the literature is largely sparse and anecdotal.

  5. Kinematic/Dynamic Characteristics for Visual and Kinesthetic Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bortolussi, Michael R. (Compiler); Adelstein, B. D.; Gold, Miriam

    1996-01-01

    Work was carried out on two topics of principal importance to current progress in virtual environment research at NASA Ames and elsewhere. The first topic was directed at maximizing the temporal dynamic response of visually presented Virtual Environments (VEs) through reorganization and optimization of system hardware and software. The final results of this portion of the work was a VE system in the Advanced Display and Spatial Perception Laboratory at NASA Ames capable of updating at 60 Hz (the maximum hardware refresh rate) with latencies approaching 30 msec. In the course of achieving this system performance, specialized hardware and software tools for measurement of VE latency and analytic models correlating update rate and latency for different system configurations were developed. The second area of activity was the preliminary development and analysis of a novel kinematic architecture for three Degree Of Freedom (DOF) haptic interfaces--devices that provide force feedback for manipulative interaction with virtual and remote environments. An invention disclosure was filed on this work and a patent application is being pursued by NASA Ames. Activities in these two areas are expanded upon below.

  6. A Collaborative Extensible User Environment for Simulation and Knowledge Management

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Lansing, Carina S.; Porter, Ellen A.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Guillen, Zoe C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Gorton, Ian

    2015-06-01

    In scientific simulation, scientists use measured data to create numerical models, execute simulations and analyze results from advanced simulators executing on high performance computing platforms. This process usually requires a team of scientists collaborating on data collection, model creation and analysis, and on authorship of publications and data. This paper shows that scientific teams can benefit from a user environment called Akuna that permits subsurface scientists in disparate locations to collaborate on numerical modeling and analysis projects. The Akuna user environment is built on the Velo framework that provides both a rich client environment for conducting and analyzing simulations and a Web environment for data sharing and annotation. Akuna is an extensible toolset that integrates with Velo, and is designed to support any type of simulator. This is achieved through data-driven user interface generation, use of a customizable knowledge management platform, and an extensible framework for simulation execution, monitoring and analysis. This paper describes how the customized Velo content management system and the Akuna toolset are used to integrate and enhance an effective collaborative research and application environment. The extensible architecture of Akuna is also described and demonstrates its usage for creation and execution of a 3D subsurface simulation.

  7. Use of CAPE-OPEN Standard in US-UK Collaboration on Virtual Plant Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.E.

    2007-11-01

    Under the auspices of a US-UK Memorandum of Understanding and Implementing Agreement for fossil energy R&D (http://us-uk.fossil.energy.gov/), the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the UK Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) have recently completed a three-year collaboration on virtual plant modeling and simulation technology for advanced fossil-energy power generation systems. The R&D collaboration was aimed at taking full advantage of the synergies between NETL’s ongoing Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) project and the UK’s three-year Virtual Plant Demonstration Model (VPDM) project. The key objective of this collaboration has been the development of compatible, open standards-based US and UK technology for process/equipment co-simulation. To achieve plug-and-play model interoperability, the collaboration leveraged the process-industry CAPE-OPEN (CO) software standard which is managed and disseminated by the CO Laboratories Network (www.colan.org).

  8. Demonstration of the Low-Cost Virtual Collaborative Environment (VCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, David; Montes, Leticia; Ramos, Angel; Joyce, Brendan; Lumia, Ron

    1997-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of a low-cost approach of remotely controlling equipment. Our demonstration system consists of a PC, the PUMA 560 robot with Barrett hand, and commercially available controller and teleconferencing software. The system provides a graphical user interface which allows a user to program equipment tasks and preview motions i.e., simulate the results. Once satisfied that the actions are both safe and accomplish the task, the remote user sends the data over the Internet to the local site for execution on the real equipment. A video link provides visual feedback to the remote sight. This technology lends itself readily to NASA's upcoming Mars expeditions by providing remote simulation and control of equipment.

  9. Affective Behavior and Nonverbal Interaction in Collaborative Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peña, Adriana; Rangel, Nora; Muñoz, Mirna; Mejia, Jezreel; Lara, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    While a person's internal state might not be easily inferred through an automatic computer system, within a group, people express themselves through their interaction with others. The group members' interaction can be then helpful to understand, to certain extent, its members' affective behavior in any case toward the task at hand. In this…

  10. Virtual collaborative environments: programming and controlling robotic devices remotely

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Brady R.; McDonald, Michael J., Jr.; Harrigan, Raymond W.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes a technology for remote sharing of intelligent electro-mechanical devices. An architecture and actual system have been developed and tested, based on the proposed National Information Infrastructure (NII) or Information Highway, to facilitate programming and control of intelligent programmable machines (like robots, machine tools, etc.). Using appropriate geometric models, integrated sensors, video systems, and computing hardware; computer controlled resources owned and operated by different (in a geographic sense as well as legal sense) entities can be individually or simultaneously programmed and controlled from one or more remote locations. Remote programming and control of intelligent machines will create significant opportunities for sharing of expensive capital equipment. Using the technology described in this paper, university researchers, manufacturing entities, automation consultants, design entities, and others can directly access robotic and machining facilities located across the country. Disparate electro-mechanical resources will be shared in a manner similar to the way supercomputers are accessed by multiple users. Using this technology, it will be possible for researchers developing new robot control algorithms to validate models and algorithms right from their university labs without ever owning a robot. Manufacturers will be able to model, simulate, and measure the performance of prospective robots before selecting robot hardware optimally suited for their intended application. Designers will be able to access CNC machining centers across the country to fabricate prototypic parts during product design validation. An existing prototype architecture and system has been developed and proven. Programming and control of a large gantry robot located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, was demonstrated from such remote locations as Washington D.C., Washington State, and Southern California.

  11. A New Virtual and Remote Experimental Environment for Teaching and Learning Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustigova, Zdena; Lustig, Frantisek

    This paper describes how a scientifically exact and problem-solving-oriented remote and virtual science experimental environment might help to build a new strategy for science education. The main features are: the remote observations and control of real world phenomena, their processing and evaluation, verification of hypotheses combined with the development of critical thinking, supported by sophisticated relevant information search, classification and storing tools and collaborative environment, supporting argumentative writing and teamwork, public presentations and defense of achieved results, all either in real presence, in telepresence or in combination of both. Only then real understanding of generalized science laws and their consequences can be developed. This science learning and teaching environment (called ROL - Remote and Open Laboratory), has been developed and used by Charles University in Prague since 1996, offered to science students in both formal and informal learning, and also to science teachers within their professional development studies, since 2003.

  12. Study of Co-Located and Distant Collaboration with Symbolic Support via a Haptics-Enhanced Virtual Reality Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Shih-Ching; Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Wang, Jin-Liang; Zhan, Shi-Yi

    2013-01-01

    This study intends to investigate how multi-symbolic representations (text, digits, and colors) could effectively enhance the completion of co-located/distant collaborative work in a virtual reality context. Participants' perceptions and behaviors were also studied. A haptics-enhanced virtual reality task was developed to conduct…

  13. Low-cost system for real-time integration of virtual and real distributed environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balossino, Nello; Bresciani, Fulvio; Lucenteforte, Maurizio; Siracusa, Simona

    2000-12-01

    As is known, the term virtual studio is usually referred to the integration of synthetic and real environments: if an action occurs in the real world, the same must be reproduced in the artificial scene. The integration may be realized using one of the available systems which are generally characterized by high and expensive technology. Our work proposes an approach with two important advantages: low cost and possibility of building collaborative work. The system consists in a location named SM (generator of Synthetic worlds Meshing between real and virtual worlds) and in a differently located site indicated as V. The system SM is a powerful graphics oriented machine, which is able both to make highly realistic real time rendering of a complex virtual world, and to mesh the virtual scene with the video signal received from the V system. We suppose the V system characterized by a uniform background and a subject captured by a web cam whose video frames are sent to the SM system. In order to obtain the right information about the position of each video camera in the real world coordinate system and the zoom parameters, we propose an easy approach based on detecting the shape variations of a flag, with known aspect and dimension, placed in a defined position in the uniform background. This means that in a particular frame the scene modifications are codified in a few parameters related to the flag variations, so the integration between real and virtual becomes easy. The mesh results are sent to V, while just the selected meshed image is available for a generic user connected to the net service. The system may be applied in different contexts, for example video conferences and multiplayer virtual sets.

  14. Information Infrastructure, Information Environments, and Long-Term Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, K. S.; Pennington, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    Information infrastructure that supports collaborative science is a complex system of people, organizational arrangements, and tools that require co-management. Contemporary studies are exploring how to establish and characterize effective collaborative information environments. Collaboration depends on the flow of information across the human and technical system components through mechanisms that create linkages, both conceptual and technical. This transcends the need for requirements solicitation and usability studies, highlighting synergistic interactions between humans and technology that can lead to emergence of group level cognitive properties. We consider the ramifications of placing priority on establishing new metaphors and new types of learning environments located near-to-data-origin for the field sciences. In addition to changes in terms of participant engagement, there are implications in terms of innovative contributions to the design of information systems and data exchange. While data integration occurs in the minds of individual participants, it may be facilitated by collaborative thinking and community infrastructure. Existing learning frameworks - from Maslow’s hierarchy of needs to organizational learning - require modification and extension if effective approaches to decentralized information management and systems design are to emerge. Case studies relating to data integration include ecological community projects: development of cross-disciplinary conceptual maps and of a community unit registry.

  15. Aerospace Systems Design in NASA's Collaborative Engineering Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monell, Donald W.; Piland, William M.

    2000-07-01

    Past designs of complex aerospace systems involved an environment consisting of collocated design teams with project managers, technical discipline experts, and other experts (e.g., manufacturing and systems operations). These experts were generally qualified only on the basis of past design experience and typically had access to a limited set of integrated analysis tools. These environments provided less than desirable design fidelity, often led to the inability of assessing critical programmatic and technical issues (e.g., cost, risk, technical impacts), and generally derived a design that was not necessarily optimized across the entire system. The continually changing, modern aerospace industry demands systems design processes that involve the best talent available (no matter where it resides) and access to the best design and analysis tools. A solution to these demands involves a design environment referred to as collaborative engineering. The collaborative engineering environment evolving within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a capability that enables the Agency's engineering infrastructure to interact and use the best state-of-the-art tools and data across organizational boundaries. Using collaborative engineering, the collocated team is replaced with an interactive team structure where the team members are geographically distributed and the best engineering talent can be applied to the design effort regardless of physical location. In addition, a more efficient, higher quality design product is delivered by bringing together the best engineering talent with more up-to-date design and analysis tools. These tools are focused on interactive, multidisciplinary design and analysis with emphasis on the complete life cycle of the system, and they include nontraditional, integrated tools for life cycle cost estimation and risk assessment. NASA has made substantial progress during the last two years in developing a collaborative

  16. Aerospace Systems Design in NASA's Collaborative Engineering Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monell, Donald W.; Piland, William M.

    1999-01-01

    Past designs of complex aerospace systems involved an environment consisting of collocated design teams with project managers, technical discipline experts, and other experts (e.g. manufacturing and systems operations). These experts were generally qualified only on the basis of past design experience and typically had access to a limited set of integrated analysis tools. These environments provided less than desirable design fidelity, often lead to the inability of assessing critical programmatic and technical issues (e.g., cost risk, technical impacts), and generally derived a design that was not necessarily optimized across the entire system. The continually changing, modern aerospace industry demands systems design processes that involve the best talent available (no matter where it resides) and access to the best design and analysis tools. A solution to these demands involves a design environment referred to as collaborative engineering. The collaborative engineering environment evolving within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a capability that enables the Agency's engineering infrastructure to interact and use the best state-of-the-art tools and data across organizational boundaries. Using collaborative engineering, the collocated team is replaced with an interactive team structure where the team members are geographically distributed and the best engineering talent can be applied to the design effort regardless of physical location. In addition, a more efficient, higher quality design product is delivered by bringing together the best engineering talent with more up-to-date design and analysis tools. These tools are focused on interactive, multidisciplinary design and analysis with emphasis on the complete life cycle of the system, and they include nontraditional, integrated tools for life cycle cost estimation and risk assessment. NASA has made substantial progress during the last two years in developing a collaborative

  17. Aerospace Systems Design in NASA's Collaborative Engineering Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monell, Donald W.; Piland, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Past designs of complex aerospace systems involved an environment consisting of collocated design teams with project managers, technical discipline experts, and other experts (e.g., manufacturing and systems operation). These experts were generally qualified only on the basis of past design experience and typically had access to a limited set of integrated analysis tools. These environments provided less than desirable design fidelity, often lead to the inability of assessing critical programmatic and technical issues (e.g., cost, risk, technical impacts), and generally derived a design that was not necessarily optimized across the entire system. The continually changing, modern aerospace industry demands systems design processes that involve the best talent available (no matter where it resides) and access to the the best design and analysis tools. A solution to these demands involves a design environment referred to as collaborative engineering. The collaborative engineering environment evolving within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a capability that enables the Agency's engineering infrastructure to interact and use the best state-of-the-art tools and data across organizational boundaries. Using collaborative engineering, the collocated team is replaced with an interactive team structure where the team members are geographical distributed and the best engineering talent can be applied to the design effort regardless of physical location. In addition, a more efficient, higher quality design product is delivered by bringing together the best engineering talent with more up-to-date design and analysis tools. These tools are focused on interactive, multidisciplinary design and analysis with emphasis on the complete life cycle of the system, and they include nontraditional, integrated tools for life cycle cost estimation and risk assessment. NASA has made substantial progress during the last two years in developing a collaborative

  18. A Virtual Science Data Environment for Carbon Dioxide Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, R.; Goodale, C. E.; Hart, A. F.; Law, E.; Crichton, D. J.; Mattmann, C. A.; Gunson, M. R.; Braverman, A. J.; Nguyen, H. M.; Eldering, A.; Castano, R.; Osterman, G. B.

    2011-12-01

    Climate science data are often distributed cross-institutionally and made available using heterogeneous interfaces. With respect to observational carbon-dioxide (CO2) records, these data span across national as well as international institutions and are typically distributed using a variety of data standards. Such an arrangement can yield challenges from a research perspective, as users often need to independently aggregate datasets as well as address the issue of data quality. To tackle this dispersion and heterogeneity of data, we have developed the CO2 Virtual Science Data Environment - a comprehensive approach to virtually integrating CO2 data and metadata from multiple missions and providing a suite of computational services that facilitate analysis, comparison, and transformation of that data. The Virtual Science Environment provides climate scientists with a unified web-based destination for discovering relevant observational data in context, and supports a growing range of online tools and services for analyzing and transforming the available data to suit individual research needs. It includes web-based tools to geographically and interactively search for CO2 observations collected from multiple airborne, space, as well as terrestrial platforms. Moreover, the data analysis services it provides over the Internet, including offering techniques such as bias estimation and spatial re-gridding, move computation closer to the data and reduce the complexity of performing these operations repeatedly and at scale. The key to enabling these services, as well as consolidating the disparate data into a unified resource, has been to focus on leveraging metadata descriptors as the foundation of our data environment. This metadata-centric architecture, which leverages the Dublin Core standard, forgoes the need to replicate remote datasets locally. Instead, the system relies upon an extensive, metadata-rich virtual data catalog allowing on-demand browsing and retrieval of

  19. The CAVE (TM) automatic virtual environment: Characteristics and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, Robert V.

    1995-01-01

    Virtual reality may best be defined as the wide-field presentation of computer-generated, multi-sensory information that tracks a user in real time. In addition to the more well-known modes of virtual reality -- head-mounted displays and boom-mounted displays -- the Electronic Visualization Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Chicago recently introduced a third mode: a room constructed from large screens on which the graphics are projected on to three walls and the floor. The CAVE is a multi-person, room sized, high resolution, 3D video and audio environment. Graphics are rear projected in stereo onto three walls and the floor, and viewed with stereo glasses. As a viewer wearing a location sensor moves within its display boundaries, the correct perspective and stereo projections of the environment are updated, and the image moves with and surrounds the viewer. The other viewers in the CAVE are like passengers in a bus, along for the ride. 'CAVE,' the name selected for the virtual reality theater, is both a recursive acronym (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment) and a reference to 'The Simile of the Cave' found in Plato's 'Republic,' in which the philosopher explores the ideas of perception, reality, and illusion. Plato used the analogy of a person facing the back of a cave alive with shadows that are his/her only basis for ideas of what real objects are. Rather than having evolved from video games or flight simulation, the CAVE has its motivation rooted in scientific visualization and the SIGGRAPH 92 Showcase effort. The CAVE was designed to be a useful tool for scientific visualization. The Showcase event was an experiment; the Showcase chair and committee advocated an environment for computational scientists to interactively present their research at a major professional conference in a one-to-many format on high-end workstations attached to large projection screens. The CAVE was developed as a 'virtual reality theater' with scientific content and

  20. WWW creates new interactive 3D graphics and collaborative environments for medical research and education.

    PubMed

    Samothrakis, S; Arvanitis, T N; Plataniotis, A; McNeill, M D; Lister, P F

    1997-11-01

    Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML) is the start of a new era for medicine and the World Wide Web (WWW). Scientists can use VRML across the Internet to explore new three-dimensional (3D) worlds, share concepts and collaborate together in a virtual environment. VRML enables the generation of virtual environments through the use of geometric, spatial and colour data structures to represent 3D objects and scenes. In medicine, researchers often want to interact with scientific data, which in several instances may also be dynamic (e.g. MRI data). This data is often very large and is difficult to visualise. A 3D graphical representation can make the information contained in such large data sets more understandable and easier to interpret. Fast networks and satellites can reliably transfer large data sets from computer to computer. This has led to the adoption of remote tale-working in many applications including medical applications. Radiology experts, for example, can view and inspect in near real-time a 3D data set acquired from a patient who is in another part of the world. Such technology is destined to improve the quality of life for many people. This paper introduces VRML (including some technical details) and discusses the advantages of VRML in application developing. PMID:9506396

  1. Multi-modal virtual environment research at Armstrong Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    One mission of the Paul M. Fitts Human Engineering Division of Armstrong Laboratory is to improve the user interface for complex systems through user-centered exploratory development and research activities. In support of this goal, many current projects attempt to advance and exploit user-interface concepts made possible by virtual reality (VR) technologies. Virtual environments may be used as a general purpose interface medium, an alternative display/control method, a data visualization and analysis tool, or a graphically based performance assessment tool. An overview is given of research projects within the division on prototype interface hardware/software development, integrated interface concept development, interface design and evaluation tool development, and user and mission performance evaluation tool development.

  2. Immersive virtual environments for emotional engineering: description and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alejandro; Rey, Beatriz; Alcañiz, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to identify the arousal and presence level during an emotional engineering study. During the experimental sessions, a high-immersion Virtual Reality (VR) system, a CAVE-like configuration, will be used. Thirty-six volunteers will navigate through virtual houses that can be customized and that have been designed for emotional induction. Emotional induction will be obtained by stimulating the senses of sight, hearing and smell. For this purpose, the ambient lighting, music and smell will be controlled by the researcher, who will create a comfortable environment for the subject. Several physiological variables - Electrocardiogram (ECG), Respiratory signal and Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) - will be recorded during the sessions. The obtained results will help furniture companies identify the senses that have more influence on emotions and will be the basis for new studies about user needs in the sector of furniture and interior decoration.

  3. Development of patient centric virtual organizations (PCVOs) in clinical environment for patient information management.

    PubMed

    Mohyuddin; Gray, W A; Bailey, Hazel; Jones, Wendy; Morrey, David

    2007-01-01

    A novel Virtual Organization framework which incorporates wireless technology support is presented in the research work. The Virtual Organization is designed for a clinical environment to provide better patient information management and enhanced collaborative working of multidisciplinary care teams. The analysis studies the current clinical practices and looks at the general patient information resource structure currently in use for patient care. Based on this problem analysis and current requirements of the multi-disciplinary care team members, we propose a generic and sustainable Patient Centric Virtual Organization (PCVO) framework to complement the functionality of the existing infrastructure by incorporating wireless technologies support for improved patient information provision at the point of care. The preliminary results of the study identify and classify the specific point of care tasks suited to appropriate information resources needed by the care team members. This paper concentrates on the patient information management aspects brought in by incorporating wireless technologies at the point of care using patient information resources in a decentralized and distributed computing environment. This applied research is carried out in the secondary and tertiary care sector in the cancer domain. For the analysis and results of the pilot project, we have used a case study of a local NHS Cancer Hospital.

  4. Comparison of people's responses to real and virtual handshakes within a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Elias; Wang, Zheng; Peer, Angelika; Buss, Martin; Slater, Mel

    2011-06-30

    In this paper we present a method for evaluating a haptic device which simulates human handshakes interfaced via a metal rod. We provide an overview of the haptic demonstrator and the control algorithm used for delivering realistic handshakes. For the evaluation of this handshake demonstrator we introduce a 'ground truth' approach, where we compare the robot handshakes with handshakes operated by a human via the same metal rod. For this, an experiment was carried out where the participants entered a virtual environment, i.e. a virtual cocktail party, and were asked to perform a number of handshakes, either with the robot operating with one of two control algorithms operating the metal rod - a basic one for comparison or the proposed new advanced one, or with a human operating the metal rod. The virtual environment was represented only through audio and haptics, without any visual representation, i.e. the subjects participated blindfolded. The evaluation of each handshake was achieved through the subjective scoring of each of the handshakes. The results of the study show that the demonstrator operating with the proposed new control scheme was evaluated significantly more human-like than with the demonstrator operating with the basic algorithm, and also that the real human handshake was evaluated more like a real human handshake than both types of robot handshakes. Although the difference between the advanced robot and human handshake was significant, the effect sizes are not very different, indicating substantial confusion of participants between the advanced robot and human operated handshakes.

  5. Virtual environment interaction through 3D audio by blind children.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J; Lumbreras, M

    1999-01-01

    Interactive software is actively used for learning, cognition, and entertainment purposes. Educational entertainment software is not very popular among blind children because most computer games and electronic toys have interfaces that are only accessible through visual cues. This work applies the concept of interactive hyperstories to blind children. Hyperstories are implemented in a 3D acoustic virtual world. In past studies we have conceptualized a model to design hyperstories. This study illustrates the feasibility of the model. It also provides an introduction to researchers to the field of entertainment software for blind children. As a result, we have designed and field tested AudioDoom, a virtual environment interacted through 3D Audio by blind children. AudioDoom is also a software that enables testing nontrivial interfaces and cognitive tasks with blind children. We explored the construction of cognitive spatial structures in the minds of blind children through audio-based entertainment and spatial sound navigable experiences. Children playing AudioDoom were exposed to first person experiences by exploring highly interactive virtual worlds through the use of 3D aural representations of the space. This experience was structured in several cognitive tasks where they had to build concrete models of their spatial representations constructed through the interaction with AudioDoom by using Legotrade mark blocks. We analyze our preliminary results after testing AudioDoom with Chilean children from a school for blind children. We discuss issues such as interactivity in software without visual cues, the representation of spatial sound navigable experiences, and entertainment software such as computer games for blind children. We also evaluate the feasibility to construct virtual environments through the design of dynamic learning materials with audio cues.

  6. Virtual environment display for a 3D audio room simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapin, William L.; Foster, Scott

    1992-06-01

    Recent developments in virtual 3D audio and synthetic aural environments have produced a complex acoustical room simulation. The acoustical simulation models a room with walls, ceiling, and floor of selected sound reflecting/absorbing characteristics and unlimited independent localizable sound sources. This non-visual acoustic simulation, implemented with 4 audio ConvolvotronsTM by Crystal River Engineering and coupled to the listener with a Poihemus IsotrakTM, tracking the listener's head position and orientation, and stereo headphones returning binaural sound, is quite compelling to most listeners with eyes closed. This immersive effect should be reinforced when properly integrated into a full, multi-sensory virtual environment presentation. This paper discusses the design of an interactive, visual virtual environment, complementing the acoustic model and specified to: 1) allow the listener to freely move about the space, a room of manipulable size, shape, and audio character, while interactively relocating the sound sources; 2) reinforce the listener's feeling of telepresence into the acoustical environment with visual and proprioceptive sensations; 3) enhance the audio with the graphic and interactive components, rather than overwhelm or reduce it; and 4) serve as a research testbed and technology transfer demonstration. The hardware/software design of two demonstration systems, one installed and one portable, are discussed through the development of four iterative configurations. The installed system implements a head-coupled, wide-angle, stereo-optic tracker/viewer and multi-computer simulation control. The portable demonstration system implements a head-mounted wide-angle, stereo-optic display, separate head and pointer electro-magnetic position trackers, a heterogeneous parallel graphics processing system, and object oriented C++ program code.

  7. Distributed collaborative decision support environments for predictive awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuay, William K.; Stilman, Boris; Yakhnis, Vlad

    2005-05-01

    The past decade has produced significant changes in the conduct of military operations: asymmetric warfare, the reliance on dynamic coalitions, stringent rules of engagement, increased concern about collateral damage, and the need for sustained air operations. Mission commanders need to assimilate a tremendous amount of information, rapidly assess the enemy"s course of action (eCOA) or possible actions and promulgate their own course of action (COA) - a need for predictive awareness. Decision support tools in a distributed collaborative environment offer the capability of decomposing complex multitask processes and distributing them over a dynamic set of execution assets that include modeling, simulations, and analysis tools. Revolutionary new approaches to strategy generation and assessment such as Linguistic Geometry (LG) permit the rapid development of COA vs. enemy COA (eCOA). LG tools automatically generate and permit the operators to take advantage of winning strategies and tactics for mission planning and execution in near real-time. LG is predictive and employs deep "look-ahead" from the current state and provides a realistic, reactive model of adversary reasoning and behavior. Collaborative environments provide the framework and integrate models, simulations, and domain specific decision support tools for the sharing and exchanging of data, information, knowledge, and actions. This paper describes ongoing research efforts in applying distributed collaborative environments to decision support for predictive mission awareness.

  8. Beliefs and Issues Arising from a Virtual Collaborative Student-Alumni-Faculty Action Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sue Marquis; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Hollie-Major, Ramona D.

    2006-01-01

    Can graduate students in a distance learning environment gain meaningful research experience through a virtual action research project? The answer is an emphatic "yes." The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent to which students seeking an EdD degree can gain research experience through an action research project conducted in a virtual…

  9. The Earth System CoG Collaboration Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, C.; Murphy, S.; Cinquini, L.; Treshansky, A.; Wallis, J. C.; Rood, R. B.; Overeem, I.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth System CoG supports collaborative Earth science research and product development in virtual organizations that span multiple projects and communities. It provides access to data, metadata, and visualization services along with tools that support open project governance, and it can be used to host individual projects or to profile projects hosted elsewhere. All projects on CoG are described using a project ontology - an organized common vocabulary - that exposes information needed for collaboration and decision-making. Projects can be linked into a network, and the underlying ontology enables consolidated views of information across the network. This access to information promotes the creation of active and knowledgeable project governance, at both individual and aggregate project levels. CoG is being used to support software development projects, model intercomparison projects, training classes, and scientific programs. Its services and ontology are customizable by project. This presentation will provide an overview of CoG, review examples of current use, and discuss how CoG can be used as knowledge and coordination hub for networks of projects in the Earth Sciences.

  10. Spatial integration of boundaries in a 3D virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Bouchekioua, Youcef; Miller, Holly C; Craddock, Paul; Blaisdell, Aaron P; Molet, Mikael

    2013-10-01

    Prior research, using two- and three-dimensional environments, has found that when both human and nonhuman animals independently acquire two associations between landmarks with a common landmark (e.g., LM1-LM2 and LM2-LM3), each with its own spatial relationship, they behave as if the two unique LMs have a known spatial relationship despite their never having been paired. Seemingly, they have integrated the two associations to create a third association with its own spatial relationship (LM1-LM3). Using sensory preconditioning (Experiment 1) and second-order conditioning (Experiment 2) procedures, we found that human participants integrated information about the boundaries of pathways to locate a goal within a three-dimensional virtual environment in the absence of any relevant landmarks. Spatial integration depended on the participant experiencing a common boundary feature with which to link the pathways. These results suggest that the principles of associative learning also apply to the boundaries of an environment.

  11. The Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA). Design and architecture☆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, John A.; Clarno, Kevin; Sieger, Matt; Bartlett, Roscoe; Collins, Benjamin; Pawlowski, Roger; Schmidt, Rodney; Summers, Randall

    2016-12-01

    VERA, the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications, is the system of physics capabilities being developed and deployed by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). CASL was established for the modeling and simulation of commercial nuclear reactors. VERA consists of integrating and interfacing software together with a suite of physics components adapted and/or refactored to simulate relevant physical phenomena in a coupled manner. VERA also includes the software development environment and computational infrastructure needed for these components to be effectively used. We describe the architecture of VERA from both software and numerical perspectives, along with the goals and constraints that drove major design decisions, and their implications. We explain why VERA is an environment rather than a framework or toolkit, why these distinctions are relevant (particularly for coupled physics applications), and provide an overview of results that demonstrate the use of VERA tools for a variety of challenging applications within the nuclear industry.

  12. Latency and User Performance in Virtual Environments and Augmented Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    System rendering latency has been recognized by senior researchers, such as Professor Fredrick Brooks of UNC (Turing Award 1999), as a major factor limiting the realism and utility of head-referenced displays systems. Latency has been shown to reduce the user's sense of immersion within a virtual environment, disturb user interaction with virtual objects, and to contribute to motion sickness during some simulation tasks. Latency, however, is not just an issue for external display systems since finite nerve conduction rates and variation in transduction times in the human body's sensors also pose problems for latency management within the nervous system. Some of the phenomena arising from the brain's handling of sensory asynchrony due to latency will be discussed as a prelude to consideration of the effects of latency in interactive displays. The causes and consequences of the erroneous movement that appears in displays due to latency will be illustrated with examples of the user performance impact provided by several experiments. These experiments will review the generality of user sensitivity to latency when users judge either object or environment stability. Hardware and signal processing countermeasures will also be discussed. In particular the tuning of a simple extrapolative predictive filter not using a dynamic movement model will be presented. Results show that it is possible to adjust this filter so that the appearance of some latencies may be hidden without the introduction of perceptual artifacts such as overshoot. Several examples of the effects of user performance will be illustrated by three-dimensional tracking and tracing tasks executed in virtual environments. These experiments demonstrate classic phenomena known from work on manual control and show the need for very responsive systems if they are indented to support precise manipulation. The practical benefits of removing interfering latencies from interactive systems will be emphasized with some

  13. Job execution in virtualized runtime environments in grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamardin, Lev; Demichev, Andrey; Gorbunov, Ilya; Ilyin, Slava; Kryukov, Alexander

    2010-04-01

    Grid systems are used for calculations and data processing in various applied areas such as biomedicine, nanotechnology and materials science, cosmophysics and high energy physics as well as in a number of industrial and commercial areas. Traditional method of execution of jobs in grid is running jobs directly on the cluster nodes. This puts restrictions on the choice of the operational environment to the operating system of the node and also does not allow to enforce resource sharing policies or jobs isolation nor guarantee minimal level of available system resources. We propose a new approach to running jobs on the cluster nodes when each grid job runs in its own virtual environment. This allows to use different operating systems for different jobs on the same nodes in cluster, provides better isolation between running jobs and allows to enforce resource sharing policies. The implementation of the proposed approach was made in the framework of gLite middleware of the EGEE/WLCG project and was successfully tested in SINP MSU. The implementation is transparent for the grid user and allows to submit binaries compiled for various operating systems using exactly the same gLite interface. Virtual machine images with the standard gLite worker node software and sample MS Windows execution environment were created.

  14. A New Navigation Method for 3D Virtual Environment Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydar, Mahmoud; Maidi, Madjid; Roussel, David; Mallem, Malik

    2009-03-01

    Navigation in virtual environments is a complex task which imposes a high cognitive load on the user. It consists on maintaining knowledge of current position and orientation of the user while he moves through the space. In this paper, we present a novel approach for navigation in 3D virtual environments. The method is based on the principle of skiing, and the idea is to provide to the user a total control of his navigation speed and rotation using his two hands. This technique enables user-steered exploration by determining the direction and the speed of motion using the knowledge of the positions of the user hands. A module of speed control is included to the technique to easily control the speed using the angle between the hands. The direction of motion is given by the orthogonal axis of the segment joining the two hands. A user study will show the efficiency of the method in performing exploration tasks in complex 3D large-scale environments. Furthermore, we proposed an experimental protocol to prove that this technique presents a high level of navigation guidance and control, achieving significantly better performance in comparison to simple navigation techniques.

  15. Using software interoperability to achieve a virtual design environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, G. Groot; Koshel, R. John

    2005-09-01

    A variety of simulation tools, including optical design and analysis, have benefited by many years of evolution in software functionality and computing power, thus making the notion of virtual design environments a reality. To simulate the optical characteristics of a system, one needs to include optical performance, mechanical design and manufacturing aspects simultaneously. To date, no single software program offers a universal solution. One approach to achieve an integrated environment is to select tools that offer a high degree of interoperability. This allows the selection of the best tools for each aspect of the design working in concert to solve the problem. This paper discusses the issues of how to assemble a design environment and provides an example of a combination of tools for illumination design. We begin by offering a broad definition of interoperability from an optical analysis perspective. This definition includes aspects of file interchange formats, software communications protocols and customized applications. One example solution is proposed by combining SolidWorks1 for computer-aided design (CAD), TracePro2 for optical analysis and MATLAB3 as the mathematical engine for tolerance analysis. The resulting virtual tool will be applied to a lightpipe design task to illustrate how such a system can be used.

  16. Adapting line integral convolution for fabricating artistic virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jiunn-Shyan; Wang, Chung-Ming

    2003-04-01

    Vector field occurs not only extensively in scientific applications but also in treasured art such as sculptures and paintings. Artist depicts our natural environment stressing valued directional feature besides color and shape information. Line integral convolution (LIC), developed for imaging vector field in scientific visualization, has potential of producing directional image. In this paper we present several techniques of exploring LIC techniques to generate impressionistic images forming artistic virtual environment. We take advantage of directional information given by a photograph, and incorporate many investigations to the work including non-photorealistic shading technique and statistical detail control. In particular, the non-photorealistic shading technique blends cool and warm colors into the photograph to imitate artists painting convention. Besides, we adopt statistical technique controlling integral length according to image variance to preserve details. Furthermore, we also propose method for generating a series of mip-maps, which revealing constant strokes under multi-resolution viewing and achieving frame coherence in an interactive walkthrough system. The experimental results show merits of emulating satisfyingly and computing efficiently, as a consequence, relying on the proposed technique successfully fabricates a wide category of non-photorealistic rendering (NPR) application such as interactive virtual environment with artistic perception.

  17. Using presence to improve a virtual training environment.

    PubMed

    Tichon, Jennifer Gay

    2007-12-01

    In the rail industry, drivers must be trained to operate complex heavy machinery while responding appropriately to rapidly unfolding events in environments that are expensive and often dangerous to replicate in the real world. Virtual training environments (VTEs) can deliver stress exposure training to improve the decision-making skills of train drivers. Higher levels of recallable knowledge in the real world have been linked directly to the degree to which trainees have been engrossed in their VTE, an experience often measured through the concept of "presence." This paper reports on the use of presence to guide improvements to a VTE developed to deliver driver training in degraded track conditions. Two surveys were used to collect data on train drivers' introspective feedback on the level of presence created by the virtual rail environment and the simulator's effectiveness in generating immersion across a range of presence causal factors. Results indicate that using presence to investigate VTEs has practical significance. Outcomes provide direct information on where future improvements and modifications to the VTE can be made.

  18. Modal test optimization using VETO (Virtual Environment for Test Optimization)

    SciTech Connect

    Klenke, S.E.; Reese, G.M.; Schoof, L.A.; Shierling, C.

    1996-01-01

    We present a software environment integrating analysis and test-based models to support optimal modal test design through a Virtual Environment for Test Optimization (VETO). A goal in developing this software tool is to provide test and analysis organizations with a capability of mathematically simulating the complete test environment in software. Derived models of test equipment, instrumentation and hardware can be combined within the VETO to provide the user with a unique analysis and visualization capability to evaluate new and existing test methods. The VETO assists analysis and test engineers in maximizing the value of each modal test. It is particularly advantageous for structural dynamics model reconciliation applications. The VETO enables an engineer to interact with a finite element model of a test object to optimally place sensors and exciters and to investigate the selection of data acquisition parameters needed to conduct a complete modal survey. Additionally, the user can evaluate the use of different types of instrumentation such as filters, amplifiers and transducers for which models are available in the VETO. The dynamic response of most of the virtual instruments (including the device under test) is modeled in the state space domain. Design of modal excitation levels and appropriate test instrumentation are facilitated by the VETO`s ability to simulate such features as unmeasured external inputs, A/D quantization effects, and electronic noise. Measures of the quality of the experimental design, including the Modal Assurance Criterion, and the Normal Mode Indicator Function are available.

  19. WAVE: Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation for Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Ravish; Rungta, Atul; Golas, Abhinav; Ming Lin; Manocha, Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    We present an interactive wave-based sound propagation system that generates accurate, realistic sound in virtual environments for dynamic (moving) sources and listeners. We propose a novel algorithm to accurately solve the wave equation for dynamic sources and listeners using a combination of precomputation techniques and GPU-based runtime evaluation. Our system can handle large environments typically used in VR applications, compute spatial sound corresponding to listener's motion (including head tracking) and handle both omnidirectional and directional sources, all at interactive rates. As compared to prior wave-based techniques applied to large scenes with moving sources, we observe significant improvement in runtime memory. The overall sound-propagation and rendering system has been integrated with the Half-Life 2 game engine, Oculus-Rift head-mounted display, and the Xbox game controller to enable users to experience high-quality acoustic effects (e.g., amplification, diffraction low-passing, high-order scattering) and spatial audio, based on their interactions in the VR application. We provide the results of preliminary user evaluations, conducted to study the impact of wave-based acoustic effects and spatial audio on users' navigation performance in virtual environments. PMID:26357093

  20. WAVE: Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation for Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Ravish; Rungta, Atul; Golas, Abhinav; Ming Lin; Manocha, Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    We present an interactive wave-based sound propagation system that generates accurate, realistic sound in virtual environments for dynamic (moving) sources and listeners. We propose a novel algorithm to accurately solve the wave equation for dynamic sources and listeners using a combination of precomputation techniques and GPU-based runtime evaluation. Our system can handle large environments typically used in VR applications, compute spatial sound corresponding to listener's motion (including head tracking) and handle both omnidirectional and directional sources, all at interactive rates. As compared to prior wave-based techniques applied to large scenes with moving sources, we observe significant improvement in runtime memory. The overall sound-propagation and rendering system has been integrated with the Half-Life 2 game engine, Oculus-Rift head-mounted display, and the Xbox game controller to enable users to experience high-quality acoustic effects (e.g., amplification, diffraction low-passing, high-order scattering) and spatial audio, based on their interactions in the VR application. We provide the results of preliminary user evaluations, conducted to study the impact of wave-based acoustic effects and spatial audio on users' navigation performance in virtual environments.

  1. Experimenting with the virtual environment Moodle in Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Maria Ines; Dickman, Adriana

    2008-03-01

    The master's program in Physics Education of the Catholic University in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, includes the discipline ``Digital technologies in Physics education.'' The main goal of this discipline is to discuss the role of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the process of learning-teaching science. We introduce our students to several virtual platforms, both free and commercial, discussing their functionality and features. We encourage our students to get in touch with computer tools and resources by planning their own computer based course using the Moodle platform. We discuss different patterns of virtual environment courses, whose proposals are centered mainly in the students, or teacher-centered or even system-centered. The student is free to choose between only one topic and a year course to work with, since their interests vary from learning something more about a specific subject to a complete e-learning course covering the entire school year. (The courses are available online in the address sitesinf01.pucmg.br/moodle. Participation only requires filling out an application form.) After three editions of this discipline, we have several courses available. We realize that students tend to focus on traditional methods, always preserving their role as knowledge-givers. In conclusion, we can say that, in spite of exhaustive discussion about autonomy involved with ICTs abilities, most of the students used the new virtual medium to organize traditional teacher-centered courses.

  2. Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory for the Heliospheric Data Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Armstrong, T. P.; Hill, M. E.; Lal, N.; McGuire, R. E.; McKibben, R. B.; Narock, T. W.; Szabo, A.; Tranquille, C.

    2007-01-01

    The heliosphere is pervaded by interplanetary energetic particles, traditionally also called cosmic rays, from solar, internal heliospheric, and galactic sources. The particles species of interest to heliophysics extend from plasma energies to the GeV energies of galactic cosmic rays still measurably affected by heliospheric modulation and the still higher energies contributing to atmospheric ionization. The NASA and international Heliospheric Network of operational and legacy spacecraft measures interplanetary fluxes of these particles. Spatial coverage extends from the inner heliosphere and geospace to the heliosheath boundary region now being traversed by Voyager 1 and soon by Voyager 2. Science objectives include investigation of solar flare and coronal mass ejection events, acceleration and transport of interplanetary particles within the inner heliosphere, cosmic ray interactions with planetary surfaces and atmospheres, sources of suprathermal and anomalous cosmic ray ions in the outer heliosphere, and solar cycle modulation of galactic cosmic rays. The Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) will improve access and usability of selected spacecraft and sub-orbital NASA heliospheric energetic particle data sets as a newly approved effort within the evolving heliophysics virtual observatory environment. In this presentation, we will describe current VEPO science requirements, our initial priorities and an overview of our strategy to implement VEPO rapidly and at minimal cost by working within the high-level framework of the Virtual Heliospheric Observatory (VHO). VEPO will also leverage existing data services of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility and other existing capabilities of the U.S. and international heliospheric research communities.

  3. One's Colonies: a virtual reality environment of oriental residences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Catherine

    2013-03-01

    This paper is a statement about my virtual reality environment project, One's Colonies, and a description of the creative process of the project. I was inspired by the buildings in my hometown-Taiwan, which is really different from the architectural style in the United States. By analyzing the unique style of dwellings in Taiwan, I want to demonstrate how the difference between geography, weather and culture change the appearance of the living space. Through this project I want to express the relationship between architectural style and cultural difference, and how the emotional condition or characteristics of the residents are affected by their residencies.

  4. Simulation and visualization of mechanical systems in immersive virtual environments

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, T. R.

    1998-04-17

    A prototype for doing real-time simulation of mechanical systems in immersive virtual environments has been developed to run in the CAVE and on the ImmersaDesk at Argonne National Laboratory. This system has three principal software components: a visualization component for rendering the model and providing a user interface, communications software, and mechanics simulation software. The system can display the three-dimensional objects in the CAVE and project various scalar fields onto the exterior surface of the objects during real-time execution.

  5. Islandora A Flexible Drupal-Based Virtual Research Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggott, M.; Pan, J.

    2011-12-01

    Research today exists in a landscape where data flood in, literature grows exponentially, and disciplinary boundaries are increasingly porous. Many of the greatest challenges facing researchers are related to managing the information produced during the research life cycle - from the discussion of new projects to the creation of funding proposals, the production and analysis of data, and the presentation of findings via conferences and scholarly publications. The Islandora framework provides a system that stewards digital data in any form (textual, numeric, scientific, multimedia) along the entire course of this research continuum, it facilitates collaboration not just among physically distant members of research groups but also among research groups and their associated support groups. Because Islandora accommodates both the project-specific, experiment-based context and the cross-project, interdisciplinary exploration context of data, the approach to the creation and discovery of data can be called 'discipline-agnostic.' UPEI's Virtual Research Environment (or VRE) has demonstrated the immense benefits of such an approach. In one example scientists collects samples, create detailed metadata for each sample, potentially generating thousands of data files of various kinds, which can all be loaded in one step. Software (some of it developed specifically for this project) then combines, recombines, and transforms these data into alternate formats for analysis -- thereby saving scientists hundreds of hours of manual labor. Wherever possible data are translated, converting them from proprietary file formats to standard XML, and stored -- thereby exposing the data to a larger audience that may bring them together with quite different samples or experiments in novel ways. The same computer processes and software work-flows brought to bear in the context of one research program can be re-used in other areas and across completely different disciplines, since the data are

  6. Visualizing Moon Phases in Virtual and Physical Astronomy Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udomprasert, Patricia S.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Sunbury, Susan; Zhang, Zhihui; Sadler, Philip M.; Dussault, Mary E.; Wang, Qin; Johnson, Erin; Lotridge, Erin; Jackson, Jonathan; Constantin, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    We report on the development and testing of a 'Visualization Lab,' which includes both physical and virtual models, designed to teach middle school students about the cause of the Moon's phases and eclipses, phenomena that require students to visualize complex 3D relationships amongst the Sun, Earth, and Moon. The physical models included styrofoam balls, a lamp, and hula hoops, and we used two different kinds of virtual models: a simple 2D simulator, vs. a complex 3D model in WorldWide Telescope (WWT), an immersive, free astronomy data visualization environmentIn Phase I, all students used the physical model first, then one of the two virtual models. Students who used WWT as the virtual model had stronger learning gains than students who used the 2D simulator, and they had more interest in continuing to explore the computer model independently after the formal instruction was complete.In Phase 2, all students used WWT, but half used the physical model first, while the other half used WWT first. The Phase 2 pilot (N=68) showed that level of prior knowledge may influence which model order would be more beneficial to student learning. Students with low prior knowledge benefited from using the physical model first, and students with high prior knowledge benefited from using WWT first. Three additional cohorts in 2013-14 (N=226) showed that performance on the multiple choice assessment is comparable regardless of model order, with a regression analysis showing a slight benefit to using WWT first for all levels of prior knowledge.For two cohorts where we have coded open responses, students who used WWT first expressed fewer misconceptions about the cause of Moon phases on the posttest. Despite the stronger learning outcomes from using WWT first, only 19% of students preferred having WWT first or wish they had WWT first.

  7. Virtualizing access to scientific applications with the Application Hosting Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasada, S. J.; Coveney, P. V.

    2009-12-01

    The growing power and number of high performance computing resources made available through computational grids present major opportunities as well as a number of challenges to the user. At issue is how these resources can be accessed and how their power can be effectively exploited. In this paper we first present our views on the usability of contemporary high-performance computational resources. We introduce the concept of grid application virtualization as a solution to some of the problems with grid-based HPC usability. We then describe a middleware tool that we have developed to realize the virtualization of grid applications, the Application Hosting Environment (AHE), and describe the features of the new release, AHE 2.0, which provides access to a common platform of federated computational grid resources in standard and non-standard ways. Finally, we describe a case study showing how AHE supports clinical use of whole brain blood flow modelling in a routine and automated fashion. Program summaryProgram title: Application Hosting Environment 2.0 Catalogue identifier: AEEJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU Public Licence, Version 2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: not applicable No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 685 603 766 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Perl (server), Java (Client) Computer: x86 Operating system: Linux (Server), Linux/Windows/MacOS (Client) RAM: 134 217 728 (server), 67 108 864 (client) bytes Classification: 6.5 External routines: VirtualBox (server), Java (client) Nature of problem: The middleware that makes grid computing possible has been found by many users to be too unwieldy, and presents an obstacle to use rather than providing assistance [1,2]. Such problems are compounded when one attempts to harness the

  8. Security in Distributed Collaborative Environments: Limitations and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadi, Rachid; Pierson, Jean-Marc; Brunie, Lionel

    The main goal of establishing collaboration between heterogeneous environment is to create such as Pervasive context which provide nomadic users with ubiquitous access to digital information and surrounding resources. However, the constraints of mobility and heterogeneity arise a number of crucial issues related to security, especially authentication access control and privacy. First of all, in this chapter we explore the trust paradigm, specially the transitive capability to enable a trust peer to peer collaboration. In this manner, when each organization sets its own security policy to recognize (authenticate) users members of a trusted community and provide them a local access (access control), the trust transitivity between peers will allows users to gain a broad, larger and controlled access inside the pervasive environment. Next, we study the problem of user's privacy. In fact in pervasive and ubiquitous environments, nomadic users gather and exchange certificates or credential which providing them rights to access by transitivity unknown and trusted environments. These signed documents embeds increasing number of attribute that require to be filtered according to such contextual situation. In this chapter, we propose a new morph signature enabling each certificate owner to preserve his privacy by discloses or blinds some sensitive attributes according to faced situation.

  9. Distributed Engineering Environment for Inter-Enterprise Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Koji; Kasahara, Koichi; Nishioka, Yasuyuki

    This paper focuses on collaboration of engineering information among globally distributed companies and describes DEE (Distributed Engineering Environment) of design and production on inter-enterprise network. For DEE, the integration framework and methodology to execute engineering are described in the paper. As for the forms of information description, XML, PSLX (Planning and Scheduling Language for XML) and Web browsing technologies are used. In DEE, XML technology prescribes the communication data form that contains hierarchical functional data structure on a common specific Web browsing space. And PSLX technology prescribes the dynamic processes and their controls of the connection among the distributed business activities of the creation of product data and documents. A prototype of DEE for engineering collaboration is also introduced to evaluate the feasibility. This prototype has been developed as a part of IMS/GLOBEMEN of international project.

  10. Complex conditional control by pigeons in a continuous virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Muhammad A J; Reid, Sean; Cook, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    We tested two pigeons in a continuously streaming digital environment. Using animation software that constantly presented a dynamic, three-dimensional (3D) environment, the animals were tested with a conditional object identification task. The correct object at a given time depended on the virtual context currently streaming in front of the pigeon. Pigeons were required to accurately peck correct target objects in the environment for food reward, while suppressing any pecks to intermixed distractor objects which delayed the next object's presentation. Experiment 1 established that the pigeons' discrimination of two objects could be controlled by the surface material of the digital terrain. Experiment 2 established that the pigeons' discrimination of four objects could be conjunctively controlled by both the surface material and topography of the streaming environment. These experiments indicate that pigeons can simultaneously process and use at least two context cues from a streaming environment to control their identification behavior of passing objects. These results add to the promise of testing interactive digital environments with animals to advance our understanding of cognition and behavior.

  11. Complex conditional control by pigeons in a continuous virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Muhammad A J; Reid, Sean; Cook, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    We tested two pigeons in a continuously streaming digital environment. Using animation software that constantly presented a dynamic, three-dimensional (3D) environment, the animals were tested with a conditional object identification task. The correct object at a given time depended on the virtual context currently streaming in front of the pigeon. Pigeons were required to accurately peck correct target objects in the environment for food reward, while suppressing any pecks to intermixed distractor objects which delayed the next object's presentation. Experiment 1 established that the pigeons' discrimination of two objects could be controlled by the surface material of the digital terrain. Experiment 2 established that the pigeons' discrimination of four objects could be conjunctively controlled by both the surface material and topography of the streaming environment. These experiments indicate that pigeons can simultaneously process and use at least two context cues from a streaming environment to control their identification behavior of passing objects. These results add to the promise of testing interactive digital environments with animals to advance our understanding of cognition and behavior. PMID:26781058

  12. Psychological influences on distance estimation in a virtual reality environment.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kohske; Meilinger, Tobias; Watanabe, Katsumi; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2013-01-01

    Studies of embodied perception have revealed that social, psychological, and physiological factors influence space perception. While many of these influences were observed with real or highly realistic stimuli, the present work showed that even the orientation of abstract geometric objects in a non-realistic virtual environment could influence distance perception. Observers wore a head mounted display and watched virtual cones moving within an invisible cube for 5 s with their head movement recorded. Subsequently, the observers estimated the distance to the cones or evaluated their friendliness. The cones either faced the observer, a target behind the cones, or were oriented randomly. The average viewing distance to the cones varied between 1.2 and 2.0 m. At a viewing distance of 1.6 m, the observers perceived the cones facing them as closer than the cones facing a target in the opposite direction, or those oriented randomly. Furthermore, irrespective of the viewing distance, observers moved their head away from the cones more strongly and evaluated the cones as less friendly when the cones faced the observers. Similar distance estimation results were obtained with a 3-dimensional projection onto a large screen, although the effective viewing distances were farther away. These results suggest that factors other than physical distance influenced distance perception even with non-realistic geometric objects in a virtual environment. Furthermore, the distance perception modulation was accompanied by changes in subjective impression and avoidance movement. We propose that cones facing an observer are perceived as socially discomforting or threatening, and potentially violate an observer's personal space, which might influence the perceived distance of cones. PMID:24065905

  13. Psychological influences on distance estimation in a virtual reality environment

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kohske; Meilinger, Tobias; Watanabe, Katsumi; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of embodied perception have revealed that social, psychological, and physiological factors influence space perception. While many of these influences were observed with real or highly realistic stimuli, the present work showed that even the orientation of abstract geometric objects in a non-realistic virtual environment could influence distance perception. Observers wore a head mounted display and watched virtual cones moving within an invisible cube for 5 s with their head movement recorded. Subsequently, the observers estimated the distance to the cones or evaluated their friendliness. The cones either faced the observer, a target behind the cones, or were oriented randomly. The average viewing distance to the cones varied between 1.2 and 2.0 m. At a viewing distance of 1.6 m, the observers perceived the cones facing them as closer than the cones facing a target in the opposite direction, or those oriented randomly. Furthermore, irrespective of the viewing distance, observers moved their head away from the cones more strongly and evaluated the cones as less friendly when the cones faced the observers. Similar distance estimation results were obtained with a 3-dimensional projection onto a large screen, although the effective viewing distances were farther away. These results suggest that factors other than physical distance influenced distance perception even with non-realistic geometric objects in a virtual environment. Furthermore, the distance perception modulation was accompanied by changes in subjective impression and avoidance movement. We propose that cones facing an observer are perceived as socially discomforting or threatening, and potentially violate an observer's personal space, which might influence the perceived distance of cones. PMID:24065905

  14. I/O Performance of Virtualized Cloud Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoshal, Devarshi; Canon, Shane; Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

    2011-11-03

    The scientific community is exploring the suitability of cloud infrastructure to handle High Performance Computing (HPC) applications. The goal of Magellan, a project funded through DOE ASCR, is to investigate the potential role of cloud computing to address the computing needs of the Department of Energy?s Office of Science, especially for mid-range computing and data-intensive applications which are not served through existing DOE centers today. Prior work has shown that applications with significant communication orI/O tend to perform poorly in virtualized cloud environments. However, there is a limited understanding of the I/O characteristics in virtualized cloud environments. This paper will present our results in benchmarking the I/O performance over different cloud and HPC platforms to identify the major bottlenecks in existing infrastructure. We compare the I/O performance using IOR benchmark on two cloud platforms - Amazon and Magellan. We analyze the performance of different storage options available, different instance types in multiple availability zones. Finally, we perform large-scale tests in order to analyze the variability in the I/O patterns over time and region. Our results highlight the overhead and variability in I/O performance on both public and private cloud solutions. Our results will help applications decide between the different storage options enabling applications to make effective choices.

  15. A white paper: NASA virtual environment research, applications, and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Null, Cynthia H. (Editor); Jenkins, James P. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Research support for Virtual Environment technology development has been a part of NASA's human factors research program since 1985. Under the auspices of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST), initial funding was provided to the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division, Ames Research Center, which resulted in the origination of this technology. Since 1985, other Centers have begun using and developing this technology. At each research and space flight center, NASA missions have been major drivers of the technology. This White Paper was the joint effort of all the Centers which have been involved in the development of technology and its applications to their unique missions. Appendix A is the list of those who have worked to prepare the document, directed by Dr. Cynthia H. Null, Ames Research Center, and Dr. James P. Jenkins, NASA Headquarters. This White Paper describes the technology and its applications in NASA Centers (Chapters 1, 2 and 3), the potential roles it can take in NASA (Chapters 4 and 5), and a roadmap of the next 5 years (FY 1994-1998). The audience for this White Paper consists of managers, engineers, scientists and the general public with an interest in Virtual Environment technology. Those who read the paper will determine whether this roadmap, or others, are to be followed.

  16. Using an improved virtual learning environment for engineering students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourdes Martínez Cartas, Ma

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, e-learning has been used in a chemical engineering subject in the final course of a mining engineering degree, a subject concerned with fuel technology. The low results obtained by students in this subject have led the teacher to search for new strategies to increase grades. Such strategies have consisted of incorporating into the existing virtual environment a dynamics of work with conceptual maps and a consideration of the different learning styles in the classroom. In an attempt to adapt teaching to the individual methods of learning for each student, various activities aimed at strengthening different learning styles have been proposed and concept maps have been used to create meaningful learning experiences. In addition, different modalities of assessment have been proposed, which can be selected by each student according to his or her particular method of learning to avoid penalising one style preference in contrast to another. This combination of e-learning, use of concept maps and catering for different learning styles has involved the implementation of the improved virtual learning environment. This has led to an increase in participation in the subject and has improved student assessment results.

  17. Virtual environment display for a 3D audio room simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, William L.; Foster, Scott H.

    1992-01-01

    The development of a virtual environment simulation system integrating a 3D acoustic audio model with an immersive 3D visual scene is discussed. The system complements the acoustic model and is specified to: allow the listener to freely move about the space, a room of manipulable size, shape, and audio character, while interactively relocating the sound sources; reinforce the listener's feeling of telepresence in the acoustical environment with visual and proprioceptive sensations; enhance the audio with the graphic and interactive components, rather than overwhelm or reduce it; and serve as a research testbed and technology transfer demonstration. The hardware/software design of two demonstration systems, one installed and one portable, are discussed through the development of four iterative configurations.

  18. Using Wikis as a Support and Assessment Tool in Collaborative Digital Game-Based Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samur, Yavuz

    2011-01-01

    In computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments, there are many researches done on collaborative learning activities; however, in game-based learning environments, more research and literature on collaborative learning activities are required. Actually, both game-based learning environments and wikis enable us to use new chances…

  19. Recovering stereo vision by squashing virtual bugs in a virtual reality environment.

    PubMed

    Vedamurthy, Indu; Knill, David C; Huang, Samuel J; Yung, Amanda; Ding, Jian; Kwon, Oh-Sang; Bavelier, Daphne; Levi, Dennis M

    2016-06-19

    Stereopsis is the rich impression of three-dimensionality, based on binocular disparity-the differences between the two retinal images of the same world. However, a substantial proportion of the population is stereo-deficient, and relies mostly on monocular cues to judge the relative depth or distance of objects in the environment. Here we trained adults who were stereo blind or stereo-deficient owing to strabismus and/or amblyopia in a natural visuomotor task-a 'bug squashing' game-in a virtual reality environment. The subjects' task was to squash a virtual dichoptic bug on a slanted surface, by hitting it with a physical cylinder they held in their hand. The perceived surface slant was determined by monocular texture and stereoscopic cues, with these cues being either consistent or in conflict, allowing us to track the relative weighting of monocular versus stereoscopic cues as training in the task progressed. Following training most participants showed greater reliance on stereoscopic cues, reduced suppression and improved stereoacuity. Importantly, the training-induced changes in relative stereo weights were significant predictors of the improvements in stereoacuity. We conclude that some adults deprived of normal binocular vision and insensitive to the disparity information can, with appropriate experience, recover access to more reliable stereoscopic information.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'.

  20. Recovering stereo vision by squashing virtual bugs in a virtual reality environment.

    PubMed

    Vedamurthy, Indu; Knill, David C; Huang, Samuel J; Yung, Amanda; Ding, Jian; Kwon, Oh-Sang; Bavelier, Daphne; Levi, Dennis M

    2016-06-19

    Stereopsis is the rich impression of three-dimensionality, based on binocular disparity-the differences between the two retinal images of the same world. However, a substantial proportion of the population is stereo-deficient, and relies mostly on monocular cues to judge the relative depth or distance of objects in the environment. Here we trained adults who were stereo blind or stereo-deficient owing to strabismus and/or amblyopia in a natural visuomotor task-a 'bug squashing' game-in a virtual reality environment. The subjects' task was to squash a virtual dichoptic bug on a slanted surface, by hitting it with a physical cylinder they held in their hand. The perceived surface slant was determined by monocular texture and stereoscopic cues, with these cues being either consistent or in conflict, allowing us to track the relative weighting of monocular versus stereoscopic cues as training in the task progressed. Following training most participants showed greater reliance on stereoscopic cues, reduced suppression and improved stereoacuity. Importantly, the training-induced changes in relative stereo weights were significant predictors of the improvements in stereoacuity. We conclude that some adults deprived of normal binocular vision and insensitive to the disparity information can, with appropriate experience, recover access to more reliable stereoscopic information.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. PMID:27269607

  1. Collaborative Product Development in an R&D Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jose M.; Keys, L. Ken; Chen, Injazz J.; Peterson, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    Research and development (R&D) organizations are being required to be relevant, to be more application-oriented, and to be partners in the strategic management of the business while meeting the same challenges as the rest of the organization, namely: (1) reduced time to market; (2) reduced cost; (3) improved quality; (4) increased reliability; and (5) increased focus on customer needs. Recent advances in computer technology and the Internet have created a new paradigm of collaborative engineering or collaborative product development (CPD), from which new types of relationships among researchers and their partners have emerged. Research into the applicability and benefits of CPD in a low/no production, R&D, and/or government environment is limited. In addition, the supply chain management (SCM) aspects of these relationships have not been studied. This paper presents research conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) investigating the applicability of CPD and SCM in an R&D organization. The study concentrates on the management and implementation of space research activities at GRC. Results indicate that although the organization is engaged in collaborative relationships that incorporate aspects of SCM, a number of areas, such as development of trust and information sharing merit special attention.

  2. Ubiquitous mobile knowledge construction in collaborative learning environments.

    PubMed

    Baloian, Nelson; Zurita, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge management is a critical activity for any organization. It has been said to be a differentiating factor and an important source of competitiveness if this knowledge is constructed and shared among its members, thus creating a learning organization. Knowledge construction is critical for any collaborative organizational learning environment. Nowadays workers must perform knowledge creation tasks while in motion, not just in static physical locations; therefore it is also required that knowledge construction activities be performed in ubiquitous scenarios, and supported by mobile and pervasive computational systems. These knowledge creation systems should help people in or outside organizations convert their tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge, thus supporting the knowledge construction process. Therefore in our understanding, we consider highly relevant that undergraduate university students learn about the knowledge construction process supported by mobile and ubiquitous computing. This has been a little explored issue in this field. This paper presents the design, implementation, and an evaluation of a system called MCKC for Mobile Collaborative Knowledge Construction, supporting collaborative face-to-face tacit knowledge construction and sharing in ubiquitous scenarios. The MCKC system can be used by undergraduate students to learn how to construct knowledge, allowing them anytime and anywhere to create, make explicit and share their knowledge with their co-learners, using visual metaphors, gestures and sketches to implement the human-computer interface of mobile devices (PDAs).

  3. Maturing Pump Technology for EVA Applications in a Collaborative Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, Edward; Dionne, Steven; Gervais, Edward; Anchondo, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The transition from low earth orbit Extravehicular Activity (EVA) for construction and maintenance activities to planetary surface EVA on asteroids, moons, and, ultimately, Mars demands a new spacesuit system. NASA's development of that system has resulted in dramatically different pumping requirements from those in the current spacesuit system. Hamilton Sundstrand, Cascon, and NASA are collaborating to develop and mature a pump that will reliably meet those new requirements in space environments and within the design constraints imposed by spacesuit system integration. That collaboration, which began in the NASA purchase of a pump prototype for test evaluation, is now entering a new phase of development. A second generation pump reflecting the lessons learned in NASA's testing of the original prototype will be developed under Hamilton Sundstrand internal research funding and ultimately tested in an integrated Advanced Portable Life Support System (APLSS) in NASA laboratories at the Johnson Space Center. This partnership is providing benefit to both industry and NASA by supplying a custom component for EVA integrated testing at no cost to the government while providing test data for industry that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to duplicate in industry laboratories. This paper discusses the evolving collaborative process, component requirements and design development based on early NASA test experience, component stand alone test results, and near term plans for integrated testing at JSCs.

  4. Ubiquitous Mobile Knowledge Construction in Collaborative Learning Environments

    PubMed Central

    Baloian, Nelson; Zurita, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge management is a critical activity for any organization. It has been said to be a differentiating factor and an important source of competitiveness if this knowledge is constructed and shared among its members, thus creating a learning organization. Knowledge construction is critical for any collaborative organizational learning environment. Nowadays workers must perform knowledge creation tasks while in motion, not just in static physical locations; therefore it is also required that knowledge construction activities be performed in ubiquitous scenarios, and supported by mobile and pervasive computational systems. These knowledge creation systems should help people in or outside organizations convert their tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge, thus supporting the knowledge construction process. Therefore in our understanding, we consider highly relevant that undergraduate university students learn about the knowledge construction process supported by mobile and ubiquitous computing. This has been a little explored issue in this field. This paper presents the design, implementation, and an evaluation of a system called MCKC for Mobile Collaborative Knowledge Construction, supporting collaborative face-to-face tacit knowledge construction and sharing in ubiquitous scenarios. The MCKC system can be used by undergraduate students to learn how to construct knowledge, allowing them anytime and anywhere to create, make explicit and share their knowledge with their co-learners, using visual metaphors, gestures and sketches to implement the human-computer interface of mobile devices (PDAs). PMID:22969333

  5. Using "Second Life" as a Virtual Collaborative Tool for Preservice Teachers Seeking English for Speakers of Other Languages Endorsement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Deoksoon; Blankenship, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated preservice teachers' professional-knowledge transformation while they participated in simulated professional-development activities via a "Second Life" virtual classroom--an Internet-based multiuser virtual environment (MUVE). While a cohort of preservice teachers experienced the MUVE environment, the instrumental exploratory…

  6. The Heliophysics Data Environment, Virtual Observatories, NSSDC, and SPASE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, James; Grayzeck, Edwin; Roberts, Aaron; King, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Heliophysics (the study of the Sun and its effects on the Solar System, especially the Earth) has an interesting data environment in that the data are often to be found in relatively small data sets widely scattered in archives around the world. Within the last decade there have been more concentrated efforts to organize the data access methods and create a Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium (HDMC). To provide data search and access capability a number of Virtual Observatories (VO's) have been established both via funding from the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and through other funding agencies in the U.S. and worldwide. At least 15 systems can be labeled as Heliophysics Virtual Observatories, 9 of them funded by NASA. Other parts of this data environment include Resident Archives, and the final, or "deep" archive at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). The problem is that different data search and access approaches are used by all of these elements of the HDMC and a search for data relevant to a particular research question can involve consulting with multiple VO's - needing to learn a different approach for finding and acquiring data for each. The Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) project is intended to provide a common data model for Heliophysics data and therefore a common set of metadata for searches of the VO's and other data environment elements. The SPASE Data Model has been developed through the common efforts of the HDMC representatives over a number of years. We currently have released Version 2.1. of the Data Model. The advantages and disadvantages of the Data Model will be discussed along with the plans for the future. Recent changes requested by new members of the SPASE community indicate some of the directions for further development.

  7. Catchment Prediction In Changing Environments (CAPICHE): A collaborative experiment in an open water science laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Christopher; Wagener, Thorsten; Freer, Jim; Han, Dawei

    2015-04-01

    Predicting the function of hydrological systems under near-stationary conditions faces a number of challenges due to incomplete system understanding, and uncertainty in models and measurements. However, due to changes in climate, land use/land cover, and water demand, the hydrological function of many catchments cannot be considered as stationary. Such changes make modelling catchment systems more difficult, as models need to account for non-stationary forcing and boundary conditions, which in turn can change internal catchment function, and the states and processes that dominate hydrological response. In addition, such models may need to be used to make predictions beyond a range of conditions for which they were originally calibrated. Despite these problems, deriving accurate hydrological predictions under changing conditions is increasingly important for future water resource and flood hazard assessment. Simulating catchments under changing conditions may require more complex distributed models in order to adequately represent spatial changes in boundary conditions (e.g. land cover change). However, the potential for complex models to address these issues cannot be realised in many places because of data problems, which may result from a lack of data, data access issues, and time-consuming problems in bringing diverse sources of data together and into a useable format. A greater understanding of the link between model complexity and data is required to make appropriate modelling choices. Virtual water science laboratories offer the ideal opportunity to explore the issues of model complexity and data availability in the context of predictions under changing environments because they: (1) provide an opportunity to share open data; (2) provide a platform to compare different models; (3) facilitate collaboration between different modelling research groups. This paper introduces a new collaborative experiment, conducted in an open virtual water science laboratory as

  8. "Interface: Virtual Environments in Art, Design and Education"--A Report on a Conference Exploring VLEs in Art and Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanrahan, Siun, Ed.; de Pietro, Peter; Brown, Laurie Halsey; Haw, Alex; Malins, Julian; Milojevic, Michael; Raevaara, Martti; Sonvilla, Barbara; Weckman, Jan Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Funded as part of an EU collaboration, under the Socrates/Minerva initiative, the key motivation for the Interface: Virtual Environments in Art, Design and Education Conference was a sense that, while VLEs and the use of ICT tools are a growing facet of third-level education, and indeed play an important role at the cutting edge of contemporary…

  9. The Vibration Virtual Environment for Test Optimization (VETO)

    SciTech Connect

    Klenke, S.E.; Lauffer, J.P.; Gregory, D.L.; Togami, T.C.

    1996-10-01

    A new test simulation tool is being developed to support vibration test design and to evaluate the overall testability of a component or system. This environment, the Vibration Virtual Environment for Test Optimization (VETO), is utilized to optimally place vibration control and response transducers and to investigate the selection of test parameters needed in the design and performance of a vibration experiment. The engineer can investigate the effects of different control parameters prior to performing an actual vibration test. Additionally, new and existing fixture designs can be evaluated through the development of analytical or experimental models that can be integrated into the simulation environment. This test design environment also provides the engineer with the ability to combine analytically or experimentally derived models of the vibration test hardware, instrumentation and equipment into a simulation model that represents the vibration testing capability. Hardware-in-the-loop simulations can be conducted using this model to examine multiple facets of the test design. This paper presents a new tool that will assist test engineers in maximizing the value of vibration tests through the use of hardware-in-the-loop simulations.

  10. Development of Collaborative Engineering Environments for Spacecraft Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleterry, Robert C.; Johns, Bradley D.; Fan, Kwok Y.; Cheatwood, F. Mcneil; Qualls, Garry D.; Wareing, Todd A.; McGhee, John; Pautz, Shawn; Prinja, Anil K.; Gleicher, Frederick; Failla, Greg; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Wilson, John W.

    2003-01-01

    The hazards of ionizing radiation in space continue to be a limiting factor in the design of missions, spacecraft, and habitats. Shielding against such hazards is an enabling technology in the human and robotic exploration and development of space. If the design of the radiation shielding is not optimal for the mission, then excess mass will be launched, mission costs will be higher than necessary, and useful payload will be reduced. This reduced mission capability scenario can be repeated for other technical design disciplines. These other disciplines can also effect each other's requirements. A collaborative engineering environment can optimize ALL design parameters for cost (or another parameter) producing a spacecraft that will meet all mission requirements at the minimum cost. This paper describes two environments that include space radiation analyses and the inclusion within a larger optimization methodology.

  11. Exploring Cultural Heritage Resources in a 3d Collaborative Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Respaldiza, A.; Wachowicz, M.; Vázquez Hoehne, A.

    2012-06-01

    Cultural heritage is a complex and diverse concept, which brings together a wide domain of information. Resources linked to a cultural heritage site may consist of physical artefacts, books, works of art, pictures, historical maps, aerial photographs, archaeological surveys and 3D models. Moreover, all these resources are listed and described by a set of a variety of metadata specifications that allow their online search and consultation on the most basic characteristics of them. Some examples include Norma ISO 19115, Dublin Core, AAT, CDWA, CCO, DACS, MARC, MoReq, MODS, MuseumDat, TGN, SPECTRUM, VRA Core and Z39.50. Gateways are in place to fit in these metadata standards into those used in a SDI (ISO 19115 or INSPIRE), but substantial work still remains to be done for the complete incorporation of cultural heritage information. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to demonstrate how the complexity of cultural heritage resources can be dealt with by a visual exploration of their metadata within a 3D collaborative environment. The 3D collaborative environments are promising tools that represent the new frontier of our capacity of learning, understanding, communicating and transmitting culture.

  12. Video annotations of Mexican nature in a collaborative environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oropesa Morales, Lester Arturo; Montoya Obeso, Abraham; Hernández García, Rosaura; Cocolán Almeda, Sara Ivonne; García Vázquez, Mireya Saraí; Benois-Pineau, Jenny; Zamudio Fuentes, Luis Miguel; Martinez Nuño, Jesús A.; Ramírez Acosta, Alejandro Alvaro

    2015-09-01

    Multimedia content production and storage in repositories are now an increasingly widespread practice. Indexing concepts for search in multimedia libraries are very useful for users of the repositories. However the search tools of content-based retrieval and automatic video tagging, still do not have great consistency. Regardless of how these systems are implemented, it is of vital importance to possess lots of videos that have concepts tagged with ground truth (training and testing sets). This paper describes a novel methodology to make complex annotations on video resources through ELAN software. The concepts are annotated and related to Mexican nature in a High Level Features (HLF) from development set of TRECVID 2014 in a collaborative environment. Based on this set, each nature concept observed is tagged on each video shot using concepts of the TRECVid 2014 dataset. We also propose new concepts, -like tropical settings, urban scenes, actions, events, weather, places for name a few. We also propose specific concepts that best describe video content of Mexican culture. We have been careful to get the database tagged with concepts of nature and ground truth. It is evident that a collaborative environment is more suitable for annotation of concepts related to ground truth and nature. As a result a Mexican nature database was built. It also is the basis for testing and training sets to automatically classify new multimedia content of Mexican nature.

  13. Participatory design in the project of virtual learning environment of histology.

    PubMed

    Santa-Rosa, José Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    This present article describes a research on the development, under the approach of participatory design, a virtual teaching-learning of Histology in which students and teachers participated actively in all stages of development of the educational environment. We postulates that the development of virtual learning environment of Histology, through the Participatory Design approach, contributes to greater acceptance and use by students and that the adoption of virtual environment for teaching and learning by teachers is a determining factor of use by students.

  14. SVOPME: A scalable virtual organization privileges management environment

    SciTech Connect

    Garzoglio, Gabriele; Wang, Nanbor; Sfiligoi, Igor; Levshina, Tanya; Anathan, Balamurali; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2009-05-01

    Grids enable uniform access to resources by implementing standard interfaces to resource gateways. In the Open Science Grid (OSG), privileges are granted on the basis of the user's membership to a Virtual Organization (VO). However, Grid sites are solely responsible to determine and control access privileges to resources using users identity and personal attributes, which are available through Grid credentials. While this guarantees full control on access rights to the sites, it makes VO privileges heterogeneous throughout the Grid and hardly fits with the Grid paradigm of uniform access to resources. To address these challenges, we are developing the Scalable Virtual Organization Privileges Management Environment (SVOPME), which provides tools for VOs to define and publish desired privileges and assists sites to provide the appropriate access policies. Moreover, SVOPME provides tools for Grid sites to analyze site access policies for various resources, verify compliance with preferred VO policies, and generate directives for site administrators on how the local access policies can be amended to achieve such compliance without taking control of local configurations away from site administrators. This paper discusses what access policies are of interest to the OSG community and how SVOPME implements privilege management for OSG.

  15. Toward SVOPME, a Scalable Virtual Organization Privileges Management Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nanbor; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Ananthan, Balamurali; Timm, Steven; Levshina, Tanya

    Grids enable uniform access to resources by implementing standard interfaces to resource gateways. In the Open Science Grid (OSG), privileges are granted on the basis of the user's membership to a Virtual Organization (VO). However, individual Grid sites are solely responsible to determine and control access privileges to resources. While this guarantees that the sites retain full control on access rights, it often leads to heterogeneous VO privileges throughout the Grid and hardly fits with the Grid paradigm of uniform access to resources. To address these challenges, we developed the Scalable Virtual Organization Privileges Management Environment (SVOPME), which provides tools for VOs to define, publish, and verify desired privileges. Moreover, SVOPME provides tools for grid sites to analyze site access policies for various resources, verify compliance with preferred VO policies, and generate directives for site administrators on how the local access policies can be amended to achieve such compliance without taking control of local configurations away from site administrators. This paper describes how SVOPME implements privilege management tools for the OSG and our experiences in deploying and running the tools in a test bed. Finally, we outline our plan to continue to improve SVOPME and have it included as part of the standard Grid software distributions.

  16. Constructing a Successful Cross-National Virtual Learning Environment in Primary and Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ligorio, Maria Beatrice; van Veen, Klaas

    2006-01-01

    Virtual environments are more and more used in primary schools. One of the most interesting potentialities of these environments is to foster cross-national applications. Yet, this specific feature is not fully exploited. This paper presents a successful virtual learning environment for primary education involving two European countries and…

  17. Supporting Communication in a Collaborative Discovery Learning Environment: The Effect of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saab, Nadira; van Joolingen, Wouter R.; van Hout-Wolters, Bernadette H. A. M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a study on the effect of instruction on collaboration in a collaborative discovery learning environment. The instruction we used, called RIDE, is built upon four principles identified in the literature on collaborative processes: Respect, Intelligent collaboration, Deciding together, and Encouraging. In an experimental study, a group of…

  18. A virtual community and cyberinfrastructure for collaboration in volcano research and risk mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    VHub (short for VolcanoHub, and accessible at vhub.org) is an online platform for collaboration in research and training related to volcanoes, the hazards they pose, and risk mitigation. The underlying concept is to provide a mechanism that enables workers to share information with colleagues around the globe; VHub and similar hub technologies could prove very powerful in collaborating and communicating about circum-Pacific volcanic hazards. Collaboration occurs around several different points: (1) modeling and simulation; (2) data sharing; (3) education and training; (4) volcano observatories; and (5) project-specific groups. VHub promotes modeling and simulation in two ways: (1) some models can be implemented on VHub for online execution. This eliminates the need to download and compile a code on a local computer. VHub can provide a central "warehouse" for such models that should result in broader dissemination. VHub also provides a platform that supports the more complex CFD models by enabling the sharing of code development and problem-solving knowledge, benchmarking datasets, and the development of validation exercises. VHub also provides a platform for sharing of data and datasets. The VHub development team is implementing the iRODS data sharing middleware (see irods.org). iRODS allows a researcher to access data that are located at participating data sources around the world (a "cloud" of data) as if the data were housed in a single virtual database. Education and training is another important use of the VHub platform. Audio-video recordings of seminars, PowerPoint slide sets, and educational simulations are all items that can be placed onto VHub for use by the community or by selected collaborators. An important point is that the "manager" of a given educational resource (or any other resource, such as a dataset or a model) can control the privacy of that resource, ranging from private (only accessible by, and known to, specific collaborators) to completely

  19. Teachers' and students' perspectives on teaching and learning through virtual learning environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limniou, M.; Smith, M.

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to get an insight into how teachers and students responded to the use of virtual learning environments (VLE) in engineering education and what their expectations were from online courses. Teachers designed their online courses with the assistance of a support e-learning team and questionnaires were used for teachers and students to express their views on the online courses. Teachers pointed out that the online courses by themselves would be able to tackle limited lecture time and strengthen the students' background knowledge. Students, on the other hand, stated that their difficulties regarding the courses could be facilitated by using a more interactive teaching approach with the use of collaboration tools and receiving individual feedback. Thus, students suggested that teachers adopt a more student-centred approach by using VLE. Teachers' and students' perspectives were related to their personal characteristics, as students were more familiar with everyday e-communication tools.

  20. Virtual Environment Design for Low/Zero Visibility Tower Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisman, Ron; Farouk, Ahmed; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes prototype software for three-dimensional display of aircraft movement based on realtime radar and other Air Traffic Control (ATC) information. This prototype can be used to develop operational tools for controllers in ATC Towers who cannot view aircraft in low or zero visibility (LZV) weather conditions. The controller could also use the software to arbitrarily reposition his virtual eyepoint to overcome physical obstructions or increase situation awareness. The LZV Tower tool prototype consists of server and client components. The server interfaces to operational ATC radar and communications systems, sending processed data to a client process written in java. This client process runs under Netscape Communicator to provide an interactive perspective display of aircraft in the airport environment. Prototype VRML airport models were derived from 3-D databases used in FAA-certified high fidelity flight-simulators. The web-based design offers potential efficiency increases and decreased costs in the development and deployment of operational LZV Tower tools.

  1. Using a virtual integration environment in treating phantom limb pain.

    PubMed

    Zeher, Michael J; Armiger, Robert S; Burck, James M; Moran, Courtney; Kiely, Janid Blanco; Weeks, Sharon R; Tsao, Jack W; Pasquina, Paul F; Davoodi, R; Loeb, G

    2011-01-01

    The Revolutionizing Prosthetics 2009 program conducted by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has resulted in a Virtual Integration Environment (VIE) that provides a common development platform for researchers and clinicians that design, model and build prosthetic limbs and then integrate and test them with patients. One clinical need that arose during the VIE development was a feature to easily create and model animations that represent patient activities of daily living (ADLs) and simultaneously capture real-time surface EMG activity from the residual limb corresponding to the ADLs. An application of this feature is being made by the Walter Reed Military Amputee Research Program (MARP) where they are utilizing the VIE to investigate methods of reducing upper extremity amputee phantom limb pain (PLP).

  2. Presence and emotions in virtual environments: the influence of stereoscopy.

    PubMed

    Baños, Rosa M; Botella, Cristina; Rubió, Isabel; Quero, Soledad; García-Palacios, Azucena; Alcañiz, Mariano

    2008-02-01

    This study investigates how stereoscopy (the illusion of depth and 3D imaging) affects the sense of presence and the intensity of the positive mood that users feel in virtual environments (VEs). A between-group design was used, and 40 volunteers were randomly assigned to one of two experimental conditions (stereoscopy vs. no stereoscopy) and to one of two emotional VEs (relaxation or joy). The participants' emotions were assessed before and after the VR experience. Presence was measured with two postexperiment questionnaires (ITC-SOPI and SUS). Results show that there were no differences between stereoscopic and monoscopic presentations in VEs (neither subjective sense of presence nor emotional reactions). Practical and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed herein. PMID:18275306

  3. Predictive Compensator Optimization for Head Tracking Lag in Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelstein, Barnard D.; Jung, Jae Y.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the perceptual impact of plant noise parameterization for Kalman Filter predictive compensation of time delays intrinsic to head tracked virtual environments (VEs). Subjects were tested in their ability to discriminate between the VE system's minimum latency and conditions in which artificially added latency was then predictively compensated back to the system minimum. Two head tracking predictors were parameterized off-line according to cost functions that minimized prediction errors in (1) rotation, and (2) rotation projected into translational displacement with emphasis on higher frequency human operator noise. These predictors were compared with a parameterization obtained from the VE literature for cost function (1). Results from 12 subjects showed that both parameterization type and amount of compensated latency affected discrimination. Analysis of the head motion used in the parameterizations and the subsequent discriminability results suggest that higher frequency predictor artifacts are contributory cues for discriminating the presence of predictive compensation.

  4. Synthesis of Virtual Environments for Aircraft Community Noise Impact Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2005-01-01

    A new capability has been developed for the creation of virtual environments for the study of aircraft community noise. It is applicable for use with both recorded and synthesized aircraft noise. When using synthesized noise, a three-stage process is adopted involving non-real-time prediction and synthesis stages followed by a real-time rendering stage. Included in the prediction-based source noise synthesis are temporal variations associated with changes in operational state, and low frequency fluctuations that are present under all operating conditions. Included in the rendering stage are the effects of spreading loss, absolute delay, atmospheric absorption, ground reflections, and binaural filtering. Results of prediction, synthesis and rendering stages are presented.

  5. Changing heartbeat perception to induce anxiety in virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Chittaro, Luca

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we first propose a general technique to induce anxiety in virtual environments (VEs) which exploits auditory heartbeat perception and biofeedback. Then, we consider a VE that reproduces a real-world anxiety-inducing experience (being suddenly surrounded by smoke during a fire evacuation of a building), and we describe an experiment that contrasts 3 conditions: (i) an augmentation of the VE with a bar that indicates when the user's avatar gets hurt, (ii) an augmentation of the VE with the typical audio visual stimuli which are employed in violent videogames when the user's avatar gets hurt, (iii) introduction of the proposed biofeedback technique in the previous condition. We carry out an electrodermal analysis showing that the introduction of the proposed technique produces much higher physiological arousal in terms of skin conductance level (SCL) than the other two conditions. Subjective measures of users' state anxiety are consistent with the recorded physiological reactions. PMID:22954850

  6. [Virtual learning environment: script structure of an online course].

    PubMed

    Seixas, Carlos Alberto; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa; de Godoy, Simone; Mazzo, Alessandra; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora; Martins, José Carlos Amado

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the steps for developing a course and its structure in the Virtual Learning Environment Moodle. It consisted of an application of nursing content offered in an online course included in an international workshop directed to a group of nursing students from a bachelor and a teaching diploma program in Brazil and Portugal. Distinct stages were identified during the study: planning, construction and transformation of content as well as availability of such content to students. The interactive activities and context were developed by professors with the participation of the technical team. The specific procedures and roles performed by professors, specialists, students and technicians are presented. The results of the development and offering of the online course appointed some aspects to be improved in the work process such as the format of content and use of tools. PMID:23258687

  7. MASCARET: creating virtual learning environments from system modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querrec, Ronan; Vallejo, Paola; Buche, Cédric

    2013-03-01

    The design process for a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) such as that put forward in the SIFORAS project (SImulation FOR training and ASsistance) means that system specifications can be differentiated from pedagogical specifications. System specifications can also be obtained directly from the specialists' expertise; that is to say directly from Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) tools. To do this, the system model needs to be considered as a piece of VLE data. In this paper we present Mascaret, a meta-model which can be used to represent such system models. In order to ensure that the meta-model is capable of describing, representing and simulating such systems, MASCARET is based SysML1, a standard defined by Omg.

  8. Modal test optimization using VETO (Virtual Environment for Test Optimization)

    SciTech Connect

    Klenke, S.E.; Reese, G.M.; Schoof, L.A.; Shierling, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    We present a software environment integrating analysis and test based models to support optimal modal test design through a Virtual Environment for Test Optimization (VETO). The VETO assists analysis and test engineers in maximizing the value of each modal test. It is particularly advantageous for structural dynamics model reconciliation applications. The VETO enables an engineer to interact with a finite element model of a test object to optimally place sensors and exciters and to investigate the selection of-data acquisition parameters needed to conduct a complete modal survey. Additionally, the user can evaluate the use of different types of instrumentation such as filters, amplifiers and transducers for which models are available in the VETO. The dynamic response of most of the virtual instruments (including the device under test) are modeled in the state space domain. Design of modal excitation levels and appropriate test instrumentation are facilitated by the VETO`s ability to simulate such features as unmeasured external inputs, A/D quantization effects, and electronic noise. Measures of the quality of the experimental design, including the Modal Assurance Criterion, and the Normal Mode indicator Function are available. The VETO also integrates tools such as Effective Independence and minamac to assist in selection of optimal sensor locations. The software is designed about three distinct modules: (1) a main controller and GUI written in C++, (2) a visualization model, taken from FEAVR, running under AVS, and (3) a state space model and time integration module, built in SIMULINK. These modules are designed to run as separate processes on interconnected machines. MATLAB`s external interface library is used to provide transparent, bidirectional communication between the controlling program and the computational engine where all the time integration is performed.

  9. Model test optimization using the virtual environment for test optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Klenke, S.E.; Reese, G.M.; Schoof, L.A.; Shierling, C.

    1995-11-01

    We present a software environment integrating analysis and test-based models to support optimal modal test design through a Virtual Environment for Test Optimization (VETO). The VETO assists analysis and test engineers to maximize the value of each modal test. It is particularly advantageous for structural dynamics model reconciliation applications. The VETO enables an engineer to interact with a finite element model of a test object to optimally place sensors and exciters and to investigate the selection of data acquisition parameters needed to conduct a complete modal survey. Additionally, the user can evaluate the use of different types of instrumentation such as filters, amplifiers and transducers for which models are available in the VETO. The dynamic response of most of the virtual instruments (including the device under test) are modeled in the state space domain. Design of modal excitation levels and appropriate test instrumentation are facilitated by the VETO`s ability to simulate such features as unmeasured external inputs, A/D quantization effects, and electronic noise. Measures of the quality of the experimental design, including the Modal Assurance Criterion, and the Normal Mode Indicator Function are available. The VETO also integrates tools such as Effective Independence and minamac to assist in selection of optimal sensor locations. The software is designed about three distinct modules: (1) a main controller and GUI written in C++, (2) a visualization model, taken from FEAVR, running under AVS, and (3) a state space model and time integration module built in SIMULINK. These modules are designed to run as separate processes on interconnected machines.

  10. The Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA): Design and architecture

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, John A.; Clarno, Kevin; Sieger, Matt; Bartlett, Roscoe; Collins, Benjamin; Pawlowski, Roger; Schmidt, Rodney; Summers, Randall

    2016-09-08

    VERA, the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications, is the system of physics capabilities being developed and deployed by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the first DOE Hub, which was established in July 2010 for the modeling and simulation of commercial nuclear reactors. VERA consists of integrating and interfacing software together with a suite of physics components adapted and/or refactored to simulate relevant physical phenomena in a coupled manner. VERA also includes the software development environment and computational infrastructure needed for these components to be effectively used. We describe the architecture of VERA from both amore » software and a numerical perspective, along with the goals and constraints that drove the major design decisions and their implications. As a result, we explain why VERA is an environment rather than a framework or toolkit, why these distinctions are relevant (particularly for coupled physics applications), and provide an overview of results that demonstrate the application of VERA tools for a variety of challenging problems within the nuclear industry.« less

  11. Designing a Virtual Research Facility to motivate Professional-Citizen Collaboration (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, P.

    2013-12-01

    In order to handle the onslaught of data spilling from telescopes on the Earth and on orbit, CosmoQuest has created a virtual research facility that allows the public to collaborate with science teams on projects that would otherwise lack the necessary human resources. This second-generation citizen science site goes beyond asking people to click on images to also engaging them in taking classes, attending virtual seminars, and participating in virtual star parties. These features were introduced to try and expand the diversity of motivations that bring people to the project and to keep them engaged overtime - just as a research center seeks to bring a diversity of people together to work and learn over time. In creating the CosmoQuest Virtual Research Facility, we sought to answer the question, 'What would happen if we provided the public with the same kinds of facilities scientists have, and invite them to be our collaborators?' It had already been observed that the public readily attends public science lectures, open houses at science facilities, and education programs such as star parties. It was hoped that by creating a central facility, we could build a community of people learning and doing science in a productive manner. In order to be successful, we needed to first create the facility, then test if people were coming both to learn and to do science, and finally to verify that people were doing legitimate science. During the past 18 months of operations, we have continued to work through each of these stages, as discussed talk. At this early date, progress is on-going, and much research remains to be done, but all indications show that we are on our way to building a community of people learning and doing science. During 2013, a series of studies looked at the motivations of CosmoQuest users, as well as their forms of site interactions. During this talk, we will review these results, as well as the demographics of our user population.

  12. Designing a Virtual Research Facility to motivate Professional-Citizen Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Pamela

    In order to handle the onslaught of data spilling from telescopes on the Earth and on orbit, CosmoQuest has created a virtual research facility that allows the public to collaborate with science teams on projects that would otherwise lack the necessary human resources. This second-generation citizen science site goes beyond asking people to click on images to also engaging them in taking classes, attending virtual seminars, and participating in virtual star parties. These features were introduced to try and expand the diversity of motivations that bring people to the project and to keep them engaged overtime - just as a research center seeks to bring a diversity of people together to work and learn over time. In creating the CosmoQuest Virtual Research Facility, we sought to answer the question, “What would happen if we provided the public with the same kinds of facilities scientists have, and invite them to be our collaborators?” It had already been observed that the public readily attends public science lectures, open houses at science facilities, and education programs such as star parties. It was hoped that by creating a central facility, we could build a community of people learning and doing science in a productive manner. In order to be successful, we needed to first create the facility, then test if people were coming both to learn and to do science, and finally to verify that people were doing legitimate science. During the past 18 months of operations, we have continued to work through each of these stages, as discussed talk. At this early date, progress is on-going, and much research remains to be done, but all indications show that we are on our way to building a community of people learning and doing science. During 2013-2014, a series of studies looked at the motivations of CosmoQuest users, as well as their forms of site interactions. During this talk, we will review these results, as well as the demographics of our user population.

  13. Emotion and auditory virtual environments: affect-based judgments of music reproduced with virtual reverberation times.

    PubMed

    Västfjäll, Daniel; Larsson, Pontus; Kleiner, Mendel

    2002-02-01

    Emotions are experienced both in real and virtual environments (VEs). Most research to date have focused on the content that causes emotional reactions, but noncontent features of a VE (such as the realism and quality of object rendering) may also influence emotional reactions to the mediated object. The present research studied how noncontent features (different reverberation times) of an auditory VE influenced 76 participants' ratings of emotional reactions and expressed emotional qualities of the sounds. The results showed that the two emotion dimensions of pleasantness and arousal were systematically affected if the same musical piece was rendered with different reverberation times. Overall, it was found that high reverberation time was perceived as most unpleasant. Taken together, the results suggested that noncontent features of a VE influence emotional reactions to mediated objects. Moreover, the study suggests that emotional reactions may be a important aspect of the VE experience that can help complementing standard presence questionnaires and quality evaluations.

  14. Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehler, Ted

    2006-12-01

    Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds Coastline Community College has under development several virtual lab simulations and activities that range from biology, to language labs, to virtual discussion environments. Imagine a virtual world that students enter online, by logging onto their computer from home or anywhere they have web access. Upon entering this world they select a personalized identity represented by a digitized character (avatar) that can freely move about, interact with the environment, and communicate with other characters. In these virtual worlds, buildings, gathering places, conference rooms, labs, science rooms, and a variety of other “real world” elements are evident. When characters move about and encounter other people (players) they may freely communicate. They can examine things, manipulate objects, read signs, watch video clips, hear sounds, and jump to other locations. Goals of critical thinking, social interaction, peer collaboration, group support, and enhanced learning can be achieved in surprising new ways with this innovative approach to peer-to-peer communication in a virtual discussion world. In this presentation, short demos will be given of several online learning environments including a virtual biology lab, a marine science module, a Spanish lab, and a virtual discussion world. Coastline College has been a leader in the development of distance learning and media-based education for nearly 30 years and currently offers courses through PDA, Internet, DVD, CD-ROM, TV, and Videoconferencing technologies. Its distance learning program serves over 20,000 students every year. sponsor Jerry Meisner

  15. The Virtual Skeleton Database: An Open Access Repository for Biomedical Research and Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Bonaretti, Serena; Pfahrer, Marcel; Niklaus, Roman; Büchler, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Statistical shape models are widely used in biomedical research. They are routinely implemented for automatic image segmentation or object identification in medical images. In these fields, however, the acquisition of the large training datasets, required to develop these models, is usually a time-consuming process. Even after this effort, the collections of datasets are often lost or mishandled resulting in replication of work. Objective To solve these problems, the Virtual Skeleton Database (VSD) is proposed as a centralized storage system where the data necessary to build statistical shape models can be stored and shared. Methods The VSD provides an online repository system tailored to the needs of the medical research community. The processing of the most common image file types, a statistical shape model framework, and an ontology-based search provide the generic tools to store, exchange, and retrieve digital medical datasets. The hosted data are accessible to the community, and collaborative research catalyzes their productivity. Results To illustrate the need for an online repository for medical research, three exemplary projects of the VSD are presented: (1) an international collaboration to achieve improvement in cochlear surgery and implant optimization, (2) a population-based analysis of femoral fracture risk between genders, and (3) an online application developed for the evaluation and comparison of the segmentation of brain tumors. Conclusions The VSD is a novel system for scientific collaboration for the medical image community with a data-centric concept and semantically driven search option for anatomical structures. The repository has been proven to be a useful tool for collaborative model building, as a resource for biomechanical population studies, or to enhance segmentation algorithms. PMID:24220210

  16. Building virtual reality fMRI paradigms: a framework for presenting immersive virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Charles; Luehrs, Michael; Baecke, Sebastian; Adolf, Daniela; Luetzkendorf, Ralf; Luchtmann, Michael; Bernarding, Johannes

    2012-08-15

    The advantage of using a virtual reality (VR) paradigm in fMRI is the possibility to interact with highly realistic environments. This extends the functions of standard fMRI paradigms, where the volunteer usually has a passive role, for example, watching a simple movie paradigm without any stimulus interactions. From that point of view the combined usage of VR and real-time fMRI offers great potential to identify underlying cognitive mechanisms such as spatial navigation, attention, semantic and episodic memory, as well as neurofeedback paradigms. However, the design and the implementation of a VR stimulus paradigm as well as the integration into an existing MR scanner framework are very complex processes. To support the modeling and usage of VR stimuli we developed and implemented a VR stimulus application based on C++. This software allows the fast and easy presentation of VR environments for fMRI studies without any additional expert knowledge. Furthermore, it provides for the reception of real-time data analysis values a bidirectional communication interface. In addition, the internal plugin interface enables users to extend the functionality of the software with custom programmed C++ plugins. The VR stimulus framework was tested in several performance tests and a spatial navigation study. According to the post-experimental interview, all subjects described immersive experiences and a high attentional load inside the artifical environment. Results from other VR spatial memory studies confirm the neuronal activation that was detected in parahippocampal areas, cuneus, and occipital regions.

  17. Rasch Measurement of Collaborative Problem Solving in an Online Environment.

    PubMed

    Harding, Susan-Marie E; Griffin, Patrick E

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to the assessment of human to human collaborative problem solving using a set of online interactive tasks completed by student dyads. Within the dyad, roles were nominated as either A or B and students selected their own roles. The question as to whether role selection affected individual student performance measures is addressed. Process stream data was captured from 3402 students in six countries who explored the problem space by clicking, dragging the mouse, moving the cursor and collaborating with their partner through a chat box window. Process stream data were explored to identify behavioural indicators that represented elements of a conceptual framework. These indicative behaviours were coded into a series of dichotomous items. These items represented actions and chats performed by students. The frequency of occurrence was used as a proxy measure of item difficulty. Then given a measure of item difficulty, student ability could be estimated using the difficulty estimates of the range of items demonstrated by the student. The Rasch simple logistic model was used to review the indicators to identify those that were consistent with the assumptions of the model and were invariant across national samples, language, curriculum and age of the student. The data were analysed using a one and two dimension, one parameter model. Rasch separation reliability, fit to the model, distribution of students and items on the underpinning construct, estimates for each country and the effect of role differences are reported. This study provides evidence that collaborative problem solving can be assessed in an online environment involving human to human interaction using behavioural indicators shown to have a consistent relationship between the estimate of student ability, and the probability of demonstrating the behaviour. PMID:26784377

  18. Rasch Measurement of Collaborative Problem Solving in an Online Environment.

    PubMed

    Harding, Susan-Marie E; Griffin, Patrick E

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to the assessment of human to human collaborative problem solving using a set of online interactive tasks completed by student dyads. Within the dyad, roles were nominated as either A or B and students selected their own roles. The question as to whether role selection affected individual student performance measures is addressed. Process stream data was captured from 3402 students in six countries who explored the problem space by clicking, dragging the mouse, moving the cursor and collaborating with their partner through a chat box window. Process stream data were explored to identify behavioural indicators that represented elements of a conceptual framework. These indicative behaviours were coded into a series of dichotomous items. These items represented actions and chats performed by students. The frequency of occurrence was used as a proxy measure of item difficulty. Then given a measure of item difficulty, student ability could be estimated using the difficulty estimates of the range of items demonstrated by the student. The Rasch simple logistic model was used to review the indicators to identify those that were consistent with the assumptions of the model and were invariant across national samples, language, curriculum and age of the student. The data were analysed using a one and two dimension, one parameter model. Rasch separation reliability, fit to the model, distribution of students and items on the underpinning construct, estimates for each country and the effect of role differences are reported. This study provides evidence that collaborative problem solving can be assessed in an online environment involving human to human interaction using behavioural indicators shown to have a consistent relationship between the estimate of student ability, and the probability of demonstrating the behaviour.

  19. Value Production in a Collaborative Environment. Sociophysical Studies of Wikipedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasseri, Taha; Kertész, János

    2013-05-01

    We review some recent endeavors and add some new results to characterize and understand underlying mechanisms in Wikipedia (WP), the paradigmatic example of collaborative value production. We analyzed the statistics of editorial activity in different languages and observed typical circadian and weekly patterns, which enabled us to estimate the geographical origins of contributions to WPs in languages spoken in several time zones. Using a recently introduced measure we showed that the editorial activities have intrinsic dependencies in the burstiness of events. A comparison of the English and Simple English WPs revealed important aspects of language complexity and showed how peer cooperation solved the task of enhancing readability. One of our focus issues was characterizing the conflicts or edit wars in WPs, which helped us to automatically filter out controversial pages. When studying the temporal evolution of the controversiality of such pages we identified typical patterns and classified conflicts accordingly. Our quantitative analysis provides the basis of modeling conflicts and their resolution in collaborative environments and contribute to the understanding of this issue, which becomes increasingly important with the development of information communication technology.

  20. Simplified Virtualization in a HEP/NP Environment with Condor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strecker-Kellogg, W.; Caramarcu, C.; Hollowell, C.; Wong, T.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we will address the development of a simple prototype virtualized worker node cluster, using Scientific Linux 6.x as a base OS, KVM and the libvirt API for virtualization, and the Condor batch software to manage virtual machines. The discussion in this paper provides details on our experience with building, configuring, and deploying the various components from bare metal, including the base OS, creation and distribution of the virtualized OS images and the integration of batch services with the virtual machines. Our focus was on simplicity and interoperability with our existing architecture.