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Sample records for collagen gene col7a1

  1. Premature termination codons in the Type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) underlie severe, mutilating recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J. ); Anhalt, G. ); Gibbons, S.; Bauer, E.A. )

    1994-05-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of heritable mechano-bullous skin diseases classified into three major categories on the basis of the level of tissue separation within the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone. The most severe, dystrophic (scarring) forms of EB demonstrate blister formation below the cutaneous basement membrane at the level of the anchoring fibrils. Ultrastructural observations of altered anchoring fibrils and genetic linkage to the gene encoding type VII collagen (COL7A1), the major component of anchoring fibrils, have implicated COL7A1 as the candidate gene in the dystrophic forms of EB. The authors have recently cloned the entire cDNA and gene for human COL7A1, which has been mapped to 3p21. In this study, they describe mutations in four COL7A1 alleles in three patients with severe, mutilating recessive dystrophic EB (Hallopeau-Siemens type, HS-RDEB). Each of these mutations resulted in a premature termination codon (PTC) in the amino-terminal portion of COL7A1. One of the patients was a compound heterozygote for two different mutations. The heterozygous carriers showed an [approximately] 50% reduction in anchoring fibrils, yet were clinically unaffected. Premature termination codons in both alleles of COL7A1 may thus be a major underlying cause of the severe, recessive dystrophic forms of EB. 40 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Genetic linkage to the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) in 26 families with generalised recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and anchoring fibril abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Dunnill, M G; Richards, A J; Milana, G; Mollica, F; Atherton, D; Winship, I; Farrall, M; al-Imara, L; Eady, R A; Pope, F M

    1994-01-01

    To strengthen the evidence for genetic linkage to COL7A1, we have studied 26 generalised recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (EB) families of British, Italian, Irish, and South African origin. We chose two linkage markers, a COL7A1 PvuII intragenic polymorphism and a highly informative anonymous microsatellite marker, D3S1100, which maps close to the COL7A1 locus at 3p21.1-3. Diagnosis was established by family history, clinical examination, immunofluorescence, and ultrastructural studies. The PvuII marker was informative in 16 families with a maximum lod score (Zmax) of 3.51 at recombination fraction (theta) = 0. The D3S1100 microsatellite was informative in 24 out of 25 families with Zmax = 6.8 at theta = 0.05 (Z = 4.94 at theta = 0) and no obligatory recombination events. These data strongly suggest that COL7A1 mutations cause EB in these families and, combined with previous studies, indicate locus homogeneity. The importance of anchoring fibrils for dermal-epidermal adhesion is further underlined. D3S1100 may later prove useful in prenatal diagnosis of this disease, if used in combination with other markers. Images PMID:7837248

  3. Gene Editing for the Efficient Correction of a Recurrent COL7A1 Mutation in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Cristina; Mencía, Angeles; Almarza, David; Duarte, Blanca; Büning, Hildegard; Sallach, Jessica; Hausser, Ingrid; Del Río, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando; Murillas, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Clonal gene therapy protocols based on the precise manipulation of epidermal stem cells require highly efficient gene-editing molecular tools. We have combined adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of donor template DNA with transcription activator-like nucleases (TALE) expressed by adenoviral vectors to address the correction of the c.6527insC mutation in the COL7A1 gene, causing recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in a high percentage of Spanish patients. After transduction with these viral vectors, high frequencies of homology-directed repair were found in clones of keratinocytes derived from a recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) patient homozygous for the c.6527insC mutation. Gene-edited clones recovered the expression of the COL7A1 transcript and collagen VII protein at physiological levels. In addition, treatment of patient keratinocytes with TALE nucleases in the absence of a donor template DNA resulted in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated indel generation in the vicinity of the c.6527insC mutation site in a large proportion of keratinocyte clones. A subset of these indels restored the reading frame of COL7A1 and resulted in abundant, supraphysiological expression levels of mutant or truncated collagen VII protein. Keratinocyte clones corrected both by homology-directed repair (HDR) or NHEJ were used to regenerate skin displaying collagen VII in the dermo-epidermal junction. PMID:27045209

  4. Gene Editing for the Efficient Correction of a Recurrent COL7A1 Mutation in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Cristina; Mencía, Angeles; Almarza, David; Duarte, Blanca; Büning, Hildegard; Sallach, Jessica; Hausser, Ingrid; Del Río, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando; Murillas, Rodolfo

    2016-04-05

    Clonal gene therapy protocols based on the precise manipulation of epidermal stem cells require highly efficient gene-editing molecular tools. We have combined adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of donor template DNA with transcription activator-like nucleases (TALE) expressed by adenoviral vectors to address the correction of the c.6527insC mutation in the COL7A1 gene, causing recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in a high percentage of Spanish patients. After transduction with these viral vectors, high frequencies of homology-directed repair were found in clones of keratinocytes derived from a recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) patient homozygous for the c.6527insC mutation. Gene-edited clones recovered the expression of the COL7A1 transcript and collagen VII protein at physiological levels. In addition, treatment of patient keratinocytes with TALE nucleases in the absence of a donor template DNA resulted in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated indel generation in the vicinity of the c.6527insC mutation site in a large proportion of keratinocyte clones. A subset of these indels restored the reading frame of COL7A1 and resulted in abundant, supraphysiological expression levels of mutant or truncated collagen VII protein. Keratinocyte clones corrected both by homology-directed repair (HDR) or NHEJ were used to regenerate skin displaying collagen VII in the dermo-epidermal junction.

  5. SIN retroviral vectors expressing COL7A1 under human promoters for ex vivo gene therapy of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Titeux, Matthias; Pendaries, Valérie; Zanta-Boussif, Maria A; Décha, Audrey; Pironon, Nathalie; Tonasso, Laure; Mejia, José E; Brice, Agnes; Danos, Olivier; Hovnanian, Alain

    2010-08-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL7A1 encoding type VII collagen which forms key structures (anchoring fibrils) for dermal-epidermal adherence. Patients suffer since birth from skin blistering, and develop severe local and systemic complications resulting in poor prognosis. We lack a specific treatment for RDEB, but ex vivo gene transfer to epidermal stem cells shows a therapeutic potential. To minimize the risk of oncogenic events, we have developed new minimal self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors in which the COL7A1 complementary DNA (cDNA) is under the control of the human elongation factor 1alpha (EF1alpha) or COL7A1 promoters. We show efficient ex vivo genetic correction of primary RDEB keratinocytes and fibroblasts without antibiotic selection, and use either of these genetically corrected cells to generate human skin equivalents (SEs) which were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. We achieved long-term expression of recombinant type VII collagen with restored dermal-epidermal adherence and anchoring fibril formation, demonstrating in vivo functional correction. In few cases, rearranged proviruses were detected, which were probably generated during the retrotranscription process. Despite this observation which should be taken under consideration for clinical application, this preclinical study paves the way for a therapy based on grafting the most severely affected skin areas of patients with fully autologous SEs genetically corrected using a SIN COL7A1 retroviral vector.

  6. SIN Retroviral Vectors Expressing COL7A1 Under Human Promoters for Ex Vivo Gene Therapy of Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Titeux, Matthias; Pendaries, Valérie; Zanta-Boussif, Maria A; Décha, Audrey; Pironon, Nathalie; Tonasso, Laure; Mejia, José E; Brice, Agnes; Danos, Olivier; Hovnanian, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL7A1 encoding type VII collagen which forms key structures (anchoring fibrils) for dermal–epidermal adherence. Patients suffer since birth from skin blistering, and develop severe local and systemic complications resulting in poor prognosis. We lack a specific treatment for RDEB, but ex vivo gene transfer to epidermal stem cells shows a therapeutic potential. To minimize the risk of oncogenic events, we have developed new minimal self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors in which the COL7A1 complementary DNA (cDNA) is under the control of the human elongation factor 1α (EF1α) or COL7A1 promoters. We show efficient ex vivo genetic correction of primary RDEB keratinocytes and fibroblasts without antibiotic selection, and use either of these genetically corrected cells to generate human skin equivalents (SEs) which were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. We achieved long-term expression of recombinant type VII collagen with restored dermal–epidermal adherence and anchoring fibril formation, demonstrating in vivo functional correction. In few cases, rearranged proviruses were detected, which were probably generated during the retrotranscription process. Despite this observation which should be taken under consideration for clinical application, this preclinical study paves the way for a therapy based on grafting the most severely affected skin areas of patients with fully autologous SEs genetically corrected using a SIN COL7A1 retroviral vector. PMID:20485266

  7. Two novel mutations on exon 8 and intron 65 of COL7A1 gene in two Chinese brothers result in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Chen, Xue-Jun; Liu, Wei; Gong, Bo; Xie, Jun; Xiong, Jun-Hao; Cheng, Jing; Duan, Xi-Ling; Lin, Zhao-Chun; Huang, Lu-Lin; Wan, Hui-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Qi; Song, Lin-Hong; Yang, Zheng-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is an inherited bullous dermatosis caused by the COL7A1 gene mutation in autosomal dominant or recessive mode. COL7A1 gene encodes type VII collagen - the main component of the anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction. Besides the 730 mutations reported, we identified two novel COL7A1 gene mutations in a Chinese family, which caused recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). The diagnosis was established histopathologically and ultrastructurally. After genomic DNA extraction from the peripheral blood sample of all subjects (5 pedigree members and 136 unrelated control individuals), COL7A1 gene screening was performed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct DNA sequencing of the whole coding exons and flanking intronic regions. Genetic analysis of the COL7A1 gene in affected individuals revealed compound heterozygotes with identical novel mutations. The maternal mutation is a 2-bp deletion at exon 8 (c.1006_1007delCA), leading to a subsequent reading frame-shift and producing a premature termination codon located 48 amino acids downstream in exon 9 (p.Q336EfsX48), consequently resulting in the truncation of 2561 amino acids downstream. This was only present in two affected brothers, but not in the other unaffected family members. The paternal mutation is a 1-bp deletion occurring at the first base of intron 65 (c.IVS5568+1delG) that deductively changes the strongly conserved GT dinucleotide at the 5' donor splice site, results in subsequent reading-through into intron 65, and creates a stop codon immediately following the amino acids encoded by exon 65 (GTAA→TAA). This is predicted to produce a truncated protein lacking of 1089 C-terminal amino acids downstream. The latter mutation was found in all family members except one of the two unaffected sisters. Both mutations were observed concurrently only in the two affected brothers. Neither mutation was discovered in 136 unrelated Chinese control

  8. One Novel Frameshift Mutation on Exon 64 of COL7A1 Gene in an Iranian Individual Suffering Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    Khaniani, Mahmoud Shekari; Sohrabi, Nasrin; Derakhshan, Neda Mansoori; Derakhshan, Sima Mansoori

    2015-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is an extremely rare subtype of bullous dermatosis caused by the COL7A1 gene mutation. After genomic DNA extraction from the peripheral blood sample of all subjects (3 pedigree members and 3 unrelated control individuals), COL7A1 gene screening was performed by PCR amplification and direct DNA sequencing of all of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions. Genetic analysis of the COL7A1 gene in an affected individual revealed a novel mutation: c.5493delG (p.K1831Nfs*10) in exon 64 of the COL7A1 gene in homozygous state. This mutation was not discovered in 3 unrelated Iranian control individuals. These data suggest that c.5493delG may influence the phenotype of RDEB. The result of this case report contributes to the expanding database on COL7A1 mutations.

  9. Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa with one dominant and one recessive mutation of the COL7A1 gene in a child with deafness.

    PubMed

    Weinel, Sarah; Lucky, Anne W; Uitto, Jouni; Pfendner, Ellen G; Choo, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa can be inherited in autosomal dominant and recessive forms, the former usually expressed as a milder phenotype, although mild forms of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa can occur. We present a patient who was found to be a compound heterozygote, inheriting a dominant mutation from his father and a recessive mutation from his mother, resulting in a clinically severe case of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Mutations in the gene for collagen VII (COL7A1) have been documented in both types of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Our patient has also been diagnosed with bilateral auditory neuropathy, a disorder coincidentally also mapped to a nearby gene on chromosome 3p21 (the transmembrane inner ear expressed gene, TMIE).

  10. A COL7A1 Mutation Causes Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa in Rotes Höhenvieh Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Menoud, Annie; Welle, Monika; Tetens, Jens; Lichtner, Peter; Drögemüller, Cord

    2012-01-01

    We identified a congenital mechanobullous skin disorder in six calves on a single farm of an endangered German cattle breed in 2010. The condition presented as a large loss of skin distal to the fetlocks and at the mucosa of the muzzle. All affected calves were euthanized on humane grounds due to the severity, extent and progression of the skin and oral lesions. Examination of skin samples under light microscopy revealed detachment of the epidermis from the dermis at the level of the dermo epidermal junction, leading to the diagnosis of a subepidermal bullous dermatosis such as epidermolysis bullosa. The pedigree was consistent with monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance. We localized the causative mutation to an 18 Mb interval on chromosome 22 by homozygosity mapping. The COL7A1 gene encoding collagen type VII alpha 1 is located within this interval and COL7A1 mutations have been shown to cause inherited dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) in humans. A SNP in the bovine COL7A1 exon 49 (c.4756C>T) was perfectly associated with the observed disease. The homozygous mutant T/T genotype was exclusively present in affected calves and their parents were heterozygous C/T confirming the assumed recessive mode of inheritance. All known cases and genotyped carriers were related to a single cow, which is supposed to be the founder animal. The mutant T allele was absent in 63 animals from 24 cattle breeds. The identified mutation causes a premature stop codon which leads to a truncated protein representing a complete loss of COL7A1 function (p.R1586*). We thus have identified a candidate causative mutation for this genetic disease using only three cases to unravel its molecular basis. Selection against this mutation can now be used to eliminate the mutant allele from the Rotes Höhenvieh breed. PMID:22715415

  11. Construction and validation of an RNA trans-splicing molecule suitable to repair a large number of COL7A1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Tockner, B; Kocher, T; Hainzl, S; Reichelt, J; Bauer, J W; Koller, U; Murauer, E M

    2016-01-01

    RNA trans-splicing has become a versatile tool in the gene therapy of monogenetic diseases. This technique is especially valuable for the correction of mutations in large genes such as COL7A1, which underlie the dystrophic subtype of the skin blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa. Over 800 mutations spanning the entire length of the COL7A1 gene have been associated with defects in type VII collagen, leading to excessive fragility of epithelial tissues, the hallmark of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB). In the present study, we designed an RNA trans-splicing molecule (RTM) that is capable of repairing any given mutation within a 4200 nucleotide region spanning the 3′ half of COL7A1. The selected RTM, RTM28, was able to induce accurate trans-splicing into endogenous COL7A1 pre-mRNA transcripts in a type VII collagen-deficient DEB patient-derived cell line. Correct trans-splicing was detected at the RNA level by semiquantitative RT-PCR and correction of full-length type VII collagen was confirmed at the protein level by immunofluorescence and western blot analyses. Our results demonstrate that RTM28, which covers >60% of all mutations reported in DEB and is thus the longest RTM described so far for the repair of COL7A1, represents a promising candidate for therapeutic applications. PMID:27434145

  12. Human COL7A1-corrected induced pluripotent stem cells for the treatment of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Sebastiano, Vittorio; Zhen, Hanson Hui; Haddad, Bahareh; Derafshi, Bahareh Haddad; Bashkirova, Elizaveta; Melo, Sandra P; Wang, Pei; Leung, Thomas L; Siprashvili, Zurab; Tichy, Andrea; Li, Jiang; Ameen, Mohammed; Hawkins, John; Lee, Susie; Li, Lingjie; Schwertschkow, Aaron; Bauer, Gerhard; Lisowski, Leszek; Kay, Mark A; Kim, Seung K; Lane, Alfred T; Wernig, Marius; Oro, Anthony E

    2014-11-26

    Patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) lack functional type VII collagen owing to mutations in the gene COL7A1 and suffer severe blistering and chronic wounds that ultimately lead to infection and development of lethal squamous cell carcinoma. The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the ability to edit the genome bring the possibility to provide definitive genetic therapy through corrected autologous tissues. We generated patient-derived COL7A1-corrected epithelial keratinocyte sheets for autologous grafting. We demonstrate the utility of sequential reprogramming and adenovirus-associated viral genome editing to generate corrected iPSC banks. iPSC-derived keratinocytes were produced with minimal heterogeneity, and these cells secreted wild-type type VII collagen, resulting in stratified epidermis in vitro in organotypic cultures and in vivo in mice. Sequencing of corrected cell lines before tissue formation revealed heterogeneity of cancer-predisposing mutations, allowing us to select COL7A1-corrected banks with minimal mutational burden for downstream epidermis production. Our results provide a clinical platform to use iPSCs in the treatment of debilitating genodermatoses, such as RDEB.

  13. Characterization of 18 new mutations in COL7A1 in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa provides evidence for distinct molecular mechanisms underlying defective anchoring fibril formation.

    PubMed Central

    Hovnanian, A; Rochat, A; Bodemer, C; Petit, E; Rivers, C A; Prost, C; Fraitag, S; Christiano, A M; Uitto, J; Lathrop, M; Barrandon, Y; de Prost, Y

    1997-01-01

    We have characterized 21 mutations in the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) encoding the anchoring fibrils, 18 of which were not previously reported, in patients from 15 unrelated families with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). COL7A1 mutations in both alleles were identified by screening the 118 exons of COL7A1 and flanking intron regions. Fourteen mutations created premature termination codons (PTCs) and consisted of nonsense mutations, small insertions, deletions, and splice-site mutations. A further seven mutations predicted glycine or arginine substitutions in the collagenous domain of the molecule. Two mutations were found in more than one family reported in this study, and six of the seven missense mutations showed clustering within exons 72-74 next to the hinge region of the protein. Patients who were homozygous or compound heterozygotes for mutations leading to PTCs displayed both absence or drastic reduction of COL7A1 transcripts and undetectable type VII collagen protein in skin. In contrast, missense mutations were associated with clearly detectable COL7A1 transcripts and with normal or reduced expression of type VII collagen protein at the dermo/epidermal junction. Our results provide evidence for at least two distinct molecular mechanisms underlying defective anchoring fibril formation in RDEB: one involving PTCs leading to mRNA instability and absence of protein synthesis, the other implicating missense mutations resulting in the synthesis of type VII collagen polypeptide with decreased stability and/or altered function. Genotype-phenotype correlations suggested that the nature and location of these mutations are important determinants of the disease phenotype and showed evidence for interfamilial phenotypic variability. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9326325

  14. Lentiviral Engineered Fibroblasts Expressing Codon-Optimized COL7A1 Restore Anchoring Fibrils in RDEB

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, Christos; Syed, Farhatullah; Petrova, Anastasia; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Lwin, Su M.; Farzaneh, Farzin; Chan, Lucas; Ghani, Sumera; Fleck, Roland A.; Glover, Leanne; McMillan, James R.; Chen, Mei; Thrasher, Adrian J.; McGrath, John A.; Di, Wei-Li; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Cells therapies, engineered to secrete replacement proteins, are being developed to ameliorate otherwise debilitating diseases. Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by defects of type VII collagen, a protein essential for anchoring fibril formation at the dermal-epidermal junction. Whereas allogeneic fibroblasts injected directly into the dermis can mediate transient disease modulation, autologous gene-modified fibroblasts should evade immunological rejection and support sustained delivery of type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal junction. We demonstrate the feasibility of such an approach using a therapeutic grade, self-inactivating-lentiviral vector, encoding codon-optimized COL7A1, to transduce RDEB fibroblasts under conditions suitable for clinical application. Expression and secretion of type VII collagen was confirmed with transduced cells exhibiting supranormal levels of protein expression, and ex vivo migration of fibroblasts was restored in functional assays. Gene-modified RDEB fibroblasts also deposited type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal junction of human RDEB skin xenografts placed on NOD-scid IL2Rgammanull recipients, with reconstruction of human epidermal structure and regeneration of anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction. Fibroblast-mediated restoration of protein and structural defects in this RDEB model strongly supports proposed therapeutic applications in man. PMID:26763448

  15. Compound heterozygosity for COL7A1 mutations in twins with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: a recessive paternal deletion/insertion mutation and a dominant negative maternal glycine substitution result in a severe phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Christiano, A. M.; Anton-Lamprecht, I.; Amano, S.; Ebschner, U.; Burgeson, R. E.; Uitto, J.

    1996-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated genetic linkage between the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) and the dominant (DDEB) and recessive (RDEB) forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) and have subsequently identified pathogenetic mutations in several families. Mutations in DDEB identified thus far are glycine substitutions in the collagenous domain of COL7A1, while the most severe forms of RDEB result from premature termination codon (PTC) mutations on both alleles. In this study, we performed mutation analysis in the COL7A1 gene in twins who displayed a severe DEB phenotype. Mutational analysis revealed a paternal 2-bp deletion/1-bp insertion in exon 56, designated 5103CC-->G, which results in a frameshift and downstream PTC. Analysis of the maternal COL7A1 allele revealed a glycine-to-arginine substitution in exon 91 (G2351R). Careful questioning of the mother revealed that she and her father had a history of shedding of toenails and occasional poorly healing erosions, consistent with a mild form of DDEB. Immunoprecipitation of type VII collagen from fibroblasts of the twins revealed a marked reduction in intracellular protein production, consistent with the drastic reduction in mRNA transcript from the paternal mutant allele, while the majority of polypeptides bearing the glycine substitution appeared to be degraded intracellularly. Thus, the severe RDEB phenotype in the probands results from compound heterozygosity for one glycine substitution and one PTC mutation in COL7A1. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8644730

  16. Reduced anchoring fibril formation and collagen VII immunoreactivity in feline dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Olivry, T; Dunston, S M; Marinkovich, M P

    1999-11-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa was diagnosed in a cat with juvenile-onset epithelial sloughing of the oral mucosa, footpads, and haired skin. Dermoepidermal separation occurred in the absence of inflammation or cytolysis of basal epidermal cells. Collagen IV-specific immunostaining corroborated the fact that clefting took place below the epidermal basement membrane. Ultrastructural examination revealed that the proband's anchoring fibrils exhibited a filamentous morphology and were decreased in number compared with those in a normal cat. Finally, the attenuated immunoreactivity for collagen VII in our patient led us to suspect that its encoding gene, COL7A1, could be mutated in this case of feline dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

  17. Hallopeau-Siemens dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa due to homozygous 5818delC mutation in the COL7A gene.

    PubMed

    Koshida, Shigeki; Tsukamura, Atsushi; Yanagi, Takahide; Nakahara, Sayuri; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro; Kato, Takashi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Nakano, Hajime; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of inherited mechanobullous skin disease. The dystrophic EB (DEB), one subtype of EB, is inherited in an autosomal dominant DEB or in an autosomal recessive (RDEB). DEB is caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen, the major component of anchoring fibrils. Over 300 pathogenic mutations have been detected within COL7A in DEB. Patients with the Hallopeau-Siemens type (HS-RDEB), most severe form of DEB, frequently have premature termination codon (PTC) mutations on both alleles. PTC mutations on both alleles result in depleted mRNA and α1 helix, and failure to form the triple helix structure characteristic of type VII collagen. As patients with HS-RDEB usually have a pair of heterozygous PTC mutations, there have been rarely reported homozygous ones in HS-RDEB. We report the first case of HS-RDEB homozygous PTC mutations of 5818delC in both COL7A1 alleles. This case report suggests the positional effect of PTC mutations and vigilance against early infantile death in EB including HS-RDEB.

  18. Regulation of collagen I gene expression by ras.

    PubMed Central

    Slack, J L; Parker, M I; Robinson, V R; Bornstein, P

    1992-01-01

    Although transformation of rodent fibroblasts can lead to dramatic changes in expression of extracellular matrix genes, the molecular basis and physiological significance of these changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism(s) by which ras affects expression of the genes encoding type I collagen. Levels of both alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) collagen mRNAs were markedly reduced in Rat 1 fibroblasts overexpressing either the N-rasLys-61 or the Ha-rasVal-12 oncogene. In fibroblasts conditionally transformed with N-rasLys-61, alpha 1(I) transcript levels began to decline within 8 h of ras induction and reached 1 to 5% of control levels after 96 h. In contrast, overexpression of normal ras p21 had no effect on alpha 1(I) or alpha 2(I) mRNA levels. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that the transcription rates of both the alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) genes were significantly reduced in ras-transformed cells compared with those in parental cells. In addition, the alpha 1(I) transcript was less stable in transformed cells. Chimeric plasmids containing up to 3.6 kb of alpha 1(I) 5'-flanking DNA and up to 2.3 kb of the 3'-flanking region were expressed at equivalent levels in both normal and ras-transformed fibroblasts. However, a cosmid clone containing the entire mouse alpha 1(I) gene, including 3.7 kb of 5'- and 4 kb of 3'-flanking DNA, was expressed at reduced levels in fibroblasts overexpressing oncogenic ras. We conclude that oncogenic ras regulates the type I collagen genes at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels and that this effect, at least for the alpha 1(I) gene, may be mediated by sequences located either within the body of the gene itself or in the distal 3'-flanking region. Images PMID:1406656

  19. [The human genome--chromosome 10 and the collagen genes].

    PubMed

    Brdicka, R

    1995-05-17

    In relation to locuses of the 10th chromosome at present the following are in the focus of interest: tumours of endocrine glands, medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland (MTC) and multiple endocrine neoplasias (MEN). It seems that the unifying basis is the oncogene RET, responsible for the development of Hirschsprung's disease HSCR. The authors mentions also metabolically important locuses for choline acetyltransferase (CHAT), uriporphyrinogen synthase (UROS) and methyl guanine methyltransferase (MGMT). A special paragraph is devoted to a list of collagenous genes COL1-COL18 and diseases associated with them.

  20. Hernia fibroblasts lack β-estradiol induced alterations of collagen gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Background Estrogens are reported to increase type I and type III collagen deposition and to regulate Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) expression. These proteins are reported to be dysregulated in incisional hernia formation resulting in a significantly decreased type I to III ratio. We aimed to evaluate the β-estradiol mediated regulation of type I and type III collagen genes as well as MMP-2 gene expression in fibroblasts derived from patients with or without history of recurrent incisional hernia disease. We compared primary fibroblast cultures from male/female subjects without/without incisional hernia disease. Results Incisional hernia fibroblasts (IHFs) revealed a decreased type I/III collagen mRNA ratio. Whereas fibroblasts from healthy female donors responded to β-estradiol, type I and type III gene transcription is not affected in fibroblasts from males or affected females. Furthermore β-estradiol had no influence on the impaired type I to III collagen ratio in fibroblasts from recurrent hernia patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that β-estradiol does not restore the imbaired balance of type I/III collagen in incisional hernia fibroblasts. Furthermore, the individual was identified as an independent factor for the β-estradiol induced alterations of collagen gene expression. The observation of gender specific β-estradiol-dependent changes of collagen gene expression in vitro is of significance for future studies of cellular response. PMID:17010202

  1. Tissue-specific expression of the human type II collagen gene in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lovell-Badge, R.H.; Bygrave, A.; Bradley, A.; Robertson, E.; Tilly, R.; Cheah, K.S.E.

    1987-05-01

    Type II collagen is crucial to the development of form in vertebrates as it is the major protein of cartilage. To study the factors regulating its expression the authors introduced a cosmid containing the human type II collagen gene, including 4.5 kilobases of 5' and 2.2 kilobases of 3' flanking DNA, into embryonic stem cells in vitro. The transformed cells contribute to all tissues in chimeric mice allowing the expression of the exogenous gene to be studied in vivo. Human type II collagen mRNA is restricted to tissues showing transcription from the endogenous gene and human type II collagen is found in extracellular matrix surrounding chondrocytes in cartilage. The results indicate that the cis-acting requirements for correct temporal and spatial regulation of the gene are contained with the introduced DNA.

  2. The mouse collagen X gene: complete nucleotide sequence, exon structure and expression pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Elima, K; Eerola, I; Rosati, R; Metsäranta, M; Garofalo, S; Perälä, M; De Crombrugghe, B; Vuorio, E

    1993-01-01

    Overlapping genomic clones covering the 7.2 kb mouse alpha 1(X) collagen gene, 0.86 kb of promoter and 1.25 kb of 3'-flanking sequences were isolated from two genomic libraries and characterized by nucleotide sequencing. Typical features of the gene include a unique three-exon structure, similar to that in the chick gene, with the entire triple-helical domain of 463 amino acids coded by a single large exon. The highest degree of amino acid and nucleotide sequence conservation was seen in the coding region for the collagenous and C-terminal non-collagenous domains between the mouse and known chick, bovine and human collagen type X sequences. More divergence between the sequences occurred in the N-terminal non-collagenous domain. Similarity between the mammalian collagen X sequences extended into the 3'-untranslated sequence, particularly near the polyadenylation site. The promoter of the mouse collagen X gene was found to contain two TATAA boxes 159 bp apart; primer extension analyses of the transcription start site revealed that both were functional. The promoter has an unusual structure with a very low G + C content of 28% between positions -220 and -1 of the upstream transcription start site. Northern and in situ hybridization analyses confirmed that the expression of the alpha 1(X) collagen gene is restricted to hypertrophic chondrocytes in tissues undergoing endochondral calcification. The detailed sequence information of the gene is useful for studies on the promoter activity of the gene and for generation of transgenic mice. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8424763

  3. Collagen duplicate genes of bone and cartilage participate during regeneration of zebrafish fin skeleton.

    PubMed

    Duran, I; Csukasi, F; Taylor, S P; Krakow, D; Becerra, J; Bombarely, A; Marí-Beffa, M

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish fin is widely used as a model for skeleton regeneration. For years, the nature of the fin skeleton has been controversial as its extracellular matrix shows hybrid characteristics of both bone and cartilage. The presence of co-orthologs genes also increases the complexity of these tissues. In this article, we have identified and described the expression of fibrillar collagens in zebrafish fin skeleton. We found that genes coding for types I, II, V, XI and XXVII collagens are duplicated, showing in several cases, different expression domains. We also identified specific genomic features, such as the presence of type XXIV collagen and the absence of type III collagen in the zebrafish genome. Our study showed that actinotrichia-forming cells and osteoblasts synthesize a wide variety of these fibrillar collagens during fin regeneration. An intertrichial domain expressing most of the collagens was located in the transition between the mesenchyme condensations of actinotrichia and lepidotrichia and may determine an important niche associated with fin skeleton morphogenesis. We also confirmed the hybrid nature of the fin exoskeleton and provided a complete description of those fibrillar collagens expressed during the formation of the fin skeleton.

  4. Gene therapy: pursuing restoration of dermal adhesion in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Cutlar, Lara; Greiser, Udo; Wang, Wenxin

    2014-01-01

    The replacement of a defective gene with a fully functional copy is the goal of the most basic gene therapy. Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is characterised by a lack of adhesion of the epidermis to the dermis. It is an ideal target for gene therapy as all variants of hereditary RDEB are caused by mutations in a single gene, COL7A1, coding for type VII collagen, a key component of anchoring fibrils that secure attachment of the epidermis to the dermis. RDEB is one of the most severe variants in the epidermolysis bullosa (EB) group of heritable skin diseases. Epidermolysis bullosa is defined by chronic fragility and blistering of the skin and mucous membranes due to mutations in the genes responsible for production of the basement membrane proteins. This condition has a high personal, medical and socio-economic impact. People with RDEB require a broad spectrum of medications and specialised care. Due to this being a systemic condition, most research focus is in the area of gene therapy. Recently, preclinical works have begun to show promise. They focus on the virally mediated ex vivo correction of autologous epithelium. These corrected cells are then to be expanded and grafted onto the patient following the lead of the first successful gene therapy in dermatology being a grafting of corrected tissue for junctional EB treatment. Current progress, outstanding challenges and future directions in translating these approaches in clinics are reviewed in this article.

  5. Gene Expression Profiling Identifies Molecular Pathways Associated with Collagen VI Deficiency and Provides Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Paco, Sonia; Kalko, Susana G.; Jou, Cristina; Rodríguez, María A.; Corbera, Joan; Muntoni, Francesco; Feng, Lucy; Rivas, Eloy; Torner, Ferran; Gualandi, Francesca; Gomez-Foix, Anna M.; Ferrer, Anna; Ortez, Carlos; Nascimento, Andrés; Colomer, Jaume; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), caused by collagen VI deficiency, is a common congenital muscular dystrophy. At present, the role of collagen VI in muscle and the mechanism of disease are not fully understood. To address this we have applied microarrays to analyse the transcriptome of UCMD muscle and compare it to healthy muscle and other muscular dystrophies. We identified 389 genes which are differentially regulated in UCMD relative to controls. In addition, there were 718 genes differentially expressed between UCMD and dystrophin deficient muscle. In contrast, only 29 genes were altered relative to other congenital muscular dystrophies. Changes in gene expression were confirmed by real-time PCR. The set of regulated genes was analysed by Gene Ontology, KEGG pathways and Ingenuity Pathway analysis to reveal the molecular functions and gene networks associated with collagen VI defects. The most significantly regulated pathways were those involved in muscle regeneration, extracellular matrix remodelling and inflammation. We characterised the immune response in UCMD biopsies as being mainly mediated via M2 macrophages and the complement pathway indicating that anti-inflammatory treatment may be beneficial to UCMD as for other dystrophies. We studied the immunolocalisation of ECM components and found that biglycan, a collagen VI interacting proteoglycan, was reduced in the basal lamina of UCMD patients. We propose that biglycan reduction is secondary to collagen VI loss and that it may be contributing towards UCMD pathophysiology. Consequently, strategies aimed at over-expressing biglycan and restore the link between the muscle cell surface and the extracellular matrix should be considered. PMID:24223098

  6. Structure and developmental expression of a sea urchin fibrillar collagen gene.

    PubMed

    D'Alessio, M; Ramirez, F; Suzuki, H R; Solursh, M; Gambino, R

    1989-12-01

    We have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones that specify a Paracentrotus lividus procollagen chain. The cDNAs code for 160 uninterrupted Gly-Xaa-Yaa triplets and a 252-amino acid carboxyl propeptide. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences indicated that the sea urchin polypeptide exhibits structural features that are characteristic of the fibril-forming class of collagen molecules. Partial characterization of two genomic recombinants revealed that the 3' end of the echinoid gene displays a complex organization that closely resembles that of a prototypical vertebrate fibrillar collagen gene. In situ and Northern (RNA) blot hybridizations established the size, time of appearance, and tissue distribution of the collagen transcripts in the developing sea urchin embryo. Collagen mRNA, approximately equal to 6 kilobases in size, is first detected in the forming primary mesenchyme cells of late blastulae where it progressively accumulates until the free swimming/feeding pluteus larval stage. Interestingly, collagen transcripts are also detected in the forming secondary mesenchyme cells of late gastrulae, and by the prism stage, their derivatives appear to be the most intensively labeled cells.

  7. Structure and developmental expression of a sea urchin fibrillar collagen gene.

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessio, M; Ramirez, F; Suzuki, H R; Solursh, M; Gambino, R

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones that specify a Paracentrotus lividus procollagen chain. The cDNAs code for 160 uninterrupted Gly-Xaa-Yaa triplets and a 252-amino acid carboxyl propeptide. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences indicated that the sea urchin polypeptide exhibits structural features that are characteristic of the fibril-forming class of collagen molecules. Partial characterization of two genomic recombinants revealed that the 3' end of the echinoid gene displays a complex organization that closely resembles that of a prototypical vertebrate fibrillar collagen gene. In situ and Northern (RNA) blot hybridizations established the size, time of appearance, and tissue distribution of the collagen transcripts in the developing sea urchin embryo. Collagen mRNA, approximately equal to 6 kilobases in size, is first detected in the forming primary mesenchyme cells of late blastulae where it progressively accumulates until the free swimming/feeding pluteus larval stage. Interestingly, collagen transcripts are also detected in the forming secondary mesenchyme cells of late gastrulae, and by the prism stage, their derivatives appear to be the most intensively labeled cells. Images PMID:2594770

  8. Enhanced osteoblast proliferation and collagen gene expression by estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest, M.; Schmid, Ch.; Froesch, E.R. )

    1988-04-01

    Estrogens play a crucial role in the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, the mechanism by which estrogens exert their effects on bone is unknown. To examine possible direct effects of 17{beta}-estradiol on bone-forming cells, the authors used pure rat osteoblast-like cells in vitro as a model. Osteoblast-like cells prepared from calvaria of newborn rats were cultured serum-free in methylcellulose-containing medium for 21 days. Osteoblast-like cells proliferate selectively into clonally derived cell clusters of spherical morphorlogy. 17{beta}-Estradiol at concentrations of 0.1 nM and 1 nM enhanced osteoblast-like cell proliferation by 41% and 68% above vehicle-treated controls. The biologically inactive stereoisomer 17{alpha}-estradiol (same concentrations) had no effect. Moreover, the antiestrogen tamoxifen abolished the stimulation of osteoblast-like cell proliferation by 17{beta}-estradiol. After 21 days of culture, RNA was prepared and analyzed in a dot-hybridization assay for the abundance of pro{alpha}1(I) collagen mRNA. Steady-state mRNA levels were increased in cultures treated with 17{beta}-estradiol in a dose-dependent manner with maximal stimulation at 1 nM and 10 nM. At the same concentrations, the percentage of synthesized protein (labeled by ({sup 3}H)proline pulse) that was digestible by collagenase was increased, indicating that 17{beta}-estradiol acts as pretranslational levels to enhance synthesis of bone collagen. These data show that the osteoblast is a direct target for 17{beta}-estradiol.

  9. The pro alpha 2(V) collagen gene is evolutionarily related to the major fibrillar-forming collagens.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, D; Bernard, M; Gargano, S; Ramirez, F

    1987-01-01

    A number of overlapping cDNA clones, covering 5.2 kb of sequences which code for the human pro alpha 2(V) collagen chain, have been isolated. Analysis of the structural data have indicated a close evolutionary kinship between the pro alpha 2(V) chain and the major fibrillar collagen types. Isolation and analysis of an 8 kb genomic fragment has further supported this notion by revealing a homologous arrangement of nine triple-helical domain exons. These studies have therefore provided conclusive evidence which categorizes the Type V collagen as a member of the Group 1 molecules, or fibrillar-forming collagens. Images PMID:3029669

  10. Effects of type IV collagen on myogenic characteristics of IGF-I gene-engineered myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akira; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Ikeda, Kazushi; Sato, Masanori; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration requires migration, proliferation and fusion of myoblasts to form multinucleated myotubes. In our previous study, we showed that insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I gene delivery stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of mouse myoblast C2C12 cells and promotes the contractile force generated by tissue-engineered skeletal muscles. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the extracellular matrix on IGF-I gene-engineered C2C12 cells in vitro. Retroviral vectors for doxycycline (Dox)-inducible expression of the IGF-I gene were transduced into C2C12 cells. When cultured on a type IV collagen-coated surface, we observed significant increases in the migration speed and number of IGF-I gene-engineered C2C12 cells with Dox addition, designated as C2C12/IGF (+) cells. Co-culture of C2C12/IGF (+) cells and parental C2C12 cells, which had been cultured in differentiation medium for 3 days, greatly enhanced myotube formation. Moreover, type IV collagen supplementation promoted the fusion of C2C12/IGF (+) cells with differentiated C2C12 cells and increased the number of myotubes with striations. Myotubes formed by C2C12/IGF (+) cells cultured on type IV collagen showed a dynamic contractile activity in response to electrical pulse stimulation. These findings indicate that type IV collagen promotes skeletal muscle regeneration mediated by IGF-I-expressing myoblasts, which may have important clinical implications in the design of myoblast-based therapies.

  11. Analysis of the promoter region and the N-propeptide domain of the human pro alpha 2(I) collagen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, L A; de Wet, W; Di Liberto, M; Weil, D; Ramirez, F

    1985-01-01

    We have located the exon coding for the start site of transcription of the human pro alpha 2(I) collagen gene. Comparison with the homologous region of other fibrillar collagen genes has confirmed the existence of a consensus sequence (CATGTCTA-n-TAGACATG) capable of forming a hairpin secondary structure possibly involved in the regulation of collagen biosynthesis. Sequence comparison of the chromosomal regions at the 5' end of the pro alpha 1(I) and pro alpha 2(I) collagen genes failed to identify unique DNA elements potentially mediating common regulatory signals. Sequencing of four exons coding for the N-terminal propeptide has determined most of its structure and it has implied the existence of smaller coding units similar to the 11 and 18 bp exons originally described in the avian gene. Images PMID:4011429

  12. Linkage studies of four fibrillar collagen genes in three pedigrees with Larsen-like syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventure, J; Lasselin, C; Mellier, J; Cohen-Solal, L; Maroteaux, P

    1992-01-01

    We report seven children from three families who had a set of common clinical features suggestive of Larsen-like syndrome, including unusual facies, bilateral dislocations of the knees and elbows, club foot, and short stature. All of the patients originated from the island of La Réunion in the Indian Ocean. The occurrence of several affected sibs in these families and the large number of consanguineous marriages on this island are consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance of the disease. Based on this hypothesis, the pedigrees were used for linkage analysis in a candidate gene assay. Lod score calculations in a pairwise study with four different fibrillar collagen genes, COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1, and COL5A2, allowed us to exclude these genes as the mutant loci. Supporting this, electrophoretic analysis of collagens derived from fibroblast cultures failed to show defective molecules. We conclude that this syndrome is not a collagen disorder. Images PMID:1640425

  13. Identification of a cell lineage-specific gene coding for a sea urchin alpha 2(IV)-like collagen chain.

    PubMed

    Exposito, J Y; Suzuki, H; Geourjon, C; Garrone, R; Solursh, M; Ramirez, F

    1994-05-06

    We report the isolation of several overlapping cDNAs from an embryonic library of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus coding for a novel sea urchin collagen chain. The conceptual amino acid translation of the cDNAs indicated that the protein displays the structural features of a vertebrate type IV-like collagen alpha chain. In addition to a putative 31-residue signal peptide, the sea urchin molecule contains a 14-residue amino-terminal non-collagenous segment, a discontinuous 1,477-amino acid triple helical domain, and a 225-residue carboxyl-terminal domain rich in cysteines. The amino- and carboxyl-terminal non-collagenous regions of the echinoid molecule are remarkably similar to the 7 S and carboxyl-terminal non-collagenous (NC1) domains of the alpha 1 and alpha 2 chains of vertebrate type IV collagen. The sequence similarity and distinct structural features of the 7 S and NC1 domains strongly suggest that the sea urchin polypeptide is evolutionarily related to the alpha 2(IV) class of collagen chains. Finally, in situ hybridizations revealed that expression of this collagen gene is restricted to the mesenchyme cell lineage of the developing sea urchin embryo.

  14. Biomechanical regulation of type I collagen gene expression in ACLs in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Adam H; Sah, Robert L; Paul Sung, K L

    2002-03-01

    In this study, an ex vivo organ culture system that allows the application of controlled loads to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was designed and used to characterize the influence of a step input in mechanical load on gene expression. A procedure for isolating bone-ACL-bone (B-ACL-B) complexes from rat knees was developed. After harvest and 24 hour culture, B-ACL-B complexes exhibited percentages of viability similar to that in intact ACLs (approximately 90%). Application of a physiologically relevant load of 5 N (superimposed on a I N tare load) resulted in changes in levels of mRNA encoding type I collagen. While levels of type I collagen mRNA significantly increased 32+/-13% (mean +/- standard errors of the mean (SEM)) over controls within the first hour of loading, levels decreased significantly to 44+/-9% of control after 2 h. Displacements induced by the 5 N load were measured by video dimensional analysis. Calculated axial strains of 0.141+/-0.034 were achieved rapidly during the first hour and remained essentially unchanged thereafter. These results demonstrate the feasibility of maintaining ligaments in organ culture and illustrate the time course expression of type I collagen following the application of a mechanical load.

  15. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    SciTech Connect

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek; Kostrouchova, Marta

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. {yields} The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. {yields} Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. {yields} Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. {yields} New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  16. A novel deletion and two recurrent substitutions on type VII collagen gene in seven Iranian patients with epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Armita Kakavand; Moghaddam, Mohammad; Hatamnejadian, Nasim; Ebrahimi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Epidermolysis bullosa is one of the most important series of mechano-bullous heritable skin disorders which is categorized into four major types according to the layer that bullae forms within basement membrane zone. In dystrophic form of the disease, blisters are made in the sublamina densa zone, at the level of type VII collagen protein which produce anchoring fibrils. Type VII collagen gene is the only responsible gene for this form. The aim of this study was to survey causative mutations of type VII collagen gene among Iranian patients with epidermolysis bullosa. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, exons 73-75 were investigated by polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing. Results: In current study, we found three different point mutations in type VII collagen alleles in 7 out of 50 patients. Four patients were homozygous for a new deletion which resulted in frame shift (p.Pro2089fs). Two patients were homozygous for a recurrent glycine substitution (p.G2031S) and one patient was detected with an allele carrying a substitution (p.R2069C). Conclusion: The results emphasized heterogeneity in the type VII collagen gene and will provide a sign for early diagnosis and future study of the disease pathogenesis. PMID:27746867

  17. Immune response gene control of collagen reactivity in man: collagen unresponsiveness in HLA-DR4 negative nonresponders is due to the presence of T-dependent suppressive influences

    SciTech Connect

    Solinger, A.M.; Stobo, J.D.

    1982-11-01

    To determine whether the failure to detect collagen reactivity in nonresponders represents an absence of collagen-reactive T cells or a preponderance of suppressive influences, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HLA-DR4/sup -/ individuals were subjected to three procedures capable of separating suppressive influences from LIF-secreting cells; irradiation (1000 rad), discontinuous gradient fractionation, and cytolysis with the monoclonal antibody OKT 8. Each procedure resulted in the specific appearance of reactivity to collagen, which was identical to that seen in HLA-DR4/sup +/ individuals with regard to its cellular requirements and antigenic specificity. Addition of unresponsive (i.e., nonirradiated or low-density T cells) to responsive (i.e., irradiated or high-density T cells) autologous populations resulted in specific suppression of collagen reactivity. Radiation-sensitive suppressive influences could not be detected in HLA-DR4/sup +/ collagen responders.These studies indicate that the expression of T-dependent reactivity to collagen in man reflects the net influence of collage-reactive vs collagen-suppressive T cells. Moreover, it is the influence of HLA-D-linked genes on the development of suppressive influences rather than on the development of collagen-reactive, LIF-secreting T cells that serves to distinguish HLA-DR4/sup +/ collagen responders from HLA-DR4/sup -/ collagen nonresponders. (JMT)

  18. Fibrochondrogenesis Results from Mutations in the COL11A1 Type XI Collagen Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, Stuart W.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Safina, Nicole P.; Bober, Michael B.; Proud, Virginia K.; Funari, Tara; Wangler, Michael F.; Nevarez, Lisette; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Wilcox, William R.; Eyre, David R.; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrochondrogenesis is a severe, autosomal-recessive, short-limbed skeletal dysplasia. In a single case of fibrochondrogenesis, whole-genome SNP genotyping identified unknown ancestral consanguinity by detecting three autozygous regions. Because of the predominantly skeletal nature of the phenotype, the 389 genes localized to the autozygous intervals were prioritized for mutation analysis by correlation of their expression with known cartilage-selective genes via the UCLA Gene Expression Tool, UGET. The gene encoding the α1 chain of type XI collagen (COL11A1) was the only cartilage-selective gene among the three candidate intervals. Sequence analysis of COL11A1 in two genetically independent fibrochondrogenesis cases demonstrated that each was a compound heterozygote for a loss-of-function mutation on one allele and a mutation predicting substitution for a conserved triple-helical glycine residue on the other. The parents who were carriers of missense mutations had myopia. Early-onset hearing loss was noted in both parents who carried a loss-of-function allele, suggesting COL11A1 as a locus for mild, dominantly inherited hearing loss. These findings identify COL11A1 as a locus for fibrochondrogenesis and indicate that there might be phenotypic manifestations among carriers. PMID:21035103

  19. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  20. Amelioration of collagen-induced arthritis by CD95 (Apo-1/Fas)-ligand gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H; Yang, Y; Horton, J L; Samoilova, E B; Judge, T A; Turka, L A; Wilson, J M; Chen, Y

    1997-01-01

    Both rheumatoid arthritis and animal models of autoimmune arthritis are characterized by hyperactivation of synovial cells and hyperplasia of the synovial membrane. The activated synovial cells produce inflammatory cytokines and degradative enzymes that lead to destruction of cartilage and bones. Effective treatment of arthritis may require elimination of most or all activated synovial cells. The death factor Fas/Apo-1 and its ligand (FasL) play pivotal roles in maintaining self-tolerance and immune privilege. Fas is expressed constitutively in most tissues, and is dramatically upregulated at the site of inflammation. In both rheumatoid arthritis and animal models of autoimmune arthritis, high levels of Fas are expressed on activated synovial cells and infiltrating leukocytes in the inflamed joints. Unlike Fas, however, the levels of FasL expressed in the arthritic joints are extremely low, and most activated synovial cells survive despite high levels of Fas expression. To upregulate FasL expression in the arthritic joints, we have generated a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus carrying FasL gene; injection of the FasL virus into inflamed joints conferred high levels of FasL expression, induced apoptosis of synovial cells, and ameliorated collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice. The Fas-ligand virus also inhibited production of interferon-gamma by collagen-specific T cells. Coadministration of Fas-immunoglobulin fusion protein with the Fas-ligand virus prevented these effects, demonstrating the specificity of the Fas-ligand virus. Thus, FasL gene transfer at the site of inflammation effectively ameliorates autoimmune disease. PMID:9329958

  1. Hypoxic culture conditions induce increased metabolic rate and collagen gene expression in ACL-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Tomasz J; Leong, Natalie L; Dar, Ayelet; Wu, Ling; Kabir, Nima; Khan, Adam Z; Eliasberg, Claire D; Pedron, Andrew; Karayan, Ashant; Lee, Siyoung; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Jiacheng, Jin; Wu, Ben M; Evseenko, Denis; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    There has been substantial effort directed toward the application of bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissue. Recently, resident tissue-specific stem cells have been described in a variety of mesenchymal structures including ligament, tendon, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In the current study, we systematically characterize three novel anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-derived cell populations with the potential for ligament regeneration: ligament-forming fibroblasts (LFF: CD146(neg) , CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ), ligament perivascular cells (LPC: CD146(pos) CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ) and ligament interstitial cells (LIC: CD34(pos) CD146(neg) , CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) )-and describe their proliferative and differentiation potential, collagen gene expression and metabolism in both normoxic and hypoxic environments, and their trophic potential in vitro. All three groups of cells (LIC, LPC, and LFF) isolated from adult human ACL exhibited progenitor cell characteristics with regard to proliferation and differentiation potential in vitro. Culture in low oxygen tension enhanced the collagen I and III gene expression in LICs (by 2.8- and 3.3-fold, respectively) and LFFs (by 3- and 3.5-fold, respectively) and increased oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate in LICs (by 4- and 3.5-fold, respectively), LFFs (by 5.5- and 3-fold, respectively), LPCs (by 10- and 4.5-fold, respectively) as compared to normal oxygen concentration. In summary, this study demonstrates for the first time the presence of three novel progenitor cell populations in the adult ACL that demonstrate robust proliferative and matrix synthetic capacity; these cells may play a role in local ligament regeneration, and consequently represent a potential cell source for ligament engineering applications. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  2. Effects of salvianolic acid-A on NIH/3T3 fibroblast proliferation, collagen synthesis and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cheng-Hai; Hu, Yi-Yang; Wang, Xiao-Ling; Xu, Lie-Ming; Liu, Ping

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanisms of salvianolic acid A (SA-A) against liver fibrosis in vitro. METHODS: NIH/3T3 fibroblasts were cultured routinely, and incubated with 10-4 mol/L-10-7 mol/L SA-A for 22 h. The cell viability was assayed by [3H]proline incorporation, cell proliferation by [3H]TdR incorporation, cell collagen synthetic rate was measured with [3H]proline impulse and collagenase digestion method. The total RNA was prepared from the control cells and the drug treated cells respectively, and α (1) I pro-collagen mRNA expression was semi-quantitatively analyzed with RT-PCR. RESULTS: 10-4 mol/L SA-A decreased cell viability and exerted some cytotoxiciy, while 10-5 mol/L-10-7 mol/L SA-A did not affect cell viability, but inhibited cell proliferation significantly, and 10-6 mol/L SA-A had the best effect on cell viability among these concentrations of drugs. 10-5 mol/L-10-6 mol/L SA-A inhibited intracellular collagen synthetic rate, but no significant influence on extracellular collagen secretion. Both 10-5 mol/L and 10-6 mol/L SA-A could decrease α (1) I pro-collagen mRNA expression remarkably. CONCLUSION: SA-A had potent action against liver fibrosis. It inhibited NIH/3T3 fibroblast proliferation, intracellular collagen synthetic rate and type I pro-collagen gene expression, which may be one of the main mechanisms of the drug. PMID:11819598

  3. Tandem duplication within a type II collagen gene (COL2A1) exon in an individual with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E. ); Rimoin, D.L.; Cohn, D.H. Univ. of California, Los Angeles ); Murray, L.W. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors have characterized a mutation in the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) that produces a form of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia. The mutation is an internal tandem duplication of 45 base pairs within exon 48 and results in the addition of 15 amino acids to the triple-helical domain of the {alpha}1 chains of type II collagen derived from the abnormal allele. Although the repeating (Gly-Xaa-Yaa){sub n} motif that characterizes the triple-helical domain is preserved, type II collagen derived from cartilage of the affected individual contains a population with excessive posttranslational modification, consistent with a disruption in triple-helix structure. The mutation is not carried by either parent, indicating that the phenotype in the affected individual is due to a new dominant mutation. DNA sequence homology in the area of the duplication suggests that the mutation may have arisen by unequal crossover between related sequences, a proposed mechanism in the evolution and diversification of the collagen gene family.

  4. A single epidermal stem cell strategy for safe ex vivo gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Droz-Georget Lathion, Stéphanie; Rochat, Ariane; Knott, Graham; Recchia, Alessandra; Martinet, Danielle; Benmohammed, Sara; Grasset, Nicolas; Zaffalon, Andrea; Besuchet Schmutz, Nathalie; Savioz-Dayer, Emmanuelle; Beckmann, Jacques Samuel; Rougemont, Jacques; Mavilio, Fulvio; Barrandon, Yann

    2015-01-01

    There is a widespread agreement from patient and professional organisations alike that the safety of stem cell therapeutics is of paramount importance, particularly for ex vivo autologous gene therapy. Yet current technology makes it difficult to thoroughly evaluate the behaviour of genetically corrected stem cells before they are transplanted. To address this, we have developed a strategy that permits transplantation of a clonal population of genetically corrected autologous stem cells that meet stringent selection criteria and the principle of precaution. As a proof of concept, we have stably transduced epidermal stem cells (holoclones) obtained from a patient suffering from recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Holoclones were infected with self-inactivating retroviruses bearing a COL7A1 cDNA and cloned before the progeny of individual stem cells were characterised using a number of criteria. Clonal analysis revealed a great deal of heterogeneity among transduced stem cells in their capacity to produce functional type VII collagen (COLVII). Selected transduced stem cells transplanted onto immunodeficient mice regenerated a non-blistering epidermis for months and produced a functional COLVII. Safety was assessed by determining the sites of proviral integration, rearrangements and hit genes and by whole-genome sequencing. The progeny of the selected stem cells also had a diploid karyotype, was not tumorigenic and did not disseminate after long-term transplantation onto immunodeficient mice. In conclusion, a clonal strategy is a powerful and efficient means of by-passing the heterogeneity of a transduced stem cell population. It guarantees a safe and homogenous medicinal product, fulfilling the principle of precaution and the requirements of regulatory affairs. Furthermore, a clonal strategy makes it possible to envision exciting gene-editing technologies like zinc finger nucleases, TALENs and homologous recombination for next-generation gene therapy. PMID

  5. A single epidermal stem cell strategy for safe ex vivo gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Droz-Georget Lathion, Stéphanie; Rochat, Ariane; Knott, Graham; Recchia, Alessandra; Martinet, Danielle; Benmohammed, Sara; Grasset, Nicolas; Zaffalon, Andrea; Besuchet Schmutz, Nathalie; Savioz-Dayer, Emmanuelle; Beckmann, Jacques Samuel; Rougemont, Jacques; Mavilio, Fulvio; Barrandon, Yann

    2015-04-01

    There is a widespread agreement from patient and professional organisations alike that the safety of stem cell therapeutics is of paramount importance, particularly for ex vivo autologous gene therapy. Yet current technology makes it difficult to thoroughly evaluate the behaviour of genetically corrected stem cells before they are transplanted. To address this, we have developed a strategy that permits transplantation of a clonal population of genetically corrected autologous stem cells that meet stringent selection criteria and the principle of precaution. As a proof of concept, we have stably transduced epidermal stem cells (holoclones) obtained from a patient suffering from recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Holoclones were infected with self-inactivating retroviruses bearing a COL7A1 cDNA and cloned before the progeny of individual stem cells were characterised using a number of criteria. Clonal analysis revealed a great deal of heterogeneity among transduced stem cells in their capacity to produce functional type VII collagen (COLVII). Selected transduced stem cells transplanted onto immunodeficient mice regenerated a non-blistering epidermis for months and produced a functional COLVII. Safety was assessed by determining the sites of proviral integration, rearrangements and hit genes and by whole-genome sequencing. The progeny of the selected stem cells also had a diploid karyotype, was not tumorigenic and did not disseminate after long-term transplantation onto immunodeficient mice. In conclusion, a clonal strategy is a powerful and efficient means of by-passing the heterogeneity of a transduced stem cell population. It guarantees a safe and homogenous medicinal product, fulfilling the principle of precaution and the requirements of regulatory affairs. Furthermore, a clonal strategy makes it possible to envision exciting gene-editing technologies like zinc finger nucleases, TALENs and homologous recombination for next-generation gene therapy.

  6. cis regulatory requirements for hypodermal cell-specific expression of the Caenorhabditis elegans cuticle collagen gene dpy-7.

    PubMed Central

    Gilleard, J S; Barry, J D; Johnstone, I L

    1997-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans cuticle collagens are encoded by a multigene family of between 50 and 100 members and are the major component of the nematode cuticular exoskeleton. They are synthesized in the hypodermis prior to secretion and incorporation into the cuticle and exhibit complex patterns of spatial and temporal expression. We have investigated the cis regulatory requirements for tissue- and stage-specific expression of the cuticle collagen gene dpy-7 and have identified a compact regulatory element which is sufficient to specify hypodermal cell reporter gene expression. This element appears to be a true tissue-specific promoter element, since it encompasses the dpy-7 transcription initiation sites and functions in an orientation-dependent manner. We have also shown, by interspecies transformation experiments, that the dpy-7 cis regulatory elements are functionally conserved between C. elegans and C. briggsae, and comparative sequence analysis supports the importance of the regulatory sequence that we have identified by reporter gene analysis. All of our data suggest that the spatial expression of the dpy-7 cuticle collagen gene is established essentially by a small tissue-specific promoter element and does not require upstream activator or repressor elements. In addition, we have found the DPY-7 polypeptide is very highly conserved between the two species and that the C. briggsae polypeptide can function appropriately within the C. elegans cuticle. This finding suggests a remarkably high level of conservation of individual cuticle components, and their interactions, between these two nematode species. PMID:9121480

  7. SSCP and segregation analysis of the human type X collagen gene (COL10A1) in heritable forms of chondrodysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Sweetman, W.A.; Rash, B.; Thomas, J.T.; Boot-Handford, R.; Grant, M.E.; Wallis, G.A. ); Sykes, B. ); Beighton, P. ); Hecht, J.T. ); Zabell, B. )

    1992-10-01

    Type X collagen is a homotrimeric, short chain, nonfibrillar collagen that is expressed exclusively by hypertrophic chondrocytes at the sites of endochondral ossification. The distribution and pattern of expression of the type X collagen gene (COL10A1) suggests that mutations altering the structure and synthesis of the protein may be responsible for causing heritable forms of chondrodysplasia. The authors investigated whether mutations within the human COL10A1 gene were responsible for causing the disorders achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia, pseudoachondroplasia, and thanatophoric dysplasia, by analyzing the coding regions of the gene by using PCR and the single-stranded conformational polymorphism technique. By this approach, seven sequence changes were identified within and flanking the coding regions of the gene of the affected persons. The authors demonstrated that six of these sequence changes were not responsible for causing these forms of chondrodysplasia but were polymorphic in nature. The sequence changes were used to demonstrate discordant segregation between the COL10A1 locus and achondroplasia and pseudoachondroplasia, in nuclear families. This lack of segregation suggests that mutations within or near the COL101A1 locus are not responsible for these disorders. The seventh sequence change resulted in a valine-to-methionine substitution in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the molecule and was identified in only two hypochondroplasic individuals from a single family. Segregation analysis in this family was inconclusive, and the significance of this substitution remains uncertain. 47 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Polymorphism of the MHC class II Eb gene determines the protection against collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Zanelli, E.; Krco, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an animal model of auto immune polyarthritis, sharing similarities with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Paradoxally, susceptibility to mouse CIA is controlled by the H2A loci (DQ homologous) while RA is linked to HLA.DR genes (H2E homologous). We recently showed that the E{beta}{sup d} molecule prevents CIA development in susceptible H2{sup q} mice. We addressed the question of whether H2Eb polymorphism will influence CIA incidence as HLA.DRB1 polymorphism does in RA. In F{sub 1} mice, only H2Eb{sup d} and H2Eb{sup s} molecules showed protection. Using recombinant B10.RDD (Eb{sup d/b}) mice, we found that CIA protection was mediated by the first domain of the E{beta}{sup d} molecule. Using peptides covering the third hypervariable region of the E{beta} chain, we found a perfect correlation between presentation of E{beta} peptides by the H2A{sup q} molecule and protection on CIA. Therefore, the mechanism by which H2Eb protects against CIA seems to rely on the affinity of E{beta} peptides for the H2A{sup q} molecule. 35 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Differential alleleic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A2) in osteoarthritic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C.; Sykes, B.; Athanasou, N.; Carr, A.

    1995-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two COL2A1 alleles in articular cartilage obtained from each patient. Three patients demonstrated differential allelic expression and produced <12% of the normal level of mRNA from one of their COL2A1 alleles. The same allele shows reduced expression in a well-defined OA population than in a control group, suggesting the possible existence of a rare COL2A1 allele that predisposes to OA. 31 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Anopheles gambiae collagen IV genes: cloning, phylogeny and midgut expression associated with blood feeding and Plasmodium infection.

    PubMed

    Gare, D C; Piertney, S B; Billingsley, P F

    2003-07-01

    A prerequisite for understanding the role that mosquito midgut extracellular matrix molecules play in malaria parasite development is proper isolation and characterisation of the genes coding for components of the basal lamina. Here we have identified genes coding for alpha1 and alpha2 chains of collagen IV from the major malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae. Conserved sequences in the terminal NC1 domain were used to obtain partial gene sequences of this functional region, and full sequence was isolated from a pupal cDNA library. In a DNA-derived phylogeny, the alpha1 and alpha2 chains cluster with dipteran orthologs, and the alpha2 is ancestral. The expression of collagen alpha1(IV) peaked during the pupal stage of mosquito development, and was expressed continuously in the adult female following a blood meal with a further rise detected in older mosquitoes. Collagen alpha1(IV) is also upregulated when the early oocyst of Plasmodium yoelii was developing within the mosquito midgut and may contribute to a larger wound healing response. A model describing the expression of basal lamina proteins during oocyst development is presented, and we hypothesise that the development of new basal lamina between the oocyst and midgut epithelium is akin to a wound healing process.

  11. Prevention of liver fibrosis by triple helix-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides targeted to the promoter region of type I collagen gene.

    PubMed

    Koilan, Subramaniyan; Hamilton, David; Baburyan, Narina; Padala, Mythili K; Weber, Karl T; Guntaka, Ramareddy V

    2010-10-01

    Hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis remains a global health problem. The most common etiologies are alcoholism and viral infections. Liver fibrosis is associated with major changes in both quantity and composition of extracellular matix and leads to disorganization of the liver architecture and irreversible damage to the liver function. As of now there is no effective therapy to control fibrosis. The end product of fibrosis is abnormal synthesis and accumulation of type I collagen in the extracellular matrix, which is produced by activated stellate or Ito cells in the damaged liver. Therefore, inhibition of transcription of type I collagen should in principle inhibit its production and accumulation in liver. Normally, DNA exists in a duplex form. However, under some circumstances, DNA can assume triple helical (triplex) structures. Intermolecular triplexes, formed by the addition of a sequence-specific third strand to the major groove of the duplex DNA, have the potential to serve as selective gene regulators. Earlier, we demonstrated efficient triplex formation between the exogenously added triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides (TFOs) and a specific sequence in the promoter region of the COL1A1 gene. In this study we used a rat model of liver fibrosis, induced by dimethylnitrosamine, to test whether these TFOs prevent liver fibrosis. Our results indicate that both the 25-mer and 18-mer TFOs, specific for the upstream nucleotide sequence from -141 to -165 (relative to the transcription start site) in the 5' end of collagen gene promoter, effectively prevented accumulation of liver collagen and fibrosis. We also observed improvement in liver function tests. However, mutations in the TFO that eliminated formation of triplexes are ineffective in preventing fibrosis. We believe that these TFOs can be used as potential antifibrotic therapeutic molecules.

  12. Gene encoding the collagen type I and thrombospondin receptor CD36 is located on chromosome 7q11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Ruiz, E.; Armesilla, A.L.; Sanchez-Madrid, F.; Vega, M.A. )

    1993-09-01

    The human CD36 is a member of a gene family of structurally related glycoproteins and functions as a receptor for collagen type I and thrombospondin. CD36 also binds to red blood cells infected with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. In the present study, the CD36 gene was assigned to chromosome 7 by using the polymerase chain reaction with DNA from human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. Furthermore, the use of a CD36 genomic probe has allowed the localization of the CD36 locus to the 7q11.2 band by fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled with GTG-banding. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Differential effects of parathyroid hormone fragments on collagen gene expression in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The effect of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in vivo after secretion by the parathyroid gland is mediated by bioactive fragments of the molecule. To elucidate their possible role in the regulation of cartilage matrix metabolism, the influence of the amino-terminal (NH2-terminal), the central, and the carboxyl-terminal (COOH-terminal) portion of the PTH on collagen gene expression was studied in a serum free cell culture system of fetal bovine and human chondrocytes. Expression of alpha1 (I), alpha1 (II), alpha1 (III), and alpha1 (X) mRNA was investigated by in situ hybridization and quantified by Northern blot analysis. NH2- terminal and mid-regional fragments containing a core sequence between amino acid residues 28-34 of PTH induced a significant rise in alpha1 (II) mRNA in proliferating chondrocytes. In addition, the COOH-terminal portion (aa 52-84) of the PTH molecule was shown to exert a stimulatory effect on alpha1 (II) and alpha1 (X) mRNA expression in chondrocytes from the hypertrophic zone of bovine epiphyseal cartilage. PTH peptides harboring either the functional domain in the central or COOH-terminal region of PTH can induce cAMP independent Ca2+ signaling in different subsets of chondrocytes as assessed by microfluorometry of Fura-2/AM loaded cells. These results support the hypothesis that different hormonal effects of PTH on cartilage matrix metabolism are exerted by distinct effector domains and depend on the differentiation stage of the target cell. PMID:8922395

  14. Aspergillus Collagen-Like Genes (acl): Identification, Sequence Polymorphism, and Assessment for PCR-Based Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tuntevski, Kiril; Durney, Brandon C.; Snyder, Anna K.; LaSala, P. Rocco; Nayak, Ajay P.; Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.; Rio, Rita V. M.; Holland, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The genus Aspergillus is a burden to public health due to its ubiquitous presence in the environment, its production of allergens, and wide demographic susceptibility among cystic fibrosis, asthmatic, and immunosuppressed patients. Current methods of detection of Aspergillus colonization and infection rely on lengthy morphological characterization or nonstandardized serological assays that are restricted to identifying a fungal etiology. Collagen-like genes have been shown to exhibit species-specific conservation across the noncollagenous regions as well as strain-specific polymorphism in the collagen-like regions. Here we assess the conserved region of the Aspergillus collagen-like (acl) genes and explore the application of PCR amplicon size-based discrimination among the five most common etiologic species of the Aspergillus genus, including Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. nidulans, A. niger, and A. terreus. Genetic polymorphism and phylogenetic analysis of the aclF1 gene were additionally examined among the available strains. Furthermore, the applicability of the PCR-based assay to identification of these five species in cultures derived from sputum and bronchoalveolar fluid from 19 clinical samples was explored. Application of capillary electrophoresis on nanogels was additionally demonstrated to improve the discrimination between Aspergillus species. Overall, this study demonstrated that Aspergillus acl genes could be used as PCR targets to discriminate between clinically relevant Aspergillus species. Future studies aim to utilize the detection of Aspergillus acl genes in PCR and microfluidic applications to determine the sensitivity and specificity for the identification of Aspergillus colonization and invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised subjects. PMID:24123732

  15. Differential expression of human lysyl hydroxylase genes, lysine hydroxylation, and cross-linking of type I collagen during osteoblastic differentiation in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzawa, K.; Grzesik, W. J.; Nishiura, T.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Robey, P. G.; Brenner, D. A.; Yamauchi, M.

    1999-01-01

    The pattern of lysyl hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of collagen is critical in determining the cross-linking pathways that are tissue specific. We hypothesized that the tissue specificity of type I collagen cross-linking is, in part, due to the differential expression of lysyl hydroxylase genes (Procollagen-lysine,2-oxyglutarate,5-dioxygenase 1, 2, and 3 [PLOD1, PLOD2, and PLOD3]). In this study, we have examined the expression patterns of these three genes during the course of in vitro differentiation of human osteoprogenitor cells (bone marrow stromal cells [BMSCs]) and normal skin fibroblasts (NSFs). In addition, using the medium and cell layer/matrix fractions in these cultures, lysine hydroxylation of type I collagen alpha chains and collagen cross-linking chemistries have been characterized. High levels of PLOD1 and PLOD3 genes were expressed in both BMSCs and NSFs, and the expression levels did not change in the course of differentiation. In contrast to the PLOD1 and PLOD3 genes, both cell types showed low PLOD2 gene expression in undifferentiated and early differentiated conditions. However, fully differentiated BMSCs, but not NSFs, exhibited a significantly elevated level (6-fold increase) of PLOD2 mRNA. This increase coincided with the onset of matrix mineralization and with the increase in lysyl hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of alpha chains of type I collagen molecule. Furthermore, the collagen cross-links that are derived from the nontriple helical hydroxylysine-aldehyde were found only in fully differentiated BMSC cultures. The data suggests that PLOD2 expression is associated with lysine hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of collagen and, thus, could be partially responsible for the tissue-specific collagen cross-linking pattern.

  16. Structure of the human type XIX collagen (COL19A1) gene, which suggests it has arisen from an ancestor gene of the FACIT family.

    PubMed

    Khaleduzzaman, M; Sumiyoshi, H; Ueki, Y; Inoguchi, K; Ninomiya, Y; Yoshioka, H

    1997-10-15

    Type XIX collagen is a newly discovered member of the FACIT (fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices) group of extracellular matrix proteins. Based on the primary structure, type XIX collagen is thought to act as a cross-bridge between fibrils and other extracellular matrix molecules. Here we describe the complete exon/intron organization of COL19A1 and show that it contains 51 exons, spanning more than 250 kb of genomic DNA. The comparison of exon structures of COL19A1 and other FACIT family genes revealed several similarities among these genes. The structure of exons encoding the noncollagenous (NC) 1-collagenous (COL) 1-NC 2-COL 2-NC 3-COL 3-NC 4 domain of the alpha1(XIX) chain is similar to that of the NC 1-COL 1-NC 2-COL 3-NC 3 domain of the alpha2(IX) chain except for the NC 3 domain of alpha1(XIX). The exons encoding the COL 5-NC 6 domain of alpha1(XIX) are also similar to those of the COL 3-NC 4 domain of alpha1(IX) chain. Previously, COL19A1 was mapped to human chromosome 6q12-q14, where COL9A1 is also located. Likewise, the present work shows that the mouse Col19a1 gene is located on mouse chromosome 1, region A3, where Col9a1 has also been mapped. Taken together, the data suggest that COL19A1 and COL9A1 (Col19a1 and Col9a1) were duplicated from the same ancestor gene of the FACIT family. Three CA repeat markers with high heterozygosity were found in COL19A1. These markers may be useful for linkage analysis of age-related inheritable diseases involved in eyes and/or brain.

  17. Collagen V-induced nasal tolerance downregulates pulmonary collagen mRNA gene and TGF-beta expression in experimental systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate collagen deposition, mRNA collagen synthesis and TGF-beta expression in the lung tissue in an experimental model of scleroderma after collagen V-induced nasal tolerance. Methods Female New Zealand rabbits (N = 12) were immunized with 1 mg/ml of collagen V in Freund's adjuvant (IM). After 150 days, six immunized animals were tolerated by nasal administration of collagen V (25 μg/day) (IM-TOL) daily for 60 days. The collagen content was determined by morphometry, and mRNA expressions of types I, III and V collagen were determined by Real-time PCR. The TGF-beta expression was evaluated by immunostaining and quantified by point counting methods. To statistic analysis ANOVA with Bonferroni test were employed for multiple comparison when appropriate and the level of significance was determined to be p < 0.05. Results IM-TOL, when compared to IM, showed significant reduction in total collagen content around the vessels (0.371 ± 0.118 vs. 0.874 ± 0.282, p < 0.001), bronchioles (0.294 ± 0.139 vs. 0.646 ± 0.172, p < 0.001) and in the septal interstitium (0.027 ± 0.014 vs. 0.067 ± 0.039, p = 0.026). The lung tissue of IM-TOL, when compared to IM, showed decreased immunostaining of types I, III and V collagen, reduced mRNA expression of types I (0.10 ± 0.07 vs. 1.0 ± 0.528, p = 0.002) and V (1.12 ± 0.42 vs. 4.74 ± 2.25, p = 0.009) collagen, in addition to decreased TGF-beta expression (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Collagen V-induced nasal tolerance in the experimental model of SSc regulated the pulmonary remodeling process, inhibiting collagen deposition and collagen I and V mRNA synthesis. Additionally, it decreased TGF-beta expression, suggesting a promising therapeutic option for scleroderma treatment. PMID:20047687

  18. Interaction of mouse mammary epithelial cells with collagen substrata: regulation of casein gene expression and secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.H.P.; Lee, W.H.; Kaetzel, C.S.; Parry, G.; Bissell, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMEC) secrete certain milk proteins only when cultured on floating collagen gels. The authors demonstrate that modulation of milk proteins by substrata is manifested at several regulatory levels; (i) cells cultured on floating collagen gels have 3- to 10-fold more casein mRNA than cells cultured on plastic or attached collagen gels. (ii) Cells on the latter two flat substrata, nevertheless, synthesize a significant amount of caseins, indicating that the remaining mRNA is functional. (iii) Cells on all substrata are inducible for casein mRNA and casein proteins by prolactin, but the extent of induction is greater on collagen than that on plastic - i.e., the substratum confers an altered degree of inducibility. (iv) Cells on all substrata synthesize casein proteins at rates proportional to the amount of casein mRNA, but the newly synthesized caseins in cells on plastic are degraded intracellularly, whereas those synthesized by cells on floating gels are secreted into the medium. (v) Cells on all substrata examined lose virtually all mRNA for whey acidic protein despite the fact that this mRNA is abundant in the mammary gland itself; the authors conclude that additional, as-yet-unknown, factors are necessary for synthesis and secretion of whey acidic protein in culture.

  19. Changes in diaphragm muscle collagen gene expression after acute unilateral denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, L. E.; Sieck, G. C.; Aleff, R. A.; Martinez, D. A.; Vailas, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of acute (3 days) unilateral diaphragm denervation (DNV) on 1) levels of alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA; 2) collagen concentration [hydroxyproline (HYP)]; 3) amount of the nonreducible collagen cross-link hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP); and 4) the passive force-length relationship of the muscle. The levels of alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA, HYP concentration, and amount of HP were measured in muscle segments from the midcostal region of DNV and intact (INT) hemidiaphragms of adult male Fischer 344 rats (250-300 g). The in vitro passive force-length relationship of DNV and INT hemidiaphragm was determined by lengthening and shortening the diaphragm muscle segments from 85 to 115% of optimal length at a constant velocity (0.6 optimal length/s). Three days after DNV, the level of alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNA was increased over 15-fold in the DNV hemidiaphragm compared with INT (P < 0.05), whereas the level of alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA was increased by approximately sixfold in the DNV hemidiaphragm compared with INT (P < 0.05). Collagen (HYP) concentration did not differ between groups, averaging 8.7 and 8.9 micrograms/mg dry wt for the DNV and INT hemidiaphragms, respectively. In addition, there was no difference in the amount of the mature nonreducible collagen cross-link HP between the DNV and INT hemidiaphragms (0.66 vs. 0.76 mole HP/mole collagen, respectively). The amount of passive force developed during lengthening did not differ between DNV and INT hemidiaphragms. These data indicate that acute DNV of the hemidiaphragm is associated with an increase in the mRNA level of the two principal fibrillar collagen phenotypes in skeletal muscle. However, despite extensive muscle remodeling, the passive force-length relationship of the DNV hemidiaphragm is unaffected compared with the INT muscle.

  20. Overexpression of HMGA2-LPP fusion transcripts promotes expression of the {alpha} 2 type XI collagen gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Takahiro; Matsui, Yoshito . E-mail: ymatsui@sb4.so-net.ne.jp; Goto, Tomohiro; Yukata, Kiminori; Yasui, Natsuo

    2006-02-10

    In a subset of human lipomas, a specific t (3; 12) chromosome translocation gives rise to HMGA2-LPP fusion protein, containing the amino (N)-terminal DNA binding domains of HMGA2 fused to the carboxyl (C)-terminal LIM domains of LPP. In addition to its role in adipogenesis, several observations suggest that HMGA2-LPP is linked to chondrogenesis. Here, we analyzed whether HMGA2-LPP promotes chondrogenic differentiation, a marker of which is transactivation of the {alpha} 2 type XI collagen gene (Col11a2). Real-time PCR analysis showed that HMGA2-LPP and COL11A2 were co-expressed. Luciferase assay demonstrated that either of HMGA2-LPP, wild-type HMGA2 or the N-terminal HMGA2 transactivated the Col11a2 promoter in HeLa cells, while the C-terminal LPP did not. RT-PCR analysis revealed that HMGA2-LPP transcripts in lipomas with the fusion were 591-fold of full-length HMGA2 transcripts in lipomas without the fusion. These results indicate that in vivo overexpression of HMGA2-LPP promotes chondrogenesis by upregulating cartilage-specific collagen gene expression through the N-terminal DNA binding domains.

  1. A specific collagen type II gene (COL2A1) mutation presenting as spondyloperipheral dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Zabel, B.; Hilbert, K.; Spranger, J.; Winterpacht, A.; Stoeb, H.; Superti-Furga, A.

    1996-05-03

    We report on a patient with a skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, spondylo-epiphyseal involvement, and brachydactyly E-like changes. This condition has been described as spondyloperipheral dysplasia and the few published cases suggest autosomal dominant inheritance with considerable clinical variability. We found our sporadic case to be due to a collagen type II defect resulting from a specific COL2A1 mutation. This mutation is the first to be located at the C-terminal outside the helical domain of COL2A1. A frameshift as consequence of a 5 bp duplication in exon 51 leads to a stop codon. The resulting truncated C-propeptide region seems to affect helix formation and produces changes of chondrocyte morphology, collagen type II fibril structure and cartilage matrix composition. Our case with its distinct phenotype adds another chondrodysplasia to the clinical spectrum of type II collagenopathies. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Biology, chemistry and pathology of collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmajer, R.; Olsen, B.R.; Kuhn, K.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the articles are: Structure of the Type II Collagen Gene; Structural and Functional Analysis of the Genes for ..cap alpha..2(1) and ..cap alpha..1(III) collagens; Structure and Expression of the Collagen Genes of C. Elegans; Molecular Basis of Clinical Heterogeneity in the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; and Normal and Mutant Human Collagen Genes.

  3. Human collagen genes encoding basement membrane. cap alpha. 1(IV) and. cap alpha. 2(IV) chains map to the distal long arm of chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, C.A.; Emanuel, B.S.; Hansen, J.R.; Cavenee, W.K.; Myers, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    At least 20 genes encode the structurally related collagen chains that comprise > 10 homo- or heterotrimeric types. Six members of this multigene family have been assigned to five chromosomes in the human genome. The two type I genes, ..cap alpha..1 and ..cap alpha..2, are located on chromosomes 17 and 7, respectively, and the ..cap alpha..1(II) gene is located on chromosome 12. Their recent mapping of the ..cap alpha..1(III) and ..cap alpha..2(V) genes to the q24.3 ..-->.. q31 region of chromosome 2 provided the only evidence that the collagen genes are not entirely dispersed. To further determine their organization, the authors and others localized the ..cap alpha..1(IV) gene to chromosome 13 and in their experiments sublocalized the gene to band q34 by in situ hybridization. Here they show the presence of the ..cap alpha..2 type IV locus also on the distal long arm of chromosome 13 by hybridizing a human ..cap alpha..2(IV) cDNA clone to rodent-human hybrids and to metaphase chromosomes. These studies represent the only demonstration of linkage between genes encoding both polypeptide chains of the same collagen type.

  4. Mutation in the human acetylcholinesterase-associated collagen gene, COLQ, is responsible for congenital myasthenic syndrome with end-plate acetylcholinesterase deficiency (Type Ic).

    PubMed Central

    Donger, C; Krejci, E; Serradell, A P; Eymard, B; Bon, S; Nicole, S; Chateau, D; Gary, F; Fardeau, M; Massoulié, J; Guicheney, P

    1998-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) with end-plate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disease, recently classified as CMS type Ic (CMS-Ic). It is characterized by onset in childhood, generalized weakness increased by exertion, refractoriness to anticholinesterase drugs, and morphological abnormalities of the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The collagen-tailed form of AChE, which is normally concentrated at NMJs, is composed of catalytic tetramers associated with a specific collagen, COLQ. In CMS-Ic patients, these collagen-tailed forms are often absent. We studied a large family comprising 11 siblings, 6 of whom are affected by a mild form of CMS-Ic. The muscles of the patients contained collagen-tailed AChE. We first excluded the ACHE gene (7q22) as potential culprit, by linkage analysis; then we mapped COLQ to chromosome 3p24.2. By analyzing 3p24.2 markers located close to the gene, we found that the six affected patients were homozygous for an interval of 14 cM between D3S1597 and D3S2338. We determined the COLQ coding sequence and found that the patients present a homozygous missense mutation, Y431S, in the conserved C-terminal domain of COLQ. This mutation is thought to disturb the attachment of collagen-tailed AChE to the NMJ, thus constituting the first genetic defect causing CMS-Ic. PMID:9758617

  5. The effect of glycosaminoglycan content on polyethylenimine-based gene delivery within three-dimensional collagen-GAG scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hortensius, Rebecca A; Becraft, Jacob R; Pack, Daniel W; Harley, Brendan A C

    2015-04-01

    The design of biomaterials for increasingly complex tissue engineering applications often requires exogenous presentation of biomolecular signals. Integration of gene delivery vectors with a biomaterial scaffold offers the potential to bypass the use of expensive and relatively inefficient growth factor supplementation strategies to augment cell behavior. However, integration of cationic polymer based gene delivery vectors within three-dimensional biomaterials, particularly matrices which can carry significant surface charge, remains poorly explored. We examined the potential of polyethylenimine (PEI) as a gene delivery vector for three-dimensional collagen-glycosaminoglycan (CG) scaffolds under development for tendon repair. While acetylated versions of PEI have demonstrated improved transfection efficiency in 2D culture assays, we investigated translation of this effect to a 3D biomaterial that contains significant electrostatic charge. A reporter gene was used to examine the impact of polymer modification, polymer:DNA ratio, and the degree of sulfation of the biomaterial microenvironment on gene delivery in vitro. We observed highest transgene expression in acetylated and unmodified PEI at distinct polymer:DNA ratios; notably, the enhancement often seen in two-dimensional culture for acetylated PEI did not fully translate to three-dimensional scaffolds. We also found highly sulfated heparin-based CG scaffolds showed enhanced initial luciferase expression but not prolonged activity. While PEI constructs significantly reduced tenocyte metabolic health during the period of transfection, heparin-based CG scaffolds showed the greatest recovery in tenocyte metabolic health over the full 2 week culture. These results suggest that the electrostatic environment of three-dimensional biomaterials may be an important design criterion for cationic polymer-based gene delivery.

  6. Development and application of a new Silent reporter system to quantitate the activity of enhancer elements in the type II Collagen Gene.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuo; Shinomura, Tamayuki

    2016-07-01

    Type II collagen is a major component of cartilage, which provide structural stiffness to the tissue. As a sufficient amount of type II collagen is critical for maintaining the biomechanical properties of cartilage, its expression is tightly regulated in chondrocytes. Therefore, it is essential to elucidate in detail the transcriptional mechanism that controls expression of type II collagen, in particular by two enhancer elements we recently discovered. To systematically analyze and compare enhancer activities, we developed a novel reporter assay system that exploits site-specific integration of promoter and enhancer elements to activate a transcriptionally silent reporter gene. Using this system, we found that the enhancer elements have distinct characteristics, with one exhibiting additive effects and the other exhibiting synergistic effects when repeated in tandem.

  7. Cadmium induces alpha(1)collagen (I) and metallothionein II gene and alters the antioxidant system in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    del Carmen, Escobar Ma; Souza, Verónica; Bucio, Leticia; Hernández, Elizabeth; Damián-Matsumura, Pablo; Zaga, Verónica; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, Ma Concepción

    2002-01-15

    The mechanism of cadmium-mediated hepatotoxicity has been the subject of numerous investigations, principally in hepatocytes. Although, some uncertainties persist, sufficient evidence has emerged to provide a reasonable account of the toxic process in parenchymal cells. However, there is no information about the effect of cadmium in other hepatic cell types, such as stellate cells (fat storing cells, Ito cells, perisinusoidal cells, parasinusoidal cells, lipocytes). Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) express a quiescent phenotype in a healthy liver and acquire an activated phenotype in liver injury. These cells play an important role in the fibrogenic process. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a 24 h treatment of low Cd concentrations in glutathione content, lipid peroxidation damage, cytosolic free Ca, antioxidant enzyme activities: glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase and catalase along with the capacity of this heavy metal to induce metallothionein II and alpha(1)collagen (I) in an hepatic stellate cell line (CFSC-2G). Cd-treated cells increased lipid peroxidation and the content of cytosolic free calcium, decreased glutathione content and superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity. Cd was able to induce the expression of the metallothionein II and alpha(1)collagen (I) gene, that was not described in this cell type. Cadmium may act as a pro-fibrogenic agent in the liver probably by inducing oxidative damage by enhancing lipid peroxidation and altering the antioxidant system of the cells. Although, the exact role metallothionein induction plays in this process is unknown, it probably, provides a cytosolic pool of potential binding sites to sequester ionic Cd, thereby decreasing its toxicity.

  8. Recessive mutations in the α3 (VI) collagen gene COL6A3 cause early-onset isolated dystonia.

    PubMed

    Zech, Michael; Lam, Daniel D; Francescatto, Ludmila; Schormair, Barbara; Salminen, Aaro V; Jochim, Angela; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Lochmüller, Hanns; Strom, Tim M; Haslinger, Bernhard; Katsanis, Nicholas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2015-06-04

    Isolated dystonia is a disorder characterized by involuntary twisting postures arising from sustained muscle contractions. Although autosomal-dominant mutations in TOR1A, THAP1, and GNAL have been found in some cases, the molecular mechanisms underlying isolated dystonia are largely unknown. In addition, although emphasis has been placed on dominant isolated dystonia, the disorder is also transmitted as a recessive trait, for which no mutations have been defined. Using whole-exome sequencing in a recessive isolated dystonia-affected kindred, we identified disease-segregating compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3, a collagen VI gene associated previously with muscular dystrophy. Genetic screening of a further 367 isolated dystonia subjects revealed two additional recessive pedigrees harboring compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3. Strikingly, all affected individuals had at least one pathogenic allele in exon 41, including an exon-skipping mutation that induced an in-frame deletion. We tested the hypothesis that disruption of this exon is pathognomonic for isolated dystonia by inducing a series of in-frame deletions in zebrafish embryos. Consistent with our human genetics data, suppression of the exon 41 ortholog caused deficits in axonal outgrowth, whereas suppression of other exons phenocopied collagen deposition mutants. All recessive mutation carriers demonstrated early-onset segmental isolated dystonia without muscular disease. Finally, we show that Col6a3 is expressed in neurons, with relevant mRNA levels detectable throughout the adult mouse brain. Taken together, our data indicate that loss-of-function mutations affecting a specific region of COL6A3 cause recessive isolated dystonia with underlying neurodevelopmental deficits and highlight the brain extracellular matrix as a contributor to dystonia pathogenesis.

  9. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Tchetina, Elena V; Markova, Galina A; Poole, A Robin; Zukor, David J; Antoniou, John; Makarov, Sergey A; Kuzin, Aleksandr N

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1-50 μM). Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10-50 μM DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10 μM DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1β, and TNFα and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA), AMPK, HIF1α, and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients.

  10. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Markova, Galina A.; Poole, A. Robin; Zukor, David J.; Antoniou, John; Makarov, Sergey A.; Kuzin, Aleksandr N.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1–50 μM). Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10–50 μM DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10 μM DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1β, and TNFα and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA), AMPK, HIF1α, and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients. PMID:28042296

  11. Increased Cell Proliferation and Gene Expression of Genes Related to Bone Remodeling, Cell Adhesion and Collagen Metabolism in the Periodontal Ligament of Unopposed Molars in Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dorotheou, Domna; Farsadaki, Vassiliki; Bochaton-Piallat, Marie-Luce; Giannopoulou, Catherine; Halazonetis, Thanos D.; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2017-01-01

    Tooth eruption, the process by which teeth emerge from within the alveolar bone into the oral cavity, is poorly understood. The post-emergent phase of tooth eruption continues throughout life, in particular, if teeth are not opposed by antagonists. The aim of the present study was to better understand the molecular processes underlying post-emergent tooth eruption. Toward this goal, we removed the crowns of the maxillary molars on one side of the mouth of 14 young rats and examined gene expression patterns in the periodontal ligaments (PDLs) of the ipsilateral and contralateral mandibular molars, 3 and 15 days later. Nine untreated rats served as controls. Expression of six genes, Adamts18, Ostn, P4ha3, Panx3, Pth1r, and Tnmd, was upregulated in unopposed molars relative to molars with antagonists. These genes function in osteoblast differentiation and proliferation, cell adhesion and collagen metabolism. Proliferation of PDL cells also increased following loss of the antagonist teeth. Interestingly, mutations in PTH1R have been linked to defects in the post-emergent phase of tooth eruption in humans. We conclude that post-emergent eruption of unopposed teeth is associated with gene expression patterns conducive to alveolar bone formation and PDL remodeling. PMID:28239357

  12. Sp7/Osterix induces the mouse pro-α2(I) collagen gene (Col1a2) expression via the proximal promoter in osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura-Ota, Miki; Adachi, Sawako; Zhang, Juan Juan; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2014-09-26

    Bone is essentially composed of two components, hydroxyapatite and extracellular matrix proteins. The extracellular matrix of bone is primary composed of collagen, mostly type I collagen, with lesser amounts of other types of collagen such as type V collagen. Osteoblast differentiation is a multi-step process in which many classes of factors function in a coordinated manner. Sp7/Osterix, which binds to G/C-rich sequences, is a transcription factor that contributes to osteoblast differentiation. The present study aimed to clarify the involvement of Sp7/Osterix with the proximal promoter region of the mouse Col1a2 gene containing multiple G/C-rich sequences exist. Consequently, a functional analysis of the proximal mouse Col1a2 promoter showed that a substitution mutation of the second G/C-rich sequence from the transcription site specifically decreased the activity of osteoblastic cells. In addition, the experiments of overexpression of Sp7/Osterix and treatment with its specific siRNA showed that this G/C-rich sequence is responsible for the specific expression in osteoblastic cells. Consistent with these data, Sp7/Osterix bound to the region and increased the expression of the Col1a2 gene in association with osteoblast differentiation in the culture system.

  13. Constitutive Smad signaling and Smad-dependent collagen gene expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Asish K Wei, Jun; Wu, Minghua; Varga, John

    2008-09-19

    Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}), a potent inducer of collagen synthesis, is implicated in pathological fibrosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}) is a nuclear hormone receptor that regulates adipogenesis and numerous other biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that collagen gene expression was markedly elevated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking PPAR-{gamma} compared to heterozygous control MEFs. Treatment with the PPAR-{gamma} ligand 15d-PGJ{sub 2} failed to down-regulate collagen gene expression in PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs, whereas reconstitution of these cells with ectopic PPAR-{gamma} resulted in their normalization. Compared to control MEFs, PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs displayed elevated levels of the Type I TGF-{beta} receptor (T{beta}RI), and secreted more TGF-{beta}1 into the media. Furthermore, PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs showed constitutive phosphorylation of cellular Smad2 and Smad3, even in the absence of exogenous TGF-{beta}, which was abrogated by the ALK5 inhibitor SB431542. Constitutive Smad2/3 phosphorylation in PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs was associated with Smad3 binding to its cognate DNA recognition sequences, and interaction with coactivator p300 previously implicated in TGF-{beta} responses. Taken together, these results indicate that loss of PPAR-{gamma} in MEFs is associated with upregulation of collagen synthesis, and activation of intracellular Smad signal transduction, due, at least in part, to autocrine TGF-{beta} stimulation.

  14. Sp7/Osterix up-regulates the mouse pro-alpha3(V) collagen gene (Col5a3) during the osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yun-Feng, Wu; Matsuo, Noritaka; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2010-04-09

    Type V collagen is a quantitatively minor collagen, but acts as critical regulator of fibril formation in the extracellular matrix. The purpose of this study is to clarify the mechanism responsible for the transcriptional regulation of the mouse Col5a3 gene in osteoblastic cells. Sp7/Osterix is a transcription factor specifically expressed by osteoblasts and is important for osteoblast differentiation. The overexpression of Sp7/Osterix significantly increased the promoter activity and the endogenous mRNA level of the Col5a3 gene in osteoblastic cells. Conversely, a reduction of Sp7/Osterix by siRNA treatment decreased the promoter activity and the endogenous mRNA level of the Col5a3 gene. A CHIP assay confirmed that Sp7/Osterix interacted with the Col5a3 core promoter in vivo at the Sp1 binding site. The data from the experiments using the osteoblast differentiation model and the co-overexpression of Sp7/Osterix with Sp1 suggest that Sp7/Osterix promotes the expression of the collagen gene, Col5a3, and thereby playing a role in bone formation.

  15. Effects of strontium on collagen content and expression of related genes in rat chondrocytes cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Lei; Shi, Xiaoxia; Yin, Liheng; Zhang, Yuming; Li, Xiaobing; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Guowen

    2013-06-01

    Strontium stimulates cartilage matrix formation in vitro. However, the mechanisms governing these effects have not yet been extensively reported. In this study, chondrocytes were isolated from rat articular cartilage by enzymatic digestion and cultured for 24-72 h with 1-5 mM strontium. We investigated the effects of different concentrations of strontium on collagen content, type II collagen, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 expression in rat cultured articular chondrocytes in vitro. The collagen content of the chondrocytes, determined as hydroxyproline, was measured by a colorimetry method. Type II collagen, IGF-1, and MMP-13 mRNA abundance and protein expression levels were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) and western blot, respectively. The results showed that collagen content from the chondrocytes extracellular matrix increased with increasing strontium concentration. Moreover, 3 and 5 mM strontium strongly stimulated protein expression and mRNA levels of type II collagen and IGF-1. Conversely, MMP-13 expression in chondrocytes decreased dose-dependently with increasing strontium concentration. These results should provide insight into the ability of strontium to promote chondrocyte extracellular matrix synthesis. Strontium could promote collagen synthesis and suppress collagen degradation via the repression of MMP-13 expression.

  16. Sequence variations in the collagen IX and XI genes are associated with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Noponen-Hietala, N; Kyllonen, E; Mannikko, M; Ilkko, E; Karppinen, J; Ott, J; Ala-Kokko, L

    2003-01-01

    Background: Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is usually caused by disc herniation or degeneration. Several genetic factors have been implicated in disc disease. Tryptophan alleles in COL9A2 and COL9A3 have been shown to be associated with lumbar disc disease in the Finnish population, and polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR) (FokI and TaqI), the matrix metalloproteinase-3 gene (MMP-3) and an aggrecan gene (AGC1) VNTR have been reported to be associated with disc degeneration. In addition, an IVS6-4 a>t polymorphism in COL11A2 has been found in connection with stenosis caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the Japanese population. Objective: To study the role of genetic factors in LSS. Methods: 29 Finnish probands were analysed for mutations in the genes coding for intervertebral disc matrix proteins, COL1A1, COL1A2, COL2A1, COL9A1, COL9A2, COL9A3, COL11A1, COL11A2, and AGC1. VDR and MMP-3 polymorphisms were also analysed. Sequence variations were tested in 56 Finnish controls. Results: Several disease associated alleles were identified. A splice site mutation in COL9A2 leading to a premature translation termination codon and the generation of a truncated protein was identified in one proband, another had the Trp2 allele, and four others the Trp3 allele. The frequency of the COL11A2 IVS6-4 t allele was 93.1% in the probands and 72.3% in controls (p = 0.0016). The differences in genotype frequencies for this site were less significant (p = 0.0043). Conclusions: Genetic factors have an important role in the pathogenesis of LSS. PMID:14644861

  17. A novel type II collagen gene mutation in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and extensive intrafamilial phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sakamoto, Yuma; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia caused by a novel type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation and the family’s phenotypic diversity. Clinical and radiographic examinations of skeletal dysplasia were conducted on seven affected family members across two generations. The entire coding region of COL2A1, including the flanking intron regions, was analyzed with PCR and direct sequencing. The stature of the subjects ranged from extremely short to within normal height range. Hip deformity and advanced osteoarthritis were noted in all the subjects, ranging from severe coxa plana to mild acetabular dysplasia. Atlantoaxial subluxation combined with a hypoplastic odontoid process was found in three of the subjects. Various degrees of platyspondyly were confirmed in all subjects. Genetically, a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala) was identified in all the affected family members; however, it was not present in the one unaffected family member tested. We described a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala). Phenotypes were diverse even among individuals with the same mutation and within the same family. PMID:27274858

  18. Bioengineered collagens

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  19. Autologous Marrow-Derived Stem Cell-Seeded Gene-Supplemented Collagen Scaffolds for Spinal Cord Regeneration as a Treatment for Paralysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    April 18- 21 , 2007, Chicago, IL Fabrication and Characterization of Porous Hyaluronic Acid-Collagen Composite Scaffolds; S Tang, SM Vickers, H-P Hsu...and Myron Spector; Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting, April 18- 21 , 2007, Chicago, IL Incorporation of Osteogenic Protein-1 Plasmid into...Chitosan Nanoparticles for Non-Viral Gene Transfer to Chondrocytes; X Xu, RM Capito, and M Spector; Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting, April 18- 21

  20. Efficient Production of Hydroxylated Human-Like Collagen Via the Co-Expression of Three Key Genes in Escherichia coli Origami (DE3).

    PubMed

    Tang, Yunping; Yang, Xiuliang; Hang, Baojian; Li, Jiangtao; Huang, Lei; Huang, Feng; Xu, Zhinan

    2016-04-01

    Mature collagen is abundant in human bodies and very valuable for a range of industrial and medical applications. The biosynthesis of mature collagen requires post-translational modifications to increase the stability of collagen triple helix structure. By co-expressing the human-like collagen (HLC) gene with human prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H) and D-arabinono-1, 4-lactone oxidase (ALO) in Escherichia coli, we have constructed a prokaryotic expression system to produce the hydroxylated HLC. Then, five different media, as well as the induction conditions were investigated with regard to the soluble expression of such protein. The results indicated that the highest soluble expression level of target HLC obtained in shaking flasks was 49.55 ± 0.36 mg/L, when recombinant cells were grew in MBL medium and induced by 0.1 mM IPTG at the middle stage of exponential growth phase. By adopting the glucose feeding strategy, the expression level of target HLC can be improved up to 260 mg/L in a 10 L bench-top fermentor. Further, HPLC analyses revealed that more than 10 % of proline residues in purified HLC were successfully hydroxylated. The present work has provided a solid base for the large-scale production of hydroxylated HLC in E. coli.

  1. Low-level laser therapy induces an upregulation of collagen gene expression during the initial process of bone healing: a microarray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tim, Carla Roberta; Bossini, Paulo Sérgio; Kido, Hueliton Wilian; Malavazi, Iran; von Zeska Kress, Marcia Regina; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Rennó, Ana Cláudia; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the histological modifications produced by low level laser therapy (LLLT) on the first day of bone repair, as well as evaluates the LLLT effects on collagen expression on the site of a fracture. Twenty Wistar rats were distributed into a control group (CG) and a laser group (LG). Laser irradiation of Ga-Al-As laser 830 nm, 30 mW, 94 s, 2.8 J was performed in five sessions. Animals were euthanized on day 5 postsurgery. Histopathological analysis showed that LLLT was able to increase deposition of granulation tissue and newly formed bone at the site of the injury. In addition, picrosirius analysis showed that collagen fiber organization in the LG was enhanced compared to CG. Microarray analysis demonstrated that LLLT produced an upregulation type I collagen (COL-I). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the subjects that were treated presented a higher immunoexpression of COL-I. Our findings indicated that LLLT improves bone healing by producing a significant increase in the expression of collagen genes.

  2. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in mice features regulatory transcriptional network connecting major histocompatibility complex (MHC H2) with autoantigen genes in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Donate, Paula B; Fornari, Thaís A; Junta, Cristina M; Magalhães, Danielle A; Macedo, Cláudia; Cunha, Thiago M; Nguyen, Catherine; Cunha, Fernando Q; Passos, Geraldo A

    2011-05-01

    Considering that imbalance of central tolerance in the thymus contributes to aggressive autoimmunity, we compared the expression of peripheral tissue autoantigens (PTA) genes, which are involved in self-representation in the thymic stroma, of two mouse strains; DBA-1/J (MHC-H2(q)) susceptible and DBA-2/J (MHC-H2(d)) resistant to collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We evaluate whether these strains differ in their thymic gene expression, allowing identification of genes that might play a role in susceptibility/resistance to CIA. Microarray profiling showed that 1093 PTA genes were differentially modulated between collagen immunized DBA-1/J and DBA-2/J mice. These genes were assigned to 17 different tissues/organs, including joints/bone, characterizing the promiscuous gene expression (PGE), which is implicated in self-representation. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that Aire (autoimmune regulator), an important regulator of the PGE process, Aire-dependent (insulin), Aire-independent (Col2A1 and Gad67), and other 22 joint/bone autoantigen genes were down-regulated in DBA-1/J compared with DBA-2/J in the thymus. Considering the importance of MHC-H2 in peptide-self presentation and autoimmunity susceptibility, we reconstructed transcriptional networks of both strains based on actual microarray data. The networks clearly demonstrated different MHC-H2 transcriptional interactions with PTAs genes. DBA-1/J strain featured MHC-H2 as a node influencing downstream genes. Differently, in DBA-2/J strain network MHC-H2 was exclusively self-regulated and does not control other genes. These findings provide evidence that CIA susceptibility in mice may be a reflex of a cascade-like transcriptional control connecting different genes to MHC-H2 in the thymus.

  3. The use of collagen-based scaffolds to simulate prostate cancer bone metastases with potential for evaluating delivery of nanoparticulate gene therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kathleen A; Guo, Jianfeng; Tierney, Erica G; Curtin, Caroline M; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Darcy, Raphael; O'Brien, Fergal J; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer bone metastases are a leading cause of cancer-related death in men with current treatments offering only marginally improved rates of survival. Advances in the understanding of the genetic basis of prostate cancer provide the opportunity to develop gene-based medicines capable of treating metastatic disease. The aim of this work was to establish a 3D cell culture model of prostate cancer bone metastasis using collagen-based scaffolds, to characterise this model, and to assess the potential of the model to evaluate delivery of gene therapeutics designed to target bone metastases. Two prostate cancer cell lines (PC3 and LNCaP) were cultured in 2D standard culture and compared to 3D cell growth on three different collagen-based scaffolds (collagen and composites of collagen containing either glycosaminoglycan or nanohydroxyapatite). The 3D model was characterised for cell proliferation, viability and for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzyme and Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) secretion. Chemosensitivity to docetaxel treatment was assessed in 2D in comparison to 3D. Nanoparticles (NPs) containing siRNA formulated using a modified cyclodextrin were delivered to the cells on the scaffolds and gene silencing was quantified. Both prostate cancer cell lines actively infiltrated and proliferated on the scaffolds. Cell culture in 3D resulted in reduced levels of MMP1 and MMP9 secretion in PC3 cells. In contrast, LNCaP cells grown in 3D secreted elevated levels of PSA, particularly on the scaffold composed of collagen and glycosaminoglycans. Both cell lines grown in 3D displayed increased resistance to docetaxel treatment. The cyclodextrin.siRNA nanoparticles achieved cellular uptake and knocked down the endogenous GAPDH gene in the 3D model. In conclusion, development of a novel 3D cell culture model of prostate cancer bone metastasis has been initiated resulting, for the first time, in the successful delivery of gene therapeutics in a 3D in vitro model

  4. Structure of the human type IV collagen COL4A6 gene, which is mutated in Alport syndrome-associated leiomyomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu |; Zhou, Jing; Reeders, S.T.

    1996-05-01

    Basement membrane (type IV) collagen, a subfamily of the collagen protein family, is encoded by six distinct genes in mammals. Three of those, COL4A3, COL4A4, and COL4A5, are linked with Alport syndrome (hereditary nephritis). Patients with leimoyomatosis associated with Alport syndrome have been shown to have deletions in the 5{prime} end of the COL4A6 gene, in addition to having deletions in COL4A6. The human COL4A6 gene is reported to be 425 kb as determined by mapping of overlapping YAC clones by probes for its 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends. In the present study we describe the complete exon/intron size pattern of the human COL4A6 gene. The 12 {lambda} phage clones characterized in the study spanned a total of 110 kb, including 85 kb of the actual gene and 25 kb of flanking sequences. The overlapping clones contained all 46 exons of the gene and all introns, except for intron 2. Since the total size of the exons and all introns except for intron 2 is about 85 kb, intron 2 must be about 340 kb. All exons of the gene were assigned to EcoRI restriction fragments to facilitate analysis of the gene in patients with leiomyomatosis associated with Alport syndrome. The exon size pattern of COL4A6 is highly homologous with that of the human and mouse COL4A2 genes, with 27 of the 46 exons of COL4A6 being identical in size between the genes. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. A collagen-remodeling gene signature regulated by TGFβ signaling is associated with metastasis and poor survival in serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Dong-Joo; Tong, Yunguang; Sim, Myung-Shin; Dering, Judy; Berel, Dror; Cui, Xiaojiang; Lester, Jenny; Beach, Jessica A.; Tighiouart, Mourad; Walts, Ann E.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate molecular pathways contributing to metastatic cancer progression and poor clinical outcome in serous ovarian cancer. Experimental Design Poor survival signatures from three different serous ovarian cancer datasets were compared and a common set of genes was identified. The predictive value of this gene signature was validated in independent datasets. The expression of the signature genes was evaluated in primary, metastatic, and/or recurrent cancers using qPCR and in situ hybridization. Alterations in gene expression by TGFβ1 and functional consequences of loss of COL11A1 were evaluated using pharmacologic and knockdown approaches, respectively. Results We identified and validated a 10-gene signature (AEBP1, COL11A1, COL5A1, COL6A2, LOX, POSTN, SNAI2, THBS2, TIMP3, VCAN) that is associated with poor overall survival in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer. The signature genes encode extracellular matrix proteins involved in collagen remodeling. Expression of the signature genes is regulated by TGFβ1 signaling and is enriched in metastases in comparison to primary ovarian tumors. We demonstrate that levels of COL11A1, one of the signature genes, continuously increase during ovarian cancer disease progression, with the highest expression in recurrent metastases. Knockdown of COL11A1 decreases in vitro cell migration and invasion and tumor progression in mice. Conclusion Our findings suggest that collagen-remodeling genes regulated by TGFβ1 signaling promote metastasis and contribute to poor overall survival in patients with serous ovarian cancer. Our 10-gene signature has both predictive value and biological relevance and thus may be useful as a therapeutic target. PMID:24218511

  6. Tenascin-X, collagen, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: tenascin-X gene defects can protect against adverse cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Petersen, John W; Douglas, J Yellowlees

    2013-09-01

    Long thought to be two separate syndromes, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) appear on close examination to represent the same syndrome, with virtually identical clinical manifestations. While both EDS-HT and BJHS were long thought to lack the genetic loci of other connective tissue disorders, including all other types of EDS, researchers have discovered a genetic locus that accounts for manifestations of both EDS-HT and BJHS in a small population of patients. However, given the modest sample size of these studies and the strong correlation between serum levels of tenascin-X with clinical symptoms of both EDS-HT and BJHS, strong evidence exists for the origins of both types of hypermobility originating in haploinsufficiency or deficiency of the gene TNXB, responsible for tenascin-X. Tenascin-X regulates both the structure and stability of elastic fibers and organizes collagen fibrils in the extra-cellular matrix (ECM), impacting the rigidity or elasticity of virtually every cell in the body. While the impacts of tenascin-X insufficiency or deficiency on the skin and joints have received some attention, its potential cardiovascular impacts remain relatively unexplored. Here we set forth two novel hypotheses. First, TNXB haploinsufficiency or deficiency causes the range of clinical manifestations long identified with both EDS-HT and BJHS. And, second, that haploinsufficiency or deficiency of TNXB may provide some benefits against adverse cardiovascular events, including heart attack and stroke, by lowering levels of arterial stiffness associated with aging, as well as by enhancing accommodation of accrued atherosclerotic plaques. This two-fold hypothesis provides insights into the mechanisms underlying the syndromes previous identified with joint hypermobility, at the same time the hypothesis also sheds light on the role of the composition of the extracellular matrix and its impacts on endothelial sheer

  7. Abnormal response to physical activity in femurs after heterozygous inactivation of one allele of the Col2a1 gene for type II collagen in mice.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, J; Sahlman, J; Hirvonen, T; Jämsä, T; Tuukkanen, J; Kovanen, V; Kröger, H; Jurvelin, J; Arita, M; Li, S W; Prockop, D J; Hyttinen, M M; Helminen, H J; Lapveteläinen, T; Puustjärvi, K

    2005-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of heterozygous inactivation of one allele of the type II collagen gene (Col2a1) on biomechanical properties and mineral density of bone under physical loading conditions. C57BL/6-TGN mice with heterozygous knockout (HZK) inactivation of Col2a1 gene and their nontransgenic littermate controls were housed in individual cages with running wheels for 9 and 15 months. The running activity of each mouse was monitored continuously throughout the experiment. Bone mineral density (BMD) of mice femora was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT). Biomechanical properties were determined using three-point bending tests. Vertebral bone samples were prepared for quantitative polarized light microscopy and digital densitometry of proteoglycans. The concentration of total collagen and collagen cross-links were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatograpy (HPLC). The average daily running distance was shorter for the HZK mice between the age of 4 and 15 months as compared with normal runners (P < 0.05). The ultimate breaking force was 14.8% and 23.6% (9 vs. 15 months) lower in HZK-runners than in wild-type runners. BMD of the femur was 6.1% lower in HZK-runners at the age of 9 months (P < 0.05). Physical activity increased cortical BMD in wild-type runners but not in the HZK runners at the age of 9 months. The collagen network of the HZK mice was less organized. There were only minor changes in BMD and mechanical and structural properties between sedentary HZK mice and their wild-type controls. Increased physical activity induced significantly lower bone density, mechanical properties, and organization of collagen fibers in male HZK mice. However, there were no major differences in biomechanical parameters between sedentary HZK and wild-type male mice. This suggests an important guiding role of collagen type II in bone remodelling and

  8. Association of Reduced Type IX Collagen Gene Expression in Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes With Epigenetic Silencing by DNA Hypermethylation

    PubMed Central

    Imagawa, Kei; de Andrés, María C; Hashimoto, Ko; Itoi, Eiji; Otero, Miguel; Roach, Helmtrud I; Goldring, Mary B; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the changes in collagen gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) human chondrocytes are associated with changes in the DNA methylation status in the COL2A1 enhancer and COL9A1 promoter. Methods Expression levels were determined using quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and the percentage of DNA methylation was quantified by pyrosequencing. The effect of CpG methylation on COL9A1 promoter activity was determined using a CpG-free vector; cotransfections with expression vectors encoding SOX9, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), and HIF-2α were carried out to analyze COL9A1 promoter activities in response to changes in the methylation status. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were carried out to validate SOX9 binding to the COL9A1 promoter and the influence of DNA methylation. Results Although COL2A1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in OA chondrocytes were 19-fold higher than those in the controls, all of the CpG sites in the COL2A1 enhancer were totally demethylated in both samples. The levels of COL9A1 mRNA in OA chondrocytes were 6,000-fold lower than those in controls; 6 CpG sites of the COL9A1 promoter were significantly hypermethylated in OA patients as compared with controls. Treatment with 5-azadeoxycitidine enhanced COL9A1 gene expression and prevented culture-induced hypermethylation. In vitro methylation decreased COL9A1 promoter activity. Mutations in the 5 CpG sites proximal to the transcription start site decreased COL9A1 promoter activity. Cotransfection with SOX9 enhanced COL9A1 promoter activity; CpG methylation attenuated SOX9 binding to the COL9A1 promoter. Conclusion This first demonstration that hypermethylation is associated with down-regulation of COL9A1 expression in OA cartilage highlights the pivotal role of epigenetics in OA, involving not only hypomethylation, but also hypermethylation, with important therapeutic implications for OA treatment. PMID:25048791

  9. Development of a gene-activated scaffold platform for tissue engineering applications using chitosan-pDNA nanoparticles on collagen-based scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Rosanne M; Tierney, Erica G; Curtin, Caroline M; Cryan, Sally-Ann; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-07-28

    Biomaterial scaffolds that support cell infiltration and tissue formation can also function as platforms for the delivery of therapeutics such as drugs, proteins, and genes. As burst release of supraphysiological quantities of recombinant proteins can result in adverse side effects, the objective of this study was to explore the potential of a series of collagen-based scaffolds, developed in our laboratory, as gene-activated scaffold platforms with potential in a range of tissue engineering applications. The potential of chitosan, a biocompatible material derived from the shells of crustaceans, as a gene delivery vector was assessed using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). A transfection efficiency of >45% is reported which is similar to what is achieved with polyethyleneimine (PEI), a non-viral gold standard vector, without causing cytotoxic side effects. When the optimised chitosan nanoparticles were incorporated into a series of collagen-based scaffolds, sustained transgene expression from MSCs seeded on the scaffolds was maintained for up to 28days and interestingly the composition of the scaffold had an effect on transfection efficiency. These results demonstrate that by simply varying the scaffold composition and the gene (or combinations thereof) chosen; the system has potential for a myriad of therapeutic applications.

  10. Regulation of collagenase-3 and osteocalcin gene expression by collagen and osteopontin in differentiating MC3T3-E1 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Alonzo, Richard C.; Kowalski, Aaron J.; Denhardt, David T.; Nickols, G. Allen; Partridge, Nicola C.

    2002-01-01

    Both collagenase-3 and osteocalcin mRNAs are expressed maximally during the later stages of osteoblast differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that collagenase-3 mRNA expression in differentiating MC3T3-E1 cells is dependent upon the presence of ascorbic acid, is inhibited in the presence of the collagen synthesis inhibitor, 3,4-dehydroproline, and is stimulated by growth on collagen in the absence of ascorbic acid. Transient transfection studies show that collagenase-3 promoter activity increases during cell differentiation and requires the presence of ascorbic acid. Additionally, we show that, in differentiating MC3T3-E1 cells, collagenase-3 gene expression increases in the presence of an anti-osteopontin monoclonal antibody that binds near the RGD motif of this protein, whereas osteocalcin expression is inhibited. Furthermore, an RGD peptidomimetic compound, designed to block interaction of ligands to the alpha(v) integrin subunit, increases osteocalcin expression and inhibits collagenase-3 expression, suggesting that the RGD peptidomimetic initiates certain alpha(v) integrin signaling in osteoblastic cells. Overall, these studies demonstrate that stimulation of collagenase-3 expression during osteoblast differentiation requires synthesis of a collagenous matrix and that osteopontin and alpha(v) integrins exert divergent regulation of collagenase-3 and osteocalcin expression during osteoblast differentiation.

  11. Proline with or without hydroxyproline influences collagen concentration and regulates prolyl 4-hydroxylase α (I) gene expression in juvenile turbo ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaikai; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui; Liufu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yanjiao; Peng, Mo; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary proline (Pro), and Pro and hydroxyproline (Hyp) in combination on the growth performance, total Hyp and collagen concentrations of tissues, and prolyl 4-hydroxylase α(I) (P4H α(I)) gene expression in juvenile turbot feeding high plant protein diets. A diet containing 50% crude protein and 12% crude lipid was formulated as the basal and control, on which other two protein and lipid contents identical experimental diets were formulated by supplementing the basal with either 0.75% Pro (Pro-0.75) or 0.75% Pro and 0.75% Hyp (Pro+Hyp). Four groups of fish in indoor seawater recirculating systems, 35 individuals each, were fed twice a day to apparent satiation for 10 weeks. The results showed that dietary Pro and Hyp supplementation had no significant effect on growth performance and feed utilization of juvenile turbot (P > 0.05). Total Hyp and collagen concentrations in muscle were significantly increased when dietary Pro and Hyp increased (P <0.05), and fish fed diet Pro+Hyp showed significantly higher free Hyp content in plasma than those fed other diets (P <0.05). The expression of P4H a(I) gene in liver and muscle was significantly up regulated in fish fed diet Pro-0.75 in comparison with control (P <0.05); however the gene was significantly down regulated in fish fed diet Pro+Hyp in muscle in comparison with fish fed diet Pro-0.75 (P <0.05). It can be concluded that supplement of crystal L-Pro and L-Hyp to high plant protein diets did not show positive effects on growth performance of juvenile turbot, but enhanced total collagen concentrations in muscle.

  12. A functional collagen adhesin gene, acm, in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecium correlates with the recent success of this emerging nosocomial pathogen.

    PubMed

    Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R; Singh, Kavindra V; Okhuysen, Pablo C; Murray, Barbara E

    2008-09-01

    Enterococcus faecium recently evolved from a generally avirulent commensal into a multidrug-resistant health care-associated pathogen causing difficult-to-treat infections, but little is known about the factors responsible for this change. We previously showed that some E. faecium strains express a cell wall-anchored collagen adhesin, Acm. Here we analyzed 90 E. faecium isolates (99% acm(+)) and found that the Acm protein was detected predominantly in clinically derived isolates, while the acm gene was present as a transposon-interrupted pseudogene in 12 of 47 isolates of nonclinical origin. A highly significant association between clinical (versus fecal or food) origin and collagen adherence (P collagen adherence, multilocus sequence typing demonstrated that the majority of collagen-adhering isolates, as well as 16 of 17 endocarditis isolates, are part of the hospital-associated E. faecium genogroup referred to as clonal complex 17 (CC17), which has emerged globally. Taken together, our findings support the hypothesis that Acm has contributed to the emergence of E. faecium and CC17 in nosocomial infections.

  13. Collagenous colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kingham, J G; Levison, D A; Morson, B C; Dawson, A M

    1986-01-01

    Clinical and pathological aspects of six patients with collagenous colitis are presented. These patients have been observed for between four and 15 years and the evolution of the condition is documented in three (cases 1, 3 and 5). Management and possible pathogenetic mechanisms of this enigmatic condition are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3699567

  14. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoyi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Takashi; Kondo, Yutaka; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Iijima, Katsunori; Imatani, Akira; Watanabe, Mika; Shirane, Akio; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we report a case of rare collagenous gastritis. The patient was a 25-year-old man who had experienced nausea, abdominal distention and epigastralgia since 2005. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) carried out at initial examination by the patient's local doctor revealed an extensively discolored depression from the upper gastric body to the lower gastric body, mainly including the greater curvature, accompanied by residual mucosa with multiple islands and nodularity with a cobblestone appearance. Initial biopsies sampled from the nodules and accompanying atrophic mucosa were diagnosed as chronic gastritis. In August, 2011, the patient was referred to Tohoku University Hospital for observation and treatment. EGD at our hospital showed the same findings as those by the patient's local doctor. Pathological findings included a membranous collagen band in the superficial layer area of the gastric mucosa, which led to a diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic findings to make a diagnosis.

  15. Protein kinase signalling pathways involved in the up-regulation of the rat alpha1(I) collagen gene by transforming growth factor beta1 and bone morphogenetic protein 2 in osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Palcy, S; Goltzman, D

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) family members are known for their important role in bone physiology. TGFbeta(1) and, to a smaller extent, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) have been reported to regulate the gene expression of different osteoblast markers in vitro. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in these actions. Here we report that BMP-2, like TGFbeta(1), up-regulated alpha1(I) collagen mRNA expression in ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic cells. This was mediated through an increase in the transcriptional rate of the gene rather than through the stabilization of alpha1(I) collagen mRNA, and required new protein synthesis. In addition, TGFbeta(1)- and BMP-2-induced increases in alpha1(I) collagen mRNA levels were both dependent on protein kinase C and protein tyrosine kinase activities. Furthermore, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) [MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase kinase 1/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (MEK-1/ERK)] pathway participated in the up-regulation of alpha1(I) collagen gene expression by TGFbeta(1) and BMP-2. In response to either TGFbeta(1) or BMP-2, the stimulation of alpha1(I) collagen mRNA levels was paralleled by an early increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase protein activity. Moreover, the effects of both TGFbeta(1) and BMP-2 on alpha1(I) collagen gene expression were markedly decreased in transfected ROS 17/2.8 cells expressing a dominant-negative MEK-1. Our findings therefore show that TGFbeta(1) and BMP-2, which signal through discrete cell-surface receptors, are able to trigger analogous, if not identical, protein-phosphorylation-transducing cascades leading to comparable actions on the transcription of the alpha1(I) collagen gene in osteoblastic cells. PMID:10493907

  16. Degenerated intervertebral disc prolapse and its association of collagen I alpha 1 Spl gene polymorphism: A preliminary case control study of Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Anjankar, Shailendra D; Poornima, Subhadra; Raju, Subodh; Jaleel, MA; Bhiladvala, Dilnavaz; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2015-01-01

    Background: Degenerated disc disease (DDD) is a common disorder responsible for increased morbidity in a productive age group. Its etiology is multifactorial and genetic factors have been predominantly implicated. Disc prolapse results due to tear in the annulus, which is a fibrous structure composed largely of type I collagen. Functional polymorphism at the Sp1 site of the collagen I alpha 1 (COL1A1) gene has shown a positive association with DDD in Dutch and Greek populations. The purpose of this study was to assess COL1A1 Sp1 gene polymorphism in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Fifty clinically and radiologically proven patients with disc prolapse requiring surgery were included as cases and 50 healthy, age-matched volunteers served as controls. After isolating DNA from their blood sample, genotyping for COL1A1 polymorphism (rs1800012) was performed and identified as GG, GT, and TT. Results: The mean age and body mass index in cases and controls were similar. 76% of the patients were males. The most common site of disc degeneration was L4–L5 (36%), followed by L5–S1 (34%). Homozygous–GG, heterozygous GT, and homozygous TT genotypes were seen in 38 (76%), 10 (20%) and 2 (4%) cases respectively, controls had similar percentage of genotypes as well. The alleles in cases and the control group showed no significant difference (P = 0.6744) and followed the Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium in the study population. Conclusion: The COL1A1 (rs1800012) is in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in the present subset of Indian population. But taken as a single factor, it was not found to be associated with DDD in this preliminary study. Disc degeneration is multifactorial and also anticipated to be a result of multiple genes involvement and gene-gene interaction. PMID:26806964

  17. Deletions in the COL4A5 collagen gene in X-linked Alport syndrome. Characterization of the pathological transcripts in nonrenal cells and correlation with disease expression.

    PubMed Central

    Antignac, C; Knebelmann, B; Drouot, L; Gros, F; Deschênes, G; Hors-Cayla, M C; Zhou, J; Tryggvason, K; Grünfeld, J P; Broyer, M

    1994-01-01

    The type IV collagen alpha 5 chain (COL4A5) gene of 88 unrelated male patients with X-linked Alport syndrome was tested for major gene rearrangements by Southern blot analysis, using COL4A5 cDNA probes. 14 different deletions were detected, providing a 16% deletion rate in the COL4A5 gene in the patient population. The deletions are dispersed all over the gene with different sizes, ranging from 1 kb to the complete absence of the gene (> 250 kb) in one patient. In four patients with intragenic deletions, absence of the alpha 3 (IV) chain in the glomerular basement membrane was demonstrated by immunohistochemical studies. This finding supports the hypothesis that abnormalities in the alpha 5 (IV) chain may prevent normal incorporation of the alpha 3 (IV) chain into the glomerular basement membrane. Direct sequencing of cDNA amplified from lymphoblast mRNA of four patients with internal gene deletions, using appropriate combinations of primers amplifying across the predicted boundaries of the deletions, allowed us to determine the effect of the genomic rearrangements on the transcripts and, by inference, on the alpha 5 (IV) chain. Regardless of the extent of deletion and of the putative protein product, the 14 deletions occur in patients with juvenile-type Alport syndrome. Images PMID:8132760

  18. B-Myb acts as a repressor of human COL1A1 collagen gene expression by interacting with Sp1 and CBF factors in scleroderma fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Cicchillitti, Lucia; Jimenez, Sergio A; Sala, Arturo; Saitta, Biagio

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the role of B-Myb, a cell-cycle-regulated transcription factor, in the expression of the alpha1 (I) pro-collagen gene (COL1A1) in scleroderma fibroblasts. Scleroderma or SSc (systemic sclerosis) is a fibrotic disease characterized by excessive production of extracellular matrix components, especially type I collagen. Northern-blot analysis showed an inverse relationship between COL1A1 mRNA expression and that of B-Myb during exponential cell growth and during quiescence in human SSc fibroblasts. Overexpression of B-Myb in SSc fibroblasts was correlated with decreased COL1A1 mRNA expression. Transient transfections localized the down-regulatory effect of B-Myb to a region containing the proximal 174 bp of the COL1A1 promoter that does not contain B-Myb consensus binding sites. Gel-shift analysis, using nuclear extracts from normal and SSc fibroblasts transfected with B-Myb, showed no differences in DNA-protein complex formation when compared with the nuclear extracts from mock-transfected cells. However, we found that B-Myb decreases Sp1 (specificity protein 1) and CBF (CCAAT-binding factor) binding for their specific sites localized in the 174 bp COL1A1 proximal promoter. These results were also confirmed using B-Myb-immunodepleted nuclear extracts. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation assays using SSc nuclear extracts demonstrated a physical interaction of B-Myb with Sp1 and CBF transcription factors, and also an interaction between Sp1 and CBF. In addition, by employing full-length or deleted B-Myb cDNA construct, we found that B-Myb down-regulates the COL1A1 proximal promoter through its C-terminal domain. Thus these results suggest that B-Myb may be an important factor in the pathway(s) regulating collagen production in SSc fibroblasts. PMID:14613485

  19. Sp7/Osterix is involved in the up-regulation of the mouse pro-α1(V) collagen gene (Col5a1) in osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yun-Feng; Matsuo, Noritaka; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2010-10-01

    Sp7/Osterix, a transcription factor whose expression is restricted in osteoblasts, belongs to the Sp family of transcription factor that bind to G/C-rich sequences. Previous studies have identified a Sp1binding site in the proximal promoter region of the mouse Col5a1 gene, but it did not activate or repress this gene in a mouse fibroblast cell line and a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the involvement of Sp7/Osterix in the mouse Col5a1 gene. A functional analysis revealed that mutation of the Sp1 binding site specifically decreased the promoter activity in osteoblastic cells. An overexpression of Sp7/Osterix significantly increased the promoter activity and the endogenous mRNA levels of the Col5a1 gene in osteoblastic cells. Conversely, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Sp7/Osterix decreased the promoter activity and the endogenous mRNA levels of the Col5a1 gene. These effects on promoter activity were canceled when the mutant construct of Sp1 binding site was introduced. Consistent with these data, the experiments using an osteoblast differentiation model showed increased promoter activity and endogenous mRNA levels, along with increased Sp7/Osterix during differentiation. Therefore, type V collagen appears to be involved in bone formation.

  20. Association of a change in chromatin structure with a tissue-specific switch in transcription start sites in the alpha 2(I) collagen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, K M; Seekamp, A H; Askew, G R; Mei, Z; Farrell, C M; Wang, S; Lukens, L N

    1991-01-01

    Chick embryonic sternal chondrocytes do not synthesize alpha 2(I) collagen until they are shifted by treatment with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to a fibroblastic phenotype, yet they transcribe this gene as rapidly as BrdUrd-treated cells. To examine further this transcription, the DNase I hypersensitive sites were mapped in the 5' region of this gene in chondrocytes, BrdUrd-treated chondrocytes, fibroblasts and three types of non-transcribing cells. A DNase I hypersensitive site at -200 bp, previously shown to be associated with the active transcription of this gene in fibroblasts, is not present in chondrocyte chromatin. The chondrocyte alpha 2(I) gene contains, however, a novel major hypersensitive site in the DNA region corresponding to the fibroblast intron 2, near the chondrocyte-specific transcription initiation site of this gene. This novel hypersensitive site is associated with the use of this alternate start site by chondrocytes, since it is lost when BrdUrd treatment causes these chondrocytes to switch to the initiation of transcription at the fibroblast start site. The BrdUrd-treated chondrocytes contain the same alpha 2(I) hypersensitive sites as fibroblasts, except that fibroblasts have an additional, previously unreported, site at -1000 bp. Images PMID:1717939

  1. Effect of polystyrene and polyether imide cell culture inserts with different roughness on chondrocyte metabolic activity and gene expression profiles of aggrecan and collagen.

    PubMed

    König, Josephine; Kohl, Benjamin; Kratz, Karl; Jung, Friedrich; Lendlein, Andreas; Ertel, Wolfgang; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cultured autologous chondrocytes can be used for implantation to support cartilage repair. For this purpose, a very small number of autologous cells harvested from a biopsy have to be expanded in monolayer culture. Commercially available polymer surfaces lead to chondrocyte dedifferentiation. Hence, the demanding need for optimized polymers and surface topologies supporting chondrocytes' differentiated phenotypes in vitro arises. In this study we explored the effect of tailored cell culture plate inserts prepared from polystyrene (PS) and polyether imide (PEI) exhibiting three different roughness levels (R0, RI, RII) on chondrocyte morphology, metabolism and gene expression profile. As a control, commercially available tissue culture plastic (TCP) dishes were included. Primary porcine articular chondrocytes were seeded on tailored PS and PEI inserts with three different roughness levels. The metabolic activity of the chondrocytes was determined after 24 hours using alamar blue assay. Chondrocyte gene expression profiles (aggrecan, type I and type II collagen) were monitored after 48 hours using Real Time Detection (RTD)-PCR. Chondrocytes cultured on PS and PEI surfaces formed cell clusters after 24 and 48 hours, which was not observed on TCP. The metabolic activity of chondrocytes cultured on PS was lower than of chondrocytes cultured on PEI, but also lower than on TCP. Gene expression analyses revealed an elevated expression of cartilage-specific aggrecan and an impaired expression of both collagen types by chondrocytes on PS and PEI compared with TCP. In summary, PEI is a biocompatible biomaterial suitable for chondrocyte culturing, which can be further chemically functionalized for generating specific surface interactions or covalent binding of biomolecules.

  2. Stimulation with type I collagen induces changes in gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    PubMed Central

    Atamas, S P; Luzina, I G; Ingels, J; Choi, J; Wong, W K; Furst, D E; Clements, P J; Postlethwaite, A E

    2010-01-01

    An autoantigenic role for collagen type I (CI) has been suggested previously in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc). Whether CI is indeed capable of affecting the immune system in dcSSc is not known. Patients with early (3 years or less) or late (>3 years) dcSSc and healthy controls donated blood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured with or without CI, and expression of genes known for their involvement in autoimmune and inflammatory processes was assessed using cDNA arrays; results were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for selected genes. Patients with early and late dcSSc were similarly different from healthy controls in basal gene expression. When cultured with CI, PBMC from patients with early dcSSc differed from healthy controls in expression of 34 genes, whereas PBMC from patients with late dcSSc differed from healthy controls in expression of only 29 genes. Direct comparisons of matched PBMC samples cultured with and without CI revealed differences in expression of eight genes in healthy controls, of five genes in patients with early dcSSc, and no differences in patients with late dcSSc. Thus, PBMC from patients with dcSSc respond differently than do PBMC from healthy controls when cultured with CI. Exposure to CI in culture of PBMC from patients in the early stage of dcSSc in contrast to PBMC from patients with late-stage dcSSc evokes a greater degree of activation of immune-related genes, suggesting that CI is more dominant as an autoantigen in early versus late dcSSc. PMID:20529088

  3. Stimulation with type I collagen induces changes in gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (scleroderma).

    PubMed

    Atamas, S P; Luzina, I G; Ingels, J; Choi, J; Wong, W K; Furst, D E; Clements, P J; Postlethwaite, A E

    2010-09-01

    An autoantigenic role for collagen type I (CI) has been suggested previously in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc). Whether CI is indeed capable of affecting the immune system in dcSSc is not known. Patients with early (3 years or less) or late (>3 years) dcSSc and healthy controls donated blood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured with or without CI, and expression of genes known for their involvement in autoimmune and inflammatory processes was assessed using cDNA arrays; results were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for selected genes. Patients with early and late dcSSc were similarly different from healthy controls in basal gene expression. When cultured with CI, PBMC from patients with early dcSSc differed from healthy controls in expression of 34 genes, whereas PBMC from patients with late dcSSc differed from healthy controls in expression of only 29 genes. Direct comparisons of matched PBMC samples cultured with and without CI revealed differences in expression of eight genes in healthy controls, of five genes in patients with early dcSSc, and no differences in patients with late dcSSc. Thus, PBMC from patients with dcSSc respond differently than do PBMC from healthy controls when cultured with CI. Exposure to CI in culture of PBMC from patients in the early stage of dcSSc in contrast to PBMC from patients with late-stage dcSSc evokes a greater degree of activation of immune-related genes, suggesting that CI is more dominant as an autoantigen in early versus late dcSSc.

  4. IL-4 gene therapy for collagen arthritis suppresses synovial IL-17 and osteoprotegerin ligand and prevents bone erosion.

    PubMed

    Lubberts, E; Joosten, L A; Chabaud, M; van Den Bersselaar, L; Oppers, B; Coenen-De Roo, C J; Richards, C D; Miossec, P; van Den Berg, W B

    2000-06-01

    Bone destruction is the most difficult target in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we report that local overexpression of IL-4, introduced by a recombinant human type 5 adenovirus vector (Ad5E1mIL-4) prevents joint damage and bone erosion in the knees of mice with collagen arthritis (CIA). No difference was noted in the course of CIA in the injected knee joints between Ad5E1mIL-4 and the control vector, but radiographic analysis revealed impressive reduction of joint erosion and more compact bone structure in the Ad5E1mIL-4 group. Although severe inflammation persisted in treated mice, Ad5E1mIL-4 prevented bone erosion and diminished tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity, indicating that local IL-4 inhibits the formation of osteoclast-like cells. Messenger RNA levels of IL-17, IL-12, and cathepsin K in the synovial tissue were suppressed, as were IL-6 and IL-12 protein production. Osteoprotegerin ligand (OPGL) expression was markedly suppressed by local IL-4, but no loss of OPG expression was noted with Ad5E1mIL-4 treatment. Finally, in in vitro studies, bone samples of patients with arthritis revealed consistent suppression by IL-4 of type I collagen breakdown. IL-4 also enhanced synthesis of type I procollagen, suggesting that it promoted tissue repair. These findings may have significant implications for the prevention of bone erosion in arthritis.

  5. Oral collagen-derived dipeptides, prolyl-hydroxyproline and hydroxyprolyl-glycine, ameliorate skin barrier dysfunction and alter gene expression profiles in the skin.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Jun; Asami, Naoto; Kataoka, Aya; Sugihara, Fumihito; Inoue, Naoki; Kimira, Yoshifumi; Wada, Masahiro; Mano, Hiroshi

    2015-01-09

    Oral supplementation with collagen hydrolysate (CH) has been shown to improve the condition of the skin in humans and experimental animals. Several hydroxyproline-containing oligo-peptides were previously detected in human peripheral blood after the ingestion of CH, and the two dipeptides, prolyl-hydroxyproline (PO) and hydroxyprolyl-glycine (OG), have been proposed to have beneficial effects on human health. When HR-1 hairless mice were fed a HR-AD diet, which lacked magnesium and zinc, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) increased and water content of stratum corneum decreased. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary PO and OG on skin barrier dysfunction in HR-1 hairless mice. Mice were fed a HR-AD diet with or without PO (0.15%) and OG (0.15%) for 35 consecutive days. The administration of PO and OG significantly decreased TEWL, and significantly increased water content of stratum corneum. A DNA microarray analysis of the dorsal skin revealed differences in gene expression between the group administered PO and OG and the control group. We also identified muscle-related Gene Ontology as a result of analyzing the up-regulated genes. These results suggested that the administration of PO and OG improved skin barrier dysfunction and altered muscle-related gene expression.

  6. Autologous Marrow-Derived Stem Cell-Seeded Gene-Supplemented Collagen Scaffolds for Spinal Cord Regeneration as a Treatment for Paralysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    factors; 3) formulation of collagen scaffolds containing hyaluronic acid ; and 4) investigation of the conditions in vitro for the neuro-differentiation...bone morphogenetic protein-7. 3. Collagen- hyaluronic acid composite scaffolds were developed for neural tissue engineering. The following describes...the achievement related to the development of navel calcium phosphate nanoparticles and hyaluronic acid -collagen composite scaffolds. A. Novel

  7. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins.

  8. Severe osteoporosis with multiple spontaneous vertebral fractures in a young male carrying triple polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor, collagen type 1, and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related peptide 5 genes.

    PubMed

    Yavropoulou, Maria P; Kollia, Panagoulia; Chatzidimitriou, Dimitris; Samara, Stavroula; Skoura, Lemonia; Yovos, John G

    2016-10-01

    Osteoporosis is a common disease with a strong genetic component. Several studies have reported the vitamin D receptor (VDR), collagen type I (COL1A1), and LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) genes as the most likely candidates. However, most of the studies have been carried out in postmenopausal women and older men and show inconsistent results.

  9. Proton pump inhibitor induced collagen expression in colonocytes is associated with collagenous colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shiori; Kadochi, Yui; Luo, Yi; Fujiwara-Tani, Rina; Nishiguchi, Yukiko; Kishi, Shingo; Fujii, Kiyomu; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    AIM To elucidate the role of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in collagenous disease, direct effect of PPI on colonocytes was examined. METHODS Collagenous colitis is a common cause of non-bloody, watery diarrhea. Recently, there has been increasing focus on the use of proton PPIs as a risk factor for developing collagenous colitis. Mouse CT26 colonic cells were treated with PPI and/or PPI-induced alkaline media. Expression of fibrosis-associated genes was examined by RT-PCR. In human materials, collagen expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS CT26 cells expressed a Na+-H+ exchanger gene (solute carrier family 9, member A2). Treatment with PPI and/or PPI-induced alkaline media caused growth inhibition and oxidative stress in CT26 cells. The treatment increased expression of fibrosis inducing factors, transforming growth factor β and fibroblast growth factor 2. The treatment also decreased expression of a negative regulator of collagen production, replication factor C1, resulting in increased expression of collagen types III and IV in association with lipid peroxide. In biopsy specimens from patients with collagenous colitis, type III and IV collagen were increased. Increase of type III collagen was more pronounced in PPI-associated collagenous colitis than in non-PPI-associated disease. CONCLUSION From these findings, the reaction of colonocytes to PPI might participate in pathogenesis of collagenous colitis. PMID:28321159

  10. Molecules in Focus: Collagen XII: Protecting bone and muscle integrity by organizing collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, Matthias; Birk, David E.; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Koch, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Collagen XII, largest member of the fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helix (FACIT) family, assembles from three identical α-chains encoded by the COL12A1 gene. The molecule consists of three threadlike N-terminal noncollagenous NC3 domains, joined by disulfide bonds and a short interrupted collagen triple helix towards the C-terminus. Splice variants differ considerably in size and properties: "small" collagen XIIB (220 kDa subunit) is similar to collagen XIV, whereas collagen XIIA (350 kDa) has a much larger NC3 domain carrying glycosaminoglycan chains. Collagen XII binds to collagen I-containing fibrils via its collagenous domain, whereas its large noncollagenous arms interact with other matrix proteins such as tenascin-X. In dense connective tissues and bone, collagen XII is thought to regulate organization and mechanical properties of collagen fibril bundles. Accordingly, recent findings show that collagen XII mutations cause Ehlers-Danlos/myopathy overlap syndrome associated with skeletal abnormalities and muscle weakness in mice and humans. PMID:24801612

  11. Rare mutations and potentially damaging missense variants in genes encoding fibrillar collagens and proteins involved in their production are candidates for risk for preterm premature rupture of membranes

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria E.; Pearson, Laurel N.; Parikh, Hardik I.; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Sheth, Nihar U.; York, Timothy P.; Romero, Roberto; Strauss, Jerome F.

    2017-01-01

    Preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) is the leading identifiable cause of preterm birth with ~ 40% of preterm births being associated with PPROM and occurs in 1% - 2% of all pregnancies. We hypothesized that multiple rare variants in fetal genes involved in extracellular matrix synthesis would associate with PPROM, based on the assumption that impaired elaboration of matrix proteins would reduce fetal membrane tensile strength, predisposing to unscheduled rupture. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on neonatal DNA derived from pregnancies complicated by PPROM (49 cases) and healthy term deliveries (20 controls) to identify candidate mutations/variants. Genotyping for selected variants from the WES study was carried out on an additional 188 PPROM cases and 175 controls. All mothers were self-reported African Americans, and a panel of ancestry informative markers was used to control for genetic ancestry in all genetic association tests. In support of the primary hypothesis, a statistically significant genetic burden (all samples combined, SKAT-O p-value = 0.0225) of damaging/potentially damaging rare variants was identified in the genes of interest—fibrillar collagen genes, which contribute to fetal membrane strength and integrity. These findings suggest that the fetal contribution to PPROM is polygenic, and driven by an increased burden of rare variants that may also contribute to the disparities in rates of preterm birth among African Americans. PMID:28346524

  12. Profile of collagen gene expression in the glenohumeral capsule of patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the expression of the genes COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1 and COL5A1 in the glenohumeral capsule of patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder. Methods Samples from the glenohumeral capsule of 18 patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder were evaluated. Male patients with a positive grip test and a Bankart lesion seen on magnetic resonance imaging were included. All the patients had suffered more than one episode of shoulder dislocation. Samples were collected from the injured glenohumeral capsule (anteroinferior region) and from the macroscopically unaffected region (anterosuperior region) of each patient. The expression of collagen genes was evaluated using the polymerase chain reaction after reverse transcription with quantitative analysis (qRT-PCR). Results The expression of COL1A1, COL1A2 and COL3A1 did not differ between the two regions of the shoulder capsule. However, it was observed that the expression of COL5A1 was significantly lower in the anteroinferior region than in the anterosuperior region (median ± interquartile range: 0.057 ± 0.052 vs. 0.155 ± 0.398; p = 0.028) of the glenohumeral capsule. Conclusion The affected region of the glenohumeral capsule in patients with shoulder instability presented reduced expression of COL5A1. PMID:26229875

  13. Physical and linkage mapping of the human and murine genes for the [alpha]1 chain of type IX collagen (COL9A1)

    SciTech Connect

    Warman, M.L. Children's Hospital Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A. ); Seldin, M.F.; Rochelle, J.M. ); Knoll, J.H.M.; Cheng, Sou De ); Olsen, B.R. )

    1993-09-01

    The IX collagen, a member of the FACIT family of extracellular matrix proteins, is a heterotrimer composed of three genetically distinct [alpha] chains. The cDNAs for the human and mouse [alpha]1(IX) chains have been cloned. In this paper the authors confirm the mapping of the human COL9A1 gene to chromosome 6q12-q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization utilizing two genomic clones which also contain short tandem repeat polymorphisms. They also report the characterization of these repeats and their incorporation into the chromosome 6 linkage map. The COL9A1 locus shows no recombination with the marker D6Z1 (Z = 27.61 at [theta] = 0) and identifies the most likely locus order of KRAS1P-[D6Z1-COL9A1]-D6S30. In addition, using an interspecific backcross panel, they have mapped murine Col9a1 to mouse chromosome 1. Together with other comparative mapping results, these data suggest that the pericentric region of human chromosome 6 is homologous to the most proximal segment of mouse chromosome 1. These data may facilitate linkage studies with COL9A1 (or col9a1) as a candidate gene for hereditary chondrodysplasias and osteoarthritis. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Genetic evidence that mutations in the COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1, or COL5A2 collagen genes are not responsible for mitral valve prolapse.

    PubMed Central

    Henney, A M; Tsipouras, P; Schwartz, R C; Child, A H; Devereux, R B; Leech, G J

    1989-01-01

    DNA markers were used to assess the segregation of genes encoding the collagen types that predominate in the mitral valve (types I, III, and V) in two family pedigrees that are phenotypically different but showed dominantly inherited mitral valve prolapse. The inheritance of these markers was compared with the segregation of the phenotype for mitral valve prolapse in both families. In one family it was shown that the COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1, and COL5A2 genes segregated independently of the phenotype; in the other family the results for COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL5A2 were similar but analysis at the COL3A1 locus was not possible. These data indicate that in these families mitral valve prolapse does not arise from a defect in one of these collagen genes. PMID:2930668

  15. The homeoproteins MAB-18 and CEH-14 insulate the dauer collagen gene col-43 from activation by the adjacent promoter of the Spermatheca gene sth-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Bando, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Tatsuji; Kagawa, Hiroaki

    2005-04-22

    Genome searches in this study indicate that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans genome has 2582 bidirectionally oriented genes that account for more than 25% of the total genes. We analyze the transcriptional repression system for one of these predicted bidirectional promoters, which controls the expression of the spermathecal gene sth-1 and collagen gene col-43. These two genes are separated by 1.3 kb and are transcribed bidirectionally. sth-1 is expressed in spermatheca after the L4 stage and col-43 is expressed in the hypodermal cells of the L2d dauer stage. The upstream regions required for the expression of sth-1 and col-43 shared an overlapped control sequence. Two homeoproteins, MAB-18 and CEH-14, were isolated by yeast one-hybrid screening as binding proteins of the overlapped region. MAB-18 bound to two homeodomain-binding sites and interacted with CEH-14 to repress col-43 expression in spermatheca. These results indicate that the two homeoproteins interact with each other to repress col-43 expression in sth-1-expressing tissues. This is the first report of bidirectional gene regulation analysis in the C.elegans genome.

  16. Genes for collagen types I, IV, and V are transcribed in HeLa cells but a postinitiation block prevents the accumulation of type I mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, J.J.; Wroth, T.H.; Ackerman, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Collagen mRNA synthesis in HeLa cells was evaluated by in vitro transcription of type I collagen DNA, nuclear run-on studies, and steady-state mRNA analysis. Type I collagen mRNA was accurately initiated by HeLa cell RNQA polymerase II in nuclear extracts, and run-on analysis indicated that mRNAs for collagen types {alpha}1(I), {alpha}2(I), {alpha}1(III), {alpha}1(IV), and {alpha}2(V) were synthesized in HeLa cells. However, on assessing the steady-state levels of mRNAs of collagen types {alpha}1(I), {alpha}2(I), {alpha}1(IV), and {alpha}2(V), no type I mRNA was found in HeLa cells while types {alpha}1(IV) and {alpha}2(V) collagen mRNAs were observed. These results suggest that a postinitiation process prevents the accumulation of type I collagen mRNAs in HeLa cells. Persistence of types IV and V collagen mRNAs is consistent with the involvement of types IV and V collagen in adhesion of HeLa cells to glass or plastic.

  17. Role of Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog in the transcription activation of type I collagen gene mediated by transforming growth factor beta

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Mi-Sun; Jeong, Kwang Won

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • FLII activates TGFβ-mediated expression of COL1A2 gene. • TGFβ induces the association of FLII with SMAD3 and BRG1 in A549 cells. • FLII is required for the recruitment of SWI/SNF complex and chromatin accessibility to COL1A2 promoter. - Abstract: Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII) is a nuclear receptor coactivator that is known to interact with other transcriptional regulators such as the SWI/SNF complex, an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, at the promoter or enhancer region of estrogen receptor (ER)-α target genes. However, little is known about the role of FLII during transcription initiation in the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)/SMAD-dependent signaling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that FLII functions as a coactivator in the expression of type I collagen gene induced by TGFβ in A549 cells. FLII activates the reporter gene driven by COL1A2 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. Co-expression of GRIP1, CARM1, or p300 did not show any synergistic activation of transcription. Furthermore, the level of COL1A2 expression correlated with the endogenous level of FLII mRNA level. Depletion of FLII resulted in a reduction of TGFβ-induced expression of COL1A2 gene. In contrast, over-expression of FLII caused an increase in the endogenous expression of COL1A2. We also showed that FLII is associated with Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1) as well as SMAD in A549 cells. Notably, the recruitment of BRG1 to the COL1A2 promoter region was decreased in FLII-depleted A549 cells, suggesting that FLII is required for TGFβ-induced chromatin remodeling, which is carried out by the SWI/SNF complex. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments revealed that depletion of FLII caused a reduction in chromatin accessibility at the COL1A2 promoter. These results suggest that FLII plays a critical role in TGFβ/SMAD-mediated transcription of the COL1A2 gene

  18. Recombinant expression of hydroxylated human collagen in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rutschmann, Christoph; Baumann, Stephan; Cabalzar, Jürg; Luther, Kelvin B; Hennet, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body and thereby a structural protein of considerable biotechnological interest. The complex maturation process of collagen, including essential post-translational modifications such as prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation, has precluded large-scale production of recombinant collagen featuring the biophysical properties of endogenous collagen. The characterization of new prolyl and lysyl hydroxylase genes encoded by the giant virus mimivirus reveals a method for production of hydroxylated collagen. The coexpression of a human collagen type III construct together with mimivirus prolyl and lysyl hydroxylases in Escherichia coli yielded up to 90 mg of hydroxylated collagen per liter culture. The respective levels of prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation reaching 25 % and 26 % were similar to the hydroxylation levels of native human collagen type III. The distribution of hydroxyproline and hydroxylysine along recombinant collagen was also similar to that of native collagen as determined by mass spectrometric analysis of tryptic peptides. The triple helix signature of recombinant hydroxylated collagen was confirmed by circular dichroism, which also showed that hydroxylation increased the thermal stability of the recombinant collagen construct. Recombinant hydroxylated collagen produced in E. coli supported the growth of human umbilical endothelial cells, underlining the biocompatibility of the recombinant protein as extracellular matrix. The high yield of recombinant protein expression and the extensive level of prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation achieved indicate that recombinant hydroxylated collagen can be produced at large scale for biomaterials engineering in the context of biomedical applications.

  19. Linkage mapping of the gene for Type III collagen (COL3A1) to human chromosome 2q using a VNTR polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Summar, M.L. )

    1994-03-15

    The gene for the [alpha]1(III) chain of type III collagen, COL3A1, has been previously mapped to human chromosome 2q24.3-q31 by in situ hybridization. Physical mapping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has demonstrated that COL3A1 lies within 35 kb of COL5A2. The authors genotyped the CEPH families at the COL3A2 locus using a pentanucleotide repeat polymorphism within intron 25. They demonstrated significant linkage to 18 anonymous markers as well as the gene for carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPSI), which had been previously mapped to this region. No recombination was seen between COL3A1 and COL5A2 (Z = 9.93 at [theta] = 0) or D2S24 (Z = 10.55 at [theta] = 0). The locus order is (D2S32-D2S138-D2S148)-(D2S24-COL5A2-COL3A1)-(D2S118-D2S161), with odds of 1:2300 for the next most likely order. These relationships are consistent with the physical mapping of COL3A1 to the distal portion of 2q and place it proximal to CPSI by means of multipoint analysis. These linkage relationships should prove useful in further studies of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV and carbamyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency and provide an additional framework for localizing other genes in this region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Designing Efficient Double RNA trans-Splicing Molecules for Targeted RNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hüttner, Clemens; Murauer, Eva M.; Hainzl, Stefan; Kocher, Thomas; Neumayer, Anna; Reichelt, Julia; Bauer, Johann W.; Koller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    RNA trans-splicing is a promising tool for mRNA modification in a diversity of genetic disorders. In particular, the substitution of internal exons of a gene by combining 3′ and 5′ RNA trans-splicing seems to be an elegant way to modify especially large pre-mRNAs. Here we discuss a robust method for designing double RNA trans-splicing molecules (dRTM). We demonstrate how the technique can be implemented in an endogenous setting, using COL7A1, the gene encoding type VII collagen, as a target. An RTM screening system was developed with the aim of testing the replacement of two internal COL7A1 exons, harbouring a homozygous mutation, with the wild-type version. The most efficient RTMs from a pool of randomly generated variants were selected via our fluorescence-based screening system and adapted for use in an in vitro disease model system. Transduction of type VII collagen-deficient keratinocytes with the selected dRTM led to accurate replacement of two internal COL7A1 exons resulting in a restored wild-type RNA sequence. This is the first study demonstrating specific exon replacement by double RNA trans-splicing within an endogenous transcript in cultured cells, corroborating the utility of this technology for mRNA repair in a variety of genetic disorders. PMID:27669223

  1. Effects of gangliosides from deer bone extract on the gene expressions of matrix metalloproteinases and collagen type II in interleukin-1β-induced osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Hyung Joo; Lee, Hyunji; Min, Byung Jung; Jung, Sung Ug

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES We investigated the anti-osteoarthritic effects of deer bone extract on the gene expressions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and collagen type II (COL2) in interleukin-1β-induced osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes. MATERIALS/METHODS Primary rabbit chondrocytes were treated as follows: CON (PBS treatment), NC (IL-1β treatment), PC (IL-1β + 100 µg/mL glucosamine sulphate/chondroitin sulphate mixture), and DB (IL-1β + 100 µg/mL deer bone extract). RESULTS The results of the cell viability assay indicated that deer bone extract at doses ranging from 100 to 500 µg/mL inhibits cell death in chondrocytes induced by IL-1β. Deer bone extract was able to significantly recover the mRNA expression of COL2 that was down-regulated by IL-1β (NC: 0.79 vs. DB: 0.87, P < 0.05) and significantly decrease the mRNA expression of MMP-3 (NC: 2.24 vs. DB: 1.75) and -13 (NC: 1.28 vs. DB: 0.89) in OA chondrocytes (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS We concluded that deer bone extract induces accumulation of COL2 through the down-regulation of MMPs in IL-1β-induced OA chondrocytes. Our results suggest that deer bone extract, which contains various components related to OA, including chondroitin sulphate, may possess anti-osteoarthritic properties and be of value in inhibiting the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:27909553

  2. Transcriptome analysis reveals an unexpected role of a collagen tyrosine kinase receptor gene, Ddr2, as a regulator of ovarian function.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hirokazu; Kano, Kiyoshi; Marín de Evsikova, Caralina; Young, James A; Nishina, Patsy M; Naggert, Jürgen K; Naito, Kunihiko

    2009-10-07

    Mice homozygous for the smallie (slie) mutation lack a collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), and are dwarfed and infertile due to peripheral dysregulation of the endocrine system of unknown etiology. We used a systems biology approach to identify biological networks affected by Ddr2(slie/slie) mutation in ovaries using microarray analysis and validate findings using molecular, cellular, and functional biological assays. Transcriptome analysis indicated several altered gene categories in Ddr2(slie/slie) mutants, including gonadal development, ovulation, antiapoptosis, and steroid hormones. Subsequent biological experiments confirmed the transcriptome analysis predictions. For instance, a significant increase of TUNEL-positive follicles was found in Ddr2(slie/slie) mutants vs. wild type, which confirm the transcriptome prediction for decreased chromatin maintenance and antiapoptosis. Decreases in gene expression were confirmed by RT-PCR and/or qPCR; luteinizing hormone receptor and prostaglandin type E and F receptors in Ddr2(slie/slie) mutants, compared with wild type, confirm hormonal signaling pathways involved in ovulation. Furthermore, deficiencies in immunohistochemistry for DDR2 and luteinizing hormone receptor in the somatic cells, but not the oocytes, of Ddr2(slie/slie) mutant ovaries suggest against an intrinsic defect in germ cells. Indeed, Ddr2(slie/slie) mutants ovulated significantly fewer oocytes; their oocytes were competent to complete meiosis and fertilization in vitro. Taken together, our convergent data signify DDR2 as a novel critical player in ovarian function, which acts upon classical endocrine pathways in somatic, rather than germline, cells.

  3. Engineering the periodontal ligament in hyaluronan-gelatin-type I collagen constructs: upregulation of apoptosis and alterations in gene expression by cyclic compressive strain.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, Aarthi; Sriram, Gopu; Vinoth, Jayasaleen Kumar; Cao, Tong; Meikle, Murray C

    2015-02-01

    To engineer constructs of the periodontal ligament (PDL), human PDL cells were incorporated into a matrix of hyaluronan, gelatin, and type I collagen (COLI) in sample holders (13×1 mm) of six-well Biopress culture plates. The loading dynamics of the PDL were mimicked by applying a cyclic compressive strain of 33.4 kPa (340.6 gm/cm(2)) to the constructs for 1.0 s every 60 s, for 6, 12, and 24 h in a Flexercell FX-4000C Strain Unit. Compression significantly increased the number of nonviable cells and increased the expression of several apoptosis-related genes, including initiator and executioner caspases. Of the 15 extracellular matrix genes screened, most were upregulated at some point after 6-12 h deformation, but all were downregulated at 24 h, except for MMPs1-3 and CTGF. In culture supernatants, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) protein levels were upregulated at 24 h; receptor activator of nuclear kappa factor B (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) were unchanged; and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) not detected. The low modulus of elasticity of the constructs was a disadvantage-future mechanobiology studies and tissue engineering applications will require constructs with much higher stiffness. Since the major structural protein of the PDL is COLI, a more rational approach would be to permeabilize preformed COLI scaffolds with PDL-populated matrices.

  4. Transcriptome analysis reveals an unexpected role of a collagen tyrosine kinase receptor gene, Ddr2, as a regulator of ovarian function

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Hirokazu; de Evsikova, Caralina Marín; Young, James A.; Nishina, Patsy M.; Naggert, Jürgen K.; Naito, Kunihiko

    2009-01-01

    Mice homozygous for the smallie (slie) mutation lack a collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), and are dwarfed and infertile due to peripheral dysregulation of the endocrine system of unknown etiology. We used a systems biology approach to identify biological networks affected by Ddr2slie/slie mutation in ovaries using microarray analysis and validate findings using molecular, cellular, and functional biological assays. Transcriptome analysis indicated several altered gene categories in Ddr2slie/slie mutants, including gonadal development, ovulation, antiapoptosis, and steroid hormones. Subsequent biological experiments confirmed the transcriptome analysis predictions. For instance, a significant increase of TUNEL-positive follicles was found in Ddr2slie/slie mutants vs. wild type, which confirm the transcriptome prediction for decreased chromatin maintenance and antiapoptosis. Decreases in gene expression were confirmed by RT-PCR and/or qPCR; luteinizing hormone receptor and prostaglandin type E and F receptors in Ddr2slie/slie mutants, compared with wild type, confirm hormonal signaling pathways involved in ovulation. Furthermore, deficiencies in immunohistochemistry for DDR2 and luteinizing hormone receptor in the somatic cells, but not the oocytes, of Ddr2slie/slie mutant ovaries suggest against an intrinsic defect in germ cells. Indeed, Ddr2slie/slie mutants ovulated significantly fewer oocytes; their oocytes were competent to complete meiosis and fertilization in vitro. Taken together, our convergent data signify DDR2 as a novel critical player in ovarian function, which acts upon classical endocrine pathways in somatic, rather than germline, cells. PMID:19671659

  5. Identification of a deep intronic mutation in the COL6A2 gene by a novel custom oligonucleotide CGH array designed to explore allelic and genetic heterogeneity in collagen VI-related myopathies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Molecular characterization of collagen-VI related myopathies currently relies on standard sequencing, which yields a detection rate approximating 75-79% in Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and 60-65% in Bethlem myopathy (BM) patients as PCR-based techniques tend to miss gross genomic rearrangements as well as copy number variations (CNVs) in both the coding sequence and intronic regions. Methods We have designed a custom oligonucleotide CGH array in order to investigate the presence of CNVs in the coding and non-coding regions of COL6A1, A2, A3, A5 and A6 genes and a group of genes functionally related to collagen VI. A cohort of 12 patients with UCMD/BM negative at sequencing analysis and 2 subjects carrying a single COL6 mutation whose clinical phenotype was not explicable by inheritance were selected and the occurrence of allelic and genetic heterogeneity explored. Results A deletion within intron 1A of the COL6A2 gene, occurring in compound heterozygosity with a small deletion in exon 28, previously detected by routine sequencing, was identified in a BM patient. RNA studies showed monoallelic transcription of the COL6A2 gene, thus elucidating the functional effect of the intronic deletion. No pathogenic mutations were identified in the remaining analyzed patients, either within COL6A genes, or in genes functionally related to collagen VI. Conclusions Our custom CGH array may represent a useful complementary diagnostic tool, especially in recessive forms of the disease, when only one mutant allele is detected by standard sequencing. The intronic deletion we identified represents the first example of a pure intronic mutation in COL6A genes. PMID:20302629

  6. Collagen-mediated hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Manon-Jensen, T; Kjeld, N G; Karsdal, M A

    2016-03-01

    Collagens mediate essential hemostasis by maintaining the integrity and stability of the vascular wall. Imbalanced turnover of collagens by uncontrolled formation and/or degradation may result in pathologic conditions such as fibrosis. Thickening of the vessel wall because of accumulation of collagens may lead to arterial occlusion or thrombosis. Thinning of the wall because of collagen degradation or deficiency may lead to rupture of the vessel wall or aneurysm. Preventing excessive hemorrhage or thrombosis relies on collagen-mediated actions. Von Willebrand factor, integrins and glycoprotein VI, as well as clotting factors, can bind collagen to restore normal hemostasis after trauma. This review outlines the essential roles of collagens in mediating hemostasis, with a focus on collagens types I, III, IV, VI, XV, and XVIII.

  7. Biomedical applications of collagens.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, John A M

    2016-05-01

    Collagen-based biomedical materials have developed into important, clinically effective materials used in a range of devices that have gained wide acceptance. These devices come with collagen in various formats, including those based on stabilized natural tissues, those that are based on extracted and purified collagens, and designed composite, biosynthetic materials. Further knowledge on the structure and function of collagens has led to on-going developments and improvements. Among these developments has been the production of recombinant collagen materials that are well defined and are disease free. Most recently, a group of bacterial, non-animal collagens has emerged that may provide an excellent, novel source of collagen for use in biomaterials and other applications. These newer collagens are discussed in detail. They can be modified to direct their function, and they can be fabricated into various formats, including films and sponges, while solutions can also be adapted for use in surface coating technologies.

  8. A base substitution in the exon of a collagen gene causes alternative splicing and generates a structurally abnormal polypeptide in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VII.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, D; D'Alessio, M; Ramirez, F; de Wet, W; Cole, W G; Chan, D; Bateman, J F

    1989-01-01

    An unusual splicing mutation has been characterized in the pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene of a sporadic case of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type VII. Cloning of primer extended cDNA in conjunction with R-looping experiments established that nearly half of the pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene transcripts are abnormally spliced, for they lack exon 6 sequences. Analysis of cloned genomic fragments revealed that one of the proband's alleles displays the substitution of an A for a G in the last nucleotide of exon 6. The change converts the normal Met (ATG) codon to Ile (ATA) and, in addition, obliterates a NcoI restriction site. The latter event was exploited to demonstrate the de novo nature of the mutation since DNA from the unaffected parents was fully digested with the enzyme, after in vitro amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Further confirmation of the missplicing was obtained by transient expression into animal cells of allelic minigene constructs. Finally, Western blot analysis of cyanogen bromide cleaved collagen and nucleotide sequencing of appropriately selected cDNA clones demonstrated the production of relatively low amounts of correctly spliced molecules harboring the Ile substitution, as well. Images PMID:2767050

  9. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  10. Collagen and gelatin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dasong; Nikoo, Mehdi; Boran, Gökhan; Zhou, Peng; Regenstein, Joe M

    2015-01-01

    Collagen and gelatin have been widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries due to their excellent biocompatibility, easy biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. Fish collagen and gelatin are of renewed interest, owing to the safety and religious concerns of their mammalian counterparts. The structure of collagen has been studied using various modern technologies, and interpretation of the raw data should be done with caution. The structure of collagen may vary with sources and seasons, which may affect its applications and optimal extraction conditions. Numerous studies have investigated the bioactivities and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and their hydrolysis peptides, using both in vitro and in vivo assay models. In addition to their established nutritional value as a protein source, collagen and collagen-derived products may exert various potential biological activities on cells in the extracellular matrix through the corresponding food-derived peptides after ingestion, and this might justify their applications in dietary supplements and pharmaceutical preparations. Moreover, an increasing number of novel applications have been found for collagen and gelatin. Therefore, this review covers the current understanding of the structure, bioactivities, and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and gelatin hydrolysates as well as their most recent applications.

  11. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Dyn. 237, 2607−2621. (3) von der Mark, H., von der Mark, K., and Gay , S. (1976) Study of differential collagen synthesis during development of the...GFP encoding plasmid DNA through electrostatic interactions and enhance gene transfection (adapted from Ref. [52]). www.sciencedirect.com Current

  12. Identification of a Collagen Type I Adhesin of Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Bruna P. G. V.; Weber, Brandon W.; Rafudeen, Mohamed S.; Ferreira, Eliane O.; Patrick, Sheila; Abratt, Valerie R.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is an opportunistic pathogen which can cause life threatening infections in humans and animals. The ability to adhere to components of the extracellular matrix, including collagen, is related to bacterial host colonisation. Collagen Far Western analysis of the B. fragilis outer membrane protein (OMP) fraction revealed the presence two collagen adhesin bands of ∼31 and ∼34 kDa. The collagen adhesins in the OMP fraction were separated and isolated by two-dimensional SDS-PAGE and also purified by collagen affinity chromatography. The collagen binding proteins isolated by both these independent methods were subjected to tandem mass spectroscopy for peptide identification and matched to a single hypothetical protein encoded by B. fragilis NCTC 9343 (BF0586), conserved in YCH46 (BF0662) and 638R (BF0633) and which is designated in this study as cbp1 (collagen binding protein). Functionality of the protein was confirmed by targeted insertional mutagenesis of the cbp1 gene in B. fragilis GSH18 which resulted in the specific loss of both the ∼31 kDa and the ∼34 kDa adhesin bands. Purified his-tagged Cbp1, expressed in a B. fragilis wild-type and a glycosylation deficient mutant, confirmed that the cbp1 gene encoded the observed collagen adhesin, and showed that the 34 kDa band represents a glycosylated version of the ∼31 kDa protein. Glycosylation did not appear to be required for binding collagen. This study is the first to report the presence of collagen type I adhesin proteins in B. fragilis and to functionally identify a gene encoding a collagen binding protein. PMID:24618940

  13. Isolation of cDNA and genomic DNA clones encoding type II collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Young, M F; Vogeli, G; Nunez, A M; Fernandez, M P; Sullivan, M; Sobel, M E

    1984-01-01

    A cDNA library constructed from total chick embryo RNA was screened with an enriched fraction of type II collagen mRNA. Two overlapping cDNA clones were characterized and shown to encode the COOH propeptide of type II collagen. In addition, a type II collagen clone was isolated from a Charon 4A library of chick genomic fragments. Definitive identification of the clones was based on DNA sequence analysis. The 3' end of the type II collagen gene appears to be similar to that of other interstitial collagen genes. Northern hybridization data indicates that there is a marked decrease in type II collagen mRNA levels in chondrocytes treated with the dedifferentiating agent 5-bromodeoxyuridine. The major type II collagen mRNA species is 5300 bases long, similar to that of other interstitial collagen RNAs. Images PMID:6203098

  14. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... developed these disorders were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names ... be used. These include as undifferentiated systemic rheumatic (connective tissue) diseases or overlap syndromes. Images Dermatomyositis, heliotrope eyelids ...

  15. Nanomechanics of collagen microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Vesentini, Simone; Redaelli, Alberto; Gautieri, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Summary Collagen constitutes one third of the human proteome, providing mechanical stability, elasticity and strength to organisms and is thus the prime construction material in biology. Collagen is also the dominating material in the extracellular matrix where its stiffness controls cell differentiation, growth and pathology. We use atomistic-based hierarchical multiscale modeling to describe this complex biological material from the bottom up. This includes the use and development of large-scale computational modeling tools to investigate several aspects related to collagen-based tissues, including source of visco-elasticity and deformation mechanisms at the nanoscale level. The key innovation of this research is that until now, collagen materials have primarily been described at macroscopic scales, without explicitly understanding the mechanical contributions at the molecular and fibrillar levels. The major impact of this research will be the development of fundamental models of collagenous tissues, important to the design of new scaffolding biomaterials for regenerative medicine as well as for the understanding of collagen-related diseases. PMID:23885342

  16. Localization of type II collagen, long form alpha 1(IX) collagen, and short form alpha 1(IX) collagen transcripts in the developing chick notochord and axial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Swiderski, R E; Solursh, M

    1992-06-01

    In this study we compare, by in situ hybridization, the spatial and temporal expression patterns of transcripts of avian type II collagen and the long and short forms of the (alpha 1) chain of type IX collagen during the development of the notochord and axial skeleton. We observed type II collagen and short form type IX collagen transcripts in the developing (stage 25-28) nonchondrogenic notochord. Conversely, long form type IX transcripts were not detectable in the notochord or perinotochordal sheath. Interestingly, all three transcripts colocalized in the developing chondrogenic vertebrae of the axial skeleton as well as in the chondrocranium and Meckel's cartilage. The expression of the short form of type IX collagen in these regions was more restricted than that of the long form. This report provides additional support for a complex regulatory pathway of cartilage marker gene expression in chondrogenic vs. nonchondrogenic tissues during avian embryogenesis.

  17. Use of a new rat chondrosarcoma cell line to delineate a 119-base pair chondrocyte-specific enhancer element and to define active promoter segments in the mouse pro-alpha 1(II) collagen gene.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, K; Lefebvre, V; Zhou, G; Garofalo, S; Kimura, J H; de Crombrugghe, B

    1995-11-17

    We show that a new rat chondrosarcoma (RCS) cell line established in long-term culture from the Swarm tumor displayed a stable differentiated chondrocyte-like phenotype. Indeed, these cells produced the collagen types II, IX, and XI and alcian blue-stainable cartilage-specific proteoglycans, but no type I or type III collagen. To functionally characterize their chondrocytic nature, the cells were stably transfected with a type II collagen/beta geo chimeric gene which confers essentially perfect chondrocyte-specific expression in transgenic mice. RCS cells expressed both beta-galactosidase and G418 resistance, in comparison with similarly transfected 10T1/2 and NIH/3T3 fibroblasts which did not. These cells were then used to perform a systematic deletion analysis of the first intron of the mouse type II collagen gene (Col2a1) using transient expression experiments to determine which segments stimulated expression of a luciferase reporter gene in RCS cells but not in 10T1/2 fibroblasts. Cloning of two tandem copies of a 156-base pair (bp) intron 1 fragment (+2188 to +2343) in a construction containing a 314-bp Col2a1 promoter caused an almost 200-fold increase in promoter activity in RCS cells but no increase in 10T1/2 cells. DNase I footprint analysis over this 156-bp fragment revealed two adjacent protected regions, FP1 and FP2, located in the 3'-half of this segment, but no differences were seen with nuclear extracts of RCS cells and 10T1/2 fibroblasts. Deletion of FP2 to leave a 119-bp segment decreased enhancer activity by severalfold, but RCS cell specificity was maintained. Further deletions indicated that sequences both in the 5' part of the 119-bp fragment and in FP1 were needed simultaneously for RCS cell-specific enhancer activity. A series of deletions in the promoter region of the mouse Col2a1 gene progressively reduced activity when these promoters were tested by themselves in transient expression experiments. However, these promoter deletions were all

  18. Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2), an osteoarthritis-associated gene, enhances proliferation and type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Kazumasa; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Yamaga, Mika; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Abula, Kahaer; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. ► To examine the molecular functions of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in chondrocytic ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 enhanced proliferation and colony formation in ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 increased type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells treated with chondrogenic medium. -- Abstract: Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2/CHI3L2) is a secreted 39 kDa protein produced by articular chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Recent studies showed that hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes suggesting the involvement of hYKL-39 in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However little is known regarding the molecular function of hYKL-39 in joint homeostasis. Sequence analyses indicated that hYKL-39 has significant identity with the human chitotorisidase family molecules, although it is considered that hYKL-39 has no enzymatic activity since it lacks putative chitinase catalytic motif. In this study, to examine the molecular function of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in ATDC5 cells. Here we report that hYKL-39 enhances colony forming activity, cell proliferation, and type II collagen expression in these cells. These data suggest that hYKL-39 is a novel growth and differentiation factor involved in cartilage homeostasis.

  19. The Sp1 binding site polymorphism in the collagen type I alpha 1 (COLIA1) gene is not associated with bone mineral density in healthy children, adolescents, and young adults.

    PubMed

    Berg, J P; Lehmann, E H; Stakkestad, J A; Haug, E; Halse, J

    2000-08-01

    Up to 85% of the variance in bone mineral density (BMD) is genetically determined. A putative candidate gene involved in the regulation of bone mass is the COLIA1 gene encoding type I collagen, which is the major protein of bone. We examined possible allelic influences of a G to T COLIA1 gene polymorphism in a recognition site for the transcription factor Sp1 on: (i) gain of forearm BMD using single photon absorptiometry (SPA); and (ii), BMD of the forearm, spine, hip, and whole body with dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). At baseline, 269 healthy boys and girls aged 8.2-16.5 years were eligible for the study. Forearm BMD measurements obtained at baseline and after 3.8+/-0.1 years (+/-s.d.) were used to calculate the annual percentage change in BMD. Calcium intake and physical activity were determined by a detailed questionnaire at baseline and after 1 year. Essentially no significant differences in forearm BMD gain or in BMD assessed at the forearm, spine, and whole body were observed among the three COLIA1 genotypes. In conclusion, the data indicate that the polymorphism at the Sp1 site in the COLIA1 gene is not associated with BMD or gain of forearm BMD in healthy boys and girls.

  20. Development of multifunctional collagen scaffolds directed by collagen mimetic peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Lan (Allen)

    Collagen is widely used for soft tissue replacement and tissue engineering scaffold. Functionalized collagen may offer new and improved applications for collagen-based biomaterials. But passively adsorbed molecules readily diffuse out from collagen matrix, and conventional chemical reactions on collagen are difficult to control and may compromise the biochemical feature of natural collagen. Hence, the aim of this dissertation is to develop a new physical collagen modification method through the non-covalent immobilization of collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs) and CMP derivatives on collagen scaffolds, thereby evading the drawbacks of passive and chemical modifications. Most of the research on CMPs over the past three decades has focused on synthesizing CMPs and understanding the effects of amino acid sequence on the peptide structural stability. Although few attempts have been made to develop biomaterials based on pure CMP, CMP has never used in complex with natural collagen. We demonstrate that CMPs with varying chain lengths have strong propensity to associate with natural 2-D and 3-D collagen substrates. We also show that CMPs can recognize and bind to reconstituted type I collagen fibers as well as collagens of ex vivo human liver tissue. The practical use of CMPs conjugated with linear and multi-arm poly(ethylene glycol)s allows to control cell organization in 2-D collagen substrates. Our cell adhesion studies suggest that under certain conditions (e.g. high incubation temperature, small CMP size), the bound CMP derivatives can be released from the collagen matrix, which may provide new opportunities for manipulating cell behavior especially by dynamically controlling the amount of signaling molecules in the collagen matrix. Polyanionic charged CMP was synthesized to modulate tubulogenesis of endothelial cells by attracting VEGF with 3-D collagen gel and a new PEG hydrogel using bifunctional CMP conjugates was synthesized as physico-chemical crosslinkers for

  1. Collagen fibrils: nanoscale ropes.

    PubMed

    Bozec, Laurent; van der Heijden, Gert; Horton, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibrils from staggered repeats of individual molecules has become "accepted" wisdom. However, for over thirty years now, such a model has failed to resolve several structural and functional questions. In a novel approach, it was found, using atomic force microscopy, that tendon collagen fibrils are composed of subcomponents in a spiral disposition-that is, their structure is similar to that of macroscale ropes. Consequently, this arrangement was modeled and confirmed using elastic rod theory. This work provides new insight into collagen fibril structure and will have wide application-from the design of scaffolds for tissue engineering and a better understanding of pathogenesis of diseases of bone and tendon, to the conservation of irreplaceable parchment-based museum exhibits.

  2. An RNA-splicing mutation (G{sup +51VS20}) in the Type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Weis, M.A.; Eyre, D.R.; Gruber, H.E.; Rimoin, D.L.; Cohn, D.H. |

    1995-02-01

    Defects in type II collagen have been demonstrated in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that includes achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We have determined that cartilage from a terminated fetus with an inherited form of SEDC contained both normal {alpha}1(II) collagen chains and chains that lacked amino acids 256-273 of the triple-helical domain. PCR amplification of this region of COL2A1, from genomic DNA, yielded products of normal size, while amplification of cDNA yielded a normal sized species and a shorter fragment missing exon 20. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from the fetus revealed a G{yields}T transversion at position +5 of intron 20; the affected father was also heterozygous for the mutation. Allele-specific PCR and heteroduplex analysis of a VNTR in COL2A1 independently confirmed the unaffected status of a fetus in a subsequent pregnancy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the mutation prevents normal splicing of exon 20 by interfering with binding of U{sub 1} small-nuclear RNA to pre-mRNA, thus leading to skipping of exon 20 in transcripts from the mutant allele. Electron micrographs of diseased cartilage showed intracellular inclusion bodies, which were stained by an antibody to {alpha}1(II) procollagen. Our findings support the hypothesis that {alpha}-chain length alterations that preserve the Gly-X-Y repeat motif of the triple helix result in partial intracellular retention of {alpha}1(II) procollagen and produce mild to moderate chondrodysplasia phenotypes. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Enhanced hepatic uptake and bioactivity of type alpha1(I) collagen gene promoter-specific triplex-forming oligonucleotides after conjugation with cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kun; Ye, Zhaoyang; Guntaka, Ramareddy V; Mahato, Ram I

    2006-05-01

    A triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) specific for type alpha1(I) collagen promoter is a promising candidate for treating liver fibrosis. Earlier, we determined the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of TFO after systemic administration into normal and fibrotic rats. In this study, we conjugated cholesterol to the 3' end of the TFO via a disulfide bond and determined its cellular and nuclear uptake and bioactivity using HSC-T6 cell lines in vitro, followed by biodistribution at whole-body, organ (liver), and subcellular levels. Conjugation with cholesterol had little effect on the triplex-forming ability of the TFO with target duplex DNA, and the cellular uptake of (33)P-TFO-cholesterol (Chol) increased by 2- to approximately 4-fold. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis after transfection of HSC-T6 cells with TFO-Chol or TFO indicated that TFO-Chol had higher inhibition on type alpha1(I) collagen primary transcript than naked TFO at low concentration (200 nM) but showed similar inhibition at higher concentration (500 and 1000 nM). There was increase in the inhibition on primary transcript with transfection time. The hepatic uptake of (33)P-TFO-Chol after systemic administration was 72.22% of the dose compared with 45.8% of (33)P-TFO. There was significant increase in the uptake of (33)P-TFO-Chol by hepatic stellate cells and hepatocytes. More importantly, the nuclear uptake of TFO-Chol was higher than TFO in cell culture system and in vivo studies. In conclusion, TFO-Chol is a potential antifibrotic agent.

  4. Collagen Prolyl Hydroxylases are Essential for Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gilkes, Daniele M.; Chaturvedi, Pallavi; Bajpai, Saumendra; Wong, Carmen Chak-Lui; Wei, Hong; Pitcairn, Stephen; Hubbi, Maimon E.; Wirtz, Denis; Semenza, Gregg L.

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death among patients with breast cancer. Understanding the role of the extracellular matrix in the metastatic process may lead to the development of improved therapies for cancer patients. Intratumoral hypoxia is found in the majority of breast cancers and is associated with an increased risk of metastasis and patient mortality. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia-inducible factor 1 activates the transcription of genes encoding collagen prolyl hydroxylases that are critical for collagen deposition by breast cancer cells. We show that expression of collagen prolyl hydroxylases promotes cancer cell alignment along collagen fibers, resulting in enhanced invasion and metastasis to lymph nodes and lungs. Lastly, we establish the prognostic significance of collagen prolyl hydroxylase mRNA expression in human breast cancer biopsies, and demonstrate that ethyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, decreases tumor fibrosis and metastasis in a mouse model of breast cancer. PMID:23539444

  5. Collagen in organ development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    It is important to know whether microgravity will adversely affect developmental processes. Collagens are macromolecular structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which may be altered by perturbations in gravity. Interstitial collagens have been shown to be necessary for normal growth and morphogenesis in some embryonic organs, and in the mouse salivary gland, the biosynthetic pattern of these molecules changes during development. Determination of the effects of microgravity on epithelial organ development must be preceded by crucial ground-based studies. These will define control of normal synthesis, secretion, and deposition of ECM macromolecules and the relationship of these processes to morphogenesis.

  6. Structure and function of collagen types

    SciTech Connect

    Mayne, R.; Burgeson, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Classical Collagens: Types I, II, and III; Type IV Collagen; Type IX Collagen; and Analysis of Collagen Structure by Molecular Biology Techniques.

  7. [The genetics of collagen diseases].

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J; Maroteaux, P; Frezal, J

    1986-01-01

    Heritable disorders of collagen include Ehler-Danlos syndromes (11 types are actually known), Larsen syndrome and osteogenesis imperfecta. Their clinical, genetic and biochemical features are reviewed. Marfan syndrome is closely related to heritable disorders of collagen.

  8. Genetically corrected iPSCs as cell therapy for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Daniel; Bayerl, Jonathan; Nyström, Alexander; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Meixner, Arabella; Penninger, Josef M

    2014-11-26

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding type VII collagen, resulting in fragile skin and mucous membranes that blister easily in response to mechanical stress. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) carry the potential to fundamentally change cell-based therapies for human diseases, in particular for RDEB, for which no effective treatments are available. To provide proof of principle on the applicability of iPSCs for the treatment of RDEB, we developed iPSCs from type VII collagen (Col7a1) mutant mice that exhibited skin fragility and blistering resembling human RDEB. Genetically repaired iPSCs could be differentiated into functional fibroblasts that reexpressed and secreted type VII collagen. Corrected iPSC-derived fibroblasts did not form tumors in vivo and could be traced up to 16 weeks after intradermal injection. Moreover, iPSC-based cell therapy resulted in faithful and long-term restoration of type VII collagen deposition at the epidermal-dermal junction of Col7a1 mutant mice. Intradermal injection of genetically repaired iPSC-derived fibroblasts restored the mechanical resistance to skin blistering in mice with RDEB, suggesting that RDEB skin could be effectively and safely repaired using iPSC-based cell therapy.

  9. Human recombinant type I collagen produced in plants.

    PubMed

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2013-07-01

    As a central element of the extracellular matrix, collagen is intimately involved in tissue development, remodeling, and repair and confers high tensile strength to tissues. Numerous medical applications, particularly, wound healing, cell therapy, bone reconstruction, and cosmetic technologies, rely on its supportive and healing qualities. Its synthesis and assembly require a multitude of genes and post-translational modifications, where even minor deviations can be deleterious or even fatal. Historically, collagen was always extracted from animal and human cadaver sources, but bare risk of contamination and allergenicity and was subjected to harsh purification conditions resulting in irreversible modifications impeding its biofunctionality. In parallel, the highly complex and stringent post-translational processing of collagen, prerequisite of its viability and proper functioning, sets significant limitations on recombinant expression systems. A tobacco plant expression platform has been recruited to effectively express human collagen, along with three modifying enzymes, critical to collagen maturation. The plant extracted recombinant human collagen type I forms thermally stable helical structures, fibrillates, and demonstrates bioactivity resembling that of native collagen. Deployment of the highly versatile plant-based biofactory can be leveraged toward mass, rapid, and low-cost production of a wide variety of recombinant proteins. As in the case of collagen, proper planning can bypass plant-related limitations, to yield products structurally and functionally identical to their native counterparts.

  10. Pyridinium cross-links in heritable disorders of collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquali, M.; Still, M.J.; Dembure, P.P.

    1995-12-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of collagen that is characterized by skin fragility, skin hyperextensibility, and joint hypermobility. EDS type VI is caused by impaired collagen lysyl hydroxylase (procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase; E.C.1.14.11.4), the ascorbate-dependent enzyme that hydroxylates lysyl residues on collagen neopeptides. Different alterations in the gene for collagen lysyl hydroxylase have been reported in families with EDS type VI. In EDS type VI, impairment of collagen lysyl hydroxylase results in a low hydroxylysine content in mature collagen. Hydroxylysine is a precursor of the stable, covalent, intermolecular cross-links of collagen, pyridinoline (Pyr), and deoxypyridinoline (Dpyr). Elsewhere we reported in preliminary form that patients with EDS type VI had a distinctive alteration in the urinary excretion of Pyr and Dpyr. In the present study, we confirm that the increased Dpyr/Pyr ratio is specific for EDS type VI and is not observed in other inherited or acquired collagen disorders. In addition, we find that skin from patients with EDS type VI has reduced Pyr and increased Dpyr, which could account for the organ pathology. 19 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Collagen hydrolysate based collagen/hydroxyapatite composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficai, Anton; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Birsan, Mihaela; Sonmez, Maria; Ficai, Denisa; Trandafir, Viorica; Andronescu, Ecaterina

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to study the influence of collagen hydrolysate (HAS) on the formation of ternary collagen-hydrolysate/hydroxyapatite composite materials (COLL-HAS/HA). During the precipitation process of HA, a large amount of brushite is resulted at pH = 7 but, practically pure HA is obtained at pH ⩾ 8. The FTIR data reveal the duplication of the most important collagen absorption bands due to the presence of the collagen hydrolysate. The presence of collagen hydrolysate is beneficial for the management of bone and joint disorders such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis.

  12. Regulation of immune reactivity to collagen in human beings

    SciTech Connect

    Solinger, A.M.; Stobo, J.D.

    1981-08-01

    Denaturated beef collagen was tested for its ability to induce the production of leukocyte inhibition factor among the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal individuals. Responsiveness, defined as the production of leukocyte inhibition factor sufficient to cause greater than 20% inhibition of leukocyte migration, was significantly (P less than 0.001, X2 . 31.1) associated with HLA-DR4. All HLA-DR4 positive individuals, including subjects without any evidence of synovitis, were collagen responders. There was no significant (P . 0.3) difference in the absolute reactivity of HLA-DR4+ versus HLA-DR4- individuals to respond to another antigen, Candida albicans. Collagen reactivity required interactions between macrophages and T cells and was directed against determinants inherent in the linear polypeptide, (Gly-Pro)n. In 5 normal HLA-DR4- nonresponders tested, absence of discernable reactivity to collagen was associated with the presence of antigen-specific, radiosensitive suppressive T cells. These studies suggest that during the physiologic metabolism of collagen all individuals are exposed to Gly-Pro determinants normally buried in the interstices of the collagen triple helix. In individuals whose major histocompatibility complex contains genes linked to those coding for HLA-DR4, this results in the activation of reactive T cells. Conversely, in individuals lacking these genes, collagen-specific suppressive cells predominate.

  13. A COL2A1 mutation in achondrogenesis type II results in the replacement of type II collagen by type I and III collagens in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chan, D; Cole, W G; Chow, C W; Mundlos, S; Bateman, J F

    1995-01-27

    An autosomal dominant mutation in the COL2A1 gene was identified in a fetus with achondrogenesis type II. A transition of G2853 to A in exon 41 produced a substitution of Gly769 by Ser within the triple helical domain of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II collagen, interrupting the mandatory Gly-X-Y triplet sequence required for the normal formation of stable triple helical type II collagen molecules, resulting in the complete absence of type II collagen in the cartilage, which had a gelatinous composition. Type I and III collagens were the major species found in cartilage tissue and synthesized by cultured chondrocytes along with cartilage type XI collagen. However, cultured chondrocytes produced a trace amount of type II collagen, which was retained within the cells and not secreted. In situ hybridization of cartilage sections showed that the chondrocytes produced both type II and type I collagen mRNA. As a result, it is likely that the chondrocytes produced type II collagen molecules, which were then degraded. The close proximity of the Gly769 substitution by Ser to the mammalian collagenase cleavage site at Gly775-Leu776 may have produced an unstable domain that was highly susceptible to proteolysis. The type I and III collagens that replaced type II collagen were unable to maintain the normal structure of the hyaline cartilage but did support chondrocyte maturation, evidenced by the expression of type X collagen in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate cartilage.

  14. Structure-mechanics relationships of collagen fibrils in the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, O G; Chang, S W; Vanleene, M; Howarth, P H; Davies, D E; Shefelbine, S J; Buehler, M J; Thurner, P J

    2015-10-06

    The collagen molecule, which is the building block of collagen fibrils, is a triple helix of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. However, in the severe mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OIM), deletion of the COL1A2 gene results in the substitution of the α2(I) chain by one α1(I) chain. As this substitution severely impairs the structure and mechanics of collagen-rich tissues at the tissue and organ level, the main aim of this study was to investigate how the structure and mechanics are altered in OIM collagen fibrils. Comparing results from atomic force microscopy imaging and cantilever-based nanoindentation on collagen fibrils from OIM and wild-type (WT) animals, we found a 33% lower indentation modulus in OIM when air-dried (bound water present) and an almost fivefold higher indentation modulus in OIM collagen fibrils when fully hydrated (bound and unbound water present) in phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) compared with WT collagen fibrils. These mechanical changes were accompanied by an impaired swelling upon hydration within PBS. Our experimental and atomistic simulation results show how the structure and mechanics are altered at the individual collagen fibril level as a result of collagen gene mutation in OIM. We envisage that the combination of experimental and modelling approaches could allow mechanical phenotyping at the collagen fibril level of virtually any alteration of collagen structure or chemistry.

  15. Collagen XII Contributes to Epicardial and Connective Tissues in the Zebrafish Heart during Ontogenesis and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Marro, Jan; Pfefferli, Catherine; de Preux Charles, Anne-Sophie; Bise, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish heart regeneration depends on cardiac cell proliferation, epicardium activation and transient reparative tissue deposition. The contribution and the regulation of specific collagen types during the regenerative process, however, remain poorly characterized. Here, we identified that the non-fibrillar type XII collagen, which serves as a matrix-bridging component, is expressed in the epicardium of the zebrafish heart, and is boosted after cryoinjury-induced ventricular damage. During heart regeneration, an intense deposition of Collagen XII covers the outer epicardial cap and the interstitial reparative tissue. Analysis of the activated epicardium and fibroblast markers revealed a heterogeneous cellular origin of Collagen XII. Interestingly, this matrix-bridging collagen co-localized with fibrillar type I collagen and several glycoproteins in the post-injury zone, suggesting its role in tissue cohesion. Using SB431542, a selective inhibitor of the TGF-β receptor, we showed that while the inhibitor treatment did not affect the expression of collagen 12 and collagen 1a2 in the epicardium, it completely suppressed the induction of both genes in the fibrotic tissue. This suggests that distinct mechanisms might regulate collagen expression in the outer heart layer and the inner injury zone. On the basis of this study, we postulate that the TGF-β signaling pathway induces and coordinates formation of a transient collagenous network that comprises fibril-forming Collagen I and fiber-associated Collagen XII, both of which contribute to the reparative matrix of the regenerating zebrafish heart. PMID:27783651

  16. Three reasons protein disorder analysis makes more sense in the light of collagen.

    PubMed

    Smithers, Ben; Oates, Matt E; Tompa, Peter; Gough, Julian

    2016-05-01

    We have identified that the collagen helix has the potential to be disruptive to analyses of intrinsically disordered proteins. The collagen helix is an extended fibrous structure that is both promiscuous and repetitive. Whilst its sequence is predicted to be disordered, this type of protein structure is not typically considered as intrinsic disorder. Here, we show that collagen-encoding proteins skew the distribution of exon lengths in genes. We find that previous results, demonstrating that exons encoding disordered regions are more likely to be symmetric, are due to the abundance of the collagen helix. Other related results, showing increased levels of alternative splicing in disorder-encoding exons, still hold after considering collagen-containing proteins. Aside from analyses of exons, we find that the set of proteins that contain collagen significantly alters the amino acid composition of regions predicted as disordered. We conclude that research in this area should be conducted in the light of the collagen helix.

  17. Titanium surface topography affects collagen biosynthesis of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Daniela B S; Miguez, Patrícia A; Mendonça, Gustavo; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Aragão, Francisco J L; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2011-09-01

    Collagen-dependent microstructure and physicochemical properties of newly formed bone around implant surfaces represent key determinants of implant biomechanics. This study investigated the effects of implant surface topography on collagen biosynthesis of adherent human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). hMSCs were grown for 0 to 42 days on titanium disks (20.0 × 1.0 mm) with smooth or rough surfaces. Cell attachment and spreading were evaluated by incubating cells with Texas-Red-conjugated phalloidin antibody. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the mRNA levels of Col1α1 and collagen modifying genes including prolyl hydroxylases (PHs), lysyl oxidases (LOXs) and lysyl hydroxylases (LHs). Osteogenesis was assessed at the level of osteoblast specific gene expression and alizarin red staining for mineralization. Cell layer-associated matrix and collagen content were determined by amino acid analysis. At 4h, 100% cells were flattened on both surfaces, however the cells on smooth surface had a fibroblast-like shape, while cells on rough surface lacked any defined long axis. PH, LH, and most LOX mRNA levels were greater in hMSCs grown on rough surfaces for 3 days. The mineralized area was greater for rough surface at 28 and 42 days. The collagen content (percent total protein) was also greater at rough surface compared to smooth surface at 28 (36% versus 26%) and 42 days (46% versus 29%), respectively (p<.05). In a cell culture model, rough surface topography positively modulates collagen biosynthesis and accumulation and the expression of genes associated with collagen cross-linking in adherent hMSC. The altered biosynthesis of the collagen-rich ECM adjacent to endosseous implants may influence the biomechanical properties of osseointegrated endosseous implants.

  18. UV damage of collagen: insights from model collagen peptides.

    PubMed

    Jariashvili, Ketevan; Madhan, Balaraman; Brodsky, Barbara; Kuchava, Ana; Namicheishvili, Louisa; Metreveli, Nunu

    2012-03-01

    Fibrils of Type I collagen in the skin are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light and there have been claims that collagen photo-degradation leads to wrinkles and may contribute to skin cancers. To understand the effects of UV radiation on collagen, Type I collagen solutions were exposed to the UV-C wavelength of 254 nm for defined lengths of time at 4°C. Circular dichroism (CD) experiments show that irradiation of collagen leads to high loss of triple helical content with a new lower thermal stability peak and SDS-gel electrophoresis indicates breakdown of collagen chains. To better define the effects of UV radiation on the collagen triple-helix, the studies were extended to peptides which model the collagen sequence and conformation. CD studies showed irradiation for days led to lower magnitudes of the triple-helix maximum at 225 nm and lower thermal stabilities for two peptides containing multiple Gly-Pro-Hyp triplets. In contrast, the highest radiation exposure led to little change in the T(m) values of (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10) and (Ala-Hyp-Gly)(10) , although (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10) did show a significant decrease in triple helix intensity. Mass spectroscopy indicated preferential cleavage sites within the peptides, and identification of some of the most susceptible sites of cleavage. The effect of radiation on these well defined peptides gives insight into the sequence and conformational specificity of photo-degradation of collagen.

  19. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type VI collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.

    1988-05-01

    Normal adult rabbit corneas were digested with 5% pepsin and their collagens extracted with acetic acid. Collagen extracts were fractionated by differential salt precipitation. The 2.5 M NaCl fraction was then redissolved with tris buffer and precipitated with sodium acetate. The precipitate contained a high-molecular-weight disulfide-bonded aggregate which, upon reduction with mercaptoethanol, was converted into three distinct polypeptides having molecular weights between 45 and 66 Kd. These physical characteristics, together with the susceptibility of these polypeptides to collagenase and their amino acid composition, identified the high molecular weight aggregate as type VI collagen. Corneas from neonate rabbits and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were organ cultured in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine to incorporate radiolabel into collagen. Tissues were digested with 0.02% pepsin and their collagens extracted with formic acid. The total radioactivity of the extracts and tissue residues was determined before the collagens were separated by SDS-polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis. Radioactive collagen polypeptides bands were then stained with Coomassie blue, processed for fluorography, and analyzed by densitometry. The results show that: (1) type VI collagen is synthesized by neonate corneas and healing adult corneas; (2) it is not readily solubilized from either corneal tissue by 0.02% pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction; and (3) the proportion of type VI collagen deposited in scar tissue is markedly lower than that found in neonate corneas.

  20. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type III collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.; Covington, H.I.; Macarak, E.J.

    1988-05-01

    Whole neonate rabbit corneas and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were incubated in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine. Radiolabeled collagen extracted from the corneas and scar tissue were analyzed by sodium dodecylsulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to determine the types and relative quantity of collagen polypeptides present and synthesized by these tissues. In addition to other collagen types, type III was found in both neonate cornea and scar tissue from adult cornea, albeit in relatively small quantities. Type III collagen in normal cornea was associated with the residue after pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction of the tissue, and the same type of collagen was extracted from scar tissue after similar treatment. Type III collagen-specific monoclonal antibody bound to developing normal corneas and healing adult tissue sections, as determined by immunofluorescence. Antibody binding was localized to the endothelium and growing Descemet's membrane in fetal and neonate corneas, and restricted to the most posterior region of the corneal scar tissue. Although monoclonal antibody to keratan sulfate, used as a marker for stromal fibroblasts, bound to most of the scar tissue, the antibody failed to bind to the posterior scar tissue positive for type III collagen. We conclude that endothelial cells from fetal and neonate rabbit cornea and endothelium-derived fibroblasts from healing wounds of adult cornea synthesize and deposit type III collagen. Moreover, this collagen appears to be incorporated into the growing Descemet's membrane of normal corneas and narrow posterior portion of the scar tissue.

  1. A novel dwarfism with gonadal dysfunction due to loss-of-function allele of the collagen receptor gene, Ddr2, in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kano, Kiyoshi; Marín de Evsikova, C; Young, James; Wnek, Christopher; Maddatu, Terry P; Nishina, Patsy M; Naggert, Jürgen K

    2008-08-01

    Smallie (slie), a spontaneous, autosomal-recessive mutation causes dwarfing and infertility in mice. The purpose of this study was to determine and characterize the underlying molecular genetic basis for its phenotype. The slie locus was mapped to chromosome 1, and fine-structure mapping narrowed the slie allele within 2 Mb between genetic markers D1Mit36 and Mpz. To pinpoint the underlying mutation quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the relative expression levels for the genes residing within this region. Expression of one gene, Ddr2, which encodes discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), was absent in slie homozygote mice. Genomic sequencing analysis detected a 150-kb deletion that extended into the Ddr2 gene transcript. Detailed phenotype analysis revealed that gonadal dysregulation underlies infertility in slie mice because all females were anovulatory and most adult males lacked spermatogenesis. The pituitary gland of prepubertal slie mice was smaller than in wild-type mice. The basal levels and gene expression for pituitary and hypothalamic hormones, and gene expression for hypothalamic-releasing hormones, were not significantly different between slie and wild-type mice. Circulating levels of IGF-1 did not differ in slie mice despite lower Igf-1 mRNA expression in the liver. After exogenous gonadotropin administration, the levels of secreted steroid hormones in both male and female adult slie mice were blunted compared to adult wild-type, but was similar to prepubertal wild-type mice. Taken together, our results indicate that the absence of DDR2 leads to growth retardation and gonadal dysfunction due to peripheral defects in hormonal-responsive pathways in slie mice.

  2. A Novel Dwarfism with Gonadal Dysfunction Due to Loss-of-Function Allele of the Collagen Receptor Gene, Ddr2, in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kano, Kiyoshi; Marín de Evsikova, C.; Young, James; Wnek, Christopher; Maddatu, Terry P.; Nishina, Patsy M.; Naggert, Jürgen K.

    2008-01-01

    Smallie (slie), a spontaneous, autosomal-recessive mutation causes dwarfing and infertility in mice. The purpose of this study was to determine and characterize the underlying molecular genetic basis for its phenotype. The slie locus was mapped to chromosome 1, and fine-structure mapping narrowed the slie allele within 2 Mb between genetic markers D1Mit36 and Mpz. To pinpoint the underlying mutation quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the relative expression levels for the genes residing within this region. Expression of one gene, Ddr2, which encodes discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), was absent in slie homozygote mice. Genomic sequencing analysis detected a 150-kb deletion that extended into the Ddr2 gene transcript. Detailed phenotype analysis revealed that gonadal dysregulation underlies infertility in slie mice because all females were anovulatory and most adult males lacked spermatogenesis. The pituitary gland of prepubertal slie mice was smaller than in wild-type mice. The basal levels and gene expression for pituitary and hypothalamic hormones, and gene expression for hypothalamic-releasing hormones, were not significantly different between slie and wild-type mice. Circulating levels of IGF-1 did not differ in slie mice despite lower Igf-1 mRNA expression in the liver. After exogenous gonadotropin administration, the levels of secreted steroid hormones in both male and female adult slie mice were blunted compared to adult wild-type, but was similar to prepubertal wild-type mice. Taken together, our results indicate that the absence of DDR2 leads to growth retardation and gonadal dysfunction due to peripheral defects in hormonal-responsive pathways in slie mice. PMID:18483174

  3. Lamprey type II collagen and Sox9 reveal an ancient origin of the vertebrate collagenous skeleton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangjun; Miyamoto, Michael M; Cohn, Martin J

    2006-02-28

    Type II collagen is the major cartilage matrix protein in the jawed vertebrate skeleton. Lampreys and hagfishes, by contrast, are thought to have noncollagenous cartilage. This difference in skeletal structure has led to the hypothesis that the vertebrate common ancestor had a noncollagenous skeleton, with type II collagen becoming the predominant cartilage matrix protein after the divergence of jawless fish from the jawed vertebrates approximately 500 million years ago. Here we report that lampreys have two type II collagen (Col2alpha1) genes that are expressed during development of the cartilaginous skeleton. We also demonstrate that the adult lamprey skeleton is rich in Col2alpha1 protein. Furthermore, we have isolated a lamprey orthologue of Sox9, a direct transcriptional regulator of Col2alpha1 in jawed vertebrates, and show that it is coexpressed with both Col2alpha1 genes during skeletal development. These results reveal that the genetic pathway for chondrogenesis in lampreys and gnathostomes is conserved through the activation of cartilage matrix molecules and suggest that a collagenous skeleton evolved surprisingly early in vertebrate evolution.

  4. Binding of Clostridium perfringens to collagen correlates with the ability to cause necrotic enteritis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Wade, B; Keyburn, A L; Seemann, T; Rood, J I; Moore, R J

    2015-11-18

    This study investigated the ability of Clostridium perfringens isolates derived from chickens to bind to collagen types I-V and gelatin. In total 21 strains from three distinct backgrounds were studied: (i) virulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis, (ii) avirulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis and (iii) strains isolated from healthy birds. All strains isolated from diseased birds had been assessed for virulence in a disease induction model. The virulent isolates all displayed collagen binding ability. However, most strains in the other two classes showed negligible binding to collagen. The prevalence of a previously described C. perfringens putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene was investigated by PCR screening. It was found that five of the strains carried the putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene and that all of these strains were virulent isolates. Based on these studies it is postulated that collagen adhesion may play a role in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis.

  5. Collagenous colitis: an unrecognised entity.

    PubMed Central

    Bogomoletz, W V; Adnet, J J; Birembaut, P; Feydy, P; Dupont, P

    1980-01-01

    A patient is reported with chronic abdominal pain, diarrhoea, and associated radiological and endoscopic abnormalities of the sigmoid colon. Light and electron microscopic study of colorectal mucosa showed abnormal collagenous thickening of the subepithelial basement membrane. The authors felt that the clinical and morphological features justified a diagnosis of collagenous colitis. Review of the literature suggested that collagenous colitis was still an unrecognised entity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7380341

  6. Second harmonic generation in collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, Karen M.; Stoller, Patrick; Celliers, Peter; Rubenchik, Alexander; Bratton, Clay; Yankelevich, Diego

    2003-11-01

    Collagen possesses a strong second order nonlinear susceptibility; when it is irradiated with intense laser light, some of the reflected and transmitted light will have twice the frequency of the incident beam, a phenomenon known as second harmonic generation (SHG). Polarization modulation of an ultra-short pulse laser beam can be used to simultaneously measure collagen fiber orientation, SHG intensity, and a parameter related to the second order non-linear susceptibility. This technique has made it possible to discriminate among patterns of fibrillar orientation in many tissues. In the present study the role that organizational complexity plays in the relationship between nonlinear optical properties and collagen structure is investigated. As a component of tissues and organs, collagen"s structure and function is inextricably intertwined with that of the many other matrix components; to what extent do these noncollagenous components affect its nonlinear properties? To answer this, we investigated SHG in two different collagenous tissues, liver and cartilage; in addition we looked at the effect of progressive pathological changes in these tissues on SHG. At the other end of the spectrum, we studied collagen organized at the minimal level of complexity necessary for SHG detection: fibrils generated from solutions containing only a single type of collagen. Data obtained from these studies suggest that collagen"s strong nonlinear susceptibility, a property no other biologically significant macromolecule shares to the same degree, may serve as more than the basis of a novel imaging device for soft tissue. Collagen"s nonlinear optical properties in conjunction with its vast capacity for self-initiated conformational change--through self-assembly, site recognition, post-translational modification, and the like -make it an attractive candidate molecule for any of several demanding engineering applications, such as nanopatterning.

  7. Salamander-derived, human-optimized nAG protein suppresses collagen synthesis and increases collagen degradation in primary human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; Shier, Medhat K; Abd-Alwahed, Mervat M; Mawlana, Ola H; El-Wetidy, Mohammed S; Bagayawa, Reginald S; Ali, Hebatallah H; Al-Nbaheen, May S; Aldahmash, Abdullah M

    2013-01-01

    Unlike humans, salamanders regrow their amputated limbs. Regeneration depends on the presence of regenerating axons which upregulate the expression of newt anterior gradient (nAG) protein. We had the hypothesis that nAG might have an inhibitory effect on collagen production since excessive collagen production results in scarring, which is a major enemy to regeneration. nAG gene was designed, synthesized, and cloned. The cloned vector was then transfected into primary human fibroblasts. The results showed that the expression of nAG protein in primary human fibroblast cells suppresses the expression of collagen I and III, with or without TGF- β 1 stimulation. This suppression is due to a dual effect of nAG both by decreasing collagen synthesis and by increasing collagen degradation. Furthermore, nAG had an inhibitory effect on proliferation of transfected fibroblasts. It was concluded that nAG suppresses collagen through multiple effects.

  8. Mutation in a short-chain collagen gene, CTRP5, results in extracellular deposit formation in late-onset retinal degeneration: a genetic model for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Caroline; Shu, Xinhua; Cideciyan, Artur V; Lennon, Alan; Barran, Perdita; Zareparsi, Sepideh; Sawyer, Lindsay; Hendry, Grace; Dhillon, Baljean; Milam, Ann H; Luthert, Philip J; Swaroop, Anand; Hastie, Nicholas D; Jacobson, Samuel G; Wright, Alan F

    2003-10-15

    A primary feature of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the presence of extracellular deposits between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and underlying Bruch's membrane, leading to RPE dysfunction, photoreceptor death and severe visual loss. AMD accounts for about 50% of blind registrations in Western countries and is a common, genetically complex disorder. Very little is known regarding its molecular basis. Late-onset retinal degeneration (L-ORD) is an autosomal dominant disorder with striking clinical and pathological similarity to AMD. Here we show that L-ORD is genetically heterogeneous and that a proposed founder mutation in the CTRP5 (C1QTNF5) gene, which encodes a novel short-chain collagen, changes a highly conserved serine to arginine (Ser163Arg) in 7/14 L-ORD families and 0/1000 control individuals. The mutation occurs in the gC1q domain of CTRP5 and results in abnormal high molecular weight aggregate formation which may alter its higher-order structure and interactions. These results indicate a novel disease mechanism involving abnormal adhesion between RPE and Bruch's membrane.

  9. Down-regulation of insulin receptor substrates (IRS)-1 and IRS-2 and Src homologous and collagen-like protein Shc gene expression by insulin in skeletal muscle is not associated with insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xudong; Vaag, Allan; Hansson, Mona; Groop, Leif

    2002-01-01

    To examine whether altered gene expression of insulin receptor substrates (IRS)-1 and IRS-2 and Src homologous and collagen-like protein Shc is an inherited trait and is associated with muscle insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes, we measured mRNA levels of these genes by a relative quantitative RT-PCR method in muscle biopsies taken before and after an insulin clamp from 12 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for type 2 diabetes and 12 control subjects. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was decreased both in the diabetic and nondiabetic twin, compared with healthy control subjects (5.2 +/- 0.7 and 8.5 +/- 0.8 vs. 11.4 +/- 0.9 mg/kg x min(-1); P < 0.01 and P < 0.02, respectively). Basal mRNA levels of IRS-1, IRS-2, and Shc were similar in the diabetic and nondiabetic twins as well as in the control subjects. Insulin decreased mRNA expression of IRS-1 by 72% (from 0.75 +/- 0.06 to 0.21 +/- 0.04 relative units; P < 0.001), IRS-2 by 71% (from 0.55 +/- 0.10 to 0.16 +/- 0.08 relative units; P < 0.03), and Shc by 25% (from 0.95 +/- 0.04 to 0.71 +/- 0.04 relative units; P < 0.01) vs. baseline as demonstrated in the control subjects. The postclamp Shc mRNA level was slightly higher in the diabetic twins (P = 0.05) but similar in the nondiabetic twins, as compared with the control subjects, whereas postclamp IRS-1 and IRS-2 mRNA levels were similar between the study groups. There was an inverse correlation between postclamp Shc mRNA concentration and glucose uptake (r = -0.53, P = 0.01; n = 22) in the controls and nondiabetic twins. However, the decrease in Shc gene expression by insulin was not significantly different between the study groups. In conclusion, because insulin down-regulates IRS-1, IRS-2, and Shc gene expression in skeletal muscle in diabetic and nondiabetic monozygotic twins and control subjects to the same extent, it is unlikely that expression of these genes is an inherited trait or contributes to skeletal muscle insulin resistance.

  10. Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Miki; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Real time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.

  11. Mechanisms of action of acetaldehyde in the up-regulation of the human α2(I) collagen gene in hepatic stellate cells: key roles of Ski, SMAD3, SMAD4, and SMAD7.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Gordillo, Karina; Shah, Ruchi; Arellanes-Robledo, Jaime; Hernández-Nazara, Zamira; Rincón-Sánchez, Ana Rosa; Inagaki, Yutaka; Rojkind, Marcos; Lakshman, M Raj

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol-induced liver fibrosis and eventually cirrhosis is a leading cause of death. Acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, up-regulates expression of the human α2(I) collagen gene (COL1A2). Early acetaldehyde-mediated effects involve phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of SMAD3/4-containing complexes that bind to COL1A2 promoter to induce fibrogenesis. We used human and mouse hepatic stellate cells to elucidate the mechanisms whereby acetaldehyde up-regulates COL1A2 by modulating the role of Ski and the expression of SMADs 3, 4, and 7. Acetaldehyde induced up-regulation of COL1A2 by 3.5-fold, with concomitant increases in the mRNA (threefold) and protein (4.2- and 3.5-fold) levels of SMAD3 and SMAD4, respectively. It also caused a 60% decrease in SMAD7 expression. Ski, a member of the Ski/Sno oncogene family, is colocalized in the nucleus with SMAD4. Acetaldehyde induces translocation of Ski and SMAD4 to the cytoplasm, where Ski undergoes proteasomal degradation, as confirmed by the ability of the proteasomal inhibitor lactacystin to blunt up-regulation of acetaldehyde-dependent COL1A2, but not of the nonspecific fibronectin gene (FN1). We conclude that acetaldehyde up-regulates COL1A2 by enhancing expression of the transactivators SMAD3 and SMAD4 while inhibiting the repressor SMAD7, along with promoting Ski translocation from the nucleus to cytoplasm. We speculate that drugs that prevent proteasomal degradation of repressors targeting COL1A2 may have antifibrogenic properties.

  12. A new long form of Sox5 (L-Sox5), Sox6 and Sox9 are coexpressed in chondrogenesis and cooperatively activate the type II collagen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, V; Li, P; de Crombrugghe, B

    1998-01-01

    Transcripts for a new form of Sox5, called L-Sox5, and Sox6 are coexpressed with Sox9 in all chondrogenic sites of mouse embryos. A coiled-coil domain located in the N-terminal part of L-Sox5, and absent in Sox5, showed >90% identity with a similar domain in Sox6 and mediated homodimerization and heterodimerization with Sox6. Dimerization of L-Sox5/Sox6 greatly increased efficiency of binding of the two Sox proteins to DNA containing adjacent HMG sites. L-Sox5, Sox6 and Sox9 cooperatively activated expression of the chondrocyte differentiation marker Col2a1 in 10T1/2 and MC615 cells. A 48 bp chondrocyte-specific enhancer in this gene, which contains several HMG-like sites that are necessary for enhancer activity, bound the three Sox proteins and was cooperatively activated by the three Sox proteins in non-chondrogenic cells. Our data suggest that L-Sox5/Sox6 and Sox9, which belong to two different classes of Sox transcription factors, cooperate with each other in expression of Col2a1 and possibly other genes of the chondrocytic program. PMID:9755172

  13. Association of ACL tears and single nucleotide polymorphisms in the collagen 12 A1 gene in the Indian population - a preliminary case-control study

    PubMed Central

    John, Rakesh; Prabhakar, Sharad; Dhillon, Mandeep Singh; Anand, Akshay; Minhas, Gillipsie

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Genetic predisposition to ACL tears has received tremendous interest in the past few years with many SNPs of different genes being linked to ACL tear. Study Objectives To examine if specific sequence variants in COL12A1 gene are associated with ACL tears in Indian population. Study design Case-control study. Materials and methods 50 patients with surgically diagnosed ACL tear and 52 healthy, age-matched controls without any ligament/tendon injuries were genotyped for rs970547 and rs240736 SNPs using real time PCR method. Results The AG and GG genotypes were significantly under-represented in study group patients in rs970547 region (p=0.0361). However, there was no significant difference in genotype/allele frequencies in the rs240736 region. Conclusions The COL12A1 rs970547 SNP is associated with ACL tears in the Indian population. However, these results need to be validated further so that predisposed individuals can be screened in the future for counselling and intervention. Level of evidence III PMID:27900301

  14. Collagen for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-09-01

    In the last decades, increased knowledge about the organization, structure and properties of collagen (particularly concerning interactions between cells and collagen-based materials) has inspired scientists and engineers to design innovative collagen-based biomaterials and to develop novel tissue-engineering products. The design of resorbable collagen-based medical implants requires understanding the tissue/organ anatomy and biological function as well as the role of collagen's physicochemical properties and structure in tissue/organ regeneration. Bone is a complex tissue that plays a critical role in diverse metabolic processes mediated by calcium delivery as well as in hematopoiesis whilst maintaining skeleton strength. A wide variety of collagen-based scaffolds have been proposed for different tissue engineering applications. These scaffolds are designed to promote a biological response, such as cell interaction, and to work as artificial biomimetic extracellular matrices that guide tissue regeneration. This paper critically reviews the current understanding of the complex hierarchical structure and properties of native collagen molecules, and describes the scientific challenge of manufacturing collagen-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of innovative techniques for scaffold and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to the preparation of biomimetic substrates that modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, retention or enhancement of bone tissue function.

  15. Novel and emerging therapies in the treatment of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Rashidghamat, Ellie; McGrath, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited blistering diseases that affects ∼ 500,000 people worldwide. Clinically, individuals with EB have fragile skin and are susceptible to blistering following minimal trauma, with mucous membrane and other organ involvement in some subtypes. Within the spectrum of EB, ∼ 5% of affected individuals have the clinically more severe recessive dystrophic (RDEB) variant with a prevalence of 8 per one million of the population. RDEB is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the type VII collagen gene, COL7A1, which leads to reduced or absent type VII collagen (C7) and a paucity of structurally effective anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ). Currently, there is no cure for RDEB, although considerable progress has been made in testing novel treatments including gene therapy (lentiviral and gamma retroviral vectors for COL7A1 supplementation in keratinocytes and fibroblasts), as well as cell therapy (use of allogeneic fibroblasts, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), and bone marrow transplantation (BMT)). Here, we review current treatment modalities available as well as novel and emerging therapies in the treatment of RDEB. Clinical trials of new translational therapies in RDEB offer hope for improved clinical management of patients as well as generating broader lessons for regenerative medicine that could be applicable to other inherited or acquired abnormalities of wound healing or scarring. PMID:28357176

  16. From collagen chemistry towards cell therapy – a personal journey

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    The Fell–Muir Award requires the recipient to deliver a lecture and a review manuscript which provides a personal overview of significant scientific developments in the field of matrix biology over the period of the recipient's career. In this context, this review considers the collagen family of structural proteins and the advances in biochemical, molecular biological and genetic techniques which led to the elucidation of the structure, synthesis and function of this important group of extracellular matrix constituents. Particular attention is focussed on early research on the identification and assembly of the soluble precursors of collagen types I and II, and the identification of the precursor of basement membrane collagen type IV. In subsequent studies investigating the maintenance of the chick chondrocyte phenotype in culture, the influence of the extracellular milieu was found to influence markedly both cell morphology and collagen gene expression. These studies led to the discovery of collagen type X whose expression is restricted to hypertrophic chondrocytes at sites of endochondral ossification. Such research provided a prelude to investigations of mammalian endochondral ossification which is known to be aberrant in a variety of human chondrodysplasias and is reactivated in bone fracture repair and in osteoarthritis. The cloning of bovine and then human collagen type X genes facilitated studies in relevant human diseases and contributed to the discovery of mutations in the COL10A1 gene in families with metaphyseal chondrodysplasia type Schmid. Clustering of mutations in the C-terminal domain of the type X collagen molecule has now been widely documented and investigations of the pathogenic mechanisms in animal models are beginning to suggest the prospect of novel treatment strategies. PMID:17696900

  17. SPARC and the N-propeptide of collagen I influence fibroblast proliferation and collagen assembly in the periodontal ligament

    PubMed Central

    Trombetta-eSilva, Jessica; Hepfer, Glenn; Yao, Hai; Bradshaw, Amy Dodd

    2017-01-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) is a fibrous connective tissue that anchors tooth cementum into alveolar bone. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a collagen-binding matricellular protein known to influence collagen fiber assembly in the PDL. In contrast, functional properties of the N-propeptide of collagen I, encoded in exon 2 of the COL1A1 gene, are poorly understood. In this study, the PDL of collagen I exon 2-deleted (wt/ko), SPARC-null (ko/wt), and double transgenic (ko/ko) mice were evaluated in terms of cellularity, collagen area, fiber morphology, and extraction force and compared to WT (wt/wt) mice. Picro sirius red staining indicated a decrease in total PDL collagen content in each of the transgenic mice compared to WT at 1 and 3 month age points. At 12 months, only SPARC-null (ko/wt) and double-null PDL demonstrated less total collagen versus WT. Likewise, an increase in thin PDL collagen fibers was observed at 1 and 3 months in each transgenic, with increases only in SPARC-null and double-null mice at 12 months. The force required for tooth extraction was significantly reduced in SPARC-null versus exon 2-deleted and WT mice, whereas double-null mice demonstrated further decreases in force required for tooth extraction. The number of proliferating fibroblasts and number and size of epithelial rests of Malassez were increased in each transgenic versus WT with double-null PDL exhibiting highest levels of proliferation and rests of Malassez at 1 month of age. Consistent with increases in PDL collagen in exon-2 deleted mice, with age, numbers of rests decreased at 12 months in this genotype. These results demonstrate for the first time a functional role of the N-propeptide in regulating collagen fiber assembly and cell behavior and suggest that SPARC and the N-propeptide of collagen I have distinct activities in regulating collagen fiber assembly and fibroblast function. PMID:28245286

  18. Type I Collagen and Collagen Mimetics as Angiogenesis Promoting Superpolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Twardowski, T.; Fertala, A.; Orgel, J.P.R.O.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2008-07-18

    Angiogenesis, the development of blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, is a key component of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Angiogenesis also drives pathologies such as tumor growth and metastasis, and hemangioma development in newborns. On the other hand, promotion of angiogenesis is needed in tissues with vascular insufficiencies, and in bioengineering, to endow tissue substitutes with appropriate microvasculatures. Therefore, much research has focused on defining mechanisms of angiogenesis, and identifying pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules. Type I collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, potently stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to its angiogenic activity appears to be ligation and possibly clustering of endothelial cell (EC) surface {alpha}1{beta}1/{alpha}2{beta}1 integrin receptors by the GFPGER502-507 sequence of the collagen fibril. However, additional aspects of collagen structure and function that may modulate its angiogenic properties are discussed. Moreover, type I collagen and fibrin, another angiogenic polymer, share several structural features. These observations suggest strategies for creating 'angiogenic superpolymers', including: modifying type I collagen to influence its biological half-life, immunogenicity, and integrin binding capacity; genetically engineering fibrillar collagens to include additional integrin binding sites or angiogenic determinants, and remove unnecessary or deleterious sequences without compromising fibril integrity; and exploring the suitability of poly(ortho ester), PEG-lysine copolymer, tubulin, and cholesteric cuticle as collagen mimetics, and suggesting means of modifying them to display ideal angiogenic properties. The collagenous and collagen mimetic angiogenic superpolymers described here may someday prove useful for many applications in tissue engineering and human medicine.

  19. The Collagen-Binding Adhesin Is a Virulence Factor in Staphylococcus aureus Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Rhem, Marcus N.; Lech, Elizabeth M.; Patti, Joseph M.; McDevitt, Damien; Höök, Magnus; Jones, Dan B.; Wilhelmus, Kirk R.

    2000-01-01

    A collagen-binding strain of Staphylococcus aureus produced suppurative inflammation in a rabbit model of soft contact lens-associated bacterial keratitis more often than its collagen-binding-negative isogenic mutant. Reintroduction of the cna gene on a multicopy plasmid into the mutant helped it regain its corneal adherence and infectivity. The topical application of a collagen-binding peptide before bacterial challenge decreased S. aureus adherence to deepithelialized corneas. These data suggest that the collagen-binding adhesin is involved in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infection of the cornea. PMID:10816547

  20. Tenascin-x deficiency mimics ehlers-danlos syndrome in mice through alteration of collagen deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J.R.; Taylor, G.; Dean, W.B.; Wagner, D.R.; Afzal, V.; Lotz, J.C.; Rubin, E.M.; Bristow, J.

    2002-03-01

    Tenascin-X is a large extracellular matrix protein of unknown function1-3. Tenascin-X deficiency in humans is associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome4,5, a generalized connective tissue disorder resulting from altered metabolism of the fibrillar collagens6. Because TNXB is the first Ehlers-Danlos syndrome gene that does not encode a fibrillar collagen or collagen-modifying enzyme7-14, we suggested that tenascin-X might regulate collagen synthesis or deposition15. To test this hypothesis, we inactivated Tnxb in mice. Tnxb-/- mice showed progressive skin hyperextensibility, similar to individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Biomechanical testing confirmed increased deformability and reduced tensile strength of their skin. The skin of Tnxb-/- mice was histologically normal, but its collagen content was significantly reduced. At the ultrastructural level, collagen fibrils of Tnxb-/- mice were of normal size and shape, but the density of fibrils in their skin was reduced, commensurate with the reduction in collagen content. Studies of cultured dermal fibroblasts showed that although synthesis of collagen I by Tnxb-/- and wildtype cells was similar, Tnxb-/- fibroblasts failed to deposit collagen I into cell-associated matrix. This study confirms a causative role for TNXB in human Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and suggests that tenascin-X is an essential regulator of collagen deposition by dermal fibroblasts.

  1. Collagen reconstitution is inversely correlated with induction of limb regeneration in Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Hirata, Ayako; Makanae, Aki

    2012-03-01

    Amphibians can regenerate missing body parts, including limbs. The regulation of collagen has been considered to be important in limb regeneration. Collagen deposition is suppressed during limb regeneration, so we investigated collagen deposition and apical epithelial cap (AEC) formation during axolotl limb regeneration. The accessory limb model (ALM) has been developed as an alternative model for studying limb regeneration. Using this model, we investigated the relationship between nerves, epidermis, and collagen deposition. We found that Sp-9, an AEC marker gene, was upregulated by direct interaction between nerves and epidermis. However, collagen deposition hindered this interaction, and resulted in the failure of limb regeneration. During wound healing, an increase in deposition of collagen caused a decrease in the blastema induction rate in ALM. Wound healing and limb regeneration are alternate processes.

  2. Collagen binding to Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Holderbaum, D.; Hall, G.S.; Ehrhart, L.A.

    1986-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can bind soluble collagen in a specific, saturable manner. We have previously shown that some variability exists in the degree of collagen binding between different strains of heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed S. aureus which are commercially available as immunologic reagents. The present study demonstrates that live S. aureus of the Cowan 1 strain binds amounts of collagen per organism equivalent to those demonstrated previously in heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed bacteria but has an affinity over 100 times greater, with Kd values of 9.7 X 10(-11) M and 4.3 X 10(-8) M for live and heat-killed organisms, respectively. Studies were also carried out with S. aureus killed by ionizing radiation, since this method of killing the organism seemed less likely to alter the binding moieties on the surface than did heat killing. Bacteria killed by exposure to gamma radiation bound collagen in a manner essentially indistinguishable from that of live organisms. Binding of collagen to irradiated cells of the Cowan 1 strain was rapid, with equilibrium reached by 30 min at 22 degrees C, and was fully reversible. The binding was not inhibited by fibronectin, fibrinogen, C1q, or immunoglobulin G, suggesting a binding site for collagen distinct from those for these proteins. Collagen binding was virtually eliminated in trypsin-treated organisms, indicating that the binding site has a protein component. Of four strains examined, Cowan 1 and S. aureus ATCC 25923 showed saturable, specific binding, while strains Woods and S4 showed a complete lack of binding. These results suggest that some strains of S. aureus contain high-affinity binding sites for collagen. While the number of binding sites per bacterium varied sixfold in the two collagen-binding strains, the apparent affinity was similar.

  3. An {alpha}1(II) Gly{sup 913} to cys substitution prevents the matrix incorporation of type II collagen which is replaced with type I and III collagens in cartilage from a patient with hypochondrogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mundlos, S.; Chan, D.; Bateman, J.F.; McGill, J.

    1996-05-03

    A heterozygous mutation in the COL2A1 gene was identified in a patient with hypochondrogenesis. The mutation was a single nucleotide transition of G3285T that resulted in an amino acid substitution of Cys for Gly{sup 913} in the {alpha}1(II) chain of type II collagen. This amino acid change disrupted the obligatory Gly-X-Y triplet motif required for the normal formation of a stable collagen triple helix and prevented the deposition of type II collagen into the proposita`s cartilage, which contained predominantly type I and III collagens and minor amounts of type XI collagen. Biosynthetic analysis of collagens produced and secreted by the patient`s chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads was consistent with the in vivo matrix composition, demonstrating that the main products were type I and III collagens, along with type XI collagen. The synthesis of the cartilage-specific type XI collagen at similar levels to controls indicated that the isolated cartilage cells had re-differentiated to the chondrocyte phenotype. The chondrocytes also produced small amounts of type II collagen, but this was post-translationally overmodified and not secreted. These data further delineate the biochemical and phenotypic consequences of mutations in the COL2A1 gene and suggest that cartilage formation and bone development can take place in the absence of type II collagen. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Electrostatic effects in collagen fibrillization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2014-03-01

    Using light scattering and AFM techniques, we have measured the kinetics of fibrillization of collagen (pertinent to the vitreous of human eye) as a function of pH and ionic strength. At higher and lower pH, collagen triple-peptides remain stable in solution without fibrillization. At neutral pH, the fibrillization occurs and its growth kinetics is slowed upon either an increase in ionic strength or a decrease in temperature. We present a model, based on polymer crystallization theory, to describe the observed electrostatic nature of collagen assembly.

  5. Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: case of non-Hallopeau-Siemens variant with premature termination codons in both alleles.

    PubMed

    Yonei, Nozomi; Ohtani, Toshio; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2006-11-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding collagen, the major component of anchoring fibrils. Premature termination codon (PTC) mutations in both alleles usually lead to the Hallopeau-Siemens variant that shows the most severe phenotype. We experienced a case of the non-Hallopeau-Siemens variant (nHS-RDEB), which had a mild clinical severity although it has PTC mutations in both alleles. Our patient was a compound heterozygote for a nonsense mutation (R669X) in exon 15 and a nonsense mutation (E2857X) in exon 116. But we confirmed the existence of some anchoring fibrils on electron micrograph. This suggested that a PTC close to the 3' end of COL7A1 does not completely abolish the collagen VII mRNA. We hypothesized that the truncated procollagen VII from the mutant allele with a nonsense mutation (E2857X) in exon 116 included two out of eight cysteines needed for disulfide bond formation, and hence a few functional anchoring fibrils could be formed.

  6. Bone Collagen: New Clues to its Mineralization Mechanism From Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, David R.; Ann Weis, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Until 2006 the only mutations known to cause osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) were in the two genes coding for type I collagen chains. These dominant mutations affecting the expression or primary sequence of collagen α1(I) and α2(I) chains account for over 90% of OI cases. Since then a growing list of mutant genes causing the 5–10% of recessive cases has rapidly emerged. They include CRTAP, LEPRE1 and PPIB, which encode three proteins forming the prolyl 3-hydroxylase complex; PLOD2 and FKBP10, which encode respectively lysyl hydroxylase 2 and a foldase required for its activity in forming mature cross-links in bone collagen; SERPIN H1, which encodes the collagen chaperone HSP47; SERPIN F1, which encodes pigment epithelium-derived factor required for osteoid mineralization; and BMP1, which encodes the type I procollagen C-propeptidase. All cause fragile bone in infancy, which can include over-mineralization or under-mineralization defects as well as abnormal collagen post-translational modifications. Consistently both dominant and recessive variants lead to abnormal cross-linking chemistry in bone collagen. These recent discoveries strengthen the potential for a common pathogenic mechanism of misassembled collagen fibrils. Of the new genes identified, eight encode proteins required for collagen post-translational modification, chaperoning of newly synthesized collagen chains into native molecules or transport through the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi for polymerization, cross-linking and mineralization. In reviewing these findings, we conclude that a common theme is emerging in the pathogenesis of brittle bone disease of mishandled collagen assembly with important insights on post-translational features of bone collagen that have evolved to optimize it as a biomineral template. PMID:23508630

  7. Clinical uses of collagen shields.

    PubMed

    Poland, D E; Kaufman, H E

    1988-09-01

    Collagen shields immersed in tobramycin solution for one minute were applied to one eye each of 60 patients who had had cataract extraction, penetrating keratoplasty, or epikeratophakia or who had nonsurgical epithelial healing problems. The shields were well tolerated; one patient had the shield removed and one patient lost the shield in the early postoperative period. The surgical patients showed more rapid healing of epithelial defects after surgery with the use of the collagen shield. Patients with acute nonsurgical epithelial problems, such as contact lens abrasions and recurrent erosion, responded to the use of the collagen shield with improved healing. Patients with chronic epithelial defects responded poorly, presumably because underlying abnormalities in Bowman's layer prevented epithelial growth in the area of the defect. No infections were noted in any of the patients. The collagen shields appear to promote enhanced healing in patients with postsurgical and acute epithelial defects and to provide adequate antibiotic prophylaxis against infection in these vulnerable eyes.

  8. Evaluation of nanoarchitectured collagen type II molecules on cartilage engineering.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shyh Ming; Chiang, Ming Yu; Lan, Cheng Wen; Niu, Gregory Cheng-Chie; Chang, Shwu Jen

    2013-02-01

    Scaffold architecture, including the geometry and dimension of scaffolds, is an important parameter in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Following the characterization of collagen type II nanoarchitectured molecules, collagen fibrils (CNFs) and collagen spheres (CNPs) prepared using a high-voltage electric field in our laboratory, we proposed to use these nanoarchitectured molecules to assess their influence on the culturing of chondrocytes in stirred bioreactors. The results demonstrate that chondrocytes rapidly formed more and larger chondrocyte pellets (spheroids) after the addition of nanoarchitectured molecules into the culture medium. The maintenance of chondrocytes with round morphology and increased glycosaminoglycan secretion indicated that these spheroids contained viable and un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. No significant increases in DNA content were detected. These results show that the introduction of these molecules did not affect chondrocyte proliferation during a 3-day culture period. After the addition of CNPs and CNFs into the culture medium, the expression levels of collagen type II and aggrecan genes in chondrocytes increased significantly as demonstrated by real-time PCR analysis. Interestingly, chondrocytes exhibited distinct collagen type II and aggrecan gene expression profiles in culture with CNPs and CNFs. The aggrecan gene expression level of the chondrocytes was 2.5-fold greater following CFN addition than following the addition of CNPs. In contrast, the collagen type II expression level of the chondrocytes was 2.2-fold greater following the addition of CNPs than following the addition of CNFs. The chondrocyte pellets rapidly restored defects in articular cartilage during a 1-month implantation period in a rabbit model.

  9. Human collagen produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2014-01-01

    Consequential to its essential role as a mechanical support and affinity regulator in extracellular matrices, collagen constitutes a highly sought after scaffolding material for regeneration and healing applications. However, substantiated concerns have been raised with regard to quality and safety of animal tissue-extracted collagen, particularly in relation to its immunogenicity, risk of disease transmission and overall quality and consistency. In parallel, contamination with undesirable cellular factors can significantly impair its bioactivity, vis-a-vis its impact on cell recruitment, proliferation and differentiation. High-scale production of recombinant human collagen Type I (rhCOL1) in the tobacco plant provides a source of an homogenic, heterotrimeric, thermally stable “virgin” collagen which self assembles to fine homogenous fibrils displaying intact binding sites and has been applied to form numerous functional scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In addition, rhCOL1 can form liquid crystal structures, yielding a well-organized and mechanically strong membrane, two properties indispensable to extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicry. Overall, the shortcomings of animal- and cadaver-derived collagens arising from their source diversity and recycled nature are fully overcome in the plant setting, constituting a collagen source ideal for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23941988

  10. The mRNAs for the three chains of human collagen type XI are widely distributed but not necessarily co-expressed: implications for homotrimeric, heterotrimeric and heterotypic collagen molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Lui, V C; Kong, R Y; Nicholls, J; Cheung, A N; Cheah, K S

    1995-01-01

    In cartilage collagen type XI exists as heterotrimeric molecules composed of alpha 1(XI), alpha 2(XI) and alpha 3(XI) subunits. Messenger RNAs for some of the alpha chains of collagen type XI have also been found in non-chondrogenic tissues but the chain composition of the molecule in these sites is not known. Some non-chondrogenic tissues also contain heterotrimers containing collagen alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(XI) chains. We have explored the possibility that collagen type XI could exist in differing trimeric forms in non-chondrogenic tissues and aimed to predict the subunit composition of this collagen in those tissues. The distribution and relative levels of expression of collagen alpha 1(XI), alpha 2(XI) and alpha 3(XI)/alpha 1(II) mRNAs in different human fetal tissues were studied. Expression of mRNAs for all three genes of collagen type XI is not restricted to cartilage but is widespread. However, in some non-chondrogenic tissues, the mRNAs for all three alpha chains of collagen type XI were not co-expressed, but collagen alpha 1(XI) and alpha 2(XI) mRNAs were found either singly or without collagen alpha 3(XI) transcripts. Collagen type XI may therefore exist as homotrimers and/or heterotrimers composed of two collagen alpha(XI) chains in some tissues. The distribution of mRNAs for collagen alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(I) were also studied. Co-expression of collagen type XI, alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(I) mRNAs was found for many tissues. These findings have implications for the possibility of additional chain associations for collagen types XI and V in cross-type heterotrimers within heterotypic fibrils. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7487888

  11. Lysyl Oxidase Activity Is Required for Ordered Collagen Fibrillogenesis by Tendon Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Herchenhan, Andreas; Uhlenbrock, Franziska; Eliasson, Pernilla; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David; Kadler, Karl E.; Magnusson, S. Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidases (LOXs) are a family of copper-dependent oxido-deaminases that can modify the side chain of lysyl residues in collagen and elastin, thereby leading to the spontaneous formation of non-reducible aldehyde-derived interpolypeptide chain cross-links. The consequences of LOX inhibition in producing lathyrism are well documented, but the consequences on collagen fibril formation are less clear. Here we used β-aminoproprionitrile (BAPN) to inhibit LOX in tendon-like constructs (prepared from human tenocytes), which are an experimental model of cell-mediated collagen fibril formation. The improvement in structure and strength seen with time in control constructs was absent in constructs treated with BAPN. As expected, BAPN inhibited the formation of aldimine-derived cross-links in collagen, and the constructs were mechanically weak. However, an unexpected finding was that BAPN treatment led to structurally abnormal collagen fibrils with irregular profiles and widely dispersed diameters. Of special interest, the abnormal fibril profiles resembled those seen in some Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome phenotypes. Importantly, the total collagen content developed normally, and there was no difference in COL1A1 gene expression. Collagen type V, decorin, fibromodulin, and tenascin-X proteins were unaffected by the cross-link inhibition, suggesting that LOX regulates fibrillogenesis independently of these molecules. Collectively, the data show the importance of LOX for the mechanical development of early collagenous tissues and that LOX is essential for correct collagen fibril shape formation. PMID:25979340

  12. Riboflavin-induced photo-crosslinking of collagen hydrogel and its application in meniscus tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jiseung; Koh, Rachel H; Shim, Whuisu; Kim, Hwan D; Yim, Hyun-Gu; Hwang, Nathaniel S

    2016-04-01

    A meniscus tear is a common knee injury, but its regeneration remains a clinical challenge. Recently, collagen-based scaffolds have been applied in meniscus tissue engineering. Despite its prevalence, application of natural collagen scaffold in clinical setting is limited due to its extremely low stiffness and rapid degradation. The purpose of the present study was to increase the mechanical properties and delay degradation rate of a collagen-based scaffold by photo-crosslinking using riboflavin (RF) and UV exposure. RF is a biocompatible vitamin B2 that showed minimal cytotoxicity compared to conventionally utilized photo-initiator. Furthermore, collagen photo-crosslinking with RF improved mechanical properties and delayed enzyme-triggered degradation of collagen scaffolds. RF-induced photo-crosslinked collagen scaffolds encapsulated with fibrochondrocytes resulted in reduced scaffold contraction and enhanced gene expression levels for the collagen II and aggrecan. Additionally, hyaluronic acid (HA) incorporation into photo-crosslinked collagen scaffold showed an increase in its retention. Based on these results, we demonstrate that photo-crosslinked collagen-HA hydrogels can be potentially applied in the scaffold-based meniscus tissue engineering.

  13. Nanomechanics of Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-07-12

    Type I collagen is the predominant collagen in mature tendons and ligaments, where it gives them their load-bearing mechanical properties. Fibrils of type I collagen are formed by the packing of polypeptide triple helices. Higher-order structures like fibril bundles and fibers are assembled from fibrils in the presence of other collagenous molecules and noncollagenous molecules. Curiously, however, experiments show that fibrils/fibril bundles are less resistant to axial stress compared to their constituent triple helices-the Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles are an order-of-magnitude smaller than the Young's moduli of triple helices. Given the sensitivity of the Young's moduli of triple helices to solvation environment, a plausible explanation is that the packing of triple helices into fibrils perhaps reduces the Young's modulus of an individual triple helix, which results in fibrils having smaller Young's moduli. We find, however, from molecular dynamics and accelerated conformational sampling simulations that the Young's modulus of the buried core of the fibril is of the same order as that of a triple helix in aqueous phase. These simulations, therefore, suggest that the lower Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles cannot be attributed to the specific packing of triple helices in the fibril core. It is not the fibril core that yields initially to axial stress. Rather, it must be the portion of the fibril exposed to the solvent and/or the fibril-fibril interface that bears the initial strain. Overall, this work provides estimates of Young's moduli and persistence lengths at two levels of collagen's structural assembly, which are necessary to quantitatively investigate the response of various biological factors on collagen mechanics, including congenital mutations, posttranslational modifications and ligand binding, and also engineer new collagen-based materials.

  14. Production of human type II collagen using an efficient baculovirus-silkworm multigene expression system.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qi; Yao, Lunguang; Liang, Zhisheng; Yan, Donghua; Li, Zhuo; Huang, Yadong; Sun, Jingchen

    2016-12-01

    Human type II collagen is a macromolecular protein found throughout the human body. The baculovirus expression vector system is one of the most ideal systems for the routine production and display of recombinant eukaryotic proteins in insect, larvae, and mammalian cells. We use this system to express a full-length gene, human type II collagen cDNA (4257 bp), in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda 9 cells (Sf9), Bombyx mori cells, and silkworm larvae. In this study, the expression of human type II collagen gene in both insect cells and silkworm larvae was purified by nickel column chromatography, leading to 300-kDa bands in SDS-PAGE and western blotting indicative of collagen α-chains organized in a triple-helical structure. About 1 mg/larva human type II collagen is purified from silkworm skin, which shows a putative large scale of collagen production way. An activity assay of recombinant human type II collagen expressed by silkworm larvae demonstrated that the recombinant protein has considerable bioactive properties. Scanning electron microscopy of purified proteins clearly reveals randomly distributed and pitted structures. We conclude that the baculovirus-silkworm multigene expression system can be used as an efficient platform for express active human type II collagen and other complicated eukaryotic proteins.

  15. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (p<0.04) and showed a 3-fold increase in Young's modulus (p<0.04) at higher concentration. Furfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications.

  16. Collagen fibril diameter and alignment promote the quiescent keratocyte phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Muthusubramaniam, Lalitha; Peng, Lily; Zaitseva, Tatiana; Paukshto, Michael; Martin, George R.; Desai, Tejal

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how matrix nanotopography affects corneal fibroblast phenotype and matrix synthesis. To this end, corneal fibroblasts isolated from bovine corneas were grown on collagen nanofiber scaffolds of different diameters and alignment – 30 nm aligned fibrils (30A), 300 nm or larger aligned fibrils (300A), and 30 nm nonaligned fibrils (30NA) in comparison to collagen coated flat glass substrates (FC). Cell morphology was visualized using confocal microscopy. Quantitative PCR was used to measure expression levels of six target genes: the corneal crystallin - transketolase (TKT), the myofibroblast marker - α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), and four matrix proteins - collagen 1 (COL1), collagen 3 (COL3), fibronectin (FN) and biglycan. It was found that SMA expression was down-regulated and TKT expression was increased on all three collagen nanofiber substrates, compared to the FC control substrates. However, COL3 and biglycan expression was also significantly increased on 300A, compared to the FC substrates. Thus matrix nanotopography down-regulates the fibrotic phenotype, promotes formation of the quiescent keratocyte phenotype and influences matrix synthesis. These results have significant implications for the engineering of corneal replacements and for promoting regenerative healing of the cornea after disease and/or injury. PMID:22213336

  17. Monozygotic twins discordant for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa phenotype highlight the role of TGF-β signalling in modifying disease severity.

    PubMed

    Odorisio, Teresa; Di Salvio, Michela; Orecchia, Angela; Di Zenzo, Giovanni; Piccinni, Eugenia; Cianfarani, Francesca; Travaglione, Antonella; Uva, Paolo; Bellei, Barbara; Conti, Andrea; Zambruno, Giovanna; Castiglia, Daniele

    2014-08-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is a genodermatosis characterized by fragile skin forming blisters that heal invariably with scars. It is due to mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen, the major component of anchoring fibrils connecting the cutaneous basement membrane to the dermis. Identical COL7A1 mutations often result in inter- and intra-familial disease variability, suggesting that additional modifiers contribute to RDEB course. Here, we studied a monozygotic twin pair with RDEB presenting markedly different phenotypic manifestations, while expressing similar amounts of collagen VII. Genome-wide expression analysis in twins' fibroblasts showed differential expression of genes associated with TGF-β pathway inhibition. In particular, decorin, a skin matrix component with anti-fibrotic properties, was found to be more expressed in the less affected twin. Accordingly, fibroblasts from the more affected sibling manifested a profibrotic and contractile phenotype characterized by enhanced α-smooth muscle actin and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 expression, collagen I release and collagen lattice contraction. These cells also produced increased amounts of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Both TGF-β canonical (Smads) and non-canonical (MAPKs) pathways were basally more activated in the fibroblasts of the more affected twin. The profibrotic behaviour of these fibroblasts was suppressed by decorin delivery to cells. Our data show that the amount of type VII collagen is not the only determinant of RDEB clinical severity, and indicate an involvement of TGF-β pathways in modulating disease variability. Moreover, our findings identify decorin as a possible anti-fibrotic/inflammatory agent for RDEB therapeutic intervention.

  18. Hydroperoxide formation in model collagens and collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Madison, S A; McCallum, J E B; Rojas Wahl, R U

    2002-02-01

    Protein hydroperoxides represent a relatively new concept in understanding biological oxidation chemistry. Here, we show with post-column-chemiluminescence that this sometimes remarkably stable and yet reactive species can be formed in collagen models and collagen type I when submitted to oxidative stress as exemplified by the Fenton reaction. These findings are supported by mass spectrometry and iodometry. Using (Proline-hydroxyproline-glycine)(10) (POG)(10), those hydroperoxides are stable for hours at room temperature and can give rise to free radicals in the presence of ferrous sulphate, as evidenced by EPR spin trapping with DMPO. Possible implications for biological systems are discussed with emphasis on collagen in the extracellular matrix in skin as a major type of connective tissue.

  19. Developmental changes in skin collagen biosynthesis pathway in posthatch male and female chickens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, M.; Schickler, M.; Hurwitz, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1996-01-01

    The developmental changes in skin collagen biosynthesis pathway in male and female chickens were evaluated. Concentration of collagen, levels of mRNA for collagen type I subunits and for lysyl hydroxylase, and the level of three lysyl oxidase-derived cross-links: dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine (DHLNL), dehydro-hydroxylysinonorleucine (HLNL), and dehydro-histidinohydroxymerodesmosine (HHMD) were determined during 4 wk posthatching. Skin collagen content increased with age and was higher in males than in females. In both sexes, the expression of the genes coding for alpha 1 and alpha 2 of collagen type I decreased with age: alpha 1(I) gene expression decreased from Day 3 onwards, whereas the reduction in alpha 2(I) gene expression started 1 wk later. At all ages examined, the expression of both genes was higher in male than in female skin. Males and females lysyl hydroxylase gene expression remained low until Day 16, after which an increase in the enzyme gene expression was observed. An increase in skin HLNL content was observed from Day 3 in both sexes reaching a peak in males at Day 9 and in females 1 wk later. The DHLNL content, which was higher in males than in females at all ages tested, dramatically decreased in both male and female skin from 3 d of age, reaching its lowest level at Day 16, and remained at that low level thereafter. The skin content of HHMD in males and females followed an oscillatory behavior with higher peaks in the male skin. The results suggest that the higher tensile strength of male skin than female skin may be due to the elevated skin collagen content that resulted from increased expression in collagen type I genes on the one hand, and from the higher amounts of various collagen cross-links on the other.

  20. The Role of Collagen Quaternary Structure in the Platelet:Collagen Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Brass, Lawrence F.; Bensusan, Howard B.

    1974-01-01

    We have investigated whether collagen queternary structure is required for the platelet: collagen interaction. Quaternary structure refers to the assembly of collagen monomers (tropocollagen) into polymers (native-type fibrils). Purified monomeric collagen was prepared from acetic acid extracts of fetal calfskin. Polymeric collagen was prepared by dispersion of bovine Achilles tendon collagen and by incubation of monomeric collagen at 37°C and pH 7.4. The state of polymerization was confirmed by electron microscopy. Release of platelet serotonin in the absence of platelet aggregation was used to determine the effectiveness of the platelet: collagen interaction. All forms of collagen produced serotonin release only after a lag period, but polymeric collagen gave a shorter lag period than did monomeric collagen. Monomeric collagen was also quanidinated selectively to convert collagen lysine groups to homoarginine, while leaving the arrangement of polar groups intact. Guanidination of monomeric collagen increased the rate of polymerization and reduced the lag time in serotonin release. Glucosamine (17 mM) retarded polymerization and inhibited the release of platelet serotonin by monomeric collagen but had little effect on release produced by thrombin or polymeric collagen. At the same concentration, glucosamine did not reduce the sensitivity of platelets to stimulation by collagen or block the platelet: collagen interaction. The only effect of glucosamine was on the collagen: collagen interaction. Galactosamine had a similar effect, but glucose, galactose, and N-acetylglycosamine had no effect. We conclude from this data that collagen monomers cannot effectively interact with platelets and that, therefore, collagen quaternary structure has a role in the recognition of collagen by platelets. PMID:4215825

  1. Water-soluble undenatured type II collagen ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Orie; Shiojima, Yoshiaki; Moriyama, Hiroyoshi; Shinozaki, Junichi; Nakane, Takahisa; Masuda, Kazuo; Bagchi, Manashi

    2013-11-01

    Earlier studies have reported the efficacy of type II collagen (C II) in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, a few studies have investigated the ability of the antigenic collagen to induce oral tolerance, which is defined as active nonresponse to an orally administered antigen. We hypothesized that water-soluble undenatured C II had a similar effect as C II in RA. The present study was designed to examine the oral administration of a novel, water-soluble, undenatured C II (commercially known as NEXT-II) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. In addition, the underlying mechanism of NEXT-II was also identified. After a booster dose (collagen-Freund's complete adjuvant), mice were assigned to control CIA group, or NEXT-II treatment group, to which saline and NEXT-II were administered, respectively. The arthritis index in the NEXT-II group was significantly lower compared with the CIA group. Serum IL-6 levels in the NEXT-II group were significantly lower compared with the CIA group, while serum IL-2 level was higher. Furthermore, oral administration of NEXT-II enhanced the proportion of CD4+CD25+T (Treg) cells, and gene expressions of stimulated dendritic cells induced markers for regulatory T cells such as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and CD25. These results demonstrated that orally administered water-soluble undenatured C II (NEXT-II) is highly efficacious in the suppression of CIA by inducing CD4+CD25+ Treg cells.

  2. Mandibular Cartilage Collagen Network Nanostructure

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Berg-Foels, Wendy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mandibular condyle cartilage (MCC) has a unique structure among articular cartilages; however, little is known about its nanoscale collagen network architecture, hampering design of regeneration therapies and rigorous evaluation of regeneration experiment outcomes in preclinical research. Helium ion microscopy is a novel technology with a long depth of field that is uniquely suited to imaging open 3D collagen networks at multiple scales without obscuring conductive coatings. Objective The objective of this research was to image, at the micro- and nanoscales, the depth-dependent MCC collagen network architecture. Design MCC was collected from New Zealand white rabbits. Images of MCC zones were acquired using helium ion, transmission electron, and light microscopy. Network fibril and canal diameters were measured. Results For the first time, the MCC was visualized as a 3D collagen fibril structure at the nanoscale, the length scale of network assembly. Fibril diameters ranged from 7 to 110 nm and varied by zone. The articular surface was composed of a fine mesh that was woven through thin layers of larger fibrils. The fibrous zone was composed of approximately orthogonal lamellae of aligned fibrils. Fibrocyte processes surrounded collagen bundles forming extracellular compartments. The proliferative, mature, and hypertrophic zones were composed of a branched network that was progressively remodeled to accommodate chondrocyte hypertrophy. Osteoid fibrils were woven around osteoblast cytoplasmic processes to create numerous canals similar in size to canaliculi of mature bone. Conclusion This multiscale investigation advances our foundational understanding of the complex, layered 3D architecture of the MCC collagen network. PMID:27375843

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 modulates collagen matrices and wound repair

    PubMed Central

    LeBert, Danny C.; Squirrell, Jayne M.; Rindy, Julie; Broadbridge, Elizabeth; Lui, Yuming; Zakrzewska, Anna; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Meijer, Annemarie H.; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic injuries are characterized by leukocyte infiltration into tissues. Although matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Mmp9) has been implicated in both conditions, its role in wound repair remains unclear. We previously reported a zebrafish chronic inflammation mutant caused by an insertion in the hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor gene 1 (hai1; also known as spint1) that is characterized by epithelial extrusions and neutrophil infiltration into the fin. Here, we performed a microarray analysis and found increased inflammatory gene expression in the mutant larvae, including a marked increase in mmp9 expression. Depletion of mmp9 partially rescued the chronic inflammation and epithelial phenotypes, in addition to restoring collagen fiber organization, as detected by second-harmonic generation imaging. Additionally, we found that acute wounding induces epithelial cell mmp9 expression and is associated with a thickening of collagen fibers. Interestingly, depletion of mmp9 impaired this collagen fiber reorganization. Moreover, mmp9 depletion impaired tissue regeneration after tail transection, implicating Mmp9 in acute wound repair. Thus, Mmp9 regulates both acute and chronic tissue damage and plays an essential role in collagen reorganization during wound repair. PMID:26015541

  4. The evolution of fibrillar collagens: a sea-pen collagen shares common features with vertebrate type V collagen.

    PubMed

    Tillet, E; Franc, J M; Franc, S; Garrone, R

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular matrix of marine primitive invertebrates (sponges, polyps and jellyfishes) contains collagen fibrils with narrow diameters. From various data, it has been hypothesized that these primitive collagens could represent ancestral forms of the vertebrate minor collagens, i.e., types V or XI. Recently we have isolated a primitive collagen from the soft tissues of the sea-pen Veretillum cynomorium. This report examines whether the sea-pen collagen shares some features with vertebrate type V collagen. Rotary shadowed images of acid-soluble collagen molecules extracted from beta-APN treated animals, positive staining of segment-long-spacing crystallites precipitated from pepsinized collagen, Western blots of the pepsinized alpha1 and alpha2 chains with antibodies to vertebrate types I, III and V collagens, and in situ gold immunolabeling of ECM collagen fibrils were examined. Our results showed that the tissue form of the sea-pen collagen is a 340-nm threadlike molecule, which is close to the vertebrate type V collagen with its voluminous terminal globular domain, the distribution of most of its polar amino-acid residues, and its antigenic properties.

  5. Collagen crosslinks in chondromalacia of the patella.

    PubMed

    Väätäinen, U; Kiviranta, I; Jaroma, H; Arokosi, J; Tammi, M; Kovanen, V

    1998-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine collagen concentration and collagen crosslinks in cartilage samples from chondromalacia of the patella. To study the extracellular matrix alterations associated to chondromalacia, we determined the concentration of collagen (hydroxyproline) and its hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline crosslinks from chondromalacia foci of the patellae in 12 patients and 7 controls from apparently normal cadavers. The structure of the collagen network in 8 samples of grades II-IV chondromalacia was examined under polarized light microscopy. The full-thickness cartilage samples taken with a surgical knife from chondromalacia lesions did not show changes in collagen, hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline concentration as compared with the controls. Polarized light microscopy showed decreased birefringence in the superficial cartilage of chondromalacia lesions, indicating disorganization or disappearance of collagen fibers in this zone. It is concluded that the collagen network shows gradual disorganization with the severity of chondromalacia lesion of the patella without changes in the concentration or crosslinks of collagen.

  6. [Disc electrophoresis of collagen protein (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Reitmayr, P; Verzár, F

    1975-01-01

    The composition of proteins extracted from tendon collagen is investigated by disc electrophoresis. No qualitative differences can be demonstrated between young and old collagen. The action of formaldehyde and methionine on the tendons has no effect on the electrophoretic picture.

  7. Contraction-induced Mmp13 and -14 expression by goat articular chondrocytes in collagen type I but not type II gels.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Agnes D; Vonk, Lucienne A; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A

    2012-10-01

    Collagen gels are promising scaffolds to prepare an implant for cartilage repair but several parameters, such as collagen concentration and composition as well as cell density, should be carefully considered, as they are reported to affect phenotypic aspects of chondrocytes. In this study we investigated whether the presence of collagen type I or II in gel lattices affects matrix contraction and relative gene expression levels of matrix proteins, MMPs and the subsequent degradation of collagen by goat articular chondrocytes. Only floating collagen I gels, and not those attached or composed of type II collagen, contracted during a culture period of 12 days. This coincided with an upregulation of both Mmp13 and -14 gene expression, whereas Mmp1 expression was not affected. The release of hydroxyproline in the culture medium, indicating matrix degradation, was increased five-fold in contracted collagen I gels compared to collagen II gels without contraction. Furthermore, blocking contraction of collagen I gels by cytochalasin B inhibited Mmp13 and -14 expression and the release of hydroxyproline. The expression of cartilage-specific ECM genes was decreased in contracted collagen I gels, with increased numbers of cells with an elongated morphology, suggesting that matrix contraction induces dedifferentiation of chondrocytes into fibroblast-like cells. We conclude that the collagen composition of the gels affects matrix contraction by articular chondrocytes and that matrix contraction induces an increased Mmp13 and -14 expression as well as matrix degradation.

  8. Interleukin-13 modulates collagen homeostasis in human skin and keloid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Oriente, A; Fedarko, N S; Pacocha, S E; Huang, S K; Lichtenstein, L M; Essayan, D M

    2000-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-13 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases characterized by fibrosis. We describe the effects of IL-13 on collagen homeostasis from normal (NF) and keloid (KF) fibroblasts and compare these effects with those of IL-4 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta(1). Total collagen generation was up-regulated in NF after 48 h of stimulation by IL-13; in KF, IL-13 stimulated a more rapid collagen response. The kinetics and magnitude of collagen generation induced by IL-13 were equivalent to those induced by similar concentrations of IL-4 and TGF-beta(1). Collagen type I production paralleled total collagen generation from both NF and KF; however, IL-4-induced collagen type I and total collagen production from KF was more transient than that induced by either IL-13 or TGF-beta(1). Procollagen 1alpha1 gene expression was induced in KF by stimulation with IL-13 for 24 h. Moreover, IL-13 was unique among these three cytokines in its ability to induce gene expression for procollagen 3alpha1. Finally, IL-13 inhibited IL-1beta-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-3 production and enhanced tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 generation from NF; although similar effects were observed with IL-4, TGF-beta(1) transiently enhanced MMP-1 and MMP-3 generation without effecting TIMP-1. In KF, IL-13 and IL-4 inhibited MMP-3, whereas TGF-beta(1) enhanced MMP-3; TIMP-1 was unaffected by any of the three cytokines. These data demonstrate both the profibrotic effects of IL-13 on collagen homeostasis and the potential differential regulation of collagen homeostasis in fibroblast subtypes by IL-13.

  9. Type V Collagen in Health, Disease, and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mak, Ki M; Png, Chien Yi M; Lee, Danielle J

    2016-05-01

    Type V collagen (COLV) is a regulatory fibril-forming collagen. It has at least three different molecular isoforms-α1(V)2 α2(V), α1(V)3, and α1(V)α2(V)α3(V)-formed by combinations of three different polypeptide α chains-α1(V), α2(V), and α3(V). COL V is a relatively minor collagen of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Morphologically, COLV occurs as heterotypic fibrils with type I collagen (COLI), microfilaments, or 12-nm-thick fibrils. COLV is synthesized in various mesenchymal cells and its gene expression is modulated by TGF-β and growth factors. While resistant to digestion by interstitial collagenases, native and denatured COLV are degraded by metalloproteinases and gelatinases, thereby promoting ECM remodeling. COLV interacts with matrix collagens and structural proteins, conferring structural integrity to tissue scaffolds. It binds matrix macromolecules, modulating cellular behavior, and functions. COLV co-assembles with COLI into heterotypic fibrils in the cornea and skin dermis, acting as a dominant regulator of collagen fibrillogenesis. COLV deficiency is associated with loss of corneal transparency and classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, while COLV overexpression is found in cancer, granulation tissue, inflammation, atherosclerosis, and fibrosis of lungs, skin, kidneys, adipose tissue, and liver. COLV isoform containing the α3(V) chain is involved in mediating pancreatic islet cell functions. In the liver, COLV is a minor but regular component of the ECM. Increases in COLV are associated with both early and advanced hepatic fibrosis. The neoepitopes of COLV have been shown to be a useful noninvasive serum biomarker for assessing fibrotic progression and resolution in experimental hepatic fibrosis. COLV is multifunctional in health, disease, and fibrosis.

  10. Exposure to Mimivirus Collagen Promotes Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Hülsmeier, Andreas J.; Hochhold, Nina; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in animals, also occur in some recently described nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses such as Mimiviridae, which replicate in amoebae. To clarify the impact of viral collagens on the immune response of animals exposed to Mimiviridae, we have investigated the localization of collagens in Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus particles and the response of mice to immunization with mimivirus particles. Using protein biotinylation, we have first shown that viral collagen encoded by open reading frame L71 is present at the surface of mimivirus particles. Exposure to mimivirus collagens elicited the production of anti-collagen antibodies in DBA/1 mice immunized intradermally with mimivirus protein extracts. This antibody response also targeted mouse collagen type II and was accompanied by T-cell reactivity to collagen and joint inflammation, as observed in collagen-induced arthritis following immunization of mice with bovine collagen type II. The broad distribution of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses in the environment suggests that humans are constantly exposed to such large virus particles. A survey of blood sera from healthy human subjects and from rheumatoid arthritis patients indeed demonstrated that 30% of healthy-subject and 36% of rheumatoid arthritis sera recognized the major mimivirus capsid protein L425. Moreover, whereas 6% of healthy-subject sera recognized the mimivirus collagen protein L71, 22% of rheumatoid arthritis sera were positive for mimivirus L71. Accordingly, our study shows that environmental exposure to mimivirus represents a risk factor in triggering autoimmunity to collagens. PMID:24173233

  11. The materials science of collagen.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Vincent R; Yang, Wen; Meyers, Marc A

    2015-12-01

    Collagen is the principal biopolymer in the extracellular matrix of both vertebrates and invertebrates. It is produced in specialized cells (fibroblasts) and extracted into the body by a series of intra and extracellular steps. It is prevalent in connective tissues, and the arrangement of collagen determines the mechanical response. In biomineralized materials, its fraction and spatial distribution provide the necessary toughness and anisotropy. We review the structure of collagen, with emphasis on its hierarchical arrangement, and present constitutive equations that describe its mechanical response, classified into three groups: hyperelastic macroscopic models based on strain energy in which strain energy functions are developed; macroscopic mathematical fits with a nonlinear constitutive response; structurally and physically based models where a constitutive equation of a linear elastic material is modified by geometric characteristics. Viscoelasticity is incorporated into the existing constitutive models and the effect of hydration is discussed. We illustrate the importance of collagen with descriptions of its organization and properties in skin, fish scales, and bone, focusing on the findings of our group.

  12. β-Aminopropionitrile-Induced Reduction in Enzymatic Crosslinking Causes In Vitro Changes in Collagen Morphology and Molecular Composition

    PubMed Central

    Canelón, Silvia P.

    2016-01-01

    Type I collagen morphology can be characterized using fibril D-spacing, a metric which describes the periodicity of repeating bands of gap and overlap regions of collagen molecules arranged into collagen fibrils. This fibrillar structure is stabilized by enzymatic crosslinks initiated by lysyl oxidase (LOX), a step which can be disrupted using β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN). Murine in vivo studies have confirmed effects of BAPN on collagen nanostructure and the objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanism of these effects in vitro by measuring D-spacing, evaluating the ratio of mature to immature crosslinks, and quantifying gene expression of type I collagen and LOX. Osteoblasts were cultured in complete media, and differentiated using ascorbic acid, in the presence or absence of 0.25mM BAPN-fumarate. The matrix produced was imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and 2D Fast Fourier transforms were performed to extract D-spacing from individual fibrils. The experiment was repeated for quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses. The D-spacing distribution of collagen produced in the presence of BAPN was shifted toward higher D-spacing values, indicating BAPN affects the morphology of collagen produced in vitro, supporting aforementioned in vivo experiments. In contrast, no difference in gene expression was found for any target gene, suggesting LOX inhibition does not upregulate the LOX gene to compensate for the reduction in aldehyde formation, or regulate expression of genes encoding type I collagen. Finally, the mature to immature crosslink ratio decreased with BAPN treatment and was linked to a reduction in peak percent area of mature crosslink hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP). In conclusion, in vitro treatment of osteoblasts with low levels of BAPN did not induce changes in genes encoding LOX or type I collagen, but led to an increase in collagen D-spacing as well as

  13. Type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis: identification of abnormal type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, M; Hollister, D W

    1988-12-01

    We have extended the study of a mild case of type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis to include biochemical analyses of cartilage, bone, and the collagens produced by dermal fibroblasts. Type I collagen extracted from bone and types I and III collagen produced by dermal fibroblasts were normal, as was the hexosamine ratio of cartilage proteoglycans. Hyaline cartilage, however, contained approximately equal amounts of types I and II collagen and decreased amounts of type XI collagen. Unlike the normal SDS-PAGE mobility. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE revealed extensive overmodification of all type II cyanogen bromide peptides in a pattern consistent with heterozygosity for an abnormal pro alpha 1(II) chain which impaired the assembly and/or folding of type II collagen. This interpretation implies that dominant mutations of the COL2A1 gene may cause type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis. More generally, emerging data implicating defects of type II collagen in the type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis-spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita spectrum and in the Kniest-Stickler syndrome spectrum suggest that diverse mutations of this gene may be associated with widely differing phenotypic outcome.

  14. Structural constraints on the evolution of the collagen fibril: convergence on a 1014-residue COL domain

    PubMed Central

    Slatter, David Anthony; Farndale, Richard William

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is the fundamental component of the extracellular matrix. Its α1 gene is the direct descendant of ancestral fibrillar collagen and contains 57 exons encoding the rod-like triple-helical COL domain. We trace the evolution of the COL domain from a primordial collagen 18 residues in length to its present 1014 residues, the limit of its possible length. In order to maintain and improve the essential structural features of collagen during evolution, exons can be added or extended only in permitted, non-random increments that preserve the position of spatially sensitive cross-linkage sites. Such sites cannot be maintained unless the twist of the triple helix is close to 30 amino acids per turn. Inspection of the gene structure of other long structural proteins, fibronectin and titin, suggests that their evolution might have been subject to similar constraints. PMID:25994354

  15. The collagenous gastroenteritides: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Purva; McKenna, Barbara J

    2010-10-01

    Collagenous gastritis, collagenous sprue, and collagenous colitis share striking histologic similarities and occur together in some patients. They also share some drug and disease associations. Pediatric cases of collagenous gastritis, however, lack most of these associations. The etiologies of the collagenous gastroenteritides are not known, so it is not clear whether they are similar because they share pathogeneses, or because they indicate a common histologic response to varying injuries. The features, disease and drug associations, and the inquiries into the pathogenesis of these disorders are reviewed.

  16. Collagen I confers gamma radiation resistance.

    PubMed

    Azorin, E; González-Martínez, P R; Azorin, J

    2012-12-01

    The effect of collagen on the response of somatomammotroph tumor cells (GH3) to gamma, radiation therapy was studied in vitro. After incubating confluent GH3 cell monolayers in a serum-free, maintaining medium, either with or without collagen, the monolayers were irradiated with 137Cs, gamma radiation. Collagen reduces cell mortality via ERK1/2 activation, abolishing gamma radiation, cell death, and promotes cell invasion when acting in synergy with collagen and in association with the, MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway activation. The presence of collagen in somatomammotroph tumors, confers resistance to radiation.

  17. Collagen: a network for regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pawelec, K. M.; Best, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    The basic building block of the extra-cellular matrix in native tissue is collagen. As a structural protein, collagen has an inherent biocompatibility making it an ideal material for regenerative medicine. Cellular response, mediated by integrins, is dictated by the structure and chemistry of the collagen fibers. Fiber formation, via fibrillogenesis, can be controlled in vitro by several factors: pH, ionic strength, and collagen structure. After formation, fibers are stabilized via cross-linking. The final bioactivity of collagen scaffolds is a result of both processes. By considering each step of fabrication, scaffolds can be tailored for the specific needs of each tissue, improving their therapeutic potential. PMID:27928505

  18. Collagen interactions: Drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Collagen is a major component in a wide range of drug delivery systems and biomaterial applications. Its basic physical and structural properties, together with its low immunogenicity and natural turnover, are keys to its biocompatibility and effectiveness. In addition to its material properties, the collagen triple-helix interacts with a large number of molecules that trigger biological events. Collagen interactions with cell surface receptors regulate many cellular processes, while interactions with other ECM components are critical for matrix structure and remodeling. Collagen also interacts with enzymes involved in its biosynthesis and degradation, including matrix metalloproteinases. Over the past decade, much information has been gained about the nature and specificity of collagen interactions with its partners. These studies have defined collagen sequences responsible for binding and the high-resolution structures of triple-helical peptides bound to its natural binding partners. Strategies to target collagen interactions are already being developed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies to interfere with collagen fibril formation and the use of triple-helical peptides to direct liposomes to melanoma cells. The molecular information about collagen interactions will further serve as a foundation for computational studies to design small molecules that can interfere with specific interactions or target tumor cells. Intelligent control of collagen biological interactions within a material context will expand the effectiveness of collagen-based drug delivery.

  19. Proportion of collagen type II in the extracellular matrix promotes the differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells into nucleus pulposus cells.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yiqing; Zhou, Xiaopeng; Liu, Dongyu; Li, Hao; Liang, Chengzhen; Li, Fangcai; Chen, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    During degeneration process, the catabolism of collagen type II and anabolism of collagen type I in nucleus pulposus (NP) may influence the bioactivity of transplanted cells. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) were cultured as a micromass or in a series of gradual proportion hydrogels of a mix of collagen types I and II. Cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were detected using CCK-8 and LDH assays respectively. The expression of differentiation-related genes and proteins, including SOX9, aggrecan, collagen type I, and collagen type II, was examined using RT-qPCR and Western blotting. Novel phenotypic genes were also detected by RT-qPCR and western blotting. Alcian blue and dimethylmethylene blue assays were used to investigate sulfate proteoglycan expression, and PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK, and Smad signaling pathways were examined by Western blotting. The results showed collagen hydrogels have good biocompatibility, and cell proliferation increased after collagen type II treatment. Expressions of SOX9, aggrecan, and collagen type II were increased in a collagen type II dependent manner. Sulfate proteoglycan synthesis increased in proportion to collagen type II concentration. Only hADMSCs highly expressed NP cell marker KRT19 in collagen type II culture. Additionally, phosphorylated Smad3, which is associated with phosphorylated ERK, was increased after collagen type II-stimulation. The concentration and type of collagen affect hADMSC differentiation into NP cells. Collagen type II significantly ameliorates hADMSC differentiation into NP cells and promotes extracellular matrix synthesis. Therefore, anabolism of collagen type I and catabolism of type II may attenuate the differentiation and biosynthesis of transplanted stem cells.

  20. Activation of hageman factor by collagen

    PubMed Central

    Wilner, G. D.; Nossel, H. L.; LeRoy, E. C.

    1968-01-01

    Purified acid-soluble and insoluble human collagen accelerated the clotting of plateletpoor plasma in silicone-treated tubes. The clot-promoting effect did not appear to be due to thromboplastic activity since the collagen preparations did not activate factor X in the presence of factor VII and calcium. Instead, collagen appeared to accelerate clotting by activating Hageman factor (factor XII) on the basis of the following findings: collagen increased the clot-promoting activity of partially purified Hageman factor but exerted no further effect in the presence of kaolin, a known activator of Hageman factor; clot-promoting eluates were obtained from collagen exposed to normal, hemophilic, or PTC-deficient plasma but not from collagen exposed to Hageman or PTA-deficient plasma. The collagen molecule itself appeared to be required for the clot-promoting activity since digestion with collagenase or thermal denaturation at pH 2.5 (about 35°C) resulted in very marked reduction in clot-promoting activity. Since thermal denaturation is associated with transformation of collagen structure from triple helical to random coil form, it is suggested that the native form of collagen is essential for the ability to activate Hageman factor. Blockage of the free amino groups by treatment with nitrous acid or dinitrofluorobenzene only slightly reduced the clot-promoting activity of collagen. In contrast, since addition of cationic proteins to collagen markedly reduced pro-coagulant activity it is suggested that negatively charged sites on the collagen molecule are critical for Hageman factor activation. This suggestion is supported by the finding that pepsin treatment of collagen, which removes the predominantly negatively charged telopeptides, results in significant decrease in coagulant activity. Esterification of collagen, which neutralizes 80-90% of the free carboxyl groups, reduced coagulant activity by over 90% and it is suggested that the free carboxyl groups of glutamic and

  1. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  2. Immunostimulation effect of jellyfish collagen.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Takuya; Ueno, Masashi; Goto, Yoko; Shiraishi, Ryusuke; Doi, Mikiharu; Akiyama, Koichi; Yamauchi, Satoshi

    2006-09-01

    Certain edible large jellyfishes belonging to the order Rhizostomeae are consumed in large quantities in China and Japan. The exumbrella part of the edible jellyfish Stomolophus nomurai was cut and soaked in dilute hydrochloric acid solution (pH 3.0) for 12 h, and heated at 121 degrees C for 20 min. The immunostimulation effects of the jellyfish extract were examined. The jellyfish extract enhanced IgM production of human hybridoma HB4C5 cells 34-fold. IgM and IgG production of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were also accelerated, 2.8- and 1.4-fold respectively. Moreover, production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by human PBL was stimulated 100- and 17-fold respectively. Collagenase treatment inactivated the immunostimulation activity of the jellyfish extract. In addition, purified collagen from bovine Achilles' tendon accelerated IgM production of hybridoma cells. These facts mean that collagen has an immunostimulation effect, and that the active substance in jellyfish extract is collagen.

  3. Factors that influence transgene expression and cell viability on DNA-PEI-seeded collagen films.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jordan M; Roth, Charles M; Dunn, Michael G

    2005-01-01

    Gene delivery from tissue-engineering devices has the potential to improve healing, but better regulation of the level and duration of gene expression is needed. We hypothesized that transgene expression could be controlled by varying the fabrication and soaking parameters used in making collagen- based gene delivery scaffolds. Collagen films were made from acid-insoluble type I bovine dermal collagen and seeded with plasmid DNA encoding firefly luciferase, complexed with polyethylenimine. By varying the thickness of the films, the volume of the DNA soak solution, and the pH of the DNA soak solution, and by cross-linking the films, we identified variable combinations that produce significantly different levels of cell number and transgene expression in L-929 cells in vitro. Increasing film thickness or soak volume increased overall reporter gene expression. Decreasing film thickness or soak volume decreased cell number but did not significantly change reporter gene expression per cell. Cross-linking by ultraviolet irradiation (before adding the DNA) significantly decreased transgene expression, probably because of decreased swelling of the collagen film. These results suggest that collagen-based biomaterials may be designed and fabricated to induce, in a controlled fashion, various levels of cellularity and transgene expression.

  4. The induction of the collagen capsule synthesis by Trichinella spiralis is closely related to protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Bo Young; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-10-30

    The muscle-stage larvae of the parasite Trichinella spiralis have the ability to survive within host muscle tissue by virtue of the formation a nurse cell-parasite complex, which is surrounded by collagen. The formation of the complex is initiated by excretory-secretory (ES) proteins produced by the parasite. To determine the mechanisms underlying collagen capsule formation, we investigated the expression levels of several types of collagen genes and TGF-βI signaling-related genes (Smad2 and Smad3) in muscle cells. Synthesis of type I, IV, and VI collagen, which are major constituents of the collagen capsule, significantly increased during T. spiralis infection. In addition, we found that expression of the protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) gene was significantly increased during this period. Expression levels of the collagen genes and TGF-βI, Smad2, and Smad3 were induced by ES proteins and a PAR2 agonist, whereas their enhanced expression levels were reduced by a PAR2 antagonist and serine protease inhibitors. To evaluate the involvement of PAR2 during T. spiralis infection in vivo, we infected wild-type and PAR2 knockout (KO) mice with T. spiralis. Expression levels of type I, IV, and VI collagen genes and TGF-βI signaling-related genes (Smad2 and Smad3) were also decreased in the PAR2 KO mice. Phosphorylation of Smad2/3, which was increased by T. spiralis infection, was significantly diminished in the PAR2 KO mice. In conclusion, ES proteins containing serine protease most likely activate collagen synthesis via PAR2 and TGF-βI signaling, and this event could influence collagen capsule formation.

  5. A Novel Functional Role of Collagen Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Madsen, Daniel H.; Ingvarsen, Signe; Melander, Maria C.; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Patthy, Laszlo; Engelholm, Lars H.; Behrendt, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Collagens make up the most abundant component of interstitial extracellular matrices and basement membranes. Collagen remodeling is a crucial process in many normal physiological events and in several pathological conditions. Some collagen subtypes contain specific carbohydrate side chains, the function of which is poorly known. The endocytic collagen receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP)/Endo180 plays an important role in matrix remodeling through its ability to internalize collagen for lysosomal degradation. uPARAP/Endo180 is a member of the mannose receptor protein family. These proteins all include a fibronectin type II domain and a series of C-type lectin-like domains, of which only a minor part possess carbohydrate recognition activity. At least two of the family members, uPARAP/Endo180 and the mannose receptor, interact with collagens. The molecular basis for this interaction is known to involve the fibronectin type II domain but nothing is known about the function of the lectin domains in this respect. In this study, we have investigated a possible role of the single active lectin domain of uPARAP/Endo180 in the interaction with collagens. By expressing truncated recombinant uPARAP/Endo180 proteins and analyzing their interaction with collagens with high and low levels of glycosylation we demonstrated that this lectin domain interacts directly with glycosylated collagens. This interaction is functionally important because it was found to modulate the endocytic efficiency of the receptor toward highly glycosylated collagens such as basement membrane collagen IV. Surprisingly, this property was not shared by the mannose receptor, which internalized glycosylated collagens independently of its lectin function. This role of modulating its uptake efficiency by a specific receptor is a previously unrecognized function of collagen glycosylation. PMID:21768090

  6. The NC2 Domain of Collagen IX Provides Chain Selection and Heterotrimerization*

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Sergei P.; Zientek, Keith D.; Vance, Jesse; Hacker, Jessica L.; Engel, Jürgen; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of chain selection and trimerization of fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices (FACITs) differs from that of fibrillar collagens that have special C-propeptides. We recently showed that the second carboxyl-terminal non-collagenous domain (NC2) of homotrimeric collagen XIX forms a stable trimer and substantially stabilizes a collagen triple helix attached to either end. We then hypothesized a general trimerizing role for the NC2 domain in other FACITs. Here we analyzed the NC2 domain of human heterotrimeric collagen IX, the only member of FACITs with all three chains encoded by distinct genes. Upon oxidative folding of equimolar amounts of the α1, α2, and α3 chains of NC2, a stable heterotrimer with a disulfide bridge between α1 and α3 chains is formed. Our experiments show that this heterotrimerization domain can stabilize a short triple helix attached at the carboxyl-terminal end and allows for the proper oxidation of the cystine knot of type III collagen after the short triple helix. PMID:20507993

  7. Electrospun tilapia collagen nanofibers accelerating wound healing via inducing keratinocytes proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Nanping; Xue, Yang; Ding, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Mo, Xiumei; Sun, Jiao

    2016-07-01

    The development of biomaterials with the ability to induce skin wound healing is a great challenge in biomedicine. In this study, tilapia skin collagen sponge and electrospun nanofibers were developed for wound dressing. The collagen sponge was composed of at least two α-peptides. It did not change the number of spleen-derived lymphocytes in BALB/c mice, the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+) lymphocytes, and the level of IgG or IgM in Sprague-Dawley rats. The tensile strength and contact angle of collagen nanofibers were 6.72±0.44MPa and 26.71±4.88°, respectively. They also had good thermal stability and swelling property. Furthermore, the nanofibers could significantly promote the proliferation of human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and stimulate epidermal differentiation through the up-regulated gene expression of involucrin, filaggrin, and type I transglutaminase in HaCaTs. The collagen nanofibers could also facilitate rat skin regeneration. In the present study, electrospun biomimetic tilapia skin collagen nanofibers were succesfully prepared, were proved to have good bioactivity and could accelerate rat wound healing rapidly and effectively. These biological effects might be attributed to the biomimic extracellular matrix structure and the multiple amino acids of the collagen nanofibers. Therefore, the cost-efficient tilapia collagen nanofibers could be used as novel wound dressing, meanwhile effectively avoiding the risk of transmitting animal disease in the future clinical apllication.

  8. Condensed cellular seeded collagen gel as an improved biomaterial for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Rath, Ralf; Gavénis, Karsten; Andereya, Stefan; Mumme, Torsten; Albrand, Monique; Stoffel, Marcus; Weichert, Dieter; Schneider, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional autologous chondrocyte implantation based on collagen gel as matrix scaffold has become a clinically applied treatment for focal defects of articular cartilage. However, the low biomechanical properties of collagen gel makes intraoperative handling difficult and creates the risk of early damages to the vulnerable implant. The aim of the study was to create a stabilized form of collagen gel and to evaluate its biomechanical and biochemical properties.Collagen type-I gel was seeded with human articular chondrocytes. 20 samples were subject to condensation which was achieved mechanically by compression and filtration. Control samples were left uncondensed. From both types of gels 10 samples were used for initial biomechanical evaluation by means of unconfined compression and 10 samples were cultivated under standard conditions in vitro. Following cultivation the samples were evaluated by conventional histology and immunohistochemistry. The proliferation rate was calculated and matrix gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR.The biomechanical tests revealed a higher force carrying capacity of the condensed specimens. Strain rate dependency and relaxation was seen in both types of collagen gel representing viscoelastic material properties. Cells embedded within the condensed collagen gel were able to produce extracellular matrix proteins and showed proliferation.Condensed collagen gel represents a mechanically improved type of biomaterial which is suitable for three-dimensional autologous chondrocyte implantation.

  9. Thermogelling chitosan and collagen composite hydrogels initiated with beta-glycerophosphate for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Limin; Stegemann, Jan P

    2010-05-01

    Chitosan and collagen type I are naturally derived materials used as cell carriers because of their ability to mimic the extracellular environment and direct cell function. In this study beta-glycerophosphate (beta-GP), an osteogenic medium supplement and a weak base, was used to simultaneously initiate gelation of pure chitosan, pure collagen, and chitosan-collagen composite materials at physiological pH and temperature. Adult human bone marrow-derived stem cells (hBMSC) encapsulated in such hydrogels at chitosan/collagen ratios of 100/0, 65/35, 25/75, and 0/100 wt% exhibited high viability at day 1 after encapsulation, but DNA content dropped by about half over 12 days in pure chitosan materials while it increased twofold in materials containing collagen. Collagen-containing materials compacted more strongly and were significantly stiffer than pure chitosan gels. In monolayer culture, exposure of hBMSC to beta-GP resulted in decreased cell metabolic activity that varied with concentration and exposure time, but washing effectively removed excess beta-GP from hydrogels. The presence of chitosan in materials resulted in higher expression of osterix and bone sialoprotein genes in medium with and without osteogenic supplements. Chitosan also increased alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition in osteogenic medium. Chitosan-collagen composite materials have potential as matrices for cell encapsulation and delivery, or as in situ gel-forming materials for tissue repair.

  10. Jellyfish collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Birgit; Bernhardt, Anne; Lode, Anja; Heinemann, Sascha; Sewing, Judith; Klinger, Matthias; Notbohm, Holger; Gelinsky, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Porous scaffolds were engineered from refibrillized collagen of the jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum for potential application in cartilage regeneration. The influence of collagen concentration, salinity and temperature on fibril formation was evaluated by turbidity measurements and quantification of fibrillized collagen. The formation of collagen fibrils with a typical banding pattern was confirmed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis. Porous scaffolds from jellyfish collagen, refibrillized under optimized conditions, were fabricated by freeze-drying and subsequent chemical cross-linking. Scaffolds possessed an open porosity of 98.2%. The samples were stable under cyclic compression and displayed an elastic behavior. Cytotoxicity tests with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) did not reveal any cytotoxic effects of the material. Chondrogenic markers SOX9, collagen II and aggrecan were upregulated in direct cultures of hMSCs upon chondrogenic stimulation. The formation of typical extracellular matrix components was further confirmed by quantification of sulfated glycosaminoglycans.

  11. Collagen-coated microparticles in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Praveen Kumar; Srinivasan, Aishwarya

    2009-07-01

    Advantages of drug-incorporated collagen particles have been described for the controlled delivery system for therapeutic actions. The attractiveness of collagen lies in its low immunogenicity and high biocompatibility. It is also recognized by the body as a natural constituent rather than a foreign body. Our research and development efforts are focused towards addressing some of the limitations of collagen, like the high viscosity of an aqueous phase, nondissolution in neutral pH buffers, thermal instability (denaturation) and biodegradability, to make it an ideal material for drug delivery with particular reference to microparticles. These limitations could be overcome by making collagen conjugates with other biomaterials or chemically modifying collagen monomer without affecting its triple helical conformation and maintaining its native properties. This article highlights collagen microparticles' present status as a carrier in drug delivery.

  12. Collagen-Based Biomaterials for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Sayani; Raines, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    With its wide distribution in soft and hard connective tissues, collagen is the most abundant of animal proteins. In vitro, natural collagen can be formed into highly organized, three-dimensional scaffolds that are intrinsically biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic upon exogenous application, and endowed with high tensile strength. These attributes make collagen the material of choice for wound healing and tissue engineering applications. In this article, we review the structure and molecular interactions of collagen in vivo; the recent use of natural collagen in sponges, injectables, films and membranes, dressings, and skin grafts; and the on-going development of synthetic collagen mimetic peptides as pylons to anchor cytoactive agents in wound beds. PMID:24633807

  13. Stress controls the mechanics of collagen networks

    PubMed Central

    Licup, Albert James; Münster, Stefan; Sharma, Abhinav; Sheinman, Michael; Jawerth, Louise M.; Fabry, Ben; Weitz, David A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is the main structural and load-bearing element of various connective tissues, where it forms the extracellular matrix that supports cells. It has long been known that collagenous tissues exhibit a highly nonlinear stress–strain relationship, although the origins of this nonlinearity remain unknown. Here, we show that the nonlinear stiffening of reconstituted type I collagen networks is controlled by the applied stress and that the network stiffness becomes surprisingly insensitive to network concentration. We demonstrate how a simple model for networks of elastic fibers can quantitatively account for the mechanics of reconstituted collagen networks. Our model points to the important role of normal stresses in determining the nonlinear shear elastic response, which can explain the approximate exponential relationship between stress and strain reported for collagenous tissues. This further suggests principles for the design of synthetic fiber networks with collagen-like properties, as well as a mechanism for the control of the mechanics of such networks. PMID:26195769

  14. Stress controls the mechanics of collagen networks.

    PubMed

    Licup, Albert James; Münster, Stefan; Sharma, Abhinav; Sheinman, Michael; Jawerth, Louise M; Fabry, Ben; Weitz, David A; MacKintosh, Fred C

    2015-08-04

    Collagen is the main structural and load-bearing element of various connective tissues, where it forms the extracellular matrix that supports cells. It has long been known that collagenous tissues exhibit a highly nonlinear stress-strain relationship, although the origins of this nonlinearity remain unknown. Here, we show that the nonlinear stiffening of reconstituted type I collagen networks is controlled by the applied stress and that the network stiffness becomes surprisingly insensitive to network concentration. We demonstrate how a simple model for networks of elastic fibers can quantitatively account for the mechanics of reconstituted collagen networks. Our model points to the important role of normal stresses in determining the nonlinear shear elastic response, which can explain the approximate exponential relationship between stress and strain reported for collagenous tissues. This further suggests principles for the design of synthetic fiber networks with collagen-like properties, as well as a mechanism for the control of the mechanics of such networks.

  15. Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 Mediates Collagen-Induced Activation of Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase in Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Majkowska, Iwona; Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Ito, Noriko; Gray, Nathanael S; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2017-03-07

    Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-bound MMP that is highly expressed in cells with invading capacity including fibroblasts and invasive cancer cell. A potential physiological stimulus for MT1-MMP expression is fibrillar collagen, and it has been shown that it upregulates both MT1-MMP gene and functions in various cell types. However, the mechanisms of collagen-mediated MT1-MMP activation is not clearly understood. In this study we identified discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) as a crucial receptor that mediates this process in human fibroblasts. Knocking down DDR2, but not β1 integrin subunit, a common subunit for all collagen-binding integrins, inhibited collagen-induced activation of proMMP-2 and upregulation of MT1-MMP at the gene and protein level. Interestingly DDR2 knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of DDR2 also inhibited MT1-MMP-dependent cellular degradation of collagen film, suggesting that cell surface collagen degradation by MT1-MMP involves DDR2-mediated collagen signalling. This DDR2-mediated mechanism is only present in non-transformed mesenchymal cells, as collagen-induced MT1-MMP activation in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells and MT1-MMP function in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells were not affected by DDR kinase inhibition. DDR2 activation was found to be noticeably more effective when cells were stimulated by collagen without non-helical telopeptides region compared to intact collagen fibrils. Those data suggest that DDR2 is a microenvironmental sensor that regulates fibroblasts migration in collagen-rich environment.

  16. A subset of myofibroblastic cancer-associated fibroblasts regulate collagen fiber elongation, which is prognostic in multiple cancers.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Christopher J; Noble, Fergus; Ward, Matthew; Bullock, Marc; Drifka, Cole; Mellone, Massimiliano; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Johnston, Harvey E; Hayden, Annette; Thirdborough, Steve; Liu, Yuming; Smith, David M; Mellows, Toby; Kao, W John; Garbis, Spiros D; Mirnezami, Alex; Underwood, Tim J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Thomas, Gareth J

    2016-02-02

    Collagen structure has been shown to influence tumor cell invasion, metastasis and clinical outcome in breast cancer. However, it remains unclear how it affects other solid cancers. Here we utilized multi-photon laser scanning microscopy and Second Harmonic Generation to identify alterations to collagen fiber structure within the tumor stroma of head & neck, esophageal and colorectal cancers. Image segmentation algorithms were then applied to quantitatively characterize these morphological changes, showing that elongated collagen fibers significantly correlated with poor clinical outcome (Log Rank p < 0.05). We used TGF-β treatment to model fibroblast conversion to smooth muscle actin SMA-positive cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and found that these cells induce the formation of elongated collagen fibers in vivo. However, proteomic/transcriptomic analysis of SMA-positive CAFs cultured ex-vivo showed significant heterogeneity in the expression of genes with collagen fibril organizing gene ontology. Notably, stratifying patients according to stromal SMA-positivity and collagen fiber elongation was found to provide a highly significant correlation with poor survival in all 3 cancer types (Log Rank p ≤ 0.003). In summary, we show that increased collagen fiber length correlates with poor patient survival in multiple tumor types and that only a sub-set of SMA-positive CAFs can mediate the formation of this collagen structure.

  17. Enhanced osteoprogenitor elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by bioactive glass ionic silicon dependent on Sp7 (osterix) transcription.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Venu G; Odatsu, Tetsurou; Bishop, Timothy; Chang, Joyce; Owyoung, Jeremy; Loomer, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive glasses release ions, those enhance osteoblast collagen matrix synthesis and osteogenic marker expression during bone healing. Collagen matrix density and osteogenic marker expression depend on osteogenic transcription factors, (e.g., Osterix (OSX)). We hypothesize that enhanced expression and formation of collagen by Si(4+) depends on enhanced expression of OSX transcription. Experimental bioactive glass (6P53-b) and commercial Bioglass(TM) (45S5) were dissolved in basal medium to make glass conditioned medium (GCM). ICP-MS analysis was used to measure bioactive glass ion release rates. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured for 20 days, and gene expression and extracellular matrix collagen formation was analyzed. In a separate study, siRNA was used to determine the effect of OSX knockdown on impacting the effect of Si(4+) on osteogenic markers and matrix collagen formation. Each bioactive glass exhibited similar ion release rates for all ions, except Mg(2+) released by 6P53-b. Gene expression results showed that GCM markedly enhanced many osteogenic markers, and 45S5 GCM showed higher levels of expression and collagen matrix fiber bundle density than 6P53-b GCM. Upon knockdown of OSX transcription, collagen type 5, alkaline phosphatase, and matrix density were not enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This study illustrates that the enhancement of elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by Si(±) depends on OSX transcription. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2604-2615, 2016.

  18. A subset of myofibroblastic cancer-associated fibroblasts regulate collagen fiber elongation, which is prognostic in multiple cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Christopher J.; Noble, Fergus; Ward, Matthew; Bullock, Marc; Drifka, Cole; Mellone, Massimiliano; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Johnston, Harvey E.; Hayden, Annette; Thirdborough, Steve; Liu, Yuming; Smith, David M.; Mellows, Toby; Kao, W. John; Garbis, Spiros D.; Mirnezami, Alex; Underwood, Tim J.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen structure has been shown to influence tumor cell invasion, metastasis and clinical outcome in breast cancer. However, it remains unclear how it affects other solid cancers. Here we utilized multi-photon laser scanning microscopy and Second Harmonic Generation to identify alterations to collagen fiber structure within the tumor stroma of head & neck, esophageal and colorectal cancers. Image segmentation algorithms were then applied to quantitatively characterize these morphological changes, showing that elongated collagen fibers significantly correlated with poor clinical outcome (Log Rank p < 0.05). We used TGF-β treatment to model fibroblast conversion to smooth muscle actin SMA-positive cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and found that these cells induce the formation of elongated collagen fibers in vivo. However, proteomic/transcriptomic analysis of SMA-positive CAFs cultured ex-vivo showed significant heterogeneity in the expression of genes with collagen fibril organizing gene ontology. Notably, stratifying patients according to stromal SMA-positivity and collagen fiber elongation was found to provide a highly significant correlation with poor survival in all 3 cancer types (Log Rank p ≤ 0.003). In summary, we show that increased collagen fiber length correlates with poor patient survival in multiple tumor types and that only a sub-set of SMA-positive CAFs can mediate the formation of this collagen structure. PMID:26716418

  19. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Michael S. Yu CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Utah Salt Lake City, UT 84112 REPORT DATE: October 2015 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual...SUBTITLE Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0555 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...peptide (CMP) as a collagen targeting agents that will allow imaging of invasive PCa. Since CMP binds to unstructured collagens more readily, it is

  20. STUDIES ON THE FORMATION OF COLLAGEN

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Jerome

    1958-01-01

    Some properties of cold neutral salt extracts of fresh guinea pig dermis have been described in terms of viscosity, electrophoresis and sedimentation patterns, partial composition, the collagen content, conditions for extraction of collagen, and the effect of certain enzymes. Viscosity of the extracts depended on the collagen in solution as demonstrated by removal of this protein by precipitation or enzymatic degradation. The intrinsic viscosity of the crude 0.45 M extract, as well as that of the isolated collagen was 14.5, identical with that for collagen dissolved by dilute acid, indicating the same high asymmetry ratio for both. Electrophoresis of the skin extracts revealed a slow moving, high, sharp, poorly diffusing boundary in addition to a pattern superficially resembling that of serum. The ultracentrifuge pattern revealed a slowly sedimenting, hypersharp boundary following a large rapidly diffusing peak. The slow moving boundaries in both patterns were abolished by collagenase or heat precipitation of the collagen fraction. Hyaluronidase had no effect on either pattern. Neutral sulfate, chloride, and phosphate extracted more collagen than did thiocyanate. Very little collagen was extracted at 37°C. as compared with that removed at 3°C. A two stage fractionation procedure employing dilute trichloroacetic acid and ethanol is described for the isolation and purification of soluble collagen from crude extracts. PMID:13491760

  1. Ultrananocrystalline diamond thin films functionalized with therapeutically active collagen networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Chen, M.; Bruno, P.; Lam, R.; Robinson, E.; Gruen, D.; Ho, D.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2009-01-01

    The fabrication of biologically amenable interfaces in medicine bridges translational technologies with their surrounding biological environment. Functionalized nanomaterials catalyze this coalescence through the creation of biomimetic and active substrates upon which a spectrum of therapeutic elements can be delivered to adherent cells to address biomolecular processes in cancer, inflammation, etc. Here, we demonstrate the robust functionalization of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) with type I collagen and dexamethasone (Dex), an anti-inflammatory drug, to fabricate a hybrid therapeutically active substrate for localized drug delivery. UNCD oxidation coupled with a pH-mediated collagen adsorption process generated a comprehensive interface between the two materials, and subsequent Dex integration, activity, and elution were confirmed through inflammatory gene expression assays. These studies confer a translational relevance to the biofunctionalized UNCD in its role as an active therapeutic network for potent regulation of cellular activity toward applications in nanomedicine.

  2. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo; Kim, So Young; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Taehoon G.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify a function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in Hs27. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YIGSR peptide enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis both of gene and protein levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There were no changes in cell proliferation and MMP-1 level in YIGSR treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR effect on collagen synthesis mediated activation of FAK, pyk2 and ERK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR-induced FAK and ERK activation was modulated by FAK and MEK inhibitors. -- Abstract: The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the {beta}1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67 kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate

  3. Hagfish and lancelet fibrillar collagens reveal that type II collagen-based cartilage evolved in stem vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangjun; Cohn, Martin J

    2006-11-07

    The origin of vertebrates was defined by evolution of a skeleton; however, little is known about the developmental mechanisms responsible for this landmark evolutionary innovation. In jawed vertebrates, cartilage matrix consists predominantly of type II collagen (Col2alpha1), whereas that of jawless fishes has long been thought to be noncollagenous. We recently showed that Col2alpha1 is present in lamprey cartilage, indicating that type II collagen-based cartilage evolved earlier than previously recognized. Here, we investigate the origin of vertebrate cartilage, and we report that hagfishes, the sister group to lampreys, also have Col2alpha1-based cartilage, suggesting its presence in the common ancestor of crown-group vertebrates. We go on to show that lancelets, a sister group to vertebrates, possess an ancestral clade A fibrillar collagen (ColA) gene that is expressed in the notochord. Together, these results suggest that duplication and diversification of ColA genes at the chordate-vertebrate transition may underlie the evolutionary origin of vertebrate skeletal tissues.

  4. Effect of FGF-2 on collagen tissue regeneration by human vertebral bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Soo; Park, Jung-Chul; Lee, Jung-Seok; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Ki-Joon; Jung, Byung-Joo; Shim, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Eun-Young; Park, So-Yon; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Kim, Chang-Sung

    2015-01-15

    The effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) on collagen tissue regeneration by human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) were investigated. hBMSCs were isolated from human vertebral body bone marrow during vertebral surgery and a population of hBMSCs with the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells was observed. The FGF-2 treatment (5 ng/mL) affected on the colony-forming efficiency, proliferation, and in vitro differentiation of hBMSCs. Insoluble/soluble collagen and hydroxyproline synthesis was significantly enhanced in hBMSCs expanded with FGF-2 and the treatment of FGF-2 caused a reduction in the mRNA expression of collagen type I, but an increase of collagen types II and III along with lysyl oxidase family genes. Collagen formation was also examined using an in vivo assay model by transplanting hBMSCs into immunocompromised mice (n=4) and the histologic and immunohistochemical results revealed that significantly more collagen with a well-organized structure was formed by FGF-2-treated hBMSCs at 8 weeks posttransplantation (P<0.05). The DNA microarray assay demonstrated that genes related to extracellular matrix formation were significantly upregulated. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, chemical inhibitors against extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) were treated and following downstream expression was observed. Collectively, FGF-2 facilitated the collagen-producing potency of hBMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, rendering them more suitable for use in collagen regeneration in the clinical field.

  5. Sea urchin collagen evolutionarily homologous to vertebrate pro-alpha 2(I) collagen.

    PubMed

    Exposito, J Y; D'Alessio, M; Solursh, M; Ramirez, F

    1992-08-05

    We isolated several overlapping cDNA clones covering the 4242 nucleotides of a Strongylocentrotus purpuratus transcript that codes for a fibrillar procollagen chain. The sea urchin polypeptide includes a 124-amino acid long amino pre-propeptide, a 1064-amino acid alpha-chain inclusive of 338 uninterrupted Gly-X-Y repeats, and a 226-residue carboxyl-propeptide. The distribution of the highly conserved cysteines within the last domain together with the structural configuration of the amino-propeptide and the organization of the corresponding coding region, strongly suggest that the sea urchin gene is evolutionarily related to the vertebrate pro-alpha 2(I) collagen. This work, therefore, represents the first report of the complete primary structure of an invertebrate fibrillar procollagen chain. It also provides a new insight into the evolution of the amino-propeptide, the most divergent among the major protein domains of fibrillar procollagen chains.

  6. Nanolayered Features of Collagen-like Peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valluzzi, Regina; Bini, Elisabetta; Haas, Terry; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2003-01-01

    We have been investigating collagen-like model oligopeptides as molecular bases for complex ordered biomimetic materials. The collagen-like molecules incorporate aspects of native collagen sequence and secondary structure. Designed modifications to native primary and secondary structure have been incorporated to control the nanostructure and microstructure of the collagen-like materials produced. We find that the collagen-like molecules form a number of lyotropic rod liquid crystalline phases, which because of their strong temperature dependence in the liquid state can also be viewed as solvent intercalated thermotropic liquid crystals. The liquid crystalline phases formed by the molecules can be captured in the solid state by drying off solvent, resulting in solid nanopatterned (chemically and physically) thermally stable (to greater than 100 C) materials. Designed sequences which stabilize smectic phases have allowed a variety of nanoscale multilayered biopolymeric materials to be developed. Preliminary investigations suggest that chemical patterns running perpendicular to the smectic layer plane can be functionalized and used to localize a variety of organic, inorganic, and organometallic moieties in very simple multilayered nanocomposites. The phase behavior of collagen-like oligopeptide materials is described, emphasizing the correlation between mesophase, molecular orientation, and chemical patterning at the microscale and nanoscale. In many cases, the textures observed for smectic and hexatic phase collagens are remarkably similar to the complex (and not fully understood) helicoids observed in biological collagen-based tissues. Comparisons between biological morphologies and collagen model liquid crystalline (and solidified materials) textures may help us understand the molecular features which impart order and function to the extracellular matrix and to collagen-based mineralized tissues. Initial studies have utilized synthetic collagen-like peptides while

  7. Collagen structure: new tricks from a very old dog.

    PubMed

    Bella, Jordi

    2016-04-15

    The main features of the triple helical structure of collagen were deduced in the mid-1950s from fibre X-ray diffraction of tendons. Yet, the resulting models only could offer an average description of the molecular conformation. A critical advance came about 20 years later with the chemical synthesis of sufficiently long and homogeneous peptides with collagen-like sequences. The availability of these collagen model peptides resulted in a large number of biochemical, crystallographic and NMR studies that have revolutionized our understanding of collagen structure. High-resolution crystal structures from collagen model peptides have provided a wealth of data on collagen conformational variability, interaction with water, collagen stability or the effects of interruptions. Furthermore, a large increase in the number of structures of collagen model peptides in complex with domains from receptors or collagen-binding proteins has shed light on the mechanisms of collagen recognition. In recent years, collagen biochemistry has escaped the boundaries of natural collagen sequences. Detailed knowledge of collagen structure has opened the field for protein engineers who have used chemical biology approaches to produce hyperstable collagens with unnatural residues, rationally designed collagen heterotrimers, self-assembling collagen peptides, etc. This review summarizes our current understanding of the structure of the collagen triple helical domain (COL×3) and gives an overview of some of the new developments in collagen molecular engineering aiming to produce novel collagen-based materials with superior properties.

  8. [Collagen diseases with gastrointestinal manifestations].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Ohara, Mikiko; Imai, Kohzoh

    2004-06-01

    Collagen vascular diseases are known to present with a diverse array of gastrointestinal manifestations. These can be classified as: 1) gastrointestinal damage due to the collagen vascular disease itself; 2) adverse events caused by pharmacotherapies; or 3) gastrointestinal infections following immunosuppression due to corticosteroid (CS) administration. The first group includes lupus enteritis and protein-losing gastroenteropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), reflux esophagitis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and pneumatosis cystoids intestinalis in systemic sclerosis, amyloidosis in rheumatoid arthritis, bowel ulcer and bleeding in rheumatoid vasculitis and microscopic polyangiitis, and ileocecal ulcer in Behcet disease. In particular, colonic ulcers associated with SLE represent refractory lesions resistant to CS. Analysis of reported cases showing colonic lesions with SLE (22 cases in Japan) revealed that mean duration of SLE was 9.9 years and 77% of colonic lesions were observed in the rectum and sigmoid colon. Half of the patients developed intestinal perforation or penetration, and 6 of the 11 patients with perforation died. The second group includes lesions in the small and large intestine due to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and CSs, in addition to peptic ulcers. As perforation in CS-treated patients displays relatively high incidence with poor prognosis, careful attention to such complications is needed. The third group includes candidal esophagitis and cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis. Prompt diagnosis is required to prevent colonic bleeding and perforation due to CMV.

  9. Laser welding and collagen crosslinks

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, K.M.; Last, J.A.; Small, W. IV; Maitland, D.J.; Heredia, N.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.

    1997-02-20

    Strength and stability of laser-welded tissue may be influenced, in part, by effects of laser exposure on collagen crosslinking. We therefore studied effects of diode laser exposure (805 nm, 1-8 watts, 30 seconds) + indocyanine green dye (ICG) on calf tail tendon collagen crosslinks. Effect of ICG dye alone on crosslink content prior to laser exposure was investigated; unexpectedly, we found that ICG-treated tissue had significantly increased DHLNL and OHP, but not HLNL. Laser exposure after ICG application reduced elevated DHLNL and OHP crosslink content down to their native levels. The monohydroxylated crosslink HLNL was inversely correlated with laser output (p<0.01 by linear regression analysis). DHLNL content was highly correlated with content of its maturational product, OHP, suggesting that precursor-product relations are maintained. We conclude that: (1)ICG alone induces DHLNL and OHP crosslink formation; (2)subsequent laser exposure reduces the ICG-induced crosslinks down to native levels; (3)excessive diode laser exposure destroys normally occurring HLNL crosslinks.

  10. Thioamides in the collagen triple helix†

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Robert W.; VanVeller, Brett

    2015-01-01

    To probe noncovalent interactions within the collagen triple helix, backbone amides were replaced with a thioamide isostere. This subtle substitution is the first in the collagen backbone that does not compromise thermostability. A triple helix with a thioamide as a hydrogen bond donor was found to be more stable than triple helices assembled from isomeric thiopeptides. PMID:25967743

  11. Oriented collagen nanocoatings for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pastorino, Laura; Dellacasa, Elena; Scaglione, Silvia; Giulianelli, Massimo; Sbrana, Francesca; Vassalli, Massimo; Ruggiero, Carmelina

    2014-02-01

    Collagens are among the most widely present and important proteins composing the human total body, providing strength and structural stability to various tissues, from skin to bone. In this paper, we report an innovative approach to bioactivate planar surfaces with oriented collagen molecules to promote cells proliferation and alignment. The Langmuir-Blodgett technique was used to form a stable collagen film at the air-water interface and the Langmuir-Schaefer deposition was adopted to transfer it to the support surface. The deposition process was monitored by estimating the mass of the protein layers after each deposition step. Collagen films were then structurally characterized by atomic force, scanning electron and fluorescent microscopies. Finally, collagen films were functionally tested in vitro. To this aim, 3T3 cells were seeded onto the silicon supports either modified or not (control) by collagen film deposition. Cells adhesion and proliferation on collagen films were found to be greater than those on control both after 1 (p<0.05) and 7 days culture. Moreover, the functionalization of the substrate surface triggered a parallel orientation of cells when cultured on it. In conclusion, these data demonstrated that the Langmuir-Schaefer technique can be successfully used for the deposition of oriented collagen films for tissue engineering applications.

  12. Thioamides in the collagen triple helix.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Robert W; VanVeller, Brett; Raines, Ronald T

    2015-06-14

    To probe noncovalent interactions within the collagen triple helix, backbone amides were replaced with a thioamide isostere. This subtle substitution is the first in the collagen backbone that does not compromise thermostability. A triple helix with a thioamide as a hydrogen bond donor was found to be more stable than triple helices assembled from isomeric thiopeptides.

  13. Structure, physiology, and biochemistry of collagens.

    PubMed

    Mienaltowski, Michael J; Birk, David E

    2014-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments are connective tissues that guide motion, share loads, and transmit forces in a manner that is unique to each as well as the anatomical site and biomechanical stresses to which they are subjected. Collagens are the major molecular components of both tendons and ligaments. The hierarchical structure of tendon and its functional properties are determined by the collagens present, as well as their supramolecular organization. There are 28 different types of collagen that assemble into a variety of supramolecular structures. The assembly of specific supramolecular structures is dependent on the interaction with other matrix molecules as well as the cellular elements. Multiple suprastructural assemblies are integrated to form the functional tendon/ligament. This chapter begins with a discussion of collagen molecules. This is followed by a definition of the supramolecular structures assembled by different collagen types. The general principles involved in the assembly of collagen-containing suprastructures are presented focusing on the regulation of tendon collagen fibrillogenesis. Finally, site-specific differences are discussed. While generalizations can be made, differences exist between different tendons as well as between tendons and ligaments. Compositional differences will impact structure that in turn will determine functional differences. Elucidation of the unique physiology and pathophysiology of different tendons and ligaments will require an appreciation of the role compositional differences have on collagen suprastructural assembly, tissue organization, and function.

  14. Polarization effects in SHG of collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Paul; Cox, Guy C.; Ramshaw, John A. M.; Lukins, Philip B.; Sheppard, Colin J. R.

    2004-06-01

    The polarization dependence of the second harmonic emission of purified in-vitro reconstituted fibrils of collagen has been examined. The results confirmed the quasi-hexagonal crystalline structure within the fibrils. Interesting different polarization behaviours were seen between collagen types I and II, which can be utilized as an experimental technique for differentiation.

  15. Influence of collagen source on fibrillar architecture and properties of vitrified collagen membranes.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Shoumyo; Guo, Qiongyu; Garza-Madrid, Marcos; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Duan, Derek; Carbajal, Priscilla; Schein, Oliver; Trexler, Morgana; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Collagen vitrigel membranes are transparent biomaterials characterized by a densely organized, fibrillar nanostructure that show promise in the treatment of corneal injury and disease. In this study, the influence of different type I collagen sources and processing techniques, including acid-solubilized collagen from bovine dermis (Bov), pepsin-solubilized collagen from human fibroblast cell culture (HuCC), and ficin-solubilized collagen from recombinant human collagen expressed in tobacco leaves (rH), on the properties of the vitrigel membranes was evaluated. Postvitrification carbodiimide crosslinking (CX) was also carried out on the vitrigels from each collagen source, forming crosslinked counterparts BovXL, HuCCXL, and rHXL, respectively. Collagen membrane ultrastructure and biomaterial properties were found to rely heavily on both collagen source and crosslinking. Bov and HuCC samples showed a random fibrillar organization of collagen, whereas rH vitrigels showed remarkable regional fibril alignment. After CX, light transmission was enhanced in all groups. Denaturation temperatures after CX increased in all membranes, of which the highest increase was seen in rH (14.71°C), suggesting improved thermal stability of the collagen fibrils in the membranes. Noncrosslinked rH vitrigels may be reinforced through CX to reach levels of mechanical strength and thermal stability comparable to Bov.

  16. A novel benign solution for collagen processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoult, Olivier

    Collagen is the main protein constituting the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tissues in the body (skin, cartilage, blood vessels...). It exists many types of collagen, this work studies only fibrillar collagen (e.g. collagen type I contained in the skin) that exhibits a triple helical structure composed of 3 alpha-helical collagen chains. This particular and defined hierarchical structure is essential to the biological and mechanical properties of the collagen. Processing collagen into scaffolds to mimic the ECM is crucial for successful tissue engineering. Recently collagen was processed into fibrous and porous scaffold using electrospinning process. However the solvent (HFIP) used for electrospinning is extremely toxic for the user and expensive. This work shows that HFIP can be replaced by a benign mixture composed of water, salt and alcohol. Yet only three alcohols (methanol, ethanol and iso-propanol) enable the dissolution of large quantity of collagen in the benign mixture, with a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, and conserve the collagen hierarchical structure at least as well as the HFIP. Collagen can be electrospun from the benign mixture into sub-micron fibers with concentrations as low as 6 wt-% for a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, with at least 10wt-% of salt, and any of the three alcohols. Specific conditions yield nano size fibers. After processing from HFIP or a benign mixture, collagen is water soluble and needs to be chemically crosslink for tissue engineering application. Post-crosslinking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) results in the loss of the scaffold fibrous aspect and porosity, hence it is useless for tissue engineering. Such issue could be prevented by incorporating the crosslinker into the mixture prior to electrospinning. When EDC is used alone, collagen forms a gel in the mixture within minutes, preventing electrospinning. The addition of N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in excess to EDC

  17. Molecular level detection and localization of mechanical damage in collagen enabled by collagen hybridizing peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitnay, Jared L.; Li, Yang; Qin, Zhao; San, Boi Hoa; Depalle, Baptiste; Reese, Shawn P.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yu, S. Michael; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical injury to connective tissue causes changes in collagen structure and material behaviour, but the role and mechanisms of molecular damage have not been established. In the case of mechanical subfailure damage, no apparent macroscale damage can be detected, yet this damage initiates and potentiates in pathological processes. Here, we utilize collagen hybridizing peptide (CHP), which binds unfolded collagen by triple helix formation, to detect molecular level subfailure damage to collagen in mechanically stretched rat tail tendon fascicle. Our results directly reveal that collagen triple helix unfolding occurs during tensile loading of collagenous tissues and thus is an important damage mechanism. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a likely mechanism for triple helix unfolding is intermolecular shearing of collagen α-chains. Our results elucidate a probable molecular failure mechanism associated with subfailure injuries, and demonstrate the potential of CHP targeting for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of tissue disease and injury.

  18. Molecular level detection and localization of mechanical damage in collagen enabled by collagen hybridizing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zitnay, Jared L.; Li, Yang; Qin, Zhao; San, Boi Hoa; Depalle, Baptiste; Reese, Shawn P.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yu, S. Michael; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical injury to connective tissue causes changes in collagen structure and material behaviour, but the role and mechanisms of molecular damage have not been established. In the case of mechanical subfailure damage, no apparent macroscale damage can be detected, yet this damage initiates and potentiates in pathological processes. Here, we utilize collagen hybridizing peptide (CHP), which binds unfolded collagen by triple helix formation, to detect molecular level subfailure damage to collagen in mechanically stretched rat tail tendon fascicle. Our results directly reveal that collagen triple helix unfolding occurs during tensile loading of collagenous tissues and thus is an important damage mechanism. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggest that a likely mechanism for triple helix unfolding is intermolecular shearing of collagen α-chains. Our results elucidate a probable molecular failure mechanism associated with subfailure injuries, and demonstrate the potential of CHP targeting for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of tissue disease and injury. PMID:28327610

  19. Matrix metalloproteinase interactions with collagen and elastin

    PubMed Central

    Van Doren, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Most abundant in the extracellular matrix are collagens, joined by elastin that confers elastic recoil to the lung, aorta, and skin. These fibrils are highly resistant to proteolysis but can succumb to a minority of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Considerable inroads to understanding how such MMPs move to the susceptible sites in collagen and then unwind the triple helix of collagen monomers have been gained. The essential role in unwinding of the hemopexin-like domain of interstitial collagenases or the collagen binding domain of gelatinases is highlighted. Elastolysis is also facilitated by the collagen binding domain in the cases of MMP-2 and MMP-9, and remote exosites of the catalytic domain in the case of MMP-12. PMID:25599938

  20. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di

    2015-03-15

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations.

  1. Bioengineered collagens: emerging directions for biomedical materials.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, John A M; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications.

  2. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di

    2015-03-01

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations.

  3. A targeted mutation at the known collagenase cleavage site in mouse type I collagen impairs tissue remodeling

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Degradation of type I collagen, the most abundant collagen, is initiated by collagenase cleavage at a highly conserved site between Gly775 and Ile776 of the alpha 1 (I) chain. Mutations at or around this site render type I collagen resistant to collagenase digestion in vitro. We show here that mice carrying a collagenase-resistant mutant Col1a-1 transgene die late in embryo-genesis, ascribable to overexpression of the transgene, since the same mutation introduced into the endogenous Col1a-1 gene by gene targeting permitted normal development of mutant mice to young adulthood. With increasing age, animals carrying the targeted mutation developed marked fibrosis of the dermis similar to that in human scleroderma. Postpartum involution of the uterus in the mutant mice was also impaired, with persistence of collagenous nodules in the uterine wall. Although type I collagen from the homozygous mutant mice was resistant to cleavage by human or rat fibroblast collagenases at the helical site, only the rat collagenase cleaved collagen trimers at an additional, novel site in the nonhelical N-telopeptide domain. Our results suggest that cleavage by murine collagenase at the N-telopeptide site could account for resorption of type I collagen during embryonic and early adult life. During intense collagen resorption, however, such as in the immediate postpartum uterus and in the dermis later in life, cleavage at the helical site is essential for normal collagen turnover. Thus, type I collagen is degraded by at least two differentially controlled mechanisms involving collagenases with distinct, but overlapping, substrate specificities. PMID:7790374

  4. Guide to collagen characterization for biomaterial studies.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Leah C; Zuena, Erin; Perez-Ramirez, Bernardo; Kaplan, David L

    2008-10-01

    The structure and remodeling of collagen in vivo is critical to the pathology and healing of many human diseases, as well as to normal tissue development and regeneration. In addition, collagen matrices in the form of fibers, coatings, and films are used extensively in biomaterial and biomedical applications. The specific properties of these matrices, both in terms of physical and chemical characteristics, have a direct impact on cellular adhesion, spreading, and proliferation rates, and ultimately on the rate and extent of new extracellular matrix formation in vitro or in vivo. In recent studies, it has also been shown that collagen matrix structure has a major impact on cell and tissue outcomes related to cellular aging and differentiation potential. Collagen structure is complex because of both diversity of source materials, chemistry, and structural hierarchy. With such significant impact of collagen features on biological outcomes, it becomes essential to consider an appropriate set of analytical tools, or guide, so that collagens attained from commercial vendors are characterized in a comparative manner as an integral part of studies focused on biological parameters. The analysis should include as a starting point: (a) structural detail-mainly focused on molecular mass, purity, helical content, and bulk thermal properties, (b) chemical features-mainly focused on surface elemental analysis and hydrophobicity, and (c) morphological features at different length scales. The application of these analytical techniques to the characterization of collagen biomaterial matrices is critical in order to appropriately correlate biological responses from different studies with experimental outcomes in vitro or in vivo. As a case study, the analytical tools employed for collagen biomaterial studies are reviewed in the context of collagen remodeling by fibroblasts. The goal is to highlight the necessity of understanding collagen biophysical and chemical features as a

  5. Mechanisms and Dynamics of Collagen Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jinhui; Friddle, Raymond; Wang, Debin; de Yoreo, Jim

    2013-03-01

    Collagen is the major structural protein of bone, dentine and it template the nucleation of biomineral phases. Both collagen conformation and architecture on substrate are critical for its function. We studied the mechanism of collagen I assembly on mica by in-situ AFM. At acidic condition, assembled architecture evolved from random fibers to co-aligned fibers and finally to bundles as the K+ concentration increased from 100 to 300mM. XPS and NEXAFS showed the concentration of K+ within the collagen layer increased and the intensity of absorption peak due to π*(C =O) resonance decreased with higher K+concentration. The magnitude of collagen-mica (C-M) and collagen-collagen (C-C) interactions were measured by dynamic force spectroscopy. The free energy ΔGb for C-M and C-C at 200mM K+were 13.7kT and 1.4kT, while ΔGb at 300mM K+ were 5.7kT and 12.3kT, respectively. The switch from co-aligned fibers to 3D bundles is driven by the reversal in the magnitude of C-C and C-M interactions. Our results indicate K+ complex with C =O of collagen and its effect on the strength of collagen-collagen bridging is the likely source of architecture control. Authors would like to acknowledge grant no. DK61673 from the National Institutes of Health. Theoretical analysis was supported by Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract no. DE-AC02-05CH1123.

  6. Liver collagen synthesis in murine schistosomiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, M A; Rojkind, M; Warren, K S; Hait, P K; Rifas, L; Seifter, S

    1977-01-01

    Collagen synthesis was measured in liver slices obtained from mice with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis. Enlarged fibrotic livers from these mice contained 20 times more collagen than normal. This model of hepatic fibrosis results from an inflammatory granulomatous host response to Schistosoma mansoni ova in portal tracts, rather than from direct lover cell injury as with carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Collagen synthesis, as measured by the formation of labeled protein-bound hydroxyproline, occurred in granulomas isolated from fibrotic livers. Labeled collagen that cochromatographed with type I collagen was extracted with neutral salt solution from liver slices incubated with labeled proline. The free proline pool of the liver was doubled in infected mice; coordinately, liver slices from these animals showed maximal collagen production when the concentration of free proline in the medium was raised to 0.4 mM, the same level measured in the fibrotic livers. Under such conditions, collagen synthesis was at a rate equivalent to the formation of 5.4 nmol of protein-bound hydroxyproline per g liver in 6 h. In comparative incubations in medium containing 0.2 mM proline, fibrotic liver slices produced 16-fold more collagen than normal slices. The proline analogue, L-azetidine 2-carboxylic acid, effectively inhibited synthesis of labeled collagen by fibrotic liver slices. These studies show the synthesis of collagen in a reproducible animal model of the most prevalent form of human liver fibrosis. Difinitition of the controlling factors in this system is of interest for the general problem of fibrosis produced by immunological responses. Images PMID:845255

  7. Hepatocytes in collagen sandwich: evidence for transcriptional and translational regulation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The influence of extracellular matrix configuration on the tissue- specific function of cultured hepatocytes was investigated. Adult rat hepatocytes sandwiched between two layers of collagen gel were compared to cells cultured on a single layer of collagen gel for differences in the total RNA content, the level of albumin-specific mRNA, the rate of albumin gene transcription, and the rate of albumin mRNA translation. Adult hepatocytes in the sandwich system maintained the level of albumin mRNA similar to that found in the normal liver for at least six weeks, whereas the level of albumin mRNA declined rapidly in the single gel system. After one week of culture, hepatocytes in the single gel system could be induced to recover the high level of albumin mRNA and albumin production when a second layer of collagen gel was overlaid at that time. Furthermore, sandwiched hepatocytes maintained significantly higher transcriptional activity compared to cells in the single gel system. In addition to transcriptional control, the ultimate rate of albumin production was shown to depend on the rate of translation, which increased with culture time and reached a plateau in one to two weeks. This increase in translational activity over time in culture was observed in both the sandwich and the single gel systems and, thus, appeared to be independent of the configuration of extracellular matrix. PMID:1734019

  8. Immunomodulatory effects of amniotic membrane matrix incorporated into collagen scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hortensius, Rebecca A.; Ebens, Jill H.; Harley, Brendan A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Adult tendon wound repair is characterized by the formation of disorganized collagen matrix which leads to decreases in mechanical properties and scar formation. Studies have linked this scar formation to the inflammatory phase of wound healing. Instructive biomaterials designed for tendon regeneration are often designed to provide both structural and cellular support. In order to facilitate regeneration, success may be found by tempering the body’s inflammatory response. This work combines collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds, previously developed for tissue regeneration, with matrix materials (hyaluronic acid and amniotic membrane) that have been shown to promote healing and decreased scar formation in skin studies. The results presented show that scaffolds containing amniotic membrane matrix have significantly increased mechanical properties and that tendon cells within these scaffolds have increased metabolic activity even when the media is supplemented with the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta. Collagen scaffolds containing hyaluronic acid or amniotic membrane also temper the expression of genes associated with the inflammatory response in normal tendon healing (TNF-α, COLI, MMP-3). These results suggest that alterations to scaffold composition, to include matrix known to decrease scar formation in vivo, can modify the inflammatory response in tenocytes. PMID:26799369

  9. Loss of Interneuron-Derived Collagen XIX Leads to a Reduction in Perineuronal Nets in the Mammalian Telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianmin; Cole, James; Fox, Michael A

    2017-02-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are lattice-like supramolecular assemblies of extracellular glycoproteins that surround subsets of neuronal cell bodies in the mammalian telencephalon. PNNs emerge at the end of the critical period of brain development, limit neuronal plasticity in the adult brain, and are lost in a variety of complex brain disorders diseases, including schizophrenia. The link between PNNs and schizophrenia led us to question whether neuronally expressed extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules associated with schizophrenia contribute to the assembly of these specialized supramolecular ECM assemblies. We focused on collagen XIX-a minor, nonfibrillar collagen expressed by subsets of telencephalic interneurons. Genetic alterations in the region encoding collagen XIX have been associated with familial schizophrenia, and loss of this collagen in mice results in altered inhibitory synapses, seizures, and the acquisition of schizophrenia-related behaviors. Here, we demonstrate that loss of collagen XIX also results in a reduction of telencephalic PNNs. Loss of PNNs was accompanied with reduced levels of aggrecan (Acan), a major component of PNNs. Despite reduced levels of PNN constituents in collagen XIX-deficient mice ( col19a1(-)(/)(-)), we failed to detect reduced expression of genes encoding these ECM molecules. Instead, we discovered a widespread upregulation of extracellular proteases capable of cleaving Acan and other PNN constituents in col19a1(-)(/)(-) brains. Taken together, these results suggest a mechanism by which the loss of collagen XIX speeds PNN degradation and they identify a novel mechanism by which the loss of collagen XIX may contribute to complex brain disorders.

  10. Tenascin-X, Collagen, Elastin and the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, James; Carey, William; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2005-08-31

    Tenascin-X is an extracellular matrix protein initially identified because of its overlap with the human CYP21B gene. Because studies of gene and protein function of other tenascins had been poorly predictive of essential functions in vivo, we used a genetic approach that critically relied on an understanding of the genomic locus to uncover an association between inactivating tenascin-X mutations and novel recessive and dominant forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Tenascin-X provides the first example of a gene outside of the fibrillar collagens and their processing enzymes that causes Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Tenascin-X null mice recapitulate the skin findings of the human disease, confirming a causative role for this gene in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Further evaluation of these mice showed that tenascin-X is an important regulator of collagen deposition in vivo, suggesting a novel mechanism of disease in this form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Further studies suggest that tenascin-X may do this through both direct and indirect interactions with the collagen fibril. Recent studies show that TNX effects on matrix extend beyond the collagen to the elastogenic pathway and matrix remodeling enzymes. Tenascin-X serves as a compelling example of how human experiments of nature can guide us to an understanding of genes whose function may not be evident from their sequence or in vitro studies of their encoded proteins.

  11. Changes induced by ozone and ultraviolet light in type I collagen. Bovine Achilles tendon collagen versus rat tail tendon collagen.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, E

    1985-10-15

    High-molecular-mass aggregates were made soluble from insoluble collagens of bovine Achilles tendon and rat tail tendon by limited thermal hydrolysis. These polymeric collagen aggregates were cross-linked by 390-nm-fluorescent 3-hydroxy-pyridinium residues (excited at 325 nm) in the former tendon and by unknown non-fluorescent residues in the latter. With the solubilized insoluble-collagens from both tendons, as well as with acid-soluble collagen from rat tail tendon, other 350-385-nm fluorescence intensities (excited at 300 nm) were found to be higher in monomeric chains than in dimeric and polymeric chains. Low levels of ozone inhibited fibril formation of acid-soluble collagen particularly from young rat tail tendon, reacting with tyrosine residues and the 350-385-nm fluorophores. Aldehyde groups, involved in cross-linking, were not effectively modified by ozone. beta-Components (alpha-chain dimers) were not efficiently dissociated even by higher doses of ozone compared to gamma-components (alpha-chain trimers). Polymeric chain aggregates from bovine Achilles tendon collagen, whose 3-hydroxy-pyridinium cross-links are cleaved by ozone, were more readily dissociated by ozone than those from rat tail tendon collagen. Ultraviolet (300-nm) light, which destroyed the 350-385-nm fluorophores, inhibited fibril formation less effectively than ultraviolet (275-nm) light, which is absorbed by tyrosine residues, and did not dissociate collagen polymers from rat tail tendon. On the other hand, ultraviolet (320-nm) light, absorbed by 3-hydroxy-pyridinium cross-links which were rapidly photolyzed, partially dissociated polymeric collagen aggregates from bovine Achilles tendon after subsequent heating.

  12. The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180 in tissue degradation and cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Melander, Maria C; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Madsen, Daniel H; Engelholm, Lars H; Behrendt, Niels

    2015-10-01

    The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180, the product of the MRC2 gene, is a central component in the collagen turnover process governed by various mesenchymal cells. Through the endocytosis of collagen or large collagen fragments, this recycling receptor serves to direct basement membrane collagen as well as interstitial collagen to lysosomal degradation. This capacity, shared only with the mannose receptor from the same protein family, endows uPARAP/Endo180 with a critical role in development and homeostasis, as well as in pathological disruptions of the extracellular matrix structure. Important pathological functions of uPARAP/Endo180 have been identified in various cancers and in several fibrotic conditions. With a particular focus on matrix turnover in cancer, this review presents the necessary background for understanding the function of uPARAP/Endo180 at the molecular and cellular level, followed by an in-depth survey of the available knowledge of the expression and role of this receptor in various types of cancer and other degenerative diseases.

  13. The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180 in tissue degradation and cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MELANDER, MARIA C.; JÜRGENSEN, HENRIK J.; MADSEN, DANIEL H.; ENGELHOLM, LARS H.; BEHRENDT, NIELS

    2015-01-01

    The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180, the product of the MRC2 gene, is a central component in the collagen turnover process governed by various mesenchymal cells. Through the endocytosis of collagen or large collagen fragments, this recycling receptor serves to direct basement membrane collagen as well as interstitial collagen to lysosomal degradation. This capacity, shared only with the mannose receptor from the same protein family, endows uPARAP/Endo180 with a critical role in development and homeostasis, as well as in pathological disruptions of the extracellular matrix structure. Important pathological functions of uPARAP/Endo180 have been identified in various cancers and in several fibrotic conditions. With a particular focus on matrix turnover in cancer, this review presents the necessary background for understanding the function of uPARAP/Endo180 at the molecular and cellular level, followed by an in-depth survey of the available knowledge of the expression and role of this receptor in various types of cancer and other degenerative diseases. PMID:26316068

  14. Repair of Avascular Meniscus Tears with Electrospun Collagen Scaffolds Seeded with Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jihye; Sovani, Sujata; Glembotski, Nicholas E; Du, Jiang; Jin, Sungho; Grogan, Shawn P; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2016-03-01

    The self-healing capacity of an injured meniscus is limited to the vascularized regions and is especially challenging in the inner avascular regions. As such, we investigated the use of human meniscus cell-seeded electrospun (ES) collagen type I scaffolds to produce meniscal tissue and explored whether these cell-seeded scaffolds can be implanted to repair defects created in meniscal avascular tissue explants. Human meniscal cells (derived from vascular and avascular meniscal tissue) were seeded on ES scaffolds and cultured. Constructs were evaluated for cell viability, gene expression, and mechanical properties. To determine potential for repair of meniscal defects, human meniscus avascular cells were seeded and cultured on aligned ES collagen scaffolds for 4 weeks before implantation. Surgical defects resembling "longitudinal tears" were created in the avascular zone of bovine meniscus and implanted with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds and cultured for 3 weeks. Tissue regeneration and integration were evaluated by histology, immunohistochemistry, mechanical testing, and magentic resonance imaging. Ex vivo implantation with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds resulted in neotissue that was significantly better integrated with the native tissue than acellular collagen scaffolds or untreated defects. Human meniscal cell-seeded ES collagen scaffolds may therefore be useful in facilitating meniscal repair of avascular meniscus tears.

  15. Differential co-expression of long and short form type IX collagen transcripts during avian limb chondrogenesis in ovo.

    PubMed

    Swiderski, R E; Solursh, M

    1992-05-01

    Using RNA blot analysis of developmentally staged avian limb buds, we demonstrate that transcripts of several cartilage marker genes appear in limb tissue prior to overt chondrogenesis. Type II collagen mRNA, cartilage proteoglycan core protein mRNA, alpha 2(IX) collagen mRNA, and transcripts of the short form alpha 1(IX) collagen chain derived from the downstream promoter are co-expressed in limb tissue approximately 24-36 hours before the appearance of the respective polypeptides in differentiating cartilagenous tissue. Transcripts of the long form alpha 1(IX) collagen chain derived from the upstream promoter appear somewhat later in development; nearly coincident with the immunolocalization of type IX collagen in the cartilage elements of the limb. The spatial distribution of type II and type IX collagen transcripts was analyzed by in situ hybridization. Type II collagen and the long form alpha 1(IX) collagen transcripts co-localized in the chondrogenic elements of the developing forelimb. In contrast, short form alpha 1(IX) collagen transcripts which lack the 5' region encoding the NC4 globular amino-terminal domain were distributed throughout the non-chondrogenic, non-myogenic mesenchymal regions of the limb and were not detectable above background levels in the limb chondrogenic elements. The precocious appearance of several cartilage marker gene transcripts prior to chondrogenesis suggests that multiple levels of gene regulation including alternative promoter use, alternative RNA splicing, alternative polyadenylation, and other post-transcriptional as well as translational mechanisms are active prior to, and during avian limb chondrogenesis.

  16. Dysregulation of collagen production in diabetes following recurrent skin injury: contribution to the development of a chronic wound.

    PubMed

    Caskey, Robert C; Zgheib, Carlos; Morris, Michael; Allukian, Myron; Dorsett-Martin, Wanda; Xu, Junwang; Wu, Wenjie; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent injury has been implicated in the development of chronic diabetic wounds. We have developed a chronic diabetic wound model based upon recurrent injury in diabetic mice. We hypothesized that dysregulation of collagen production at both the mRNA and microRNA levels contributes to the development of chronic diabetic wounds. To test this, both diabetic and nondiabetic mice were made to undergo recurrent injury. Real-time PCR for TGF-β1, SMAD-3, Col1α1, Col3α1, microRNA-25, and microRNA-29a and Western blot for collagen I and III were performed 7 days following each injury. Diabetic wounds displayed decreased collagen at all time points. This was associated with dysregulated collagen production at both the gene and microRNA levels at all time points. Following the final injury, however, diabetic collagen production significantly improved. This appeared to be due to a substantial decrease in both microRNAs as well as an increase in the expression of collagen pathway genes. That dysregulated collagen production progressed throughout the course of wounding suggests that this is one factor contributing to the development of chronic diabetic wounds. Future studies using this model will allow for the determination of other factors that may also contribute to the development and/or persistence of chronic diabetic wounds.

  17. Aging decreases collagen IV expression in vivo in the dermo-epidermal junction and in vitro in dermal fibroblasts: possible involvement of TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Feru, Jezabel; Delobbe, Etienne; Ramont, Laurent; Brassart, Bertrand; Terryn, Christine; Dupont-Deshorgue, Aurelie; Garbar, Christian; Monboisse, Jean-Claude; Maquart, Francois-Xavier; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Collagen IV is a major component of the dermo-epidermal junction (DEJ). To study expression of collagen IV upon aging in the DEJ and dermal fibroblasts isolated from the same patients. A model of senescent fibroblasts was developed in order to identify biological compounds that might restore the level of collagen IV. Skin fragments of women (30 to 70 years old) were collected. Localisation of collagen IV expression in the DEJ was studied by immunofluorescence. Fibroblast collagen IV expression was studied by real-time PCR, ELISA, and western blotting. Premature senescence was simulated by exposing fibroblasts to subcytotoxic H2O2 concentrations. Collagen IV decreased in the DEJ and fibroblasts relative to age. TGF-β1 treatment significantly increased collagen IV gene and protein expression in fibroblasts and restored expression in the model of senescence. Addition of TGF-β1-neutralizing antibody to fibroblast cultures decreased collagen IV expression. Taken together, the results suggest that the decrease in collagen IV in the DEJ, relative to age, could be due to a decrease in collagen IV expression by senescent dermal fibroblasts and may involve TGF-β1 signalling.

  18. Structure, evolution and expression of collagen XXVIII: Lessons from the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Jan M; Kobbe, Birgit; Paulsson, Mats; Wagener, Raimund

    2016-01-01

    Collagen XXVIII is the last discovered member of the collagen superfamily and thus has been only sparsely investigated. We studied collagen XXVIII in zebrafish to gain insight into its structure, evolution and expression. In contrast to human and mouse, the zebrafish genome contains four collagen XXVIII genes, col28a1a and -b, and col28a2a and -b. Genomic context and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the a2 branch was lost during evolution of mammals, whereas the duplication of the a1 and a2 branches results from the whole genome duplication in the teleost lineage. Sequence analysis revealed conservation of domain structure and the unique imperfections in the triple helical domain. Two major forms of collagen XXVIII were identified, Col28a1b in adult and Col28a2a in 3-5dpf zebrafish. Composite agarose/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that both these chains mainly form dimers of trimers, although Col28a1b appears to be more polydisperse. Homodimers are abundant, although it is possible that complexes consisting of Col28a2a and Col28a1a or -a2b occur. Peptide mass fingerprint analysis revealed that the C-terminal Kunitz domain is often proteolytically processed. In contrast to murine collagen XXVIII, the zebrafish orthologs are widely expressed and not only present in the nervous system. They are differentially expressed in the liver, thymus, muscle, intestine and skin. Altogether our results point to a unique nature of collagen XXVIII within the collagen family.

  19. Discoidin domain receptor 2 inhibits fibrillogenesis of collagen type 1.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Cosmin; Iscru, Daniel F; Druhan, Lawrence J; Elton, Terry S; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2006-09-01

    Discoidin domain receptors (DDR1 and DDR2) are widely expressed cell-surface receptors, which bind to and are activated by collagens, including collagen type 1. Activation of DDRs and the resulting downstream signaling is known to regulate the extracellular matrix. However, little is known about how DDRs interact with collagen and its direct impact on collagen regulation. Here, we have established that by binding to collagen, the extracellular domain (ECD) of DDR2 inhibits collagen fibrillogenesis and alters the morphology of collagen type 1 fibers. Our in vitro assays utilized DDR2-Fc fusion proteins, which contain only the ECD of DDR2. Using surface plasmon resonance, we confirmed that further oligomerization of DDR2-Fc (by means of anti-Fc antibody) greatly enhances its binding to immobilized collagen type 1. Collagen turbidity measurements and biochemical assays indicated that DDR2 delays the formation of collagen fibrils. Atomic force microscopy of soluble collagen revealed that a predominately monomeric state of collagen was present with DDR2, while control solutions had an abundance of polymeric collagen. Transmission electron microscopy of collagen fibers, showed that the native periodic banded structure of collagen fibers was weakened and nearly absent in the presence of DDR2. Further, using a cell-based assay we demonstrate that overexpression of full length DDR2 inhibits fibrillogenesis of collagen type 1. Our results demonstrate a novel and important functional role of the DDR2 ECD that may contribute to collagen regulation via modulation of fibrillogenesis.

  20. Nonlinear optical response of the collagen triple helix and second harmonic microscopy of collagen liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniset-Besseau, A.; De Sa Peixoto, P.; Duboisset, J.; Loison, C.; Hache, F.; Benichou, E.; Brevet, P.-F.; Mosser, G.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2010-02-01

    Collagen is characterized by triple helical domains and plays a central role in the formation of fibrillar and microfibrillar networks, basement membranes, as well as other structures of the connective tissue. Remarkably, fibrillar collagen exhibits efficient Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and SHG microscopy proved to be a sensitive tool to score fibrotic pathologies. However, the nonlinear optical response of fibrillar collagen is not fully characterized yet and quantitative data are required to further process SHG images. We therefore performed Hyper-Rayleigh Scattering (HRS) experiments and measured a second order hyperpolarisability of 1.25 10-27 esu for rat-tail type I collagen. This value is surprisingly large considering that collagen presents no strong harmonophore in its amino-acid sequence. In order to get insight into the physical origin of this nonlinear process, we performed HRS measurements after denaturation of the collagen triple helix and for a collagen-like short model peptide [(Pro-Pro-Gly)10]3. It showed that the collagen large nonlinear response originates in the tight alignment of a large number of weakly efficient harmonophores, presumably the peptide bonds, resulting in a coherent amplification of the nonlinear signal along the triple helix. To illustrate this mechanism, we successfully recorded SHG images in collagen liquid solutions by achieving liquid crystalline ordering of the collagen triple helices.

  1. Age-related crosslink in skin collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M.; Mechanic, G.

    1986-05-01

    A stable crosslinking amino acid was isolated from mature bovine skin collagen and its structure was identified as histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry and /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C-NMR. This newly identified crosslink has a linkage between C-2 histidine and C-6 of lysine in the latter's portion of hydroxylysinonorleucine. Quantitative studies using various aged samples of cow and human skin collagen indicated that this acid-heat stable nonreducible compound was the major age-related crosslink. In case of cow skin collagen, for example, during early embryonic development (3 and 5 month old embryos) the content of HHL stayed less than 0.01 residue/mole of collagen, however from the middle of gestation period (7 month old embryo) through the maturation stage it showed rapid increase with age and reached approximately 0.5 residues/mole of collagen in the 3 year old animal. Small increments (up to 0.65 res/mole of collagen) were observed in the 9 year old cow. The amounts of the crosslink unlike pyridinoline do not decrease with aging. Similar patterns were observed in human skin collagen.

  2. Molecular structure of the collagen triple helix.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Barbara; Persikov, Anton V

    2005-01-01

    The molecular conformation of the collagen triple helix confers strict amino acid sequence constraints, requiring a (Gly-X-Y)(n) repeating pattern and a high content of imino acids. The increasing family of collagens and proteins with collagenous domains shows the collagen triple helix to be a basic motif adaptable to a range of proteins and functions. Its rodlike domain has the potential for various modes of self-association and the capacity to bind receptors, other proteins, GAGs, and nucleic acids. High-resolution crystal structures obtained for collagen model peptides confirm the supercoiled triple helix conformation, and provide new information on hydrogen bonding patterns, hydration, sidechain interactions, and ligand binding. For several peptides, the helix twist was found to be sequence dependent, and such variation in helix twist may serve as recognition features or to orient the triple helix for binding. Mutations in the collagen triple-helix domain lead to a variety of human disorders. The most common mutations are single-base substitutions that lead to the replacement of one Gly residue, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern. A single Gly substitution destabilizes the triple helix through a local disruption in hydrogen bonding and produces a discontinuity in the register of the helix. Molecular information about the collagen triple helix and the effect of mutations will lead to a better understanding of function and pathology.

  3. Propranolol-induced elevation of pulmonary collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenschmidt, R.C.; Witschi, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    Current concepts of collagen metabolism suggest that fibroblasts tightly control collagen production. One of the possible mechanisms of control is via the cyclic nucleotides, cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP). Beta adrenergic agonists, by elevating intracellular cAMP levels, have been shown in vitro to suppress fibroblast collagen production; whereas beta adrenergic antagonists were effective in removing this suppression by blocking the rise in cAMP. In the present study with mice, the authors showed that administration of the beta adrenergic antagonists, propranolol, at a dose demonstrated to decrease the ratio of cAMP to cGMP, resulted in an elevation in total lung collagen in vivo. The increase in collagen was evident only when propranolol was administered before and during acute lung damage induced by either butylated hydroxytoluene, bleomycin or high concentrations of oxygen. There was no increase in lung collagen when propranolol administration was delayed after injury or when given to an undamaged lung. The authors propose that via beta adrenergic blockage by propranolol, fibroblasts involved in the normal reparative process may have lost a mechanism for regulatory control, resulting in excessive deposition of collagen. 38 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  4. The Mineral–Collagen Interface in Bone

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The interface between collagen and the mineral reinforcement phase, carbonated hydroxyapatite (cAp), is essential for bone’s remarkable functionality as a biological composite material. The very small dimensions of the cAp phase and the disparate natures of the reinforcement and matrix are essential to the material’s performance but also complicate study of this interface. This article summarizes what is known about the cAp-collagen interface in bone and begins with descriptions of the matrix and reinforcement roles in composites, of the phases bounding the interface, of growth of cAp growing within the collagen matrix, and of the effect of intra- and extrafibrilar mineral on determinations of interfacial properties. Different observed interfacial interactions with cAp (collagen, water, non-collagenous proteins) are reviewed; experimental results on interface interactions during loading are reported as are their influence on macroscopic mechanical properties; conclusions of numerical modeling of interfacial interactions are also presented. The data suggest interfacial interlocking (bending of collagen molecules around cAp nanoplatelets) and water-mediated bonding between collagen and cAp are essential to load transfer. The review concludes with descriptions of areas where new research is needed to improve understanding of how the interface functions. PMID:25824581

  5. Hyaluronic acid abrogates ethanol-dependent inhibition of collagen biosynthesis in cultured human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Donejko, Magdalena; Przylipiak, Andrzej; Rysiak, Edyta; Miltyk, Wojciech; Galicka, Elżbieta; Przylipiak, Jerzy; Zaręba, Ilona; Surazynski, Arkadiusz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol on collagen biosynthesis in cultured human skin fibroblasts, and the role of hyaluronic acid (HA) in this process. Regarding the mechanism of ethanol action on human skin fibroblasts we investigated: expression of β1 integrin and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-IR), signaling pathway protein expression: mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), protein kinase B (Akt), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factor, cytotoxicity assay and apoptosis, metalloproteinase activity, as well as the influence of HA on these processes. Materials and methods Collagen biosynthesis, activity of prolidase, DNA biosynthesis, and cytotoxicity were measured in confluent human skin fibroblast cultures that have been treated with 25, 50, and 100 mM ethanol and with ethanol and 500 µg/mL HA. Western blot analysis and zymography were performed to evaluate expression of collagen type I, β1 integrin receptor, IGF-IR, NF-κB protein, phospho-Akt protein, kinase MAPK, caspase 9 activity, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9 and MMP-2). Results Ethanol in a dose-dependent manner lead to the impairment of collagen biosynthesis in fibroblast cultures through decreasing prolidase activity and expression of β1 integrin and IGF-IR. This was accompanied by an increased cytotoxicity, apoptosis and lowered expression of the signaling pathway proteins induced by β1 integrin and IGF-IR, that is, MAPK (ERK1/2) kinases. The lowered amount of synthesized collagen and prolidase activity disturbance may also be due to the activation of NF-κB transcription factor, which inhibits collagen gene expression. It suggests that the decrease in fibroblast collagen production may be caused by the disturbance in its biosynthesis but not degradation. The application of HA has a protective effect on disturbances caused by the examined substances. It seems that regulatory mechanism of ethanol-induced collagen aberration take

  6. Posttranscriptional regulation of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, B; Hellerbrand, C; Holcik, M; Briendl, M; Aliebhaber, S; Brenner, D A

    1997-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cell (HSC) is the primary cell responsible for the dramatic increase in the synthesis of type I collagen in the cirrhotic liver. Quiescent HSCs contain a low level of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA, while activated HSCs contain about 60- to 70-fold more of this mRNA. The transcription rate of the collagen alpha1(I) gene is only two fold higher in activated HSCs than in quiescent HSCs. In assays using actinomycin D or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside collagen alpha1(I) mRNA has estimated half-lives of 1.5 h in quiescent HSCs and 24 h in activated HSCs. Thus, this 16-fold change in mRNA stability is primarily responsible for the increase in collagen alpha1(I) mRNA steady-state level in activated HSCs. We have identified a novel RNA-protein interaction targeted to the C-rich sequence in the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR). This sequence is localized 24 nucleotides 3' to the stop codon. In transient transfection experiments, mutation of this sequence diminished accumulation of an mRNA transcribed from a collagen alpha1(I) minigene and in stable transfections decreased the half-life of collagen alpha1(I) minigene mRNA. Binding to the collagen alpha1(I) 3' UTR is present in cytoplasmic extracts of activated but not quiescent HSCs. It contains as a subunit alphaCP, which is also found in the complex involved in stabilization of alpha-globin mRNA. The auxiliary factors necessary to promote binding of alphaCP to the collagen 3' UTR are distinct from the factors necessary for binding to the alpha-globin sequence. Since alphaCP is expressed in both quiescent and activated HSCs, these auxiliary factors are responsible for the differentially expressed RNA-protein interaction at the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' UTR. PMID:9271398

  7. Metal-triggered collagen peptide disk formation.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, David E; Chmielewski, Jean

    2010-06-16

    A collagen peptide was designed for metal-triggered, hierarchical assembly through a radial growth mechanism. To achieve radial assembly, H-(byp)(2) containing Pro-Hyp-Gly repeating sequences and two staggered bipyridine ligands within the peptide was synthesized. Triple helix formation resulted in the placement of six bipyridine ligands along the triple helix, and the addition of metal ions resulted in the formation of nanometer-sized collagen peptide disks. These structures were found to disassemble upon the addition of EDTA, demonstrating that radial assembly of collagen peptide triple helices could be realized with the addition of metal ions.

  8. Collagen scaffolds loaded with collagen-binding NGF-beta accelerate ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjie; Lin, Hang; Chen, Bing; Zhao, Wenxue; Zhao, Yannan; Xiao, Zhifeng; Dai, Jianwu

    2010-03-01

    Studies have shown that exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) accelerates ulcer healing, but the inefficient growth factor delivery system limits its clinical application. In this report, we found that the native human NGF-beta fused with a collagen-binding domain (CBD) could form a collagen-based NGF targeting delivery system, and the CBD-fused NGF-beta could bind to collagen membranes efficiently. Using the rabbit dermal ischemic ulcer model, we have found that this targeting delivery system maintains a higher concentration and stronger bioactivity of NGF-beta on the collagen membranes by promoting peripheral nerve growth. Furthermore, it enhances the rate of ulcer healing through accelerating the re-epithelialization of dermal ulcer wounds and the formation of capillary lumens within the newly formed tissue area. Thus, collagen membranes loaded with collagen-targeting human NGF-beta accelerate ulcer healing efficiently.

  9. Epidermal cells adhere preferentially to type IV (basement membrane) collagen

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Epidermal cells from adult guinea pig skin attach and differentiate preferentially on substrates of type IV (basement membrane) collagen, compared to those of types I--III collagen. In contrast, guinea pig dermal fibroblasts attach equally well to all four collagen substrates. Fibronectin mediates the attachment of fibroblasts but not of epidermal cells to collagen. PMID:422650

  10. Withaferin-A Reduces Type I Collagen Expression In Vitro and Inhibits Development of Myocardial Fibrosis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Challa, Azariyas A.; Vukmirovic, Milica; Blackmon, John; Stefanovic, Branko

    2012-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body. Its excessive synthesis results in fibrosis of various organs. Fibrosis is a major medical problem without an existing cure. Excessive synthesis of type I collagen in fibrosis is primarily due to stabilization of collagen mRNAs. We recently reported that intermediate filaments composed of vimentin regulate collagen synthesis by stabilizing collagen mRNAs. Vimentin is a primary target of Withaferin-A (WF-A). Therefore, we hypothesized that WF-A may reduce type I collagen production by disrupting vimentin filaments and decreasing the stability of collagen mRNAs. This study is to determine if WF-A exhibits anti-fibrotic properties in vitro and in vivo and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of its action. In lung, skin and heart fibroblasts WF-A disrupted vimentin filaments at concentrations of 0.5–1.5 µM and reduced 3 fold the half-lives of collagen α1(I) and α2(I) mRNAs and protein expression. In addition, WF-A inhibited TGF-β1 induced phosphorylation of TGF-β1 receptor I, Smad3 phosphorylation and transcription of collagen genes. WF-A also inhibited in vitro activation of primary hepatic stellate cells and decreased their type I collagen expression. In mice, administration of 4 mg/kg WF-A daily for 2 weeks reduced isoproterenol-induced myocardial fibrosis by 50%. Our findings provide strong evidence that Withaferin-A could act as an anti-fibrotic compound against fibroproliferative diseases, including, but not limited to, cardiac interstitial fibrosis. PMID:22900077

  11. Zebrafish Collagen Type I: Molecular and Biochemical Characterization of the Major Structural Protein in Bone and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Gistelinck, C.; Gioia, R.; Gagliardi, A.; Tonelli, F.; Marchese, L.; Bianchi, L.; Landi, C.; Bini, L.; Huysseune, A.; Witten, P. E.; Staes, A.; Gevaert, K.; De Rocker, N.; Menten, B.; Malfait, F.; Leikin, S.; Carra, S.; Tenni, R.; Rossi, A.; De Paepe, A.; Coucke, P.; Willaert, A.; Forlino, A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last years the zebrafish imposed itself as a powerful model to study skeletal diseases, but a limit to its use is the poor characterization of collagen type I, the most abundant protein in bone and skin. In tetrapods collagen type I is a trimer mainly composed of two α1 chains and one α2 chain, encoded by COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes, respectively. In contrast, in zebrafish three type I collagen genes exist, col1a1a, col1a1b and col1a2 coding for α1(I), α3(I) and α2(I) chains. During embryonic and larval development the three collagen type I genes showed a similar spatio-temporal expression pattern, indicating their co-regulation and interdependence at these stages. In both embryonic and adult tissues, the presence of the three α(I) chains was demonstrated, although in embryos α1(I) was present in two distinct glycosylated states, suggesting a developmental-specific collagen composition. Even though in adult bone, skin and scales equal amounts of α1(I), α3(I) and α2(I) chains are present, the presented data suggest a tissue-specific stoichiometry and/or post-translational modification status for collagen type I. In conclusion, this data will be useful to properly interpret results and insights gained from zebrafish models of skeletal diseases. PMID:26876635

  12. Nanoscale scraping and dissection of collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Wenger, M P E; Horton, M A; Mesquida, P

    2008-09-24

    The main function of collagen is mechanical, hence there is a fundamental scientific interest in experimentally investigating the mechanical and structural properties of collagen fibrils on the nanometre scale. Here, we present a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) based scraping technique that can dissect the outer layer of a biological specimen. Applied to individual collagen fibrils, the technique was successfully used to expose the fibril core and reveal the presence of a D-banding-like structure. AFM nanoindentation measurements of fibril shell and core indicated no significant differences in mechanical properties such as stiffness (reduced modulus), hardness, adhesion and adhesion work. This suggests that collagen fibrils are mechanically homogeneous structures. The scraping technique can be applied to other biological specimens, as demonstrated on the example of bacteria.

  13. In vitro Sirius Red collagen assay measures the pattern shift from soluble to deposited collagen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Zhang, Bingrong; Han, Deping; Ma, Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Hong, Jingshen; Guo, Yansong; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we compared two in vitro collagen production assays ([(3)H]-proline incorporation and Sirius Red) for their ability to determine the pattern shift from soluble to deposited collagen. The effect of the antifibrotic agent, triptolide (TPL), on collagen production was also studied. The results showed that: (1) 48 h after NIH 3T3 (murine embryo fibroblast) and HFL-1(human fetal lung fibroblast) were exposed to transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β), there was an increase in soluble collagen in the culture medium; (2) on day 4, soluble collagen declined, whereas deposited collagen increased; (3) Sirius Red was easier to use than [(3)H]-proline incorporation and more consistently reflected the collagen pattern shift from soluble to deposited; (4) the in vitro Sirius Red assay took less time than the in vivo assay to determine the effect of TPL. Our results suggest that: (a) the newly synthesized soluble collagen can sensitively evaluate an agent's capacity for collagen production and (b) Sirius Red is more useful than [(3)H]-proline because it is easier to use, more convenient, less time consuming, and does not require radioactive material.

  14. Marine Collagen: An Emerging Player in Biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Subhan, Fazli; Ikram, Muhammad; Shehzad, Adeeb; Ghafoor, Abdul

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian collagen is a multifactorial biomaterial that is widely used for beneficial purposes in the advanced biomedical technologies. Generally, biomedical applicable collagen is extracted from the mammalian body, but it can also be derived from marine species. Recently, mammalian tissues collagen proteins are considered a great pathological risk for transmitted diseases, because purification of such protein is very challenging and needs efficient tool to avoid structure alteration. Thus, difficult extraction process and high cost decreased mammalian collagen demands for beneficial effects compared to marine collagen. In contrast, marine collagen is safe and easy to extract, however this potential source of collagen is hindered by low denaturing temperature, which is considered a main hurdle in the beneficial effects of marine collagen. Characterization and biomedical applications of marine collagen are in transition state and yet to be discovered. Therefore, an attempt was made to summarize the recent knowledge regarding different aspects of marine collagen applications in the biomedical engineering field.

  15. Thermal stability of collagen triple helix.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yujia

    2009-01-01

    Chief among the challenges of characterizing the thermal stability of the collagen triple helix are the lack of the reversibility of the thermal transition and the presence of multiple folding-unfolding steps during the thermal transition which rarely follows the simple two-state, all-or-none mechanism. Despite of the difficulties inherited in the quantitative depiction of the thermal transition of collagen, biophysical studies combined with proteolysis and mutagenesis approaches using full-chain collagens, short synthetic peptides, and recombinant collagen fragments have revealed molecular features of the thermal unfolding of the subdomains of collagen and led to a better understanding of the diverse biological functions of this versatile protein. The subdomain of collagen generally refers to a segment of the long, rope-like triple helical molecule that can unfold cooperatively as an independent unit whose properties (their size, location, and thermal stability) are considered essential for the molecular recognition during the self-assembly of collagen and during the interactions of collagen with other macromolecules. While the unfolding of segments of the triple helix at temperatures below the apparent melting temperature of the molecule has been used to interpret much of the features of the thermal unfolding of full-chain collagens, the thermal studies of short, synthetic peptides have firmly established the molecular basis of the subdomains by clearly demonstrating the close dependence of the thermal stability of a triple helix on the constituent amino acid residues at the X and the Y positions of the characteristic Gly-X-Y repeating sequence patterns of the triple helix. Studies using recombinant collagen fragments further revealed that in the context of the long, linear molecule, the stability of a segment of the triple helix is also modulated by long-range impact of the local interactions such as the interchain salt bridges. Together, the combined approaches

  16. Unusual Fragmentation Pathways in Collagen Glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdivara, Irina; Perera, Lalith; Sricholpech, Marnisa; Terajima, Masahiko; Pleshko, Nancy; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Tomer, Kenneth B.

    2013-07-01

    Collagens are the most abundant glycoproteins in the body. One characteristic of this protein family is that the amino acid sequence consists of repeats of three amino acids -(X—Y—Gly)n. Within this motif, the Y residue is often 4-hydroxyproline (HyP) or 5-hydroxylysine (HyK). Glycosylation in collagen occurs at the 5-OH group in HyK in the form of two glycosides, galactosylhydroxylysine (Gal-HyK) and glucosyl galactosylhydroxylysine (GlcGal-HyK). In collision induced dissociation (CID), collagen tryptic glycopeptides exhibit unexpected gas-phase dissociation behavior compared to typical N- and O-linked glycopeptides (i.e., in addition to glycosidic bond cleavages, extensive cleavages of the amide bonds are observed). The Gal- or GlcGal- glycan modifications are largely retained on the fragment ions. These features enable unambiguous determination of the amino acid sequence of collagen glycopeptides and the location of the glycosylation site. This dissociation pattern was consistent for all analyzed collagen glycopeptides, regardless of their length or amino acid composition, collagen type or tissue. The two fragmentation pathways—amide bond and glycosidic bond cleavage—are highly competitive in collagen tryptic glycopeptides. The number of ionizing protons relative to the number of basic sites (i.e., Arg, Lys, HyK, and N-terminus) is a major driving force of the fragmentation. We present here our experimental results and employ quantum mechanics calculations to understand the factors enhancing the labile character of the amide bonds and the stability of hydroxylysine glycosides in gas phase dissociation of collagen glycopeptides.

  17. Unusual fragmentation pathways in collagen glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Perdivara, Irina; Perera, Lalith; Sricholpech, Marnisa; Terajima, Masahiko; Pleshko, Nancy; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Tomer, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant glycoproteins in the body. One characteristic of this protein family is that the amino acid sequence consists of repeats of three amino acids –(X—Y—Gly)n. Within this motif, the Y residue is often 4-hydroxyproline (HyP) or 5-hydroxylysine (HyK). Glycosylation in collagen occurs at the 5-OH group in HyK in the form of two glycosides, galactosylhydroxylysine (Gal-HyK) and glucosyl galactosylhydroxylysine (GlcGal-HyK). In collision induced dissociation (CID), collagen tryptic glycopeptides exhibit unexpected gas-phase dissociation behavior compared to typical N- and O-linked glycopeptides, i.e. in addition to glycosidic bond cleavages, extensive cleavages of the amide bonds are observed. The Gal- or GlcGal- glycan modifications are largely retained on the fragment ions. These features enable unambiguous determination of the amino acid sequence of collagen glycopeptides and the location of the glycosylation site. This dissociation pattern was consistent for all analyzed collagen glycopeptides, regardless of their length or amino acid composition, collagen type or tissue. The two fragmentation pathways – amide bond and glycosidic bond cleavage – are highly competitive in collagen tryptic glycopeptides. The number of ionizing protons relative to the number of basic sites (i.e. Arg, Lys, HyK and N-terminus) is a major driving force of the fragmentation. We present here our experimental results and employ quantum mechanics calculations, to understand the factors enhancing the labile character of the amide bonds and the stability of hydroxylysine glycosides in gas phase dissociation of collagen glycopeptides. PMID:23633013

  18. Techniques for Type I Collagen Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson-Jackson, LaTecia Diamond

    Tissue Engineering is a process in which cells, engineering, and material methods are used in amalgamation to improve biological functions. The purpose of tissue engineering is to develop alternative solutions to treat or cure tissues and organs that have been severely altered or damaged by diseases, congenital defects, trauma, or cancer. One of the most common and most promising biological materials for tissue engineering to develop scaffolds is Type I collagen. A major challenge in biomedical research is aligning Type I collagen to mimic biological structures, such as ligaments, tendons, bones, and other hierarchal aligned structures within the human body. The intent of this research is to examine possible techniques for organizing Type I collagen and to assess which of the techniques is effective for potential biological applications. The techniques used in this research to organize collagen are soft lithography with solution-assisted sonication embossing, directional freezing, and direct poling. The final concentration used for both soft lithography with solution-assisted sonication embossing and direct poling was 1 mg/ml, whereas for directional freezing the final concentration varied between 4mg/ml, 2mg/ml, and 1 mg/ml. These techniques were characterized using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and Helium Ion Microscope (HIM). In this study, we have found that out of the three techniques, the soft lithography and directional freezing techniques have been successful in organizing collagen in a particular pattern, but not alignment. We concluded alignment may be dependent on the pH of collagen and the amount of acetic acid used in collagen solution. However, experiments are still being conducted to optimize all three techniques to align collagen in a unidirectional arrangement.

  19. Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Jankov II, Mirko R.; Jovanovic, Vesna; Nikolic, Ljubisa; Lake, Jonathan C.; Kymionis, Georgos; Coskunseven, Efekan

    2010-01-01

    Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) with riboflavin and ultraviolet-A (UVA) is a new technique of corneal tissue strengthening by using riboflavin as a photosensitizer and UVA to increase the formation of intra and interfibrillar covalent bonds by photosensitized oxidation. Keratocyte apoptosis in the anterior segment of the corneal stroma all the way down to a depth of about 300 microns has been described and a demarcation line between the treated and untreated cornea has been clearly shown. It is important to ensure that the cytotoxic threshold for the endothelium has not been exceeded by strictly respecting the minimal corneal thickness. Confocal microscopy studies show that repopulation of keratocytes is already visible 1 month after the treatment, reaching its pre-operative quantity and quality in terms of functional morphology within 6 months after the treatment. The major indication for the use of CXL is to inhibit the progression of corneal ectasias, such as keratoconus and pellucid marginal degeneration. CXL may also be effective in the treatment and prophylaxis of iatrogenic keratectasia, resulting from excessively aggressive photoablation. This treatment has also been used to treat infectious corneal ulcers with apparent favorable results. Combination with other treatments, such as intracorneal ring segment implantation, limited topography-guided photoablation and conductive keratoplasty have been used with different levels of success. PMID:20543933

  20. Eupatilin ameliorates collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juryun; Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Jung, Hyerin; Rim, Yeri Alice; Park, Narae; Jung, Seung Min; Park, Sung-Hwan; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2015-03-01

    Eupatilin is the main active component of DA-9601, an extract from Artemisia. Recently, eupatilin was reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the anti-arthritic effect of eupatilin in a murine arthritis model and human rheumatoid synoviocytes. DA-9601 was injected into collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Arthritis score was regularly evaluated. Mouse monocytes were differentiated into osteoclasts when eupatilin was added simultaneously. Osteoclasts were stained with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and then manually counted. Rheumatoid synoviocytes were stimulated with TNF-α and then treated with eupatilin, and the levels of IL-6 and IL-1β mRNA expression in synoviocytes were measured by RT-PCR. Intraperitoneal injection of DA-9601 reduced arthritis scores in CIA mice. TNF-α treatment of synoviocytes increased the expression of IL-6 and IL-1β mRNAs, which was inhibited by eupatilin. Eupatilin decreased the number of osteoclasts in a concentration dependent manner. These findings, showing that eupatilin and DA-9601 inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines and the differentiation of osteoclasts, suggest that eupatilin and DA-9601 is a candidate anti-inflammatory agent.

  1. Annotation and genetic diversity of the chicken collagenous lectins.

    PubMed

    Hamzić, Edin; Pinard-van der Laan, Marie-Hélène; Bed'Hom, Bertrand; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2015-06-01

    Collectins and ficolins are multimeric proteins present in various tissues and are actively involved in innate immune responses. In chickens, six different collagenous lectins have been characterized so far: mannose-binding lectin (MBL), surfactant protein A (SP-A), collectin 10 (COLEC10), collectin 11 (COLEC11), collectin 12 (COLEC12), lung lectin (LL) and one ficolin (FCN). However, the structural and functional features of the chicken collectins and ficolin are still not fully understood. Therefore, the aims of this study were: (i) to make an overview of the genetic structure and function of chicken collectins and the ficolin, (ii) to investigate the variation in the chicken collectins and the ficolin gene in different chicken populations, and (iii) to assess the presence of MBL gene variants in different chicken populations. We performed comparative genomic analysis using publically available data. The obtained results showed that collectins and ficolins have conserved protein sequences and gene structure across all vertebrate groups and this is especially notable for COLEC10, COLEC11 and COLEC12. For the purpose of studying the genetic variation, 179 animals from 14 populations were genotyped using 31 SNPs covering five genomic regions. The obtained results revealed low level of heterozygosity in the collagenous lectins except for the COLEC12 gene and the LL-SPA-MBL region compared to heterozygosity at neutral microsatellite markers. In addition, the MBL gene variants were assessed in different chicken populations based on the polymorphisms in the promoter region. We observed 10 previously identified MBL variants with A2/A8 and A4 as the most frequent alleles.

  2. Spherical silver nanoparticles in the detection of thermally denatured collagens.

    PubMed

    Ahumada, Manuel; McLaughlin, Sarah; Pacioni, Natalia L; Alarcon, Emilio I

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a rapid colorimetric method to determine the concentration of denatured collagen in solution, which is based on the collagen-silver nanoparticle corona formation. Using the proposed method, the lowest detectable concentration of denatured collagen protein in a solution of pure collagen was 14.7, 8.5, and 8.6 μg mL(-1) for porcine (PCOL), rat tail (RCOL), and type I human recombinant (HCOL) collagen, respectively.

  3. The peculiar collagens of mussel byssus.

    PubMed

    Waite, J H; Qin, X X; Coyne, K J

    1998-06-01

    The byssal collagens of marine mussels are extracorporeal collagens that function in byssal threads under tension. Each byssal thread resembles a shock absorber in its mechanical design: it is strong and stiff at one end and pliably elastic at the other. Primary structures of three of these collagens (preCols), deduced from cDNAs, reveal signal peptide sequences, but no N-glycosylation sites or propeptides typical of procollagens. The collagen domain (40-50 kDa) represents roughly half the mass of the mature molecules and is distinguished by its central location, abundant Gly-Gly-X repeats, and "flaws" (usually Gly deletions). Flanking the collagen domains on both sides are structural domains that resemble elastin in preCol-P, spider drag-line silk in preCol-D, and Gly-rich cell wall proteins in preCol-NG. Not surprisingly, studies of preCol distribution in byssal threads suggest preCol-P enhancement in the elastic proximal portion, while preCol-D predominates in the stiffer distal portion. PreCol-NG, in contrast, is evenly distributed. Although no data are yet available on the fibrillogenesis and cross-linking of the preCols, the quarter-stagger assembly of fibrillar interstitial collagens does not pertain since preCols lack the terminal peptides of tropocollagen. Metal-binding by histidines may mediate the initial inter- and intramolecular stabilization of preCols in the byssus.

  4. Marine Origin Collagens and Its Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tiago H.; Moreira-Silva, Joana; Marques, Ana L. P.; Domingues, Alberta; Bayon, Yves; Reis, Rui L.

    2014-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant high molecular weight proteins in both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms, including mammals, and possess mainly a structural role, existing different types according with their specific organization in distinct tissues. From this, they have been elected as one of the key biological materials in tissue regeneration approaches. Also, industry is constantly searching for new natural sources of collagen and upgraded methodologies for their production. The most common sources are from bovine and porcine origin, but other ways are making their route, such as recombinant production, but also extraction from marine organisms like fish. Different organisms have been proposed and explored for collagen extraction, allowing the sustainable production of different types of collagens, with properties depending on the kind of organism (and their natural environment) and extraction methodology. Such variety of collagen properties has been further investigated in different ways to render a wide range of applications. The present review aims to shed some light on the contribution of marine collagens for the scientific and technological development of this sector, stressing the opportunities and challenges that they are and most probably will be facing to assume a role as an alternative source for industrial exploitation. PMID:25490254

  5. New Altered Non-Fibrillar Collagens in Human Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Role in the Remodeling Process

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Ana; Tarazón, Estefanía; Triviño, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Dolz, Luis; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Lago, Francisca; Portolés, Manuel; Rivera, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background In dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), cardiac failure is accompanied by profound alterations of extracellular matrix associated with the progression of cardiac dilation and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Recently, we reported alterations of non-fibrillar collagen expression in ischemic cardiomyopathy linked to fibrosis and cardiac remodeling. We suspect that expression changes in genes coding for non-fibrillar collagens may have a potential role in DCM development. Objectives This study sought to analyze changes in the expression profile of non-fibrillar collagen genes in patients with DCM and to examine relationships between cardiac remodeling parameters and the expression levels of these genes. Methods and Results Twenty-three human left ventricle tissue samples were obtained from DCM patients (n = 13) undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n = 10) for RNA sequencing analysis. We found increased mRNA levels of six non-fibrillar collagen genes, such as COL4A5, COL9A1, COL21A1, and COL23A1 (P < 0.05 for all), not previously described in DCM. Protein levels of COL8A1 and COL16A1 (P < 0.05 for both), were correspondingly increased. We also identified TGF-β1 significantly upregulated and related to both COL8A1 and COL16A1. Interestingly, we found a significant relationship between LV mass index and the gene expression level of COL8A1 (r = 0.653, P < 0.05). Conclusions In our research, we identified new non-fibrillar collagens with altered expression in DCM, being COL8A1 overexpression directly related to LV mass index, suggesting that they may be involved in the progression of cardiac dilation and remodeling. PMID:27936202

  6. In situ hybridization reveals that type I and III collagens are produced by pericytes in the anterior pituitary gland of rats.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Ken; Jindatip, Depicha; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    Type I and III collagens widely occur in the rat anterior pituitary gland and are the main components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Although ECM components possibly play an important role in the function of the anterior pituitary gland, little is known about collagen-producing cells. Type I collagen is a heterotrimer of two α1(I) chains (the product of the col1a1 gene) and one α2(I) chain (the product of the col1a2 gene). Type III collagen is a homotrimer of α1(III) chains (the product of the col3a1 gene). We used in situ hybridization with digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probes to examine the expression of col1a1, col1a2, and col3a1 mRNAs in the pituitary gland of adult rats. mRNA expression for these collagen genes was clearly observed, and cells expressing col1a1, col1a2, and col3a1 mRNA were located around capillaries in the gland. We also investigated the possible double-staining of collagen mRNA and pituitary hormones, S-100 protein (a marker of folliculo-stellate cells), or desmin (a marker of pericytes). Col1a1 and col3a1 mRNA were identified in desmin-immunopositive cells. Thus, only pericytes produce type I and III collagens in the rat anterior pituitary gland.

  7. Modulation of tumor cell stiffness and migration by type IV collagen through direct activation of integrin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Yi; Lin, Jo-Shi; Yang, Bei-Chang

    2014-08-01

    Excessive collagen deposition plays a critical role in tumor progression and metastasis. To understand how type IV collagen affects mechanical stiffness and migration, low-collagen-IV-expressing transfectants of B16F10, U118MG, and Huh7 (denoted shCol cells) were established by the lentiviral-mediated delivery of small interfering RNA against type IV-α1 collagen (Col4A1). Although having similar growth rates, shCol cells showed a flatter morphology compared to that of the corresponding controls. Notably, knocking down the Col4A1 gene conferred the cells with higher levels of elasticity and lower motility. Exposure to blocking antibodies against human β1 integrin or α2β1 integrin or the pharmacological inhibition of Src and ERK activity by PP1 and U0126, respectively, effectively reduced cell motility and raised cell stiffness. Reduced Src and ERK activities in shCol cells indicate the involvement of a collagen IV/integrin signaling pathway. The forced expression of β1 integrin significantly stimulated Src and ERK phosphorylation, reduced cell stiffness, and accelerated cell motility. In an experimental metastasis assay using C57BL/6 mice, B16F10 shCol cells formed significantly fewer and smaller lung nodules, confirming the contribution of collagen to metastasis. In summary, the integrin signaling pathway activated in a tumor environment with collagen deposition is responsible for low cell elasticity and high metastatic ability.

  8. Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on collagen scaffolds for the functional regeneration of injured rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lijun; Li, Xin'an; Sun, Haixiang; Su, Jing; Lin, Nacheng; Péault, Bruno; Song, Tianran; Yang, Jun; Dai, Jianwu; Hu, Yali

    2014-06-01

    Serious injuries of endometrium in women of reproductive age are often followed by uterine scar formation and a lack of functional endometrium predisposing to infertility or miscarriage. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have shown great promise in clinical applications. In the present study, BM-MSCs loaded onto degradable collagen membranes were constructed. Collagen membranes provided 3-dimmensional architecture for the attachment, growth and migration of rat BM-MSCs and did not impair the expression of the stemness genes. We then investigated the effect of collagen/BM-MSCs constructs in the healing of severe uterine injury in rats (partial full thickness uterine excision). At four weeks after the transplantation of collagen/BM-MSCs constructs, BM-MSCs were mainly located to the basal membrane of regenerative endometrium. The wounded tissue adjacent to collagen/BM-MSCs constructs expressed higher level of bFGF, IGF-1, TGFβ1 and VEGF than the corresponding tissue in rats receiving collagen construct alone or in spontaneous regeneration group. Moreover, the collagen/BM-MSCs system increased proliferative abilities of uterine endometrial and muscular cells, facilitated microvasculature regeneration, and restored the ability of endometrium to receive the embryo and support its development to a viable stage. Our findings indicate that BM-MSCs may support uterine tissue regeneration.

  9. Exosite Interactions Impact Matrix Metalloproteinase Collagen Specificities*

    PubMed Central

    Robichaud, Trista K.; Steffensen, Bjorn; Fields, Gregg B.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family selectively cleave collagens in vivo. However, the substrate structural determinants that facilitate interaction with specific MMPs are not well defined. We hypothesized that type I–III collagen sequences located N- or C-terminal to the physiological cleavage site mediate substrate selectivity among MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-13, and MMP-14/membrane-type 1 (MT1)-MMP. The enzyme kinetics for hydrolysis of three fluorogenic triple-helical peptides (fTHPs) was evaluated herein. The first fTHP contained consensus residues 769–783 from type I–III collagens, the second inserted α1(II) collagen residues 763–768 N-terminal to the consensus sequence, and the third inserted α1(II) collagen residues 784–792 C-terminal to the consensus sequence. Our analyses showed that insertion of the C-terminal residues significantly increased kcat/Km and kcat for MMP-1. MMP-13 showed the opposite behavior with a decreased kcat/Km and kcat and a greatly improved Km in response to the C-terminal residues. Insertion of the N-terminal residues enhanced kcat/Km and kcat for MMP-8 and MT1-MMP. For MMP-2, the C-terminal residues enhanced Km and dramatically decreased kcat, resulting in a decrease in the overall activity. These changes in activities and kinetic parameters represented the collagen preferences of MMP-8, MMP-13, and MT1-MMP well. Thus, interactions with secondary binding sites (exosites) helped direct the specificity of these enzymes. However, MMP-1 collagen preferences were not recapitulated by the fTHP studies. The preference of MMP-1 for type III collagen appears to be primarily based on the flexibility of the hydrolysis site of type III collagen compared with types I and II. Further characterization of exosite determinants that govern interactions of MMPs with collagenous substrates should aid the development of pharmacotherapeutics that target individual MMPs. PMID:21896477

  10. Inhibitory effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonists on collagen IV production in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjiao; Shen, Yachen; Li, Min; Su, Dongming; Xu, Weifeng; Liang, Xiubin; Li, Rongshan

    2015-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonists have beneficial effects on the kidney diseases through preventing microalbuminuria and glomerulosclerosis. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain to be fully understood. In this study, we investigate the effects of PPAR-γ agonist, rosiglitazone (Rosi) and pioglitazone (Pio), on collagen IV production in mouse podocytes. The endogenous expression of PPAR-γ was found in the primary podocytes and can be upregulated by Rosi and Pio, respectively, detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. PPAR-γ agonist markedly blunted the increasing of collagen IV expression and extraction in podocytes induced by TGF-β. In contrast, adding PPAR-γ antagonist, GW9662, to podocytes largely prevented the inhibition of collagen IV expression from Pio treatment. Our data also showed that phosphorylation of Smad2/3 enhanced by TGF-β in a time-dependent manner was significantly attenuated by adding Pio. The promoter region of collagen IV gene contains one putative consensus sequence of Smad-binding element (SBE) by promoter analysis, Rosi and Pio significantly ameliorated TGF-β-induced SBE4-luciferase activity. In conclusion, PPAR-γ activation by its agonist, Rosi or Pio, in vitro directly inhibits collagen IV expression and synthesis in primary mouse podocytes. The suppression of collagen IV production was related to the inhibition of TGF-β-driven phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and decreased response activity of SBEs of collagen IV in PPAR-γ agonist-treated mouse podocytes. This represents a novel mechanistic support regarding PPAR-γ agonists as podocyte protective agents.

  11. Collagen functionalized bioactive nanofiber matrices for osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells: bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yixing; Ramos, Daisy; Lee, Paul; Liang, Danni; Yu, Xiaojun; Kumbar, Sangamesh G

    2014-02-01

    Scaffold architecture, surface topography, biochemical and mechanical cues have been shown to significantly improve cellular events and in vivo tissue regeneration. Specifically electrospun nanofiber matrices have gained tremendous interest due to their intrinsic structural resemblance to native tissue extracellular matrix (ECM). The present study reports on the electrospun nanofiber matrices of polycaprolactone (PCL)-chitosan (CS) blends and effect of type I collagen surface functionalization in regulating rat bone marrow derived stromal cells (rBMSCs) differentiation into osteogenic lineage. Collagen was covalently attached to blend nanofibers via carbodiimide (EDC) coupling. Bead-free smooth nanofibers (diameter-700-850 nm) obtained at the optimized conditions of polymer concentration and electrospinning parameters were used for the study. EDC collagen coupling resulted in 0.120+/-0.016 micro g of collagen immobilization onto a 1 cm2 area of the PCL/CS nanofibers, which was 2.6-folds higher than the amount of collagen that can be retained by physical adsorption. Significantly improved rBMSCs adhesion, spreading, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation was observed on the collagen functionalized COL-PCULCS nanofiber matrices as compared to control groups. Osteogenic phenotypic markers such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization were found to be significantly higher on COL-PCL/CS nanofiber matrices as compared to controls. Elevated gene expression profiles of osteogenic markers such as osteocalcin (0CN), osteopontin (OPN) and ALP further corroborate the osteoinductive nature of the collagen functionalized PCL/CS nanofiber matrices. These fiber matrices and modification techniques could be extended to other scaffold systems for tissue engineering applications.

  12. Collagen-Binding Peptidoglycans Inhibit MMP Mediated Collagen Degradation and Reduce Dermal Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Paul W.; Freeman, Lynetta; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-01-01

    Scarring of the skin is a large unmet clinical problem that is of high patient concern and impact. Wound healing is complex and involves numerous pathways that are highly orchestrated, leaving the skin sealed, but with abnormal organization and composition of tissue components, namely collagen and proteoglycans, that are then remodeled over time. To improve healing and reduce or eliminate scarring, more rapid restoration of healthy tissue composition and organization offers a unique approach for development of new therapeutics. A synthetic collagen-binding peptidoglycan has been developed that inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-1 and 13 (MMP-1 and MMP-13) mediated collagen degradation. We investigated the synthetic peptidoglycan in a rat incisional model in which a single dose was delivered in a hyaluronic acid (HA) vehicle at the time of surgery prior to wound closure. The peptidoglycan treatment resulted in a significant reduction in scar tissue at 21 days as measured by histology and visual analysis. Improved collagen architecture of the treated wounds was demonstrated by increased tensile strength and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of collagen fibril diameters compared to untreated and HA controls. The peptidoglycan's mechanism of action includes masking existing collagen and inhibiting MMP-mediated collagen degradation while modulating collagen organization. The peptidoglycan can be synthesized at low cost with unique design control, and together with demonstrated preclinical efficacy in reducing scarring, warrants further investigation for dermal wound healing. PMID:21779387

  13. Ultrastructural changes in muscle cells of patients with collagen VI-related myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Tagliavini, Francesca; Sardone, Francesca; Squarzoni, Stefano; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Merlini, Luciano; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix protein expressed in several tissues including skeletal muscle. Mutations in COL6A genes cause Bethlem Myopathy (BM), Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (UCMD) and Myosclerosis Myopathy (MM). Collagen VI deficiency causes increased opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), leading to ultrastructural and functional alterations of mitochondria, amplified by impairment of autophagy. Here we report for the first time ultrastructural studies on muscle biopsies from BM and UCMD patients, showing swollen mitochondria with hypodense matrix, disorganized cristae and paracrystalline inclusions, associated with dilated sarcoplasmic reticulum and apoptotic changes. These data were supported by scanning electron microscopy analysis on BM and UCMD cultured cells, showing alterations of the mitochondrial network. Morphometric analysis also revealed a reduced short axis and depicted swelling in about 3% of mitochondria. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial defects underlie the pathogenetic mechanism in muscle tissue of patients affected by collagen VI myopathies. PMID:24596691

  14. Effect of kiwifruit juice on beef collagen.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Sumi; Hirota, Aya; Okada, Chikako; Yorita, Taeko; Sato, Kenji; Ohtsuki, Kozo

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this study is to clarify the difference in susceptibility to protease digestion by kiwifruit juice between collagen domains under different conditions. In addition, the effect of pre-treatment with kiwifruit juice on collagen in meat during cooking processes was examined. Kiwifruit juice can degrade denatured collagen, but it can not cleave the triple helical domain of collagen. Thus, kiwifruit juice does not have collagenase activity. On the other hand, the cross-linked subunits of acid-soluble collagen were converted to monomeric subunits by kiwifruit juice treatment at acidic pH, suggesting that the globular domains, in which cross-links preferentially occur, can be degraded by kiwifruit juice. The pre-treatment with kiwifruit juice significantly decreased the shear force of connective tissue in comparison with other pre-treatments without protease activity, but inversely increased the liberation of collagen-related peptides in the outer solution by heating processes at 50 and 70 degrees C or by a shorter heating time at 100 degrees C. This can be explained by the protease-mediated degradation of globular domains. However, this effect was not observed with a prolonged heating period at 100 degrees C, and the liberation of collagen-related peptides by pre-treatment with kiwifruit juice at 100 degrees C was less than that at 70 degrees C for all heating periods. Thus, it can be suggested that the pre-treatment with kiwifruit juice might be useful in meat softening under vacuum-cooking and grilling, but not under stewing.

  15. Trans-splicing improvement by the combined application of antisense strategies.

    PubMed

    Koller, Ulrich; Hainzl, Stefan; Kocher, Thomas; Hüttner, Clemens; Klausegger, Alfred; Gruber, Christina; Mayr, Elisabeth; Wally, Verena; Bauer, Johann W; Murauer, Eva M

    2015-01-06

    Spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing has become an emergent tool for the repair of mutated pre-mRNAs in the treatment of genetic diseases. RNA trans-splicing molecules (RTMs) are designed to induce a specific trans-splicing reaction via a binding domain for a respective target pre-mRNA region. A previously established reporter-based screening system allows us to analyze the impact of various factors on the RTM trans-splicing efficiency in vitro. Using this system, we are further able to investigate the potential of antisense RNAs (AS RNAs), presuming to improve the trans-splicing efficiency of a selected RTM, specific for intron 102 of COL7A1. Mutations in the COL7A1 gene underlie the dystrophic subtype of the skin blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa (DEB). We have shown that co-transfections of the RTM and a selected AS RNA, interfering with competitive splicing elements on a COL7A1-minigene (COL7A1-MG), lead to a significant increase of the RNA trans-splicing efficiency. Thereby, accurate trans-splicing between the RTM and the COL7A1-MG is represented by the restoration of full-length green fluorescent protein GFP on mRNA and protein level. This mechanism can be crucial for the improvement of an RTM-mediated correction, especially in cases where a high trans-splicing efficiency is required.

  16. Plasma clot-promoting effect of collagen in relation to collagen-platelet interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, P.A.; Schneider, M.D.; Miller, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    The hemostatic function of several acid-soluble collagen preparations and a fibrillar-form collagen preparation have been compared. Pepsin-treated acid-soluble collagen isolated from burro and horse aortic tissue and acid-soluble colagen isolated from human umbilical cord readily promoted platelet aggregation, but failed to activate the coagulation mechanism even after prolonged incubation with plasma at 37 C. By contrast, fibrillar-form collagen isolated from burro aorta was both an efficient stimulant for the induction of platelet aggregation and a potent clot-promoting agent. Similar results were found for all the collagen preparations irrespective of whether the studies were conducted with sheep or with burro plasma. Heat denaturation studies showed that the hemostatic functon of the fibrillar-form colagen was dependent on an intact tirple-helical structure.

  17. Daily consumption of the collagen supplement Pure Gold Collagen® reduces visible signs of aging

    PubMed Central

    Borumand, Maryam; Sibilla, Sara

    2014-01-01

    With age, changes in the metabolic processes of structural components of the skin lead to visible signs of aging, such as increased dryness and wrinkle formation. The nutritional supplement, Pure Gold Collagen®, which consists of hydrolyzed collagen, hyaluronic acid, vitamins, and minerals, was developed to counteract these signs. An open-label study was conducted to investigate the effects of this nutritional supplement on skin properties. Supplementation with 50 mL of Pure Gold Collagen on a daily basis for 60 days led to a noticeable reduction in skin dryness, wrinkles, and nasolabial fold depth. In addition, a significant increase in collagen density and skin firmness was observed after 12 weeks. The data from this study suggest that Pure Gold Collagen can counteract signs of natural aging. PMID:25342893

  18. Lipoid proteinosis: an inherited disorder of collagen metabolism?

    PubMed

    Harper, J I; Duance, V C; Sims, T J; Light, N D

    1985-08-01

    The dermal collagen of a patient with lipoid proteinosis was investigated by immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis. The affected skin was found to contain significantly less collagen per unit dry weight than normal dermis but showed elevated levels of type 3 collagen with respect to type I. Purification of collagen types from affected skin after pepsin digestion showed no novel forms, but a doubling in the yield of type 5 collagen. These results correlated well with those of immunohistochemistry which showed a patchy, diffuse, widely distributed type 3 collagen and an increase in types 4 and 5 collagens associated with 'onion skin' endothelial basement membrane thickening. Estimation of collagen cross-links showed an abnormal pattern with a preponderance of the keto-imine form not normally associated with skin. These results strongly suggest that lipoid proteinosis involves a primary perturbation of collagen metabolism.

  19. In vitro bone formation by mesenchymal stem cells with 3D collagen/β-TCP composite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Todo, Mitsugu; Arahira, Takaaki

    2013-01-01

    Recent years, various kinds of natural polymers and bioceramics has been used to develop porous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Among of them, collagen guarantees good biological conditions, and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) possesses good oseteoconductivity, cellular adhesion, accelerated differentiation and mechanical property. In this study, rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rMSC) were cultured in β-TCP/collagen composite scaffolds up to 28 days in order to assess the time-dependent behavior of the extracellular matrix formation and the mechanical performance of the scaffold-cell system. The cell number and ALP activity were evaluated using a spectrophotometric plate reader. Gene expression of osteogenesis was analyzed using the real-time PCR reactions. Compression tests were also conducted periodically by using a conventional testing machine to evaluate the elastic modulus. The increasing behaviors of cell number and ALP activity in the composite scaffold were much better than in the collagen scaffold. The gene expression of osteocalcin and collagen type-I in collagen/β-TCP scaffold was higher than that of the collagen scaffold. The compressive modulus also increased up to 28 days. These results clearly showed that the distribution of micro β-TCP particles is very effective to increase the elastic modulus and promote cell growth.

  20. Localization of pro-alpha 2(V) collagen transcripts in the tissues of the developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulos, K; Suzuki, H R; Solursh, M; Ramirez, F

    1992-10-01

    Correct assembly of fibrillar collagen networks plays a critical role in animal morphogenesis. Very little is known about the contribution of the so-called minor fibrillar collagens (types V and XI) to fibrillogenesis. Here we examined the developmental expression of the mouse pro-alpha 2(V) collagen gene (col5a2) after the cloning and sequencing of cDNAs that cover the entire length of the message. Transcripts of col5a2, detectable as early as 9 days of gestation, localize with distinct patterns in the tissues of day 12.5 and day 16.5 fetuses. The earlier developmental stage is characterized by low and diffuse col5a2 expression in the peritoneal membranes and intestinal and craniofacial mesenchymes. The later stage exhibits higher and more restricted col5a2 mRNA accumulation in primary ossified regions, perichondrium, joints, tendon, atrioventricular valve of the heart, and selected portions of the head. A parallel analysis using a cartilage-specific pro-alpha 1(II) collagen (col2a1) probe confirmed that these two collagen genes are transcribed in a mutually exclusive manner during mouse embryogenesis. On the other hand, the developmental pattern of col5a2 expression closely resembles that of the type I collagen, thus further substantiating the notion that these macromolecules cooperate in the formation of fibrillar networks in non-cartilaginous matrices.

  1. AP-1 overexpression impairs corticosteroid inhibition of collagen production by fibroblasts isolated from asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Eric; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Boulet, Louis Philippe; Chakir, Jamila

    2010-08-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway remodeling associated with an increase in the deposition of ECM proteins such as type I collagen. These components are mainly produced by fibroblasts. Inhaled corticosteroids are considered the cornerstone of asthma therapy. Despite substantial evidence as to the anti-inflammatory action of corticosteroids, their effect on controlling ECM protein deposition in the airways is not completely understood. This study determined the effect of dexamethasone (Dex) on collagen production by bronchial fibroblasts derived from asthmatic and healthy subjects. Expression of procollagen mRNA in fibroblasts from asthmatics and normal controls was determined by quantitative PCR. Regulation of the procollagen-alpha(1)I promoter was evaluated by transient transfections. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) protein expression was determined by ELISA. Protein expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and interaction with activator protein-1 (AP-1), a collagen regulatory transcription factor, was assessed by Western blots, coimmunoprecipitations, and EMSA. AP-1 overexpression was performed by transient transfection using c-Fos/c-Jun expression plasmids. Dex significantly downregulated procollagen production and promoter activity in normal fibroblasts but had no effect on asthmatic fibroblasts. AP-1 and GR interaction increased after Dex stimulation in asthmatic fibroblasts. AP-1 overexpression in control fibroblasts abrogated collagen gene response to Dex. These results show that Dex failed to reduce collagen production in fibroblasts from asthmatic subjects. This impaired response may be related to AP-1 overexpression in these cells.

  2. Regulation of collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts by ascorbic-induced lipid peroxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Geesin, J.C. Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products, Inc., Skillman, NJ ); Gordon, J.S. ); Gordon, J.S. ); Berg, R.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Ascorbic acid has been shown to stimulate collagen synthesis through the induction of lipid peroxidation which leads to increased transcription of the collagen genes. To test the ability of aldehyde products of lipid peroxidation to mediate this effect, the authors treated cultured fibroblasts with 1-200{mu}M of malondialdehyde, acetaldehyde, glyoxal or hexenal in the presence of lipid peroxidation inducing or noninducing concentrations of ascorbic acid. The treatment process involved either pretreatment of cells for 66hrs with either concentration of ascorbate before a 6hr treatment in the presence of ascorbate and the aldehydes, or 6 or 72hr treatment of the cells in the presence of either concentration of ascorbate plus the aldehydes. No effect of any of these aldehydes was seen on ascorbate-stimulated collagen synthesis. Also, pretreatment of fibroblasts for 24hrs with 100nM phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which produces down regulation of protein kinase C(PKC), failed to alter the ascorbate-stimulation of collagen synthesis. Additionally, the authors tested the ability of benzamide, a poly ACP ribosylation inhibitor, to inhibit the ascorbate response with no specific effect noted. These results do not support the proposed roles for aldehydes, PKC, or poly ADP ribosylation in the mediation of the lipid peroxidation induced stimulation of collagen synthesis.

  3. Collagen Matrix Density Drives the Metabolic Shift in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Morris, Brett A; Burkel, Brian; Ponik, Suzanne M; Fan, Jing; Condeelis, John S; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Castracane, James; Denu, John M; Keely, Patricia J

    2016-11-01

    Increased breast density attributed to collagen I deposition is associated with a 4-6 fold increased risk of developing breast cancer. Here, we assessed cellular metabolic reprogramming of mammary carcinoma cells in response to increased collagen matrix density using an in vitro 3D model. Our initial observations demonstrated changes in functional metabolism in both normal mammary epithelial cells and mammary carcinoma cells in response to changes in matrix density. Further, mammary carcinoma cells grown in high density collagen matrices displayed decreased oxygen consumption and glucose metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle compared to cells cultured in low density matrices. Despite decreased glucose entry into the TCA cycle, levels of glucose uptake, cell viability, and ROS were not different between high and low density matrices. Interestingly, under high density conditions the contribution of glutamine as a fuel source to drive the TCA cycle was significantly enhanced. These alterations in functional metabolism mirrored significant changes in the expression of metabolic genes involved in glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and the serine synthesis pathway. This study highlights the broad importance of the collagen microenvironment to cellular expression profiles, and shows that changes in density of the collagen microenvironment can modulate metabolic shifts of cancer cells.

  4. Immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine Motility Factor Receptor in Odontogenic Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sneha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autocrine motility factor receptor (AMFR) is a tumour motility stimulating protein secreted by tumour cells. The protein encoded by this gene is a glycosylated transmembrane protein and a receptor for autocrine motility factor. It has been known to play a role in progression of neoplastic lesions. Basement membranes are specialized extracellular matrices that serve as structural barriers as well as substrates for cellular interactions. The network of type IV collagen is thought to define the scaffold integrating other components such as laminins and perlecan into highly organized supramolecular architecture. The aim of this study was to determine and evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine motility factor receptor in odontogenic lesions. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of Type IV Collagen and Autocrine motility factor receptor was evaluated in 31 odontogenic lesions, including unicystic ameloblastoma, multicystic ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumour and ameloblastic carcinoma. Normal follicular tissue formed the control. Results: Maximum expression for Type IV Collagen was seen in multicystic ameloblastoma and minimum expression in keratocystic odontogenic tumour. The maximum expression of AMFR was seen in ameloblastic carcinoma and minimum expression in multicystic ameloblastoma. Conclusion: The results of this study suggested an association of loss of expression of type IV Collagen with progression of lesion. AMFR expression was found to be associated with the aggressive potential of tumours. PMID:25478440

  5. Effect of Collagen Nanotopography on Keloid Fibroblast Proliferation and Matrix Synthesis: Implications for Dermal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Muthusubramaniam, Lalitha; Zaitseva, Tatiana; Paukshto, Michael; Martin, George

    2014-01-01

    Keloids are locally exuberant dermal scars characterized by excessive fibroblast proliferation and matrix accumulation. Although treatment strategies include surgical removal and intralesional steroid injections, an effective regimen is yet to be established due to a high rate of recurrence. The regressing center and growing margin of the keloid have different collagen architecture and also differ in the rate of proliferation. To investigate whether proliferation is responsive to collagen topography, keloid, scar, and dermal fibroblasts were cultured on nanopatterned scaffolds varying in collagen fibril diameter and alignment-small and large diameter, aligned and random fibrils, and compared to cells grown on flat collagen-coated substrates, respectively. Cell morphology, proliferation, and expression of six genes related to proliferation (cyclin D1), phenotype (α-smooth muscle actin), and matrix synthesis (collagens I and III, and matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -2) were measured to evaluate cell response. Fibril alignment was shown to reduce proliferation and matrix synthesis in all three types of fibroblasts. Further, keloid cells were found to be most responsive to nanotopography. PMID:24724556

  6. Collagen polymorphism in idiopathic chronic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, J M; Hutcheson, E T; Kang, A H

    1976-01-01

    Collagens in normal human lung and in idiopathic chronic fibrosis were investigated in terms of their covalent structure and compared for possible alterations in the diseased state. Collagens were solubilized by limited digestion with pepsin under nondenaturing conditions, and after purification they, were fractionated into types I and III. Carboxymethylcellulose and agarose chromatography of both types I and III collagens, and amino acid and carbohydrate analyses of the resulting alpha-chains indicated that the alpha 1 (I), alpha 2, and alpha 1 (III) chains of normal human lung were identical with the human skin alpha-chains in all respects examined except that the normal lung chains contained higher levels of hydroxylysine. Examination of collagens obtained from the diseased lung revealed that the content of hydroxylysine of the alpha 1 (I) and the alpha 1 (III) chains appeared to be diminished as compared to the normal lung chains. The values, expressed as residues per 1,000 residues, are 7.1 and 8.3 for the alpha 1 (I) and the alpha 1 (III) chains, respectively, as compared to 10.0 and 11.1 for the alpha-chains from the normal tissue. The chromatographic properties and amino acid and carbohydrate composition of the alpha-chains from the diseased tissue were otherwise indistinguishable from those of normal lung. In addition, isolation and characterization of the CNBr peptides of alpha 1 (I), alpha 2 and alpha 1 (III) from the diseased lung revealed no significant differences from the CNBr peptides from other human tissues reported previously. Normal and diseased lungs were also digested with CNBr, and the resultant alpha 1 (I) and alpha 1 (III) peptides were separated chromatographically. The relative quantities of these peptides indicate that type III collagen constitutes 33% of the total collagen in normal human lung, with the remainder being type I, whereas in idiopathic chronic pulmonary fibrosis, the relative content of type III collagen is markedly

  7. Collagenous colitis: new diagnostic possibilities with endomicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A.; Goetz, M.; Biesterfeld, S.; Galle, P. R.; Neurath, M. F.; Kiesslich, R.

    2006-02-01

    Collagenous colitis is a kind of microscopic colitis. It is characterized by chronic watery diarrhea and abdominal pain. The etiology is still unknown. So far, for the diagnose a histological evaluation was necessary with the presence of thickened subepithelial collagneous bands in the lamina propria. A new developed endoscope with a confocal laser allows analysing cellular and subcellular details of the mucosal layer at high resolution in vivo. In this case report we describe for the first time to diagnose collagenous colitis during ongoing colonoscopy by using this confocal endomicroscopy. In a 67 year old female patient with typical symptoms the characteristic histological changes could be identified in the endomicroscopic view. Biopsies could be targeted to affected areas and endomicroscopic prediction of the presence of collagenous bands could be confirmed in all targeted biopsies. First endomicroscopic experience in microscopic colitis could be confirmed in four additional patients. Future prospective studies are warranted to further evaluate these initial findings. However, collagenous colitis is frequently missed and endomicroscopy seems to be the ideal tool for accurate diagnosing collagenous colitis during ongoing endoscopy.

  8. Collagen degrading activity associated with Mycobacterium species

    PubMed Central

    Masso, F; Paez, A; Varela, E; d Diaz; Zenteno, E; Montano, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis penetration into tissues is poorly understood but it is reasonable to assume that there is a contribution from proteases capable of disrupting the extracellular matrix of the pulmonary epithelium and the blood vessels. A study was undertaken to identify and characterise collagen degrading activity of M tuberculosis.
METHODS—Culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) was obtained from reference mycobacterial strains and mycobacteria isolated from patients with tuberculosis. The collagen degrading activity of CFPE was determined according to the method of Johnson-Wint using 3H-type I collagen. The enzyme was identified by the Birkedal-Hansen and Taylor method and its molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration chromatography using an electroelution purified enzyme.
RESULTS—CFPE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv showed collagenolytic activity that was four times higher than that of the avirulent strain H37Ra. The 75 kDa enzyme responsible was divalent cation dependent. Other mycobacterial species and those isolated from patients with tuberculosis also had collagen degrading activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Mycobacterium species possess a metalloprotease with collagen degrading activity. The highest enzymatic activity was found in the virulent reference strain H37Rv.

 PMID:10212111

  9. New recommendations for measuring collagen solubility.

    PubMed

    Latorre, María E; Lifschitz, Adrian L; Purslow, Peter P

    2016-08-01

    The heat-solubility of intramuscular collagen is usually conducted in 1/4 Ringer's solution at pH7.4, despite this ionic strength and pH being inappropriate for post-rigor meat. The current work studied the percentage of soluble collagen and hydrothermal isometric tension characteristics of perimysial strips on bovine semitendinosus muscles in either 1/4 Ringer's solution, distilled water, PBS, or a solution of the same salt concentration as 1/4 Ringer's but at pH5.6. Values of % soluble collagen were lower at pH7.4 than 5.6. Increasing ionic strength reduced % soluble collagen. The maximum perimysial isometric tension was independent of the bathing medium, but the percent relaxation was higher at pH7.4 than at pH5.6, and increased with ionic strength of the media. It is recommended that future measurements of collagen solubility and tests on connective tissue components of post-rigor meat should be carried out in a solution of concentrations NaCl and KCl equivalent to those in 1/4 Ringer's, but at pH5.6, a pH relevant to post-rigor meat.

  10. Crosslink in bone collagen in Paget's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Misra, D P

    1975-01-01

    The crosslink in bone collagen was analysed in specimens of bone obtained at necropsy from cases of Paget's disease and compared with normal bone collagen of the same age. The specimens were stored at -20 degrees C before analysis. The predominant crosslink in a normal bone collagen was hydroxylysinohydroxynorleucine (di OH-LNL) (F1), which was designated syndesine in the past; another fraction, hydroxylysinorleucine (HLNL) (F2), musch less prominent than di OH-LNL, was also noted in a normal bone collagen. Both fractions were reduced in bone tissue of advancing age. The peak corresponding to HLNL was considerably increased in Paget's disease. This abnormality was constantly seen in specimens of bone from cases of Paget's disease, but the significance of the finging could not be assessed from the present investigation. Calcitonin has been shown to produce complete remission in Paget's disease and the crosslink pattern was found to be normal in specimens examined froma calcitonin-treated patient. This shows that calcitonin has some effect on the metabolism of collagen and a normal crosslink in such a situation lends support to this idea. PMID:1127123

  11. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  12. A novel rat tail collagen type-I gel for the cultivation of human articular chondrocytes in low cell density.

    PubMed

    Muller-Rath, R; Gavénis, K; Andereya, S; Mumme, T; Schmidt-Rohlfing, B; Schneider, U

    2007-12-01

    Collagen type-I matrix systems have gained growing importance as a cartilage repair device. However, most of the established matrix systems use collagen type-I of bovine origin seeded in high cell densities. Here we present a novel collagen type-I gel system made of rat tail collagen for the cultivation of human chondrocytes in low cell densities. Rat tail collagen type-I gel (CaReS, Arthro Kinetics, Esslingen, Germany) was seeded with human passage 2 chondrocytes in different cell densities to evaluate the optimal cell number. In vitro, the proliferation factor of low density cultures was more than threefold higher compared with high density cultures. After 6 weeks of in vitro cultivation, freshly prepared chondrocytes with an initial cell density of 2x10(5) cells/mL showed a proliferation factor of 33. A cell density of 2x10(5) cells/mL was chosen for in vitro and in vivo cultivation using the common nude mouse model as an in vivo system. Chondrocytes stayed viable as a Live/Dead fluorescence assay and TUNEL staining revealed. During in vitro cultivation, passage 0 cells partly dedifferentiated morphologically. In vivo, passage 0 cells maintained the chondrocyte phenotype and demonstrated an increased synthesis of collagen type-II protein and gene expression compared to passage 2 cells. Passage 2 cells did not redifferentiate in vivo. Cultivating a cell-seeded collagen gel of bovine origin as a control (AtelocollagenTM, Koken, Tokyo, Japan) did not lead to superior results with regard to cell morphology, col-II protein production and col-II gene expression. With the CaReS collagen gel system the best quality of repair tissue was obtained by seeding freshly isolated chondrocytes.

  13. Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Genes URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  14. Biomimetic silicification of demineralized hierarchical collagenous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ryou, Heonjune; Diogenes, Anibal; Yiu, Cynthia K.Y.; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Chen, Ji-hua; Arola, Dwayne D.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike man-made composite materials, natural biominerals containing composites usually demonstrate different levels of sophisticated hierarchical structures which are responsible for their mechanical properties and other metabolic functions. However, the complex spatial organizations of the organic-inorganic phases are far beyond what they be achieved by contemporary engineering techniques. Here, we demonstrate that carbonated apatite present in collagen matrices derived from fish scale and bovine bone may be replaced by amorphous silica, using an approach that simulates what is utilized by phylogenetically ancient glass sponges. The structural hierarchy of these collagen-based biomaterials is replicated by the infiltration and condensation of fluidic polymer-stabilized silicic acid precursors within the intrafibrillar milieu of type I collagen fibrils. This facile biomimetic silicification strategy may be used for fabricating silica-based, three-dimensional functional materials with specific morphological and hierarchical requirements. PMID:23586938

  15. Physical crosslinkings of edible collagen casing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhang; Zhang, Yi; Ye, Ran; Ni, Yonghao

    2015-11-01

    Although edible collagen casing has been commercially used in meat industry, the safety and effectiveness of collagen cross-linking with minimally invasive treatments are still big concerns for manufacturers. In this study, ultraviolet irradiation (UV) and dehydrothermal treatment (DHT) were used to improve the properties of casing. UV, DHT, and their combination (UV+DHT) significantly increased tensile strength and decreased elongation at break of casing, in which DHT showed the best performance. Swelling of casing was also partially inhibited by the treatments. Furthermore, UV and DHT slightly improved thermal stability of the casings. In addition, X-ray diffraction patterns showed the treatments caused different extents of denaturation of collagen. No obvious effects in thickness and light transparency except for surface roughness were observed in the treated casings. The physical treatments could potentially be used as safe and effective alternatives to chemical cross-linking for the production of collage casing.

  16. [Collagenous colitis. Morphologic and immunohistochemical study].

    PubMed

    Genova, G; Arena, N; Guddo, F; Vita, C; Reitano, R; Nagar, C; Tralongo, V

    1993-01-01

    Collagenous colitis is a clinico-pathological entity characterized by chronic diarrhoeas and deposition of collagen beneath the epithelium surface of large bowel. We revised 265 endoscopy biopsy specimens of the large bowel from 198 consecutive patients with "aspecific chronic colitis". Morphometric study showed that were not significant differences among various tracts in the same patients regarding to the thickness of basament membrane. It was more than 11.9 +/- 0.49 mu only in 13 pts (6.6%), while it was 3.96 +/- 1.4 mu in the others. Immunohistochemistry study confirmed the normality of subepithelial basement membrane and the below deposition of the large quantity of collagen IV.

  17. Prospects and limitations of the rational engineering of fibrillar collagens

    PubMed Central

    Majsterek, Ireneusz; McAdams, Erin; Adachi, Eijiro; Dhume, Shirish T.; Fertala, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant collagens are attractive proteins for a number of biomedical applications. To date, significant progress was made in the large-scale production of nonmodified recombinant collagens; however, engineering of novel collagen-like proteins according to customized specifications has not been addressed. Herein we investigated the possibility of rational engineering of collagen-like proteins with specifically assigned characteristics. We have genetically engineered two DNA constructs encoding multi-D4 collagens defined as collagen-like proteins, consisting primarily of a tandem of the collagen II D4 periods that correspond to the biologically active region. We have also attempted to decrease enzymatic degradation of novel collagen by mutating a matrix metalloproteinase 1 cleavage site present in the D4 period. We demonstrated that the recombinant collagen α-chains consisting predominantly of the D4 period but lacking most of the other D periods found in native collagen fold into a typical collagen triple helix, and the novel procollagens are correctly processed by procollagen N-proteinase and procollagen C-proteinase. The nonmutated multi-D4 collagen had a normal melting point of 41°C and a similar carbohydrate content as that of control. In contrast, the mutant multi-D4 collagen had a markedly lower thermostability of 36°C and a significantly higher carbohydrate content. Both collagens were cleaved at multiple sites by matrix metalloproteinase 1, but the rate of hydrolysis of the mutant multi-D4 collagen was lower. These results provide a basis for the rational engineering of collagenous proteins and identifying any undesirable consequences of altering the collagenous amino acid sequences. PMID:12931004

  18. Cell-collagen interactions: the use of peptide Toolkits to investigate collagen-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Farndale, Richard W; Lisman, Ton; Bihan, Dominique; Hamaia, Samir; Smerling, Christiane S; Pugh, Nicholas; Konitsiotis, Antonios; Leitinger, Birgit; de Groot, Philip G; Jarvis, Gavin E; Raynal, Nicolas

    2008-04-01

    Fibrillar collagens provide the most fundamental platform in the vertebrate organism for the attachment of cells and matrix molecules. We have identified specific sites in collagens to which cells can attach, either directly or through protein intermediaries. Using Toolkits of triple-helical peptides, each peptide comprising 27 residues of collagen primary sequence and overlapping with its neighbours by nine amino acids, we have mapped the binding of receptors and other proteins on to collagens II or III. Integrin alpha2beta1 binds to several GXX'GER motifs within the collagens, the affinities of which differ sufficiently to control cell adhesion and migration independently of the cellular regulation of the integrin. The platelet receptor, Gp (glycoprotein) VI binds well to GPO (where O is hydroxyproline)-containing model peptides, but to very few Toolkit peptides, suggesting that sequence in addition to GPO triplets is important in defining GpVI binding. The Toolkits have been applied to the plasma protein vWF (von Willebrand factor), which binds to only a single sequence, identified by truncation and amino acid substitution within Toolkit peptides, as GXRGQOGVMGFO in collagens II and III. Intriguingly, the receptor tyrosine kinase, DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2) recognizes three sites in collagen II, including its vWF-binding site, although the amino acids that support the interaction differ slightly within this motif. Furthermore, the secreted protein BM-40 (basement membrane protein 40) also binds well to this same region. Thus the availability of extracellular collagen-binding proteins may be important in regulating and facilitating direct collagen-receptor interaction.

  19. Ordered collagen membranes: production and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ruderman, G; Mogilner, I G; Tolosa, E J; Massa, N; Garavaglia, M; Grigera, J R

    2012-01-01

    A collagen membrane with microscopic order is presented. The membranes were produced with acid-soluble collagen, using two different methods to obtain orientation. The product was characterized by mean of UV and IR spectra, scanning electronic microscopy, optical microscopy and laser diffractometry. The results clearly show a high level of order in the membranes obtained by both techniques. Permeability for rifamycin, ascorbic acid and NaCl was also measured. Due to the characteristics of the membranes, they have a potential application for treatment of surface injuries.

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction and defective autophagy in the pathogenesis of collagen VI muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Paolo; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2013-05-01

    Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem Myopathy (BM), and Congenital Myosclerosis are diseases caused by mutations in the genes encoding the extracellular matrix protein collagen VI. A dystrophic mouse model, where collagen VI synthesis was prevented by targeted inactivation of the Col6a1 gene, allowed the investigation of pathogenesis, which revealed the existence of a Ca(2+)-mediated dysfunction of mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum, and of defective autophagy. Key events are dysregulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, an inner membrane high-conductance channel that for prolonged open times causes mitochondrial dysfunction, and inadequate removal of defective mitochondria, which amplifies the damage. Consistently, the Col6a1(-/-) myopathic mice could be cured through inhibition of cyclophilin D, a matrix protein that sensitizes the pore to opening, and through stimulation of autophagy. Similar defects contribute to disease pathogenesis in patients irrespective of the genetic lesion causing the collagen VI defect. These studies indicate that permeability transition pore opening and defective autophagy represent key elements for skeletal muscle fiber death, and provide a rationale for the use of cyclosporin A and its nonimmunosuppressive derivatives in patients affected by collagen VI myopathies, a strategy that holds great promise for treatment.

  1. 3D in vitro bioengineered tumors based on collagen I hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Szot, Christopher S.; Buchanan, Cara F.; Freeman, Joseph W.; Rylander, Marissa N.

    2011-01-01

    Cells cultured within a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro environment have the ability to acquire phenotypes and respond to stimuli analogous to in vivo biological systems. This approach has been utilized in tissue engineering and can also be applied to the development of a physiologically relevant in vitro tumor model. In this study, collagen I hydrogels cultured with MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were bioengineered as a platform for in vitro solid tumor development. The cell–cell and cell-matrix interactions present during in vivo tissue progression were encouraged within the 3D hydrogel architecture, and the biocompatibility of collagen I supported unconfined cellular proliferation. The development of necrosis beyond a depth of ~150–200 μm and the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α were demonstrated in the in vitro bioengineered tumors. Oxygen and nutrient diffusion limitations through the collagen I matrix as well as competition for available nutrients resulted in growing levels of intra-cellular hypoxia, quantified by a statistically significant (p < 0.01) upregulation of HIF-1α gene expression. The bioengineered tumors also demonstrated promising angiogenic potential with a statistically significant (p < 0.001) upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A gene expression. In addition, comparable gene expression analysis demonstrated a statistically significant increase of HIF-1α (p < 0.05) and VEGF-A (p < 0.001) by MDA-MB-231 cells cultured in the 3D collagen I hydrogels compared to cells cultured in a monolayer on two-dimensional tissue culture polystyrene. The results presented in this study demonstrate the capacity of collagen I hydrogels to facilitate the development of 3D in vitro bioengineered tumors that are representative of the pre-vascularized stages of in vivo solid tumor progression. PMID:21782234

  2. Platelet-reactive sites in collagen. Collagens I and III possess different aggregatory sites.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, L F; Fitzsimmons, C M; Rauterberg, J; Barnes, M J

    1987-01-01

    Collagen type III possesses a highly reactive platelet-aggregatory site at a locus which in type I is essentially inactive whilst the latter collagen possesses reactive sites absent in type III. It is proposed that platelet aggregation by collagen involves the sequence GK[or R]PG(EY)GPK[or R]G(EY) or, less favourably, GPK[or R]G(EY)G(XY)GK[or R]PG(EY), one basic residue acting in combination with the second in an adjacent alpha-chain. PMID:3124815

  3. Novel chitosan/collagen scaffold containing transforming growth factor-{beta}1 DNA for periodontal tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yufeng; Cheng Xiangrong . E-mail: Xiangrongcheng@hotmail.com; Wang Jiawei; Wang Yining; Shi Bin; Huang Cui; Yang Xuechao; Liu Tongjun

    2006-05-26

    The current rapid progression in tissue engineering and local gene delivery system has enhanced our applications to periodontal tissue engineering. In this study, porous chitosan/collagen scaffolds were prepared through a freeze-drying process, and loaded with plasmid and adenoviral vector encoding human transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1). These scaffolds were evaluated in vitro by analysis of microscopic structure, porosity, and cytocompatibility. Human periodontal ligament cells (HPLCs) were seeded in this scaffold, and gene transfection could be traced by green fluorescent protein (GFP). The expression of type I and type III collagen was detected with RT-PCR, and then these scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously into athymic mice. Results indicated that the pore diameter of the gene-combined scaffolds was lower than that of pure chitosan/collagen scaffold. The scaffold containing Ad-TGF-{beta}1 exhibited the highest proliferation rate, and the expression of type I and type III collagen up-regulated in Ad-TGF-{beta}1 scaffold. After implanted in vivo, EGFP-transfected HPLCs not only proliferated but also recruited surrounding tissue to grow in the scaffold. This study demonstrated the potential of chitosan/collagen scaffold combined Ad-TGF-{beta}1 as a good substrate candidate in periodontal tissue engineering.

  4. Probing multiscale mechanics of collagen with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Marjan; Rezaei, Naghmeh; Lam, Norman H.; Altindal, Tuba; Wieczorek, Andrew; Forde, Nancy R.

    2013-09-01

    How the molecular structure of the structural, extracellular matrix protein collagen correlates with its mechanical properties at different hierarchical structural levels is not known. We demonstrate the utility of optical tweezers to probe collagen's mechanical response throughout its assembly hierarchy, from single molecule force-extension measurements through microrheology measurements on solutions of collagen molecules, collagen fibrillar gels and gelatin. These experiments enable the determination of collagen's flexibility, mechanics, and timescales and strengths of interaction at different levels of hierarchy, information critical to developing models of how collagen's physiological function and stability are influenced by its chemical composition. By investigating how the viscoelastic properties of collagen are affected by the presence of telopeptides, protein domains that strongly influence fibril formation, we demonstrate that these play a role in conferring transient elasticity to collagen solutions.

  5. Structural insight for chain selection and stagger control in collagen

    PubMed Central

    Boudko, Sergei P.; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2016-01-01

    Collagen plays a fundamental role in all known metazoans. In collagens three polypeptides form a unique triple-helical structure with a one-residue stagger to fit every third glycine residue in the inner core without disturbing the poly-proline type II helical conformation of each chain. There are homo- and hetero-trimeric types of collagen consisting of one, two or three distinct chains. Thus there must be mechanisms that control composition and stagger during collagen folding. Here, we uncover the structural basis for both chain selection and stagger formation of a collagen molecule. Three distinct chains (α1, α2 and α3) of the non-collagenous domain 2 (NC2) of type IX collagen are assembled to guide triple-helical sequences in the leading, middle and trailing positions. This unique domain opens the door for generating any fragment of collagen in its native composition and stagger. PMID:27897211

  6. SPARC regulates collagen interaction with cardiac fibroblast cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Harris, Brett S; Zhang, Yuhua; Card, Lauren; Rivera, Lee B; Brekken, Rolf A; Bradshaw, Amy D

    2011-09-01

    Cardiac tissue from mice that do not express secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) have reduced amounts of insoluble collagen content at baseline and in response to pressure overload hypertrophy compared with wild-type (WT) mice. However, the cellular mechanism by which SPARC affects myocardial collagen is not clearly defined. Although expression of SPARC by cardiac myocytes has been detected in vitro, immunohistochemistry of hearts demonstrated SPARC staining primarily associated with interstitial fibroblastic cells. Primary cardiac fibroblasts isolated from SPARC-null and WT mice were assayed for collagen I synthesis by [(3)H]proline incorporation into procollagen and by immunoblot analysis of procollagen processing. Bacterial collagenase was used to discern intracellular from extracellular forms of collagen I. Increased amounts of collagen I were found associated with SPARC-null versus WT cells, and the proportion of total collagen I detected on SPARC-null fibroblasts without propeptides [collagen-α(1)(I)] was higher than in WT cells. In addition, the amount of total collagen sensitive to collagenase digestion (extracellular) was greater in SPARC-null cells than in WT cells, indicating an increase in cell surface-associated collagen in the absence of SPARC. Furthermore, higher levels of collagen type V, a fibrillar collagen implicated in collagen fibril initiation, were found in SPARC-null fibroblasts. The absence of SPARC did not result in significant differences in proliferation or in decreased production of procollagen I by cardiac fibroblasts. We conclude that SPARC regulates collagen in the heart by modulating procollagen processing and interactions with fibroblast cell surfaces. These results are consistent with decreased levels of interstitial collagen in the hearts of SPARC-null mice being due primarily to inefficient collagen deposition into the extracellular matrix rather than to differences in collagen production.

  7. Immunosuppression by fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in collagen arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Belli, J.A.; Trentham, D.E.

    1982-05-01

    Treatments with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and cyclophosphamide were evaluated for rats injected with type II collagen. Preadministration of TLI and repeated injections of cyclophosphamide suppressed the severity of arthritis and lowered antibody titers to collagen significantly. TLI initiated at the onset of collagen arthritis decreased humoral and cellular responses to collagen but did not affect the severity of arthritis. These data demonstrate that both TLi and cyclophosphamide are immunosuppressive in an experimentally inducible autoimmune disease.

  8. Conformational stability of triazolyl functionalized collagen triple helices.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Roman S; Wennemers, Helma

    2013-06-15

    Functionalized collagen is attractive for the development of synthetic biomaterials. Herein we present the functionalization of azidoproline containing collagen model peptides with various alkynes using click chemistry. The influence on the stability of the collagen triple helix of the stereochemistry of the introduced triazolyl prolines (4R or 4S), the position of their incorporation (Xaa or Yaa) and the substituents attached to them are shown. The results provide a useful guide for the optimal functionalization of collagen using click chemistry.

  9. Collagen Fiber Orientation in Primate Long Bones.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, Johanna; Bromage, Timothy G; Terranova, Carl J; Enlow, Donald H

    2017-02-16

    Studies of variation in orientation of collagen fibers within bone have lead to the proposition that these are preferentially aligned to accommodate different kinds of load, with tension best resisted by fibers aligned longitudinally relative to the load, and compression best resisted by transversely aligned fibers. However, previous studies have often neglected to consider the effect of developmental processes, including constraints on collagen fiber orientation (CFO), particularly in primary bone. Here we use circularly polarized light microscopy to examine patterns of CFO in cross-sections from the midshaft femur, humerus, tibia, radius and ulna in a range of living primate taxa with varied body sizes, phylogenetic relationships and positional behaviors. We find that a preponderance of longitudinally oriented collagen is characteristic of both periosteal primary and intracortically remodeled bone. Where variation does occur among groups, it is not simply understood via interpretations of mechanical loads, although prioritized adaptations to tension and/or shear are considered. While there is some suggestion that CFO may correlate with body size, this relationship is neither consistent nor easily explicable through consideration of size-related changes in mechanical adaptation. The results of our study indicate that there is no clear relationship between CFO and phylogenetic status. One of the principle factors accounting for the range of variation that does exist is primary tissue type, where slower depositing bone is more likely to comprise a larger proportion of oblique to transverse collagen fibers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Biological safety of fish (tilapia) collagen.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohei; Igawa, Kazunari; Sugimoto, Kouji; Yoshizawa, Yuu; Yanagiguchi, Kajiro; Ikeda, Takeshi; Yamada, Shizuka; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Marine collagen derived from fish scales, skin, and bone has been widely investigated for application as a scaffold and carrier due to its bioactive properties, including excellent biocompatibility, low antigenicity, and high biodegradability and cell growth potential. Fish type I collagen is an effective material as a biodegradable scaffold or spacer replicating the natural extracellular matrix, which serves to spatially organize cells, providing them with environmental signals and directing site-specific cellular regulation. This study was conducted to confirm the safety of fish (tilapia) atelocollagen for use in clinical application. We performed in vitro and in vivo biological studies of medical materials to investigate the safety of fish collagen. The extract of fish collagen gel was examined to clarify its sterility. All present sterility tests concerning bacteria and viruses (including endotoxin) yielded negative results, and all evaluations of cell toxicity, sensitization, chromosomal aberrations, intracutaneous reactions, acute systemic toxicity, pyrogenic reactions, and hemolysis were negative according to the criteria of the ISO and the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan. The present study demonstrated that atelocollagen prepared from tilapia is a promising biomaterial for use as a scaffold in regenerative medicine.

  11. Collagen network strengthening following cyclic tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Monica E; Paten, Jeffrey A; Sander, Edward A; Nguyen, Thao D; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2016-02-06

    The bulk mechanical properties of tissues are highly tuned to the physiological loads they experience and reflect the hierarchical structure and mechanical properties of their constituent parts. A thorough understanding of the processes involved in tissue adaptation is required to develop multi-scale computational models of tissue remodelling. While extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is partly due to the changing cellular metabolic activity, there may also be mechanically directed changes in ECM nano/microscale organization which lead to mechanical tuning. The thermal and enzymatic stability of collagen, which is the principal load-bearing biopolymer in vertebrates, have been shown to be enhanced by force suggesting that collagen has an active role in ECM mechanical properties. Here, we ask how changes in the mechanical properties of a collagen-based material are reflected by alterations in the micro/nanoscale collagen network following cyclic loading. Surprisingly, we observed significantly higher tensile stiffness and ultimate tensile strength, roughly analogous to the effect of work hardening, in the absence of network realignment and alterations to the fibril area fraction. The data suggest that mechanical loading induces stabilizing changes internal to the fibrils themselves or in the fibril-fibril interactions. If such a cell-independent strengthening effect is operational in vivo, then it would be an important consideration in any multiscale computational approach to ECM growth and remodelling.

  12. Controlled self assembly of collagen nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papi, Massimiliano; Palmieri, Valentina; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Arcovito, Giuseppe; Greco, Emanuela; Quintiliani, Gianluca; Fraziano, Maurizio; De Spirito, Marco

    2011-11-01

    In recent years carrier-mediated drug delivery has emerged as a powerful methodology for the treatment of various pathologies. The therapeutic index of traditional and novel drugs is enhanced via the increase of specificity due to targeting of drugs to a particular tissue, cell or intracellular compartment, the control over release kinetics, the protection of the active agent, or a combination of the above. Collagen is an important biomaterial in medical applications and ideal as protein-based drug delivery platform due to its special characteristics, such as biocompatibility, low toxicity, biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. While some many attempts have been made, further work is needed to produce fully biocompatible collagen hydrogels of desired size and able to release drugs on a specific target. In this article we propose a novel method to obtain spherical particles made of polymerized collagen surrounded by DMPC liposomes. The liposomes allow to control both the particles dimension and the gelling environment during the collagen polymerization. Furthermore, an optical based method to visualize and quantify each step of the proposed protocol is detailed and discussed.

  13. Autoantibodies and immunoglobulins in collagenous colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, J; Tysk, C; Yang, P; Danielsson, D; Järnerot, G

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aetiology and pathogenesis of collagenous colitis are unknown. Autoimmunity has been suggested, but no serological findings have supported such a theory. AIMS AND METHODS: Serum from 38 collagenous colitis patients and 38 matched healthy controls was analysed for autoantibodies--that is, antinuclear antibodies, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies, smooth muscle and mitochondrial antibodies, rheumatoid factor and antibodies to thyroglobulin and microsomal antigen, together with antibodies to endomysium, gliadin, and cardiolipin. The serum values of IgA, IgG, IgM, and IgG-subclasses, and complement factors C3 and C4 were also determined. RESULTS: In patients with collagenous colitis the mean value of IgM was significantly increased 2.5 g/l (95% CI; 1.9, 3.2) compared with 1.4 g/l (95% CI; 1.2, 1.7) in controls (p = 0.002). Antinuclear antibodies occurred in nine of 38 patients compared with three of 38 controls, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.11). The results of all other immunoglobulins, complement factors, and specific antibodies showed no statistical difference between patients and controls. CONCLUSIONS: No firm evidence for an autoimmune genesis in collagenous colitis is found in this study, although the findings of a positive ANA-titre in some patients and an increased IgM level might give some support for this hypothesis. PMID:8881813

  14. Collagen binding specificity of the discoidin domain receptors: binding sites on collagens II and III and molecular determinants for collagen IV recognition by DDR1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huifang; Raynal, Nicolas; Stathopoulos, Stavros; Myllyharju, Johanna; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2 are cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by triple-helical collagen. While normal DDR signalling regulates fundamental cellular processes, aberrant DDR signalling is associated with several human diseases. We previously identified GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as a major DDR2 binding site in collagens I-III, and located two additional DDR2 binding sites in collagen II. Here we extend these studies to the homologous DDR1 and the identification of DDR binding sites on collagen III. Using sets of overlapping triple-helical peptides, the Collagen II and Collagen III Toolkits, we located several DDR2 binding sites on both collagens. The interaction of DDR1 with Toolkit peptides was more restricted, with DDR1 mainly binding to peptides containing the GVMGFO motif. Triple-helical peptides containing the GVMGFO motif induced DDR1 transmembrane signalling, and DDR1 binding and receptor activation occurred with the same amino acid requirements as previously defined for DDR2. While both DDRs exhibit the same specificity for binding the GVMGFO motif, which is present only in fibrillar collagens, the two receptors display distinct preferences for certain non-fibrillar collagens, with the basement membrane collagen IV being exclusively recognised by DDR1. Based on our recent crystal structure of a DDR2-collagen complex, we designed mutations to identify the molecular determinants for DDR1 binding to collagen IV. By replacing five amino acids in DDR2 with the corresponding DDR1 residues we were able to create a DDR2 construct that could function as a collagen IV receptor.

  15. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS – which was released from scaffolds quickly – significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  16. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS – which was released from scaffolds quickly – significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA. PMID:28256634

  17. Extracellular Protease Inhibition Alters the Phenotype of Chondrogenically Differentiating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in 3D Collagen Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sejin; Li, Yuk Yin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Matrix remodeling of cells is highly regulated by proteases and their inhibitors. Nevertheless, how would the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) be affected, when the balance of the matrix remodeling is disturbed by inhibiting matrix proteases, is incompletely known. Using a previously developed collagen microencapsulation platform, we investigated whether exposing chondrogenically differentiating MSCs to intracellular and extracellular protease inhibitors will affect the extracellular matrix remodeling and hence the outcomes of chondrogenesis. Results showed that inhibition of matrix proteases particularly the extracellular ones favors the phenotype of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage in chondrogenically differentiating hMSCs by upregulating type I collagen protein deposition and type II collagen gene expression without significantly altering the hypertrophic markers at gene level. This study suggests the potential of manipulating extracellular proteases to alter the outcomes of hMSC chondrogenesis, contributing to future development of differentiation protocols for fibrocartilage tissues for intervertebral disc and meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:26760956

  18. Microscale Mechanical Testing of Individual Collagen Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poissant, Jeffrey

    Collagen is a key constituent for a large number of biological materials including bone, tendon, cartilage, skin and fish scales. Understanding the mechanical behavior of collagen's microscale structural components (fibers and fibrils) is therefore of utmost importance for fields such as biomimetics and biomedical engineering. However, the mechanics of collagen fibers and fibrils remain largely unexplored. The main research challenges are the small sample sizes (diameters less than 1 im) and the need to maintain physiologically relevant conditions. In this work, a microscale mechanical testing device (MMTD) capable of measuring the stress-strain response of individual collagen fibers and fibrils was developed. The MMTD consists of: (i) a transducer from a commercial nanoindenter to measure load and displacement, (ii) an optical microscope to observe the deformation of the sample in-situ and (iii) micromanipulators to isolate, position and fix samples. Collagen fibers and fibrils were extracted from fish scales using a novel dissection procedure and tested using the MMTD. A variety of tensile tests were performed including monotonic loading and cyclic tests with increasing loading rate or maximum displacement. The monotonic test results found that the elastic modulus, ultimate tensile strength and strain at failure range from 0.5 to 1.3 GPa, 100 to 200 MPa and 20% to 60%, respectively. The cyclic tests revealed that the largest increase in damage accumulation occurs at strains between 10% and 20%, when hydrogen bonds at the molecular level are ruptured. Further straining the fibril causes little additional damage accumulation and signals the approach of failure. The addition of water is shown to increase damage tolerance and strain to failure.

  19. Mechanically overloading collagen fibrils uncoils collagen molecules, placing them in a stable, denatured state.

    PubMed

    Veres, Samuel P; Harrison, Julia M; Lee, J Michael

    2014-01-01

    Due to the high occurrence rate of overextension injuries to tendons and ligaments, it is important to understand the fundamental mechanisms of damage to these tissues' primary load-bearing elements: collagen fibrils and their constituent molecules. Based on our recent observations of a new subrupture, overload-induced mode of fibril disruption that we call discrete plasticity, we have sought in the current study to re-explore whether the tensile overload of collagen fibrils can alter the helical conformation of collagen molecules. In order to accomplish this, we have analyzed the conformation of collagen molecules within repeatedly overloaded tendons in relation to their undamaged matched-pair controls using both differential scanning calorimetry and variable temperature trypsin digestion susceptibility. We find that tensile overload reduces the specific enthalpy of denaturation of tendons, and increases their susceptibility to trypsin digestion, even when the digestion is carried out at temperatures as low as 4 °C. Our results indicate that the tensile overload of collagen fibrils can uncoil the helix of collagen molecules, placing them in a stable, denatured state.

  20. “Target” and “Sandwich” Signs in Thigh Muscles have High Diagnostic Values for Collagen VI-related Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jun; Zheng, Yi-Ming; Jin, Su-Qin; Yi, Jun-Fei; Liu, Xiu-Juan; Lyn, He; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Jiang-Xi; Yuan, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Collagen VI-related myopathies are autosomal dominant and recessive hereditary myopathies, mainly including Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM). Muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to diagnosis muscular disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of thigh muscles MRI for collagen VI-related myopathies. Methods: Eleven patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies were enrolled in this study. MRI of the thigh muscles was performed in all patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies and in 361 patients with other neuromuscular disorders (disease controls). T1-weighted images were used to assess fatty infiltration of the muscles using a modified Mercuri's scale. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the MRI features of collagen VI-related myopathies. The relationship between fatty infiltration of muscles and specific collagen VI gene mutations was also investigated. Results: Eleven patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies included six UCMD patients and five BM patients. There was no significant difference between UCMD and BM patients in the fatty infiltration of each thigh muscle except sartorius (P = 0.033); therefore, we combined the UCMD and BM data. Mean fatty infiltration scores were 3.1 and 3.0 in adductor magnus and gluteus maximus, while the scores were 1.3, 1.3, and 1.5 in gracilis, adductor longus, and sartorius, respectively. A “target” sign in rectus femoris (RF) was present in seven cases, and a “sandwich” sign in vastus lateralis (VL) was present in ten cases. The “target” and “sandwich” signs had sensitivities of 63.6% and 90.9% and specificities of 97.3% and 96.9% for the diagnosis of collagen VI-related myopathies, respectively. Fatty infiltration scores were 2.0–3.0 in seven patients with mutations in the triple-helical domain, and 1.0–1.5 in three of four patients with

  1. Loss of Interneuron-Derived Collagen XIX Leads to a Reduction in Perineuronal Nets in the Mammalian Telencephalon

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jianmin; Cole, James

    2017-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are lattice-like supramolecular assemblies of extracellular glycoproteins that surround subsets of neuronal cell bodies in the mammalian telencephalon. PNNs emerge at the end of the critical period of brain development, limit neuronal plasticity in the adult brain, and are lost in a variety of complex brain disorders diseases, including schizophrenia. The link between PNNs and schizophrenia led us to question whether neuronally expressed extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules associated with schizophrenia contribute to the assembly of these specialized supramolecular ECM assemblies. We focused on collagen XIX—a minor, nonfibrillar collagen expressed by subsets of telencephalic interneurons. Genetic alterations in the region encoding collagen XIX have been associated with familial schizophrenia, and loss of this collagen in mice results in altered inhibitory synapses, seizures, and the acquisition of schizophrenia-related behaviors. Here, we demonstrate that loss of collagen XIX also results in a reduction of telencephalic PNNs. Loss of PNNs was accompanied with reduced levels of aggrecan (Acan), a major component of PNNs. Despite reduced levels of PNN constituents in collagen XIX-deficient mice (col19a1−/−), we failed to detect reduced expression of genes encoding these ECM molecules. Instead, we discovered a widespread upregulation of extracellular proteases capable of cleaving Acan and other PNN constituents in col19a1−/− brains. Taken together, these results suggest a mechanism by which the loss of collagen XIX speeds PNN degradation and they identify a novel mechanism by which the loss of collagen XIX may contribute to complex brain disorders. PMID:28090790

  2. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-08-07

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release.

  3. Exploring a Role in Tanning for the Gap Region of the Collagen Fibril: Catechin-Collagen Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electron micrographs of stained collagen fibrils display a pattern of alternating light and dark bands perpendicular to the axis of the collagen fibril. Light bands correspond to regions of more dense lateral packing where adjacent collagen monomers overlap, and dark bands correspond to 'gap' regio...

  4. Characterization of muscle epimysium, perimysium and endomysium collagens.

    PubMed Central

    Light, N; Champion, A E

    1984-01-01

    In the past it has been proven difficult to separate and characterize collagen from muscle because of its relative paucity in this tissue. The present report presents a comprehensive methodology, combining methods previously described by McCollester [(1962) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 57, 427-437] and Laurent, Cockerill, McAnulty & Hastings [(1981) Anal. Biochem. 113, 301-312], in which the three major tracts of muscle connective tissue, the epimysium, perimysium and endomysium, may be prepared and separated from the bulk of muscle protein. Connective tissue thus prepared may be washed with salt and treated with pepsin to liberate soluble native collagen, or can be washed with sodium dodecyl sulphate to produce a very clean insoluble collagenous product. This latter type of preparation may be used for quantification of the ratio of the major genetic forms of collagen or for measurement of reducible cross-link content to give reproducible results. It was shown that both the epimysium and perimysium contain type I collagen as the major component and type III collagen as a minor component; perimysium also contained traces of type V collagen. The endomysium, the sheaths of individual muscle fibres, was shown to contain both type I and type III collagen as major components. Type V collagen was also present in small amounts, and type IV collagen, the collagenous component of basement membranes, was purified from endomysial preparations. This is the first biochemical demonstration of the presence of type IV collagen in muscle endomysium. The preparation was shown to be very similar to other type IV collagens from other basement membranes on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and was indistinguishable from EHS sarcoma collagen and placenta type IV collagen in the electron microscope after rotary shadowing. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6743238

  5. Thickness sensing of hMSCs on collagen gel directs stem cell fate

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Wen Shing; Tay, Chor Yong; Yu, Haiyang; Li, Ang; Wu, Shu Cheng; Duc, Duong-Hong; Lim, Chwee Teck; Tan, Lay Poh

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} hMSCs appeared to sense thin collagen gel (130 {mu}m) with higher effective modulus as compared to thick gel (1440 {mu}m). {yields} Control of collagen gel thickness can modulate cellular behavior, even stem cell fate (neuronal vs. Quiescent). {yields} Distinct cellular behavior of hMSCs on thin and thick collagen gel suggests long range interaction of hMSCs with collagen gel. -- Abstract: Mechanically compliant substrate provides crucial biomechanical cues for multipotent stem cells to regulate cellular fates such as differentiation, proliferation and maintenance of their phenotype. Effective modulus of which cells sense is not only determined by intrinsic mechanical properties of the substrate, but also the thickness of substrate. From our study, it was found that interference from underlying rigid support at hundreds of microns away could induce significant cellular response. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured on compliant biological gel, collagen type I, of different thickness but identical ECM composition and local stiffness. The cells sensed the thin gel (130 {mu}m) as having a higher effective modulus than the thick gel (1440 {mu}m) and this was reflected in their changes in morphology, actin fibers structure, proliferation and tissue specific gene expression. Commitment into neuronal lineage was observed on the thin gel only. Conversely, the thick gel (1440 {mu}m) was found to act like a substrate with lower effective modulus that inhibited actin fiber polymerization. Stem cells on the thick substrate did not express tissue specific genes and remained at their quiescent state. This study highlighted the need to consider not only the local modulus but also the thickness of biopolymer gel coating during modulation of cellular responses.

  6. Effect of oxy radicals on several types of collagen.

    PubMed

    Monboisse, J C; Poulin, G; Braquet, P; Randoux, A; Ferradini, C; Borel, J P

    1984-01-01

    Fibrils of collagen reconstituted in vitro by dialysis against sodium formate are exposed to free oxy radicals generated by three different systems: (i) xanthine oxidase + hypoxanthine, (ii) gamma-rays originating from a cobalt bomb; (iii) pulse radiolysis in a particle accelerator. A degradation of the collagen fibres is demonstrated by determination of the amount of hydroxyproline-containing peptides in the supernatant after incubation. Types I and III collagen are sensitive to the effect, whereas type V collagen is not. The effect persists when collagen is specially delipidated.

  7. Second harmonic imaging and scoring of collagen in fibrotic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, M.; Pena, A.-M.; Hernest, M.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Martin, J.-L.; Beaurepaire, E.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2007-04-01

    We compare second harmonic generation (SHG) to histological and immunohistochemical techniques for the visualization and scoring of collagen in biological tissues. We show that SHG microscopy is highly specific for fibrillar collagens and that combined SHG and two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) imaging can provide simultaneous three-dimensional visualization of collagen synthesis and assembly sites in transgenic animal models expressing GFP constructs. Finally, we propose several scores for characterizing collagen accumulation based on SHG images and appropriate for different types of collagen distributions. We illustrate the sensitivity of these scores in a murine model of renal fibrosis using a morphological segmentation of the tissue based on endogenous 2PEF signals.

  8. Activation of nuclear factor κB in colonic mucosa from patients with collagenous and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, L; Jørgensen, V L; Perner, A; Hansen, A; Eugen-Olsen, J; Rask-Madsen, J

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is greatly upregulated in the colonic mucosa of patients with collagenous and ulcerative colitis. As the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NFκB) is a major inducer of iNOS gene expression, we compared activation and transcriptional activity of NFκB in colonic mucosal biopsies from these patients. Patients: Eight patients with collagenous colitis, six with relapsing ulcerative colitis, and eight with uninflamed bowel were studied. Methods: NFκB DNA binding activity was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and inhibitor of NFκB (IκB) kinase (IKK) activity by immunocomplex kinase assay. In vivo recruitment of NFκB to the iNOS promoter was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis and transcriptional activity by NFκB gene expression profiling arrays. Cells showing NFκB activation were identified by immunohistochemistry. Results: In collagenous and ulcerative colitis, as opposed to uninflamed bowel, IKKβ activity and strong NFκB DNA binding gave rise to activation of identical NFκB subunits and recruitment of transcriptionally active p65 to the iNOS promoter. In collagenous colitis, activated NFκB was observed only in epithelial cells while up to 10% of lamina propria macrophages showed activation in ulcerative colitis. Conclusions: In collagenous and ulcerative colitis, colonic mucosal NFκB is activated and recruited to the iNOS promoter in vivo via an IKKβ mediated pathway. As collagenous colitis is not associated with tissue injury, these data challenge the prevailing view that activation of NFκB per se mediates tissue injury. Our results suggest that downstream inflammatory reactions leading to tissue damage originate in lamina propria immune cells, as increased NFκB activity in collagenous colitis was localised solely in epithelial cells, but present also in macrophages in ulcerative colitis. PMID:15753535

  9. Comparative analysis of fibrillar and basement membrane collagen expression in embryos of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H R; Reiter, R S; D'Alessio, M; Di Liberto, M; Ramirez, F; Exposito, J Y; Gambino, R; Solursh, M

    1997-06-01

    The time of appearance and location of three distinct collagen gene transcripts termed 1 alpha, 2 alpha, and 3 alpha, were monitored in the developing S. purpuratus embryo by in situ hybridization. The 1 alpha and 2 alpha transcripts of fibrillar collagens were detected simultaneously in the primary (PMC) and secondary (SMC) mesenchyme cells of the late gastrula stage and subsequently expressed in the spicules and gut associated cells of the pluteus stage. The 3 alpha transcripts of the basement membrane collagen appeared earlier than 1 alpha and 2 alpha, and were first detected in the presumptive PMC at the vegetal plate of the late blastula stage. The PMC exhibited high expression of 3 alpha at the mesenchyme blastula stage, but during gastrulation the level of expression was reduced differentially among the PMC. In the late gastrula and pluteus stages, both PMC and SMC expressed 3 alpha mRNA, and thus at these stages all three collagen genes displayed an identical expression pattern by coincidence. This study thus provides the first survey of onset and localization of multiple collagen transcripts in a single sea urchin species.

  10. Interaction study of collagen and sericin in blending solution.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lian; Yuan, Jingjie; Yang, Xiao; Cheng, Xinjian; Li, Jiao

    2016-12-01

    The interactions of collagen and sericin were studied by fluorescence spectra, ultraviolet spectra, FTIR spectra and dynamic light scattering. The fluorescence quenching in emission spectra and red-shift (283-330nm) in synchronous fluorescence spectra suggested the Tyr of collagen and sericin overlapped with a distance of 3Å, generating excimer. The overlapped Tyr of collagen and sericin decreased the hydrophobicity of collagen, which resulted in the red-shifts (233-240nm) in ultraviolet spectra. Moreover, the red-shifts of amide bands of collagen in FTIR spectra indicated the hydrogen bonds of collagen were weaken and it could also be explained by the overlapped Tyr. The results of 2D-FTIR spectra demonstrated the backbone of collagen molecule was varied and the most susceptible structure of collagen was the triple helix with the presence of sericin. Based on dynamic light scattering, we conjectured large pure collagen aggregates were replaced by hybrid aggregates of collagen and sericin particles after the addition of sericin. With ascending sericin ratio, the diameters of the hybrid aggregates increased and attained maximum with 60% ratio of sericin, which were on account of the increasing excimer number. The results of DSC demonstrated the presence of sericin enhanced the thermal stability of collagen.

  11. Northern pike (Esox lucius) collagen: Extraction, characterization and potential application.

    PubMed

    Kozlowska, J; Sionkowska, A; Skopinska-Wisniewska, J; Piechowicz, K

    2015-11-01

    Acid soluble collagen (ASC) and pepsin soluble collagen (PSC) from the scales of northern pike (Esox lucius) were extracted and characterized. It was the first time that this species was used as sources of collagen. FT-IR and amino acid analysis results revealed the presence of collagen. Glycine accounts for one-third of its amino acid residues and specific for collagen amino acid - hydroxyproline - is present in isolated protein. The content of imino acid: proline and hydroxyproline in ASC and PSC was similar (12.5% Pro and 6.5% Hyp). Both ASC and PSC were type I collagen. The denaturation temperature of ASC and PSC were 28.5 and 27°C, respectively. Thin collagen films were obtained by casting of collagen solution onto glass plates. The surface properties of ASC and PSC films were different - the surface of ASC collagen film was more polar and less rough than PSC and we can observe the formation of collagen fibrils after solvent evaporation. ASC films showed much higher tensile properties than PSC. The obtained results suggest that northern pike scales have potential as an alternative source of collagen for use in various fields.

  12. Physical and chemical modifications of collagen gels: impact on diffusion.

    PubMed

    Erikson, Arne; Andersen, Hilde Nortvedt; Naess, Stine Nalum; Sikorski, Pawel; Davies, Catharina de Lange

    2008-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) represents a major barrier for delivery of therapeutic drugs, and the transport is determined by the ECM composition, structure, and distribution. Because of the high interstitial fluid pressure in tumors, diffusion becomes the main transport mechanism through ECM. The purpose of this work was to study the impact of the structure of the collagen network on diffusion, by studying to what extent the orientation and chemical modification of the collagen network influenced diffusion. Collagen gels with a concentration of 0.2-2.0% that is comparable with the amount of collagen in the tumor ECM were used as a model system for ECM. Collagen gels were aligned in a low-strength magnetic field and geometrical confinement, and chemically modified by adding decorin or hyaluronan. Diffusion of dextran 2-MDa molecules in the collagen gels was measured using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Alignment of the collagen fibers in our gels was found to have no impact on the diffusion coefficient. Adding decorin reduced the diameter of the collagen fibers, but no effect on diffusion was observed. Hyaluronan also reduced the fiber diameter, and high concentration of hyaluronan (2.5 mg/ml) increased the diffusion coefficient. The results indicate that the structure of the collagen network is not a major factor in determining the diffusion through the ECM. Rather, increasing the concentration of collagen was found to reduce the diffusion coefficient. Concentration of the collagen network is more important than the structure in determining the diffusion coefficient.

  13. Preparation of (3H)collagen for studies of the biologic fate of xenogenic collagen implants in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, J.M.; Sawamura, S.J.; Conti, A.

    1986-06-01

    Reduction of a commercially available, pepsin-solubilized, bovine dermal collagen (Vitrogen 100) with sodium (3H)borohydride provided radiolabeled collagen preparations with specific activities ranging from 7.1-12.0 muCi/mg collagen. These specific activities were 2-3 times greater than those obtained by reduction of intact rat tail tendon collagen under similar conditions. The alpha, beta, and higher aggregate components of type I collagen were radiolabeled as well as the alpha component of a small amount of type III collagen present in the samples. Fractionation of cyanogen bromide peptides showed that alpha 1(I)CB7, alpha 1(I)CB8, and alpha 2(I)CB3,5 were the predominant peptides labeled by this procedure. Amino acid analysis indicated that the majority of the radioactivity was in reducible cross-links, precursors of these cross-links, and in hexosyllysine residues. Reconstitution experiments comparing this radiolabeled collagen with nonlabeled collagen showed them to be indistinguishable. Bacterial collagenase digestion of this reconstituted fibrillar collagen in both a lightly cross-linked (glutaraldehyde 0.0075%) and noncross-linked form provided evidence that digestion of labeled and nonlabeled collagens proceeded at similar rates. Thus, labeling did not change the properties of the collagen. Cross-linking made the preparation refractory to proteolytic degradation. Injection of fibrillar collagen preparations, spiked with radiolabeled collagen, into the guinea pig dermis followed by quantitation of the amount of radioactivity recovered from implant sites as a function of time, indicated that the lightly cross-linked samples also were more resistant to degradation in vivo than the noncross-linked preparation. The half-life of noncross-linked collagen was about 4 days while that of the cross-linked collagen was about 25 days.

  14. Transdermal Delivery of Functional Collagen Via Polyvinylpyrrolidone Microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenchao; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Manoukian, Martin A. C.; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Manickam, Sathish; Marinkovich, M. Peter; Lane, Alfred T.; Tayebi, Lobat; Seifalian, Alexander M.; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2017-01-01

    Collagen makes up a large proportion of the human body, particularly the skin. As the body ages, collagen content decreases, resulting in wrinkled skin and decreased wound healing capabilities. This paper presents a method of delivering type I collagen into porcine and human skin utilizing a polyvinylpyrrolidone microneedle delivery system. The microneedle patches were made with concentrations of 1, 2, 4, and 8% type I collagen (w/w). Microneedle structures and the distribution of collagen were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. Patches were then applied on the porcine and human skin, and their effectiveness was examined using fluorescence microscopy. The results illustrate that this microneedle delivery system is effective in delivering collagen I into the epidermis and dermis of porcine and human skin. Since the technique presented in this paper is quick, safe, effective and easy, it can be considered as a new collagen delivery method for cosmetic and therapeutic applications. PMID:26066056

  15. Quantity change in collagen following 830-nm diode laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; O'Callaghan, David; Rouy, Simone; Godlewski, Guilhem; Prudhomme, Michel

    1996-12-01

    The actual mechanism for production of laser welding of tissue is presently unknown, but collagen plays an important role is tissue welded after laser irradiance. The quantity change in collagen extracted from the abdominal aorta of Wistar rats after tissue welding using an 830 nm diode laser was investigated. The collagen contents following repeated pepsin digestion after acetic acid extraction were determined with Sircol collagen assay. Compared with untreated aorta, the collagen content of the treated vessel was obvious decreased immediately after laser irradiation and following an initial increase on day 3, there was a peak at day 10. The results suggest that a part of collagen molecules is denatured by the heat of laser. There is an effect of stimulating collagen synthesis after laser welding with parameters used in this study.

  16. Human collagen Krox up-regulates type I collagen expression in normal and scleroderma fibroblasts through interaction with Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Kypriotou, Magdalini; Beauchef, Gallic; Chadjichristos, Christos; Widom, Russell; Renard, Emmanuelle; Jimenez, Sergio A; Korn, Joseph; Maquart, François-Xavier; Oddos, Thierry; Von Stetten, Otto; Pujol, Jean-Pierre; Galéra, Philippe

    2007-11-02

    Despite several investigations, the transcriptional mechanisms that regulate the expression of both type I collagen genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2) in either physiological or pathological situations, such as scleroderma, are not completely known. We have investigated the role of hc-Krox transcription factor on type I collagen expression by human dermal fibroblasts. hc-Krox exerted a stimulating effect on type I collagen protein synthesis and enhanced the corresponding mRNA steady-state levels of COL1A1 and COL1A2 in foreskin fibroblasts (FF), adult normal fibroblasts (ANF), and scleroderma fibroblasts (SF). Forced hc-Krox expression was found to up-regulate COL1A1 transcription through a -112/-61-bp sequence in FF, ANF, and SF. Knockdown of hc-Krox by short interfering RNA and decoy strategies confirmed the transactivating effect of hc-Krox and decreased substantially COL1A1 transcription levels in all fibro-blast types. The -112/-61-bp sequence bound specifically hc-Krox but also Sp1 and CBF. Attempts to elucidate the potential interactions between hc-Krox, Sp1, and Sp3 revealed that all of them co-immunoprecipitate from FF cellular extracts when a c-Krox antibody was used and bind to the COL1A1 promoter in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Moreover, hc-Krox DNA binding activity to its COL1A1-responsive element is increased in SF, cells producing higher amounts of type I collagen compared with ANF and FF. These data suggest that the regulation of COL1A1 gene transcription in human dermal fibroblasts involves a complex machinery that implicates at least three transcription proteins, hc-Krox, Sp1, and Sp3, which could act in concert to up-regulate COL1A1 transcriptional activity and provide evidence for a pro-fibrotic role of hc-Krox.

  17. Expression of type I collagen and tenascin C is regulated by actin polymerization through MRTF in dedifferentiated chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Parreno, Justin; Raju, Sneha; Niaki, Mortah Nabavi; Andrejevic, Katarina; Jiang, Amy; Delve, Elizabeth; Kandel, Rita

    2014-10-16

    This study examined actin regulation of fibroblast matrix genes in dedifferentiated chondrocytes. We demonstrated that dedifferentiated chondrocytes exhibit increased actin polymerization, nuclear localization of myocardin related transcription factor (MRTF), increased type I collagen (col1) and tenascin C (Tnc) gene expression, and decreased Sox9 gene expression. Induction of actin depolymerization by latrunculin treatment or cell rounding, reduced MRTF nuclear localization, repressed col1 and Tnc expression, and increased Sox9 gene expression in dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Treatment of passaged chondrocytes with MRTF inhibitor repressed col1 and Tnc expression, but did not affect Sox9 expression. Our results show that actin polymerization regulates fibroblast matrix gene expression through MRTF in passaged chondrocytes.

  18. LARP6 Meets Collagen mRNA: Specific Regulation of Type I Collagen Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujie; Stefanovic, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant structural protein in all vertebrates, but its constitutive rate of synthesis is low due to long half-life of the protein (60–70 days). However, several hundred fold increased production of type I collagen is often seen in reparative or reactive fibrosis. The mechanism which is responsible for this dramatic upregulation is complex, including multiple levels of regulation. However, posttranscriptional regulation evidently plays a predominant role. Posttranscriptional regulation comprises processing, transport, stabilization and translation of mRNAs and is executed by RNA binding proteins. There are about 800 RNA binding proteins, but only one, La ribonucleoprotein domain family member 6 (LARP6), is specifically involved in type I collagen regulation. In the 5′untranslated region (5’UTR) of mRNAs encoding for type I and type III collagens there is an evolutionally conserved stem-loop (SL) structure; this structure is not found in any other mRNA, including any other collagen mRNA. LARP6 binds to the 5′SL in sequence specific manner to regulate stability of collagen mRNAs and their translatability. Here, we will review current understanding of how is LARP6 involved in posttranscriptional regulation of collagen mRNAs. We will also discuss how other proteins recruited by LARP6, including nonmuscle myosin, vimentin, serine threonine kinase receptor associated protein (STRAP), 25 kD FK506 binding protein (FKBP25) and RNA helicase A (RHA), contribute to this process. PMID:27011170

  19. Vascular smooth muscle cell response on thin films of collagen.

    PubMed

    Elliott, John T; Woodward, John T; Langenbach, Kurt J; Tona, Alex; Jones, Peter L; Plant, Anne L

    2005-10-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) cultured on gels of fibrillar type I collagen or denatured collagen (gelatin) comprise a model system that has been widely used for studying the role of the extracellular matrix in vascular diseases such as hypertension, restenosis and athrosclerosis. Despite the wide use of this model system, there are several disadvantages to using collagen gels for cellular studies. These include poor optical characteristics for microscopy, difficulty in verifying that the properties of the preparations are identical from experiment to experiment, heterogeneity within the gels, and difficulty in handling the gels because they are fragile. Previously, we developed an alternative collagen matrix by forming thin films of native fibrillar collagen or denatured collagen on self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols [Elliott, J.T., Tona, A., Woodward, J., Jones,P., Plant, A., 2003a. Thin films of collagen affect smooth muscle cell morphology. Langmuir 19, 1506-1514.]. These substrates are robust and can be characterized by surface analytical techniques that allow both verification of the reproducibility of the preparation and high-resolution analysis of collagen structure. In addition, they have excellent optical properties that allow more details of the cell-matrix interactions to be observed by microscopy. In this study, we performed a side-by-side structural and functional comparison of collagen gels with thin films of collagen. Our results indicate that vSMC on thin films of collagen are nearly identical to vSMC on thick gels as determined by morphology, proliferation rate, integrin ligation, tenascin-C expression and intracellular signaling events. These results suggest that the features of collagen gels that direct the observed vSMC responses are adequately reconstituted in the thin films of collagen. These thin films will be useful for elucidating the features of the collagen matrix that regulate vSMC response and may be applicable to high

  20. The effect of gamma irradiation on injectable human amnion collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.C.; Harrell, R.; Davis, R.H.; Dresden, M.H.; Spira, M. )

    1989-08-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the physicochemical properties of injectable human amnion collagen was investigated. Pepsin-extracted human amnion collagen was purified, reconstituted, and irradiated with varying doses of gamma irradiation (0.25 Mrads to 2.5 Mrads). Gamma irradiation had a significant impact on the physical characteristics of the collagen. The neutral solubility of collagen in PBS at 45{degrees}C was decreased from 100% for the nonirradiated control sample to 16% for the 2.5 Mrads irradiated sample. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis also demonstrated the dose-dependent effect of gamma irradiation on collagen cross-links. Electron microscopic observation revealed that even at low irradiation dose (0.25 Mrads), collagen fibril diameter increased. The average diameter was 50 nm for nonirradiated control fibrils, while 4.4% of the irradiated collagen fibrils had a diameter greater than 100 nm. Irradiated collagen showed little evidence of damage. Well-preserved cross-striations were found in collagen fibrils at all doses of irradiation. Native amnion collagen irradiated with gamma rays demonstrated a slight increase in resistance to collagenase degradation compared with nonirradiated native collagen samples. Increased resistance to collagenase did not correlate with increasing irradiation dose. After 30 min of incubation at 37{degrees}C, both irradiated and nonirradiated collagen was completely digested by collagenase. However, gamma-irradiated collagen did become more sensitive to hydrolysis by trypsin. The higher the irradiation doses used, the greater sensitivity to trypsin was observed. At 0.25 Mrads irradiation only a slight increase was found. No marked differences in amino acid composition were noted among the high dose irradiated, low dose irradiated and control amnion collagen.

  1. Suppression of hedgehog signaling regulates hepatic stellate cell activation and collagen secretion.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Leng, Xi-Sheng; Zhu, Ji-Ye; Wang, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play an important role in liver fibrosis. This study investigates the expression of hedgehog in HSC and the role of hedgehog signaling on activation and collagen secretion of HSC. Liver ex vivo perfusion with collagenase IV and density gradient centrifugation were used to isolate HSC. Expression of hedgehog signaling components Ihh, Smo, Ptc, Gli2 and Gli3 in HSC were detected by RT-PCR. Hedgehog siRNA vectors targeting Ihh, Smo and Gli2 were constructed and transfected into HSC respectively. Suppression of hedgehog signaling were detected by SYBR Green fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR. Effects of hedgehog signaling inhibition on HSC activation and collagen I secretion were analyzed. Hedgehog signaling components Ihh, Smo, Ptc, Gli2 and Gli3 were expressed in HSC. siRNA vectors targeting Ihh, Smo and Gli2 were successfully constructed and decreased target gene expression. Suppression of hedgehog signaling significantly decreased the expression of α-SMA in HSC (P<0.01). Collagen type I secretion of HSC were also significantly decreased (P<0.01). In summary, HSC activation and collagen secretion can be regulated by hedgehog signaling. Hedgehog may play a role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis.

  2. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation.

  3. Peroxidase Enzymes Regulate Collagen Biosynthesis and Matrix Mineralization by Cultured Human Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Shoubridge, Alexandra J; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The early recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of bone fracture and trauma is a critical determinant in successful fracture healing. Released by infiltrating inflammatory cells, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are heme-containing enzymes, whose functional involvement in bone repair has mainly been studied in the context of providing a mechanism for oxidative defense against invading microorganisms. We report here novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes have the capacity to stimulate osteoblastic cells to secrete collagen I protein and generate a mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured osteoblasts show that peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl hydroxylase-dependent manner, which does not require ascorbic acid. Our studies demonstrate that osteoblasts rapidly bind and internalize both MPO and EPO, and the catalytic activity of these peroxidase enzymes is essential to support collagen I biosynthesis and subsequent release of collagen by osteoblasts. We show that EPO is capable of regulating osteogenic gene expression and matrix mineralization in culture, suggesting that peroxidase enzymes may play an important role not only in normal bone repair, but also in the progression of pathological states where infiltrating inflammatory cells are known to deposit peroxidases.

  4. Mutations in collagen 18A1 and their relevance to the human phenotype.

    PubMed

    Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Suzuki, Oscar T; Armelin-Correa, Lucia M; Sertié, Andréa L; Errera, Flavia I V; Bagatini, Kelly; Kok, Fernando; Leite, Katia R M

    2006-03-01

    Collagen XVIII, a proteoglycan, is a component of basement membranes (BMs). There are three distinct isoforms that differ only by their N-terminal, but with a specific pattern of tissue and developmental expression. Cleavage of its C-terminal produces endostatin, an inhibitor of angiogenesis. In its N-terminal, there is a frizzled motif which seems to be involved in Wnt signaling. Mutations in this gene cause Knobloch syndrome KS), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by vitreoretinal and macular degeneration and occipital encephalocele. This review discusses the effect of both rare and polymorphic alleles in the human phenotype, showing that deficiency of one of the collagen XVIII isoforms is sufficient to cause KS and that null alleles causing deficiency of all collagen XVIII isoforms are associated with a more severe ocular defect. This review besides illustrating the functional importance of collagen XVIII in eye development and its structure maintenance throughout life, it also shows its role in other tissues and organs, such as nervous system and kidney.

  5. Impaired intestinal wound healing in Fhl2-deficient mice is due to disturbed collagen metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Kirfel, Jutta Pantelis, Dimitrios; Kabba, Mustapha; Kahl, Philip; Roeper, Anke; Kalff, Joerg C.; Buettner, Reinhard

    2008-12-10

    Four and one half LIM domain protein FHL2 participates in many cellular processes involved in tissue repair such as regulation of gene expression, cytoarchitecture, cell adhesion, migration and signal transduction. The repair process after wounding is initiated by the release of peptides and bioactive lipids. These molecules induce synthesis and deposition of a provisional extracellular matrix. We showed previously that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) triggers a signal transduction cascade mediating nuclear translocation of FHL2 in response to activation of the RhoA GTPase. Our present study shows that FHL2 is an important signal transducer influencing the outcome of intestinal anastomotic healing. Early wound healing is accompanied by reconstitution and remodelling of the extracellular matrix and collagen is primarily responsible for wound strength. Our results show that impaired intestinal wound healing in Fhl2-deficient mice is due to disturbed collagen III metabolism. Impaired collagen III synthesis reduced the mechanical stability of the anastomoses and led to lower bursting pressure in Fhl2-deficient mice after surgery. Our data confirm that FHL2 is an important factor regulating collagen expression in the early phase of wound healing, and thereby is critically involved in the physiologic process of anastomosis healing after bowel surgery and thus may represent a new therapeutic target.

  6. Role of α1 and α2 chains of type IV collagen in early fibrotic lesions of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and migration of lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Urushiyama, Hirokazu; Terasaki, Yasuhiro; Nagasaka, Shinya; Terasaki, Mika; Kunugi, Shinobu; Nagase, Takahide; Fukuda, Yuh; Shimizu, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Early fibrotic lesions are thought to be the initial findings of fibrogenesis in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, but little is known about their properties. Type IV collagen comprises six gene products, α1-α6, and although it is known as a major basement membrane component, its abnormal deposition is seen in fibrotic lesions of certain organs. We studied the expression of type I and III collagen and all α chains of type IV collagen in lung specimens from patients with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) or organizing pneumonia (OP) via immunohistochemistry. With cultured lung fibroblasts, we analyzed the expression and function of all α chains of type IV collagen via immunohistochemistry, western blotting, real-time quantitative PCR, and a Boyden chamber migration assay after the knockdown of α1 and α2 chains. Although we observed type I and III collagens in early fibrotic lesions of both UIP and OP, we found type IV collagen, especially α1 and α2 chains, in early fibrotic lesions of UIP but not OP. Fibroblasts enhanced the expression of α1 and α2 chains of type IV collagen after transforming growth factor-β1 stimulation. Small interfering RNA against α1 and α2 chains increased fibroblast migration, with upregulated phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and adding medium containing fibroblast-produced α1 and α2 chains reduced the increased levels of fibroblast migration and phosphorylation of FAK. Fibroblasts in OP were positive for phosphorylated FAK but fibroblasts in UIP were not. These results suggest that fibroblasts in UIP with type IV collagen deposition, especially α1 and α2 chains, have less ability to migrate from early fibrotic lesions than fibroblasts in OP without type IV collagen deposition. Thus, type IV collagen deposition in early fibrotic lesions of UIP may be implicated in refractory pathophysiology including migration of lesion fibroblasts via a FAK pathway.

  7. Elevated expression of type VII collagen in the skin of patients with systemic sclerosis. Regulation by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicka, L; Varga, J; Christiano, A M; Iozzo, R V; Jimenez, S A; Uitto, J

    1994-01-01

    A hallmark of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is the development of tissue fibrosis. Excessive production of several connective tissue components normally present in the dermis, including type I, III, V, and VI collagens as well as fibronectin and proteoglycans, is a consistent finding in the skin of SSc patients. Type VII collagen is a major constituent of anchoring fibrils, present in the skin at the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone. TGF-beta has been shown to upregulate the expression of the type VII collagen gene. In this study, we assessed the expression of type VII collagen and TGF-beta in the skin of patients with SSc. Indirect immunofluorescence showed an abundance of type VII collagen in the patients' skin, including the dermis. Ultrastructural analysis of SSc skin revealed an abundance of fibrillar material, possibly representing type VII collagen. The increased expression of type VII collagen epitopes was accompanied by the elevated expression of immunodetectable TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2. Dermal fibroblasts cultured from the affected individuals showed a statistically significant (P < 0.02) increase in the expression of type VII collagen at the mRNA level, as detected by reverse transcription-PCR with a mutated cDNA as an internal standard, and increased deposition of the protein as assessed by indirect immunofluorescence. Thus, type VII collagen is abundantly present in SSc patients' dermis, a location not characteristic of its normal distribution, and its aberrant expression may relate to the presence of TGF-beta in the same topographic distribution. The presence of type VII collagen in the dermis may contribute to the tightly bound and indurated appearance of the affected skin in SSc patients. Images PMID:7512991

  8. Mechanical Behavior of Collagen-Fibrin Co-Gels Reflects Transition From Series to Parallel Interactions With Increasing Collagen Content

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Victor K.; Lake, Spencer P.; Frey, Christina R.; Tranquillo, Robert T.; Barocas, Victor H.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrin and collagen, biopolymers occurring naturally in the body, are commonly-used biomaterials as scaffolds for tissue engineering. How collagen and fibrin interact to confer macroscopic mechanical properties in collagen-fibrin composite systems remains poorly understood. In this study, we formulated collagen-fibrin co-gels at different collagen-to-fibrin ratios to observe changes in overall mechanical behavior and microstructure. A modeling framework of a two-network system was developed by modifying our micro-scale model, considering two forms of interaction between the networks: (a) two interpenetrating but non-interacting networks (“parallel”), and (b) a single network consisting of randomly alternating collagen and fibrin fibrils (“series”). Mechanical testing of our gels show that collagen-fibrin co-gels exhibit intermediate properties (UTS, strain at failure, tangent modulus) compared to those of pure collagen and fibrin. Comparison with model predictions show that the parallel and series model cases provide upper and lower bounds respectively for the experimental data, suggesting that a combination of such interactions exist between collagen and fibrin in co-gels. A transition from the series model to the parallel model occurs with increasing collagen content, with the series model best describing predominantly fibrin co-gels, and the parallel model best describing predominantly collagen co-gels. PMID:22482659

  9. Definition of the native and denatured type II collagen binding site for fibronectin using a recombinant collagen system.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Abbonante, Vittorio; Yigit, Sezin; Balduini, Alessandra; Kaplan, David L; Brodsky, Barbara

    2014-02-21

    Interaction of collagen with fibronectin is important for extracellular matrix assembly and regulation of cellular processes. A fibronectin-binding region in collagen was identified using unfolded fragments, but it is not clear if the native protein binds fibronectin with the same primary sequence. A recombinant bacterial collagen is utilized to characterize the sequence requirement for fibronectin binding. Chimeric collagens were generated by inserting the putative fibronectin-binding region from human collagen into the bacterial collagen sequence. Insertion of a sufficient length of human sequence conferred fibronectin affinity. The minimum sequence requirement was identified as a 6-triplet sequence near the unique collagenase cleavage site and was the same in both triple-helix and denatured states. Denaturation of the chimeric collagen increased its affinity for fibronectin, as seen for mammalian collagens. The fibronectin binding recombinant collagen did not contain hydroxyproline, indicating hydroxyproline is not essential for binding. However, its absence may account, in part, for the higher affinity of the native chimeric protein and the lower affinity of the denatured protein compared with type II collagen. Megakaryocytes cultured on chimeric collagen with fibronectin affinity showed improved adhesion and differentiation, suggesting a strategy for generating bioactive materials in biomedical applications.

  10. Study of Native Type I Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, August

    2006-03-01

    Presented in this work is direct imaging and force microscopy of native, intact type I collagen fibrils extracted from the sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa dermis with affiliated proteoglycan molecules. The prototypical collagen fibril structure is well conserved through higher mammalian species and presents a model for study of the mechanical properties of the primary individual components of the dermis and skeletal ligature. Common practice is to use reconstituted fibrils which lack the precise conformal structure and affiliated proteoglycans. We have performed force microscopy to probe the mechanical properties of native fibrils and extract the elastic modulus under natural conditions. This knowledge is combined transmission and atomic force imaging, in conjunction with applied computation models, to demonstrate an inherent semitubular structure of these fibrils.

  11. Cryptic Peptides from Collagen: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pradipta; Shanthi, C

    2016-01-01

    Collagen, a predominant structural protein in extracellular matrix (ECM), is now considered to have probable roles in many biological activities and hence, in different forms have found application as nutraceutical or pharmaceutical therapy option. Many of the biological properties are believed to be due to small hidden peptide residues in the collagen molecules, which come into play after the biodegradation or biosorption of the parent molecule. These peptide regions are called cryptic peptides or by some, as cryptides. The proteolytic hydrolysis of the ECM protein releases the cryptic peptides with many novel biological activities not exhibited directly by the parental protein which include angiogenic, antimicrobial, mitogenic and chemotactic properties. The research for understanding the role of these cryptic peptide regions and making use of them in medical field is very active. Such an understanding could lead to the development of peptide supplements for many biomedical applications. The prolific research in this area is reviewed in this paper.

  12. About collagen, a tribute to Yves Bouligand

    PubMed Central

    Charvolin, Jean; Sadoc, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Yves Bouligand's analysis of the organizations of biological materials in relation to those of liquid crystals enabled the development of the idea that physical forces exerting their actions under strong spatial constraints determine the structures and morphologies of these materials. The different levels of organization in collagen have preoccupied him for a long time. We present here our recent works in this domain that we were still discussing with him a few months before his death at the age of 76 on 21 January 2011. After recalling the hierarchical set of structures built by collagen molecules, we analyse them, exploiting the properties of the curved space of the hypersphere and of the algorithm of phyllotaxis. Those two geometrical concepts can be proposed as structural archetypes founding the polymorphism of this complex material of biological origin. PMID:24098840

  13. Oxygen Toxicity and Lung Collagenous Protein.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-28

    the a and s chains. A large portion of the applied material did not enter the gel until reduced, a behavior typical of this type of sample [20]. The...Collagen. In Crystal RG (ed) The Biochemical Basis of Pulmonary Function, Dekker, New York, pp. 215-271. 11. Hoyer JR, Spiro RG (1978) Studies on the...mono-dispersed lung cell preparations without using time consuming differential gradient centrifugation. Past methods of isolating alveolar type II cells

  14. Collagen-Binding Peptidoglycans: A Biomimetic Approach to Modulate Collagen Fibrillogenesis for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Paderi, John E.; Sistiabudi, Rizaldi; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2009-01-01

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs), prevalent in collagenous tissues, regulate collagen fibrillogenesis and provide a host of biochemical cues critical to tissue function and homeostasis. Incorporating SLRPs may enhance tissue engineering designs that mimic the native extracellular matrix, although SLRPs purified from animal sources bear low yields and lack design control. Consequently, we have designed synthetic peptidoglycans, inspired by the native SLRP decorin, that contain a collagen-binding peptide attached to a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chain. These peptidoglycans modulate collagen fibrillogenesis and decrease fibril diameter in vitro, similarly to decorin, while maintaining the characteristic D-banded fibrils. Application for tissue engineering is demonstrated as these peptidoglycans are incorporated into collagen gels seeded with smooth muscle cells. Gels formed with peptidoglycans and decorin show a faster rate of gel compaction, and one peptidoglycan uniquely increases elastin production. The peptidoglycan design can be tailored with respect to the peptide sequence and GAG identity and is expected to have versatile application in tissue engineering. PMID:19323607

  15. Second Harmonic Light Scattering from Macromolecules: Collagen.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Shmuel

    In this work we present the theory and practice of optical second harmonic generation (SHG) as applied to rat-tail tendon collagen. Our work is the first quantitative application of SHG to biological systems. The angular dependence of SHG is found to display a sharp, intense, forward peak superimposed on a broad background. The sharp peak is shown to imply long-range polar order, while the broad background corresponds to that predicted for the random "up"/"down" array of collagen fibrils seen with the electron microscope. The dependence of fibril diameter distribution on age and state of hydration is measured. Our experiments also reveal information concerning the structure of the fibrils and their arrangement in the tendon. The degree of polar order, the coherence length of tendon for harmonic generation and the absolute magnitude of the nonlinear susceptibility of the collagen fibril are also determined. The biological significance of these findings and the many advantages of SHG for the structural study of biological macromolecules and tissues are discussed.

  16. The collagen triple-helix structure.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, B; Ramshaw, J A

    1997-03-01

    Recent advances, principally through the study of peptide models, have led to an enhanced understanding of the structure and function of the collagen triple helix. In particular, the first crystal structure has clearly shown the highly ordered hydration network critical for stabilizing both the molecular conformation and the interactions between triple helices. The sequence dependent nature of the conformational features is also under active investigation by NMR and other techniques. The triple-helix motif has now been identified in proteins other than collagens, and it has been established as being important in many specific biological interactions as well as being a structural element. The nature of recognition and the degree of specificity for interactions involving triple helices may differ from globular proteins. Triple-helix binding domains consist of linear sequences along the helix, making them amenable to characterization by simple model peptides. The application of structural techniques to such model peptides can serve to clarify the interactions involved in triple-helix recognition and binding and can help explain the varying impact of different structural alterations found in mutant collagens in diseased states.

  17. Partial characterization of cell-type X collagen interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Luckman, Steven P; Rees, Elaine; Kwan, Alvin P L

    2003-01-01

    Type X collagen is a short-chain non-fibrillar collagen that is deposited exclusively at sites of new bone formation. Although this collagen has been implicated in chondrocyte hypertrophy and endochondral ossification, its precise function remains unclear. One possible function could be to regulate the processes of chondrocyte hypertrophy through direct cell-type X collagen interactions. Adhesions of embryonic chick chondrocytes, and cell lines with known expression of collagen-binding integrins (MG63 and HOS), were assayed on chick type X collagen substrates, including the native, heat-denatured and pepsin-digested collagen, and the isolated C-terminal non-collagenous (NC1) domain. Type X collagen supported the greatest level of adhesion for all cell types tested. The involvement of the alpha2beta1 integrin in type X collagen-cell interaction was demonstrated by adhesion studies in the presence of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) ions and integrin-function-blocking antibodies. Cells expressing alpha2beta1 integrin (chick chondrocytes and MG63 cells) also adhered to heat-denatured type X collagen and the isolated NC1 domain; however, removal of the non-collagenous domains by limited pepsinization of type X collagen resulted in very low levels of adhesion. Both focal contacts and actin stress-fibre formation were apparent in cells plated on type X collagen. The presence of alpha2 and beta1 integrin subunits in isolated chondrocytes and epiphyseal cartilage was also confirmed by immunolocalization. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that type X collagen is capable of interacting directly with chondrocytes and other cells, primarily via alpha2beta1 integrin. These findings are atypical from the fibrillar collagen-cell interactions via collagen binding integrins in that: (1) the triple-helical conformation is not strictly required for cell adhesion; (2) the NC1 domain is also involved in the adhesion of alpha2beta1-expressing cells. These data form the basis for further

  18. Cell population kinetics of collagen scaffolds in ex vivo oral wound repair.

    PubMed

    Agis, Hermann; Collins, Amy; Taut, Andrei D; Jin, Qiming; Kruger, Laura; Görlach, Christoph; Giannobile, William V

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable collagen scaffolds are used clinically for oral soft tissue augmentation to support wound healing. This study sought to provide a novel ex vivo model for analyzing healing kinetics and gene expression of primary human gingival fibroblasts (hGF) within collagen scaffolds. Sponge type and gel type scaffolds with and without platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF) were assessed in an hGF containing matrix. Morphology was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy, and hGF metabolic activity using MTT. We quantitated the population kinetics within the scaffolds based on cell density and distance from the scaffold border of DiI-labled hGFs over a two-week observation period. Gene expression was evaluated with gene array and qPCR. The sponge type scaffolds showed a porous morphology. Absolute cell number and distance was higher in sponge type scaffolds when compared to gel type scaffolds, in particular during the first week of observation. PDGF incorporated scaffolds increased cell numbers, distance, and formazan formation in the MTT assay. Gene expression dynamics revealed the induction of key genes associated with the generation of oral tissue. DKK1, CYR61, CTGF, TGFBR1 levels were increased and integrin ITGA2 levels were decreased in the sponge type scaffolds compared to the gel type scaffold. The results suggest that this novel model of oral wound healing provides insights into population kinetics and gene expression dynamics of biodegradable scaffolds.

  19. Characterization of riboflavin-modified dentin collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, A; Nitisusanta, L; Iqbal, K; Daood, U; Beng, L T; Neo, J

    2012-11-01

    Crosslinking is considered a possible approach to increasing the mechanical and structural stability and biodegradation resistance of the dentin collagen matrix. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical and chemical variations and collagen degradation resistance associated with crosslinking of the dentin collagen matrix with UVA-activated riboflavin. Dentin collagen matrix specimens were treated with 0.1 and 1% riboflavin for 2 min and photo-activated with 7 mW/cm(2) UVA (368 nm) for 2 min. The structural change of the dentin collagen network with collagenase exposure was investigated by AFM and SEM at different time-points. The variations in surface/bulk mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance were characterized by nano-indentation, conventional mechanical testing, and hydroxyproline liberation at different time-points. Chemical changes associated with riboflavin/collagen-matrix interaction were analyzed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. UVA-activated riboflavin increased the mechanical properties, mechanical stability, and biodegradation resistance of the dentin collagen matrix. Higher collagen-network structural resistance against collagenolytic challenges was found with crosslinking. micro-Raman spectroscopy showed a strong dependency, in both intensity and wave-number, of certain Raman bands (1242-1667 cm(-1)) with crosslinking indicating the collagen/riboflavin interactions. UVA-activated riboflavin (1%) more efficiently crosslinked the dentin collagen matrix within a relatively clinically acceptable time-frame compared with 0.1% riboflavin.

  20. Pathogenetic difference between collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Daily treatment with cyclosporin at a dose of 25 mg/kg for 14 d gave complete suppression of the development of collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis in Sprague-Dawley rats during an observation period of 45 d. To study whether the immunologic unresponsiveness produced by cyclosporin is antigen specific, we rechallenged the cyclosporin- protected rats with either type II collagen or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) after discontinuation of cyclosporin treatment. Type II collagen-immunized, cyclosporin-protected rats did not develop arthritis in response to reimmunization with type II collagen, but, they did develop arthritis in response to a subsequent injection of CFA. Similarly, CFA-injected, cyclosporin-protected rats showed a suppressed arthritogenic reaction in response to reinjection of CFA, whereas their response to a subsequent immunization with type II collagen was unaffected. On the other hand, the rats that were treated with cyclosporin without any prior antigenic challenge could develop arthritis in response to a subsequent injection of CFA or type II collagen after cessation of cyclosporin treatment. These results indicate that specific immunologic unresponsiveness can be induced by cyclosporin in the two experimental models of polyarthritis, collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis, and that there is no cross-reactivity between type II collagen and the mycobacterial cell wall components. The results further indicate that immunity to type II collagen plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of collagen arthritis but that its pathogenetic role in adjuvant arthritis is insignificant. PMID:6201583

  1. In vivo determination of arterial collagen synthesis in atherosclerotic rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Opsahl, W.P.; DeLuca, D.J.; Ehrhart, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    Collagen and non-collagen protein synthesis rates were determined in vivo in tissues from rabbits fed a control or atherogenic diet supplemented with 2% peanut oil and 0.25% cholesterol for 4 months. Rabbits received a bolus intravenous injection of L-(/sup 3/H)-proline (1.0 mCi/kg) and unlabeled L-proline (7 mmoles/kg) in 0.9% NaCl. Plasma proline specific activity decreased only 20% over 5 hr and was similar to the specific activity of free proline in tissues. Thoracic aortas from atherosclerotic rabbits exhibited raised plaques covering at least 75% of the surface. Thoracic intima plus a portion of the media (TIM) was separated from the remaining media plus adventitia (TMA). Dry delipidated weight, total collagen content, and collagen as a percent of dry weight were increased significantly in the TIM of atherosclerotic rabbits. Collagen synthesis rates and collagen synthesis as a percent of total protein synthesis were likewise increased both in the TIM and in the abdominal aortas. No differences from controls either in collagen content or collagen synthesis rates were observed in the TMA, lung or skin. These results demonstrate for the first time in vivo that formation of atherosclerotic plaques is associated with increased rates of collagen synthesis. Furthermore, as previously observed with incubations in vitro, collagen synthesis was elevated to a greater extent than noncollagen protein synthesis in atherosclerotic aortas from rabbits fed cholesterol plus peanut oil.

  2. Collagen Fibril Ultrastructure in Mice Lacking Discoidin Domain Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Tonniges, Jeffrey R; Albert, Benjamin; Calomeni, Edward P; Roy, Shuvro; Lee, Joan; Mo, Xiaokui; Cole, Susan E; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2016-06-01

    The quantity and quality of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have a pivotal role in dictating biological processes. Several collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) are known to modulate collagen deposition and fibril diameter. However, limited studies exist on alterations in the fibril ultrastructure by CBPs. In this study, we elucidate how the collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) regulates the collagen content and ultrastructure in the adventitia of DDR1 knock-out (KO) mice. DDR1 KO mice exhibit increased collagen deposition as observed using Masson's trichrome. Collagen ultrastructure was evaluated in situ using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Although the mean fibril diameter was not significantly different, DDR1 KO mice had a higher percentage of fibrils with larger diameter compared with their wild-type littermates. No significant differences were observed in the length of D-periods. In addition, collagen fibrils from DDR1 KO mice exhibited a small, but statistically significant, increase in the depth of the fibril D-periods. Consistent with these observations, a reduction in the depth of D-periods was observed in collagen fibrils reconstituted with recombinant DDR1-Fc. Our results elucidate how DDR1 modulates collagen fibril ultrastructure in vivo, which may have important consequences in the functional role(s) of the underlying ECM.

  3. Collagen Fibril Ultrastructure in Mice Lacking Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Tonniges, Jeffrey R.; Albert, Benjamin; Calomeni, Edward P.; Roy, Shuvro; Lee, Joan; Mo, Xiaokui; Cole, Susan E.; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2016-01-01

    The quantity and quality of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix (ECM) have a pivotal role in dictating biological processes. Several collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) are known to modulate collagen deposition and fibril diameter. However, limited studies exist on alterations in the fibril ultrastructure by CBPs. In this study, we elucidate how the collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) regulates the collagen content and ultrastructure in the adventitia of DDR1 knock-out (KO) mice. DDR1 KO mice exhibit increased collagen deposition as observed using Masson’s trichrome. Collagen ultrastructure was evaluated in situ using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Although the mean fibril diameter was not significantly different, DDR1 KO mice had a higher percentage of fibrils with larger diameter compared with their wild-type littermates. No significant differences were observed in the length of D-periods. In addition, collagen fibrils from DDR1 KO mice exhibited a small, but statistically significant, increase in the depth of the fibril D-periods. Consistent with these observations, a reduction in the depth of D-periods was observed in collagen fibrils reconstituted with recombinant DDR1-Fc. Our results elucidate how DDR1 modulates collagen fibril ultrastructure in vivo, which may have important consequences in the functional role(s) of the underlying ECM. PMID:27329311

  4. Collagen Structural Hierarchy and Susceptibility to Degradation by Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Rabotyagova, Olena S; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L

    2008-12-01

    Collagen type I is the most abundant extracellular matrix protein in the human body, providing the basis for tissue structure and directing cellular functions. Collagen has complex structural hierarchy, organized at different length scales, including the characteristic triple helical feature. In the present study, the relationship between collagen structure (native vs. denatured) and sensitivity to UV radiation was assessed, with a focus on changes in primary structure, changes in conformation, microstructure and material properties. A brief review of free radical reactions involved in collagen degradation is also provided as a mechanistic basis for the changes observed in the study. Structural and functional changes in the collagens were related to the initial conformation (native vs. denatured) and the energy of irradiation. These changes were tracked using SDS-PAGE to assess molecular weight, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to study changes in the secondary structure, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize changes in mechanical properties. The results correlate differences in sensitivity to irradiation with initial collagen structural state: collagen in native conformation vs. heat-treated (denatured) collagen. Changes in collagen were found at all levels of the hierarchical structural organization. In general, the native collagen triple helix is most sensitive to UV-254nm radiation. The triple helix delays single chain degradation. The loss of the triple helix in collagen is accompanied by hydrogen abstraction through free radical mechanisms. The results received suggest that the effects of electromagnetic radiation on biologically relevant extracellular matrices (collagen in the present study) are important to assess in the context of the state of collagen structure. The results have implications in tissue remodeling, wound repair and disease progression.

  5. Collagen Structural Hierarchy and Susceptibility to Degradation by Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Collagen type I is the most abundant extracellular matrix protein in the human body, providing the basis for tissue structure and directing cellular functions. Collagen has complex structural hierarchy, organized at different length scales, including the characteristic triple helical feature. In the present study, the relationship between collagen structure (native vs. denatured) and sensitivity to UV radiation was assessed, with a focus on changes in primary structure, changes in conformation, microstructure and material properties. A brief review of free radical reactions involved in collagen degradation is also provided as a mechanistic basis for the changes observed in the study. Structural and functional changes in the collagens were related to the initial conformation (native vs. denatured) and the energy of irradiation. These changes were tracked using SDS-PAGE to assess molecular weight, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to study changes in the secondary structure, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize changes in mechanical properties. The results correlate differences in sensitivity to irradiation with initial collagen structural state: collagen in native conformation vs. heat-treated (denatured) collagen. Changes in collagen were found at all levels of the hierarchical structural organization. In general, the native collagen triple helix is most sensitive to UV-254nm radiation. The triple helix delays single chain degradation. The loss of the triple helix in collagen is accompanied by hydrogen abstraction through free radical mechanisms. The results received suggest that the effects of electromagnetic radiation on biologically relevant extracellular matrices (collagen in the present study) are important to assess in the context of the state of collagen structure. The results have implications in tissue remodeling, wound repair and disease progression. PMID:22199459

  6. Heterogeneous nanomechanical properties of type I collagen in longitudinal direction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming; Li, Tong; Gandhi, Neha S; Burrage, Kevin; Gu, YuanTong

    2017-01-07

    Collagen is an abundant structural biopolymer in mammal vertebrates, providing structural support as well as mechanical integrity for connective tissues such as bone, ligament, and tendon. The mechanical behaviours of these tissues are determined by the nanomechanics of their structures at different hierarchies and the role of collagen structures in the extracellular matrix. Some studies revealed that there is significant microstructural difference in the longitudinal direction of the collagen fibril, which challenges the conventional rod-like assumption prevalently adopted in the existing studies. Motivated by this discrepancy, in this study, we investigated the longitudinal heterogeneous nanomechanical properties of type I collagen molecule to probe the origin of the longitudinal heterogeneity of the collagen fibril at the molecular level. A full length type I collagen molecule structure was built based on the experimentally calibrated nanostructure. Then, a suitable strain rate was determined for stretching the three intact 'gap' regions and three intact 'overlap' regions of the collagen molecule. Further, the nanomechanical properties of the six collagen molecule segments were characterized by performing steered molecular dynamics simulations, using the obtained suitable strain rate in modelling. The results indicate that this computational model can be used to capture the mechanical behaviour of the collagen molecule under physiological stress conditions. Moreover, the 'gap' regions show a lower stiffness and undergo a slightly lager strain in the unwinding process, compared to the 'overlap' regions of the collagen molecule. This investigation provides insights into the origin of the longitudinal heterogeneity of collagen fibrils at the molecular level and suggests that it is of significant importance to consider the longitudinal heterogeneous mechanical properties of the collagen molecule in the development of coarse-grained models of collagen-related tissues.

  7. Binding of collagens to an enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Visai, L.; Speziale, P.; Bozzini, S. )

    1990-02-01

    An enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli, B34289c, has been shown to bind the N-terminal region of fibronectin with high affinity. We now report that this strain also binds collagen. The binding of 125I-labeled type II collagen to bacteria was time dependent and reversible. Bacteria expressed a limited number of collagen receptors (2.2 x 10(4) per cell) and bound collagen with a Kd of 20 nM. All collagen types tested (I to V) as well as all tested cyanogen bromide-generated peptides (alpha 1(I)CB2, alpha 1(I)CB3, alpha 1(I)CB7, alpha 1(I)CB8, and alpha 2(I)CB4) were recognized by bacterial receptors, as demonstrated by the ability of these proteins to inhibit the binding of 125I-labeled collagen to bacteria. Of several unlabeled proteins tested in competition experiments, fibronectin and its N-terminal region strongly inhibited binding of the radiolabeled collagen to E. coli cells. Conversely, collagen competed with an 125I-labeled 28-kilodalton fibronectin fragment for bacterial binding. Collagen bound to bacteria could be displaced by excess amounts of either unlabeled fibronectin or its N-terminal fragment. Similarly, collagen could displace 125I-labeled N-terminal peptide of fibronectin bound to the bacterial cell surface. Bacteria grown at 41 degrees C or in the presence of glucose did not express collagen or fibronectin receptors. These results indicate the presence of specific binding sites for collagen on the surface of E. coli cells and furthermore that the collagen and fibronectin binding sites are located in close proximity, possibly on the same structure.

  8. Physicochemical properties of collagen solutions cross-linked by glutaraldehyde.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhenhua; Li, Conghu; Duan, Lian; Li, Guoying

    2014-06-01

    The physicochemical properties of collagen solutions (5 mg/ml) cross-linked by various amounts of glutaraldehyde (GTA) [GTA/collagen (w/w) = 0-0.5] under acidic condition (pH 4.00) were examined. Based on the results of the determination of residual amino group content, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, dynamic rheological measurements, differential scanning calorimetry and atomic force microscopy (AFM), it was proved that the collagen solutions possessed strikingly different physicochemical properties depending on the amount of GTA. At low GTA amounts [GTA/collagen (w/w) ≤ 0.1], the residual amino group contents of the cross-linked collagens decreased largely from 100% to 32.76%, accompanied by an increase in the molecular weight. Additionally, increases of the fiber diameter and the values of G', G″ and η* were measured, while the thermal denaturation temperature (Td) did not change visibly and the fluidity of collagen samples was still retained with increasing the GTA amount. When the ratio of GTA to collagen exceeded 0.1, although the residual amino group content only decreased by ~8.2%, the cross-linked collagen solution [GTA/collagen (w/w) = 0.3] displayed a clear loss of flow and a sudden rise (~2.0 °C) of the Td value compared to the uncross-linked collagen solution, probably illustrating that the collagen solution was converted into a gel with mature network structure-containing nuclei observed in AFM image. It was conjectured that the physicochemical properties of the collagen solutions might be in connection with the cross-linking between collagen molecules from the same aggregate or different aggregates.

  9. Mass transfer of large molecules through collagen and collagen-silica hybrid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre-Lora, Pedro

    Diabetes is a growing concern in the United States and around the world that must be addressed through new treatment options. Current standard treatment options of diabetes are limiting and have tremendous impacts on patient's lives. Emerging therapies, such as the implantation of encapsulated islets, are promising treatment options, but have not yet materialized due to unsolved problems with material properties. Hybrid silica-collagen membranes address some of these unsolved problems and are a promising material for cell encapsulation. However, the mass transfer properties of large molecules, such as insulin, TNF-alpha, IL1beta, and other important proteins in the etiology of diabetes, through these hybrid membranes are poorly characterized. In order to begin characterizing these properties, a device was constructed to accurately and efficiently measure the mass transfer of other similar large molecules, fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FITC-dextran), through collagen-silica hybrid membranes. The device was used to measure diffusion coefficients of 4, 20, 40, and 150 kDa FITC-dextrans through non-silicified and silicified samples of 200 and 1000 Pa porcine skin collagen. Diffusion coefficients were found to be in the 10-7-10-6 cm2s -1 range, which is in agreement with previously published data for similar molecules through similar hydrogels. The effects of collagen stiffness, FITC-dextran molecular weight, and silicification treatment on diffusion were investigated. It was found that collagen stiffness and FITC-dextran molecular weight had a negative correlation with diffusion, whereas silicification treatment had no global impact on diffusion. The device created, and the results of this preliminary investigation, can be used to develop collagen-silica hybrid membranes as an alternative material for cell encapsulation in a forward-design manner.

  10. ISOCT study of collagen crosslinking of collagen in cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Graham; Young, Scott T.; Yi, Ji; Shea, Lonnie D.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The role of extracellular matrix modification and signaling in cancer progression is an increasingly recognized avenue for the progression of the disease. Previous study of field effect carcinogenesis with Inverse Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (ISOCT) has revealed pronounced changes in the nanoscale-sensitive mass fractal dimension D measured from field effect tissue when compared to healthy tissue. However, the origin of this difference in tissue ultrastructure in field effect carcinogenesis has remained poorly understood. Here, we present findings supporting the idea that enzymatic crosslinking of the extracellular matrix is an effect that presents at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. We use a model of collagen gel with crosslinking induced by lysyl oxidase (LOXL4) to recapitulate the difference in D previously reported from healthy and cancerous tissue biopsies. Furthermore, STORM imaging of this collagen gel model verifies the morphologic effects of enzymatic crosslinking at length scales as small as 40 nm, close to the previously reported lower length scale sensitivity threshold of 35 nm for ISOCT. Analysis of the autocorrelation function from STORM images of collagen gels and subsequent fitting to the Whittle-Matérn correlation function shows a similar effect of LOXL4 on D from collagen measured with ISOCT and STORM. We extend this to mass spectrometric study of tissue to directly measure concentrations of collagen crosslink residues. The validation of ISOCT as a viable tool for non-invasive rapid quantification of collagen ultrastructure lends it to study other physiological phenomena involving ECM restructuring such as atherosclerotic plaque screening or cervical ripening during pregnancy.

  11. Collagen I-induced dendritic cells activation is regulated by TNF-alpha production through down-regulation of IRF4.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Barun; Ki, Hyeon-Hui; Lee, Young-Mi; Kim, Dae-Ki

    2015-03-01

    Previously we have shown that collagen I enhances the maturation and function of dendritic cells (DCs). Inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)- alpha, interleukin (IL)-1 beta and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are also known to activate DCs. Here we investigated the involvement of TNF-alpha on the collagen I-induced DCs activation. TNF-a neutralization inhibited collagen I-induced IL-12 secretions by DCs. Additionally, we observed suppression of collagen I-induced costimulatory molecules expression along with down-regulation of genes involved in DCs activation pathway. Furthermore, TNF- alpha inhibition upon collagen Istimulation up-regulated the expression of interferon regulatory transcription factor IRF4, when compared to collagen I only treated cells. Collectively, our data demonstrate that collagen I induce TNF- alpha production, which is crucial for the activation and function of DCs, through down-regulation of IRF4, and implicates the importance in development of anti- TNF-alpha therapeutics for several inflammatory diseases.

  12. Antisense-mediated exon skipping to reframe transcripts.

    PubMed

    Turczynski, Sandrina; Titeux, Matthias; Pironon, Nathalie; Hovnanian, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic disorders are caused by loss-of-function mutations that disrupt the open reading frame of the gene either by nonsense or by frameshift (insertion, deletion, indel, or splicing) mutations. Most of the time, the result is the absence of functional protein synthesis due to mRNA degradation by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, or rapid degradation of a truncated protein. Antisense-based splicing modulation is a powerful tool that has the potential to treat genetic disorders by restoring the open reading frame through selective removal of the mutated exon, or by restoring correct splicing.We have developed this approach for a severe genetic skin disorder, recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen. This gene is particularly suited for exon-skipping approaches due to its unique genomic structure. It is composed of 118 exons, 83 of which are in frame. Moreover, these exons encode a single repetitive collagenous domain.Using this gene as an example, we describe general methods that demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the antisense-mediated exon-skipping strategy to reframe transcripts.

  13. Collagen-IV supported embryoid bodies formation and differentiation from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Taru Sharma, G.; Dubey, Pawan K.; Verma, Om Prakash; Pratheesh, M.D.; Nath, Amar; Sai Kumar, G.

    2012-08-03

    Graphical abstract: EBs formation, characterization and expression of germinal layers marker genes of in vivo developed teratoma using four different types of extracellular matrices. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV matrix is found cytocompatible for EBs formation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Established 3D microenvironment for ES cells development and differentiation into three germ layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV may be useful as promising candidate for ES cells based therapeutic applications. -- Abstract: Embryoid bodies (EBs) are used as in vitro model to study early extraembryonic tissue formation and differentiation. In this study, a novel method using three dimensional extracellular matrices for in vitro generation of EBs from buffalo embryonic stem (ES) cells and its differentiation potential by teratoma formation was successfully established. In vitro derived inner cell masses (ICMs) of hatched buffalo blastocyst were cultured on buffalo fetal fibroblast feeder layer for primary cell colony formation. For generation of EBs, pluripotent ES cells were seeded onto four different types of extracellular matrices viz; collagen-IV, laminin, fibronectin and matrigel using undifferentiating ES cell culture medium. After 5 days of culture, ESCs gradually grew into aggregates and formed simple EBs having circular structures. Twenty-six days later, they formed cystic EBs over collagen matrix with higher EBs formation and greater proliferation rate as compared to other extracellular matrices. Studies involving histological observations, fluorescence microscopy and RT-PCR analysis of the in vivo developed teratoma revealed that presence of all the three germ layer derivatives viz. ectoderm (NCAM), mesoderm (Flk-1) and endoderm (AFP). In conclusion, the method described here demonstrates a simple and cost-effective way of generating EBs from buffalo ES cells. Collagen-IV matrix was found cytocompatible as it

  14. In vivo bioengineered ovarian tumors based on collagen, matrigel, alginate and agarose hydrogels: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Hu, Xuefeng; Huang, Yuanjie; Xu, Guojie; Yang, Jinsong; Li, Li

    2015-01-29

    Scaffold-based tumor engineering is rapidly evolving the study of cancer progression. However, the effects of scaffolds and environment on tumor formation have seldom been investigated. In this study, four types of injectable hydrogels, namely, collagen type I, Matrigel, alginate and agarose gels, were loaded with human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells and then injected into nude mice subcutaneously. The growth of the tumors in vitro was also investigated. After four weeks, the specimens were harvested and analyzed. We found that tumor formation by SKOV3 cells was best supported by collagen, followed by Matrigel, alginate, control (without scaffold) and agarose in vivo. The collagen I group exhibited a larger tumor volume with increased neovascularization and increased necrosis compared with the other materials. Further, increased MMP activity, upregulated expression of laminin and fibronectin and higher levels of HIF-1α and VEGF-A in the collagen group revealed that the engineered tumor is closer to human ovarian carcinoma. In order, collagen, Matrigel, alginate, control (without scaffold) and agarose exhibited decreases in tumor formation. All evidence indicated that the in vivo engineered tumor is scaffold-dependent. Bioactive hydrogels are superior to inert hydrogels at promoting tumor regeneration. In particular, biomimetic hydrogels are advantageous because they provide a microenvironment that mimics the ECM of natural tumors. On the other hand, typical features of cancer cells and the expression of genes related to cancer malignancy were far less similar to the natural tumor in vitro, which indicated the importance of culture environment in vivo. Superior to the in vitro culture, nude mice can be considered satisfactory in vivo 'bioreactors' for the screening of favorable cell vehicles for tumor engineering in vitro.

  15. Expression of the collagen VI α5 and α6 chains in normal human skin and in skin of patients with collagen VI-related myopathies.

    PubMed

    Sabatelli, Patrizia; Gara, Sudheer K; Grumati, Paolo; Urciuolo, Anna; Gualandi, Francesca; Curci, Rosa; Squarzoni, Stefano; Zamparelli, Alessandra; Martoni, Elena; Merlini, Luciano; Paulsson, Mats; Bonaldo, Paolo; Wagener, Raimund

    2011-01-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix protein with critical roles in maintaining muscle and skin integrity and function. Skin abnormalities, including predisposition to keratosis pilaris and abnormal scarring, were described in Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM) patients carrying mutations in COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3 genes, whereas COL6A5, previously designated as COL29A1, was linked to atopic dermatitis. To gain insight into the function of the newly identified collagen VI α5 and α6 chains in human skin, we studied their expression and localization in normal subjects and in genetically characterized UCMD and BM patients. We found that localization of α5, and to a lesser extent α6, is restricted to the papillary dermis, where the protein mainly colocalizes with collagen fibrils. In addition, both chains were found around blood vessels. In UCMD patients with COL6A1 or COL6A2 mutations, immunolabeling for α5 and α6 was often altered, whereas in a UCMD and in a BM patient, each with a COL6A3 mutation, expression of α5 and α6 was apparently unaffected, suggesting that these chains may substitute for α3, forming α1α2α5 or α1α2α6 heterotrimers.

  16. Sol-gel assisted fabrication of collagen hydrolysate composite scaffold: a novel therapeutic alternative to the traditional collagen scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ramadass, Satiesh Kumar; Perumal, Sathiamurthi; Gopinath, Arun; Nisal, Anuya; Subramanian, Saravanan; Madhan, Balaraman

    2014-09-10

    Collagen is one of the most widely used biomaterial for various biomedical applications. In this Research Article, we present a novel approach of using collagen hydrolysate, smaller fragments of collagen, as an alternative to traditionally used collagen scaffold. Collagen hydrolysate composite scaffold (CHCS) was fabricated with sol-gel transition procedure using tetraethoxysilane as the silica precursor. CHCS exhibits porous morphology with pore sizes varying between 380 and 780 μm. Incorporation of silica conferred CHCS with controlled biodegradation and better water uptake capacity. Notably, 3T3 fibroblast proliferation was seen to be significantly better under CHCS treatment when compared to treatment with collagen scaffold. Additionally, CHCS showed excellent antimicrobial activity against the wound pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Escherichia coli due to the inherited antimicrobial activity of collagen hydrolysate. In vivo wound healing experiments with full thickness excision wounds in rat model demonstrated that wounds treated with CHCS showed accelerated healing when compared to wounds treated with collagen scaffold. These findings indicate that the CHCS scaffold from collagen fragments would be an effective and affordable alternative to the traditionally used collagen structural biomaterials.

  17. Design and synthesis of collagen mimetic peptide derivatives for studying triple helix assembly and collagen mimetic peptide-collagen binding interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Xiao

    2008-10-01

    Collagen is the principal tensile clement of the extra-cellular matrix in mammals and is the basic scaffold for cells and tissues. Collagen molecules are comprised of homo-trimeric helices (e.g. collagen type II and type III), ABB type hetero-trimeric helices (e.g. collagen type I, type IV, and type V), or ABC type hetero-trimeric helices (e.g. type V). Mimicry of collagen structures can help elucidate collagen triple helical conformation and provide insights into making novel collagen-like biomaterials. Our group previously reported a new physical collagen modification method, which was based on non-covalent interaction between collagen mimetic peptide (CMP: -(Pro-Hyp-Gly) x-) and natural collagen. We hypothesized that CMP binds to collagen through a process involving both strand invasion and triple helix assembly. The aim of this dissertation is to study structural formation and stability of collagen triple helix, and to investigate CMP-collagen binding interactions using two types of CMP derivatives: covalently templated CMP trimer and CMP-nanoparticle conjugates. We demonstrated that covalently templated ABB type CMP hetero-trimers could be prepared by a versatile synthetic strategy involving both solid phase and solution peptide coupling. Our thermal melting studies showed that the templated CMP hetero-trimers formed collagen-like triple helices and their folding kinetics correlated with the amino acid compositions of the individual CMP strands. We also studied the thermal melting behavior and folding kinetics of a templated hetero-trimer complex comprised of CMP and a peptide derived from collagen. This synthetic strategy can be readily extended to synthesize other ABB type hetero-trimers to investigate their local melting behavior and biological activity. We also prepared colloidally stable CMP functionalized gold nanoparticles (Au-CMPs) as a TEM marker for investigating the CMP-collagen interaction. Au-CMP showed preferential binding to collagen fiber's gap

  18. Evolution of the vertebrate bone matrix: an expression analysis of the network forming collagen paralogues in amphibian osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Daniel; Hanna, Patricia; Munoz, David; Espinoza, Javier; Torrejon, Marcela; Sachs, Laurent; Buisine, Nicolas; Oulion, Silvan; Escriva, Hector; Marcellini, Sylvain

    2013-09-01

    The emergence of vertebrates is closely associated to the evolution of mineralized bone tissue. However, the molecular basis underlying the origin and subsequent diversification of the skeletal mineralized matrix is still poorly understood. One efficient way to tackle this issue is to compare the expression, between vertebrate species, of osteoblastic genes coding for bone matrix proteins. In this work, we have focused on the evolution of the network forming collagen family which contains the Col8a1, Col8a2, and Col10a1 genes. Both phylogeny and synteny reveal that these three paralogues are vertebrate-specific and derive from two independent duplications in the vertebrate lineage. To shed light on the evolution of this family, we have analyzed the osteoblastic expression of the network forming collagens in endochondral and intramembraneous skeletal elements of the amphibian Xenopus tropicalis. Remarkably, we find that amphibian osteoblasts express Col10a1, a gene strongly expressed in osteoblasts in actinopterygians but not in amniotes. In addition, while Col8a1 is known to be robustly expressed in mammalian osteoblasts, the expression levels of its amphibian orthologue are dramatically reduced. Our work reveals that while a skeletal expression of network forming collagen members is widespread throughout vertebrates, osteoblasts from divergent vertebrate lineages express different combinations of network forming collagen paralogues.

  19. Defective pro alpha 2(I) collagen synthesis in a recessive mutation in mice: a model of human osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Chipman, S D; Sweet, H O; McBride, D J; Davisson, M T; Marks, S C; Shuldiner, A R; Wenstrup, R J; Rowe, D W; Shapiro, J R

    1993-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable disorder of connective tissue associated with fractures, osteopenia, and short stature. OI results from mutations affecting the pro alpha 1 or pro alpha 2 gene of type I collagen. We describe a strain of mice with a nonlethal recessively inherited mutation (oim) that results in phenotypic and biochemical features that simulate moderate to severe human OI. The phenotype of homozygous oim mice includes skeletal fractures, limb deformities, generalized osteopenia, and small body size. Their femurs are smaller and demonstrate marked cortical thinning and fewer medullary trabeculae than those of wild-type mice. Breeding studies show the mutation is inherited in most crosses as a single recessive gene on chromosome 6, near the murine Cola-2 gene. Biochemical analysis of skin and bone, as well as isolated dermal fibroblast cultures, demonstrate that alpha 1(I) homotrimeric collagen accumulates in these tissues and is secreted by fibroblasts. Short labeling studies in fibroblasts demonstrate an absence of pro alpha 2(I) collagen chains. Nucleotide sequencing of the cDNA encoding the COOH-propeptide reveals a G deletion at pro alpha 2(I) nucleotide 3983; this results in an alteration of the sequence of the last 48 amino acids. The oim mouse will facilitate the study of type I collagen-related skeletal disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8446583

  20. A novel functional role of collagen glycosylation: interaction with the endocytic collagen receptor uparap/ENDO180.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Henrik J; Madsen, Daniel H; Ingvarsen, Signe; Melander, Maria C; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Patthy, Laszlo; Engelholm, Lars H; Behrendt, Niels

    2011-09-16

    Collagens make up the most abundant component of interstitial extracellular matrices and basement membranes. Collagen remodeling is a crucial process in many normal physiological events and in several pathological conditions. Some collagen subtypes contain specific carbohydrate side chains, the function of which is poorly known. The endocytic collagen receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP)/Endo180 plays an important role in matrix remodeling through its ability to internalize collagen for lysosomal degradation. uPARAP/Endo180 is a member of the mannose receptor protein family. These proteins all include a fibronectin type II domain and a series of C-type lectin-like domains, of which only a minor part possess carbohydrate recognition activity. At least two of the family members, uPARAP/Endo180 and the mannose receptor, interact with collagens. The molecular basis for this interaction is known to involve the fibronectin type II domain but nothing is known about the function of the lectin domains in this respect. In this study, we have investigated a possible role of the single active lectin domain of uPARAP/Endo180 in the interaction with collagens. By expressing truncated recombinant uPARAP/Endo180 proteins and analyzing their interaction with collagens with high and low levels of glycosylation we demonstrated that this lectin domain interacts directly with glycosylated collagens. This interaction is functionally important because it was found to modulate the endocytic efficiency of the receptor toward highly glycosylated collagens such as basement membrane collagen IV. Surprisingly, this property was not shared by the mannose receptor, which internalized glycosylated collagens independently of its lectin function. This role of modulating its uptake efficiency by a specific receptor is a previously unrecognized function of collagen glycosylation.

  1. Loss of fibulin-4 disrupts collagen synthesis and maturation: implications for pathology resulting from EFEMP2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Papke, Christina L.; Tsunezumi, Jun; Ringuette, Léa-Jeanne; Nagaoka, Hideaki; Terajima, Masahiko; Yamashiro, Yoshito; Urquhart, Greg; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Davis, Elaine C.; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Homozygous recessive mutations in either EFEMP2 (encoding fibulin-4) or FBLN5 (encoding fibulin-5), critical genes for elastogenesis, lead to autosomal recessive cutis laxa types 1B and 1A, respectively. Previously, fibulin-4 was shown to bind lysyl oxidase (LOX), an elastin/collagen cross-linking enzyme, in vitro. Consistently, reported defects in humans with EFEMP2 mutations are more severe and broad in range than those due to FBLN5 mutations and encompass both elastin-rich and collagen-rich tissues. However, the underlying disease mechanism in EFEMP2 mutations has not been fully addressed. Here, we show that fibulin-4 is important for the integrity of aortic collagen in addition to elastin. Smooth muscle-specific Efemp2 loss in mouse (termed SMKO) resulted in altered fibrillar collagen localization with larger, poorly organized fibrils. LOX activity was decreased in Efemp2-null cells, and collagen cross-linking was diminished in SMKO aortas; however, elastin cross-linking was unaffected and the level of mature LOX was maintained to that of wild-type aortas. Proteomic screening identified multiple proteins involved in procollagen processing and maturation as potential fibulin-4-binding partners. We showed that fibulin-4 binds procollagen C-endopeptidase enhancer 1 (Pcolce), which enhances proteolytic cleavage of the procollagen C-terminal propeptide during procollagen processing. Interestingly, however, procollagen cleavage was not affected by the presence or absence of fibulin-4 in vitro. Thus, our data indicate that fibulin-4 serves as a potential scaffolding protein during collagen maturation in the extracellular space. Analysis of collagen in other tissues affected by fibulin-4 loss should further increase our understanding of underlying pathologic mechanisms in patients with EFEMP2 mutations. PMID:26220971

  2. A composite SWNT-collagen matrix: characterization and preliminary assessment as a conductive peripheral nerve regeneration matrix.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Z; McFetridge, P S

    2010-12-01

    Unique in their structure and function, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have received significant attention due to their potential to create unique conductive materials. For neural applications, these conductive materials hold promise as they may enhance regenerative processes. However, like other nano-scaled biomaterials it is important to have a comprehensive understanding how these materials interact with cell systems and how the biological system responds to their presence. These investigations aim to further our understanding of SWNT-cell interactions by assessing the effect SWNT/collagen hydrogels have on PC12 neuronal-like cells seeded within and (independently) on top of the composite material. Two types of collagen hydrogels were prepared: (1) SWNTs dispersed directly within the collagen (SWNT/COL) and (2) albumin-coated SWNTs prepared using the surfactant 'sodium cholate' to improve dispersion (AL-SWNT/COL) and collagen alone serving as a control (COL). SWNT dispersion was significantly improved when using surfactant-assisted dispersion. The enhanced dispersion resulted in a stiffer, more conductive material with an increased collagen fiber diameter. Short-term cell interactions with PC12 cells and SWNT composites have shown a stimulatory effect on cell proliferation relative to plain collagen controls. In parallel to these results, p53 gene displayed normal expression levels, which indicates the absence of nanoparticle-induced DNA damage. In summary, these mechanically tunable SWNT-collagen scaffolds show the potential for enhanced electrical activity and have shown positive in vitro biocompatibility results offering further evidence that SWNT-based materials have an important role in promoting neuronal regeneration.

  3. Collagen XVIII/endostatin is associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transformation in the atrioventricular valves during cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Carvalhaes, Lorenza S; Gervásio, Othon L; Guatimosim, Cristina; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Sormunen, Raija; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Kitten, Gregory T

    2006-01-01

    Type XVIII collagen is a multidomain protein that contains cleavable C-terminal NC1 and endostatin fragments, which have been shown to either induce or inhibit cell migration. Endostatin is being intensely studied because of its anti-angiogenic activity. Three variants of type XVIII collagen have been reported to be distributed in epithelial and endothelial basement membranes in a tissue-specific manner. The single gene encoding collagen XVIII is on chromosome 21 within the region associated with the congenital heart disease phenotype observed in Down's syndrome. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of collagen XVIII in embryonic mouse hearts during formation of the atrioventricular (AV) valves. We found that collagen XVIII is localized not only in various basement membranes but is also highly expressed throughout the connective tissue core of the endocardial cushions and forming AV valve leaflets. It was closely associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transformation of endothelial cells into mesenchymal cushion tissue cells and was localized around these cells as they migrated into the cardiac jelly to form the initial connective tissue elements of the valve leaflets. However, after embryonic day 17.5 collagen XVIII expression decreased rapidly in the connective tissue and thereafter remained detectable only in the basement membranes of the endothelial layer covering the leaflets. The staining pattern observed within the AV endocardial cushions suggests that collagen XVIII may have a role in cardiac valve morphogenesis. These results may help us to better understand normal heart development and the aberrant mechanisms that cause cardiac malformations in Down's syndrome.

  4. Ventricular remodeling in heart failure: the role of myocardial collagen.

    PubMed

    Janicki, J S; Brower, G L; Henegar, J R; Wang, L

    1995-01-01

    Collagen which is present in the myocardium in relatively small amounts is the most abundant structural protein of the connective tissue network. Its structural organization consists of a complex weave of collagen fibers that surrounds and interconnects myocytes, groups of myocytes, muscle fibers and muscle bundles. The conformation of interstitial fibrillar collagen makes it highly resistant to degradation by all proteinases other than specific collagenases. In hearts with myocardial damage secondary to myocardial infarction, chronic ischemia, inflammation, or cardiomyopathy, a complex sequence of compensatory events occur that eventually result in an adverse left ventricular remodeling. This continual state of remodeling is characterized by persistent collagenase activity, fibrillar collagen degradation, and progressive myocyte loss. The net effect is a shift in the balance between collagen synthesis and degradation which leads to an inadequate fibrillar collagen matrix, progressive ventricular dilatation and sphericalization with wall thinning and eventual congestive heart failure.

  5. Effects of cyclosporin on collagen induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Takagishi, K; Kaibara, N; Hotokebuchi, T; Arita, C; Morinaga, M; Arai, K

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the effect of the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporin on collagen induced arthritis in mice. Cyclosporin, when given prophylactically, was capable of suppressing the development of collagen induced arthritis and the immunological response to native type II collagen in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment with cyclosporin, started on the same day as the booster injection with type II collagen, also resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and of immunity to collagen. These findings suggest that the time of a booster injection, three weeks after the initial immunisation, might be still within the induction phase of arthritis since reinoculation is required to produce a high incidence of arthritis in mice. In addition, therapeutic treatment with cyclosporin did not affect the clinical course of the disease or the immune response to collagen. PMID:3754714

  6. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: increased solubility of skin collagen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    We studied the solubility of skin collagen from six patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and six controls. The amount of collagen extracted with neutral salt solution was significantly greater in patients with ALS than in controls. In addition, there was a statistically significant increase in the proportion of collagen extracted from ALS patients with increased duration of illness. The collagen solubilized by pepsin and cyanogen bromide treatments was significantly higher in ALS patients than in controls, and its proportion was positively and significantly associated with duration of illness in ALS patients. These results indicate that the metabolism of skin collagen may be affected in the disease process of ALS, causing an increase in immature soluble collagen in the tissue, which is the opposite to that which occurs in the normal aging process.

  7. Alternating potentials assisted electrochemical deposition of mineralized collagen coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Junjun; Lin, Jun; Li, Juan; Weng, Wenjian; Cheng, Kui; Wang, Huiming

    2015-12-01

    Mineralized collagen coatings were synthesized by electrochemical deposition with alternating negative and positive potentials. The obtained coatings demonstrated a multi-layer structure alternating consisting of weakly and highly mineralized collagen layers and the proportion of each layer could be controlled by adjusting the deposition time. The coatings deposited using alternating potentials assisted electrochemical deposition (AP-ECD) showed significantly enhanced osteoblasts proliferation, and rhBMP-2 loading capability compared to those of the coatings deposited using constant potential electrochemical deposition (CP-ECD). The enhanced cytocompatibility and rhBMP-2 loading capability of the coatings might be attributed to their high proportion of weakly mineralized collagen layer. Furthermore, the deposition mechanism for alternating potentials is proposed as that positive potential induces deposition of negatively charged collagen fibrils to form a weakly mineralized collagen layer. Our results suggest that the present deposition method could be a promising approach to engineer mineralized collagen coating with better biological performances.

  8. Utilizing Core–Shell Fibrous Collagen-Alginate Hydrogel Cell Delivery System for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Roman A.; Kim, Meeju; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Jeong-Hui; Knowles, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional matrices that encapsulate and deliver stem cells with defect-tuned formulations are promising for bone tissue engineering. In this study, we designed a novel stem cell delivery system composed of collagen and alginate as the core and shell, respectively. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were loaded into the collagen solution and then deposited directly into a fibrous structure while simultaneously sheathing with alginate using a newly designed core–shell nozzle. Alginate encapsulation was achieved by the crosslinking within an adjusted calcium-containing solution that effectively preserved the continuous fibrous structure of the inner cell-collagen part. The constructed hydrogel carriers showed a continuous fiber with a diameter of ∼700–1000 μm for the core and 200–500 μm for the shell area, which was largely dependent on the alginate concentration (2%–5%) as well as the injection rate (20–80 mL/h). The water uptake capacity of the core–shell carriers was as high as 98%, which could act as a pore channel to supply nutrients and oxygen to the cells. Degradation of the scaffolds showed a weight loss of ∼22% at 7 days and ∼43% at 14 days, suggesting a possible role as a degradable tissue-engineered construct. The MSCs encapsulated within the collagen core showed excellent viability, exhibiting significant cellular proliferation up to 21 days with levels comparable to those observed in the pure collagen gel matrix used as a control. A live/dead cell assay also confirmed similar percentages of live cells within the core–shell carrier compared to those in the pure collagen gel, suggesting the carrier was cell compatible and was effective for maintaining a cell population. Cells allowed to differentiate under osteogenic conditions expressed high levels of bone-related genes, including osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, and osteopontin. Further, when the core–shell fibrous carriers were implanted in a rat calvarium defect, the bone

  9. Galactosylated collagen matrix enhanced in vitro maturation of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ghodsizadeh, Arefeh; Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Piryaei, Abbas; Pournasr, Behshad; Najarasl, Mostafa; Hiraoka, Yosuke; Baharvand, Hossein

    2014-05-01

    Due to their important biomedical applications, functional human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hESC-HLCs) are an attractive topic in the field of stem cell differentiation. Here, we have initially differentiated hESCs into functional hepatic endoderm (HE) and continued the differentiation by replating them onto galactosylated collagen (GC) and collagen matrices. The differentiation of hESC-HE cells into HLCs on GC substrate showed significant up-regulation of hepatic-specific genes such as ALB, HNF4α, CYP3A4, G6P, and ASGR1. There was more albumin secretion and urea synthesis, as well as more cytochrome p450 activity, in differentiated HLCs on GC compared to the collagen-coated substrate. These results suggested that GC substrate has the potential to be used for in vitro maturation of hESC-HLCs.

  10. Three-dimensional collagen matrix induces a mechanosensitive invasive epithelial phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Shawn P.; Martin, Karen E.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2017-01-01

    A critical step in breast cancer progression is local tissue invasion, during which cells pass from the epithelial compartment to the stromal compartment. We recently showed that malignant leader cells can promote the invasion of otherwise non-invasive epithelial follower cells, but the effects of this induced-invasion phenomenon on follower cell phenotype remain unclear. Notably, this process can expose epithelial cells to the stromal extracellular matrix (ECM), which is distinct from the ECM within the normal epithelial microenvironment. Here, we used a 3D epithelial morphogenesis model in which cells were cultured in biochemically and mechanically defined matrices to examine matrix-mediated gene expression and the associated phenotypic response. We found that 3D collagen matrix promoted expression of mesenchymal genes including MT1-MMP, which was required for collagen-stimulated invasive behavior. Epithelial invasion required matrix anchorage as well as signaling through Src, PI3K, and Rac1, and increasingly stiff collagen promoted dispersive epithelial cell invasion. These results suggest that leader cell-facilitated access to the stromal ECM may trigger an invasive phenotype in follower epithelial cells that could enable them to actively participate in local tissue invasion. PMID:28186196

  11. Jellyfish collagen and alginate: Combined marine materials for superior chondrogenesis of hMSC.

    PubMed

    Pustlauk, W; Paul, B; Gelinsky, M; Bernhardt, A

    2016-07-01

    Marine, hybrid constructs of porous scaffolds from fibrillized jellyfish collagen and alginate hydrogel are mimicking both of the main tissue components of cartilage, thus being a promising approach for chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Investigating their potential for articular cartilage repair, the present study examined scaffolds being either infiltrated with an alginate-cell-suspension (ACS) or seeded with hMSC and embedded in alginate after cell adhesion (EAS). Hybrid constructs with 2×10(5) and 4.5×10(5)hMSC/scaffold were compared to hMSC encapsulated in pure alginate discs, both chondrogenically stimulated for 21days. Typical round, chondrocyte-like morphology was observed in pure alginate gels and ACS scaffolds, while cells in EAS were elongated and tightly attached to the collagen pores. Col 2 gene expression was comparable in all scaffold types examined. However, the Col 2/Col 1 ratio was higher for pure alginate discs and ACS scaffolds compared to EAS. In contrast, cells in EAS scaffolds displayed higher gene expression of Sox 9, Col 11 and ACAN compared to ACS and pure alginate. Secretion of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG) was comparable for ACS and EAS scaffolds. In conclusion hybrid constructs of jellyfish collagen and alginate support hMSC chondrogenic differentiation and provide more stable and constructs compared to pure hydrogels.

  12. Pregnancy Differentially Regulates the Collagens Types I and III in Left Ventricle from Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Limon-Miranda, Sarai; Salazar-Enriquez, Diana G.; Muñiz, Jesus; Ramirez-Archila, Mario V.; Sanchez-Pastor, Enrique A.; Andrade, Felipa; Soñanez-Organis, Jose G.; Moran-Palacio, Edgar F.; Virgen-Ortiz, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    The pathologic cardiac remodeling has been widely documented; however, the physiological cardiac remodeling induced by pregnancy and its reversion in postpartum are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the changes in collagen I (Col I) and collagen III (Col III) mRNA and protein levels in left ventricle from rat heart during pregnancy and postpartum. Col I and Col III mRNA expression in left ventricle samples during pregnancy and postpartum were analyzed by using quantitative PCR. Data obtained from gene expression show that Col I and Col III in left ventricle are upregulated during pregnancy with reversion in postpartum. In contrast to gene expression, the protein expression evaluated by western blot showed that Col I is downregulated and Col III is upregulated in left ventricle during pregnancy. In conclusion, the pregnancy differentially regulates collagens types I and III in heart; this finding could be an important molecular mechanism that regulates the ventricular stiffness in response to blood volume overload present during pregnancy which is reversed in postpartum. PMID:25147829

  13. Pregnancy differentially regulates the collagens types I and III in left ventricle from rat heart.

    PubMed

    Limon-Miranda, Sarai; Salazar-Enriquez, Diana G; Muñiz, Jesus; Ramirez-Archila, Mario V; Sanchez-Pastor, Enrique A; Andrade, Felipa; Soñanez-Organis, Jose G; Moran-Palacio, Edgar F; Virgen-Ortiz, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    The pathologic cardiac remodeling has been widely documented; however, the physiological cardiac remodeling induced by pregnancy and its reversion in postpartum are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the changes in collagen I (Col I) and collagen III (Col III) mRNA and protein levels in left ventricle from rat heart during pregnancy and postpartum. Col I and Col III mRNA expression in left ventricle samples during pregnancy and postpartum were analyzed by using quantitative PCR. Data obtained from gene expression show that Col I and Col III in left ventricle are upregulated during pregnancy with reversion in postpartum. In contrast to gene expression, the protein expression evaluated by western blot showed that Col I is downregulated and Col III is upregulated in left ventricle during pregnancy. In conclusion, the pregnancy differentially regulates collagens types I and III in heart; this finding could be an important molecular mechanism that regulates the ventricular stiffness in response to blood volume overload present during pregnancy which is reversed in postpartum.

  14. The Non-phagocytic Route of Collagen Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Ingvarsen, Signe; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Melander, Maria C.; Kjøller, Lars; Moyer, Amanda; Honoré, Christian; Madsen, Charlotte A.; Garred, Peter; Burgdorf, Sven; Bugge, Thomas H.; Behrendt, Niels; Engelholm, Lars H.

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of collagens, the most abundant proteins of the extracellular matrix, is involved in numerous physiological and pathological conditions including cancer invasion. An important turnover pathway involves cellular internalization and degradation of large, soluble collagen fragments, generated by initial cleavage of the insoluble collagen fibers. We have previously observed that in primary mouse fibroblasts, this endocytosis of collagen fragments is dependent on the receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP)/Endo180. Others have identified additional mechanisms of collagen uptake, with different associated receptors, in other cell types. These receptors include β1-integrins, being responsible for collagen phagocytosis, and the mannose receptor. We have now utilized a newly developed monoclonal antibody against uPARAP/Endo180, which down-regulates the receptor protein level on treated cells, to examine the role of uPARAP/Endo180 as a mediator of collagen internalization by a wide range of cultured cell types. With the exception of macrophages, all cells that proved capable of efficient collagen internalization were of mesenchymal origin and all of these utilized uPARAP/Endo180 for their collagen uptake process. Macrophages internalized collagen in a process mediated by the mannose receptor, a protein belonging to the same protein family as uPARAP/Endo180. β1-Integrins were found not to be involved in the endocytosis of soluble collagen, irrespectively of whether this was mediated by uPARAP/Endo180 or the mannose receptor. This further distinguishes these pathways from the phagocytic uptake of particulate collagen. PMID:21652704

  15. Collagenous gastritis: a morphologic and immunohistochemical study of 40 patients.

    PubMed

    Arnason, Thomas; Brown, Ian S; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Anderson, William; O'Brien, Blake H; Wilson, Claire; Winter, Harland; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2015-04-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare condition defined histologically by a superficial subepithelial collagen layer. This study further characterizes the morphologic spectrum of collagenous gastritis by evaluating a multi-institutional series of 40 patients (26 female and 14 male). The median age at onset was 16 years (range 3-89 years), including 24 patients (60%) under age 18. Twelve patients (30%) had associated celiac disease, collagenous sprue, or collagenous colitis. Hematoxylin and eosin slides were reviewed in biopsies from all patients and tenascin, gastrin, eotaxin, and IgG4/IgG immunohistochemical stains were applied to a subset. The distribution of subepithelial collagen favored the body/fundus in pediatric patients and the antrum in adults. There were increased surface intraepithelial lymphocytes (>25 lymphocytes/100 epithelial cells) in five patients. Three of these patients had associated celiac and/or collagenous sprue/colitis, while the remaining two had increased duodenal lymphocytosis without specific etiology. An eosinophil-rich pattern (>30 eosinophils/high power field) was seen in 21/40 (52%) patients. Seven patients' biopsies demonstrated atrophy of the gastric corpus mucosa. Tenascin immunohistochemistry highlighted the subepithelial collagen in all 21 specimens evaluated and was a more sensitive method of collagen detection in biopsies from two patients with subtle subepithelial collagen. No increased eotaxin expression was identified in 16 specimens evaluated. One of the twenty-three biopsies tested had increased IgG4-positive cells (100/high power field) with an IgG4/IgG ratio of 55%. In summary, collagenous gastritis presents three distinct histologic patterns including a lymphocytic gastritis-like pattern, an eosinophil-rich pattern, and an atrophic pattern. Eotaxin and IgG4 were not elevated enough to implicate these pathways in the pathogenesis. Tenascin immunohistochemistry can be used as a sensitive method of collagen detection.

  16. The Role of Collagen Organization on the Properties of Bone.

    PubMed

    Garnero, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Bone is a complex tissue constituted by a collagen matrix filled in with crystal of hydroxyapatite (HAP). Bone mechanical properties are influenced by the collagen matrix which is organized into hierarchical structures from the individual type I collagen heterotrimer flanked by linear telopeptides at each end to the collagen fibrils that are interconnected by enzymatic and non-enzymatic cross-links. Although most studies focused on the role of collagen cross-links in bone strength, other organizational features may also play a role. At the molecular level it has been shown that homotrimer of type I collagen found in bone tissue of some patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by decreased mechanical competence compared to the regular heterotrimer. The state of C-telopeptide isomerization-which can be estimated by the measurement in body fluids of the native and isomerized isoforms-has also been shown to be associated with bone strength, particularly the post-yield properties independent of bone size and bone mineral density. Other higher hierarchical features of collagen organization have shown to be associated with changes in bone mechanical behavior in ex vivo models and may also be relevant to explain bone fragility in diseases characterized by collagen abnormalities e.g., OI and Paget's disease. These include the orientation of collagen fibrils in a regular longitudinal direction, the D-spacing period between collagen fibrils and the collagen-HAP interfacial bonding. Preliminary data indicate that some of these organizational features can change during treatment with bisphosphonate, raloxifene, and PTH suggesting that they may contribute to their anti-fracture efficacy. It remains however to be determined which of these parameters play a specific and independent role in bone matrix properties, what is the magnitude of mechanical strength explained by collagen organization, whether they are relevant to explain osteoporosis-induced bone

  17. [The use of collagen in the cicatrization of wounds].

    PubMed

    Torra i Bou, J E; Casaroli-Marano, R P; Martínez Cuervo, F; Reina, M; Soldevilla Agreda, J J; Vilaró, S

    2000-10-01

    The authors review the use of collagen in the cicatrization of wounds, analyzing what this process consists of and what its regeneration and reparation phases are. The authors also summarize some fundamental biological aspects collagen has, their functions in hemostasia and in cicatrization; they develop the use of heterologous collagen in the cicatrization process. Expressive illustrations and a selection of bibliographical references accompany this article.

  18. Raman study of the shockwave effect on collagens.

    PubMed

    Cárcamo, José J; Aliaga, Alvaro E; Clavijo, R Ernesto; Brañes, Manuel R; Campos-Vallette, Marcelo M

    2012-02-01

    The Raman spectra (1800-200 cm(-1)) of isolated dried collagen types I and III were recorded at different times after shockwave (SW) application in aqueous media. SWs were applied in a single session. One week after the SW application the vibrational data analysis indicates changes in the conformation of the collagens; orientational changes are also inferred. During the next three weeks collagens tended to recover the conformation and orientation existing before SW application.

  19. IL-13 mediates collagen deposition via STAT6 and microRNA-135b: a role for epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Steven; Ciechomska, Marzena; Fullard, Nicola; Przyborski, Stefan; van Laar, Jacob M.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune connective tissue disease in which T cells play a prominent role. We and others have previously demonstrated a role for T cell-derived IL-13 in mediating the induction of collagen in dermal fibroblasts and that blockade with IL-13 antibodies attenuates this increase. In this study we want to probe the signalling that underpins IL-13 mediated matrix deposition. Isolated dermal fibroblasts were incubated with recombinant IL-13 and gene expression by qRT-PCR was performed for collagen1A1 and TGF-β1. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to knock down STAT6 and a small molecule inhibitor was also used to block this pathway. MiR-135b was transfected into fibroblasts plus and minus IL-13 to see if this miR plays a role. miR-135b was measured in systemic sclerosis fibroblasts isolated from patients and also in serum. Results showed that IL-13 increased collagen expression and that this is independent from TGF-β1. This is dependent on STAT6 as targeting this blocked induction. MiR-135b reduces collagen induction in fibroblasts and scleroderma fibroblasts have lower constitutive levels of the miR. We further demonstrate that miR135b is repressed by methylation and may include MeCP2. In conclusion we show that STAT6 and miR-135b regulate IL-13-mediated collagen production by fibroblasts. PMID:27113293

  20. The effect of vascular endothelial growth factor on aggrecan and type II collagen expression in rat articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuan-Yin; Hao, Ya-Rong; Wang, Zhe; Zhou, Jian-Lin; Jia, Qi-Xue; Qiu, Bo

    2012-11-01

    The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) directly correlates with the Mankin score and the degree of cartilage destruction. The biological activity of VEGF on articular cartilage remains unknown, so this study was performed to investigate the effect of VEGF on aggrecan and type II collagen expression in vitro. We carried out this study at the Center Laboratory of Renmin Hospital at Wuhan University. Rat articular chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer. Then, the experiment was divided into 4 groups: group A (control group), without any disposal; group B, treated with 10 ng/ml VEGF; group C, treated with 10 ng/ml IL-1β; and group D, treated with 10