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Sample records for collagen gene col7a1

  1. Premature termination codons in the Type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) underlie severe, mutilating recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J. ); Anhalt, G. ); Gibbons, S.; Bauer, E.A. )

    1994-05-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of heritable mechano-bullous skin diseases classified into three major categories on the basis of the level of tissue separation within the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone. The most severe, dystrophic (scarring) forms of EB demonstrate blister formation below the cutaneous basement membrane at the level of the anchoring fibrils. Ultrastructural observations of altered anchoring fibrils and genetic linkage to the gene encoding type VII collagen (COL7A1), the major component of anchoring fibrils, have implicated COL7A1 as the candidate gene in the dystrophic forms of EB. The authors have recently cloned the entire cDNA and gene for human COL7A1, which has been mapped to 3p21. In this study, they describe mutations in four COL7A1 alleles in three patients with severe, mutilating recessive dystrophic EB (Hallopeau-Siemens type, HS-RDEB). Each of these mutations resulted in a premature termination codon (PTC) in the amino-terminal portion of COL7A1. One of the patients was a compound heterozygote for two different mutations. The heterozygous carriers showed an [approximately] 50% reduction in anchoring fibrils, yet were clinically unaffected. Premature termination codons in both alleles of COL7A1 may thus be a major underlying cause of the severe, recessive dystrophic forms of EB. 40 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Structural organization of the human type VII collagen gene (COL7A1), composed of more exons than any previously characterized gene

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, A.M.; Chung-Honet, L.C.; Greenspan, D.S.; Hoffman, G.G.; Lee, S.; Cheng, W. ); Uitto, J. )

    1994-05-01

    The human type VII collagen (COL7A1) gene is the locus for mutations in at least some cases of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Here the authors describe the entire intron/exon organization of COL7A1, which is shown to have 118 exons, more than any previously described gene. Despite this complexity, COL7A1 is compact. Consisting of 31,132 bp from transcription start site to polyadenylation site, it is only about three times the size of type VII collagen mRNA. Thus, COL7A1 introns are small. A 71-nucleotide COL7A1 intron is the smallest intron yet reported in a collagen gene, and only one COL7A1 intron is greater than 1 kb in length. All exons in the COL7A1 triple helix coding region that do not begin with sequences corresponding to imperfections of the triple helix begin with intact codons for Gly residues of Gly-X-Y repeats. This is reminiscent of the structure of fibrillar rather than other nonfibrillar collagen genes. In addition, the COL7A1 triple helix coding region contains many exons of recurring sizes (e.g., 25 exons are 36 bp, 12 exons are 45 bp, 8 exons are 63 bp), suggesting an evolutionary origin distinct from those of other nonfibrillar collagen genes. Sequences from the 5[prime] portion of COL7A1 are presented along with the 3766-bp intergenic sequence, which separated COL7A1 from the upstream gene encoding the core I protein of the cytochrome bc[sub 1] complex. The COL7A1 promoter region is found to lack extensive homologies with promoter regions of other genes expressed primarily in skin. 60 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Premature termination codons on both alleles of the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) in three brothers with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed Central

    Christiano, A M; Suga, Y; Greenspan, D S; Ogawa, H; Uitto, J

    1995-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of heritable mechano-bullous skin diseases classified into three major categories on the basis of the level of tissue separation within the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone. In the most severe, dystrophic (scarring) forms of EB, blisters form below the cutaneous basement membrane at the level of the anchoring fibrils, which are composed of type VII collagen. Ultrastructural observations of altered anchoring fibrils and genetic linkage to the type VII collagen locus (COL7A1) have implicated COL7A1 as the candidate gene in the dystrophic forms of EB. We have recently cloned the entire cDNA and the gene for human COL7A1. In this study, we describe distinct mutations in both COL7A1 alleles in three brothers with severe, mutilating recessive dystrophic EB (the Hallopeau-Siemens type, HS-RDEB). The patients are compound heterozygotes for two different mutations, both of which result in a premature termination codon in COL7A1, and the parents were shown to be clinically heterozygous carries of the respective mutations. Premature termination codons in both alleles of COL7A1 appear to be the underlying cause of severe, recessive dystrophic EB in this family. Images PMID:7883979

  4. cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of the mouse type VII collagen gene (Col7a1): Evidence for rapid evolutionary divergence of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kehua; Christiano, A.M.; Chu, Mon Li; Uitto, J. Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA ); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J. )

    1993-06-01

    Type VII collagen is the major component of anchoring fibrils, critical attachment structures at the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone. Genetic linkage analyses with recently cloned human type VII collagen cDNAs have indicated that the corresponding gene, COL7A1, is the candidate gene in the dystrophic forms of epidermolysis bullosa. To gain insight into the evolutionary conservation of COL7A1, in this study the authors have isolated mouse type VII collagen cDNAs by screening a mouse epidermal keratinocyte cDNA library with a human COL7A1 cDNA. Two overlapping mouse cDNAs were isolated, and Northern hybridization of mouse epidermal keratinocyte RNA with one of them revealed the presence of a mRNA transcript of [approximately]9.5 kb, the approximate size of the human COL7A1 mRNA. Nucleotide sequencing of the mouse cDNAs revealed a 2760-bp open reading frame that encodes the 5[prime] half of the collagenous domain and a segment of the NC-1, the noncollagenous amino-terminal domain of type VII collagen. Comparison of the mouse amino acid sequences with the corresponding human sequences deduced from cDNAs revealed 82.5% identity. The evolutionary divergence of the gene was relatively rapid in comparison to other collagen genes. Despite the high degree of sequence variation, several sequences, including the size and the position of noncollagenous imperfections and interruptions within the Gly-X-Y repeat sequence, were precisely conserved. Finally, the mouse Col7a1 gene was located by interspecific backcross mapping to mouse Chromosome 9, a region that corresponds to human chromosome 3p21, the position of human COL7Al. This assignment confirms and extends the relationship between the mouse and the human chromosomes in this region of the genome. 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. PCR-SSCP analysis of the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1): Detection of a point mutation in five patients

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnil, M.G.S.; Richards, A.J.; Pope, F.M.

    1994-09-01

    Type VII collagen is the major component of anchoring fibrils, structures which extend below the lamina densa of the epidermal basement membrane in stratified squamous epithelia. Genetic linkage studies and two mutation reports have implicated the type VII collagen gene, COL7A1, in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB), an inherited disorder characterized by blistering and scarring of the skin and mucous membranes after minor trauma. We have used PCR-SSCP of genomic DNA to screen exons of COL7A1 for mutations in recessive DEB patients. Band mobility shifts were detected in exon FN4-B in five patients. Sequencing revealed a C to T transition changing a codon for arginine into a stop codon, homozygous in two related patients and heterozygous in the others. We are currently searching for a second mutation in these three heterozygous patients who are presumably genetic compounds. Screening for an informative Xho I restriction site altered by the mutation showed parental heterozygosity but no evidence for the mutation in 50 normal chromosomes. Segregation of COL7A1 markers in these patients suggests that the mutation has arisen independently in at least two of our families. The premature stop mutation in the 5{prime} end of the gene predicts a severely shortened collagen VII molecule. The homozygote formation of anchoring fibrils would be impaired providing an explanation at the molecular level for the ultrastructural findings of reduced numbers or absence of anchoring fibrils in this disease. In conclusion, these data strongly suggest that this novel premature stop mutation is the cause of DEB in the homozygotes and contributes to the disease in the other patients. The important role of anchoring fibrils in dermal-epidermal adhesion is also underlined.

  6. Prenatal diagnosis for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in 10 families by mutation and haplotype analysis in the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1).

    PubMed Central

    Christiano, A. M.; LaForgia, S.; Paller, A. S.; McGuire, J.; Shimizu, H.; Uitto, J.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of heritable diseases that manifest as blistering and erosions of the skin and mucous membranes. In the dystrophic forms of EB (DEB), the diagnostic hallmark is abnormalities in the anchoring fibrils, attachment structures beneath the cutaneous basement membrane zone. The major component of anchoring fibrils is type VII collagen, and DEB has been linked to the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) at 3p21, with no evidence for locus heterogeneity. Due to life-threatening complications and significant long-term morbidity associated with the severe, mutilating form of recessive dystrophic EB (RDEB), there has been a demand for prenatal diagnosis from families with affected offspring. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Intragenic polymorphisms in COL7A1 and flanking microsatellite markers on chromosome 3p21, as well as detection of pathogenetic mutations in families, were used to perform PCR-based prenatal diagnosis from DNA obtained by chorionic villus sampling at 10-15 weeks or amniocentesis at 12-15 weeks gestation in 10 families at risk for recurrence of RDEB. RESULTS: In nine cases, the fetus was predicted to be normal or a clinically unaffected carrier of a mutation in one allele. These predictions have been validated in nine cases by the birth of a healthy child. In one case, an affected fetus was predicted, and the diagnosis was confirmed by fetal skin biopsy. CONCLUSIONS: DNA-based prenatal diagnosis of RDEB offers an early, expedient method of testing which will largely replace the previously available invasive fetal skin biopsy at 18-20 weeks gestation. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 PMID:8900535

  7. Gene Editing for the Efficient Correction of a Recurrent COL7A1 Mutation in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Cristina; Mencía, Angeles; Almarza, David; Duarte, Blanca; Büning, Hildegard; Sallach, Jessica; Hausser, Ingrid; Del Río, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando; Murillas, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Clonal gene therapy protocols based on the precise manipulation of epidermal stem cells require highly efficient gene-editing molecular tools. We have combined adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of donor template DNA with transcription activator-like nucleases (TALE) expressed by adenoviral vectors to address the correction of the c.6527insC mutation in the COL7A1 gene, causing recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in a high percentage of Spanish patients. After transduction with these viral vectors, high frequencies of homology-directed repair were found in clones of keratinocytes derived from a recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) patient homozygous for the c.6527insC mutation. Gene-edited clones recovered the expression of the COL7A1 transcript and collagen VII protein at physiological levels. In addition, treatment of patient keratinocytes with TALE nucleases in the absence of a donor template DNA resulted in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated indel generation in the vicinity of the c.6527insC mutation site in a large proportion of keratinocyte clones. A subset of these indels restored the reading frame of COL7A1 and resulted in abundant, supraphysiological expression levels of mutant or truncated collagen VII protein. Keratinocyte clones corrected both by homology-directed repair (HDR) or NHEJ were used to regenerate skin displaying collagen VII in the dermo-epidermal junction. PMID:27045209

  8. Genetic linkage of type VII collagen (COL7A1) to dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in families with abnormal anchoring fibrils.

    PubMed Central

    Ryynänen, M; Ryynänen, J; Sollberg, S; Iozzo, R V; Knowlton, R G; Uitto, J

    1992-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) in a group of genodermatoses characterized by the fragility of skin. Previous studies on the dystrophic (scarring) forms of EB have suggested abnormalities in anchoring fibrils, morphologically recognizable attachment structures that provide stability to the association of the cutaneous basement membrane to the underlying dermis. Since type VII collagen is the major component of the anchoring fibrils, we examined the genetic linkage of dominant dystrophic EB (EBDD) and the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) locus, which we have recently mapped to chromosome 3p, in three large kindreds with abnormal anchoring fibrils. Strong genetic linkage of EBDD and COL7A1 loci was demonstrated with the maximum logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 8.77 at theta = 0. This linkage was further confirmed with two additional markers in this region of the short arm of chromosome 3, and these analyses allowed further refinement of the map locus of COL7A1. Since there were no recombinants between the COL7A1 and EBDD loci, our findings suggest that type VII collagen is the candidate gene that may harbor the mutations responsible for the EB phenotype in these three families. Images PMID:1347297

  9. SIN Retroviral Vectors Expressing COL7A1 Under Human Promoters for Ex Vivo Gene Therapy of Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Titeux, Matthias; Pendaries, Valérie; Zanta-Boussif, Maria A; Décha, Audrey; Pironon, Nathalie; Tonasso, Laure; Mejia, José E; Brice, Agnes; Danos, Olivier; Hovnanian, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL7A1 encoding type VII collagen which forms key structures (anchoring fibrils) for dermal–epidermal adherence. Patients suffer since birth from skin blistering, and develop severe local and systemic complications resulting in poor prognosis. We lack a specific treatment for RDEB, but ex vivo gene transfer to epidermal stem cells shows a therapeutic potential. To minimize the risk of oncogenic events, we have developed new minimal self-inactivating (SIN) retroviral vectors in which the COL7A1 complementary DNA (cDNA) is under the control of the human elongation factor 1α (EF1α) or COL7A1 promoters. We show efficient ex vivo genetic correction of primary RDEB keratinocytes and fibroblasts without antibiotic selection, and use either of these genetically corrected cells to generate human skin equivalents (SEs) which were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. We achieved long-term expression of recombinant type VII collagen with restored dermal–epidermal adherence and anchoring fibril formation, demonstrating in vivo functional correction. In few cases, rearranged proviruses were detected, which were probably generated during the retrotranscription process. Despite this observation which should be taken under consideration for clinical application, this preclinical study paves the way for a therapy based on grafting the most severely affected skin areas of patients with fully autologous SEs genetically corrected using a SIN COL7A1 retroviral vector. PMID:20485266

  10. Two novel mutations on exon 8 and intron 65 of COL7A1 gene in two Chinese brothers result in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Chen, Xue-Jun; Liu, Wei; Gong, Bo; Xie, Jun; Xiong, Jun-Hao; Cheng, Jing; Duan, Xi-Ling; Lin, Zhao-Chun; Huang, Lu-Lin; Wan, Hui-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Qi; Song, Lin-Hong; Yang, Zheng-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is an inherited bullous dermatosis caused by the COL7A1 gene mutation in autosomal dominant or recessive mode. COL7A1 gene encodes type VII collagen - the main component of the anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction. Besides the 730 mutations reported, we identified two novel COL7A1 gene mutations in a Chinese family, which caused recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). The diagnosis was established histopathologically and ultrastructurally. After genomic DNA extraction from the peripheral blood sample of all subjects (5 pedigree members and 136 unrelated control individuals), COL7A1 gene screening was performed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct DNA sequencing of the whole coding exons and flanking intronic regions. Genetic analysis of the COL7A1 gene in affected individuals revealed compound heterozygotes with identical novel mutations. The maternal mutation is a 2-bp deletion at exon 8 (c.1006_1007delCA), leading to a subsequent reading frame-shift and producing a premature termination codon located 48 amino acids downstream in exon 9 (p.Q336EfsX48), consequently resulting in the truncation of 2561 amino acids downstream. This was only present in two affected brothers, but not in the other unaffected family members. The paternal mutation is a 1-bp deletion occurring at the first base of intron 65 (c.IVS5568+1delG) that deductively changes the strongly conserved GT dinucleotide at the 5' donor splice site, results in subsequent reading-through into intron 65, and creates a stop codon immediately following the amino acids encoded by exon 65 (GTAA→TAA). This is predicted to produce a truncated protein lacking of 1089 C-terminal amino acids downstream. The latter mutation was found in all family members except one of the two unaffected sisters. Both mutations were observed concurrently only in the two affected brothers. Neither mutation was discovered in 136 unrelated Chinese control

  11. One Novel Frameshift Mutation on Exon 64 of COL7A1 Gene in an Iranian Individual Suffering Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    Khaniani, Mahmoud Shekari; Sohrabi, Nasrin; Derakhshan, Neda Mansoori; Derakhshan, Sima Mansoori

    2015-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is an extremely rare subtype of bullous dermatosis caused by the COL7A1 gene mutation. After genomic DNA extraction from the peripheral blood sample of all subjects (3 pedigree members and 3 unrelated control individuals), COL7A1 gene screening was performed by PCR amplification and direct DNA sequencing of all of the coding exons and flanking intronic regions. Genetic analysis of the COL7A1 gene in an affected individual revealed a novel mutation: c.5493delG (p.K1831Nfs*10) in exon 64 of the COL7A1 gene in homozygous state. This mutation was not discovered in 3 unrelated Iranian control individuals. These data suggest that c.5493delG may influence the phenotype of RDEB. The result of this case report contributes to the expanding database on COL7A1 mutations.

  12. Gene-Corrected Fibroblast Therapy for Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa using a Self-Inactivating COL7A1 Retroviral Vector.

    PubMed

    Jacków, Joanna; Titeux, Matthias; Portier, Soizic; Charbonnier, Soëli; Ganier, Clarisse; Gaucher, Sonia; Hovnanian, Alain

    2016-07-01

    Patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) lack type VII collagen and therefore have severely impaired dermal-epidermal stability causing recurrent skin and mucosal blistering. There is currently no specific approved treatment for RDEB. We present preclinical data showing that intradermal injections of genetically corrected patient-derived RDEB fibroblasts using a Good Manufacturing Practices grade self-inactivating COL7A1 retroviral vector reverse the disease phenotype in a xenograft model in nude mice. We obtained 50% transduction efficiency in primary human RDEB fibroblasts with an average low copy number (range = 1-2) of integrated provirus. Transduced fibroblasts showed strong type VII collagen re-expression, improved adhesion properties, normal proliferative capabilities, and viability in vitro. We show that a single intradermal injection of 3 × 10(6) genetically corrected RDEB fibroblasts beneath RDEB skin equivalents grafted onto mice allows type VII collagen deposition, anchoring fibril formation at the dermal-epidermal junction, and improved dermal-epidermal adherence 2 months after treatment, supporting functional correction in vivo. Gene-corrected fibroblasts previously showed no tumorigenicity. These data show the efficacy and safety of gene-corrected fibroblast therapy using a self-inactivating vector that has now been good manufacturing grade-certified and pave the way for clinical translation to treat nonhealing wounds in RDEB patients. PMID:26994967

  13. A COL7A1 Mutation Causes Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa in Rotes Höhenvieh Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Menoud, Annie; Welle, Monika; Tetens, Jens; Lichtner, Peter; Drögemüller, Cord

    2012-01-01

    We identified a congenital mechanobullous skin disorder in six calves on a single farm of an endangered German cattle breed in 2010. The condition presented as a large loss of skin distal to the fetlocks and at the mucosa of the muzzle. All affected calves were euthanized on humane grounds due to the severity, extent and progression of the skin and oral lesions. Examination of skin samples under light microscopy revealed detachment of the epidermis from the dermis at the level of the dermo epidermal junction, leading to the diagnosis of a subepidermal bullous dermatosis such as epidermolysis bullosa. The pedigree was consistent with monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance. We localized the causative mutation to an 18 Mb interval on chromosome 22 by homozygosity mapping. The COL7A1 gene encoding collagen type VII alpha 1 is located within this interval and COL7A1 mutations have been shown to cause inherited dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) in humans. A SNP in the bovine COL7A1 exon 49 (c.4756C>T) was perfectly associated with the observed disease. The homozygous mutant T/T genotype was exclusively present in affected calves and their parents were heterozygous C/T confirming the assumed recessive mode of inheritance. All known cases and genotyped carriers were related to a single cow, which is supposed to be the founder animal. The mutant T allele was absent in 63 animals from 24 cattle breeds. The identified mutation causes a premature stop codon which leads to a truncated protein representing a complete loss of COL7A1 function (p.R1586*). We thus have identified a candidate causative mutation for this genetic disease using only three cases to unravel its molecular basis. Selection against this mutation can now be used to eliminate the mutant allele from the Rotes Höhenvieh breed. PMID:22715415

  14. Localization of a gene for autosomal dominant Larsen syndrome to chromosome region 3p21.1-14.1 in the proximity of, but distinct from the COL7A1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Vujic, M.; Hallstensson, K.; Wahlstroem, J.

    1995-11-01

    Larsen syndrome (LS) is a skeletal dysplasia (osteochondrodysplasia) in which multiple dislocations of the large joints are the major feature. Nosology in this group of diseases, which constitutes 8% of Mendelian disorders in man, is primarily based on clinical and radiographic features. Hopes for more accurate classification grounds are currently being met by progress in elucidation of underlying genetic defects. We have performed linkage analysis in a large Swedish kindred with autosomal dominant LS and found the gene (LAR1) to be strongly linked to chromosome 3p markers (Z{sub max} = 13.4 at {theta} = .00). Recombination analysis indicates that the LAR1 locus is located in a region defined distally by D3S1581 and proximally by D3S1600, which cytogenetically maps to chromosome region 3p21.1-14.1. Linkage and recombination analysis of a COL7A1 PvuII intragenic polymorphism versus LS and chromosome 3 markers indicate that COL7A1 is located close to, but distinct from, the LAR1 locus. 33 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Compound heterozygosity for COL7A1 mutations in twins with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: A recessive paternal deletion/insertion mutation and a dominant negative maternal glycine substitution result in a severe phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J.; Anton-Lamprecht, I.; Ebschner, U.; Amano, S.; Burgeson, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    We have previously demonstrated genetic linkage between the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) and the dominant (DDEB) and recessive (RDEB) forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) and have subsequently identified pathogenetic mutations in several families. Mutations in DDEB identified thus far are glycine substitutions in the collagenous domain of COL7A1, while the most severe forms of RDEB result from premature termination codon (PTC) mutations on both alleles. In this study, we performed mutation analysis in the COL7A1 gene in twins who displayed a severe DEB phenotype. Mutational analysis revealed a paternal 2-bp deletion/1-bp insertion in exon 56, designated 5103CC{yields}G, which results in a frameshift and downstream PTC. Analysis of the maternal COL7A1 allele revealed a glycine-to-arginine substitution in exon 91 (G2351R). Careful questioning of the mother revealed that she and her father had a history of shedding of toenails and occasional poorly heating erosions, consistent with a mild form of DDEB. Immunoprecipitation of type VII collagen from fibroblasts of the twins revealed a marked reduction in intracellular protein production, consistent with the drastic reduction in mRNA transcript from the paternal mutant allele, while the majority of polypeptides bearing the glycine substitution appeared to be degraded intracellularly. Thus, the severe RDEB phenotype in the probands results from compound heterozygosity for one glycine substitution and one PTC mutation in COL7A1. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Analysis of the functional consequences of targeted exon deletion in COL7A1 reveals prospects for dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa therapy.

    PubMed

    Bornert, Olivier; Kühl, Tobias; Bremer, Jeroen; van den Akker, Peter C; Pasmooij, Anna Mg; Nyström, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Genetically evoked deficiency of collagen VII causes dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB)-a debilitating disease characterized by chronic skin fragility and progressive fibrosis. Removal of exons carrying frame-disrupting mutations can reinstate protein expression in genetic diseases. The therapeutic potential of this approach is critically dependent on gene, protein, and disease intrinsic factors. Naturally occurring exon skipping in COL7A1, translating collagen VII, suggests that skipping of exons containing disease-causing mutations may be feasible for the treatment of DEB. However, despite a primarily in-frame arrangement of exons in the COL7A1 gene, no general conclusion of the aptitude of exon skipping for DEB can be drawn, since regulation of collagen VII functionality is complex involving folding, intra- and intermolecular interactions. To directly address this, we deleted two conceptually important exons located at both ends of COL7A1, exon 13, containing recurrent mutations, and exon 105, predicted to impact folding. The resulting recombinantly expressed proteins showed conserved functionality in biochemical and in vitro assays. Injected into DEB mice, the proteins promoted skin stability. By demonstrating functionality of internally deleted collagen VII variants, our study provides support of targeted exon deletion or skipping as a potential therapy to treat a large number of individuals with DEB. PMID:27157667

  17. Compound heterozygosity for COL7A1 mutations in twins with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: a recessive paternal deletion/insertion mutation and a dominant negative maternal glycine substitution result in a severe phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Christiano, A. M.; Anton-Lamprecht, I.; Amano, S.; Ebschner, U.; Burgeson, R. E.; Uitto, J.

    1996-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated genetic linkage between the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) and the dominant (DDEB) and recessive (RDEB) forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) and have subsequently identified pathogenetic mutations in several families. Mutations in DDEB identified thus far are glycine substitutions in the collagenous domain of COL7A1, while the most severe forms of RDEB result from premature termination codon (PTC) mutations on both alleles. In this study, we performed mutation analysis in the COL7A1 gene in twins who displayed a severe DEB phenotype. Mutational analysis revealed a paternal 2-bp deletion/1-bp insertion in exon 56, designated 5103CC-->G, which results in a frameshift and downstream PTC. Analysis of the maternal COL7A1 allele revealed a glycine-to-arginine substitution in exon 91 (G2351R). Careful questioning of the mother revealed that she and her father had a history of shedding of toenails and occasional poorly healing erosions, consistent with a mild form of DDEB. Immunoprecipitation of type VII collagen from fibroblasts of the twins revealed a marked reduction in intracellular protein production, consistent with the drastic reduction in mRNA transcript from the paternal mutant allele, while the majority of polypeptides bearing the glycine substitution appeared to be degraded intracellularly. Thus, the severe RDEB phenotype in the probands results from compound heterozygosity for one glycine substitution and one PTC mutation in COL7A1. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8644730

  18. Case Report: Whole exome sequencing reveals a novel frameshift deletion mutation p.G2254fs in COL7A1 associated with autosomal recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Karuthedath Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen; Jayarajan, Rijith; Verma, Ankit; Nair, Sreelata; Ravi, Rowmika; Senthivel, Vigneshwar; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa simplex (DEB) is a phenotypically diverse inherited skin fragility disorder. It is majorly manifested by appearance of epidermal bullae upon friction caused either by physical or environmental trauma. The phenotypic manifestations also include appearance of milia, scarring all over the body and nail dystrophy. DEB can be inherited in a recessive or dominant form and the recessive form of DEB (RDEB) is more severe. In the present study, we identify a novel p.G2254fs mutation in COL7A1 gene causing a sporadic case of RDEB by whole exome sequencing (WES). Apart from adding a novel frameshift Collagen VII mutation to the repertoire of known mutations reported in the disease, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a genetically characterized case of DEB from India. PMID:27408687

  19. Type VII collagen deficiency causes defective tooth enamel formation due to poor differentiation of ameloblasts.

    PubMed

    Umemoto, Hiroko; Akiyama, Masashi; Domon, Takanori; Nomura, Toshifumi; Shinkuma, Satoru; Ito, Kei; Asaka, Takuya; Sawamura, Daisuke; Uitto, Jouni; Uo, Motohiro; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding type VII collagen (COL7), a major component of anchoring fibrils in the epidermal basement membrane zone. Patients with RDEB present a low oral hygiene index and prevalent tooth abnormalities with caries. We examined the tooth enamel structure of an RDEB patient by scanning electron microscopy. It showed irregular enamel prisms, indicating structural enamel defects. To elucidate the pathomechanisms of enamel defects due to COL7 deficiency, we investigated tooth formation in Col7a1(-/-) and COL7-rescued humanized mice that we have established. The enamel from Col7a1(-/-) mice had normal surface structure. The enamel calcification and chemical composition of Col7a1(-/-) mice were similar to those of the wild type. However, transverse sections of teeth from the Col7a1(-/-) mice showed irregular enamel prisms, which were also observed in the RDEB patient. Furthermore, the Col7a1(-/-) mice teeth had poorly differentiated ameloblasts, lacking normal enamel protein-secreting Tomes' processes, and showed reduced mRNA expression of amelogenin and other enamel-related molecules. These enamel abnormalities were corrected in the COL7-rescued humanized mice expressing a human COL7A1 transgene. These findings suggest that COL7 regulates ameloblast differentiation and is essential for the formation of Tomes' processes. Collectively, COL7 deficiency is thought to disrupt epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, leading to defective ameloblast differentiation and enamel malformation in RDEB patients.

  20. Human type VII collagen: cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Parente, M.G.; Chung, L.C.; Ryynaenen, J.; Monli Chu; Uitto, J. ); Woodley, D.T.; Wynn, K.C.; Bauer, E.A. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1991-08-15

    A human keratinocyte cDNA expression library in bacteriophage {lambda}gt11 was screened with the purified IgG fraction of serum from a patient with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, which had a high titer of anti-type VII collagen antibodies. Screening of {approx}3 {times} 10{sup 5} plaques identified 8 positive clones, the largest one (K-131) being {approx}1.9 kilobases in size. Dideoxynucleotide sequencing of K-131 indicated that it consisted of 1875 base pairs and contained an open reading frame coding for a putative N-terminal noncollagenous domain of 439 amino acids and a collagenous domain was characterized by repeating Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequences that were interrupted in several positions by insertions or deletions of 1-3 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence also revealed a peptide segment that had a high degree of identity with a published type VII collagen protein sequence. The results mapped the COL7A1 to the locus 3p21. The cDNA clones characterized in this study will be valuable for understanding the protein structure and gene expression of type VII collagen present in anchoring fibrils and its aberrations in the dystrophic forms of heritable epidermolysis bullosa.

  1. Cloning of an annelid fibrillar-collagen gene and phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate and invertebrate collagens.

    PubMed

    Sicot, F X; Exposito, J Y; Masselot, M; Garrone, R; Deutsch, J; Gaill, F

    1997-05-15

    Arenicola marina possesses cuticular and interstitial collagens, which are mostly synthesised by its epidermis. A cDNA library was constructed from the body wall. This annelid cDNA library was screened with a sea-urchin-collagen cDNA probe, and several overlapping clones were isolated. Nucleotide sequencing of these clones revealed an open reading frame of 2052 nucleotides. The translation product exhibits a triple helical domain of 138 Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats followed by a 269-residue-long C-terminal non-collagenous domain (C-propeptide). The triple helical domain exhibits an imperfection that has been previously described in a peptide produced by cyanogen bromide digestion (CNBr peptide) of A. marina interstitial collagen. This imperfection occurs at the same place in the interstitial collagen of the vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila. This identifies the clone as coding for the C-terminal part of a fibrillar collagen chain. It was called FAm1alpha, for fibrillar collagen 1alpha chain of A. marina. The non-collagenous domain possesses a structure similar to carboxy-terminal propeptides of fibrillar pro-alpha chains. Only six conserved cysteine residues are observed in A. marina compared with seven or eight in all other known C-propeptides. This provides information on the importance of disulfide bonds in C-propeptide interactions and in the collagen-assembly process. Phylogenetic studies indicate that the fibrillar collagen 1alpha chain of A. marina is homologous to the R. pachyptila interstitial collagen and that the FAm1alpha gene evolved independently from the other alpha-chain genes. Complementary analyses indicate that the vertebrate fibrillar collagen family is composed of two monophyletic subgroups with a specific position of the collagen type-V chains. PMID:9210465

  2. [Osteochondrodysplasia determined genetically by a collagen type II gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Czarny-Ratajczak, M; Rogala, P; Wolnik-Brzozowska, D; Latos-Bieleńska, A

    2001-01-01

    Chondrodysplasias are a heterogenous group of skeletal dysplasias, affecting the growing cartilage. The main part of chondrodysplasias is caused by mutations in various types of collagen genes. The current classification within this group of disorder relies on clinical, histological and radiographic features. Type II collagenopathies comprise part of chondrodysplasias, consisting of hereditary disorders caused by defects in the type II collagen. Collagen type II is coded by a large gene--COL2A1. The chromosomal location for the human COL2A1 gene is 12q13.11-q13.12. Defects in collagen type II are caused by point mutations in the COL2A1 gene. Type II collagenopathies form a wide spectrum of clinical severity ranging from lethal achondrogenesis type II, hypochondrogenesis, through severe forms like spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia congenita, Marshall syndrome, to the mild forms--Stickler syndrome and early osteoarthritis. The pathological changes in the patients are observed in the growth plate, nucleus pulposus and vitreous body, where the abnormal collagen type II is distributed. This article presents the genetic background of collagenopathies type II and the results of current molecular studies of the patients. Both the molecular and the clinical studies may promise a better understanding of the relationship between the genotype and the phenotype. We present the patients, who were diagnosed at the Department of Medical Genetics and in the Orthopaedic Department in Poznań. PMID:11481990

  3. d-alpha-tocopherol inhibits collagen alpha 1(I) gene expression in cultured human fibroblasts. Modulation of constitutive collagen gene expression by lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Houglum, K; Brenner, D A; Chojkier, M

    1991-01-01

    Ascorbic acid stimulates collagen gene transcription in cultured fibroblasts, and this effect is mediated through the induction of lipid peroxidation by ascorbic acid. Quiescent cultured fibroblasts in the absence of ascorbic acid have a high constitutive level of collagen production, but the mechanisms of collagen gene regulation in this unstimulated state are not known. Because lipid peroxidation also occurs in normal cells, we wondered if lipid peroxidation plays a role in the regulation of basal collagen gene expression. Inhibition of lipid peroxidation in cultured human fibroblasts with d-alpha-tocopherol or methylene blue decreased the synthesis of collagen, the steady-state levels of procollagen alpha 1(I) mRNA and the transcription of the procollagen alpha 1(I) gene. This effect on collagen gene expression was selective and not associated with cellular toxicity. Thus, these experiments suggest a role for lipid peroxidation in the modulation of constitutive collagen gene expression. Images PMID:2040703

  4. Type VII collagen regulates expression of OATP1B3, promotes front-to-rear polarity and increases structural organisation in 3D spheroid cultures of RDEB tumour keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Jasbani H S; Cole, Clare L; Pourreyron, Celine; Watt, Stephen A; Lim, Yok Zuan; Salas-Alanis, Julio C; Murrell, Dedee F; McGrath, John A; Stieger, Bruno; Jahoda, Colin; Leigh, Irene M; South, Andrew P

    2014-02-15

    Type VII collagen is the main component of anchoring fibrils, structures that are integral to basement membrane homeostasis in skin. Mutations in the gene encoding type VII collagen COL7A1 cause recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) an inherited skin blistering condition complicated by frequent aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). OATP1B3, which is encoded by the gene SLCO1B3, is a member of the OATP (organic anion transporting polypeptide) superfamily responsible for transporting a wide range of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. OATP1B3 expression is limited to the liver in healthy tissues, but is frequently detected in multiple cancer types and is reported to be associated with differing clinical outcome. The mechanism and functional significance of tumour-specific expression of OATP1B3 has yet to be determined. Here, we identify SLCO1B3 expression in tumour keratinocytes isolated from RDEB and UV-induced cSCC and demonstrate that SLCO1B3 expression and promoter activity are modulated by type VII collagen. We show that reduction of SLCO1B3 expression upon expression of full-length type VII collagen in RDEB cSCC coincides with acquisition of front-to-rear polarity and increased organisation of 3D spheroid cultures. In addition, we show that type VII collagen positively regulates the abundance of markers implicated in cellular polarity, namely ELMO2, PAR3, E-cadherin, B-catenin, ITGA6 and Ln332. PMID:24357722

  5. Regulation of collagen I gene expression by ras.

    PubMed Central

    Slack, J L; Parker, M I; Robinson, V R; Bornstein, P

    1992-01-01

    Although transformation of rodent fibroblasts can lead to dramatic changes in expression of extracellular matrix genes, the molecular basis and physiological significance of these changes remain poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism(s) by which ras affects expression of the genes encoding type I collagen. Levels of both alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) collagen mRNAs were markedly reduced in Rat 1 fibroblasts overexpressing either the N-rasLys-61 or the Ha-rasVal-12 oncogene. In fibroblasts conditionally transformed with N-rasLys-61, alpha 1(I) transcript levels began to decline within 8 h of ras induction and reached 1 to 5% of control levels after 96 h. In contrast, overexpression of normal ras p21 had no effect on alpha 1(I) or alpha 2(I) mRNA levels. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that the transcription rates of both the alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) genes were significantly reduced in ras-transformed cells compared with those in parental cells. In addition, the alpha 1(I) transcript was less stable in transformed cells. Chimeric plasmids containing up to 3.6 kb of alpha 1(I) 5'-flanking DNA and up to 2.3 kb of the 3'-flanking region were expressed at equivalent levels in both normal and ras-transformed fibroblasts. However, a cosmid clone containing the entire mouse alpha 1(I) gene, including 3.7 kb of 5'- and 4 kb of 3'-flanking DNA, was expressed at reduced levels in fibroblasts overexpressing oncogenic ras. We conclude that oncogenic ras regulates the type I collagen genes at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels and that this effect, at least for the alpha 1(I) gene, may be mediated by sequences located either within the body of the gene itself or in the distal 3'-flanking region. Images PMID:1406656

  6. Collagen protein abnormalities produced by site-directed mutagenesis of the pro alpha 1(I) gene.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Mascara, T; Cole, W G; Stacey, A; Jaenisch, R

    1989-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of collagen genes offers a powerful new approach for studying structure-function relationships. The construction of engineered mutant collagen genes coding for glycine substitutions and their expression giving rise to the osteogenesis imperfecta type II phenotype in cells and transgenic mice has recently been achieved. This paper further defines the molecular abnormalities of collagen and bone pathology resulting from the expression of the mutant genes.

  7. Complete structural organization of the human {alpha}1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1): Divergence from the conserved organization of other characterized fibrillar collagen genes

    SciTech Connect

    Takahara, Kazuhiko; Hoffman, G.G.; Greenspan, D.S.

    1995-10-10

    Genes that encode the vertebrate fibrillar collagen types I-III have previously been shown to share a highly conserved intron/exon organization, thought to reflect common ancestry and evolutionary pressures at the protein level. We report here the complete intron/exon organization of COL5A1, the human gene that encodes the {alpha}1 chain of fibrillar collagen type V. The structure of COL5A1 is shown to be considerably diverged from the conserved structure of the genes for fibrillar collagen types I-III. COL5A1 has 66 exons, which is greater than the number of exons found in the genes for collagen types I-III. The increased number of exons is partly due to the increased size of the pro-{alpha}1(V) N-propeptide, relative to the sizes of the N-propeptides of the types I-III procollagen molecules. In addition, however, the increased number of exons is due to differences in the intron/exon organization of the triple-helix coding region of COL5A1 compared to the organization of the triple-helix coding regions of the genes for collagen types I-III. Of particular interest is the increase of 54 bp exons in this region of COL5A1, strongly supporting the proposal that the triple-helix coding regions of fibrillar collagen genes evolved from duplication of a 54 bp primordial genetic element. Moreover, comparison of the structure of COL5A1 to the highly conserved structure of the genes of collagen types I-III provides insights into the probable structure of the ancestral gene that gave rise to what appears to be two classes of vertebrate fibrillar collagen genes. 50 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Deep RNA profiling identified CLOCK and molecular clock genes as pathophysiological signatures in collagen VI myopathy.

    PubMed

    Scotton, Chiara; Bovolenta, Matteo; Schwartz, Elena; Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Martoni, Elena; Passarelli, Chiara; Armaroli, Annarita; Osman, Hana; Rodolico, Carmelo; Messina, Sonia; Pegoraro, Elena; D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico; Gualandi, Francesca; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Boffi, Patrizia; Maioli, Maria Antonietta; Lochmüller, Hanns; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Katherine; Castrignanò, Tiziana; Pesole, Graziano; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Merlini, Luciano; Braghetta, Paola; Bonaldo, Paolo; Bernardi, Paolo; Foley, Reghan; Cirak, Sebahattin; Zaharieva, Irina; Muntoni, Francesco; Capitanio, Daniele; Gelfi, Cecilia; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Yuryev, Anton; Lebowitz, Michael; Zhang, Xiping; Hodge, Brian A; Esser, Karyn A; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2016-04-15

    Collagen VI myopathies are genetic disorders caused by mutations in collagen 6 A1, A2 and A3 genes, ranging from the severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy to the milder Bethlem myopathy, which is recapitulated by collagen-VI-null (Col6a1(-/-)) mice. Abnormalities in mitochondria and autophagic pathway have been proposed as pathogenic causes of collagen VI myopathies, but the link between collagen VI defects and these metabolic circuits remains unknown. To unravel the expression profiling perturbation in muscles with collagen VI myopathies, we performed a deep RNA profiling in both Col6a1(-/-)mice and patients with collagen VI pathology. The interactome map identified common pathways suggesting a previously undetected connection between circadian genes and collagen VI pathology. Intriguingly, Bmal1(-/-)(also known as Arntl) mice, a well-characterized model displaying arrhythmic circadian rhythms, showed profound deregulation of the collagen VI pathway and of autophagy-related genes. The involvement of circadian rhythms in collagen VI myopathies is new and links autophagy and mitochondrial abnormalities. It also opens new avenues for therapies of hereditary myopathies to modulate the molecular clock or potential gene-environment interactions that might modify muscle damage pathogenesis.

  9. Rescue of type I collagen-deficient phenotype by retroviral-vector-mediated transfer of human pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene into Mov-13 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, A; Mulligan, R; Jaenisch, R

    1987-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone corresponding to the human pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene was isolated and inserted into a retrovirus vector. Cell lines were obtained which produced recombinant viruses transducing the collagen cDNA (HUC virus). To test whether the transduced cDNA was functional, Mov-13 mouse cells were infected with the virus. These cells do not produce any type I collagen due to an insertional mutation of the pro alpha 1(I) gene which blocks transcription. While normal amounts of pro alpha 2(I) RNA were synthesized, no alpha 2(I) collagen chains were detectable in the mutant Mov-13 cells. Infection with HUC virus, however, resulted in the production of stable type I collagen, which was secreted into the medium. Analysis of pepsin-resistant proteins indicated that interspecies heterotrimers consisting of human alpha 1(I) and mouse alpha 2(I) collagen chains were secreted by the infected Mov-13 cells. Our results show that pro alpha (I) collagen chains from species as distant as human and mouse can associate to form stable type I collagen. The availability of a retrovirus vector transducing a functional pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene combined with the Mov-13 mutant system should enable us to study the effect of specific mutations on the synthesis, assembly, and function of type I collagen, not only in tissue culture but also in the animal. Images PMID:3599181

  10. The mouse collagen X gene: complete nucleotide sequence, exon structure and expression pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Elima, K; Eerola, I; Rosati, R; Metsäranta, M; Garofalo, S; Perälä, M; De Crombrugghe, B; Vuorio, E

    1993-01-01

    Overlapping genomic clones covering the 7.2 kb mouse alpha 1(X) collagen gene, 0.86 kb of promoter and 1.25 kb of 3'-flanking sequences were isolated from two genomic libraries and characterized by nucleotide sequencing. Typical features of the gene include a unique three-exon structure, similar to that in the chick gene, with the entire triple-helical domain of 463 amino acids coded by a single large exon. The highest degree of amino acid and nucleotide sequence conservation was seen in the coding region for the collagenous and C-terminal non-collagenous domains between the mouse and known chick, bovine and human collagen type X sequences. More divergence between the sequences occurred in the N-terminal non-collagenous domain. Similarity between the mammalian collagen X sequences extended into the 3'-untranslated sequence, particularly near the polyadenylation site. The promoter of the mouse collagen X gene was found to contain two TATAA boxes 159 bp apart; primer extension analyses of the transcription start site revealed that both were functional. The promoter has an unusual structure with a very low G + C content of 28% between positions -220 and -1 of the upstream transcription start site. Northern and in situ hybridization analyses confirmed that the expression of the alpha 1(X) collagen gene is restricted to hypertrophic chondrocytes in tissues undergoing endochondral calcification. The detailed sequence information of the gene is useful for studies on the promoter activity of the gene and for generation of transgenic mice. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8424763

  11. Cbfa1 contributes to the osteoblast-specific expression of type I collagen genes.

    PubMed

    Kern, B; Shen, J; Starbuck, M; Karsenty, G

    2001-03-01

    Type I collagen is composed of two chains, alpha1(I) and alpha2(I), encoded by two distinct genes, the alpha1(I) and alpha2(I) collagen genes, that are highly expressed in osteoblasts. In most physiological situations, alpha1(I) and alpha2(I) collagen expression is coregulated, suggesting that identical transcription factors control their expression. Here, we studied the role of Cbfa1, an osteoblast-specific transcription factor, in the control of alpha1(I) and alpha2(I) collagen expression in osteoblasts. A consensus Cbfa1-binding site, termed OSE2, is present at the same location in the alpha1(I) collagen promoter at approximately -1347 base pairs (bp) of the rat, mouse, and human genes. Cbfa1 can bind to this site, as demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and supershift experiments using an anti-Cbfa1 antibody. Mutagenesis of the alpha1(I) collagen OSE2 at -1347 bp reduced the activity of a alpha1(I) collagen promoter fragment 2- to 3-fold. Moreover, multimers of this OSE2 at -1347bp confer osteoblast-specific activity to a minimum alpha1(I) collagen promoter fragment in DNA transfection experiments as well as in transgenic mice. An additional Cbfa1-binding element is present in the alpha1(I) collagen promoter of mouse, rat, and human at approximately position -372. This site binds Cbfa1 only weakly and does not act as a cis-acting activator of transcription when tested in DNA transfection experiments. Similar to alpha1(I) collagen, the mouse alpha2(I) collagen gene contains multiple OSE2 sites, of which one is conserved across multiple species. In EMSA, Cbfa1 binds to this site and multimers of this alpha2(I) OSE2 element confer osteoblast-specific activity to the minimum alpha1(I) collagen promoter in DNA transfection experiments. Thus, our results suggest that Cbfa1 is one of the positive regulators of the osteoblast-specific expression of both type I collagen genes. PMID:11106645

  12. Effect of orally administered collagen hydrolysate on gene expression profiles in mouse skin: a DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Oba, Chisato; Ito, Kyoko; Ichikawa, Satomi; Morifuji, Masashi; Nakai, Yuji; Ishijima, Tomoko; Abe, Keiko; Kawahata, Keiko

    2015-08-01

    Dietary collagen hydrolysate has been hypothesized to improve skin barrier function. To investigate the effect of long-term collagen hydrolysate administration on the skin, we evaluated stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity in intrinsically aged mice. Female hairless mice were fed a control diet or a collagen hydrolysate-containing diet for 12 wk. Stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity were gradually decreased in chronologically aged control mice. Intake of collagen hydrolysate significantly suppressed such changes. Moreover, we used DNA microarrays to analyze gene expression in the skin of mice that had been administered collagen hydrolysate. Twelve weeks after the start of collagen intake, no significant differences appeared in the gene expression profile compared with the control group. However, 1 wk after administration, 135 genes were upregulated and 448 genes were downregulated in the collagen group. This suggests that gene changes preceded changes of barrier function and elasticity. We focused on several genes correlated with functional changes in the skin. Gene Ontology terms related to epidermal cell development were significantly enriched in upregulated genes. These skin function-related genes had properties that facilitate epidermal production and differentiation while suppressing dermal degradation. In conclusion, our results suggest that altered gene expression at the early stages after collagen administration affects skin barrier function and mechanical properties. Long-term oral intake of collagen hydrolysate improves skin dysfunction by regulating genes related to production and maintenance of skin tissue.

  13. Collagen duplicate genes of bone and cartilage participate during regeneration of zebrafish fin skeleton.

    PubMed

    Duran, I; Csukasi, F; Taylor, S P; Krakow, D; Becerra, J; Bombarely, A; Marí-Beffa, M

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish fin is widely used as a model for skeleton regeneration. For years, the nature of the fin skeleton has been controversial as its extracellular matrix shows hybrid characteristics of both bone and cartilage. The presence of co-orthologs genes also increases the complexity of these tissues. In this article, we have identified and described the expression of fibrillar collagens in zebrafish fin skeleton. We found that genes coding for types I, II, V, XI and XXVII collagens are duplicated, showing in several cases, different expression domains. We also identified specific genomic features, such as the presence of type XXIV collagen and the absence of type III collagen in the zebrafish genome. Our study showed that actinotrichia-forming cells and osteoblasts synthesize a wide variety of these fibrillar collagens during fin regeneration. An intertrichial domain expressing most of the collagens was located in the transition between the mesenchyme condensations of actinotrichia and lepidotrichia and may determine an important niche associated with fin skeleton morphogenesis. We also confirmed the hybrid nature of the fin exoskeleton and provided a complete description of those fibrillar collagens expressed during the formation of the fin skeleton. PMID:26256560

  14. Collagen duplicate genes of bone and cartilage participate during regeneration of zebrafish fin skeleton.

    PubMed

    Duran, I; Csukasi, F; Taylor, S P; Krakow, D; Becerra, J; Bombarely, A; Marí-Beffa, M

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish fin is widely used as a model for skeleton regeneration. For years, the nature of the fin skeleton has been controversial as its extracellular matrix shows hybrid characteristics of both bone and cartilage. The presence of co-orthologs genes also increases the complexity of these tissues. In this article, we have identified and described the expression of fibrillar collagens in zebrafish fin skeleton. We found that genes coding for types I, II, V, XI and XXVII collagens are duplicated, showing in several cases, different expression domains. We also identified specific genomic features, such as the presence of type XXIV collagen and the absence of type III collagen in the zebrafish genome. Our study showed that actinotrichia-forming cells and osteoblasts synthesize a wide variety of these fibrillar collagens during fin regeneration. An intertrichial domain expressing most of the collagens was located in the transition between the mesenchyme condensations of actinotrichia and lepidotrichia and may determine an important niche associated with fin skeleton morphogenesis. We also confirmed the hybrid nature of the fin exoskeleton and provided a complete description of those fibrillar collagens expressed during the formation of the fin skeleton.

  15. Gene expression analysis in patients with traumatic anterior shoulder instability suggests deregulation of collagen genes.

    PubMed

    Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Cohen, Carina; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Smith, Marília Cardoso; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2014-10-01

    Shoulder dislocation occurs in 1-2% of the population. Capsular deformation is a key factor in shoulder dislocation; however, little is known about capsule biology. We evaluated, for the first time in literature, the expression of COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1 and COL5A1 in the antero-inferior, antero-superior and posterior regions of the glenohumeral capsule of 31 patients with anterior shoulder instability and eight controls. The expression of collagen genes was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. The expression of COL1A1, COL3A1 and the ratio of COL1A1/COL1A2 were increased in all three portions of the capsule in patients compared to controls (p < 0.05). COL1A2 expression was upregulated in the antero-superior and posterior sites of the capsule of patients (p < 0.05). The ratio of COL1A2/COL3A1 expression was reduced in capsule antero-inferior and posterior sites of patients compared to controls (p < 0.05). In the capsule antero-inferior site of patients, the ratios of COL1A1/COL5A1, CO1A2/COL5A1 and COL3A1/COL5A1 expression were increased (p < 0.05). In patients, COL1A1/COL5A1 was also increased in the posterior site (p < 0.05). We found deregulated expression of collagen genes across the capsule of shoulder instability patients. These molecular alterations may lead to modifications of collagen fibril structure and impairment of the healing process, possibly with a role in capsular deformation. PMID:25042113

  16. Perinatal lethal osteogenesis imperfecta in transgenic mice bearing an engineered mutant pro-alpha 1(I) collagen gene.

    PubMed

    Stacey, A; Bateman, J; Choi, T; Mascara, T; Cole, W; Jaenisch, R

    1988-03-10

    Substitutions of single glycine residues of alpha 1(I) collagen have previously been associated with the inherited disease osteogenesis imperfecta type II. Transgenic mice bearing a mutant alpha 1(I) collagen gene into which specific glycine substitutions have been engineered show a dominant lethal phenotype characteristic of the human disease, and demonstrate that as little as 10% mutant gene expression can disrupt normal collagen function.

  17. Mutations in the collagen XII gene define a new form of extracellular matrix-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Debbie; Farsani, Golara Torabi; Laval, Steven; Collins, James; Sarkozy, Anna; Martoni, Elena; Shah, Ashoke; Zou, Yaqun; Koch, Manuel; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Roberts, Mark; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Bethlem myopathy (BM) [MIM 158810] is a slowly progressive muscle disease characterized by contractures and proximal weakness, which can be caused by mutations in one of the collagen VI genes (COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3). However, there may be additional causal genes to identify as in ∼50% of BM cases no mutations in the COL6 genes are identified. In a cohort of -24 patients with a BM-like phenotype, we first sequenced 12 candidate genes based on their function, including genes for known binding partners of collagen VI, and those enzymes involved in its correct post-translational modification, assembly and secretion. Proceeding to whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified mutations in the COL12A1 gene, a member of the FACIT collagens (fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices) in five individuals from two families. Both families showed dominant inheritance with a clinical phenotype resembling classical BM. Family 1 had a single-base substitution that led to the replacement of one glycine residue in the triple-helical domain, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern, and Family 2 had a missense mutation, which created a mutant protein with an unpaired cysteine residue. Abnormality at the protein level was confirmed in both families by the intracellular retention of collagen XII in patient dermal fibroblasts. The mutation in Family 2 leads to the up-regulation of genes associated with the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and swollen, dysmorphic rough-ER. We conclude that the spectrum of causative genes in extracellular matrix (ECM)-related myopathies be extended to include COL12A1. PMID:24334769

  18. Gene Expression Profiling Identifies Molecular Pathways Associated with Collagen VI Deficiency and Provides Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Paco, Sonia; Kalko, Susana G.; Jou, Cristina; Rodríguez, María A.; Corbera, Joan; Muntoni, Francesco; Feng, Lucy; Rivas, Eloy; Torner, Ferran; Gualandi, Francesca; Gomez-Foix, Anna M.; Ferrer, Anna; Ortez, Carlos; Nascimento, Andrés; Colomer, Jaume; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), caused by collagen VI deficiency, is a common congenital muscular dystrophy. At present, the role of collagen VI in muscle and the mechanism of disease are not fully understood. To address this we have applied microarrays to analyse the transcriptome of UCMD muscle and compare it to healthy muscle and other muscular dystrophies. We identified 389 genes which are differentially regulated in UCMD relative to controls. In addition, there were 718 genes differentially expressed between UCMD and dystrophin deficient muscle. In contrast, only 29 genes were altered relative to other congenital muscular dystrophies. Changes in gene expression were confirmed by real-time PCR. The set of regulated genes was analysed by Gene Ontology, KEGG pathways and Ingenuity Pathway analysis to reveal the molecular functions and gene networks associated with collagen VI defects. The most significantly regulated pathways were those involved in muscle regeneration, extracellular matrix remodelling and inflammation. We characterised the immune response in UCMD biopsies as being mainly mediated via M2 macrophages and the complement pathway indicating that anti-inflammatory treatment may be beneficial to UCMD as for other dystrophies. We studied the immunolocalisation of ECM components and found that biglycan, a collagen VI interacting proteoglycan, was reduced in the basal lamina of UCMD patients. We propose that biglycan reduction is secondary to collagen VI loss and that it may be contributing towards UCMD pathophysiology. Consequently, strategies aimed at over-expressing biglycan and restore the link between the muscle cell surface and the extracellular matrix should be considered. PMID:24223098

  19. The human alpha 2(IV) collagen gene, COL4A2, is syntenic with the alpha 1(IV) gene, COL4A1, on chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E; Hall, V; Kurkinen, M

    1987-05-01

    We have previously assigned the gene for the alpha 1 chain of type IV collagen to chromosome 13. In this report we show that the gene coding for the second chain of this heterotrimer is on the same chromosome. This is the first example of the genes for both chains of one collagen molecule being syntenic. PMID:3674752

  20. Perineurial cells coexpress genes encoding interstitial collagens and basement membrane zone components

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Perineurial cell cultures were established from the sciatic nerves of adult Wistar rats. Highly enriched cultures were studied with respect to the production of extracellular matrix components under conditions free from the influence of Schwann cells, axons, or the extracellular matrix of peripheral nerves. Indirect immunofluorescence staining revealed the presence of collagen type IV epitopes, and electron microscopy demonstrated patches of basement membrane on the perineurial cell surfaces. Collagenous fibrils with a diameter of 15-20 nm were also observed in the intracellular space. SDS-PAGE of radiolabeled medium proteins showed a pattern of bands suggesting the synthesis and secretion of fibronectin, and type I and IV collagens. Northern hybridizations revealed characteristic polymorphic mRNA transcripts corresponding to fibronectin, laminin B2 chain, as well as to the alpha- chain subunits of type I, III, and IV collagens. Furthermore, in situ hybridizations suggested expression of these genes by cultured perineurial cells without apparent heterogeneity within the cell populations. In situ hybridizations of sciatic nerve tissue from 2-wk- old rats also suggested that perineurial cells express alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(IV) collagen, as well as laminin B2 chain genes in vivo. This profile of matrix gene expression is different from that of Schwann cells, which do not synthesize fibronectin, or that of fibroblastic cells, which do not form a cell surface basement membrane. The capability of perineurial cells to express genes for the basement membrane zone and for interstitial collagens further adds to our understanding of the functional role of perineurial cells in developing and healing peripheral nerve, as well as in certain neoplastic lesions of neural origin, such as von Recklinghausen's neurofibromas. PMID:2921281

  1. Enhanced osteoblast proliferation and collagen gene expression by estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest, M.; Schmid, Ch.; Froesch, E.R. )

    1988-04-01

    Estrogens play a crucial role in the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis. However, the mechanism by which estrogens exert their effects on bone is unknown. To examine possible direct effects of 17{beta}-estradiol on bone-forming cells, the authors used pure rat osteoblast-like cells in vitro as a model. Osteoblast-like cells prepared from calvaria of newborn rats were cultured serum-free in methylcellulose-containing medium for 21 days. Osteoblast-like cells proliferate selectively into clonally derived cell clusters of spherical morphorlogy. 17{beta}-Estradiol at concentrations of 0.1 nM and 1 nM enhanced osteoblast-like cell proliferation by 41% and 68% above vehicle-treated controls. The biologically inactive stereoisomer 17{alpha}-estradiol (same concentrations) had no effect. Moreover, the antiestrogen tamoxifen abolished the stimulation of osteoblast-like cell proliferation by 17{beta}-estradiol. After 21 days of culture, RNA was prepared and analyzed in a dot-hybridization assay for the abundance of pro{alpha}1(I) collagen mRNA. Steady-state mRNA levels were increased in cultures treated with 17{beta}-estradiol in a dose-dependent manner with maximal stimulation at 1 nM and 10 nM. At the same concentrations, the percentage of synthesized protein (labeled by ({sup 3}H)proline pulse) that was digestible by collagenase was increased, indicating that 17{beta}-estradiol acts as pretranslational levels to enhance synthesis of bone collagen. These data show that the osteoblast is a direct target for 17{beta}-estradiol.

  2. Increased Expression of Several Collagen Genes is Associated with Drug Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Januchowski, Radosław; Świerczewska, Monika; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer. The main reason for the high mortality among ovarian cancer patients is the development of drug resistance. The expression of collagen genes by cancer cells can increase drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into the cancer tissue as well as increase apoptosis resistance. In this study, we present data that shows differential expression levels of collagen genes and proteins in cisplatin- (CIS), paclitaxel- (PAC), doxorubicin- (DOX), topotecan- (TOP), vincristine- (VIN) and methotrexate- (MTX) resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to determine the mRNA levels. Protein expression was detected using Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays. In the drug resistant cell lines, we observed the upregulation of eight collagen genes at the mRNA level and based on these expression levels, we divided the collagen genes into the following three groups: 1. Genes with less than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A1, COL5A2, COL12A1 and COL17A1. 2. Genes with greater than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A2, COL15A1 and COL21A1. 3. Gene with a very high level of expression: COL3A1. Expression of collagen (COL) proteins from groups 2 and 3 were also confirmed using immunocytochemistry. Western blot analysis showed very high expression levels of COL3A1 protein, and immunocytochemistry analysis showed the presence of extracellular COL3A1 in the W1TR cell line. The cells mainly responsible for the extracellular COL3A1 production are aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) positive cells. All correlations between the types of cytostatic drugs and the expression levels of different COL genes were studied, and our results suggest that the expression of fibrillar collagens may be involved in the TOP and PAC resistance of the ovarian cancer cells. The expression pattern of COL genes provide a preliminary view into the role of these proteins in

  3. Increased Expression of Several Collagen Genes is Associated with Drug Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Januchowski, Radosław; Świerczewska, Monika; Sterzyńska, Karolina; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer. The main reason for the high mortality among ovarian cancer patients is the development of drug resistance. The expression of collagen genes by cancer cells can increase drug resistance by inhibiting the penetration of the drug into the cancer tissue as well as increase apoptosis resistance. In this study, we present data that shows differential expression levels of collagen genes and proteins in cisplatin- (CIS), paclitaxel- (PAC), doxorubicin- (DOX), topotecan- (TOP), vincristine- (VIN) and methotrexate- (MTX) resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to determine the mRNA levels. Protein expression was detected using Western blot and immunocytochemistry assays. In the drug resistant cell lines, we observed the upregulation of eight collagen genes at the mRNA level and based on these expression levels, we divided the collagen genes into the following three groups: 1. Genes with less than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A1, COL5A2, COL12A1 and COL17A1. 2. Genes with greater than a 50-fold increase in expression: COL1A2, COL15A1 and COL21A1. 3. Gene with a very high level of expression: COL3A1. Expression of collagen (COL) proteins from groups 2 and 3 were also confirmed using immunocytochemistry. Western blot analysis showed very high expression levels of COL3A1 protein, and immunocytochemistry analysis showed the presence of extracellular COL3A1 in the W1TR cell line. The cells mainly responsible for the extracellular COL3A1 production are aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) positive cells. All correlations between the types of cytostatic drugs and the expression levels of different COL genes were studied, and our results suggest that the expression of fibrillar collagens may be involved in the TOP and PAC resistance of the ovarian cancer cells. The expression pattern of COL genes provide a preliminary view into the role of these proteins in

  4. Mutation of the type X collagen gene (COL10A1) causes spondylometaphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Ikegawa, S; Nishimura, G; Nagai, T; Hasegawa, T; Ohashi, H; Nakamura, Y

    1998-01-01

    Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia (SMD) comprises a heterogeneous group of heritable skeletal dysplasias characterized by modifications of the vertebral bodies of the spine and metaphyses of the tubular bones. The genetic etiology of SMD is currently unknown; however, the type X collagen gene (COL10A1) is considered an excellent candidate, for two reasons: first, Schmid metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, a condition known to result from COL10A1 mutations, shows a significant phenotypic overlap with SMD; and, second, transgenic mice carrying deletions in type X collagen show SMD phenotypes. Hence, we examined the entire coding region of COL10A1 by direct sequencing of DNA from five unrelated patients with SMD and found a heterozygous missense mutation (Gly595Glu) cosegregating with the disease phenotype in one SMD family. This initial documented identification of a mutation in SMD expands our knowledge concerning the range of the pathological phenotypes that can be produced by aberrations of type X collagen (type X collagenopathy). PMID:9837818

  5. Expression of a collagen gene in mesenchyme lineages of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryo.

    PubMed

    Angerer, L M; Chambers, S A; Yang, Q; Venkatesan, M; Angerer, R C; Simpson, R T

    1988-02-01

    We have previously described cloning of an exon of a sea urchin collagen gene and shown that its expression is temporally regulated during embryogenesis, beginning during blastula formation. We have now localized the protein encoded by the gene and the sites of its mRNA synthesis in the developing embryo. Antibody to a synthetic peptide reacts with a 208,000 Mr protein that is digestible by collagenase. Fractionation of pluteus stage embryos demonstrates that the protein is localized primarily with cells that form the syncytium of primary mesenchyme that elaborates the larval endoskeleton; furthermore, immunofluorescence localizes the epitope to the periphery of the endoskeleton in situ. Transcripts of the gene accumulate only in mesenchyme cells, especially those of the primary mesenchyme lineage. Measurements of absolute transcript abundance show that collagen mRNA is present in blastula primary mesenchyme cells at 600-700 copies per cell and at about fourfold lower amounts in other mesenchyme cells. PMID:3360324

  6. TASR-1 regulates alternative splicing of collagen genes in chondrogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiroshi; Blackburn, Michael L; Klineberg, Eric; Zielinska-Kwiatkowska, Anna; Bolander, Mark E; Sarkar, Gobinda; Suva, Larry J; Chansky, Howard A; Yang, Liu

    2007-05-01

    During the differentiation of chondroprogenitors into mature chondrocytes, the alternative splicing of collagen genes switches from longer isoforms to shorter ones. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, we infected mouse ATDC5 chondroprogenitor cells with retrovirus for stable expression of two closely related SR splicing factors. RT-PCR analysis revealed that TASR-1, but not TASR-2, influenced alternative splicing of type II and type XI collagens in ATDC5 cells. The effect of TASR-1 on splicing could be reversed with the addition of insulin. Results from our microarray analysis of ATDC5 cells showed that TASR-1 and TASR-2 differentially affect genes involved in the differentiation of chondrocytes. Of special interest is the finding that TASR-1 could down-regulate expression of type X collagen, a hallmark of hypertrophic chondrocytes. Immunohistostaining demonstrated that TASR-1 protein is more abundantly expressed than TASR-2 in mouse articular chondrocytes, raising the possibility that TASR-1 might be involved in phenotype maintenance of articular chondrocytes. PMID:17367759

  7. TASR-1 regulates alternative splicing of collagen genes in chondrogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hiroshi; Blackburn, Michael L; Klineberg, Eric; Zielinska-Kwiatkowska, Anna; Bolander, Mark E; Sarkar, Gobinda; Suva, Larry J; Chansky, Howard A; Yang, Liu

    2007-05-01

    During the differentiation of chondroprogenitors into mature chondrocytes, the alternative splicing of collagen genes switches from longer isoforms to shorter ones. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, we infected mouse ATDC5 chondroprogenitor cells with retrovirus for stable expression of two closely related SR splicing factors. RT-PCR analysis revealed that TASR-1, but not TASR-2, influenced alternative splicing of type II and type XI collagens in ATDC5 cells. The effect of TASR-1 on splicing could be reversed with the addition of insulin. Results from our microarray analysis of ATDC5 cells showed that TASR-1 and TASR-2 differentially affect genes involved in the differentiation of chondrocytes. Of special interest is the finding that TASR-1 could down-regulate expression of type X collagen, a hallmark of hypertrophic chondrocytes. Immunohistostaining demonstrated that TASR-1 protein is more abundantly expressed than TASR-2 in mouse articular chondrocytes, raising the possibility that TASR-1 might be involved in phenotype maintenance of articular chondrocytes.

  8. Transcriptional promoter of the human alpha 1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1).

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S; Greenspan, D S

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized the 5' region of the human alpha 1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1). The transcriptional promoter is shown to have a number of features characteristic of the promoters of 'housekeeping' and growth-control-related genes. It lacks obvious TATA and CAAT boxes, has multiple transcription start sites, has a high GC content, lies within a well-defined CpG island and has a number of consensus sites for the potential binding of transcription factor Sp1. This type of promoter structure, while unusual for a collagen gene, is consistent with the broad distribution of expression of COL5A1 and is reminiscent of the promoter structures of the genes encoding type VI collagen, which has a similarly broad distribution of expression. Stepwise deletion of COL5A1 5' sequences, placed upstream of a heterologous reporter gene, yielded a gradual decrease in promoter activity, indicating that the COL5A1 promoter is composed of an array of cis-acting elements. A minimal promoter region contained within the 212 bp immediately upstream of the major transcription start site contained no consensus sequences for the binding of known transcription factors, but gel mobility shift assays showed this region to bind nuclear factors, including Sp1, at a number of sites. The major transcription start site is flanked by an upstream 34-bp oligopurine/oligopyrimidine stretch, or 'GAGA' box, and a downstream 56-bp GAGA box which contains a 10-bp mirror repeat and is sensitive to cleavage with S1 nuclease. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7646438

  9. Characterization of a type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation identified in cultured chondrocytes from human hypochondrogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, W A; Machado, M A; Ellard, J; Campbell, D; Bartley, J; Ramirez, F; Vitale, E; Lee, B

    1992-01-01

    A subtle mutation in the type II collagen gene COL2A1 was detected in a case of human hypochondrogenesis by using a chondrocyte culture system and PCR-cDNA scanning analysis. Chondrocytes obtained from cartilage biopsies were dedifferentiated and expanded in monolayer culture and then redifferentiated by culture over agarose. Single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing analysis identified a G----A transition, resulting in a glycine substitution at amino acid 574 of the pro alpha 1(II) collagen triple-helical domain. Morphologic assessment of cartilage-like structures produced in culture and electrophoretic analysis of collagens synthesized by the cultured chondrocytes suggested that the glycine substitution interferes with conversion of type II procollagen to collagen, impairs intracellular transport and secretion of the molecule, and disrupts collagen fibril assembly. This experimental approach has broad implications for the investigation of human chondrodysplasias as well as human chondrocyte biology. Images PMID:1374906

  10. Collagen, genes and the skeletal dysplasias on the edge of a new era: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Lachman, R S; Tiller, G E; Graham, J M; Rimoin, D L

    1992-01-01

    This article reviews the newly described biochemical (type I and II collagen) abnormalities and specific gene defects in the skeletal dysplasias. The model of the collagen molecule is described and how collagen is processed from procollagen, where and how abnormalities occur, and the types of abnormalities produced (quantitative and qualitative). The only known type I collagen defects producing skeletal dysplasias--osteogenesis imperfecta, as well as the 'family' of established type II collagen disorders--achondrogenesis type II, hypochondrogenesis and spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita are discussed. Finally, using case presentations, the practical approach to these disorders is shown. The importance of these investigations and the subsequent reevaluation of the clinical and radiological findings of specifically delineated skeletal dysplasias are discussed. PMID:1563395

  11. Biomechanical regulation of type I collagen gene expression in ACLs in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Adam H; Sah, Robert L; Paul Sung, K L

    2002-03-01

    In this study, an ex vivo organ culture system that allows the application of controlled loads to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was designed and used to characterize the influence of a step input in mechanical load on gene expression. A procedure for isolating bone-ACL-bone (B-ACL-B) complexes from rat knees was developed. After harvest and 24 hour culture, B-ACL-B complexes exhibited percentages of viability similar to that in intact ACLs (approximately 90%). Application of a physiologically relevant load of 5 N (superimposed on a I N tare load) resulted in changes in levels of mRNA encoding type I collagen. While levels of type I collagen mRNA significantly increased 32+/-13% (mean +/- standard errors of the mean (SEM)) over controls within the first hour of loading, levels decreased significantly to 44+/-9% of control after 2 h. Displacements induced by the 5 N load were measured by video dimensional analysis. Calculated axial strains of 0.141+/-0.034 were achieved rapidly during the first hour and remained essentially unchanged thereafter. These results demonstrate the feasibility of maintaining ligaments in organ culture and illustrate the time course expression of type I collagen following the application of a mechanical load.

  12. NHR-23 dependent collagen and hedgehog-related genes required for molting

    SciTech Connect

    Kouns, Nathaniel A.; Nakielna, Johana; Behensky, Frantisek; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouch, Zdenek; Kostrouchova, Marta

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} NHR-23 is a critical regulator of nematode development and molting. {yields} The manuscript characterizes the loss-of-function phenotype of an nhr-23 mutant. {yields} Whole genome expression analysis identifies new potential targets of NHR-23. {yields} Hedgehog-related genes are identified as NHR-23 dependent genes. {yields} New link between sterol mediated signaling and regulation by NHR-23 is found. -- Abstract: NHR-23, a conserved member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, is required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans where it plays a critical role in growth and molting. In a search for NHR-23 dependent genes, we performed whole genome comparative expression microarrays on both control and nhr-23 inhibited synchronized larvae. Genes that decreased in response to nhr-23 RNAi included several collagen genes. Unexpectedly, several hedgehog-related genes were also down-regulated after nhr-23 RNAi. A homozygous nhr-23 deletion allele was used to confirm the RNAi knockdown phenotypes and the changes in gene expression. Our results indicate that NHR-23 is a critical co-regulator of functionally linked genes involved in growth and molting and reveal evolutionary parallels among the ecdysozoa.

  13. Tyrosine dephosphorylation of nuclear proteins mimics transforming growth factor {beta}1 stimulation of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwel, P.; Hu, Wei; Ramirez, F.; Kohanski, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes how the transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) stimulates the transcription of the gene coding for collagen I (COL1A2). The report goes on to correlate tyrosine dephosphorylation, increased binding of a transcriptional complex and TGF-{beta}1 stimulation of gene expression. 33 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Vasopressin inhibits type-I collagen and albumin gene expression in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chojkier, M.; Brenner, D.A.; Leffert, H.L.

    1989-06-05

    The mechanisms that regulate collagen gene expression in hepatic cells are poorly understood. Accelerated Ca2+ fluxes are associated with inhibiting collagen synthesis selectively in human fibroblasts. In suspension cultures of isolated hepatocytes, the Ca2+ agonist vasopressin increases cytosolic levels of free Ca2+. However, whether vasopressin's interactions with plasma membrane V1 receptors attenuate hepatic collagen production is unknown. We investigated this problem by studying vasopressin's effects on collagen synthesis and Ca2+ efflux in long-term primary cultures of differentiated and proliferation-competent adult rat hepatocytes. Twelve-day-old quiescent cultures were exposed to test substances and labeled with (5-3H)proline. Determinations of radioactivity in collagenase-sensitive and collagenase-resistant proteins were used to calculate the relative levels of collagen production. Synthetic (8-arg)vasopressin stimulated 45Ca2+ efflux within 1 min and inhibited hepatocyte collagen production within 3 h by 50%; overall rates of protein synthesis were not affected significantly. In cultures labeled with (35S)methionine, vasopressin also decreased the levels of newly synthesized and secreted albumin, but not fibrinogen, detected in specific immunoprecipitates analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Northern blot analyses using specific (32P)cDNA probes revealed 70% decreases in hybridizable levels of collagen alpha 1(I) mRNA in hepatocyte cultures treated with either vasopressin or Ca2+ ionophore A23187; hybridizable levels of albumin mRNA also fell approximately 50% following vasopressin treatment.

  15. Collagen osteoid-like model allows kinetic gene expression studies of non-collagenous proteins in relation with mineral development to understand bone biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Silvent, Jérémie; Nassif, Nadine; Helary, Christophe; Azaïs, Thierry; Sire, Jean-Yves; Guille, Marie Madeleine Giraud

    2013-01-01

    Among persisting questions on bone calcification, a major one is the link between protein expression and mineral deposition. A cell culture system is here proposed opening new integrative studies on biomineralization, improving our knowledge on the role played by non-collagenous proteins in bone. This experimental in vitro model consisted in human primary osteoblasts cultured for 60 days at the surface of a 3D collagen scaffold mimicking an osteoid matrix. Various techniques were used to analyze the results at the cellular and molecular level (adhesion and viability tests, histology and electron microscopy, RT- and qPCR) and to characterize the mineral phase (histological staining, EDX, ATG, SAED and RMN). On long term cultures human bone cells seeded on the osteoid-like matrix displayed a clear osteoblast phenotype as revealed by the osteoblast-like morphology, expression of specific protein such as alkaline phosphatase and expression of eight genes classically considered as osteoblast markers, including BGLAP, COL1A1, and BMP2. Von Kossa and alizarine red allowed us to identify divalent calcium ions at the surface of the matrix, EDX revealed the correct Ca/P ratio, and SAED showed the apatite crystal diffraction pattern. In addition RMN led to the conclusion that contaminant phases were absent and that the hydration state of the mineral was similar to fresh bone. A temporal correlation was established between quantified gene expression of DMP1 and IBSP, and the presence of hydroxyapatite, confirming the contribution of these proteins to the mineralization process. In parallel a difference was observed in the expression pattern of SPP1 and BGLAP, which questioned their attributed role in the literature. The present model opens new experimental possibilities to study spatio-temporal relations between bone cells, dense collagen scaffolds, NCPs and hydroxyapatite mineral deposition. It also emphasizes the importance of high collagen density environment in bone cell

  16. A novel deletion and two recurrent substitutions on type VII collagen gene in seven Iranian patients with epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Armita Kakavand; Moghaddam, Mohammad; Hatamnejadian, Nasim; Ebrahimi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Epidermolysis bullosa is one of the most important series of mechano-bullous heritable skin disorders which is categorized into four major types according to the layer that bullae forms within basement membrane zone. In dystrophic form of the disease, blisters are made in the sublamina densa zone, at the level of type VII collagen protein which produce anchoring fibrils. Type VII collagen gene is the only responsible gene for this form. The aim of this study was to survey causative mutations of type VII collagen gene among Iranian patients with epidermolysis bullosa. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, exons 73-75 were investigated by polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing. Results: In current study, we found three different point mutations in type VII collagen alleles in 7 out of 50 patients. Four patients were homozygous for a new deletion which resulted in frame shift (p.Pro2089fs). Two patients were homozygous for a recurrent glycine substitution (p.G2031S) and one patient was detected with an allele carrying a substitution (p.R2069C). Conclusion: The results emphasized heterogeneity in the type VII collagen gene and will provide a sign for early diagnosis and future study of the disease pathogenesis. PMID:27746867

  17. Expression of COLLAGEN 1 and ELASTIN Genes in Mitral Valvular Interstitial Cells within Microfiber Reinforced Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, Maryam; Javadi, Gholamreza; Agdami, Nasser; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective The incidence of heart valve disease is increasing worldwide and the number of heart valve replacements is expected to increase in the future. By mimicking the main tissue structures and properties of heart valve, tissue engineering offers new options for the replacements. Applying an appropriate scaffold in fabricating tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) is of importance since it affects the secretion of the main extracellular matrix (ECM) components, collagen 1 and elastin, which are crucial in providing the proper mechanical properties of TEHVs. Materials and Methods Using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in this experi- mental study, the relative expression levels of COLLAGEN 1 and ELASTIN were obtained for three samples of each examined sheep mitral valvular interstitial cells (MVICs)-seeded onto electrospun poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS)-poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) microfibrous, gelatin and hyaluronic acid based hydrogel-only and composite (PGS-PCL/hydrogel) scaffolds. This composite has been shown to create a synthetic three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment with appropriate mechanical and biological properties for MVICs. Results Cell viability and metabolic activity were similar among all scaffold types. Our results showed that the level of relative expression of COLLAGEN 1 and ELASTIN genes was higher in the encapsulated composite scaffolds compared to PGS-PCL-only and hydrogel-only scaffolds with the difference being statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion The encapsulated composite scaffolds are more conducive to ECM secretion over the PGS-PCL-only and hydrogel-only scaffolds. This composite scaffold can serve as a model scaffold for heart valve tissue engineering. PMID:26464819

  18. Fibrochondrogenesis Results from Mutations in the COL11A1 Type XI Collagen Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, Stuart W.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Safina, Nicole P.; Bober, Michael B.; Proud, Virginia K.; Funari, Tara; Wangler, Michael F.; Nevarez, Lisette; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Wilcox, William R.; Eyre, David R.; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrochondrogenesis is a severe, autosomal-recessive, short-limbed skeletal dysplasia. In a single case of fibrochondrogenesis, whole-genome SNP genotyping identified unknown ancestral consanguinity by detecting three autozygous regions. Because of the predominantly skeletal nature of the phenotype, the 389 genes localized to the autozygous intervals were prioritized for mutation analysis by correlation of their expression with known cartilage-selective genes via the UCLA Gene Expression Tool, UGET. The gene encoding the α1 chain of type XI collagen (COL11A1) was the only cartilage-selective gene among the three candidate intervals. Sequence analysis of COL11A1 in two genetically independent fibrochondrogenesis cases demonstrated that each was a compound heterozygote for a loss-of-function mutation on one allele and a mutation predicting substitution for a conserved triple-helical glycine residue on the other. The parents who were carriers of missense mutations had myopia. Early-onset hearing loss was noted in both parents who carried a loss-of-function allele, suggesting COL11A1 as a locus for mild, dominantly inherited hearing loss. These findings identify COL11A1 as a locus for fibrochondrogenesis and indicate that there might be phenotypic manifestations among carriers. PMID:21035103

  19. Fibrochondrogenesis results from mutations in the COL11A1 type XI collagen gene.

    PubMed

    Tompson, Stuart W; Bacino, Carlos A; Safina, Nicole P; Bober, Michael B; Proud, Virginia K; Funari, Tara; Wangler, Michael F; Nevarez, Lisette; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Wilcox, William R; Eyre, David R; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H

    2010-11-12

    Fibrochondrogenesis is a severe, autosomal-recessive, short-limbed skeletal dysplasia. In a single case of fibrochondrogenesis, whole-genome SNP genotyping identified unknown ancestral consanguinity by detecting three autozygous regions. Because of the predominantly skeletal nature of the phenotype, the 389 genes localized to the autozygous intervals were prioritized for mutation analysis by correlation of their expression with known cartilage-selective genes via the UCLA Gene Expression Tool, UGET. The gene encoding the α1 chain of type XI collagen (COL11A1) was the only cartilage-selective gene among the three candidate intervals. Sequence analysis of COL11A1 in two genetically independent fibrochondrogenesis cases demonstrated that each was a compound heterozygote for a loss-of-function mutation on one allele and a mutation predicting substitution for a conserved triple-helical glycine residue on the other. The parents who were carriers of missense mutations had myopia. Early-onset hearing loss was noted in both parents who carried a loss-of-function allele, suggesting COL11A1 as a locus for mild, dominantly inherited hearing loss. These findings identify COL11A1 as a locus for fibrochondrogenesis and indicate that there might be phenotypic manifestations among carriers.

  20. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  1. Effect of Brahman genetic influence on collagen enzymatic crosslinking gene expression and meat tenderness.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J M; Johnson, D D; Elzo, M A; White, M C; Stelzleni, A M; Johnson, S E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effect of Brahman genetics on collagen enzymatic crosslinking gene expression and meat tenderness. Steers were randomly selected to represent a high percentage Brahman genetics (n = 13), Half-Blood genetics (n = 13), Brangus genetics (n = 13), and a high percentage Angus genetics (n = 13). Muscle samples from the Longissimus lumborum muscle were collected at weaning and harvest and reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis was conducted to measure the mRNA expression of lysyl oxidase (LOX), bone morphogenetic protein 1 (BMP1), and cystatin C (CYS). Steaks from subject animals were collected at harvest, aged for 14 d and subjected to collagen analysis, Warner-Bratzler Shear Force (WBS) and trained sensory panel analysis (tenderness, juiciness, and connective tissue). Data indicated that Half-Blood and Brahman steers had greater (P<0.05) WBS values and tended to receive decreased (P < 0.06) panel tenderness scores than Angus and Brangus steers. Panelists tended to detect more connective tissue in Brahman and Half-Blood steaks when compared to Angus and Brangus steaks (P < 0.07). Crosslinking gene expression data revealed that at weaning Half-Blood steers had more (P < 0.05) mRNA expression of CYS and LOX than Angus and Brangus steers. At weaning and harvest, all genetic groups had similar mRNA expression of BMP1 (P > 0.10). At harvest, Brangus and Angus steers had greater LOX mRNA expression than Brahman cattle (P < 0.05). Pearson's correlation coefficients indicated that only weaning CYS mRNA expression was correlated to WBS, panel tenderness and connective tissue scores (P < 0.05). Expression of LOX was only correlated to these measures at harvest, and BMP1 was correlated to these traits at both time periods (P < 0.05). These results indicate that collagen crosslinking enzyme activity, as indicated by mRNA levels, early in an animal's life may account for some of the variation seen in steak tenderness due

  2. Expression of silicatein and collagen genes in the marine sponge Suberites domuncula is controlled by silicate and myotrophin.

    PubMed

    Krasko, A; Lorenz, B; Batel, R; Schröder, H C; Müller, I M; Müller, W E

    2000-08-01

    The major skeletal elements in the (Porifera) sponges, are spicules formed from inorganic material. The spicules in the Demospongiae class are composed of hydrated, amorphous silica. Recently an enzyme, silicatein, which polymerizes alkoxide substrates to silica was described from the sponge Tethya aurantia. In the present study the cDNA encoding silicatein was isolated from the sponge Suberites domuncula. The deduced polypeptide comprises 331 amino acids and has a calculated size of Mr 36 306. This cDNA was used as a probe to study the potential role of silicate on the expression of the silicatein gene. For these studies, primmorphs, a special form of aggregates composed of proliferating cells, have been used. It was found that after increasing the concentration of soluble silicate in the seawater medium from around 1 microM to approximately 60 microM, this gene is strongly upregulated. Without additional silicate only a very weak expression could be measured. Because silica as well as collagen are required for the formation of spicules, the expression of the gene encoding collagen was measured in parallel. It was also found that the level of transcripts for collagen strongly increases in the presence of 60 microM soluble silicate. In addition, it is demonstrated that the expression of collagen is also upregulated in those primmorphs which were treated with recombinant myotrophin obtained from the same sponge. Myotrophin, however, had no effect on the expression of silicatein. From these data we conclude that silicate influences the expression of the enzyme silicatein and also the expression of collagen, (via the mediator myotrophin).

  3. A single epidermal stem cell strategy for safe ex vivo gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Droz-Georget Lathion, Stéphanie; Rochat, Ariane; Knott, Graham; Recchia, Alessandra; Martinet, Danielle; Benmohammed, Sara; Grasset, Nicolas; Zaffalon, Andrea; Besuchet Schmutz, Nathalie; Savioz-Dayer, Emmanuelle; Beckmann, Jacques Samuel; Rougemont, Jacques; Mavilio, Fulvio; Barrandon, Yann

    2015-02-27

    There is a widespread agreement from patient and professional organisations alike that the safety of stem cell therapeutics is of paramount importance, particularly for ex vivo autologous gene therapy. Yet current technology makes it difficult to thoroughly evaluate the behaviour of genetically corrected stem cells before they are transplanted. To address this, we have developed a strategy that permits transplantation of a clonal population of genetically corrected autologous stem cells that meet stringent selection criteria and the principle of precaution. As a proof of concept, we have stably transduced epidermal stem cells (holoclones) obtained from a patient suffering from recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Holoclones were infected with self-inactivating retroviruses bearing a COL7A1 cDNA and cloned before the progeny of individual stem cells were characterised using a number of criteria. Clonal analysis revealed a great deal of heterogeneity among transduced stem cells in their capacity to produce functional type VII collagen (COLVII). Selected transduced stem cells transplanted onto immunodeficient mice regenerated a non-blistering epidermis for months and produced a functional COLVII. Safety was assessed by determining the sites of proviral integration, rearrangements and hit genes and by whole-genome sequencing. The progeny of the selected stem cells also had a diploid karyotype, was not tumorigenic and did not disseminate after long-term transplantation onto immunodeficient mice. In conclusion, a clonal strategy is a powerful and efficient means of by-passing the heterogeneity of a transduced stem cell population. It guarantees a safe and homogenous medicinal product, fulfilling the principle of precaution and the requirements of regulatory affairs. Furthermore, a clonal strategy makes it possible to envision exciting gene-editing technologies like zinc finger nucleases, TALENs and homologous recombination for next-generation gene therapy.

  4. SSCP and segregation analysis of the human type X collagen gene (COL10A1) in heritable forms of chondrodysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Sweetman, W.A.; Rash, B.; Thomas, J.T.; Boot-Handford, R.; Grant, M.E.; Wallis, G.A. ); Sykes, B. ); Beighton, P. ); Hecht, J.T. ); Zabell, B. )

    1992-10-01

    Type X collagen is a homotrimeric, short chain, nonfibrillar collagen that is expressed exclusively by hypertrophic chondrocytes at the sites of endochondral ossification. The distribution and pattern of expression of the type X collagen gene (COL10A1) suggests that mutations altering the structure and synthesis of the protein may be responsible for causing heritable forms of chondrodysplasia. The authors investigated whether mutations within the human COL10A1 gene were responsible for causing the disorders achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia, pseudoachondroplasia, and thanatophoric dysplasia, by analyzing the coding regions of the gene by using PCR and the single-stranded conformational polymorphism technique. By this approach, seven sequence changes were identified within and flanking the coding regions of the gene of the affected persons. The authors demonstrated that six of these sequence changes were not responsible for causing these forms of chondrodysplasia but were polymorphic in nature. The sequence changes were used to demonstrate discordant segregation between the COL10A1 locus and achondroplasia and pseudoachondroplasia, in nuclear families. This lack of segregation suggests that mutations within or near the COL101A1 locus are not responsible for these disorders. The seventh sequence change resulted in a valine-to-methionine substitution in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the molecule and was identified in only two hypochondroplasic individuals from a single family. Segregation analysis in this family was inconclusive, and the significance of this substitution remains uncertain. 47 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Differential alleleic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A2) in osteoarthritic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C.; Sykes, B.; Athanasou, N.; Carr, A.

    1995-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two COL2A1 alleles in articular cartilage obtained from each patient. Three patients demonstrated differential allelic expression and produced <12% of the normal level of mRNA from one of their COL2A1 alleles. The same allele shows reduced expression in a well-defined OA population than in a control group, suggesting the possible existence of a rare COL2A1 allele that predisposes to OA. 31 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Polymorphism of the MHC class II Eb gene determines the protection against collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Zanelli, E.; Krco, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an animal model of auto immune polyarthritis, sharing similarities with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Paradoxally, susceptibility to mouse CIA is controlled by the H2A loci (DQ homologous) while RA is linked to HLA.DR genes (H2E homologous). We recently showed that the E{beta}{sup d} molecule prevents CIA development in susceptible H2{sup q} mice. We addressed the question of whether H2Eb polymorphism will influence CIA incidence as HLA.DRB1 polymorphism does in RA. In F{sub 1} mice, only H2Eb{sup d} and H2Eb{sup s} molecules showed protection. Using recombinant B10.RDD (Eb{sup d/b}) mice, we found that CIA protection was mediated by the first domain of the E{beta}{sup d} molecule. Using peptides covering the third hypervariable region of the E{beta} chain, we found a perfect correlation between presentation of E{beta} peptides by the H2A{sup q} molecule and protection on CIA. Therefore, the mechanism by which H2Eb protects against CIA seems to rely on the affinity of E{beta} peptides for the H2A{sup q} molecule. 35 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Antigen-specific T cell–mediated gene therapy in collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Atsuo; Seroogy, Christine M.; Sandora, Matthew R.; Tarner, Ingo H.; Costa, Gina L.; Taylor-Edwards, Cariel; Bachmann, Michael H.; Contag, Christopher H.; Fathman, C. Garrison

    2001-01-01

    Autoantigen-specific T cells have tissue-specific homing properties, suggesting that these cells may be ideal vehicles for the local delivery of immunoregulatory molecules. We tested this hypothesis by using type II collagen–specific (CII-specific) CD4+ T hybridomas or primary CD4+ T cells after gene transfer, as vehicles to deliver an immunoregulatory protein for the treatment of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CII-specific T cells or hybridomas were transduced using retroviral vectors to constitutively express the IL-12 antagonist, IL-12 p40. Transfer of engineered CD4+ T cells after immunization significantly inhibited the development of CIA, while cells transduced with vector control had no effect. The beneficial effect on CIA of IL-12 p40-transduced T cells required TCR specificity against CII, since transfer of T cells specific for another antigen producing equivalent amounts of IL-12 p40 had no effect. In vivo cell detection using bioluminescent labels and RT-PCR showed that transferred CII-reactive T-cell hybridomas accumulated in inflamed joints in mice with CIA. These results indicate that the local delivery of IL-12 p40 by T cells inhibited CIA by suppressing autoimmune responses at the site of inflammation. Modifying antigen-specific T cells by retroviral transduction for local expression of immunoregulatory proteins thus offers a promising strategy for treating RA. PMID:11375419

  8. 2D and 3D collagen and fibrin biopolymers promote specific ECM and integrin gene expression by vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    HONG, HELEN; STEGEMANN, JAN P.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen Type I and fibrin are polymeric proteins commonly used in the field of regenerative medicine as the foundational matrix of engineered tissues. We examined the response of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) to both two-dimensional (2D) substrates as well as three-dimensional (3D) matrices of these biopolymers. Pure collagen Type I, pure fibrin and composite matrices consisting of 1:1 mixtures of collagen and fibrin were studied. Relative gene expression of three ECM molecules (collagen Type I and III, and tropoelastin) and three integrin subunits (integrins α1, β1 and β3) was determined over 7 days in culture using quantitative RT-PCR. Expression of all of these marker genes was up-regulated in 3D matrices, relative to 2D substrates. Tropoelastin, integrin α1 and integrin β1 were highest in collagen matrices, while collagen III and integrin β3 expression were highest in pure fibrin, and collagen I expression was highest in the collagen-fibrin composite materials. Both the compositional and temporal expression patterns of these specific ECM-related genes were suggestive of a wound healing response. These results illuminate the short-term responses of VSMC to 2D and 3D biopolymer matrices, and have relevance to tissue engineering and cardiovascular biology. PMID:18854122

  9. Interactions between collagen gene variants and risk of anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Kevin; Knight, Hayley; Ficek, Krzysztof; Leonska-Duniec, Agata; Maciejewska-Karlowska, Agnieszka; Sawczuk, Marek; Stepien-Slodkowska, Marta; O'Cuinneagain, Dion; van der Merwe, Willem; Posthumus, Michael; Cieszczyk, Pawel; Collins, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    The COL5A1 and COL12A1 variants are independently associated with modulating the risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in females. The objective of this study was to further investigate if COL3A1 and COL6A1 variants independently, as well as, collagen gene-gene interactions, modulate ACL rupture risk. Three hundred and thirty-three South African (SA, n = 242) and Polish (PL, n = 91) participants with diagnosed ACL ruptures and 378 controls (235 SA and 143 PL) were recruited. Participants were genotyped for COL3A1 rs1800255 G/A, COL5A1 rs12722 (T/C), COL6A1 rs35796750 (T/C) and COL12A1 rs970547 (A/G). No significant associations were identified between COL6A1 rs35796750 and COL3A1 rs1800255 genotypes and risk of ACL rupture in the SA cohort. The COL3A1 AA genotype was, however, significantly (p = 0.036) over-represented in the PL ACL group (9.9%, n = 9) when compared to the PL control (CON) group (2.8%, n = 4). Although there were genotype distribution differences between the SA and PL cohorts, the T+A-inferred pseudo-haplotype constructed from COL5A1 and COL12A1 was significantly over-represented in the female ACL group when compared to the female CON group within the SA (T+A ACL 50.5%, T+A CON 38.1%, p = 0.022), PL (T+A ACL 56.3%, T+A CON 36.3%, p = 0.029) and combined (T+A ACL 51.8%, T+A CON 37.5%, p = 0.004) cohorts. In conclusion, the novel main finding of this study was a significant interaction between the COL5A1 rs12722 T/C and COL12A1 rs970547 A/G variants and risk of ACL injury. These results highlight the importance of investigating gene-gene interactions in the aetiology of ACL ruptures in multiple independent cohorts. PMID:25073002

  10. Prevention of Liver Fibrosis by Triple Helix-Forming Oligodeoxyribonucleotides Targeted to the Promoter Region of Type I Collagen Gene

    PubMed Central

    Koilan, Subramaniyan; Hamilton, David; Baburyan, Narina; Padala, Mythili K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis remains a global health problem. The most common etiologies are alcoholism and viral infections. Liver fibrosis is associated with major changes in both quantity and composition of extracellular matix and leads to disorganization of the liver architecture and irreversible damage to the liver function. As of now there is no effective therapy to control fibrosis. The end product of fibrosis is abnormal synthesis and accumulation of type I collagen in the extracellular matrix, which is produced by activated stellate or Ito cells in the damaged liver. Therefore, inhibition of transcription of type I collagen should in principle inhibit its production and accumulation in liver. Normally, DNA exists in a duplex form. However, under some circumstances, DNA can assume triple helical (triplex) structures. Intermolecular triplexes, formed by the addition of a sequence-specific third strand to the major groove of the duplex DNA, have the potential to serve as selective gene regulators. Earlier, we demonstrated efficient triplex formation between the exogenously added triplex-forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides (TFOs) and a specific sequence in the promoter region of the COL1A1 gene. In this study we used a rat model of liver fibrosis, induced by dimethylnitrosamine, to test whether these TFOs prevent liver fibrosis. Our results indicate that both the 25-mer and 18-mer TFOs, specific for the upstream nucleotide sequence from −141 to −165 (relative to the transcription start site) in the 5′ end of collagen gene promoter, effectively prevented accumulation of liver collagen and fibrosis. We also observed improvement in liver function tests. However, mutations in the TFO that eliminated formation of triplexes are ineffective in preventing fibrosis. We believe that these TFOs can be used as potential antifibrotic therapeutic molecules. PMID:20818932

  11. Gene encoding the collagen type I and thrombospondin receptor CD36 is located on chromosome 7q11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Ruiz, E.; Armesilla, A.L.; Sanchez-Madrid, F.; Vega, M.A. )

    1993-09-01

    The human CD36 is a member of a gene family of structurally related glycoproteins and functions as a receptor for collagen type I and thrombospondin. CD36 also binds to red blood cells infected with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. In the present study, the CD36 gene was assigned to chromosome 7 by using the polymerase chain reaction with DNA from human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. Furthermore, the use of a CD36 genomic probe has allowed the localization of the CD36 locus to the 7q11.2 band by fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled with GTG-banding. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Introduction of the human pro. cap alpha. 1(I) collagen gene into pro. cap alpha. 1(I)-deficient Mov-13 mouse cells leads to formation of functional mouse-human hybrid type I collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Schnieke, A.; Dziadek, M.; Bateman, J.; Mascara, T.; Harbers, K.; Gelinas, R.; Jaenisch, R.

    1987-02-01

    The Mov-13 mouse strain carries a retroviral insertion in the pro..cap alpha..1(I) collagen gene that prevents transcription of the gene. Cell lines derived from homozygous embryos do not express type I collagen although normal amounts of pro..cap alpha..2 mRNA are synthesized. The authors have introduced genomic clones of either the human or mouse pro..cap alpha..1(I) collagen gene into homozygous cell lines to assess whether the human or mouse pro..cap alpha..1(I) chains can associate with the endogenous mouse pro..cap alpha..2(I) chain to form stable type I collagen. The human gene under control of the simian virus 40 promoter was efficiently transcribed in the transfected cells. Protein analyses revealed that stable heterotrimers consisting of two human ..cap alpha..1 chains and one mouse ..cap alpha..2 chain were formed and that type I collagen was secreted by the transfected cells at normal rates. However, the electrophoretic migration of both ..cap alpha..1(I) and ..cap alpha..2(I) chains in the human-mouse hybrid molecules were retarded, compared to the ..cap alpha..(I) chains in control mouse cells. Inhibition of the posttranslational hydroxylation of lysine and proline resulted in comigration of human and mouse ..cap alpha..1 and ..cap alpha..2 chains, suggesting that increased posttranslational modification caused the altered electrophoretic migration in the human-mouse hybrid molecules. Amino acid sequence differences between the mouse and human ..cap alpha.. chains may interfere with the normal rate of helix formation and increase the degree of posttranslational modifications similar to those observed in patients with lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta. The Mov-13 mouse system should allow the authors to study the effect specific mutations introduced in transfected pro..cap alpha..1(I) genes have on the synthesis, assembly, and function of collagen I.

  13. Introduction of the human pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene into pro alpha 1(I)-deficient Mov-13 mouse cells leads to formation of functional mouse-human hybrid type I collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Schnieke, A; Dziadek, M; Bateman, J; Mascara, T; Harbers, K; Gelinas, R; Jaenisch, R

    1987-01-01

    The Mov-13 mouse strain carries a retroviral insertion in the pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene that prevents transcription of the gene. Cell lines derived from homozygous embryos do not express type I collagen although normal amounts of pro alpha 2 mRNA are synthesized. We have introduced genomic clones of either the human or mouse pro alpha 1(I) collagen gene into homozygous cell lines to assess whether the human or mouse pro alpha 1(I) chains can associate with the endogenous mouse pro alpha 2(I) chain to form stable type I collagen. The human gene under control of the simian virus 40 promoter was efficiently transcribed in the transfected cells. Protein analyses revealed that stable heterotrimers consisting of two human alpha 1 chains and one mouse alpha 2 chain were formed and that type I collagen was secreted by the transfected cells at normal rates. However, the electrophoretic migration of both alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) chains in the human-mouse hybrid molecules were retarded, compared to the alpha (I) chains in control mouse cells. Inhibition of the posttranslational hydroxylation of lysine and proline resulted in comigration of human and mouse alpha 1 and alpha 2 chains, suggesting that increased posttranslational modification caused the altered electrophoretic migration in the human-mouse hybrid molecules. Amino acid sequence differences between the mouse and human alpha chains may interfere with the normal rate of helix formation and increase the degree of posttranslational modifications similar to those observed in patients with lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta. The Mov-13 mouse system should allow us to study the effect specific mutations introduced in transfected pro alpha 1(I) genes have on the synthesis, assembly, and function of collagen I. Images PMID:3468512

  14. Silibinin regulates matrix metalloproteinase 3 (stromelysine1) gene expression, hexoseamines and collagen production during rat skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tabandeh, Mohammad Reza; Oryan, Ahamd; Mohhammad-Alipour, Adel; Tabatabaei-Naieni, Abotorab

    2013-08-01

    Silibinin (SB), a flavonoid isolated from the milk thistle, Silybum marianum, has been shown to exhibit protective effects against skin damage. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of topical application of SB on levels of stromelysine 1 (STM1) gene expression, acetyl hexoseamines and collagen production during skin wound healing. Full-thickness skin wounds were topically treated with 10% and 20% SB extract in acetonitril:olive oil (AOO) (4:1) for 30 days, and expression level of STM1 transcript, n-acetyl glucoseamine (NAGLA), n-acetyl galactoseamine (NAGAA) and collagen contents were analyzed on the 10th, 20th and 30th days post wounding. SB in dose- and time-dependent manner accelerated wound closure time and increased levels of STM1 mRNA, hydroxyproline, NAGLA and NAGAA compared to the untreated and vehicle (AOO)-treated rats. The current study provides evidence that SB, by increasing STM1 gene expression and extracellular matrix constituents including glycosaminoglycans and collagen contents, promotes a faster wound healing process and can be used as a healing agent in future.

  15. Dominant mutations in the type II collagen gene, COL2A1, produce spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Strudwick type.

    PubMed

    Tiller, G E; Polumbo, P A; Weis, M A; Bogaert, R; Lachman, R S; Cohn, D H; Rimoin, D L; Eyre, D R

    1995-09-01

    The chondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormal growth or development of cartilage. Current classification is based on mode of inheritance as well as clinical, histologic, and/or radiographic features. A clinical spectrum of chondrodysplasia phenotypes, ranging from mild to perinatal lethal, is due to defects in the gene for type II collagen, COL2A1. This spectrum includes Stickler syndrome, Kniest dysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), achondrogenesis type II, and hypochondrogenesis. Individuals affected with these disorders exhibit abnormalities of the growth plate, nucleus pulposus, and vitreous humor, which are tissues that contain type II collagen. The Strudwick type of spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD) is characterized by disproportionate short stature, pectus carinatum, and scoliosis, as well as dappled metaphyses (which are not seen in SEDC). The phenotype was first described by Murdoch and Walker in 1969, and a series of 14 patients was later reported by Anderson et al. The observation of two affected sibs born to unaffected parents led to the classification of SEMD Strudwick as an autosomal recessive disorder. We now describe the biochemical characterization of defects in alpha 1(II) collagen in three unrelated individuals with SEMD Strudwick, each of which is due to heterozygosity for a unique mutation in COL2A1. Our data support the hypothesis that some cases, if not all cases, of this distinctive chondrodysplasia result from dominant mutations in COL2A1, thus expanding the clinical spectrum of phenotypes associated with this gene. PMID:7550321

  16. Dominant mutations in the type II collagen gene, COL2A1, produce spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Strudwick type.

    PubMed

    Tiller, G E; Polumbo, P A; Weis, M A; Bogaert, R; Lachman, R S; Cohn, D H; Rimoin, D L; Eyre, D R

    1995-09-01

    The chondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormal growth or development of cartilage. Current classification is based on mode of inheritance as well as clinical, histologic, and/or radiographic features. A clinical spectrum of chondrodysplasia phenotypes, ranging from mild to perinatal lethal, is due to defects in the gene for type II collagen, COL2A1. This spectrum includes Stickler syndrome, Kniest dysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), achondrogenesis type II, and hypochondrogenesis. Individuals affected with these disorders exhibit abnormalities of the growth plate, nucleus pulposus, and vitreous humor, which are tissues that contain type II collagen. The Strudwick type of spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD) is characterized by disproportionate short stature, pectus carinatum, and scoliosis, as well as dappled metaphyses (which are not seen in SEDC). The phenotype was first described by Murdoch and Walker in 1969, and a series of 14 patients was later reported by Anderson et al. The observation of two affected sibs born to unaffected parents led to the classification of SEMD Strudwick as an autosomal recessive disorder. We now describe the biochemical characterization of defects in alpha 1(II) collagen in three unrelated individuals with SEMD Strudwick, each of which is due to heterozygosity for a unique mutation in COL2A1. Our data support the hypothesis that some cases, if not all cases, of this distinctive chondrodysplasia result from dominant mutations in COL2A1, thus expanding the clinical spectrum of phenotypes associated with this gene.

  17. Aspergillus Collagen-Like Genes (acl): Identification, Sequence Polymorphism, and Assessment for PCR-Based Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tuntevski, Kiril; Durney, Brandon C.; Snyder, Anna K.; LaSala, P. Rocco; Nayak, Ajay P.; Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.; Rio, Rita V. M.; Holland, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The genus Aspergillus is a burden to public health due to its ubiquitous presence in the environment, its production of allergens, and wide demographic susceptibility among cystic fibrosis, asthmatic, and immunosuppressed patients. Current methods of detection of Aspergillus colonization and infection rely on lengthy morphological characterization or nonstandardized serological assays that are restricted to identifying a fungal etiology. Collagen-like genes have been shown to exhibit species-specific conservation across the noncollagenous regions as well as strain-specific polymorphism in the collagen-like regions. Here we assess the conserved region of the Aspergillus collagen-like (acl) genes and explore the application of PCR amplicon size-based discrimination among the five most common etiologic species of the Aspergillus genus, including Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. nidulans, A. niger, and A. terreus. Genetic polymorphism and phylogenetic analysis of the aclF1 gene were additionally examined among the available strains. Furthermore, the applicability of the PCR-based assay to identification of these five species in cultures derived from sputum and bronchoalveolar fluid from 19 clinical samples was explored. Application of capillary electrophoresis on nanogels was additionally demonstrated to improve the discrimination between Aspergillus species. Overall, this study demonstrated that Aspergillus acl genes could be used as PCR targets to discriminate between clinically relevant Aspergillus species. Future studies aim to utilize the detection of Aspergillus acl genes in PCR and microfluidic applications to determine the sensitivity and specificity for the identification of Aspergillus colonization and invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised subjects. PMID:24123732

  18. Differential expression of human lysyl hydroxylase genes, lysine hydroxylation, and cross-linking of type I collagen during osteoblastic differentiation in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzawa, K.; Grzesik, W. J.; Nishiura, T.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Robey, P. G.; Brenner, D. A.; Yamauchi, M.

    1999-01-01

    The pattern of lysyl hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of collagen is critical in determining the cross-linking pathways that are tissue specific. We hypothesized that the tissue specificity of type I collagen cross-linking is, in part, due to the differential expression of lysyl hydroxylase genes (Procollagen-lysine,2-oxyglutarate,5-dioxygenase 1, 2, and 3 [PLOD1, PLOD2, and PLOD3]). In this study, we have examined the expression patterns of these three genes during the course of in vitro differentiation of human osteoprogenitor cells (bone marrow stromal cells [BMSCs]) and normal skin fibroblasts (NSFs). In addition, using the medium and cell layer/matrix fractions in these cultures, lysine hydroxylation of type I collagen alpha chains and collagen cross-linking chemistries have been characterized. High levels of PLOD1 and PLOD3 genes were expressed in both BMSCs and NSFs, and the expression levels did not change in the course of differentiation. In contrast to the PLOD1 and PLOD3 genes, both cell types showed low PLOD2 gene expression in undifferentiated and early differentiated conditions. However, fully differentiated BMSCs, but not NSFs, exhibited a significantly elevated level (6-fold increase) of PLOD2 mRNA. This increase coincided with the onset of matrix mineralization and with the increase in lysyl hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of alpha chains of type I collagen molecule. Furthermore, the collagen cross-links that are derived from the nontriple helical hydroxylysine-aldehyde were found only in fully differentiated BMSC cultures. The data suggests that PLOD2 expression is associated with lysine hydroxylation in the nontriple helical domains of collagen and, thus, could be partially responsible for the tissue-specific collagen cross-linking pattern.

  19. Improved Specificity of Gene Electrotransfer to Skin Using pDNA Under the Control of Collagen Tissue-Specific Promoter.

    PubMed

    Kos, Spela; Tesic, Natasa; Kamensek, Urska; Blagus, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Kranjc, Simona; Lavrencak, Jaka; Sersa, Gregor

    2015-10-01

    In order to ensure safe, efficient and controlled gene delivery to skin, the improvement of delivery methods together with proper design of DNA is required. Non-viral delivery methods, such as gene electrotransfer, and the design of tissue-specific promoters are promising tools to ensure the safety of gene delivery to the skin. In the scope of our study, we evaluated a novel skin-specific plasmid DNA with collagen (COL) promoter, delivered to skin cells and skin tissue by gene electrotransfer. In vitro, we determined the specificity of the COL promoter in fibroblast cells. The specific expression under the control of COL promoter was obtained for the reporter gene DsRed as well as for therapeutic gene encoding cytokine IL-12. In vivo, the plasmid with COL promoter encoding the reporter gene DsRed was efficiently transfected to mouse skin. It resulted in the notable and controlled manner, however, in lower and shorter expression, compared to that obtained with ubiquitous promoter. The concentration of the IL-12 in the skin after the in vivo transfection of plasmid with COL promoter was in the same range as after the treatment in control conditions (injection of distilled water followed by the application of electric pulses). Furthermore, this gene delivery was local, restricted to the skin, without any evident systemic shedding of IL-12. Such specific targeting of skin cells, observed with tissue-specific COL promoter, would improve the effectiveness and safety of cutaneous gene therapies and DNA vaccines.

  20. Interaction of mouse mammary epithelial cells with collagen substrata: regulation of casein gene expression and secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.H.P.; Lee, W.H.; Kaetzel, C.S.; Parry, G.; Bissell, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMEC) secrete certain milk proteins only when cultured on floating collagen gels. The authors demonstrate that modulation of milk proteins by substrata is manifested at several regulatory levels; (i) cells cultured on floating collagen gels have 3- to 10-fold more casein mRNA than cells cultured on plastic or attached collagen gels. (ii) Cells on the latter two flat substrata, nevertheless, synthesize a significant amount of caseins, indicating that the remaining mRNA is functional. (iii) Cells on all substrata are inducible for casein mRNA and casein proteins by prolactin, but the extent of induction is greater on collagen than that on plastic - i.e., the substratum confers an altered degree of inducibility. (iv) Cells on all substrata synthesize casein proteins at rates proportional to the amount of casein mRNA, but the newly synthesized caseins in cells on plastic are degraded intracellularly, whereas those synthesized by cells on floating gels are secreted into the medium. (v) Cells on all substrata examined lose virtually all mRNA for whey acidic protein despite the fact that this mRNA is abundant in the mammary gland itself; the authors conclude that additional, as-yet-unknown, factors are necessary for synthesis and secretion of whey acidic protein in culture.

  1. Cloning of cDNA and genomic DNA encoding human type XVIII collagen and localization of the [alpha]1 (XVIII) collagen gene to mouse chromosome 10 and human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, S.P.; Warman, M.L.; Timmons, S.; Olsen, B.R.; Knoll, J.H.M. ); Seldin, M.F. ); Cheng, Sou-De )

    1994-02-01

    Types XV and XVIII collagen belong to a unique and novel subclass of the collagen superfamily for which the authors have proposed the name the MULTIPLEXIN family. Members of this class contain polypeptides with multiple triple-helical domains separated and flanked by non-triple-helical regions. In this paper, they report the isolation of human cDNAs and genomic DNAs encoding the [alpha]1 (XVIII) collagen chain. Utilizing a genomic clone as probe, they have mapped the COL18A1 gene to chromosome 21q22.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. In addition, using an interspecific backcross panel, they have shown that the murine Col18a1 locus is on chromosome 10, close to the loci for Col6a1 and Col6a2. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Changes in diaphragm muscle collagen gene expression after acute unilateral denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, L. E.; Sieck, G. C.; Aleff, R. A.; Martinez, D. A.; Vailas, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of acute (3 days) unilateral diaphragm denervation (DNV) on 1) levels of alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA; 2) collagen concentration [hydroxyproline (HYP)]; 3) amount of the nonreducible collagen cross-link hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP); and 4) the passive force-length relationship of the muscle. The levels of alpha 1(I) and alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA, HYP concentration, and amount of HP were measured in muscle segments from the midcostal region of DNV and intact (INT) hemidiaphragms of adult male Fischer 344 rats (250-300 g). The in vitro passive force-length relationship of DNV and INT hemidiaphragm was determined by lengthening and shortening the diaphragm muscle segments from 85 to 115% of optimal length at a constant velocity (0.6 optimal length/s). Three days after DNV, the level of alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNA was increased over 15-fold in the DNV hemidiaphragm compared with INT (P < 0.05), whereas the level of alpha 1(III) procollagen mRNA was increased by approximately sixfold in the DNV hemidiaphragm compared with INT (P < 0.05). Collagen (HYP) concentration did not differ between groups, averaging 8.7 and 8.9 micrograms/mg dry wt for the DNV and INT hemidiaphragms, respectively. In addition, there was no difference in the amount of the mature nonreducible collagen cross-link HP between the DNV and INT hemidiaphragms (0.66 vs. 0.76 mole HP/mole collagen, respectively). The amount of passive force developed during lengthening did not differ between DNV and INT hemidiaphragms. These data indicate that acute DNV of the hemidiaphragm is associated with an increase in the mRNA level of the two principal fibrillar collagen phenotypes in skeletal muscle. However, despite extensive muscle remodeling, the passive force-length relationship of the DNV hemidiaphragm is unaffected compared with the INT muscle.

  3. A specific collagen type II gene (COL2A1) mutation presenting as spondyloperipheral dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Zabel, B.; Hilbert, K.; Spranger, J.; Winterpacht, A.; Stoeb, H.; Superti-Furga, A.

    1996-05-03

    We report on a patient with a skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, spondylo-epiphyseal involvement, and brachydactyly E-like changes. This condition has been described as spondyloperipheral dysplasia and the few published cases suggest autosomal dominant inheritance with considerable clinical variability. We found our sporadic case to be due to a collagen type II defect resulting from a specific COL2A1 mutation. This mutation is the first to be located at the C-terminal outside the helical domain of COL2A1. A frameshift as consequence of a 5 bp duplication in exon 51 leads to a stop codon. The resulting truncated C-propeptide region seems to affect helix formation and produces changes of chondrocyte morphology, collagen type II fibril structure and cartilage matrix composition. Our case with its distinct phenotype adds another chondrodysplasia to the clinical spectrum of type II collagenopathies. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Tumorigenicity and adenovirus-transformed cells: Collagen interaction and cell surface laminin are controlled by the serotype origin of the E1A and E1B genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bober, F.J.; Birk, D.E.; Raska, K. Jr. ); Shenk, T. )

    1988-02-01

    A library of cells transformed with recombinant adenoviruses was used to study tumorigenicity and interaction with extracellular matrix. Cells expressing the complete E1 region of highly oncogenic adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) are tumorigenic, adhere preferentially to type IV collagen, and express cell surface laminin. Weakly tumorigenic cells, which express the E1A oncogene of Ad12 and the E1B genes of Ad5, also attach preferentially to type IV collagen but do not contain laminin on their surface. Cells which express the E1A oncogene of Ad5 and the E1B genes of Ad12 are nontumorigenic and do not preferentially attach to type IV versus type I collagen but have laminin on their surface. There is no significant difference in the amounts of laminin secreted into the culture medium among cells expressing the E1B genes of Ad5 or Ad12. In vitro assays show that cells which express the E1B genes of Ad12, irrespective of the origin of the E1A genes, can bind three times more exogenously added {sup 125}I-laminin than cells expressing the E1B genes of nononcogenic Ad5. The interaction of adenovirus-transformed cells with collagen is controlled by the serotype origin of the E1A oncogene, whereas cell surface laminin is controlled by the serotype origin of the E1B genes.

  5. Biology, chemistry and pathology of collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmajer, R.; Olsen, B.R.; Kuhn, K.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the articles are: Structure of the Type II Collagen Gene; Structural and Functional Analysis of the Genes for ..cap alpha..2(1) and ..cap alpha..1(III) collagens; Structure and Expression of the Collagen Genes of C. Elegans; Molecular Basis of Clinical Heterogeneity in the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; and Normal and Mutant Human Collagen Genes.

  6. Collagenous gastroduodenitis.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rai, Mridula; Scholes, John V

    2011-10-01

    Collagenous gastroduodenitis is a rare histopathologic entity characterized by marked subepithelial collagen deposition with associated mucosal inflammatory infiltrate. Only 4 cases have been reported, of which 3 had associated collagenous colitis. Collagenous gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement is exceptionally rare with only 1 case reported so far in the literature. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with dyspepsia and mild anemia, who was found to have nodular gastric and duodenal mucosa on endoscopic examination. Histopathology showed collagenous gastroduodenitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second (and first in English literature) reported case of isolated collagenous gastroduodenitis.

  7. Collagenous gastroduodenitis.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rai, Mridula; Scholes, John V

    2011-10-01

    Collagenous gastroduodenitis is a rare histopathologic entity characterized by marked subepithelial collagen deposition with associated mucosal inflammatory infiltrate. Only 4 cases have been reported, of which 3 had associated collagenous colitis. Collagenous gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement is exceptionally rare with only 1 case reported so far in the literature. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with dyspepsia and mild anemia, who was found to have nodular gastric and duodenal mucosa on endoscopic examination. Histopathology showed collagenous gastroduodenitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second (and first in English literature) reported case of isolated collagenous gastroduodenitis. PMID:21346601

  8. CYTOKINE-INDUCED CHROMATIN MODIFICATIONS OF THE TYPE I COLLAGEN ALPHA 2 GENE DURING INTESTINAL ENDOTHELIAL-TO-MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Tammy; Scarpa, Melania; Rieder, Florian; West, Gail; Stylianou, Eleni

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibrosis of the intestine is currently an irreversible complication of Inflammatory Bowel Disease yet little is understood of the underlying pathogenesis and anti-fibrotic strategies remain elusive. To develop effective therapies, knowledge of the mechanism of transcription and excessive deposition of type I collagen - a hallmark of fibrosis, is needed. We have shown previously that endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) contributes to the pool of intestinal fibrotic cells and that a cytokine cocktail (IL1-β, TNF-α and TGF-β) induces Collagen I alpha 2 (COL1A2) mRNA and protein. Methods Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on pure cultures of human intestinal mucosal endothelial cells undergoing EndoMT were performed with antibodies to specific histone modifications and RNA polymerase II. RT-PCR was used to quantify the levels of Col1A2 and endothelial specific von Willebrand factor (vWF) mRNA. Results We show that cytokines induce selective chromatin modifications (histone 4 hyperacetylation and hypermethylation of histone 3) and phosphorylated RNA polymerase II at the COL1A2 promoter. Hypoacetylated and hypomethylated histone 3 was detected on the repressed vWF gene. Prolonged exposure to cytokines (16 days) retained hyperacetylation of select lysines in H4 on the COL1A2 promoter. Removal of cytokines after 16 days and continued culture for 10 days, showed persistent hyperacetylation at lysine 16 in histone H4. Conclusion This is the first study to show that COL1A2 gene expression is associated with cytokine-induced, temporally ordered and persistent chromatin modifications and suggests that these are important determinants of gene expression in EndoMT and intestinal fibrosis. PMID:23635716

  9. Collagen fillers.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Leslie; Kaufman, Joely; Saghari, Sogol

    2006-01-01

    Collagen implants, both animal and human derived, have been used for soft tissue augmentation for many years. Bovine collagen fillers were the most popular injectable implants for nearly two decades in the United States. Since then, human bioengineered collagen products have been available in addition to hyaluronic acid-containing fillers. This article outlines the different types of injectable collagen implants, injection techniques, preferred methods of treatment, and possible adverse reactions to the injectable materials.

  10. Human collagen genes encoding basement membrane. cap alpha. 1(IV) and. cap alpha. 2(IV) chains map to the distal long arm of chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, C.A.; Emanuel, B.S.; Hansen, J.R.; Cavenee, W.K.; Myers, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    At least 20 genes encode the structurally related collagen chains that comprise > 10 homo- or heterotrimeric types. Six members of this multigene family have been assigned to five chromosomes in the human genome. The two type I genes, ..cap alpha..1 and ..cap alpha..2, are located on chromosomes 17 and 7, respectively, and the ..cap alpha..1(II) gene is located on chromosome 12. Their recent mapping of the ..cap alpha..1(III) and ..cap alpha..2(V) genes to the q24.3 ..-->.. q31 region of chromosome 2 provided the only evidence that the collagen genes are not entirely dispersed. To further determine their organization, the authors and others localized the ..cap alpha..1(IV) gene to chromosome 13 and in their experiments sublocalized the gene to band q34 by in situ hybridization. Here they show the presence of the ..cap alpha..2 type IV locus also on the distal long arm of chromosome 13 by hybridizing a human ..cap alpha..2(IV) cDNA clone to rodent-human hybrids and to metaphase chromosomes. These studies represent the only demonstration of linkage between genes encoding both polypeptide chains of the same collagen type.

  11. Lethal osteogenesis imperfecta congenita and a 300 base pair gene deletion for an alpha 1(I)-like collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Pope, F M; Cheah, K S; Nicholls, A C; Price, A B; Grosveld, F G

    1984-01-01

    Broad boned lethal osteogenesis imperfecta is a severely crippling disease of unknown cause. By means of recombinant DNA technology a 300 base pair deletion in an alpha 1(I)-like collagen gene was detected in six patients and four complete parent-child groups including patients with this disease. One from each set of the patients' clinically unaffected parents also carried the deletion, implying that affected patients were genetic compounds. The study suggests that prenatal diagnosis should be possible with 100% accuracy in subjects without the deletion and with 50% accuracy in those who possess it (who would be either heterozygous--normal, or affected with the disease). Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:6419953

  12. The fibrillar collagen family.

    PubMed

    Exposito, Jean-Yves; Valcourt, Ulrich; Cluzel, Caroline; Lethias, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Collagens, or more precisely collagen-based extracellular matrices, are often considered as a metazoan hallmark. Among the collagens, fibrillar collagens are present from sponges to humans, and are involved in the formation of the well-known striated fibrils. In this review we discuss the different steps in the evolution of this protein family, from the formation of an ancestral fibrillar collagen gene to the formation of different clades. Genomic data from the choanoflagellate (sister group of Metazoa) Monosiga brevicollis, and from diploblast animals, have suggested that the formation of an ancestral alpha chain occurred before the metazoan radiation. Phylogenetic studies have suggested an early emergence of the three clades that were first described in mammals. Hence the duplication events leading to the formation of the A, B and C clades occurred before the eumetazoan radiation. Another important event has been the two rounds of "whole genome duplication" leading to the amplification of fibrillar collagen gene numbers, and the importance of this diversification in developmental processes. We will also discuss some other aspects of fibrillar collagen evolution such as the development of the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation of procollagen molecules and of striated fibrils. PMID:20386646

  13. Recessive Mutations in the α3 (VI) Collagen Gene COL6A3 Cause Early-Onset Isolated Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Zech, Michael; Lam, Daniel D.; Francescatto, Ludmila; Schormair, Barbara; Salminen, Aaro V.; Jochim, Angela; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Lochmüller, Hanns; Strom, Tim M.; Haslinger, Bernhard; Katsanis, Nicholas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    Isolated dystonia is a disorder characterized by involuntary twisting postures arising from sustained muscle contractions. Although autosomal-dominant mutations in TOR1A, THAP1, and GNAL have been found in some cases, the molecular mechanisms underlying isolated dystonia are largely unknown. In addition, although emphasis has been placed on dominant isolated dystonia, the disorder is also transmitted as a recessive trait, for which no mutations have been defined. Using whole-exome sequencing in a recessive isolated dystonia-affected kindred, we identified disease-segregating compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3, a collagen VI gene associated previously with muscular dystrophy. Genetic screening of a further 367 isolated dystonia subjects revealed two additional recessive pedigrees harboring compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3. Strikingly, all affected individuals had at least one pathogenic allele in exon 41, including an exon-skipping mutation that induced an in-frame deletion. We tested the hypothesis that disruption of this exon is pathognomonic for isolated dystonia by inducing a series of in-frame deletions in zebrafish embryos. Consistent with our human genetics data, suppression of the exon 41 ortholog caused deficits in axonal outgrowth, whereas suppression of other exons phenocopied collagen deposition mutants. All recessive mutation carriers demonstrated early-onset segmental isolated dystonia without muscular disease. Finally, we show that Col6a3 is expressed in neurons, with relevant mRNA levels detectable throughout the adult mouse brain. Taken together, our data indicate that loss-of-function mutations affecting a specific region of COL6A3 cause recessive isolated dystonia with underlying neurodevelopmental deficits and highlight the brain extracellular matrix as a contributor to dystonia pathogenesis. PMID:26004199

  14. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Colletti, R B; Trainer, T D

    1989-12-01

    Subepithelial fibrosis has previously been reported in the small intestine (collagenous sprue) and colon (collagenous colitis). We report a 15-yr-old girl with chronic gastritis and subepithelial fibrosis of the gastric corpus who presented with recurrent abdominal pain and acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Nodularity and erythema of the gastric corpus were persistent endoscopic findings. Biopsies revealed patchy chronic active gastritis with a striking focal thick band of collagen immediately beneath the surface epithelial cells that did not extend to deeper portions of the lamina propria. Contrast radiography demonstrated an abnormal mucosa of the gastric corpus with a mosaiclike surface pattern. Numerous studies have failed to elucidate the etiology. Despite treatment with ranitidine, sucralfate, and furazolidone, there has been no clinical or pathologic improvement. The pathogenesis and prognosis of collagenous gastritis, and its relationship to collagenous sprue and collagenous colitis, remain to be defined. PMID:2583419

  15. Mutations within the gene encoding the alpha1(X) chain of type X collagen (COL10A1) occur in individuals with metaphyseal chondrodysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, G.A.; Rash, B.; Grant, M.E.

    1994-09-01

    Type X collagen is specifically and transiently synthesized by hypertrophic chondrocytes at sites of endochondral ossification. The pattern of expression of type X collagen suggests that mutations within the encoding gene (COL10A1) may cause heritable forms of chondrodysplasia. We have previously identified two point mutations within the COL10A1 gene that would lead to amino acid substitutions within the carboxyl-terminal domain of the alpha1(X) chain in two unrelated individuals with metaphyseal condrodysplasia type Schmid (MCDS). We have now used PCR followed by SSCP to analyze the coding and promoter regions of the COL10A1 gene as well as the intron/extron boundaries in six further individuals with MCDS and in eleven individuals with related forms of chondrodysplasia. Using this approach, we identified mono- and dinucleotide deletions in four individuals with MCDS in the region of the gene encoding the carboxyl-terminal domain. In these instances, the deletions led to an alteration in reading frame and premature stop codons that would alter either chain recognition or assembly of the type X collagen molecule. In two individuals with MCDS we did not detect mutations within the COL10A1 gene despite extensive analysis of the coding regions. We also did not detect mutations within COL10A1 in two individuals with MCD type Jansen, one individual with MCD plus melabsorption and neutropenia, three individuals with spondylometaphyseal chondrodysplasia (SMD) type Kozlowski and five individuals with the unclassifiable forms of MCD and SMD.

  16. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Richa; Chetty, Runjan

    2010-12-01

    A 25-year-old patient presented with epigastric pain, which on gastric biopsy revealed the characteristic appearance of collagenous gastritis. There was a thick prominent subepithelial band that was confirmed to be collagen with a Masson's trichrome stain. There was associated Helicobacter pylori gastritis but no evidence of a lymphocytic gastritis. The patient did not have watery diarrhea. Collagenous gastritis can occur in young patients, be restricted to the stomach, and can be associated with celiac disease. PMID:19103610

  17. Constitutive Smad signaling and Smad-dependent collagen gene expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Asish K Wei, Jun; Wu, Minghua; Varga, John

    2008-09-19

    Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}), a potent inducer of collagen synthesis, is implicated in pathological fibrosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR-{gamma}) is a nuclear hormone receptor that regulates adipogenesis and numerous other biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that collagen gene expression was markedly elevated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking PPAR-{gamma} compared to heterozygous control MEFs. Treatment with the PPAR-{gamma} ligand 15d-PGJ{sub 2} failed to down-regulate collagen gene expression in PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs, whereas reconstitution of these cells with ectopic PPAR-{gamma} resulted in their normalization. Compared to control MEFs, PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs displayed elevated levels of the Type I TGF-{beta} receptor (T{beta}RI), and secreted more TGF-{beta}1 into the media. Furthermore, PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs showed constitutive phosphorylation of cellular Smad2 and Smad3, even in the absence of exogenous TGF-{beta}, which was abrogated by the ALK5 inhibitor SB431542. Constitutive Smad2/3 phosphorylation in PPAR-{gamma} null MEFs was associated with Smad3 binding to its cognate DNA recognition sequences, and interaction with coactivator p300 previously implicated in TGF-{beta} responses. Taken together, these results indicate that loss of PPAR-{gamma} in MEFs is associated with upregulation of collagen synthesis, and activation of intracellular Smad signal transduction, due, at least in part, to autocrine TGF-{beta} stimulation.

  18. Bioengineered collagens

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  19. A novel type II collagen gene mutation in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and extensive intrafamilial phenotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sakamoto, Yuma; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia caused by a novel type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation and the family's phenotypic diversity. Clinical and radiographic examinations of skeletal dysplasia were conducted on seven affected family members across two generations. The entire coding region of COL2A1, including the flanking intron regions, was analyzed with PCR and direct sequencing. The stature of the subjects ranged from extremely short to within normal height range. Hip deformity and advanced osteoarthritis were noted in all the subjects, ranging from severe coxa plana to mild acetabular dysplasia. Atlantoaxial subluxation combined with a hypoplastic odontoid process was found in three of the subjects. Various degrees of platyspondyly were confirmed in all subjects. Genetically, a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala) was identified in all the affected family members; however, it was not present in the one unaffected family member tested. We described a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala). Phenotypes were diverse even among individuals with the same mutation and within the same family. PMID:27274858

  20. A novel type II collagen gene mutation in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and extensive intrafamilial phenotypic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sakamoto, Yuma; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia caused by a novel type II collagen gene (COL2A1) mutation and the family’s phenotypic diversity. Clinical and radiographic examinations of skeletal dysplasia were conducted on seven affected family members across two generations. The entire coding region of COL2A1, including the flanking intron regions, was analyzed with PCR and direct sequencing. The stature of the subjects ranged from extremely short to within normal height range. Hip deformity and advanced osteoarthritis were noted in all the subjects, ranging from severe coxa plana to mild acetabular dysplasia. Atlantoaxial subluxation combined with a hypoplastic odontoid process was found in three of the subjects. Various degrees of platyspondyly were confirmed in all subjects. Genetically, a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala) was identified in all the affected family members; however, it was not present in the one unaffected family member tested. We described a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and a novel COL2A1 mutation (c.1349G>C, p.Gly450Ala). Phenotypes were diverse even among individuals with the same mutation and within the same family. PMID:27274858

  1. Differences between Mice and Humans in Regulation and the Molecular Network of Collagen, Type III, Alpha-1 at the Gene Expression Level: Obstacles that Translational Research Must Overcome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lishi; Liu, Hongchao; Jiao, Yan; Wang, Erjian; Clark, Stephen H; Postlethwaite, Arnold E; Gu, Weikuan; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Collagen, type III, alpha-1 (COL3A1) is essential for normal collagen I fibrillogenesis in many organs. There are differences in phenotypes of mutations in the COL3A1 gene in humans and mutations in mice. In order to investigate whether the regulation and gene network of COL3A1 is the same in healthy populations of mice and humans, we compared the quantitative trait loci (QTL) that regulate the expression level of COL3A1 and the gene network of COL3A1 pathways between humans and mice using whole genome expression profiles. Our results showed that, for the regulation of expression of Col3a1 in mice, an eQTL on chromosome (Chr) 12 regulates the expression of Col3a1. However, expression of genes in the syntenic region on human Chr 7 has no association with the expression level of COL3A1. For the gene network comparison, we identified 44 top genes whose expression levels are strongly associated with that of Col3a1 in mice. We next identified 41 genes strongly associated with the expression level of COL3A1 in humans. There are a few but significant differences in the COL3A1 gene network between humans and mice. Several genes showed opposite association with expression of COL3A1. These genes are known to play important roles in development and function of the extracellular matrix of the lung. Difference in the molecular pathway of key genes in the COL3A1 gene network in humans and mice suggest caution should be used in extrapolating results from models of human lung diseases in mice to clinical lung diseases in humans. These differences may influence the efficacy of drugs in humans whose development employed mouse models. PMID:26151842

  2. Collagenous gastroduodenitis on collagenous colitis.

    PubMed

    Stolte, M; Ritter, M; Borchard, F; Koch-Scherrer, G

    1990-07-01

    We report on a case of collagenous gastroduodenitis with concomitant collagenous colitis in a 75-year-old woman with watery diarrhea of approximately six months' standing. The step biopsy material obtained from the colon revealed continuous collagenous colitis with thickening of the basal membrane to 30 microns. The biopsies taken from the stomach and duodenum also revealed a band-like deposition of collagen in the duodenum (bulb and proximal portion of the descending portion) along the basal membrane of the lining epithelium, associated with partial atrophy of the villi. In the stomach, this band of collagen was located, parallel to the mucosal surface, at the level of the floor of the foveolae. PMID:2209504

  3. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in mice features regulatory transcriptional network connecting major histocompatibility complex (MHC H2) with autoantigen genes in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Donate, Paula B; Fornari, Thaís A; Junta, Cristina M; Magalhães, Danielle A; Macedo, Cláudia; Cunha, Thiago M; Nguyen, Catherine; Cunha, Fernando Q; Passos, Geraldo A

    2011-05-01

    Considering that imbalance of central tolerance in the thymus contributes to aggressive autoimmunity, we compared the expression of peripheral tissue autoantigens (PTA) genes, which are involved in self-representation in the thymic stroma, of two mouse strains; DBA-1/J (MHC-H2(q)) susceptible and DBA-2/J (MHC-H2(d)) resistant to collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We evaluate whether these strains differ in their thymic gene expression, allowing identification of genes that might play a role in susceptibility/resistance to CIA. Microarray profiling showed that 1093 PTA genes were differentially modulated between collagen immunized DBA-1/J and DBA-2/J mice. These genes were assigned to 17 different tissues/organs, including joints/bone, characterizing the promiscuous gene expression (PGE), which is implicated in self-representation. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that Aire (autoimmune regulator), an important regulator of the PGE process, Aire-dependent (insulin), Aire-independent (Col2A1 and Gad67), and other 22 joint/bone autoantigen genes were down-regulated in DBA-1/J compared with DBA-2/J in the thymus. Considering the importance of MHC-H2 in peptide-self presentation and autoimmunity susceptibility, we reconstructed transcriptional networks of both strains based on actual microarray data. The networks clearly demonstrated different MHC-H2 transcriptional interactions with PTAs genes. DBA-1/J strain featured MHC-H2 as a node influencing downstream genes. Differently, in DBA-2/J strain network MHC-H2 was exclusively self-regulated and does not control other genes. These findings provide evidence that CIA susceptibility in mice may be a reflex of a cascade-like transcriptional control connecting different genes to MHC-H2 in the thymus.

  4. The use of collagen-based scaffolds to simulate prostate cancer bone metastases with potential for evaluating delivery of nanoparticulate gene therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kathleen A; Guo, Jianfeng; Tierney, Erica G; Curtin, Caroline M; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Darcy, Raphael; O'Brien, Fergal J; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer bone metastases are a leading cause of cancer-related death in men with current treatments offering only marginally improved rates of survival. Advances in the understanding of the genetic basis of prostate cancer provide the opportunity to develop gene-based medicines capable of treating metastatic disease. The aim of this work was to establish a 3D cell culture model of prostate cancer bone metastasis using collagen-based scaffolds, to characterise this model, and to assess the potential of the model to evaluate delivery of gene therapeutics designed to target bone metastases. Two prostate cancer cell lines (PC3 and LNCaP) were cultured in 2D standard culture and compared to 3D cell growth on three different collagen-based scaffolds (collagen and composites of collagen containing either glycosaminoglycan or nanohydroxyapatite). The 3D model was characterised for cell proliferation, viability and for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzyme and Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) secretion. Chemosensitivity to docetaxel treatment was assessed in 2D in comparison to 3D. Nanoparticles (NPs) containing siRNA formulated using a modified cyclodextrin were delivered to the cells on the scaffolds and gene silencing was quantified. Both prostate cancer cell lines actively infiltrated and proliferated on the scaffolds. Cell culture in 3D resulted in reduced levels of MMP1 and MMP9 secretion in PC3 cells. In contrast, LNCaP cells grown in 3D secreted elevated levels of PSA, particularly on the scaffold composed of collagen and glycosaminoglycans. Both cell lines grown in 3D displayed increased resistance to docetaxel treatment. The cyclodextrin.siRNA nanoparticles achieved cellular uptake and knocked down the endogenous GAPDH gene in the 3D model. In conclusion, development of a novel 3D cell culture model of prostate cancer bone metastasis has been initiated resulting, for the first time, in the successful delivery of gene therapeutics in a 3D in vitro model

  5. Structure of the human type IV collagen COL4A6 gene, which is mutated in Alport syndrome-associated leiomyomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu |; Zhou, Jing; Reeders, S.T.

    1996-05-01

    Basement membrane (type IV) collagen, a subfamily of the collagen protein family, is encoded by six distinct genes in mammals. Three of those, COL4A3, COL4A4, and COL4A5, are linked with Alport syndrome (hereditary nephritis). Patients with leimoyomatosis associated with Alport syndrome have been shown to have deletions in the 5{prime} end of the COL4A6 gene, in addition to having deletions in COL4A6. The human COL4A6 gene is reported to be 425 kb as determined by mapping of overlapping YAC clones by probes for its 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends. In the present study we describe the complete exon/intron size pattern of the human COL4A6 gene. The 12 {lambda} phage clones characterized in the study spanned a total of 110 kb, including 85 kb of the actual gene and 25 kb of flanking sequences. The overlapping clones contained all 46 exons of the gene and all introns, except for intron 2. Since the total size of the exons and all introns except for intron 2 is about 85 kb, intron 2 must be about 340 kb. All exons of the gene were assigned to EcoRI restriction fragments to facilitate analysis of the gene in patients with leiomyomatosis associated with Alport syndrome. The exon size pattern of COL4A6 is highly homologous with that of the human and mouse COL4A2 genes, with 27 of the 46 exons of COL4A6 being identical in size between the genes. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Systemic gene transfer of binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) prevents disease progression in murine collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shields, A M; Klavinskis, L S; Antoniou, M; Wooley, P H; Collins, H L; Panayi, G S; Thompson, S J; Corrigall, V M

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) has previously demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in multiple models of inflammatory arthritis. We investigated whether these immunoregulatory properties could be exploited using gene therapy techniques. A single intraperitoneal injection of lentiviral vector containing the murine BiP (Lenti-mBiP) or green fluorescent protein (Lenti-GFP) transgene was administered in low- or high-dose studies during early arthritis. Disease activity was assessed by visual scoring, histology, serum cytokine and antibody production measured by cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and ELISA, respectively. Lentiviral vector treatment caused significant induction of interferon (IFN)-γ responses regardless of the transgene; however, further specific effects were directly attributable to the BiP transgene. In both studies Lenti-mBiP suppressed clinical arthritis significantly. Histological examination showed that low-dose Lenti-mBiP suppressed inflammatory cell infiltration, cartilage destruction and significantly reduced pathogenic anti-type II collagen (CII) antibodies. Lenti-mBiP treatment caused significant up-regulation of soluble cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (sCTLA-4) serum levels and down-regulation of interleukin (IL)-17A production in response to CII cell restimulation. In-vitro studies confirmed that Lenti-mBiP spleen cells could significantly suppress the release of IL-17A from CII primed responder cells following CII restimulation in vitro, and this suppression was associated with increased IL-10 production. Neutralization of CTLA-4 in further co-culture experiments demonstrated inverse regulation of IL-17A production. In conclusion, these data demonstrate proof of principle for the therapeutic potential of systemic lentiviral vector delivery of the BiP transgene leading to immunoregulation of arthritis by induction of soluble CTLA-4 and suppression of IL-17A production. PMID:25228326

  7. Tenascin-X, collagen, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: tenascin-X gene defects can protect against adverse cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Petersen, John W; Douglas, J Yellowlees

    2013-09-01

    Long thought to be two separate syndromes, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) appear on close examination to represent the same syndrome, with virtually identical clinical manifestations. While both EDS-HT and BJHS were long thought to lack the genetic loci of other connective tissue disorders, including all other types of EDS, researchers have discovered a genetic locus that accounts for manifestations of both EDS-HT and BJHS in a small population of patients. However, given the modest sample size of these studies and the strong correlation between serum levels of tenascin-X with clinical symptoms of both EDS-HT and BJHS, strong evidence exists for the origins of both types of hypermobility originating in haploinsufficiency or deficiency of the gene TNXB, responsible for tenascin-X. Tenascin-X regulates both the structure and stability of elastic fibers and organizes collagen fibrils in the extra-cellular matrix (ECM), impacting the rigidity or elasticity of virtually every cell in the body. While the impacts of tenascin-X insufficiency or deficiency on the skin and joints have received some attention, its potential cardiovascular impacts remain relatively unexplored. Here we set forth two novel hypotheses. First, TNXB haploinsufficiency or deficiency causes the range of clinical manifestations long identified with both EDS-HT and BJHS. And, second, that haploinsufficiency or deficiency of TNXB may provide some benefits against adverse cardiovascular events, including heart attack and stroke, by lowering levels of arterial stiffness associated with aging, as well as by enhancing accommodation of accrued atherosclerotic plaques. This two-fold hypothesis provides insights into the mechanisms underlying the syndromes previous identified with joint hypermobility, at the same time the hypothesis also sheds light on the role of the composition of the extracellular matrix and its impacts on endothelial sheer

  8. Effects of Food-Derived Collagen Peptides on the Expression of Keratin and Keratin-Associated Protein Genes in the Mouse Skin.

    PubMed

    Le Vu, Phuong; Takatori, Ryo; Iwamoto, Taku; Akagi, Yutaka; Satsu, Hideo; Totsuka, Mamoru; Chida, Kazuhiro; Sato, Kenji; Shimizu, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Oral ingestion of collagen peptides (CP) has long been suggested to exert beneficial effects on the skin, but the molecular events induced by CP on the skin remain unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of oral CP administration on gene expression in hairless mouse skin and of prolyl-hydroxyproline (Pro-Hyp), a collagen-derived dipeptide, on gene expression in a coculture of mouse skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Using microarray analysis, we found that oral administration of CP to hairless mice for 6 weeks induced increased expression of Krtap and Krt genes in the skin. Annotation analysis using DAVID revealed that a group of the up-regulated genes, Gprc5d, Sprr2a1, Krt27 and Krtap16-7, is associated with the development of the epidermis and the hair cycle. In addition, the presence of Pro-Hyp (200 μM) induced an increase in the expression of Krtap16-7, Krtap15, Krtap14 and Krtap8-2 in keratinocytes in coculture, partially resembling the in vivo result. The Pro-Hyp-induced up-regulation of these genes was not observed when keratinocytes were cultured without fibroblasts, suggesting that the presence of fibroblasts is essential for the effects of Pro-Hyp. Our study presents new insights into the effects of CP on the skin, which might link to the hair cycle. PMID:25721900

  9. An upstream regulatory region mediates high-level, tissue-specific expression of the human alpha 1(I) collagen gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Slack, J L; Liska, D J; Bornstein, P

    1991-01-01

    Studies in vitro have not adequately resolved the role of intronic and upstream elements in regulating expression of the alpha 1(I) collagen gene. To address this issue, we generated 12 separate lines of transgenic mice with alpha 1(I) collagen-human growth hormone (hGH) constructs containing different amounts of 5'-flanking sequence, with or without most of the first intron. Transgenes driven by 2.3 kb of alpha 1(I) 5'-flanking sequence, whether or not they contained the first intron, were expressed at a high level and in a tissue-specific manner in seven out of seven independent lines of transgenic mice. In most tissues, the transgene was expressed at levels approaching that of the endogenous alpha 1(I) gene and was regulated identically with the endogenous gene as animals aged. However, in lung, expression of the transgene was anomalously high, and in muscle, expression was lower than that of the endogenous gene, suggesting that in these tissues other regions of the gene may participate in directing appropriate expression. Five lines of mice were generated containing transgenes driven by 0.44 kb of alpha 1(I) 5'-flanking sequence (with or without the first intron), and expression was detected in four out of five of these lines. The level of expression of the 0.44-kb constructs in the major collagen-producing tissues was 15- to 500-fold lower than that observed with the longer 2.3-kb promoter. While transgenes containing the 0.44-kb promoter and the first intron retained a modest degree of tissue-specific expression, those without the first intron lacked tissue specificity and were poorly expressed in all tissues except lung.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2005897

  10. Association of Reduced Type IX Collagen Gene Expression in Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes With Epigenetic Silencing by DNA Hypermethylation

    PubMed Central

    Imagawa, Kei; de Andrés, María C; Hashimoto, Ko; Itoi, Eiji; Otero, Miguel; Roach, Helmtrud I; Goldring, Mary B; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the changes in collagen gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) human chondrocytes are associated with changes in the DNA methylation status in the COL2A1 enhancer and COL9A1 promoter. Methods Expression levels were determined using quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and the percentage of DNA methylation was quantified by pyrosequencing. The effect of CpG methylation on COL9A1 promoter activity was determined using a CpG-free vector; cotransfections with expression vectors encoding SOX9, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), and HIF-2α were carried out to analyze COL9A1 promoter activities in response to changes in the methylation status. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were carried out to validate SOX9 binding to the COL9A1 promoter and the influence of DNA methylation. Results Although COL2A1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in OA chondrocytes were 19-fold higher than those in the controls, all of the CpG sites in the COL2A1 enhancer were totally demethylated in both samples. The levels of COL9A1 mRNA in OA chondrocytes were 6,000-fold lower than those in controls; 6 CpG sites of the COL9A1 promoter were significantly hypermethylated in OA patients as compared with controls. Treatment with 5-azadeoxycitidine enhanced COL9A1 gene expression and prevented culture-induced hypermethylation. In vitro methylation decreased COL9A1 promoter activity. Mutations in the 5 CpG sites proximal to the transcription start site decreased COL9A1 promoter activity. Cotransfection with SOX9 enhanced COL9A1 promoter activity; CpG methylation attenuated SOX9 binding to the COL9A1 promoter. Conclusion This first demonstration that hypermethylation is associated with down-regulation of COL9A1 expression in OA cartilage highlights the pivotal role of epigenetics in OA, involving not only hypomethylation, but also hypermethylation, with important therapeutic implications for OA treatment. PMID:25048791

  11. An N-terminal glycine to cysteine mutation in the collagen COL1A1 gene produces moderately severe osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, W.; Scott, L.; Cohn, D.

    1994-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is usually due to mutations in the type I procollagen genes COL1A1 and COL1A2. Point mutations close to the N-terminus are generally milder than those near the C-terminus of the molecule (the gradient hypothesis of collagen mutations). We describe a patient with moderately severe OI due to a mutation in the N-terminal portion of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Electrophoretic analysis of collagen isolated from fibroblast cultures suggested the abnormal presence of a cysteine in the N-terminal portion of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Five overlapping DNA fragments amplified from fibroblast RNA were screened for mutations using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and heteroduplex analyses. Direct DNA sequence analysis of the single positive fragment demonstrated a G to T transversion, corresponding to a glycine to cysteine substitution at position 226 of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. The mutation was confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis of amplified genomic DNA. The mutation was not present in fibroblasts from either phenotypically normal parent. Combining this mutation with other reported mutations, glycine to cysteine substitutions at positions 205, 211, 223, and 226 produce a moderately severe phenotype whereas flanking mutations at positions 175 and 382 produce a mild phenotype. This data supports a regional rather than a gradient model of the relationship between the nature and location of type I collagen mutations and OI phenotype.

  12. Regulation of collagenase-3 and osteocalcin gene expression by collagen and osteopontin in differentiating MC3T3-E1 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Alonzo, Richard C.; Kowalski, Aaron J.; Denhardt, David T.; Nickols, G. Allen; Partridge, Nicola C.

    2002-01-01

    Both collagenase-3 and osteocalcin mRNAs are expressed maximally during the later stages of osteoblast differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that collagenase-3 mRNA expression in differentiating MC3T3-E1 cells is dependent upon the presence of ascorbic acid, is inhibited in the presence of the collagen synthesis inhibitor, 3,4-dehydroproline, and is stimulated by growth on collagen in the absence of ascorbic acid. Transient transfection studies show that collagenase-3 promoter activity increases during cell differentiation and requires the presence of ascorbic acid. Additionally, we show that, in differentiating MC3T3-E1 cells, collagenase-3 gene expression increases in the presence of an anti-osteopontin monoclonal antibody that binds near the RGD motif of this protein, whereas osteocalcin expression is inhibited. Furthermore, an RGD peptidomimetic compound, designed to block interaction of ligands to the alpha(v) integrin subunit, increases osteocalcin expression and inhibits collagenase-3 expression, suggesting that the RGD peptidomimetic initiates certain alpha(v) integrin signaling in osteoblastic cells. Overall, these studies demonstrate that stimulation of collagenase-3 expression during osteoblast differentiation requires synthesis of a collagenous matrix and that osteopontin and alpha(v) integrins exert divergent regulation of collagenase-3 and osteocalcin expression during osteoblast differentiation.

  13. Proline with or without hydroxyproline influences collagen concentration and regulates prolyl 4-hydroxylase α (I) gene expression in juvenile turbo ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaikai; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui; Liufu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yanjiao; Peng, Mo; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary proline (Pro), and Pro and hydroxyproline (Hyp) in combination on the growth performance, total Hyp and collagen concentrations of tissues, and prolyl 4-hydroxylase α(I) (P4H α(I)) gene expression in juvenile turbot feeding high plant protein diets. A diet containing 50% crude protein and 12% crude lipid was formulated as the basal and control, on which other two protein and lipid contents identical experimental diets were formulated by supplementing the basal with either 0.75% Pro (Pro-0.75) or 0.75% Pro and 0.75% Hyp (Pro+Hyp). Four groups of fish in indoor seawater recirculating systems, 35 individuals each, were fed twice a day to apparent satiation for 10 weeks. The results showed that dietary Pro and Hyp supplementation had no significant effect on growth performance and feed utilization of juvenile turbot (P > 0.05). Total Hyp and collagen concentrations in muscle were significantly increased when dietary Pro and Hyp increased (P <0.05), and fish fed diet Pro+Hyp showed significantly higher free Hyp content in plasma than those fed other diets (P <0.05). The expression of P4H a(I) gene in liver and muscle was significantly up regulated in fish fed diet Pro-0.75 in comparison with control (P <0.05); however the gene was significantly down regulated in fish fed diet Pro+Hyp in muscle in comparison with fish fed diet Pro-0.75 (P <0.05). It can be concluded that supplement of crystal L-Pro and L-Hyp to high plant protein diets did not show positive effects on growth performance of juvenile turbot, but enhanced total collagen concentrations in muscle.

  14. Identification of novel pro-alpha2(IX) collagen gene mutations in two families with distinctive oligo-epiphyseal forms of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Holden, P; Canty, E G; Mortier, G R; Zabel, B; Spranger, J; Carr, A; Grant, M E; Loughlin, J A; Briggs, M D

    1999-01-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder with marked clinical and radiographic variability. Traditionally, the mild "Ribbing" and severe "Fairbank" types have been used to define a broad phenotypic spectrum. Mutations in the gene encoding cartilage oligomeric-matrix protein have been shown to result in several types of MED, whereas mutations in the gene encoding the alpha2 chain of type IX collagen (COL9A2) have so far been found only in two families with the Fairbank type of MED. Type IX collagen is a heterotrimer of pro-alpha chains derived from three distinct genes-COL9A1, COL9A2, and COL9A3. In this article, we describe two families with distinctive oligo-epiphyseal forms of MED, which are heterozygous for different mutations in the COL9A2 exon 3/intron 3 splice-donor site. Both of these mutations result in the skipping of exon 3 from COL9A2 mRNA, but the position of the mutation in the splice-donor site determines the stability of the mRNA produced from the mutant COL9A2 allele. PMID:10364514

  15. Linkage of the gene that encodes the alpha 1 chain of type V collagen (COL5A1) to type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS II).

    PubMed

    Loughlin, J; Irven, C; Hardwick, L J; Butcher, S; Walsh, S; Wordsworth, P; Sykes, B

    1995-09-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of heritable disorders of connective tissue with skin, ligaments and blood vessels being the main sites affected. The commonest variant (EDS II) exhibits an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and is characterized by joint hypermobility, cigarette paper scars, lax skin and excessive bruising. As yet no gene has been linked to EDS II, nor has linkage been established to a specific region of the genome. However, several candidate genes encoding proteins of the extracellular matrix have been excluded. Using an intragenic simple sequence repeat polymorphism, we report linkage of the COL5A1 gene, which encodes the alpha 1(V) chain of type V collagen, to EDS II. A maximum LOD score (Zmax) for linkage of 8.3 at theta = 0.00 was generated for a single large pedigree.

  16. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoyi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Takashi; Kondo, Yutaka; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Iijima, Katsunori; Imatani, Akira; Watanabe, Mika; Shirane, Akio; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we report a case of rare collagenous gastritis. The patient was a 25-year-old man who had experienced nausea, abdominal distention and epigastralgia since 2005. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) carried out at initial examination by the patient's local doctor revealed an extensively discolored depression from the upper gastric body to the lower gastric body, mainly including the greater curvature, accompanied by residual mucosa with multiple islands and nodularity with a cobblestone appearance. Initial biopsies sampled from the nodules and accompanying atrophic mucosa were diagnosed as chronic gastritis. In August, 2011, the patient was referred to Tohoku University Hospital for observation and treatment. EGD at our hospital showed the same findings as those by the patient's local doctor. Pathological findings included a membranous collagen band in the superficial layer area of the gastric mucosa, which led to a diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic findings to make a diagnosis. PMID:23363075

  17. Degenerated intervertebral disc prolapse and its association of collagen I alpha 1 Spl gene polymorphism: A preliminary case control study of Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Anjankar, Shailendra D; Poornima, Subhadra; Raju, Subodh; Jaleel, MA; Bhiladvala, Dilnavaz; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2015-01-01

    Background: Degenerated disc disease (DDD) is a common disorder responsible for increased morbidity in a productive age group. Its etiology is multifactorial and genetic factors have been predominantly implicated. Disc prolapse results due to tear in the annulus, which is a fibrous structure composed largely of type I collagen. Functional polymorphism at the Sp1 site of the collagen I alpha 1 (COL1A1) gene has shown a positive association with DDD in Dutch and Greek populations. The purpose of this study was to assess COL1A1 Sp1 gene polymorphism in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Fifty clinically and radiologically proven patients with disc prolapse requiring surgery were included as cases and 50 healthy, age-matched volunteers served as controls. After isolating DNA from their blood sample, genotyping for COL1A1 polymorphism (rs1800012) was performed and identified as GG, GT, and TT. Results: The mean age and body mass index in cases and controls were similar. 76% of the patients were males. The most common site of disc degeneration was L4–L5 (36%), followed by L5–S1 (34%). Homozygous–GG, heterozygous GT, and homozygous TT genotypes were seen in 38 (76%), 10 (20%) and 2 (4%) cases respectively, controls had similar percentage of genotypes as well. The alleles in cases and the control group showed no significant difference (P = 0.6744) and followed the Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium in the study population. Conclusion: The COL1A1 (rs1800012) is in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in the present subset of Indian population. But taken as a single factor, it was not found to be associated with DDD in this preliminary study. Disc degeneration is multifactorial and also anticipated to be a result of multiple genes involvement and gene-gene interaction. PMID:26806964

  18. Targeted insertions of two exogenous collagen genes into both alleles of their endogenous loci in cultured human cells: the insertions are directed by relatively short fragments containing the promoters and the 5' ends of the genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, A; Smelt, S; Mewar, R; Fertala, A; Sieron, A L; Overhauser, J; Prockop, D J

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that type II procollagen is synthesized by HT-1080 cells that are stably transfected with constructs of the human COL2A1 gene that contain the promoter and 5' end of either the COL2A1 gene or the human COL1A1 gene. Since the host HT-1080 cells were from a human tumor line that synthesizes type IV collagen but not type II or type I procollagen, the results suggested that the constructs were integrated near active enhancers or promoters. Here, however, we demonstrate that a 33-kb construct of the COL2A1 gene containing a 5' fragment from the same gene was inserted into both alleles of the endogenous COL2A1 gene on chromosome 12, apparently by homologous recombination by a nonconservative pathway. In contrast, a similar construct of the COL2A1 gene in which the 5' end was replaced with a 1.9-kb fragment from the 5' end of the COL1A1 gene was inserted into both alleles of the locus for the COL1A1 gene on chromosome 17. Therefore, targeted insertion of the gene construct was not directed by the degree of sequence homology. Instead, it was directed by the relatively short 5' fragment from the COL1A1 gene that contained the promoter and the initially transcribed sequences of the gene. After insertion, both gene constructs were expressed from previously inactive loci. Images PMID:8041796

  19. Gene structure for the. alpha. 1 chain of a human short-chain collagen (type XIII) with alternatively spliced transcripts and translation termination codon at the 5' end of the last exon

    SciTech Connect

    Tikka, L.; Pihlajaniemi, T.; Henttu, P.; Prockop, D.J.; Tryggvason, K. )

    1988-10-01

    Two overlapping human genomic clones that encode a short-chain collagen, designated {alpha}1(XIII), were isolated by using recently described cDNA clones. Characterization of the cosmid clones that span {approx} 65,000 base pairs (bp) of the 3' end of the gene established several unusual features of this collagen gene. The last exon encodes solely the 3' untranslated region and it begins with a complete stop codon. The 10 adjacent exons vary in size from 27 to 87 bp and two of them are 54 bp. Therefore, the {alpha}1-chain gene of type XIII collagen has some features found in genes for fibrillar collagens but other features that are distinctly different. Previous analysis of overlapping cDNA clones and nuclease S1 mapping of mRNAs indicated one alternative splicing site causing a deletion of 36 bp from the mature mRNA. The present study showed that the 36 bp is contained within the gene as a single exon and also that the gene has a 45-bp -Gly-Xaa-Xaa- repeat coding exon not found in the cDNA clones previously characterized. Nuclease S1 mapping experiments indicated that this 45-bp exon is found in normal human skin fibroblast mRNAs. Accordingly, the data demonstrate that there is alternative splicing of at least two exons of the type {alpha}1(XIII)-chain gene.

  20. Novel form of X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss with cochlear malformation caused by a mutation in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6.

    PubMed

    Rost, Simone; Bach, Elisa; Neuner, Cordula; Nanda, Indrajit; Dysek, Sandra; Bittner, Reginald E; Keller, Alexander; Bartsch, Oliver; Mlynski, Robert; Haaf, Thomas; Müller, Clemens R; Kunstmann, Erdmute

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is the most common human sensorineural disorder. Genetic causes are highly heterogeneous, with mutations detected in >40 genes associated with nonsyndromic hearing loss, to date. Whereas autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant inheritance is prevalent, X-linked forms of nonsyndromic hearing impairment are extremely rare. Here, we present a Hungarian three-generation family with X-linked nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and the underlying genetic defect. Next-generation sequencing and subsequent segregation analysis detected a missense mutation (c.1771G>A, p.Gly591Ser) in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6 in all affected family members. Bioinformatic analysis and expression studies support this substitution as being causative. COL4A6 encodes the alpha-6 chain of type IV collagen of basal membranes, which forms a heterotrimer with two alpha-5 chains encoded by COL4A5. Whereas mutations in COL4A5 and contiguous X-chromosomal deletions involving COL4A5 and COL4A6 are associated with X-linked Alport syndrome, a nephropathy associated with deafness and cataract, mutations in COL4A6 alone have not been related to any hereditary disease so far. Moreover, our index patient and other affected family members show normal renal and ocular function, which is not consistent with Alport syndrome, but with a nonsyndromic type of hearing loss. In situ hybridization and immunostaining demonstrated expression of the COL4A6 homologs in the otic vesicle of the zebrafish and in the murine inner ear, supporting its role in normal ear development and function. In conclusion, our results suggest COL4A6 as being the fourth gene associated with X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss. PMID:23714752

  1. Novel form of X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss with cochlear malformation caused by a mutation in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6.

    PubMed

    Rost, Simone; Bach, Elisa; Neuner, Cordula; Nanda, Indrajit; Dysek, Sandra; Bittner, Reginald E; Keller, Alexander; Bartsch, Oliver; Mlynski, Robert; Haaf, Thomas; Müller, Clemens R; Kunstmann, Erdmute

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is the most common human sensorineural disorder. Genetic causes are highly heterogeneous, with mutations detected in >40 genes associated with nonsyndromic hearing loss, to date. Whereas autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant inheritance is prevalent, X-linked forms of nonsyndromic hearing impairment are extremely rare. Here, we present a Hungarian three-generation family with X-linked nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and the underlying genetic defect. Next-generation sequencing and subsequent segregation analysis detected a missense mutation (c.1771G>A, p.Gly591Ser) in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6 in all affected family members. Bioinformatic analysis and expression studies support this substitution as being causative. COL4A6 encodes the alpha-6 chain of type IV collagen of basal membranes, which forms a heterotrimer with two alpha-5 chains encoded by COL4A5. Whereas mutations in COL4A5 and contiguous X-chromosomal deletions involving COL4A5 and COL4A6 are associated with X-linked Alport syndrome, a nephropathy associated with deafness and cataract, mutations in COL4A6 alone have not been related to any hereditary disease so far. Moreover, our index patient and other affected family members show normal renal and ocular function, which is not consistent with Alport syndrome, but with a nonsyndromic type of hearing loss. In situ hybridization and immunostaining demonstrated expression of the COL4A6 homologs in the otic vesicle of the zebrafish and in the murine inner ear, supporting its role in normal ear development and function. In conclusion, our results suggest COL4A6 as being the fourth gene associated with X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss.

  2. Novel form of X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss with cochlear malformation caused by a mutation in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6

    PubMed Central

    Rost, Simone; Bach, Elisa; Neuner, Cordula; Nanda, Indrajit; Dysek, Sandra; Bittner, Reginald E; Keller, Alexander; Bartsch, Oliver; Mlynski, Robert; Haaf, Thomas; Müller, Clemens R; Kunstmann, Erdmute

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hearing loss is the most common human sensorineural disorder. Genetic causes are highly heterogeneous, with mutations detected in >40 genes associated with nonsyndromic hearing loss, to date. Whereas autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant inheritance is prevalent, X-linked forms of nonsyndromic hearing impairment are extremely rare. Here, we present a Hungarian three-generation family with X-linked nonsyndromic congenital hearing loss and the underlying genetic defect. Next-generation sequencing and subsequent segregation analysis detected a missense mutation (c.1771G>A, p.Gly591Ser) in the type IV collagen gene COL4A6 in all affected family members. Bioinformatic analysis and expression studies support this substitution as being causative. COL4A6 encodes the alpha-6 chain of type IV collagen of basal membranes, which forms a heterotrimer with two alpha-5 chains encoded by COL4A5. Whereas mutations in COL4A5 and contiguous X-chromosomal deletions involving COL4A5 and COL4A6 are associated with X-linked Alport syndrome, a nephropathy associated with deafness and cataract, mutations in COL4A6 alone have not been related to any hereditary disease so far. Moreover, our index patient and other affected family members show normal renal and ocular function, which is not consistent with Alport syndrome, but with a nonsyndromic type of hearing loss. In situ hybridization and immunostaining demonstrated expression of the COL4A6 homologs in the otic vesicle of the zebrafish and in the murine inner ear, supporting its role in normal ear development and function. In conclusion, our results suggest COL4A6 as being the fourth gene associated with X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss. PMID:23714752

  3. Retrovirus-induced interference with collagen I gene expression in Mov13 fibroblasts is maintained in the absence of DNA methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H; Hartung, S; Breindl, M

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the role of DNA methylation in repression of the murine alpha 1 type I collagen (COL1A1) gene in Mov13 fibroblasts. In Mov13 mice, a retroviral provirus has inserted into the first intron of the COL1A1 gene and blocks its expression at the level of transcriptional initiation. We found that regulatory sequences in the COL1A1 promoter region that are involved in the tissue-specific regulation of the gene are unmethylated in collagen-expressing wild-type fibroblasts and methylated in Mov13 fibroblasts, confirming and extending earlier observations. To directly assess the role of DNA methylation in the repression of COL1A1 gene transcription, we treated Mov13 fibroblasts with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine. This treatment resulted in a demethylation of the COL1A1 regulatory sequences but failed to activate transcription of the COL1A1 gene. Moreover, the 5-azacytidine treatment induced a transcription-competent chromatin structure in the retroviral sequences but not in the COL1A1 promoter. In DNA transfection and microinjection experiments, we found that the provirus interfered with transcriptional activity of the COL1A1 promoter in Mov13 fibroblasts but not in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In contrast, the wild-type COL1A1 promoter was transcriptionally active in Mov13 fibroblasts. These experiments showed that the COL1A1 promoter is potentially transcriptionally active in the presence of proviral sequences and that Mov13 fibroblasts contain the trans-acting factors required for efficient COL1A1 gene expression. Our results indicate that the provirus insertion in Mov13 can inactivate COL1A1 gene expression at several levels. It prevents the developmentally regulated establishment of a transcription-competent methylation pattern and chromatin structure of the COL1A1 domain and, in the absence of DNA methylation, appears to suppress the COL1A1 promoter in a cell-specific manner, presumably by assuming a dominant chromatin structure that may be

  4. Stimulation with type I collagen induces changes in gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    PubMed Central

    Atamas, S P; Luzina, I G; Ingels, J; Choi, J; Wong, W K; Furst, D E; Clements, P J; Postlethwaite, A E

    2010-01-01

    An autoantigenic role for collagen type I (CI) has been suggested previously in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc). Whether CI is indeed capable of affecting the immune system in dcSSc is not known. Patients with early (3 years or less) or late (>3 years) dcSSc and healthy controls donated blood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured with or without CI, and expression of genes known for their involvement in autoimmune and inflammatory processes was assessed using cDNA arrays; results were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for selected genes. Patients with early and late dcSSc were similarly different from healthy controls in basal gene expression. When cultured with CI, PBMC from patients with early dcSSc differed from healthy controls in expression of 34 genes, whereas PBMC from patients with late dcSSc differed from healthy controls in expression of only 29 genes. Direct comparisons of matched PBMC samples cultured with and without CI revealed differences in expression of eight genes in healthy controls, of five genes in patients with early dcSSc, and no differences in patients with late dcSSc. Thus, PBMC from patients with dcSSc respond differently than do PBMC from healthy controls when cultured with CI. Exposure to CI in culture of PBMC from patients in the early stage of dcSSc in contrast to PBMC from patients with late-stage dcSSc evokes a greater degree of activation of immune-related genes, suggesting that CI is more dominant as an autoantigen in early versus late dcSSc. PMID:20529088

  5. The candidate gene approach to susceptibility for abdominal aortic aneurysm: TIMP1, HLA-DR-15, ferritin light chain, and collagen XI-Alpha-1.

    PubMed

    Tilson, M David; Ro, Charles Y

    2006-11-01

    There are two approaches to gene discovery for diseases when genetic susceptibility has been implicated by clinical genetic or case-control studies: (1) genome-wide screening and (2) evaluation of candidate genes. Each has specific advantages and disadvantages. The principal advantage of genome-wide screening is that it is impeccably objective in as much as it proceeds without any presuppositions regarding the importance of specific pathobiological features of the disease process. The principal disadvantage is that such a study is expensive and resource intensive. A large population of enrolled patients and multidisciplinary teams of investigators cooperating from several institutions are usually required. The alternative approach of evaluating candidate genes can be pursued by a small independent laboratory with limited funding and resources, a small collection of clinical specimens, and a small number of team players. The disadvantage is that it is by necessity highly subjective in the process of selecting specific candidates among many reasonable possibilities. There is no a priori assurance that effort will not be expended on one or more candidates that turn out in the end to be failures. This report reviews efforts in our laboratory to evaluate four genes as candidates. One of these tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease 1(TIMP1) led to the description of a polymorphism, but not a conclusive mutation. The other three (HLA-DR-15, ferritin light chain (FTL), and collagen XI-alpha-1 (COL11A1) are subjects of continuing interest. PMID:17182944

  6. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins.

  7. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins. PMID:27599513

  8. Compound heterozygosity for a dominant glycine substitution and a recessive internal duplication mutation in the type XVII collagen gene results in junctional epidermolysis bullosa and abnormal dentition.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J A; Gatalica, B; Li, K; Dunnill, M G; McMillan, J R; Christiano, A M; Eady, R A; Uitto, J

    1996-06-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa is a heterogeneous autosomal recessively inherited blistering skin disorder associated with fragility at the dermal-epidermal junction. Previously, mutations in this condition have been described in the three genes for the anchoring filament protein laminin 5 (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2), in the gene encoding the hemidesmosome-associated beta4 integrin (ITGB4), and in the gene for the hemidesmosomal protein type XVII collagen (COL17A1/BPAG2). In this study, we report a patient with a form of junctional epidermolysis bullosa with skin fragility and dental anomalies who is a compound heterozygote for a novel combination of mutations, ie, a glycine substitution mutation in one allele and an internal duplication in the other allele of COL17A1. The patient also has two offspring, both of whom have inherited the glycine substitution mutation, whereas the other COL17A1 allele is normal. The latter individuals show no evidence of skin fragility but have marked dental abnormalities with enamel hypoplasia and pitting. The clinical phenotype of junctional epidermolysis bullosa in the proband in this family probably arises due to a combination of the glycine substitution and the internal duplication in COL17A1, whereas the dental abnormalities of her offspring may be the result of the glycine substitution in COL17A1 alone, resulting in this dominantly inherited clinical phenotype. PMID:8669466

  9. Identification of the collagen type 1 alpha 1 gene (COL1A1) as a candidate survival-related factor associated with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of cancer-related death especially among Asian and African populations. It is urgent that we identify carcinogenesis-related genes to establish an innovative treatment strategy for this disease. Methods Triple-combination array analysis was performed using one pair each of HCC and noncancerous liver samples from a 68-year-old woman. This analysis consists of expression array, single nucleotide polymorphism array and methylation array. The gene encoding collagen type 1 alpha 1 (COL1A1) was identified and verified using HCC cell lines and 48 tissues from patients with primary HCC. Results Expression array revealed that COL1A1 gene expression was markedly decreased in tumor tissues (log2 ratio –1.1). The single nucleotide polymorphism array showed no chromosomal deletion in the locus of COL1A1. Importantly, the methylation value in the tumor tissue was higher (0.557) than that of the adjacent liver tissue (0.008). We verified that expression of this gene was suppressed by promoter methylation. Reactivation of COL1A1 expression by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine treatment was seen in HCC cell lines, and sequence analysis identified methylated CpG sites in the COL1A1 promoter region. Among 48 pairs of surgical specimens, 13 (27.1%) showed decreased COL1A1 mRNA expression in tumor sites. Among these 13 cases, 10 had promoter methylation at the tumor site. The log-rank test indicated that mRNA down-regulated tumors were significantly correlated with a poor overall survival rate (P = 0.013). Conclusions Triple-combination array analysis successfully identified COL1A1 as a candidate survival-related gene in HCCs. Epigenetic down-regulation of COL1A1 mRNA expression might have a role as a prognostic biomarker of HCC. PMID:24552139

  10. Collagen Accumulation in Osteosarcoma Cells lacking GLT25D1 Collagen Galactosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Stephan; Hennet, Thierry

    2016-08-26

    Collagen is post-translationally modified by prolyl and lysyl hydroxylation and subsequently by glycosylation of hydroxylysine. Despite the widespread occurrence of the glycan structure Glc(α1-2)Gal linked to hydroxylysine in animals, the functional significance of collagen glycosylation remains elusive. To address the role of glycosylation in collagen expression, folding, and secretion, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to inactivate the collagen galactosyltransferase GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes in osteosarcoma cells. Loss of GLT25D1 led to increased expression and intracellular accumulation of collagen type I, whereas loss of GLT25D2 had no effect on collagen secretion. Inactivation of the GLT25D1 gene resulted in a compensatory induction of GLT25D2 expression. Loss of GLT25D1 decreased collagen glycosylation by up to 60% but did not alter collagen folding and thermal stability. Whereas cells harboring individually inactivated GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes could be recovered and maintained in culture, cell clones with simultaneously inactive GLT25D1 and GLT25D2 genes could be not grown and studied, suggesting that a complete loss of collagen glycosylation impairs osteosarcoma cell proliferation and viability. PMID:27402836

  11. Profile of collagen gene expression in the glenohumeral capsule of patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the expression of the genes COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1 and COL5A1 in the glenohumeral capsule of patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder. Methods Samples from the glenohumeral capsule of 18 patients with traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder were evaluated. Male patients with a positive grip test and a Bankart lesion seen on magnetic resonance imaging were included. All the patients had suffered more than one episode of shoulder dislocation. Samples were collected from the injured glenohumeral capsule (anteroinferior region) and from the macroscopically unaffected region (anterosuperior region) of each patient. The expression of collagen genes was evaluated using the polymerase chain reaction after reverse transcription with quantitative analysis (qRT-PCR). Results The expression of COL1A1, COL1A2 and COL3A1 did not differ between the two regions of the shoulder capsule. However, it was observed that the expression of COL5A1 was significantly lower in the anteroinferior region than in the anterosuperior region (median ± interquartile range: 0.057 ± 0.052 vs. 0.155 ± 0.398; p = 0.028) of the glenohumeral capsule. Conclusion The affected region of the glenohumeral capsule in patients with shoulder instability presented reduced expression of COL5A1. PMID:26229875

  12. Physical and linkage mapping of the human and murine genes for the [alpha]1 chain of type IX collagen (COL9A1)

    SciTech Connect

    Warman, M.L. Children's Hospital Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A. ); Seldin, M.F.; Rochelle, J.M. ); Knoll, J.H.M.; Cheng, Sou De ); Olsen, B.R. )

    1993-09-01

    The IX collagen, a member of the FACIT family of extracellular matrix proteins, is a heterotrimer composed of three genetically distinct [alpha] chains. The cDNAs for the human and mouse [alpha]1(IX) chains have been cloned. In this paper the authors confirm the mapping of the human COL9A1 gene to chromosome 6q12-q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization utilizing two genomic clones which also contain short tandem repeat polymorphisms. They also report the characterization of these repeats and their incorporation into the chromosome 6 linkage map. The COL9A1 locus shows no recombination with the marker D6Z1 (Z = 27.61 at [theta] = 0) and identifies the most likely locus order of KRAS1P-[D6Z1-COL9A1]-D6S30. In addition, using an interspecific backcross panel, they have mapped murine Col9a1 to mouse chromosome 1. Together with other comparative mapping results, these data suggest that the pericentric region of human chromosome 6 is homologous to the most proximal segment of mouse chromosome 1. These data may facilitate linkage studies with COL9A1 (or col9a1) as a candidate gene for hereditary chondrodysplasias and osteoarthritis. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Genes for collagen types I, IV, and V are transcribed in HeLa cells but a postinitiation block prevents the accumulation of type I mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, J.J.; Wroth, T.H.; Ackerman, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Collagen mRNA synthesis in HeLa cells was evaluated by in vitro transcription of type I collagen DNA, nuclear run-on studies, and steady-state mRNA analysis. Type I collagen mRNA was accurately initiated by HeLa cell RNQA polymerase II in nuclear extracts, and run-on analysis indicated that mRNAs for collagen types {alpha}1(I), {alpha}2(I), {alpha}1(III), {alpha}1(IV), and {alpha}2(V) were synthesized in HeLa cells. However, on assessing the steady-state levels of mRNAs of collagen types {alpha}1(I), {alpha}2(I), {alpha}1(IV), and {alpha}2(V), no type I mRNA was found in HeLa cells while types {alpha}1(IV) and {alpha}2(V) collagen mRNAs were observed. These results suggest that a postinitiation process prevents the accumulation of type I collagen mRNAs in HeLa cells. Persistence of types IV and V collagen mRNAs is consistent with the involvement of types IV and V collagen in adhesion of HeLa cells to glass or plastic.

  14. Collagen VI related muscle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, A; Bushby, K

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding collagen VI (COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3) cause Bethlem myopathy (BM) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), two conditions which were previously believed to be completely separate entities. BM is a relatively mild dominantly inherited disorder characterised by proximal weakness and distal joint contractures. UCMD was originally described as an autosomal recessive condition causing severe muscle weakness with proximal joint contractures and distal hyperlaxity. Here we review the clinical phenotypes of BM and UCMD and their diagnosis and management, and provide an overview of the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of collagen VI related disorders. PMID:16141002

  15. Role of Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog in the transcription activation of type I collagen gene mediated by transforming growth factor beta

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Mi-Sun; Jeong, Kwang Won

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • FLII activates TGFβ-mediated expression of COL1A2 gene. • TGFβ induces the association of FLII with SMAD3 and BRG1 in A549 cells. • FLII is required for the recruitment of SWI/SNF complex and chromatin accessibility to COL1A2 promoter. - Abstract: Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII) is a nuclear receptor coactivator that is known to interact with other transcriptional regulators such as the SWI/SNF complex, an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, at the promoter or enhancer region of estrogen receptor (ER)-α target genes. However, little is known about the role of FLII during transcription initiation in the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)/SMAD-dependent signaling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that FLII functions as a coactivator in the expression of type I collagen gene induced by TGFβ in A549 cells. FLII activates the reporter gene driven by COL1A2 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. Co-expression of GRIP1, CARM1, or p300 did not show any synergistic activation of transcription. Furthermore, the level of COL1A2 expression correlated with the endogenous level of FLII mRNA level. Depletion of FLII resulted in a reduction of TGFβ-induced expression of COL1A2 gene. In contrast, over-expression of FLII caused an increase in the endogenous expression of COL1A2. We also showed that FLII is associated with Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1) as well as SMAD in A549 cells. Notably, the recruitment of BRG1 to the COL1A2 promoter region was decreased in FLII-depleted A549 cells, suggesting that FLII is required for TGFβ-induced chromatin remodeling, which is carried out by the SWI/SNF complex. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments revealed that depletion of FLII caused a reduction in chromatin accessibility at the COL1A2 promoter. These results suggest that FLII plays a critical role in TGFβ/SMAD-mediated transcription of the COL1A2 gene

  16. Partial rescue of a lethal phenotype of fragile bones in transgenic mice with a chimeric antisense gene directed against a mutated collagen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Khillan, J S; Li, S W; Prockop, D J

    1994-01-01

    Previously, transgenic mice were prepared that developed a lethal phenotype of fragile bones because they expressed an internally deleted mini-gene for the pro alpha 1(I) chain of human type I procollagen. The shortened pro alpha 1(I) chains synthesized from the human transgene bound to and produced degradation of normal pro alpha 1(I) chains synthesized from the normal mouse alleles. Here we assembled an antisense gene that was similar to the internally deleted COL1A1 minigene but the 3' half of the gene was inverted so as to code for an antisense RNA. Transgenic mice expressing the antisense gene had a normal phenotype, apparently because the antisense gene contained human sequences instead of mouse sequences. Two lines of mice expressing the antisense gene were bred to two lines of transgenic mice expressing the mini-gene. In mice that inherited both genes, the incidence of the lethal fragile bone phenotype was reduced from 92% to 27%. The effects of the antisense gene were directly demonstrated by an increase in the ratio of normal mouse pro alpha 1(I) chains to human mini-pro alpha 1(I) chains in tissues from mice that inherited both genes and had a normal phenotype. The results raise the possibility that chimeric gene constructs that contain intron sequences and in which only the second half of a gene is inverted may be particularly effective as antisense genes. Images PMID:8022775

  17. Linkage mapping of the gene for Type III collagen (COL3A1) to human chromosome 2q using a VNTR polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Summar, M.L. )

    1994-03-15

    The gene for the [alpha]1(III) chain of type III collagen, COL3A1, has been previously mapped to human chromosome 2q24.3-q31 by in situ hybridization. Physical mapping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has demonstrated that COL3A1 lies within 35 kb of COL5A2. The authors genotyped the CEPH families at the COL3A2 locus using a pentanucleotide repeat polymorphism within intron 25. They demonstrated significant linkage to 18 anonymous markers as well as the gene for carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPSI), which had been previously mapped to this region. No recombination was seen between COL3A1 and COL5A2 (Z = 9.93 at [theta] = 0) or D2S24 (Z = 10.55 at [theta] = 0). The locus order is (D2S32-D2S138-D2S148)-(D2S24-COL5A2-COL3A1)-(D2S118-D2S161), with odds of 1:2300 for the next most likely order. These relationships are consistent with the physical mapping of COL3A1 to the distal portion of 2q and place it proximal to CPSI by means of multipoint analysis. These linkage relationships should prove useful in further studies of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV and carbamyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency and provide an additional framework for localizing other genes in this region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Designing Efficient Double RNA trans-Splicing Molecules for Targeted RNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Hüttner, Clemens; Murauer, Eva M; Hainzl, Stefan; Kocher, Thomas; Neumayer, Anna; Reichelt, Julia; Bauer, Johann W; Koller, Ulrich

    2016-09-22

    RNA trans-splicing is a promising tool for mRNA modification in a diversity of genetic disorders. In particular, the substitution of internal exons of a gene by combining 3' and 5' RNA trans-splicing seems to be an elegant way to modify especially large pre-mRNAs. Here we discuss a robust method for designing double RNA trans-splicing molecules (dRTM). We demonstrate how the technique can be implemented in an endogenous setting, using COL7A1, the gene encoding type VII collagen, as a target. An RTM screening system was developed with the aim of testing the replacement of two internal COL7A1 exons, harbouring a homozygous mutation, with the wild-type version. The most efficient RTMs from a pool of randomly generated variants were selected via our fluorescence-based screening system and adapted for use in an in vitro disease model system. Transduction of type VII collagen-deficient keratinocytes with the selected dRTM led to accurate replacement of two internal COL7A1 exons resulting in a restored wild-type RNA sequence. This is the first study demonstrating specific exon replacement by double RNA trans-splicing within an endogenous transcript in cultured cells, corroborating the utility of this technology for mRNA repair in a variety of genetic disorders.

  19. Designing Efficient Double RNA trans-Splicing Molecules for Targeted RNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hüttner, Clemens; Murauer, Eva M.; Hainzl, Stefan; Kocher, Thomas; Neumayer, Anna; Reichelt, Julia; Bauer, Johann W.; Koller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    RNA trans-splicing is a promising tool for mRNA modification in a diversity of genetic disorders. In particular, the substitution of internal exons of a gene by combining 3′ and 5′ RNA trans-splicing seems to be an elegant way to modify especially large pre-mRNAs. Here we discuss a robust method for designing double RNA trans-splicing molecules (dRTM). We demonstrate how the technique can be implemented in an endogenous setting, using COL7A1, the gene encoding type VII collagen, as a target. An RTM screening system was developed with the aim of testing the replacement of two internal COL7A1 exons, harbouring a homozygous mutation, with the wild-type version. The most efficient RTMs from a pool of randomly generated variants were selected via our fluorescence-based screening system and adapted for use in an in vitro disease model system. Transduction of type VII collagen-deficient keratinocytes with the selected dRTM led to accurate replacement of two internal COL7A1 exons resulting in a restored wild-type RNA sequence. This is the first study demonstrating specific exon replacement by double RNA trans-splicing within an endogenous transcript in cultured cells, corroborating the utility of this technology for mRNA repair in a variety of genetic disorders. PMID:27669223

  20. Designing Efficient Double RNA trans-Splicing Molecules for Targeted RNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Hüttner, Clemens; Murauer, Eva M; Hainzl, Stefan; Kocher, Thomas; Neumayer, Anna; Reichelt, Julia; Bauer, Johann W; Koller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    RNA trans-splicing is a promising tool for mRNA modification in a diversity of genetic disorders. In particular, the substitution of internal exons of a gene by combining 3' and 5' RNA trans-splicing seems to be an elegant way to modify especially large pre-mRNAs. Here we discuss a robust method for designing double RNA trans-splicing molecules (dRTM). We demonstrate how the technique can be implemented in an endogenous setting, using COL7A1, the gene encoding type VII collagen, as a target. An RTM screening system was developed with the aim of testing the replacement of two internal COL7A1 exons, harbouring a homozygous mutation, with the wild-type version. The most efficient RTMs from a pool of randomly generated variants were selected via our fluorescence-based screening system and adapted for use in an in vitro disease model system. Transduction of type VII collagen-deficient keratinocytes with the selected dRTM led to accurate replacement of two internal COL7A1 exons resulting in a restored wild-type RNA sequence. This is the first study demonstrating specific exon replacement by double RNA trans-splicing within an endogenous transcript in cultured cells, corroborating the utility of this technology for mRNA repair in a variety of genetic disorders. PMID:27669223

  1. Determination of a new collagen type I alpha 2 gene point mutation which causes a Gly640 Cys substitution in osteogenesis imperfecta and prenatal diagnosis by DNA hybridisation.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Lira, M; Sangalli, A; Pignatti, P F; Digilio, M C; Giannotti, A; Carnevale, E; Mottes, M

    1994-01-01

    The molecular defect responsible for a sporadic case of extremely severe (type II/III) osteogenesis imperfecta was investigated. The mutation site was localised in the collagen type I pro alpha 2 mRNA molecules produced by the proband's skin fibroblasts by chemical cleavage of mismatch in heteroduplex nucleic acids. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification, followed by cloning and sequencing, showed heterozygosity for a G to T transversion in the first nucleotide of exon 37 of the COL1A2 gene, which led to a cysteine for glycine substitution at position 640 of the triple helical domain. This newly characterised mutation is localised in a domain which contains several milder mutations, confirming that glycine substitutions within the alpha 2(I) chain do not follow a linear gradient pattern for genotype to phenotype correlations. In a subsequent pregnancy, absence of the G2327T mutation in the fetus was shown by allele specific oligonucleotide hybridisation to the trophoblast derived fibroblast mRNA after reverse transcription and in vitro amplification. (The nucleotide number assigned to the mutant base was inferred from the numbering system devised by the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Analysis Consortium (The OIAC Newsletter, 1 April 1994).) Images PMID:7891382

  2. Genetic mapping of a locus for multiple ephiphyseal dysplasia (EDM2) to a region of chromosome 1 containing a type IX collagen gene

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, M.D.; Choi, HiChang; Warman, M.L.; Loughlin, J.A.; Wordsworth, P.; Sykes, B.C.; Irven, C.M.M.; Smith, M.; Wynne-Davies, R.; Lipson, M.H.

    1994-10-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a dominantly inherited chondrodysplasia characterized by mild short stature and early-onset osteoarthrosis. Some forms of MED clinically resemble another chondrodysplasia phenotype, the mild form of pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH). On the basis of their clinical similarities as well as similar ultra-structural and biochemical features in cartilage from some patients, it has been proposed that MED and PSACH belong to a single bone-dysplasia family. Recently, both mild and severe PSACH as well as a form of MED have been linked to the same interval on chromosome 19, suggesting that they may be allelic disorders. Linkage studies with the chromosome 19 markers were carried out in a large family with MED and excluded the previously identified interval. Using this family, we have identified a MED locus on the short arm of chromosome 1, in a region containing the gene (COL9A2) that encodes the {alpha}2 chain of type IX collagen, a structural component of the cartilage extracellular matrix. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Engineering the periodontal ligament in hyaluronan-gelatin-type I collagen constructs: upregulation of apoptosis and alterations in gene expression by cyclic compressive strain.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, Aarthi; Sriram, Gopu; Vinoth, Jayasaleen Kumar; Cao, Tong; Meikle, Murray C

    2015-02-01

    To engineer constructs of the periodontal ligament (PDL), human PDL cells were incorporated into a matrix of hyaluronan, gelatin, and type I collagen (COLI) in sample holders (13×1 mm) of six-well Biopress culture plates. The loading dynamics of the PDL were mimicked by applying a cyclic compressive strain of 33.4 kPa (340.6 gm/cm(2)) to the constructs for 1.0 s every 60 s, for 6, 12, and 24 h in a Flexercell FX-4000C Strain Unit. Compression significantly increased the number of nonviable cells and increased the expression of several apoptosis-related genes, including initiator and executioner caspases. Of the 15 extracellular matrix genes screened, most were upregulated at some point after 6-12 h deformation, but all were downregulated at 24 h, except for MMPs1-3 and CTGF. In culture supernatants, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) protein levels were upregulated at 24 h; receptor activator of nuclear kappa factor B (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) were unchanged; and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) not detected. The low modulus of elasticity of the constructs was a disadvantage-future mechanobiology studies and tissue engineering applications will require constructs with much higher stiffness. Since the major structural protein of the PDL is COLI, a more rational approach would be to permeabilize preformed COLI scaffolds with PDL-populated matrices. PMID:25181942

  4. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  5. Complications of collagenous colitis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh-James

    2008-03-21

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis. This disorder generally has an apparently benign clinical course. However, a number of gastric and intestinal complications, possibly coincidental, may develop with collagenous colitis. Distinctive inflammatory disorders of the gastric mucosa have been described, including lymphocytic gastritis and collagenous gastritis. Celiac disease and collagenous sprue (or collagenous enteritis) may occur. Colonic ulceration has been associated with use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may evolve from collagenous colitis. Submucosal "dissection", colonic fractures or mucosal tears and perforation from air insufflation during colonoscopy may occur and has been hypothesized to be due to compromise of the colonic wall from submucosal collagen deposition. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressure during barium enema contrast studies. Finally, malignant disorders have also been reported, including carcinoma and lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:18350593

  6. Propylthiouracil, independent of its antithyroid effect, decreases VSMC collagen expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Jan; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Lin, Kwang-Huei; Yang, Su-Hui

    2009-01-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU), in addition to its antithyroid effect, is recently found to have a potent antiatherosclerotic effect. Because collagen accumulation is the major contributor to the growth of atherosclerotic lesions and the neointimal formation after arterial injury, the aim of this study is to investigate the impact of PTU on collagen regulation. In the rat carotid injury model, PTU administration reversed the up-regulation of collagen in the neointima induced by balloon injury. In vitro, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), the main origin of arterial collagen, were treated with PTU. Propylthiouracil caused a concentration-dependent decrease in collagen I and III steady-state protein and mRNA levels, as determined by immuno-cytochemistry, Western, and/or Northern blot analyses. Transient transfection experiments using rat type I collagen promoter construct showed that PTU failed to affect collagen gene transcription in VSMCs. Actinomycin D studies demonstrated that the half-life of collagens mRNA decreased with PTU treatment, suggesting that PTU down-regulates collagen expression predominantly at the post-transcriptional level. Taken together, these data suggest that PTU inhibits VSMC collagen production via destabilization of collagen mRNA that contributes to its beneficial effect on atherogenesis and neointimal formation after arterial injury. However, whether the destabilization of collagen may induce plaque rupture in PTU-treated arteries merits further investigation.

  7. The genes for the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains of human basement membrane collagen type IV are arranged head-to-head and separated by a bidirectional promoter of unique structure.

    PubMed Central

    Pöschl, E; Pollner, R; Kühn, K

    1988-01-01

    The human basement membrane specific collagen type IV is a heterotrimer composed of two alpha 1(IV) chains and one alpha 2(IV) chain. A partial genomic EcoRI library was screened with cDNA clones representing the 5' end regions of the alpha 1(IV) and the alpha 2(IV) mRNA. A 2.2-kb genomic fragment was isolated and sequenced, which contains the 5' terminal exons of both genes located in close vicinity. The two genes were found to be arranged in opposite direction, head-to-head, separated only by a short region of 127 bp, apparently representing promoters of both genes as indicated by the existence of typical sequence motifs (CAT-box, SP1 consensus sequence). These data suggest that the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) genes use a common, bidirectional promoter. The striking symmetrical arrangement of sequence elements within the promoter may be of basic importance for the coordination of bidirectional transcription. The promoter region had no detectable transcriptional activity in transient gene expression assays after fusion to the chloramphenicol acetylase (CAT) gene in either direction, indicating the necessity of additional elements for efficient and tissue-specific expression of both genes. Constructs containing different segments of both genes failed to identify regions with enhancing activity for the homologous collagen type IV promoter. When the heterologous HSV thymidine kinase promoter was used, a negatively acting region was identified. This indicates that the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) promoter activity is controlled by additional regulatory elements present on distant portions of both genes. Images PMID:2846280

  8. Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: a review

    PubMed Central

    Shinkuma, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a rare inherited blistering disorder caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen. The deficiency and/or dysfunction of type VII collagen leads to subepidermal blistering immediately below the lamina densa, resulting in mucocutaneous fragility and disease complications such as intractable ulcers, extensive scarring, malnutrition, and malignancy. The disease is usually diagnosed by immunofluorescence mapping and/or transmission electron microscopy and subsequently subclassified into one of 14 subtypes. This review provides practical knowledge on the disease, including new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26064063

  9. Enigmatic insight into collagen.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  10. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen.

  11. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  12. Abnormal type III collagen produced by an exon-17-skipping mutation of the COL3A1 gene in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is not incorporated into the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Chiodo, A A; Sillence, D O; Cole, W G; Bateman, J F

    1995-01-01

    A novel heterozygous mutation of the COL3A1 gene that encodes the alpha 1(III) chains of type III collagen was identified in a family with the acrogeric form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (EDS-IV). Cultured dermal fibroblasts produced normal and shortened alpha 1(III) chains. The triple helix of the latter chain was shortened owing to a 33 amino acid deletion of Gly-184 to Pro-216. The corresponding region of cDNA lacked 99 base pairs from nucleotides 1051 to 1149. The deletions corresponded exactly to the normal sequence encoded by exon 17 of the COL3A1 gene. The proband was heterozygous for a T to G transversion at position +2 of intron 17, which resulted in skipping of exon 17. The splicing defect was not corrected by growing the fibroblasts at 33 degrees C and no other splicing variants were identified at 33 or 37 degrees C. The affected brother had the same mutation but his unaffected mother did not. Heterotrimeric type III collagen molecules containing normal and mutant chains were retained within the cell. The mutant homotrimeric molecules were modified and secreted normally and were thermally stable. These normal characteristics of the mutant homotrimers suggested that the loss of ten Gly-Xaa-Yaa triplets (where Gly-Xaa-Yaa is a repetitive amino acid triplet structure in which Xaa and Yaa are other amino acids, proline and hydroxyproline being more common in the Yaa position) did not adversely affect the formation and stability of the triple helix or the structural requirements for secretion. However, the mutant homotrimers were not incorporated into the extracellular matrix of an in vitro model of EDS-IV dermis. The EDS-IV phenotype in this family was probably due to a deficiency in the amount of normal type III collagen available for formation of the heterotypic collagen fibrils of the extracellular matrix. Intracellular and extracellular quality-control mechanisms prevented the incorporation of heterotrimeric and homotrimeric mutant type III collagen

  13. Collagenous gastritis: Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease characterized by the subepithelial deposition of collagen bands thicker than 10 μm and the infiltration of inflammatory mononuclear cells in the lamina propria. Collagenous colitis and collagenous sprue have similar histological characteristics to collagenous gastritis and are thought to be part of the same disease entity. However, while collagenous colitis has become more common in the field of gastroenterology, presenting with clinical symptoms of chronic diarrhea in older patients, collagenous gastritis is rare. Since the disease was first reported in 1989, only 60 cases have been documented in the English literature. No safe and effective treatments have been identified from randomized, controlled trials. Therefore, better understanding of the disease and the reporting of more cases will help to establish diagnostic criteria and to develop therapeutic strategies. Therefore, here we review the clinical characteristics, endoscopic and histological findings, treatment, and clinical outcomes from case reports and case series published to date, and provide a summary of the latest information on the disease. This information will contribute to improved knowledge of collagenous gastritis so physicians can recognize and correctly diagnose the disease, and will help to develop a standard therapeutic strategy for future clinical trials. PMID:25789098

  14. Collagenous gastritis: Review.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Kenya; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji

    2015-03-16

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease characterized by the subepithelial deposition of collagen bands thicker than 10 μm and the infiltration of inflammatory mononuclear cells in the lamina propria. Collagenous colitis and collagenous sprue have similar histological characteristics to collagenous gastritis and are thought to be part of the same disease entity. However, while collagenous colitis has become more common in the field of gastroenterology, presenting with clinical symptoms of chronic diarrhea in older patients, collagenous gastritis is rare. Since the disease was first reported in 1989, only 60 cases have been documented in the English literature. No safe and effective treatments have been identified from randomized, controlled trials. Therefore, better understanding of the disease and the reporting of more cases will help to establish diagnostic criteria and to develop therapeutic strategies. Therefore, here we review the clinical characteristics, endoscopic and histological findings, treatment, and clinical outcomes from case reports and case series published to date, and provide a summary of the latest information on the disease. This information will contribute to improved knowledge of collagenous gastritis so physicians can recognize and correctly diagnose the disease, and will help to develop a standard therapeutic strategy for future clinical trials. PMID:25789098

  15. Collagen: Biochemistry, biomechanics, biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Nimni, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date reference for new ideas, information, and concepts in collagen research. The first volume emphasizes the relationship between the molecular structure and function of collagen, including descriptions of collagen types which exist in tissues as well as how these molecules organize into fibrils and the nature of the chemical crosslinks which stabilize them. In Volume II the biomechanical behavior of various specialized tissues, abnormal accumulation of collagen in the form of scars of fibrous infiltration are examined/and wound healing, tissue regulation and repair are covered in detail. Volume III explores the increasing application of collagen technology to the field of bioprosthesis, including the production of heart valve bioprosthesis, blood vessels, ligament substitutes, and bone substitutes.

  16. Backbone dynamics in collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.

    2004-11-01

    Peptide backbone motions of collagen have been extensively studied in the past. The experimental results were interpreted using a model of a collagen rod librating about its helix axis. Considering the size of the collagen molecule and the presence of cross-linked molecules, motional amplitudes derived for the helix axis libration were unusually high. Using solid-state NMR 13C chemical shift anisotropy and 2H quadrupolar lineshape analysis for five different isotope labelled collagens we show that motional averaging of the NMR interactions occurs primarily via small-angle librations about internal bond directions. This type of dynamics is compatible with both the presence of cross-links in collagen and the X-ray data, as well as dynamic models used for other proteins.

  17. Defective collagen VI α6 chain expression in the skeletal muscle of patients with collagen VI-related myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tagliavini, F; Pellegrini, C; Sardone, F; Squarzoni, S; Paulsson, M; Wagener, R; Gualandi, F; Trabanelli, C; Ferlini, A; Merlini, L; Santi, S; Maraldi, N M; Faldini, C; Sabatelli, P

    2014-09-01

    Collagen VI is a non-fibrillar collagen present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) as a complex polymer; the mainly expressed form is composed of α1, α2 and α3 chains; mutations in genes encoding these chains cause myopathies known as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM) and myosclerosis myopathy (MM). The collagen VI α6 chain is a recently identified component of the ECM of the human skeletal muscle. Here we report that the α6 chain was dramatically reduced in skeletal muscle and muscle cell cultures of genetically characterized UCMD, BM and MM patients, independently of the clinical phenotype, the gene involved and the effect of the mutation on the expression of the "classical" α1α2α3 heterotrimer. By contrast, the collagen VI α6 chain was normally expressed or increased in the muscle of patients affected by other forms of muscular dystrophy, the overexpression matching with areas of increased fibrosis. In vitro treatment with TGF-β1, a potent collagen inducer, promoted the collagen VI α6 chain deposition in the ECM of normal muscle cells, whereas, in cultures derived from collagen VI-related myopathy patients, the collagen VI α6 chain failed to develop a network outside the cells and accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum. The defect of the α6 chain points to a contribution to the pathogenesis of collagen VI-related disorders.

  18. Regulation of type-II collagen gene expression during human chondrocyte de-differentiation and recovery of chondrocyte-specific phenotype in culture involves Sry-type high-mobility-group box (SOX) transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, D G; Liu, G; Dharmavaram, R; Hawkins, D; Piera-Velazquez, S; Jimenez, S A

    2001-01-01

    During ex vivo growth as monolayer cultures, chondrocytes proliferate and undergo a process of de-differentiation. This process involves a change in morphology and a change from expression of chondrocyte-specific genes to that of genes that are normally expressed in fibroblasts. Transfer of the monolayer chondrocyte culture to three-dimensional culture systems induces the cells to re-acquire a chondrocyte-specific phenotype and produce a cartilaginous-like tissue in vitro. We investigated mechanisms involved in the control of the de-differentiation and re-differentiation process in vitro. De-differentiated chondrocytes re-acquired their chondrocyte-specific phenotype when cultured on poly-(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (polyHEMA) as assayed by morphology, reverse transcriptase PCR of chondrocyte-specific mRNA, Western-blot analysis and chondrocyte-specific promoter activity. Essentially, full recovery of the chondrocyte-specific phenotype was observed when cells that had been cultured for 4 weeks on plastic were transferred to culture on polyHEMA. However, after subsequent passages on plastic, the phenotype recovery was incomplete or did not occur. The activity of a gene reporter construct containing the promoter and enhancer from the human type-II collagen gene (COL2A1) was modulated by the culture conditions, so that its transcriptional activity was repressed in monolayer cultures and rescued to some extent when the cells were switched to polyHEMA cultures. The binding of Sry-type high-mobility-group box (SOX) transcription factors to the enhancer region was modulated by the culture conditions, as were the mRNA levels for SOX9. A transfected human type-II collagen reporter construct was activated in de-differentiated cells by ectopic expression of SOX transcription factors. These results underscore the overt change in phenotype that occurs when chondrocytes are cultured as monolayers on tissue-culture plastic substrata. PMID:11716775

  19. Complications of collagen fillers.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Patricia; Goldberg, David J

    2014-12-01

    As the skin ages, a deficiency in collagen occurs, thus injectable collagen products have become a sensible and popular option for dermal filling and volume enhancement. Several types of collagen have been developed over the years, including animal sources such as bovine and porcine collagen, as well as human-based sources derived from pieces of the patient's own skin, cadaver skin, and later cultured from human dermal fibroblasts. While collagen overall has a relatively safe, side effect profile, there are several complications, both early and late onset, that practitioners and patients should be aware of. Early complications, occurring within days of the procedure, can be divided into non-hypersensitivity and hypersensitivity reactions. The non-hypersensitive reactions include injection site reactions, discoloration, maldistribution, infection, skin necrosis, and the very rare but dreaded risk of vision loss, whereas the hypersensitivity reactions present usually as delayed type IV reactions, but can also rarely present as an immediate type I reaction. Late complications, occurring within weeks to even years after injection, include granuloma formation, foreign body reactions, and infection secondary to atypical mycobacteria or biofilms. This review will give a detailed overview of the complications secondary to cutaneous collagen injections.

  20. Nanomechanics of collagen microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Vesentini, Simone; Redaelli, Alberto; Gautieri, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Summary Collagen constitutes one third of the human proteome, providing mechanical stability, elasticity and strength to organisms and is thus the prime construction material in biology. Collagen is also the dominating material in the extracellular matrix where its stiffness controls cell differentiation, growth and pathology. We use atomistic-based hierarchical multiscale modeling to describe this complex biological material from the bottom up. This includes the use and development of large-scale computational modeling tools to investigate several aspects related to collagen-based tissues, including source of visco-elasticity and deformation mechanisms at the nanoscale level. The key innovation of this research is that until now, collagen materials have primarily been described at macroscopic scales, without explicitly understanding the mechanical contributions at the molecular and fibrillar levels. The major impact of this research will be the development of fundamental models of collagenous tissues, important to the design of new scaffolding biomaterials for regenerative medicine as well as for the understanding of collagen-related diseases. PMID:23885342

  1. Type V collagen controls the initiation of collagen fibril assembly.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, Richard J; Florer, Jane B; Brunskill, Eric W; Bell, Sheila M; Chervoneva, Inna; Birk, David E

    2004-12-17

    Vertebrate collagen fibrils are heterotypically composed of a quantitatively major and minor fibril collagen. In non-cartilaginous tissues, type I collagen accounts for the majority of the collagen mass, and collagen type V, the functions of which are poorly understood, is a minor component. Type V collagen has been implicated in the regulation of fibril diameter, and we reported recently preliminary evidence that type V collagen is required for collagen fibril nucleation (Wenstrup, R. J., Florer, J. B., Cole, W. G., Willing, M. C., and Birk, D. E. (2004) J. Cell. Biochem. 92, 113-124). The purpose of this study was to define the roles of type V collagen in the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis and matrix assembly. Mouse embryos completely deficient in pro-alpha1(V) chains were created by homologous recombination. The col5a1-/- animals die in early embryogenesis, at approximately embryonic day 10. The type V collagen-deficient mice demonstrate a virtual lack of collagen fibril formation. In contrast, the col5a1+/- animals are viable. The reduced type V collagen content is associated with a 50% reduction in fibril number and dermal collagen content. In addition, relatively normal, cylindrical fibrils are assembled with a second population of large, structurally abnormal collagen fibrils. The structural properties of the abnormal matrix are decreased relative to the wild type control animals. These data indicate a central role for the evolutionary, ancient type V collagen in the regulation of fibrillogenesis. The complete dependence of fibril formation on type V collagen is indicative of the critical role of the latter in early fibril initiation. In addition, this fibril collagen is important in the determination of fibril structure and matrix organization. PMID:15383546

  2. Type XII collagen. A large multidomain molecule with partial homology to type IX collagen.

    PubMed

    Gordon, M K; Gerecke, D R; Dublet, B; van der Rest, M; Olsen, B R

    1989-11-25

    Three overlapping cDNAs encoding alpha 1 (XII) collagen have been isolated and sequenced. The DNAs define five sequence domains within the chain. Three domains are nontriple-helical; two are relatively short triple-helical regions. The amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides derived from 16- and 10-kDa pepsin-resistant fragments isolated from tendon extracts are in full agreement with the deduced sequences of the triple-helical regions. Two of the five sequence domains in alpha 1 (XII), one triple-helical and one nontriple-helical, show a high degree of similarity to regions in type IX collagen chains. In addition, examination of seven exons in the alpha 1 (XII) gene shows that the gene is, in part, similar to the structure of type IX collagen genes. Therefore, collagen types IX and XII are partially homologous. The alpha 1 (XII) sequence data predict an asymmetric structure for type XII collagen molecules, fully consistent with the rotary shadowing images. These images show a triple-helical 75-nm tail attached through a central globule to three finger-like structures, each 60 nm long (Dublet, B., Oh, S., Sugrue, S. P., Gordon, M. K., Gerecke, D. R., Olsen, B. R., and van der Rest, M. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 13150-13156).

  3. Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2), an osteoarthritis-associated gene, enhances proliferation and type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Kazumasa; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Yamaga, Mika; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Abula, Kahaer; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. ► To examine the molecular functions of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in chondrocytic ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 enhanced proliferation and colony formation in ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 increased type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells treated with chondrogenic medium. -- Abstract: Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2/CHI3L2) is a secreted 39 kDa protein produced by articular chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Recent studies showed that hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes suggesting the involvement of hYKL-39 in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However little is known regarding the molecular function of hYKL-39 in joint homeostasis. Sequence analyses indicated that hYKL-39 has significant identity with the human chitotorisidase family molecules, although it is considered that hYKL-39 has no enzymatic activity since it lacks putative chitinase catalytic motif. In this study, to examine the molecular function of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in ATDC5 cells. Here we report that hYKL-39 enhances colony forming activity, cell proliferation, and type II collagen expression in these cells. These data suggest that hYKL-39 is a novel growth and differentiation factor involved in cartilage homeostasis.

  4. Collagen Fibrils: Nanoscale Ropes

    PubMed Central

    Bozec, Laurent; van der Heijden, Gert; Horton, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibrils from staggered repeats of individual molecules has become “accepted” wisdom. However, for over thirty years now, such a model has failed to resolve several structural and functional questions. In a novel approach, it was found, using atomic force microscopy, that tendon collagen fibrils are composed of subcomponents in a spiral disposition—that is, their structure is similar to that of macroscale ropes. Consequently, this arrangement was modeled and confirmed using elastic rod theory. This work provides new insight into collagen fibril structure and will have wide application—from the design of scaffolds for tissue engineering and a better understanding of pathogenesis of diseases of bone and tendon, to the conservation of irreplaceable parchment-based museum exhibits. PMID:17028135

  5. Collagen in organ development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    It is important to know whether microgravity will adversely affect developmental processes. Collagens are macromolecular structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which may be altered by perturbations in gravity. Interstitial collagens have been shown to be necessary for normal growth and morphogenesis in some embryonic organs, and in the mouse salivary gland, the biosynthetic pattern of these molecules changes during development. Determination of the effects of microgravity on epithelial organ development must be preceded by crucial ground-based studies. These will define control of normal synthesis, secretion, and deposition of ECM macromolecules and the relationship of these processes to morphogenesis.

  6. An RNA-splicing mutation (G{sup +51VS20}) in the Type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Weis, M.A.; Eyre, D.R.; Gruber, H.E.; Rimoin, D.L.; Cohn, D.H. |

    1995-02-01

    Defects in type II collagen have been demonstrated in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that includes achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We have determined that cartilage from a terminated fetus with an inherited form of SEDC contained both normal {alpha}1(II) collagen chains and chains that lacked amino acids 256-273 of the triple-helical domain. PCR amplification of this region of COL2A1, from genomic DNA, yielded products of normal size, while amplification of cDNA yielded a normal sized species and a shorter fragment missing exon 20. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from the fetus revealed a G{yields}T transversion at position +5 of intron 20; the affected father was also heterozygous for the mutation. Allele-specific PCR and heteroduplex analysis of a VNTR in COL2A1 independently confirmed the unaffected status of a fetus in a subsequent pregnancy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the mutation prevents normal splicing of exon 20 by interfering with binding of U{sub 1} small-nuclear RNA to pre-mRNA, thus leading to skipping of exon 20 in transcripts from the mutant allele. Electron micrographs of diseased cartilage showed intracellular inclusion bodies, which were stained by an antibody to {alpha}1(II) procollagen. Our findings support the hypothesis that {alpha}-chain length alterations that preserve the Gly-X-Y repeat motif of the triple helix result in partial intracellular retention of {alpha}1(II) procollagen and produce mild to moderate chondrodysplasia phenotypes. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. An RNA-splicing mutation (G+5IVS20) in the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita.

    PubMed

    Tiller, G E; Weis, M A; Polumbo, P A; Gruber, H E; Rimoin, D L; Cohn, D H; Eyre, D R

    1995-02-01

    Defects in type II collagen have been demonstrated in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that includes achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We have determined that cartilage from a terminated fetus with an inherited form of SEDC contained both normal alpha 1(II) collagen chains and chains that lacked amino acids 256-273 of the triple-helical domain. PCR amplification of this region of COL2A1, from genomic DNA, yielded products of normal size, while amplification of cDNA yielded a normal sized species and a shorter fragment missing exon 20. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from the fetus revealed a G-->T transversion at position +5 of intron 20; the affected father was also heterozygous for the mutation. Allele-specific PCR and heteroduplex analysis of a VNTR in COL2A1 independently confirmed the unaffected status of a fetus in a subsequent pregnancy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the mutation prevents normal splicing of exon 20 by interfering with binding of U1 small-nuclear RNA to pre-mRNA, thus leading to skipping of exon 20 in transcripts from the mutant allele. Electron micrographs of diseased cartilage showed intracellular inclusion bodies, which were stained by an antibody to alpha 1(II) procollagen. Our findings support the hypothesis that alpha-chain length alterations that preserve the Gly-X-Y repeat motif of the triple helix result in partial intracellular retention of alpha 1(II) procollagen and produce mild to moderate chondrodysplasia phenotypes. PMID:7847372

  8. An RNA-splicing mutation (G+5IVS20) in the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita.

    PubMed Central

    Tiller, G E; Weis, M A; Polumbo, P A; Gruber, H E; Rimoin, D L; Cohn, D H; Eyre, D R

    1995-01-01

    Defects in type II collagen have been demonstrated in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that includes achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We have determined that cartilage from a terminated fetus with an inherited form of SEDC contained both normal alpha 1(II) collagen chains and chains that lacked amino acids 256-273 of the triple-helical domain. PCR amplification of this region of COL2A1, from genomic DNA, yielded products of normal size, while amplification of cDNA yielded a normal sized species and a shorter fragment missing exon 20. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from the fetus revealed a G-->T transversion at position +5 of intron 20; the affected father was also heterozygous for the mutation. Allele-specific PCR and heteroduplex analysis of a VNTR in COL2A1 independently confirmed the unaffected status of a fetus in a subsequent pregnancy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the mutation prevents normal splicing of exon 20 by interfering with binding of U1 small-nuclear RNA to pre-mRNA, thus leading to skipping of exon 20 in transcripts from the mutant allele. Electron micrographs of diseased cartilage showed intracellular inclusion bodies, which were stained by an antibody to alpha 1(II) procollagen. Our findings support the hypothesis that alpha-chain length alterations that preserve the Gly-X-Y repeat motif of the triple helix result in partial intracellular retention of alpha 1(II) procollagen and produce mild to moderate chondrodysplasia phenotypes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7847372

  9. Fibrocytes Are Not an Essential Source of Type I Collagen During Lung Fibrosis1

    PubMed Central

    Kleaveland, Kathryn R.; Velikoff, Miranda; Yang, Jibing; Agarwal, Manisha; Rippe, Richard A.; Moore, Bethany B.; Kim, Kevin K.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive fibrosis involves accumulation of activated collagen producing mesenchymal cells. Fibrocytes are hematopoietic-derived cells with mesenchymal features that potentially have a unique and critical function during fibrosis. Fibrocytes have been proposed as an important direct contributor of type I collagen deposition during fibrosis based largely on fate-mapping studies. To determine the functional contribution of hematopoietic cell-derived type I collagen to fibrogenesis we utilize a double transgenic system to specifically delete the type I collagen gene across a broad population of hematopoietic cells. These mice develop a robust fibrotic response similar to littermate genotype control mice injured with bleomycin indicating that fibrocytes are not a necessary source of type I collagen. Using collagen-promoter GFP mice we find that fibrocytes express type I collagen. However, fibrocytes with confirmed deletion of the type I collagen gene have readily detectable intracellular type I collagen indicating that uptake of collagen from neighboring cells account for much of the fibrocyte collagen. Collectively these results clarify several seemingly conflicting reports regarding the direct contribution of fibrocytes to collagen deposition. PMID:25281715

  10. Structure and function of collagen types

    SciTech Connect

    Mayne, R.; Burgeson, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Classical Collagens: Types I, II, and III; Type IV Collagen; Type IX Collagen; and Analysis of Collagen Structure by Molecular Biology Techniques.

  11. Genetic disorders of collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Tsipouras, P; Ramirez, F

    1987-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Marfan syndrome form a group of genetic disorders of connective tissue. These disorders exhibit remarkable clinical heterogeneity which reflects their underlying biochemical and molecular differences. Defects in collagen types I and III have been found in all three syndromes. PMID:3543367

  12. Collagen hydrolysate based collagen/hydroxyapatite composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficai, Anton; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Birsan, Mihaela; Sonmez, Maria; Ficai, Denisa; Trandafir, Viorica; Andronescu, Ecaterina

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to study the influence of collagen hydrolysate (HAS) on the formation of ternary collagen-hydrolysate/hydroxyapatite composite materials (COLL-HAS/HA). During the precipitation process of HA, a large amount of brushite is resulted at pH = 7 but, practically pure HA is obtained at pH ⩾ 8. The FTIR data reveal the duplication of the most important collagen absorption bands due to the presence of the collagen hydrolysate. The presence of collagen hydrolysate is beneficial for the management of bone and joint disorders such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis.

  13. Pyridinium cross-links in heritable disorders of collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquali, M.; Still, M.J.; Dembure, P.P.

    1995-12-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of collagen that is characterized by skin fragility, skin hyperextensibility, and joint hypermobility. EDS type VI is caused by impaired collagen lysyl hydroxylase (procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase; E.C.1.14.11.4), the ascorbate-dependent enzyme that hydroxylates lysyl residues on collagen neopeptides. Different alterations in the gene for collagen lysyl hydroxylase have been reported in families with EDS type VI. In EDS type VI, impairment of collagen lysyl hydroxylase results in a low hydroxylysine content in mature collagen. Hydroxylysine is a precursor of the stable, covalent, intermolecular cross-links of collagen, pyridinoline (Pyr), and deoxypyridinoline (Dpyr). Elsewhere we reported in preliminary form that patients with EDS type VI had a distinctive alteration in the urinary excretion of Pyr and Dpyr. In the present study, we confirm that the increased Dpyr/Pyr ratio is specific for EDS type VI and is not observed in other inherited or acquired collagen disorders. In addition, we find that skin from patients with EDS type VI has reduced Pyr and increased Dpyr, which could account for the organ pathology. 19 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Regulation of immune reactivity to collagen in human beings

    SciTech Connect

    Solinger, A.M.; Stobo, J.D.

    1981-08-01

    Denaturated beef collagen was tested for its ability to induce the production of leukocyte inhibition factor among the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal individuals. Responsiveness, defined as the production of leukocyte inhibition factor sufficient to cause greater than 20% inhibition of leukocyte migration, was significantly (P less than 0.001, X2 . 31.1) associated with HLA-DR4. All HLA-DR4 positive individuals, including subjects without any evidence of synovitis, were collagen responders. There was no significant (P . 0.3) difference in the absolute reactivity of HLA-DR4+ versus HLA-DR4- individuals to respond to another antigen, Candida albicans. Collagen reactivity required interactions between macrophages and T cells and was directed against determinants inherent in the linear polypeptide, (Gly-Pro)n. In 5 normal HLA-DR4- nonresponders tested, absence of discernable reactivity to collagen was associated with the presence of antigen-specific, radiosensitive suppressive T cells. These studies suggest that during the physiologic metabolism of collagen all individuals are exposed to Gly-Pro determinants normally buried in the interstices of the collagen triple helix. In individuals whose major histocompatibility complex contains genes linked to those coding for HLA-DR4, this results in the activation of reactive T cells. Conversely, in individuals lacking these genes, collagen-specific suppressive cells predominate.

  15. Topographic mapping of collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, H J

    2001-07-01

    A 74-year-old woman was investigated for abdominal pain and diarrhea. Endoscopic examinations including biopsies of the stomach and colon demonstrated the typical subepithelial deposits characteristic of collagenous gastritis and collagenous colitis. Histochemical and ultrastructural methods confirmed the presence of collagen in the subepithelial deposits. The topographic distribution of these collagen deposits and their relationship to the inflammatory process in the stomach were then defined by endoscopic mapping and multiple site biopsies of the mucosa in the gastric body and antrum. These studies indicate that collagenous gastritis not only is distinctive, but also is a far more extensive and diffuse inflammatory process than has previously been appreciated. PMID:11493952

  16. A COL2A1 mutation in achondrogenesis type II results in the replacement of type II collagen by type I and III collagens in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chan, D; Cole, W G; Chow, C W; Mundlos, S; Bateman, J F

    1995-01-27

    An autosomal dominant mutation in the COL2A1 gene was identified in a fetus with achondrogenesis type II. A transition of G2853 to A in exon 41 produced a substitution of Gly769 by Ser within the triple helical domain of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II collagen, interrupting the mandatory Gly-X-Y triplet sequence required for the normal formation of stable triple helical type II collagen molecules, resulting in the complete absence of type II collagen in the cartilage, which had a gelatinous composition. Type I and III collagens were the major species found in cartilage tissue and synthesized by cultured chondrocytes along with cartilage type XI collagen. However, cultured chondrocytes produced a trace amount of type II collagen, which was retained within the cells and not secreted. In situ hybridization of cartilage sections showed that the chondrocytes produced both type II and type I collagen mRNA. As a result, it is likely that the chondrocytes produced type II collagen molecules, which were then degraded. The close proximity of the Gly769 substitution by Ser to the mammalian collagenase cleavage site at Gly775-Leu776 may have produced an unstable domain that was highly susceptible to proteolysis. The type I and III collagens that replaced type II collagen were unable to maintain the normal structure of the hyaline cartilage but did support chondrocyte maturation, evidenced by the expression of type X collagen in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate cartilage. PMID:7829510

  17. Structure-mechanics relationships of collagen fibrils in the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, O G; Chang, S W; Vanleene, M; Howarth, P H; Davies, D E; Shefelbine, S J; Buehler, M J; Thurner, P J

    2015-10-01

    The collagen molecule, which is the building block of collagen fibrils, is a triple helix of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. However, in the severe mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OIM), deletion of the COL1A2 gene results in the substitution of the α2(I) chain by one α1(I) chain. As this substitution severely impairs the structure and mechanics of collagen-rich tissues at the tissue and organ level, the main aim of this study was to investigate how the structure and mechanics are altered in OIM collagen fibrils. Comparing results from atomic force microscopy imaging and cantilever-based nanoindentation on collagen fibrils from OIM and wild-type (WT) animals, we found a 33% lower indentation modulus in OIM when air-dried (bound water present) and an almost fivefold higher indentation modulus in OIM collagen fibrils when fully hydrated (bound and unbound water present) in phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) compared with WT collagen fibrils. These mechanical changes were accompanied by an impaired swelling upon hydration within PBS. Our experimental and atomistic simulation results show how the structure and mechanics are altered at the individual collagen fibril level as a result of collagen gene mutation in OIM. We envisage that the combination of experimental and modelling approaches could allow mechanical phenotyping at the collagen fibril level of virtually any alteration of collagen structure or chemistry.

  18. Structure-mechanics relationships of collagen fibrils in the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, O G; Chang, S W; Vanleene, M; Howarth, P H; Davies, D E; Shefelbine, S J; Buehler, M J; Thurner, P J

    2015-10-01

    The collagen molecule, which is the building block of collagen fibrils, is a triple helix of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. However, in the severe mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OIM), deletion of the COL1A2 gene results in the substitution of the α2(I) chain by one α1(I) chain. As this substitution severely impairs the structure and mechanics of collagen-rich tissues at the tissue and organ level, the main aim of this study was to investigate how the structure and mechanics are altered in OIM collagen fibrils. Comparing results from atomic force microscopy imaging and cantilever-based nanoindentation on collagen fibrils from OIM and wild-type (WT) animals, we found a 33% lower indentation modulus in OIM when air-dried (bound water present) and an almost fivefold higher indentation modulus in OIM collagen fibrils when fully hydrated (bound and unbound water present) in phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) compared with WT collagen fibrils. These mechanical changes were accompanied by an impaired swelling upon hydration within PBS. Our experimental and atomistic simulation results show how the structure and mechanics are altered at the individual collagen fibril level as a result of collagen gene mutation in OIM. We envisage that the combination of experimental and modelling approaches could allow mechanical phenotyping at the collagen fibril level of virtually any alteration of collagen structure or chemistry. PMID:26468064

  19. Structure–mechanics relationships of collagen fibrils in the osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Andriotis, O. G.; Chang, S. W.; Vanleene, M.; Howarth, P. H.; Davies, D. E.; Shefelbine, S. J.; Buehler, M. J.; Thurner, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The collagen molecule, which is the building block of collagen fibrils, is a triple helix of two α1(I) chains and one α2(I) chain. However, in the severe mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (OIM), deletion of the COL1A2 gene results in the substitution of the α2(I) chain by one α1(I) chain. As this substitution severely impairs the structure and mechanics of collagen-rich tissues at the tissue and organ level, the main aim of this study was to investigate how the structure and mechanics are altered in OIM collagen fibrils. Comparing results from atomic force microscopy imaging and cantilever-based nanoindentation on collagen fibrils from OIM and wild-type (WT) animals, we found a 33% lower indentation modulus in OIM when air-dried (bound water present) and an almost fivefold higher indentation modulus in OIM collagen fibrils when fully hydrated (bound and unbound water present) in phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) compared with WT collagen fibrils. These mechanical changes were accompanied by an impaired swelling upon hydration within PBS. Our experimental and atomistic simulation results show how the structure and mechanics are altered at the individual collagen fibril level as a result of collagen gene mutation in OIM. We envisage that the combination of experimental and modelling approaches could allow mechanical phenotyping at the collagen fibril level of virtually any alteration of collagen structure or chemistry. PMID:26468064

  20. Collagen XII Contributes to Epicardial and Connective Tissues in the Zebrafish Heart during Ontogenesis and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Marro, Jan; Pfefferli, Catherine; de Preux Charles, Anne-Sophie; Bise, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish heart regeneration depends on cardiac cell proliferation, epicardium activation and transient reparative tissue deposition. The contribution and the regulation of specific collagen types during the regenerative process, however, remain poorly characterized. Here, we identified that the non-fibrillar type XII collagen, which serves as a matrix-bridging component, is expressed in the epicardium of the zebrafish heart, and is boosted after cryoinjury-induced ventricular damage. During heart regeneration, an intense deposition of Collagen XII covers the outer epicardial cap and the interstitial reparative tissue. Analysis of the activated epicardium and fibroblast markers revealed a heterogeneous cellular origin of Collagen XII. Interestingly, this matrix-bridging collagen co-localized with fibrillar type I collagen and several glycoproteins in the post-injury zone, suggesting its role in tissue cohesion. Using SB431542, a selective inhibitor of the TGF-β receptor, we showed that while the inhibitor treatment did not affect the expression of collagen 12 and collagen 1a2 in the epicardium, it completely suppressed the induction of both genes in the fibrotic tissue. This suggests that distinct mechanisms might regulate collagen expression in the outer heart layer and the inner injury zone. On the basis of this study, we postulate that the TGF-β signaling pathway induces and coordinates formation of a transient collagenous network that comprises fibril-forming Collagen I and fiber-associated Collagen XII, both of which contribute to the reparative matrix of the regenerating zebrafish heart. PMID:27783651

  1. Collagen Homeostasis and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, S Peter; Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system and its collagen rich tissue is important for ensuring architecture of skeletal muscle, energy storage in tendon and ligaments, joint surface protection, and for ensuring the transfer of muscular forces into resulting limb movement. Structure of tendon is stable and the metabolic activity is low, but mechanical loading and subsequent mechanotransduction and molecular anabolic signaling can result in some adaptation of the tendon especially during youth and adolescence. Within short time, tendon will get stiffer with training and lack of mechanical tissue loading through inactivity or immobilization of the human body will conversely result in a dramatic loss in tendon stiffness and collagen synthesis. This illustrates the importance of regular mechanical load in order to preserve the stabilizing role of the connective tissue for the overall function of the musculoskeletal system in both daily activity and exercise. Adaptive responses may vary along the tendon, and differ between mid-substance and insertional areas of the tendon. PMID:27535245

  2. Type IX collagen knock-out mouse shows progressive hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuyoshi; Asamura, Kenji; Kikuchi, Yasutake; Takumi, Yutaka; Abe, Satoko; Imamura, Yasutada; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Aszodi, Attila; Fässler, Reinhard; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2005-03-01

    Type IX collagen is one of the important components, together with type II, V, and XI collagens, in the tectorial membrane of the organ of Corti. To confirm the significance of type IX collagen for normal hearing, we assessed the detailed morphological and electrophysiological features of type IX collagen knock-out mice, which have recently been reported as a deafness model. Through assessment by auditory brainstem response (ABR), knock-out mice were shown to have progressive hearing loss. At the light microscopic level, the tectorial membrane of knock-out mice was found to be abnormal in shape. These morphological changes started in the basal turn and were progressive toward the apical turn. Electron microscopy confirmed disturbance of organization of the collagen fibrils. These results suggest that mutations in type IX collagen genes may lead to abnormal integrity of collagen fibers in the tectorial membrane.

  3. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type III collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.; Covington, H.I.; Macarak, E.J.

    1988-05-01

    Whole neonate rabbit corneas and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were incubated in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine. Radiolabeled collagen extracted from the corneas and scar tissue were analyzed by sodium dodecylsulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to determine the types and relative quantity of collagen polypeptides present and synthesized by these tissues. In addition to other collagen types, type III was found in both neonate cornea and scar tissue from adult cornea, albeit in relatively small quantities. Type III collagen in normal cornea was associated with the residue after pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction of the tissue, and the same type of collagen was extracted from scar tissue after similar treatment. Type III collagen-specific monoclonal antibody bound to developing normal corneas and healing adult tissue sections, as determined by immunofluorescence. Antibody binding was localized to the endothelium and growing Descemet's membrane in fetal and neonate corneas, and restricted to the most posterior region of the corneal scar tissue. Although monoclonal antibody to keratan sulfate, used as a marker for stromal fibroblasts, bound to most of the scar tissue, the antibody failed to bind to the posterior scar tissue positive for type III collagen. We conclude that endothelial cells from fetal and neonate rabbit cornea and endothelium-derived fibroblasts from healing wounds of adult cornea synthesize and deposit type III collagen. Moreover, this collagen appears to be incorporated into the growing Descemet's membrane of normal corneas and narrow posterior portion of the scar tissue.

  4. Lamprey type II collagen and Sox9 reveal an ancient origin of the vertebrate collagenous skeleton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangjun; Miyamoto, Michael M; Cohn, Martin J

    2006-02-28

    Type II collagen is the major cartilage matrix protein in the jawed vertebrate skeleton. Lampreys and hagfishes, by contrast, are thought to have noncollagenous cartilage. This difference in skeletal structure has led to the hypothesis that the vertebrate common ancestor had a noncollagenous skeleton, with type II collagen becoming the predominant cartilage matrix protein after the divergence of jawless fish from the jawed vertebrates approximately 500 million years ago. Here we report that lampreys have two type II collagen (Col2alpha1) genes that are expressed during development of the cartilaginous skeleton. We also demonstrate that the adult lamprey skeleton is rich in Col2alpha1 protein. Furthermore, we have isolated a lamprey orthologue of Sox9, a direct transcriptional regulator of Col2alpha1 in jawed vertebrates, and show that it is coexpressed with both Col2alpha1 genes during skeletal development. These results reveal that the genetic pathway for chondrogenesis in lampreys and gnathostomes is conserved through the activation of cartilage matrix molecules and suggest that a collagenous skeleton evolved surprisingly early in vertebrate evolution.

  5. Collagen macromolecular drug delivery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine collagen for use as a macromolecular drug delivery system by determining the mechanism of release through a matrix. Collagen membranes varying in porosity, crosslinking density, structure and crosslinker were fabricated. Collagen characterized by infrared spectroscopy and solution viscosity was determined to be pure and native. The collagen membranes were determined to possess native vs. non-native quaternary structure and porous vs. dense aggregate membranes by electron microscopy. Collagen monolithic devices containing a model macromolecule (inulin) were fabricated. In vitro release rates were found to be linear with respect to t{sup {1/2}} and were affected by crosslinking density, crosslinker and structure. The biodegradation of the collagen matrix was also examined. In vivo biocompatibility, degradation and {sup 14}C-inulin release rates were evaluated subcutaneously in rats.

  6. Binding of Clostridium perfringens to collagen correlates with the ability to cause necrotic enteritis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Wade, B; Keyburn, A L; Seemann, T; Rood, J I; Moore, R J

    2015-11-18

    This study investigated the ability of Clostridium perfringens isolates derived from chickens to bind to collagen types I-V and gelatin. In total 21 strains from three distinct backgrounds were studied: (i) virulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis, (ii) avirulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis and (iii) strains isolated from healthy birds. All strains isolated from diseased birds had been assessed for virulence in a disease induction model. The virulent isolates all displayed collagen binding ability. However, most strains in the other two classes showed negligible binding to collagen. The prevalence of a previously described C. perfringens putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene was investigated by PCR screening. It was found that five of the strains carried the putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene and that all of these strains were virulent isolates. Based on these studies it is postulated that collagen adhesion may play a role in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis.

  7. Type XIV Collagen Regulates Fibrillogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ansorge, Heather L.; Meng, Xianmin; Zhang, Guiyun; Veit, Guido; Sun, Mei; Klement, John F.; Beason, David P.; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Koch, Manuel; Birk, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Type XIV collagen is a fibril-associated collagen with an interrupted triple helix. This collagen interacts with the fibril surface and has been implicated as a regulator of fibrillogenesis; however, a specific role has not been elucidated. Functional roles for type XIV collagen were defined utilizing a new type XIV collagen-deficient mouse line. This line was produced using a conventional targeted knock-out approach. Col14a1(–/–) mice were devoid of type XIV collagen, whereas heterozygous mice had reduced synthesis. Both mutant Col14a1 genotypes were viable with a grossly normal phenotype; however, mature skin exhibited altered mechanical properties. Prior to evaluating tendon fibrillogenesis in type XIV collagen-deficient mice, the developmental expression patterns were analyzed in wild-type flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendons. Analyses of mRNA and protein expression indicated tissue-specific temporal expression that was associated with the early stages in fibrillogenesis. Ultrastructural analyses of wild-type and null tendons demonstrated premature fibril growth and larger fibril diameters in tendons from null mice at postnatal day 4 (P4). However, fibril structure in mature tendons was normal. Biomechanical studies established a direct structure/function relationship with reduced strength in P7-null tendons. However, the biomechanical properties in P60 tendons were comparable in null and wild-type mice. Our results indicate a regulatory function for type XIV collagen in early stages of collagen fibrillogenesis with tissue differences. PMID:19136672

  8. Arterial calcification: Conscripted by collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan D.

    2016-03-01

    In atherosclerotic plaques, patterns of calcification -- which have profound implications for plaque stability and vulnerability to rupture -- are determined by the collagen's content and patterning throughout the plaque.

  9. Salamander-Derived, Human-Optimized nAG Protein Suppresses Collagen Synthesis and Increases Collagen Degradation in Primary Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M.; Shier, Medhat K.; Abd-AlWahed, Mervat M.; Mawlana, Ola H.; El-Wetidy, Mohammed S.; Bagayawa, Reginald S.; Ali, Hebatallah H.; Al-Nbaheen, May S.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike humans, salamanders regrow their amputated limbs. Regeneration depends on the presence of regenerating axons which upregulate the expression of newt anterior gradient (nAG) protein. We had the hypothesis that nAG might have an inhibitory effect on collagen production since excessive collagen production results in scarring, which is a major enemy to regeneration. nAG gene was designed, synthesized, and cloned. The cloned vector was then transfected into primary human fibroblasts. The results showed that the expression of nAG protein in primary human fibroblast cells suppresses the expression of collagen I and III, with or without TGF-β1 stimulation. This suppression is due to a dual effect of nAG both by decreasing collagen synthesis and by increasing collagen degradation. Furthermore, nAG had an inhibitory effect on proliferation of transfected fibroblasts. It was concluded that nAG suppresses collagen through multiple effects. PMID:24288677

  10. Targeting the Metastasis Suppressor, N-Myc Downstream Regulated Gene-1, with Novel Di-2-Pyridylketone Thiosemicarbazones: Suppression of Tumor Cell Migration and Cell-Collagen Adhesion by Inhibiting Focal Adhesion Kinase/Paxillin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wangpu, Xiongzhi; Lu, Jiaoyang; Xi, Ruxing; Yue, Fei; Sahni, Sumit; Park, Kyung Chan; Menezes, Sharleen; Huang, Michael L H; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a complex process that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/paxillin pathway playing a major role in the formation of focal adhesions and cell motility. N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor in many solid tumor types, including prostate and colon cancer. Considering the antimetastatic effect of NDRG1 and the crucial involvement of the FAK/paxillin pathway in cellular migration and cell-matrix adhesion, we assessed the effects of NDRG1 on this important oncogenic pathway. In the present study, NDRG1 overexpression and silencing models of HT29 colon cancer and DU145 prostate cancer cells were used to examine the activation of FAK/paxillin signaling and the formation of focal adhesions. The expression of NDRG1 resulted in a marked and significant decrease in the activating phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin, whereas silencing of NDRG1 resulted in an opposite effect. The expression of NDRG1 also inhibited the formation of focal adhesions as well as cell migration and cell-collagen adhesion. Incubation of cells with novel thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, that upregulate NDRG1 also resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin. The ability of these thiosemicarbazones to inhibit cell migration and metastasis could be mediated, at least in part, through the FAK/paxillin pathway. PMID:26895766

  11. Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Miki; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Real time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.

  12. Mechanisms of action of acetaldehyde in the up-regulation of the human α2(I) collagen gene in hepatic stellate cells: key roles of Ski, SMAD3, SMAD4, and SMAD7.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Gordillo, Karina; Shah, Ruchi; Arellanes-Robledo, Jaime; Hernández-Nazara, Zamira; Rincón-Sánchez, Ana Rosa; Inagaki, Yutaka; Rojkind, Marcos; Lakshman, M Raj

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol-induced liver fibrosis and eventually cirrhosis is a leading cause of death. Acetaldehyde, the first metabolite of ethanol, up-regulates expression of the human α2(I) collagen gene (COL1A2). Early acetaldehyde-mediated effects involve phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of SMAD3/4-containing complexes that bind to COL1A2 promoter to induce fibrogenesis. We used human and mouse hepatic stellate cells to elucidate the mechanisms whereby acetaldehyde up-regulates COL1A2 by modulating the role of Ski and the expression of SMADs 3, 4, and 7. Acetaldehyde induced up-regulation of COL1A2 by 3.5-fold, with concomitant increases in the mRNA (threefold) and protein (4.2- and 3.5-fold) levels of SMAD3 and SMAD4, respectively. It also caused a 60% decrease in SMAD7 expression. Ski, a member of the Ski/Sno oncogene family, is colocalized in the nucleus with SMAD4. Acetaldehyde induces translocation of Ski and SMAD4 to the cytoplasm, where Ski undergoes proteasomal degradation, as confirmed by the ability of the proteasomal inhibitor lactacystin to blunt up-regulation of acetaldehyde-dependent COL1A2, but not of the nonspecific fibronectin gene (FN1). We conclude that acetaldehyde up-regulates COL1A2 by enhancing expression of the transactivators SMAD3 and SMAD4 while inhibiting the repressor SMAD7, along with promoting Ski translocation from the nucleus to cytoplasm. We speculate that drugs that prevent proteasomal degradation of repressors targeting COL1A2 may have antifibrogenic properties.

  13. Collagen for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-09-01

    In the last decades, increased knowledge about the organization, structure and properties of collagen (particularly concerning interactions between cells and collagen-based materials) has inspired scientists and engineers to design innovative collagen-based biomaterials and to develop novel tissue-engineering products. The design of resorbable collagen-based medical implants requires understanding the tissue/organ anatomy and biological function as well as the role of collagen's physicochemical properties and structure in tissue/organ regeneration. Bone is a complex tissue that plays a critical role in diverse metabolic processes mediated by calcium delivery as well as in hematopoiesis whilst maintaining skeleton strength. A wide variety of collagen-based scaffolds have been proposed for different tissue engineering applications. These scaffolds are designed to promote a biological response, such as cell interaction, and to work as artificial biomimetic extracellular matrices that guide tissue regeneration. This paper critically reviews the current understanding of the complex hierarchical structure and properties of native collagen molecules, and describes the scientific challenge of manufacturing collagen-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of innovative techniques for scaffold and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to the preparation of biomimetic substrates that modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, retention or enhancement of bone tissue function. PMID:22705634

  14. Type I Collagen and Collagen Mimetics as Angiogenesis Promoting Superpolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Twardowski, T.; Fertala, A.; Orgel, J.P.R.O.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2008-07-18

    Angiogenesis, the development of blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, is a key component of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Angiogenesis also drives pathologies such as tumor growth and metastasis, and hemangioma development in newborns. On the other hand, promotion of angiogenesis is needed in tissues with vascular insufficiencies, and in bioengineering, to endow tissue substitutes with appropriate microvasculatures. Therefore, much research has focused on defining mechanisms of angiogenesis, and identifying pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules. Type I collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, potently stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to its angiogenic activity appears to be ligation and possibly clustering of endothelial cell (EC) surface {alpha}1{beta}1/{alpha}2{beta}1 integrin receptors by the GFPGER502-507 sequence of the collagen fibril. However, additional aspects of collagen structure and function that may modulate its angiogenic properties are discussed. Moreover, type I collagen and fibrin, another angiogenic polymer, share several structural features. These observations suggest strategies for creating 'angiogenic superpolymers', including: modifying type I collagen to influence its biological half-life, immunogenicity, and integrin binding capacity; genetically engineering fibrillar collagens to include additional integrin binding sites or angiogenic determinants, and remove unnecessary or deleterious sequences without compromising fibril integrity; and exploring the suitability of poly(ortho ester), PEG-lysine copolymer, tubulin, and cholesteric cuticle as collagen mimetics, and suggesting means of modifying them to display ideal angiogenic properties. The collagenous and collagen mimetic angiogenic superpolymers described here may someday prove useful for many applications in tissue engineering and human medicine.

  15. Lymphocytic and Collagenous Colitis.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Correa; Giardiello

    2000-06-01

    Patients with symptomatic collagenous-lymphocytic colitis should eliminate dietary secretagogues such as caffeine- or lactose-containing food from their diet. When possible, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be discontinued. If steatorrhea is documented, a low-fat diet may be helpful. In the presence of bile salt malabsorption, binding resins such as cholestyramine might be useful. Nonspecific diarrheal agents such as loperamide hydrochloride, diphenoxylate hydrochloride and atropine, deodorized tincture of opium, or codeine might prove effective in some patients. Antibacterial agents such as bismuth subsalicylate (8 chewable 262-mg tablets daily) have been effective in symptom control. Metronidazole and erythromycin achieve response rates of 60%. Sulfasalazine, at the usual dose of 2 to 4 g daily, used in collagenous-lymphocytic colitis, demonstrated cessation of diarrhea in 1 to 2 weeks for 50% of patients. Other 5-aminosalicylic (5-ASA) compounds are preferred for patients with a history of sulfa allergy, and those who experience adverse reactions to sulfasalazine. Adrenocorticoid medication is reserved for patients whose conventional treatment with sulfasalazine or 5-ASA has failed. Resolution of diarrhea has been documented in 80% to 90% of patients within 1 week of treatment, however, in most patients, long-term therapy is required. Surgical management is reserved for those patients with disease refractory to medical therapy. Colectomy with ileostomy resulted in clinical and histologic resolution in small case series. If there is no abatement of symptoms, rule out other etiologies of diarrhea such as thyroid dysfunction, celiac disease, or bacterial overgrowth. PMID:11097741

  16. Tenascin-x deficiency mimics ehlers-danlos syndrome in mice through alteration of collagen deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J.R.; Taylor, G.; Dean, W.B.; Wagner, D.R.; Afzal, V.; Lotz, J.C.; Rubin, E.M.; Bristow, J.

    2002-03-01

    Tenascin-X is a large extracellular matrix protein of unknown function1-3. Tenascin-X deficiency in humans is associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome4,5, a generalized connective tissue disorder resulting from altered metabolism of the fibrillar collagens6. Because TNXB is the first Ehlers-Danlos syndrome gene that does not encode a fibrillar collagen or collagen-modifying enzyme7-14, we suggested that tenascin-X might regulate collagen synthesis or deposition15. To test this hypothesis, we inactivated Tnxb in mice. Tnxb-/- mice showed progressive skin hyperextensibility, similar to individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Biomechanical testing confirmed increased deformability and reduced tensile strength of their skin. The skin of Tnxb-/- mice was histologically normal, but its collagen content was significantly reduced. At the ultrastructural level, collagen fibrils of Tnxb-/- mice were of normal size and shape, but the density of fibrils in their skin was reduced, commensurate with the reduction in collagen content. Studies of cultured dermal fibroblasts showed that although synthesis of collagen I by Tnxb-/- and wildtype cells was similar, Tnxb-/- fibroblasts failed to deposit collagen I into cell-associated matrix. This study confirms a causative role for TNXB in human Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and suggests that tenascin-X is an essential regulator of collagen deposition by dermal fibroblasts.

  17. Collagen fibril formation during development

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmajer, R.; Perlish, J.S.; Timpl, R.; Olsen, B.R.

    1987-05-01

    Studies with embryonic skin and bone suggested that the aminopropeptide (AP) and carboxylpropeptide (CP) of type I pro-callagen (pro-col) play a role in fibril formation. Chick leg metatarsal tendons were studied by electron microscopy. AP and CP of type I pro-col were purified from chick leg tendons; antibodies developed in rabbits and purity tested by radioimmunoassays. Antibodies were used for immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunoblotting (IB). The peritendineum, consisting of thin 20-30 nm fibrils, revealed the AP of type I and type III procol. In the tendon area, collagen fibrils were arranged within small compartments and were of uniform diameter at 10d, 14d and 18d. However, beyond 21d, there was confluency of the compartments and a wide range of fibril diameters. IFM revealed fine streaks of collagen, staining with the AP of type I throughout the tendon. The CP was mainly intracellular with only a small amount present in the extracellular space. IB revealed procollagen, pN-collagen (AP+collagen) and pC-collagen, (CP+collagen) at all stages of development. Ratios of pN/pC collagen, determined by spectrophotometric scanning of autoradiographs, correlated well with the distribution of fibril diameter. This study suggests the hypothesis that AP initiates fibrillogenesis while CP may regulate additional fibril growth.

  18. Collagen reconstitution is inversely correlated with induction of limb regeneration in Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Hirata, Ayako; Makanae, Aki

    2012-03-01

    Amphibians can regenerate missing body parts, including limbs. The regulation of collagen has been considered to be important in limb regeneration. Collagen deposition is suppressed during limb regeneration, so we investigated collagen deposition and apical epithelial cap (AEC) formation during axolotl limb regeneration. The accessory limb model (ALM) has been developed as an alternative model for studying limb regeneration. Using this model, we investigated the relationship between nerves, epidermis, and collagen deposition. We found that Sp-9, an AEC marker gene, was upregulated by direct interaction between nerves and epidermis. However, collagen deposition hindered this interaction, and resulted in the failure of limb regeneration. During wound healing, an increase in deposition of collagen caused a decrease in the blastema induction rate in ALM. Wound healing and limb regeneration are alternate processes.

  19. Development of biomimetic tilapia collagen nanofibers for skin regeneration through inducing keratinocytes differentiation and collagen synthesis of dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Nanping; Xue, Yang; Ding, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Mo, Xiumei; Sun, Jiao

    2015-02-11

    In this study, tilapia skin collagen sponge and electrospun nanofibers were developed for wound dressing. The collagen sponge was composed of at least two α-peptides, and its denaturation temperature was 44.99 °C. It did not change the number of spleen-derived lymphocytes in BALB/c mice, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytes, and the level of IgG or IgM in Sprague-Dawley rat. The contact angle, tensile strength, and weight loss temperature of collagen nanofibers were 21.2°, 6.72±0.44 MPa, and 300 °C, respectively. The nanofibers could promote the viabilities of human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), inducing epidermal differentiation through the gene expression of involucrin, filaggrin, and type I transglutaminase of HaCaTs, and they could also accelerate migration of HaCaTs with the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Besides, the nanofibers could upregulate the protien level of Col-I in HDFs both via a direct effect and TGF-β1 secreted from HaCaTs, thus facilitating the formation of collagen fibers. Furthermore, the collagen nanofibers stimulated the skin regeneration rapidly and effectively in vivo. These biological effects could be explained as the contributions from the biomimic extracellular cell matrix structure, hydrophilicity, and the multiple amino acids of the collagen nanofibers. PMID:25598076

  20. Development of biomimetic tilapia collagen nanofibers for skin regeneration through inducing keratinocytes differentiation and collagen synthesis of dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Nanping; Xue, Yang; Ding, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Mo, Xiumei; Sun, Jiao

    2015-02-11

    In this study, tilapia skin collagen sponge and electrospun nanofibers were developed for wound dressing. The collagen sponge was composed of at least two α-peptides, and its denaturation temperature was 44.99 °C. It did not change the number of spleen-derived lymphocytes in BALB/c mice, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytes, and the level of IgG or IgM in Sprague-Dawley rat. The contact angle, tensile strength, and weight loss temperature of collagen nanofibers were 21.2°, 6.72±0.44 MPa, and 300 °C, respectively. The nanofibers could promote the viabilities of human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), inducing epidermal differentiation through the gene expression of involucrin, filaggrin, and type I transglutaminase of HaCaTs, and they could also accelerate migration of HaCaTs with the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Besides, the nanofibers could upregulate the protien level of Col-I in HDFs both via a direct effect and TGF-β1 secreted from HaCaTs, thus facilitating the formation of collagen fibers. Furthermore, the collagen nanofibers stimulated the skin regeneration rapidly and effectively in vivo. These biological effects could be explained as the contributions from the biomimic extracellular cell matrix structure, hydrophilicity, and the multiple amino acids of the collagen nanofibers.

  1. The Staphylococcus aureus collagen adhesin is a virulence determinant in experimental septic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Patti, J M; Bremell, T; Krajewska-Pietrasik, D; Abdelnour, A; Tarkowski, A; Rydén, C; Höök, M

    1994-01-01

    The importance of a collagen-binding adhesin in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis has been examined by comparing the virulence of two sets of Staphylococcus aureus mutants in an animal model. Collagen adhesin-negative mutant PH100 was constructed by replacing the chromosomal collagen adhesin gene (cna) in a clinical strain, Phillips, with an inactivated copy of the gene. Collagen adhesin-positive mutant S. aureus CYL574 was generated by introducing the cna gene into CYL316, a strain that normally lacks the cna gene. Biochemical, immunological, and functional analyses of the generated mutants and their respective parent strains showed that binding of 125I-labeled collagen, expression of an immunoreactive collagen adhesin, and bacterial adherence to cartilage were directly correlated with the presence of a functional cna gene. Greater than 70% of the mice injected with the Cna+ strains developed clinical signs of arthritis, whereas less than 27% of the animals injected with Cna- strains showed symptoms of disease. Furthermore, mice injected with the Cna+ strain Phillips had remarkably elevated levels of immunoglobulin G1 and interleukin-6 compared with mice injected with the Cna- mutant PH100. Taken together, these results demonstrate that collagen adhesin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis induced by S. aureus. Images PMID:8262622

  2. Nonlinear microscopy of collagen fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, M.; Pena, A.-M.; Hernest, M.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Fabre, A.; Marchal-Somme, J.; Crestani, B.; Débarre, D.; Martin, J.-L.; Beaurepaire, E.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2007-02-01

    We used intrinsic Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) by fibrillar collagen to visualize the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibrosis at the micrometer scale using laser scanning nonlinear microscopy. We showed that SHG signals are highly specific to fibrillar collagen and provide a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in tissues. Moreover, recording simultaneously other nonlinear optical signals in a multimodal setup, we visualized the tissue morphology using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) signals from endogenous chromophores such as NADH or elastin. We then compared different methods to determine accurate indexes of collagen fibrosis using nonlinear microscopy, given that most collagen fibrils are smaller than the microscope resolution and that second harmonic generation is a coherent process. In order to define a robust method to process our three-dimensional images, we either calculated the fraction of the images occupied by a significant SHG signal, or averaged SHG signal intensities. We showed that these scores provide an estimation of the extension of renal and pulmonary fibrosis in murine models, and that they clearly sort out the fibrotic mice.

  3. Analysis of human collagen sequences.

    PubMed

    Nassa, Manisha; Anand, Pracheta; Jain, Aditi; Chhabra, Aastha; Jaiswal, Astha; Malhotra, Umang; Rani, Vibha

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is fast emerging as important component mediating cell-cell interactions, along with its established role as a scaffold for cell support. Collagen, being the principal component of extracellular matrix, has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions. However, collagens are complex protein structures belonging to a large family consisting of 28 members in humans; hence, there exists a lack of in depth information about their structural features. Annotating and appreciating the functions of these proteins is possible with the help of the numerous biocomputational tools that are currently available. This study reports a comparative analysis and characterization of the alpha-1 chain of human collagen sequences. Physico-chemical, secondary structural, functional and phylogenetic classification was carried out, based on which, collagens 12, 14 and 20, which belong to the FACIT collagen family, have been identified as potential players in diseased conditions, owing to certain atypical properties such as very high aliphatic index, low percentage of glycine and proline residues and their proximity in evolutionary history. These collagen molecules might be important candidates to be investigated further for their role in skeletal disorders. PMID:22359431

  4. Human collagen produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2014-01-01

    Consequential to its essential role as a mechanical support and affinity regulator in extracellular matrices, collagen constitutes a highly sought after scaffolding material for regeneration and healing applications. However, substantiated concerns have been raised with regard to quality and safety of animal tissue-extracted collagen, particularly in relation to its immunogenicity, risk of disease transmission and overall quality and consistency. In parallel, contamination with undesirable cellular factors can significantly impair its bioactivity, vis-a-vis its impact on cell recruitment, proliferation and differentiation. High-scale production of recombinant human collagen Type I (rhCOL1) in the tobacco plant provides a source of an homogenic, heterotrimeric, thermally stable “virgin” collagen which self assembles to fine homogenous fibrils displaying intact binding sites and has been applied to form numerous functional scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In addition, rhCOL1 can form liquid crystal structures, yielding a well-organized and mechanically strong membrane, two properties indispensable to extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicry. Overall, the shortcomings of animal- and cadaver-derived collagens arising from their source diversity and recycled nature are fully overcome in the plant setting, constituting a collagen source ideal for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23941988

  5. Characterisations of collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, C. S.; Popa, C. L.; Petre, C. C.; Jiga, G.; Trusca, R.; Predoi, D.

    2016-05-01

    The XRD analysis were performed to confirm the formation of hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The molecular interaction in collagen-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites was highlighted by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The SEM showed a nanostructure of collagen-silverhydroxyapatite nanocomposites composed of nano needle-like particles in a veil with collagen texture. The presence of vibrational groups characteristics to the hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite (AgHApColl) nanocomposites was investigated by FTIR.

  6. Collagenous sprue: a clinicopathologic study of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Aoife A; Greenson, Joel K; Lauwers, Greg Y; Ginsburg, Richard E; Williams, Geraint T; Brown, Ian S; Riddell, Robert H; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid; Sheahan, Kieran D

    2009-10-01

    Collagenous sprue is a rare form of small bowel enteropathy characterized by chronic diarrhea and progressive malabsorption with little data available on its natural history. The pathologic lesion consists of subepithelial collagen deposition associated with variable alterations in villous architecture. The small bowel biopsies of 12 cases were reviewed. Clinical details, celiac serology, and T-cell receptor gene rearrangement study results, when available, were collated. There were 8 females and 4 males (age ranged from 41 to 84 y) who presented with chronic diarrhea and weight loss. Small intestinal biopsies showed subepithelial collagen deposition with varying degrees of villous atrophy and varying numbers of intraepithelial lymphocytes. Four patients had previous biopsies showing enteropathic changes without collagen deposition. Seven cases were associated with collagenous colitis and 1 also had features of lymphocytic colitis. Three patients also had collagen deposition in gastric biopsies. One case was associated with lymphocytic gastritis. Celiac disease (CD, gluten-sensitive enteropathy) was documented in 4 patients. Five patients made a clinical improvement with combinations of a gluten-free diet and immunosuppressive therapy. Two patients died of complications of malnutrition and 1 of another illness. Clonal T-cell populations were identified in 5 of 6 cases tested. Four of these patients improved clinically after treatment but 1 has died. Collagenous sprue evolved on a background of CD in 4 cases. There was no history of CD in others and these cases may be the result of a biologic insult other than gluten sensitivity. None has developed clinical evidence of lymphoma to date. PMID:19641452

  7. The mRNAs for the three chains of human collagen type XI are widely distributed but not necessarily co-expressed: implications for homotrimeric, heterotrimeric and heterotypic collagen molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Lui, V C; Kong, R Y; Nicholls, J; Cheung, A N; Cheah, K S

    1995-01-01

    In cartilage collagen type XI exists as heterotrimeric molecules composed of alpha 1(XI), alpha 2(XI) and alpha 3(XI) subunits. Messenger RNAs for some of the alpha chains of collagen type XI have also been found in non-chondrogenic tissues but the chain composition of the molecule in these sites is not known. Some non-chondrogenic tissues also contain heterotrimers containing collagen alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(XI) chains. We have explored the possibility that collagen type XI could exist in differing trimeric forms in non-chondrogenic tissues and aimed to predict the subunit composition of this collagen in those tissues. The distribution and relative levels of expression of collagen alpha 1(XI), alpha 2(XI) and alpha 3(XI)/alpha 1(II) mRNAs in different human fetal tissues were studied. Expression of mRNAs for all three genes of collagen type XI is not restricted to cartilage but is widespread. However, in some non-chondrogenic tissues, the mRNAs for all three alpha chains of collagen type XI were not co-expressed, but collagen alpha 1(XI) and alpha 2(XI) mRNAs were found either singly or without collagen alpha 3(XI) transcripts. Collagen type XI may therefore exist as homotrimers and/or heterotrimers composed of two collagen alpha(XI) chains in some tissues. The distribution of mRNAs for collagen alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(I) were also studied. Co-expression of collagen type XI, alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(I) mRNAs was found for many tissues. These findings have implications for the possibility of additional chain associations for collagen types XI and V in cross-type heterotrimers within heterotypic fibrils. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7487888

  8. Riboflavin-induced photo-crosslinking of collagen hydrogel and its application in meniscus tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jiseung; Koh, Rachel H; Shim, Whuisu; Kim, Hwan D; Yim, Hyun-Gu; Hwang, Nathaniel S

    2016-04-01

    A meniscus tear is a common knee injury, but its regeneration remains a clinical challenge. Recently, collagen-based scaffolds have been applied in meniscus tissue engineering. Despite its prevalence, application of natural collagen scaffold in clinical setting is limited due to its extremely low stiffness and rapid degradation. The purpose of the present study was to increase the mechanical properties and delay degradation rate of a collagen-based scaffold by photo-crosslinking using riboflavin (RF) and UV exposure. RF is a biocompatible vitamin B2 that showed minimal cytotoxicity compared to conventionally utilized photo-initiator. Furthermore, collagen photo-crosslinking with RF improved mechanical properties and delayed enzyme-triggered degradation of collagen scaffolds. RF-induced photo-crosslinked collagen scaffolds encapsulated with fibrochondrocytes resulted in reduced scaffold contraction and enhanced gene expression levels for the collagen II and aggrecan. Additionally, hyaluronic acid (HA) incorporation into photo-crosslinked collagen scaffold showed an increase in its retention. Based on these results, we demonstrate that photo-crosslinked collagen-HA hydrogels can be potentially applied in the scaffold-based meniscus tissue engineering.

  9. Lysyl Oxidase Activity Is Required for Ordered Collagen Fibrillogenesis by Tendon Cells.

    PubMed

    Herchenhan, Andreas; Uhlenbrock, Franziska; Eliasson, Pernilla; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David; Kadler, Karl E; Magnusson, S Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2015-06-26

    Lysyl oxidases (LOXs) are a family of copper-dependent oxido-deaminases that can modify the side chain of lysyl residues in collagen and elastin, thereby leading to the spontaneous formation of non-reducible aldehyde-derived interpolypeptide chain cross-links. The consequences of LOX inhibition in producing lathyrism are well documented, but the consequences on collagen fibril formation are less clear. Here we used β-aminoproprionitrile (BAPN) to inhibit LOX in tendon-like constructs (prepared from human tenocytes), which are an experimental model of cell-mediated collagen fibril formation. The improvement in structure and strength seen with time in control constructs was absent in constructs treated with BAPN. As expected, BAPN inhibited the formation of aldimine-derived cross-links in collagen, and the constructs were mechanically weak. However, an unexpected finding was that BAPN treatment led to structurally abnormal collagen fibrils with irregular profiles and widely dispersed diameters. Of special interest, the abnormal fibril profiles resembled those seen in some Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome phenotypes. Importantly, the total collagen content developed normally, and there was no difference in COL1A1 gene expression. Collagen type V, decorin, fibromodulin, and tenascin-X proteins were unaffected by the cross-link inhibition, suggesting that LOX regulates fibrillogenesis independently of these molecules. Collectively, the data show the importance of LOX for the mechanical development of early collagenous tissues and that LOX is essential for correct collagen fibril shape formation. PMID:25979340

  10. Nanomechanics of Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-07-12

    Type I collagen is the predominant collagen in mature tendons and ligaments, where it gives them their load-bearing mechanical properties. Fibrils of type I collagen are formed by the packing of polypeptide triple helices. Higher-order structures like fibril bundles and fibers are assembled from fibrils in the presence of other collagenous molecules and noncollagenous molecules. Curiously, however, experiments show that fibrils/fibril bundles are less resistant to axial stress compared to their constituent triple helices-the Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles are an order-of-magnitude smaller than the Young's moduli of triple helices. Given the sensitivity of the Young's moduli of triple helices to solvation environment, a plausible explanation is that the packing of triple helices into fibrils perhaps reduces the Young's modulus of an individual triple helix, which results in fibrils having smaller Young's moduli. We find, however, from molecular dynamics and accelerated conformational sampling simulations that the Young's modulus of the buried core of the fibril is of the same order as that of a triple helix in aqueous phase. These simulations, therefore, suggest that the lower Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles cannot be attributed to the specific packing of triple helices in the fibril core. It is not the fibril core that yields initially to axial stress. Rather, it must be the portion of the fibril exposed to the solvent and/or the fibril-fibril interface that bears the initial strain. Overall, this work provides estimates of Young's moduli and persistence lengths at two levels of collagen's structural assembly, which are necessary to quantitatively investigate the response of various biological factors on collagen mechanics, including congenital mutations, posttranslational modifications and ligand binding, and also engineer new collagen-based materials. PMID:27410733

  11. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (p<0.04) and showed a 3-fold increase in Young's modulus (p<0.04) at higher concentration. Furfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications.

  12. Extracellular collagenous spherules in salivary gland tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis of laminin and various types of collagen.

    PubMed

    Skalova, A; Leivo, I

    1992-06-01

    Collagenous spherulosis is a benign breast lesion involving lobular acini and ductules and containing eosinophilic spherules measuring up to 100 microns in diameter. We present an immunohistochemical analysis of similar collagen-rich spherules that are also found in salivary gland tumors. These collagenous spherules contain varying amounts of acidic mucins, elastin, basement membrane proteins including type IV collagen and laminin, and considerable amounts of interstitial collagen types I and III. Types II and VI collagen were not detected in collagenous spherules of salivary gland tumors. The cells surrounding these collagenous spherules expressed muscle actin, S100 protein, vimentin, and cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19, indicating that these cells have myoepithelial characteristics.

  13. Developmental changes in skin collagen biosynthesis pathway in posthatch male and female chickens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, M.; Schickler, M.; Hurwitz, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1996-01-01

    The developmental changes in skin collagen biosynthesis pathway in male and female chickens were evaluated. Concentration of collagen, levels of mRNA for collagen type I subunits and for lysyl hydroxylase, and the level of three lysyl oxidase-derived cross-links: dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine (DHLNL), dehydro-hydroxylysinonorleucine (HLNL), and dehydro-histidinohydroxymerodesmosine (HHMD) were determined during 4 wk posthatching. Skin collagen content increased with age and was higher in males than in females. In both sexes, the expression of the genes coding for alpha 1 and alpha 2 of collagen type I decreased with age: alpha 1(I) gene expression decreased from Day 3 onwards, whereas the reduction in alpha 2(I) gene expression started 1 wk later. At all ages examined, the expression of both genes was higher in male than in female skin. Males and females lysyl hydroxylase gene expression remained low until Day 16, after which an increase in the enzyme gene expression was observed. An increase in skin HLNL content was observed from Day 3 in both sexes reaching a peak in males at Day 9 and in females 1 wk later. The DHLNL content, which was higher in males than in females at all ages tested, dramatically decreased in both male and female skin from 3 d of age, reaching its lowest level at Day 16, and remained at that low level thereafter. The skin content of HHMD in males and females followed an oscillatory behavior with higher peaks in the male skin. The results suggest that the higher tensile strength of male skin than female skin may be due to the elevated skin collagen content that resulted from increased expression in collagen type I genes on the one hand, and from the higher amounts of various collagen cross-links on the other.

  14. Monozygotic twins discordant for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa phenotype highlight the role of TGF-β signalling in modifying disease severity.

    PubMed

    Odorisio, Teresa; Di Salvio, Michela; Orecchia, Angela; Di Zenzo, Giovanni; Piccinni, Eugenia; Cianfarani, Francesca; Travaglione, Antonella; Uva, Paolo; Bellei, Barbara; Conti, Andrea; Zambruno, Giovanna; Castiglia, Daniele

    2014-08-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is a genodermatosis characterized by fragile skin forming blisters that heal invariably with scars. It is due to mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen, the major component of anchoring fibrils connecting the cutaneous basement membrane to the dermis. Identical COL7A1 mutations often result in inter- and intra-familial disease variability, suggesting that additional modifiers contribute to RDEB course. Here, we studied a monozygotic twin pair with RDEB presenting markedly different phenotypic manifestations, while expressing similar amounts of collagen VII. Genome-wide expression analysis in twins' fibroblasts showed differential expression of genes associated with TGF-β pathway inhibition. In particular, decorin, a skin matrix component with anti-fibrotic properties, was found to be more expressed in the less affected twin. Accordingly, fibroblasts from the more affected sibling manifested a profibrotic and contractile phenotype characterized by enhanced α-smooth muscle actin and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 expression, collagen I release and collagen lattice contraction. These cells also produced increased amounts of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Both TGF-β canonical (Smads) and non-canonical (MAPKs) pathways were basally more activated in the fibroblasts of the more affected twin. The profibrotic behaviour of these fibroblasts was suppressed by decorin delivery to cells. Our data show that the amount of type VII collagen is not the only determinant of RDEB clinical severity, and indicate an involvement of TGF-β pathways in modulating disease variability. Moreover, our findings identify decorin as a possible anti-fibrotic/inflammatory agent for RDEB therapeutic intervention. PMID:24599399

  15. Collagen shield delivery of trifluorothymidine.

    PubMed

    Gussler, J R; Ashton, P; VanMeter, W S; Smith, T J

    1990-11-01

    Corneal and aqueous levels of topically applied trifluorothymidine (F3T) were compared with and without the collagen shield in normal and damaged rabbit eyes. Shields were presoaked in 1% F3T for 15 minutes prior to application. Rabbits received either a presoaked shield, 1% F3T drops every two hours, or both. Corneal and aqueous levels of F3T were measured at 30 minutes, two, four, and eight hours. If 5 mm epithelial defects were created, the collagen shield and topical F3T drops produced significantly higher levels of F3T than drops alone at all periods tested (P less than .05). A presoaked shield alone produced greater levels of F3T than drops alone at 30 minutes and two hours (P less than .05). Collagen shields did not enhance F3T levels in eyes with intact epithelium. Implications for treatment of herpetic keratouveitis are discussed.

  16. Chick tendon fibroblast transcriptome and shape depend on whether the cell has made its own collagen matrix

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Ching-Yan Chloé; Zeef, Leo A. H.; Lallyett, Chloe; Lu, Yinhui; Canty-Laird, Elizabeth G.; Kadler, Karl E.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen- and fibrin-based gels are extensively used to study cell behaviour. However, 2D–3D and collagen-fibrin comparisons of gene expression, cell shape and mechanotransduction, with an in vivo reference, have not been reported. Here we compared chick tendon fibroblasts (CTFs) at three stages of embryonic development with CTFs cultured in collagen- or fibrin-based tissue engineered constructs (TECs). CTFs synthesised their own collagen matrix in fibrin-based TECs and better recapitulated the gene expression, collagen fibril alignment and cell shape seen in vivo. In contrast, cells in 3D collagen gels exhibited a 2D-like morphology and expressed fewer of the genes expressed in vivo. Analysis of YAP/TAZ target genes showed that collagen gels desensitise mechanotransduction pathways. In conclusion, gene expression and cell shape are similar on plastic and 3D collagen whereas cells in 3D fibrin have a shape and transcriptome better resembling the in vivo situation. Implications for wound healing are discussed. PMID:26337655

  17. Three reasons protein disorder analysis makes more sense in the light of collagen

    PubMed Central

    Oates, Matt E.; Tompa, Peter; Gough, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have identified that the collagen helix has the potential to be disruptive to analyses of intrinsically disordered proteins. The collagen helix is an extended fibrous structure that is both promiscuous and repetitive. Whilst its sequence is predicted to be disordered, this type of protein structure is not typically considered as intrinsic disorder. Here, we show that collagen‐encoding proteins skew the distribution of exon lengths in genes. We find that previous results, demonstrating that exons encoding disordered regions are more likely to be symmetric, are due to the abundance of the collagen helix. Other related results, showing increased levels of alternative splicing in disorder‐encoding exons, still hold after considering collagen‐containing proteins. Aside from analyses of exons, we find that the set of proteins that contain collagen significantly alters the amino acid composition of regions predicted as disordered. We conclude that research in this area should be conducted in the light of the collagen helix. PMID:26941008

  18. Myofibroblast expression in skin wounds is enhanced by collagen III suppression.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammed M; Abd-Elwahed, Mervat M; Hawary, Khalid; Arafah, Maha M; Shier, Medhat K

    2015-01-01

    Generally speaking, the excessive expression of myofibroblasts is associated with excessive collagen production. One exception is seen in patients and animal models of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV in which the COL3A1 gene mutation results in reduced collagen III but with concurrent increased myofibroblast expression. This paradox has not been examined with the use of external drugs/modalities to prevent hypertrophic scars. In this paper, we injected the rabbit ear wound model of hypertrophic scarring with two doses of a protein called nAG, which is known to reduce collagen expression and to suppress hypertrophic scarring in that animal model. The higher nAG dose was associated with significantly less collagen III expression and concurrent higher degree of myofibroblast expression. We concluded that collagen III content of the extracellular matrix may have a direct or an indirect effect on myofibroblast differentiation. However, further research is required to investigate the pathogenesis of this paradoxical phenomenon. PMID:25789326

  19. The evolution of fibrillar collagens: a sea-pen collagen shares common features with vertebrate type V collagen.

    PubMed

    Tillet, E; Franc, J M; Franc, S; Garrone, R

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular matrix of marine primitive invertebrates (sponges, polyps and jellyfishes) contains collagen fibrils with narrow diameters. From various data, it has been hypothesized that these primitive collagens could represent ancestral forms of the vertebrate minor collagens, i.e., types V or XI. Recently we have isolated a primitive collagen from the soft tissues of the sea-pen Veretillum cynomorium. This report examines whether the sea-pen collagen shares some features with vertebrate type V collagen. Rotary shadowed images of acid-soluble collagen molecules extracted from beta-APN treated animals, positive staining of segment-long-spacing crystallites precipitated from pepsinized collagen, Western blots of the pepsinized alpha1 and alpha2 chains with antibodies to vertebrate types I, III and V collagens, and in situ gold immunolabeling of ECM collagen fibrils were examined. Our results showed that the tissue form of the sea-pen collagen is a 340-nm threadlike molecule, which is close to the vertebrate type V collagen with its voluminous terminal globular domain, the distribution of most of its polar amino-acid residues, and its antigenic properties.

  20. The evolution of fibrillar collagens: a sea-pen collagen shares common features with vertebrate type V collagen.

    PubMed

    Tillet, E; Franc, J M; Franc, S; Garrone, R

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular matrix of marine primitive invertebrates (sponges, polyps and jellyfishes) contains collagen fibrils with narrow diameters. From various data, it has been hypothesized that these primitive collagens could represent ancestral forms of the vertebrate minor collagens, i.e., types V or XI. Recently we have isolated a primitive collagen from the soft tissues of the sea-pen Veretillum cynomorium. This report examines whether the sea-pen collagen shares some features with vertebrate type V collagen. Rotary shadowed images of acid-soluble collagen molecules extracted from beta-APN treated animals, positive staining of segment-long-spacing crystallites precipitated from pepsinized collagen, Western blots of the pepsinized alpha1 and alpha2 chains with antibodies to vertebrate types I, III and V collagens, and in situ gold immunolabeling of ECM collagen fibrils were examined. Our results showed that the tissue form of the sea-pen collagen is a 340-nm threadlike molecule, which is close to the vertebrate type V collagen with its voluminous terminal globular domain, the distribution of most of its polar amino-acid residues, and its antigenic properties. PMID:8653581

  1. Differential Effects of Collagen Prolyl 3-Hydroxylation on Skeletal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Erica P.; Lietman, Caressa; Grafe, Ingo; Lennington, Jennifer; Morello, Roy; Napierala, Dobrawa; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Munivez, Elda M.; Dawson, Brian; Bertin, Terry K.; Chen, Yuqing; Lua, Rhonald; Lichtarge, Olivier; Hicks, John; Weis, Mary Ann; Eyre, David; Lee, Brendan H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding cartilage associated protein (CRTAP) and prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1 encoded by LEPRE1) were the first identified causes of recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). These proteins, together with cyclophilin B (encoded by PPIB), form a complex that 3-hydroxylates a single proline residue on the α1(I) chain (Pro986) and has cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity essential for proper collagen folding. Recent data suggest that prolyl 3-hydroxylation of Pro986 is not required for the structural stability of collagen; however, the absence of this post-translational modification may disrupt protein-protein interactions integral for proper collagen folding and lead to collagen over-modification. P3H1 and CRTAP stabilize each other and absence of one results in degradation of the other. Hence, hypomorphic or loss of function mutations of either gene cause loss of the whole complex and its associated functions. The relative contribution of losing this complex's 3-hydroxylation versus PPIase and collagen chaperone activities to the phenotype of recessive OI is unknown. To distinguish between these functions, we generated knock-in mice carrying a single amino acid substitution in the catalytic site of P3h1 (Lepre1H662A). This substitution abolished P3h1 activity but retained ability to form a complex with Crtap and thus the collagen chaperone function. Knock-in mice showed absence of prolyl 3-hydroxylation at Pro986 of the α1(I) and α1(II) collagen chains but no significant over-modification at other collagen residues. They were normal in appearance, had no growth defects and normal cartilage growth plate histology but showed decreased trabecular bone mass. This new mouse model recapitulates elements of the bone phenotype of OI but not the cartilage and growth phenotypes caused by loss of the prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex. Our observations suggest differential tissue consequences due to selective inactivation of P3H1 hydroxylase activity

  2. Mechanical Loading Stimulates Expression of Collagen Cross-Linking Associated Enzymes in Periodontal Ligament.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Masaru; Rosales Rocabado, Juan Marcelo; Kitami, Megumi; Ida, Takako; Akiba, Yosuke; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Uoshima, Katsumi

    2016-04-01

    Type I collagen, a major extracellular component of the periodontal ligament (PDL), is post-translationally modified by a series of specific enzymes. Among the collagen-modifying enzymes, lysyl oxidase (LOX) is essential to initiate collagen cross-linking and lysyl hydroxylases (LHs) to regulate the cross-linking pathways that are important for tissue specific mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of mechanical loading on the expression of collagen-modifying enzymes and subsequent tissue changes in PDL. Primary human PDL cells were subjected to mechanical loading in a 3D collagen gel, and gene expression and collagen component were analyzed. Wistar rats were subjected to excessive occlusal loading with or without intra-peritoneal injection of a LOX inhibitor, β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN). Upon mechanical loading, gene expression of LH2 and LOX was significantly elevated, while that of COL1A2 was not affected on hPDL-derived cells. The mechanical loading also elevated formation of collagen α-chain dimers in 3D culture. The numbers of LH2 and LOX positive cells in PDL were significantly increased in an excessive occlusal loading model. Notably, an increase of LH2-positive cells was observed only at the bone-side of PDL. Intensity of picrosirius red staining was increased by excessive occlusal loading, but significantly diminished by BAPN treatment. These results demonstrated that mechanical loading induced collagen maturation in PDL by up-regulating collagen-modifying enzymes and subsequent collagen cross-linking which are important for PDL tissue maintenance. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 926-933, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26381152

  3. Inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation by antibodies to distinct types of collagens.

    PubMed Central

    Balleisen, L; Nowack, H; Gay, S; Timpl, R

    1979-01-01

    Aggregation of platelets by fibrils formed from collagens type I, II and III could be inhibited by coating the fibrils with anti-collagen antibodies or Fab fragments. Similar results were obtained in a clot-retraction assay. Inhibition was achieved with stoichiometric amounts of antibodies and was specific for each type of collagen. Aggregation caused by a mixture of type-I and -III collagens could only be inhibited by a mixture of antibodies against both collagens. The data show that each interstitial collagen is capable of interacting with platelets and do not support the concept of an outstanding activity of type-III collagen. Images PLATE 1 PMID:395952

  4. Collagens in the aged human macula.

    PubMed

    Marshall, G E; Konstas, A G; Reid, G G; Edwards, J G; Lee, W R

    1994-03-01

    Immunogold cytochemistry was used to investigate the fine structural distribution of collagen types I-VI in Bruch's membrane and choroid of the aged human macula. Macular tissue was obtained from ten eyes, and processed for cryoultramicrotomy and London Resin white embedding. Striated collagen fibrils within the inner and outer collagenous layers were found to contain collagen types I, III and V. In addition, type V collagen was also present in the basement membrane of the choriocapillaris. Gross thickening of the choriocapillaris basement membrane was attributed to the deposition of type IV collagen. However, type IV collagen appeared to be absent from the basement membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium. The interesting location of type VI collagen on the choroidal side of the choriocapillaris suggested that its function is to anchor the choriocapillaris onto the choroid. The collagens studied were absent from fibrous banded material, long-spacing collagen, the elastic layer and amorphous granular material. It was concluded that, of the collagen types studied, only the deposition of type IV collagen contributes to the age-related thickening of Bruch's membrane.

  5. Collagen binding to OSCAR: the odd couple.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    In this issue of Blood, Zhou et al reported the high-resolution structure of the collagen-activated osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) bound to a collagen model peptide. Together with binding studies, the results confirm a novel recognition mechanism for collagen by immunoglobulin-like motifs. PMID:26847065

  6. Exposure to Mimivirus Collagen Promotes Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Hülsmeier, Andreas J.; Hochhold, Nina; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in animals, also occur in some recently described nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses such as Mimiviridae, which replicate in amoebae. To clarify the impact of viral collagens on the immune response of animals exposed to Mimiviridae, we have investigated the localization of collagens in Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus particles and the response of mice to immunization with mimivirus particles. Using protein biotinylation, we have first shown that viral collagen encoded by open reading frame L71 is present at the surface of mimivirus particles. Exposure to mimivirus collagens elicited the production of anti-collagen antibodies in DBA/1 mice immunized intradermally with mimivirus protein extracts. This antibody response also targeted mouse collagen type II and was accompanied by T-cell reactivity to collagen and joint inflammation, as observed in collagen-induced arthritis following immunization of mice with bovine collagen type II. The broad distribution of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses in the environment suggests that humans are constantly exposed to such large virus particles. A survey of blood sera from healthy human subjects and from rheumatoid arthritis patients indeed demonstrated that 30% of healthy-subject and 36% of rheumatoid arthritis sera recognized the major mimivirus capsid protein L425. Moreover, whereas 6% of healthy-subject sera recognized the mimivirus collagen protein L71, 22% of rheumatoid arthritis sera were positive for mimivirus L71. Accordingly, our study shows that environmental exposure to mimivirus represents a risk factor in triggering autoimmunity to collagens. PMID:24173233

  7. Type V Collagen in Health, Disease, and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mak, Ki M; Png, Chien Yi M; Lee, Danielle J

    2016-05-01

    Type V collagen (COLV) is a regulatory fibril-forming collagen. It has at least three different molecular isoforms-α1(V)2 α2(V), α1(V)3, and α1(V)α2(V)α3(V)-formed by combinations of three different polypeptide α chains-α1(V), α2(V), and α3(V). COL V is a relatively minor collagen of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Morphologically, COLV occurs as heterotypic fibrils with type I collagen (COLI), microfilaments, or 12-nm-thick fibrils. COLV is synthesized in various mesenchymal cells and its gene expression is modulated by TGF-β and growth factors. While resistant to digestion by interstitial collagenases, native and denatured COLV are degraded by metalloproteinases and gelatinases, thereby promoting ECM remodeling. COLV interacts with matrix collagens and structural proteins, conferring structural integrity to tissue scaffolds. It binds matrix macromolecules, modulating cellular behavior, and functions. COLV co-assembles with COLI into heterotypic fibrils in the cornea and skin dermis, acting as a dominant regulator of collagen fibrillogenesis. COLV deficiency is associated with loss of corneal transparency and classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, while COLV overexpression is found in cancer, granulation tissue, inflammation, atherosclerosis, and fibrosis of lungs, skin, kidneys, adipose tissue, and liver. COLV isoform containing the α3(V) chain is involved in mediating pancreatic islet cell functions. In the liver, COLV is a minor but regular component of the ECM. Increases in COLV are associated with both early and advanced hepatic fibrosis. The neoepitopes of COLV have been shown to be a useful noninvasive serum biomarker for assessing fibrotic progression and resolution in experimental hepatic fibrosis. COLV is multifunctional in health, disease, and fibrosis.

  8. Type V Collagen in Health, Disease, and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mak, Ki M; Png, Chien Yi M; Lee, Danielle J

    2016-05-01

    Type V collagen (COLV) is a regulatory fibril-forming collagen. It has at least three different molecular isoforms-α1(V)2 α2(V), α1(V)3, and α1(V)α2(V)α3(V)-formed by combinations of three different polypeptide α chains-α1(V), α2(V), and α3(V). COL V is a relatively minor collagen of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Morphologically, COLV occurs as heterotypic fibrils with type I collagen (COLI), microfilaments, or 12-nm-thick fibrils. COLV is synthesized in various mesenchymal cells and its gene expression is modulated by TGF-β and growth factors. While resistant to digestion by interstitial collagenases, native and denatured COLV are degraded by metalloproteinases and gelatinases, thereby promoting ECM remodeling. COLV interacts with matrix collagens and structural proteins, conferring structural integrity to tissue scaffolds. It binds matrix macromolecules, modulating cellular behavior, and functions. COLV co-assembles with COLI into heterotypic fibrils in the cornea and skin dermis, acting as a dominant regulator of collagen fibrillogenesis. COLV deficiency is associated with loss of corneal transparency and classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, while COLV overexpression is found in cancer, granulation tissue, inflammation, atherosclerosis, and fibrosis of lungs, skin, kidneys, adipose tissue, and liver. COLV isoform containing the α3(V) chain is involved in mediating pancreatic islet cell functions. In the liver, COLV is a minor but regular component of the ECM. Increases in COLV are associated with both early and advanced hepatic fibrosis. The neoepitopes of COLV have been shown to be a useful noninvasive serum biomarker for assessing fibrotic progression and resolution in experimental hepatic fibrosis. COLV is multifunctional in health, disease, and fibrosis. PMID:26910848

  9. The BRAFV600E inhibitor, PLX4032, increases type I collagen synthesis in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Molly H.; Croteau, Walburga; Mullins, David W.; Brinckerhoff, Constance E.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical growth phase (VGP) melanoma is frequently metastatic, a process mediated by changes in gene expression, which are directed by signal transduction pathways in the tumor cells. A prominent signaling pathway is the Ras-Raf-Mek-Erk MAPK pathway, which increases expression of genes that promote melanoma progression. Many melanomas harbor a mutation in this pathway, BRAFV600E, which constitutively activates MAPK signaling and expression of downstream target genes that facilitate tumor progression. In BRAFV600E melanoma, the small molecule inhibitor, vemurafenib (PLX4032), has revolutionized therapy for melanoma by inducing rapid tumor regression. This compound down-regulates the expression of many genes. However, in this study, we document that blocking the Ras-Raf-Mek-Erk MAPK pathway, either with an ERK (PLX4032) or a MEK (U1026) signaling inhibitor, in BRAFV600E human and murine melanoma cell lines increases collagen synthesis in vitro and collagen deposition in vivo. Since TGFβ signaling is a major mediator of collagen synthesis, we examined whether blocking TGFβ signaling with a small molecule inhibitor would block this increase in collagen. However, there was minimal reduction in collagen synthesis in response to blocking TGFβ signaling, suggesting additional mechanism(s), which may include activation of the p38 MAPK pathway. Presently, it is unclear whether this increased collagen synthesis and deposition in melanomas represent a therapeutic benefit or an unwanted “off target” effect of inhibiting the Ras-Raf-Erk-Mek pathway. PMID:25989506

  10. Type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis: identification of abnormal type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, M; Hollister, D W

    1988-12-01

    We have extended the study of a mild case of type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis to include biochemical analyses of cartilage, bone, and the collagens produced by dermal fibroblasts. Type I collagen extracted from bone and types I and III collagen produced by dermal fibroblasts were normal, as was the hexosamine ratio of cartilage proteoglycans. Hyaline cartilage, however, contained approximately equal amounts of types I and II collagen and decreased amounts of type XI collagen. Unlike the normal SDS-PAGE mobility. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE revealed extensive overmodification of all type II cyanogen bromide peptides in a pattern consistent with heterozygosity for an abnormal pro alpha 1(II) chain which impaired the assembly and/or folding of type II collagen. This interpretation implies that dominant mutations of the COL2A1 gene may cause type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis. More generally, emerging data implicating defects of type II collagen in the type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis-spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita spectrum and in the Kniest-Stickler syndrome spectrum suggest that diverse mutations of this gene may be associated with widely differing phenotypic outcome. PMID:3195588

  11. Genetic engineering of fibrous proteins: spider dragline silk and collagen.

    PubMed

    Wong Po Foo, Cheryl; Kaplan, David L

    2002-10-18

    Various strategies have been employed to genetically engineer fibrous proteins. Two examples, the subject of this review, include spider dragline silk from Nephila clavipes and collagen. These proteins are highlighted because of their unique mechanical and biological properties related to controlled release, biomaterials and tissue engineering. Cloning and expression of native genes and synthetic artificial variants of the consensus sequence repeats from the native genes has been accomplished. Expression of recombinant silk and collagen proteins has been reported in a variety of host systems, including bacteria, yeast, insect cells, plants and mammalian cells. Future utility for these proteins for biomedical materials is expected to increase as needs expand for designer materials with tailored mechanical properties and biological interactions to elicit specific responses in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Structural constraints on the evolution of the collagen fibril: convergence on a 1014-residue COL domain.

    PubMed

    Slatter, David Anthony; Farndale, Richard William

    2015-05-01

    Type I collagen is the fundamental component of the extracellular matrix. Its α1 gene is the direct descendant of ancestral fibrillar collagen and contains 57 exons encoding the rod-like triple-helical COL domain. We trace the evolution of the COL domain from a primordial collagen 18 residues in length to its present 1014 residues, the limit of its possible length. In order to maintain and improve the essential structural features of collagen during evolution, exons can be added or extended only in permitted, non-random increments that preserve the position of spatially sensitive cross-linkage sites. Such sites cannot be maintained unless the twist of the triple helix is close to 30 amino acids per turn. Inspection of the gene structure of other long structural proteins, fibronectin and titin, suggests that their evolution might have been subject to similar constraints.

  13. The contribution of increased collagen synthesis to human glomerulosclerosis: a quantitative analysis of alpha 2IV collagen mRNA expression by competitive polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We previously reported that one of the main components of the sclerotic material in human glomerular diseases was type IV collagen. In this study we examined the contribution of increased synthesis to this process at the gene expression level. Sufficient material has not been available to study type IV collagen synthesis by normal or sclerotic glomeruli in humans. We took advantage of the availability of nephrectomy specimens from patients with renal carcinoma, and of the observation that approximately 50% of these patients develop varying degrees of glomerulosclerosis. We microdissected glomeruli from 10 patients and analyzed them using in situ reverse transcription coupled with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses (in situ RT-PCR). alpha 2IV collagen mRNA, after reverse transcription into cDNA, was detected in all patients and appeared to be increased in those with glomerulosclerosis (n = 5). A competitive PCR assay was developed to quantitate this change. There was an average 3.7-fold increase in glomerular type IV collagen cDNA in patients with significant sclerosis. This change was not due to an increased number of glomerular cells. Thus, glomerulosclerosis in humans is associated with an elevation of glomerular type IV collagen gene expression, suggesting that increased synthesis of type IV collagen may represent one component of this process. PMID:1281210

  14. The collagenous gastroenteritides: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Purva; McKenna, Barbara J

    2010-10-01

    Collagenous gastritis, collagenous sprue, and collagenous colitis share striking histologic similarities and occur together in some patients. They also share some drug and disease associations. Pediatric cases of collagenous gastritis, however, lack most of these associations. The etiologies of the collagenous gastroenteritides are not known, so it is not clear whether they are similar because they share pathogeneses, or because they indicate a common histologic response to varying injuries. The features, disease and drug associations, and the inquiries into the pathogenesis of these disorders are reviewed. PMID:20923305

  15. Collagen interactions: Drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Collagen is a major component in a wide range of drug delivery systems and biomaterial applications. Its basic physical and structural properties, together with its low immunogenicity and natural turnover, are keys to its biocompatibility and effectiveness. In addition to its material properties, the collagen triple-helix interacts with a large number of molecules that trigger biological events. Collagen interactions with cell surface receptors regulate many cellular processes, while interactions with other ECM components are critical for matrix structure and remodeling. Collagen also interacts with enzymes involved in its biosynthesis and degradation, including matrix metalloproteinases. Over the past decade, much information has been gained about the nature and specificity of collagen interactions with its partners. These studies have defined collagen sequences responsible for binding and the high-resolution structures of triple-helical peptides bound to its natural binding partners. Strategies to target collagen interactions are already being developed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies to interfere with collagen fibril formation and the use of triple-helical peptides to direct liposomes to melanoma cells. The molecular information about collagen interactions will further serve as a foundation for computational studies to design small molecules that can interfere with specific interactions or target tumor cells. Intelligent control of collagen biological interactions within a material context will expand the effectiveness of collagen-based drug delivery.

  16. Quantification of collagen contraction in three-dimensional cell culture.

    PubMed

    Kopanska, Katarzyna S; Bussonnier, Matthias; Geraldo, Sara; Simon, Anthony; Vignjevic, Danijela; Betz, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Many different cell types including fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and cancer cells exert traction forces on the fibrous components of the extracellular matrix. This can be observed as matrix contraction both macro- and microscopically in three-dimensional (3D) tissues models such as collagen type I gels. The quantification of local contraction at the micron scale, including its directionality and speed, in correlation with other parameters such as cell invasion, local protein or gene expression, can provide useful information to study wound healing, organism development, and cancer metastasis. In this article, we present a set of tools to quantify the flow dynamics of collagen contraction, induced by cells migrating out of a multicellular cancer spheroid into a three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrix. We adapted a pseudo-speckle technique that can be applied to bright-field and fluorescent microscopy time series. The image analysis presented here is based on an in-house written software developed in the Matlab (Mathworks) programming environment. The analysis program is freely available from GitHub following the link: http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.10116. This tool provides an automatized technique to measure collagen contraction that can be utilized in different 3D cellular systems.

  17. Regulation of collagen biosynthesis in cultured bovine aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stepp, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Aortic smooth muscles cells have been implicated in the etiology of lesions which occur in atherosclerosis and hypertension. Both diseases involve proliferation of smooth muscle cells and accumulation of excessive amounts of extracellular matrix proteins, including collagen type I and type III produced by the smooth muscle cells. To better understand the sites of regulation of collagen biosynthesis and to correlate these with the growth rate of the cells, cultured bovine aortic smooth muscle cells were studied as a function of the number of days (3 to 14) in second passage. Cells grew rapidly up to day 6 when confluence was reached. The total incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-proline into proteins was highest at day 3 and decreased to a constant level after the cultures reached confluence. In contrast, collagen protein production was lowest before confluence and continued to increase over the entire time course of the experiments. cDNA clones for the ..cap alpha..1 and ..cap alpha..2 chains of type I and the ..cap alpha..1 chain of type III collagen were used to quantitate the steady state level of collagen mRNAs. RNA was tested in a cell-free translation system. Changes in the translational activity of collagen mRNAs parallelled the observed increases in collagen protein production. Thus, at later time points, collagen mRNAs are more active in directing synthesis of preprocollagens, even though less collagen mRNA is present. The conclusion is that the site of regulation of the expression of collagen genes is a function of the growth rate of cultured smooth muscle cells.

  18. WOUND HEALING AND COLLAGEN FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Russell; Benditt, Earl P.

    1961-01-01

    The regular sequence encountered in healing guinea pig skin wounds has been examined by methods of light and electron microscopy. Observations on cell populations, their fine structure, and fibril formation in the connective tissue have been made. Linear incisions in the skin of normal female guinea pigs weighing 300 to 350 grams were allowed to heal. The wounds were then excised, fixed with buffered 2 per cent osmium tetroxide, and postfixed in neutral buffered formalin, at 16 and 24 hours and at 3, 5, 9, and 14 days after wounding. They were then embedded in epoxy resin. In the inflammatory phase the exudate observed in the early wounds consists largely of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes, macrophages, fibrin, and free extracellular organelles from the disrupted inflammatory cells. These organelles later appear in vacuoles in the cytoplasm of the macrophages. Fibroblasts first appear at 24 hours, and show extensive development and dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum, which sometimes contains moderately dense flocculent material. In addition, these fibroblasts have enlarged mitochondria and condensations of filamentous material within the cytoplasm near the cell surface. Occasional myelin figures and moderately dense, 0.5 to 1.0 micron bodies are found within the cytoplasm of the early fibroblasts. Collagen fibrils are first seen at 3 days extracellularly near the cell surfaces. They appear at the later times in two populations of sizes. With increasing wound age the fibroblasts retain their morphology and the wounds decrease in cellularity concomitantly with the formation of increasing amounts of collagen. Several proposed mechanisms of collagen fibril formation are discussed in relation to the observed phenomena. The problem of correlating fibril diameter with the appearance of the periodic structure of collagen in relation to the minimal size fibril which would be anticipated to display this appearance is discussed. PMID:14494202

  19. Asymmetrical hypersensitivity to bovine collagen.

    PubMed

    Somerville, P; Wray, R C

    1993-05-01

    We report a unique patient with true asymmetrical hypersensitivity to bovine collagen. Hypersensitivity is the development of an inflammatory response at a treatment site after a negative skin test. She developed an inflammatory response in only one of two simultaneously injected sites. About 1.5% of patients with a negative skin test have a hypersensitivity reaction consisting of firmness, erythema, and swelling. The signs and symptoms generally resolve spontaneously in a few months.

  20. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  1. Biological Effects Induced by Specific Advanced Glycation End Products in the Reconstructed Skin Model of Aging.

    PubMed

    Pageon, Hervé; Zucchi, Hélène; Dai, Zhenyu; Sell, David R; Strauch, Christopher M; Monnier, Vincent M; Asselineau, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate in the aging skin. To understand the biological effects of individual AGEs, skin reconstructed with collagen selectively enriched with N(ɛ)-(carboxymethyl)-lysine (CML), N(ɛ)-(carboxyethyl)-lysine (CEL), methylglyoxal hydroimidazolone (MG-H1), or pentosidine was studied. Immunohistochemistry revealed increased expression of α6 integrin at the dermal epidermal junction by CEL and CML (p<0.01). Laminin 5 was diminished by CEL and MG-H1 (p<0.05). Both CML and CEL induced a robust increase (p<0.01) in procollagen I. In the culture medium, IL-6, VEGF, and MMP1 secretion were significantly decreased (p<0.05) by MG-H1. While both CEL and CML decreased MMP3, only CEL decreased IL-6 and TIMP1, while CML stimulated TIMP1 synthesis significantly (p<0.05). mRNA expression studies using qPCR in the epidermis layer showed that CEL increased type 7 collagen (COL7A1), β1, and α6 integrin, while CML increased only COL7A1 (p<0.05). MG-H1-modified collagen had no effect. Importantly, in the dermis layer, MMP3 mRNA expression was increased by both CML and MG-H1. CML also significantly increased the mRNAs of MMP1, TIMP1, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1) (p<0.05). Mixed effects were present in CEL-rich matrix. Minimally glycoxidized pentosidine-rich collagen suppressed most mRNAs of the genes studied (p<0.05) and decreased VEGF and increased MCP1 protein expression. Taken together, this model of the aging skin suggests that a combination of AGEs tends to counterbalance and thus minimizes the detrimental biological effects of individual AGEs. PMID:26309782

  2. Immunostimulation effect of jellyfish collagen.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Takuya; Ueno, Masashi; Goto, Yoko; Shiraishi, Ryusuke; Doi, Mikiharu; Akiyama, Koichi; Yamauchi, Satoshi

    2006-09-01

    Certain edible large jellyfishes belonging to the order Rhizostomeae are consumed in large quantities in China and Japan. The exumbrella part of the edible jellyfish Stomolophus nomurai was cut and soaked in dilute hydrochloric acid solution (pH 3.0) for 12 h, and heated at 121 degrees C for 20 min. The immunostimulation effects of the jellyfish extract were examined. The jellyfish extract enhanced IgM production of human hybridoma HB4C5 cells 34-fold. IgM and IgG production of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were also accelerated, 2.8- and 1.4-fold respectively. Moreover, production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by human PBL was stimulated 100- and 17-fold respectively. Collagenase treatment inactivated the immunostimulation activity of the jellyfish extract. In addition, purified collagen from bovine Achilles' tendon accelerated IgM production of hybridoma cells. These facts mean that collagen has an immunostimulation effect, and that the active substance in jellyfish extract is collagen.

  3. Immunostimulation effect of jellyfish collagen.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Takuya; Ueno, Masashi; Goto, Yoko; Shiraishi, Ryusuke; Doi, Mikiharu; Akiyama, Koichi; Yamauchi, Satoshi

    2006-09-01

    Certain edible large jellyfishes belonging to the order Rhizostomeae are consumed in large quantities in China and Japan. The exumbrella part of the edible jellyfish Stomolophus nomurai was cut and soaked in dilute hydrochloric acid solution (pH 3.0) for 12 h, and heated at 121 degrees C for 20 min. The immunostimulation effects of the jellyfish extract were examined. The jellyfish extract enhanced IgM production of human hybridoma HB4C5 cells 34-fold. IgM and IgG production of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were also accelerated, 2.8- and 1.4-fold respectively. Moreover, production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by human PBL was stimulated 100- and 17-fold respectively. Collagenase treatment inactivated the immunostimulation activity of the jellyfish extract. In addition, purified collagen from bovine Achilles' tendon accelerated IgM production of hybridoma cells. These facts mean that collagen has an immunostimulation effect, and that the active substance in jellyfish extract is collagen. PMID:16960386

  4. Collagen defects in lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Chan, D; Mascara, T; Rogers, J G; Cole, W G

    1986-12-15

    Quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of collagen were observed in tissues and fibroblast cultures from 17 consecutive cases of lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The content of type I collagen was reduced in OI dermis and bone and the content of type III collagen was also reduced in the dermis. Normal bone contained 99.3% type I and 0.7% type V collagen whereas OI bone contained a lower proportion of type I, a greater proportion of type V and a significant amount of type III collagen. The type III and V collagens appeared to be structurally normal. In contrast, abnormal type I collagen chains, which migrated slowly on electrophoresis, were observed in all babies with OI. Cultured fibroblasts from five babies produced a mixture of normal and abnormal type I collagens; the abnormal collagen was not secreted in two cases and was slowly secreted in the others. Fibroblasts from 12 babies produced only abnormal type I collagens and they were also secreted slowly. The slower electrophoretic migration of the abnormal chains was due to enzymic overmodification of the lysine residues. The distribution of the cyanogen bromide peptides containing the overmodified residues was used to localize the underlying structural abnormalities to three regions of the type I procollagen chains. These regions included the carboxy-propeptide of the pro alpha 1(I)-chain, the helical alpha 1(I) CB7 peptide and the helical alpha 1(I) CB8 and CB3 peptides. In one baby a basic charge mutation was observed in the alpha 1(I) CB7 peptide and in another baby a basic charge mutation was observed in the alpha 1(I) CB8 peptide. The primary defects in lethal perinatal OI appear to reside in the type I collagen chains. Type III and V collagens did not appear to compensate for the deficiency of type I collagen in the tissues.

  5. Electrospun tilapia collagen nanofibers accelerating wound healing via inducing keratinocytes proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Nanping; Xue, Yang; Ding, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Mo, Xiumei; Sun, Jiao

    2016-07-01

    The development of biomaterials with the ability to induce skin wound healing is a great challenge in biomedicine. In this study, tilapia skin collagen sponge and electrospun nanofibers were developed for wound dressing. The collagen sponge was composed of at least two α-peptides. It did not change the number of spleen-derived lymphocytes in BALB/c mice, the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+) lymphocytes, and the level of IgG or IgM in Sprague-Dawley rats. The tensile strength and contact angle of collagen nanofibers were 6.72±0.44MPa and 26.71±4.88°, respectively. They also had good thermal stability and swelling property. Furthermore, the nanofibers could significantly promote the proliferation of human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and stimulate epidermal differentiation through the up-regulated gene expression of involucrin, filaggrin, and type I transglutaminase in HaCaTs. The collagen nanofibers could also facilitate rat skin regeneration. In the present study, electrospun biomimetic tilapia skin collagen nanofibers were succesfully prepared, were proved to have good bioactivity and could accelerate rat wound healing rapidly and effectively. These biological effects might be attributed to the biomimic extracellular matrix structure and the multiple amino acids of the collagen nanofibers. Therefore, the cost-efficient tilapia collagen nanofibers could be used as novel wound dressing, meanwhile effectively avoiding the risk of transmitting animal disease in the future clinical apllication. PMID:27037778

  6. Long-term effects of knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and osteoarthritis prevention.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weiliang; Chen, Xiao; Hu, Yejun; Yin, Zi; Zhu, Ting; Hu, Jiajie; Chen, Jialin; Zheng, Zefeng; Zhang, Wei; Ran, Jisheng; Heng, Boon Chin; Ji, Junfeng; Chen, Weishan; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2014-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is difficult to heal after injury due to the dynamic fluid environment of joint. Previously, we have achieved satisfactory regeneration of subcutaneous tendon/ligament with knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold due to its specific "internal-space-preservation" property. This study aims to investigate the long-term effects of knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold on ACL regeneration and osteoarthritis prevention. The knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold was fabricated and implanted into a rabbit ACL injury model. The knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold was found to enhance migration and adhesion of spindle-shaped cells into the scaffold at 2 months post-surgery. After 6 months, ACL treated with the knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold exhibited increased expression of ligament genes and better microstructural morphology. After 18 months, the knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold-treated group had more mature ligament structure and direct ligament-to-bone healing. Implanted knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffolds degraded much more slowly compared to subcutaneous implantation. Furthermore, the knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold effectively protected joint surface cartilage and preserved joint space for up to 18 months post-surgery. These findings thus demonstrated that the knitted silk-collagen sponge scaffold can regenerate functional ACL and prevent osteoarthritis in the long-term, suggesting its clinical use as a functional bioscaffold for ACL reconstruction.

  7. Collagen-Based Biomaterials for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Sayani; Raines, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    With its wide distribution in soft and hard connective tissues, collagen is the most abundant of animal proteins. In vitro, natural collagen can be formed into highly organized, three-dimensional scaffolds that are intrinsically biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic upon exogenous application, and endowed with high tensile strength. These attributes make collagen the material of choice for wound healing and tissue engineering applications. In this article, we review the structure and molecular interactions of collagen in vivo; the recent use of natural collagen in sponges, injectables, films and membranes, dressings, and skin grafts; and the on-going development of synthetic collagen mimetic peptides as pylons to anchor cytoactive agents in wound beds. PMID:24633807

  8. Stress controls the mechanics of collagen networks

    PubMed Central

    Licup, Albert James; Münster, Stefan; Sharma, Abhinav; Sheinman, Michael; Jawerth, Louise M.; Fabry, Ben; Weitz, David A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is the main structural and load-bearing element of various connective tissues, where it forms the extracellular matrix that supports cells. It has long been known that collagenous tissues exhibit a highly nonlinear stress–strain relationship, although the origins of this nonlinearity remain unknown. Here, we show that the nonlinear stiffening of reconstituted type I collagen networks is controlled by the applied stress and that the network stiffness becomes surprisingly insensitive to network concentration. We demonstrate how a simple model for networks of elastic fibers can quantitatively account for the mechanics of reconstituted collagen networks. Our model points to the important role of normal stresses in determining the nonlinear shear elastic response, which can explain the approximate exponential relationship between stress and strain reported for collagenous tissues. This further suggests principles for the design of synthetic fiber networks with collagen-like properties, as well as a mechanism for the control of the mechanics of such networks. PMID:26195769

  9. Capsaicin inhibits collagen fibril formation and increases the stability of collagen fibers.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Sathiamurthi; Dubey, Kriti; Badhwar, Rahul; George, Kodimattan Joseph; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Bagler, Ganesh; Madhan, Balaraman; Kar, Karunakar

    2015-02-01

    Capsaicin is a versatile plant product which has been ascribed several health benefits and anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. We have investigated the effect of capsaicin on the molecular stability, self-assembly, and fibril stability of type-I collagen. It was found that capsaicin suppresses collagen fibril formation, increases the stability of collagen fibers in tendons, and has no effect on the molecular stability of collagen. Turbidity assay data show that capsaicin does not promote disassembly of collagen fibrils. However, capsaicin moderately protects collagen fibrils from enzymatic degradation. Computational studies revealed the functions of the aromatic group and amide region of capsaicin in the collagen-capsaicin interaction. The results may have significant implications for capsaicin-based therapeutics that target excess collagen accumulation-linked pathology, for example thrombosis, fibrosis, and sclerosis.

  10. Collagenous skeleton of the rat mystacial pad.

    PubMed

    Haidarliu, Sebastian; Simony, Erez; Golomb, David; Ahissar, Ehud

    2011-05-01

    Anatomical and functional integrity of the rat mystacial pad (MP) is dependent on the intrinsic organization of its extracellular matrix. By using collagen autofluorescence, in the rat MP, we revealed a collagenous skeleton that interconnects whisker follicles, corium, and deep collagen layers. We suggest that this skeleton supports MP tissues, mediates force transmission from muscles to whiskers, facilitates whisker retraction after protraction, and limits MP extensibility.

  11. A subset of myofibroblastic cancer-associated fibroblasts regulate collagen fiber elongation, which is prognostic in multiple cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Christopher J.; Noble, Fergus; Ward, Matthew; Bullock, Marc; Drifka, Cole; Mellone, Massimiliano; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Johnston, Harvey E.; Hayden, Annette; Thirdborough, Steve; Liu, Yuming; Smith, David M.; Mellows, Toby; Kao, W. John; Garbis, Spiros D.; Mirnezami, Alex; Underwood, Tim J.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen structure has been shown to influence tumor cell invasion, metastasis and clinical outcome in breast cancer. However, it remains unclear how it affects other solid cancers. Here we utilized multi-photon laser scanning microscopy and Second Harmonic Generation to identify alterations to collagen fiber structure within the tumor stroma of head & neck, esophageal and colorectal cancers. Image segmentation algorithms were then applied to quantitatively characterize these morphological changes, showing that elongated collagen fibers significantly correlated with poor clinical outcome (Log Rank p < 0.05). We used TGF-β treatment to model fibroblast conversion to smooth muscle actin SMA-positive cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and found that these cells induce the formation of elongated collagen fibers in vivo. However, proteomic/transcriptomic analysis of SMA-positive CAFs cultured ex-vivo showed significant heterogeneity in the expression of genes with collagen fibril organizing gene ontology. Notably, stratifying patients according to stromal SMA-positivity and collagen fiber elongation was found to provide a highly significant correlation with poor survival in all 3 cancer types (Log Rank p ≤ 0.003). In summary, we show that increased collagen fiber length correlates with poor patient survival in multiple tumor types and that only a sub-set of SMA-positive CAFs can mediate the formation of this collagen structure. PMID:26716418

  12. Enhanced osteoprogenitor elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by bioactive glass ionic silicon dependent on Sp7 (osterix) transcription.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Venu G; Odatsu, Tetsurou; Bishop, Timothy; Chang, Joyce; Owyoung, Jeremy; Loomer, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive glasses release ions, those enhance osteoblast collagen matrix synthesis and osteogenic marker expression during bone healing. Collagen matrix density and osteogenic marker expression depend on osteogenic transcription factors, (e.g., Osterix (OSX)). We hypothesize that enhanced expression and formation of collagen by Si(4+) depends on enhanced expression of OSX transcription. Experimental bioactive glass (6P53-b) and commercial Bioglass(TM) (45S5) were dissolved in basal medium to make glass conditioned medium (GCM). ICP-MS analysis was used to measure bioactive glass ion release rates. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured for 20 days, and gene expression and extracellular matrix collagen formation was analyzed. In a separate study, siRNA was used to determine the effect of OSX knockdown on impacting the effect of Si(4+) on osteogenic markers and matrix collagen formation. Each bioactive glass exhibited similar ion release rates for all ions, except Mg(2+) released by 6P53-b. Gene expression results showed that GCM markedly enhanced many osteogenic markers, and 45S5 GCM showed higher levels of expression and collagen matrix fiber bundle density than 6P53-b GCM. Upon knockdown of OSX transcription, collagen type 5, alkaline phosphatase, and matrix density were not enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This study illustrates that the enhancement of elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by Si(±) depends on OSX transcription. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2604-2615, 2016.

  13. A nanostructured synthetic collagen mimic for hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek A; Taylor, Nichole L; Jalan, Abhishek A; Hwang, Lyahn K; Wang, Benjamin K; Hartgerink, Jeffery D

    2014-04-14

    Collagen is a major component of the extracellular matrix and plays a wide variety of important roles in blood clotting, healing, and tissue remodeling. Natural, animal derived, collagen is used in many clinical applications but concerns exist with respect to its role in inflammation, batch-to-batch variability, and possible disease transfection. Therefore, development of synthetic nanomaterials that can mimic the nanostructure and properties of natural collagen has been a heavily pursued goal in biomaterials. Previously, we reported on the design and multihierarchial self-assembly of a 36 amino acid collagen mimetic peptide (KOD) that forms nanofibrous triple helices that entangle to form a hydrogel. In this report, we utilize this nanofiber forming collagen mimetic peptide as a synthetic biomimetic matrix useful in thrombosis. We demonstrate that nanofibrous KOD synthetic collagen matrices adhere platelets, activate them (indicated by soluble P-selectin secretion), and clot plasma and blood similar to animal derived collagen and control surfaces. In addition to the thrombotic potential, THP-1 monocytes incubated with our KOD collagen mimetic showed minimal proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-α or IL-1β) production. Together, the data presented demonstrates the potential of a novel synthetic collagen mimetic as a hemostat.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Collagen Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Chesnick, Ingrid E.; Mason, Jeffrey T.; Giuseppetti, Anthony A.; Eidelman, Naomi; Potter, Kimberlee

    2008-01-01

    A model mineralizing system was subjected to magnetic resonance microscopy to investigate how water proton transverse (T2) relaxation times and magnetization transfer ratios can be applied to monitor collagen mineralization. In our model system, a collagen sponge was mineralized with polymer-stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate. The lower hydration and water proton T2 values of collagen sponges during the initial mineralization phase were attributed to the replacement of the water within the collagen fibrils by amorphous calcium carbonate. The significant reduction in T2 values by day 6 (p < 0.001) was attributed to the appearance of mineral crystallites, which were also detected by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. In the second phase, between days 6 and 13, magnetic resonance microscopy properties appear to plateau as amorphous calcium carbonate droplets began to coalesce within the intrafibrillar space of collagen. In the third phase, after day 15, the amorphous mineral phase crystallized, resulting in a reduction in the absolute intensity of the collagen diffraction pattern. We speculate that magnetization transfer ratio values for collagen sponges, with similar collagen contents, increased from 0.25 ± 0.02 for control strips to a maximum value of 0.31 ± 0.04 at day 15 (p = 0.03) because mineral crystals greatly reduce the mobility of the collagen fibrils. PMID:18487295

  15. A nanostructured synthetic collagen mimic for hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek A; Taylor, Nichole L; Jalan, Abhishek A; Hwang, Lyahn K; Wang, Benjamin K; Hartgerink, Jeffery D

    2014-04-14

    Collagen is a major component of the extracellular matrix and plays a wide variety of important roles in blood clotting, healing, and tissue remodeling. Natural, animal derived, collagen is used in many clinical applications but concerns exist with respect to its role in inflammation, batch-to-batch variability, and possible disease transfection. Therefore, development of synthetic nanomaterials that can mimic the nanostructure and properties of natural collagen has been a heavily pursued goal in biomaterials. Previously, we reported on the design and multihierarchial self-assembly of a 36 amino acid collagen mimetic peptide (KOD) that forms nanofibrous triple helices that entangle to form a hydrogel. In this report, we utilize this nanofiber forming collagen mimetic peptide as a synthetic biomimetic matrix useful in thrombosis. We demonstrate that nanofibrous KOD synthetic collagen matrices adhere platelets, activate them (indicated by soluble P-selectin secretion), and clot plasma and blood similar to animal derived collagen and control surfaces. In addition to the thrombotic potential, THP-1 monocytes incubated with our KOD collagen mimetic showed minimal proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-α or IL-1β) production. Together, the data presented demonstrates the potential of a novel synthetic collagen mimetic as a hemostat. PMID:24694012

  16. Collagenous gastritis: a report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Lagorce-Pages, C; Fabiani, B; Bouvier, R; Scoazec, J Y; Durand, L; Flejou, J F

    2001-09-01

    Collagenous gastritis is an exceptional entity with eight cases documented to date characterized by the presence of a thick subepithelial collagen band associated with an inflammatory infiltrate of the gastric mucosa. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical and histologic characteristics of six new cases of collagenous gastritis. All cases showed a subepithelial collagen band that averaged 30 microm but often measured up to 120 microm. This finding was almost always accompanied by mixed chronic inflammation in the lamina propria and by surface epithelial damage of varying severity. Our study seems to delineate two subsets in patients with collagenous gastritis: 1) collagenous gastritis occurring in children and young adults presenting with severe anemia, a nodular pattern on endoscopy, and a disease limited to the gastric mucosa without evidence of colonic involvement, and 2) collagenous gastritis associated with collagenous colitis occurring in adult patients presenting with chronic watery diarrhea. These findings highlight the fact that subepithelial collagen deposition may be a generalized disease affecting the entire gastrointestinal tract. PMID:11688577

  17. Ionic solutes impact collagen scaffold bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Pawelec, K M; Husmann, A; Wardale, R J; Best, S M; Cameron, R E

    2015-02-01

    The structure of ice-templated collagen scaffolds is sensitive to many factors. By adding 0.5 wt% of sodium chloride or sucrose to collagen slurries, scaffold structure could be tuned through changes in ice growth kinetics and interactions of the solute and collagen. With ionic solutes (sodium chloride) the entanglements of the collagen molecule decreased, leading to fibrous scaffolds with increased pore size and decreased attachment of chondrocytes. With non-ionic solutes (sucrose) ice growth was slowed, leading to significantly reduced pore size and up-regulated cell attachment. This highlights the large changes in structure and biological function stimulated by solutes in ice-templating systems. PMID:25649518

  18. Collagenous gastritis and collagenous colitis: a report with sequential histological and ultrastructural findings.

    PubMed

    Pulimood, A B; Ramakrishna, B S; Mathan, M M

    1999-06-01

    The case is reported of a young adult man with collagenous gastritis, an extremely rare disorder with only three case reports in the English literature, who subsequently presented with collagenous colitis. Sequential gastric biopsies showed a notable increase in thickness of the subepithelial collagen band. Ultrastructural study of gastric and rectal mucosa showed the characteristic subepithelial band composed of haphazardly arranged collagen fibres, prominent degranulating eosinophils, and activated pericryptal fibroblasts. PMID:10323893

  19. Ultrananocrystalline diamond thin films functionalized with therapeutically active collagen networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Chen, M.; Bruno, P.; Lam, R.; Robinson, E.; Gruen, D.; Ho, D.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2009-01-01

    The fabrication of biologically amenable interfaces in medicine bridges translational technologies with their surrounding biological environment. Functionalized nanomaterials catalyze this coalescence through the creation of biomimetic and active substrates upon which a spectrum of therapeutic elements can be delivered to adherent cells to address biomolecular processes in cancer, inflammation, etc. Here, we demonstrate the robust functionalization of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) with type I collagen and dexamethasone (Dex), an anti-inflammatory drug, to fabricate a hybrid therapeutically active substrate for localized drug delivery. UNCD oxidation coupled with a pH-mediated collagen adsorption process generated a comprehensive interface between the two materials, and subsequent Dex integration, activity, and elution were confirmed through inflammatory gene expression assays. These studies confer a translational relevance to the biofunctionalized UNCD in its role as an active therapeutic network for potent regulation of cellular activity toward applications in nanomedicine.

  20. Injectable collagen implant--update.

    PubMed

    Castrow, F F; Krull, E A

    1983-12-01

    Injectable collagen implant (ICI), a new biomaterial reportedly useful for correction of scars and certain aging skin lines (wrinkles), was recently introduced. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this product. Data for this study were obtained from a survey which was sent to a group of cutaneous surgeons. They were asked about test site and treatment site reactions and about their satisfaction with ICI. The incidence of adverse reactions is low, and the severity of the reactions does not appear to be serious. The long-term benefit of ICI has not been established.

  1. [Collagenous crystalloids and collagenous spherules in salivary gland tumors. A light microscopy and immunohistochemistry study].

    PubMed

    Skálová, A; Michal, M; Leivo, I

    1993-04-01

    In a series of 354 salivary gland tumors, the morphological and immunohistochemical study of two distinctive types of extracellular matrix deposits was carried out. First, collagenous crystalloids, distinct spherical crystalloids composed of radially arranged needle-shaped collagen fibres, were found in twelve cases of benign salivary gland tumors. Second, collagenous spherules, globoid structures often showing concentric lamellar or radial pattern, were found in 46 cases of both benign and malignant salivary gland tumors. Immunohistochemically, collagenous crystalloids and collagenous spherules contain varying amounts of type I and III collagens, proteoglycans and elastic fibres but not collagen types II and VI. Strong linear deposition of basement membrane proteins, collagen type IV and laminin, surrounded collagenous spherules. Discontinuous patchy deposits of both proteins were, however, found near collagenous crystalloids. The cells surrounding these collagenous crystalloids and collagenous spherules showed immunohistochemical and morphological features of modified myoepithelial cells. Our observations may improve a terminology of the structures in question. Proposed active role of modified myoepithelial cells in the origin of these extracellular deposits still remains open for discussion.

  2. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo; Kim, So Young; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Taehoon G.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify a function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in Hs27. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YIGSR peptide enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis both of gene and protein levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There were no changes in cell proliferation and MMP-1 level in YIGSR treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR effect on collagen synthesis mediated activation of FAK, pyk2 and ERK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR-induced FAK and ERK activation was modulated by FAK and MEK inhibitors. -- Abstract: The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the {beta}1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67 kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate

  3. Effect of FGF-2 on collagen tissue regeneration by human vertebral bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Soo; Park, Jung-Chul; Lee, Jung-Seok; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Ki-Joon; Jung, Byung-Joo; Shim, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Eun-Young; Park, So-Yon; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Kim, Chang-Sung

    2015-01-15

    The effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) on collagen tissue regeneration by human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) were investigated. hBMSCs were isolated from human vertebral body bone marrow during vertebral surgery and a population of hBMSCs with the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells was observed. The FGF-2 treatment (5 ng/mL) affected on the colony-forming efficiency, proliferation, and in vitro differentiation of hBMSCs. Insoluble/soluble collagen and hydroxyproline synthesis was significantly enhanced in hBMSCs expanded with FGF-2 and the treatment of FGF-2 caused a reduction in the mRNA expression of collagen type I, but an increase of collagen types II and III along with lysyl oxidase family genes. Collagen formation was also examined using an in vivo assay model by transplanting hBMSCs into immunocompromised mice (n=4) and the histologic and immunohistochemical results revealed that significantly more collagen with a well-organized structure was formed by FGF-2-treated hBMSCs at 8 weeks posttransplantation (P<0.05). The DNA microarray assay demonstrated that genes related to extracellular matrix formation were significantly upregulated. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, chemical inhibitors against extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) were treated and following downstream expression was observed. Collectively, FGF-2 facilitated the collagen-producing potency of hBMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, rendering them more suitable for use in collagen regeneration in the clinical field.

  4. Nanolayered Features of Collagen-like Peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valluzzi, Regina; Bini, Elisabetta; Haas, Terry; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2003-01-01

    We have been investigating collagen-like model oligopeptides as molecular bases for complex ordered biomimetic materials. The collagen-like molecules incorporate aspects of native collagen sequence and secondary structure. Designed modifications to native primary and secondary structure have been incorporated to control the nanostructure and microstructure of the collagen-like materials produced. We find that the collagen-like molecules form a number of lyotropic rod liquid crystalline phases, which because of their strong temperature dependence in the liquid state can also be viewed as solvent intercalated thermotropic liquid crystals. The liquid crystalline phases formed by the molecules can be captured in the solid state by drying off solvent, resulting in solid nanopatterned (chemically and physically) thermally stable (to greater than 100 C) materials. Designed sequences which stabilize smectic phases have allowed a variety of nanoscale multilayered biopolymeric materials to be developed. Preliminary investigations suggest that chemical patterns running perpendicular to the smectic layer plane can be functionalized and used to localize a variety of organic, inorganic, and organometallic moieties in very simple multilayered nanocomposites. The phase behavior of collagen-like oligopeptide materials is described, emphasizing the correlation between mesophase, molecular orientation, and chemical patterning at the microscale and nanoscale. In many cases, the textures observed for smectic and hexatic phase collagens are remarkably similar to the complex (and not fully understood) helicoids observed in biological collagen-based tissues. Comparisons between biological morphologies and collagen model liquid crystalline (and solidified materials) textures may help us understand the molecular features which impart order and function to the extracellular matrix and to collagen-based mineralized tissues. Initial studies have utilized synthetic collagen-like peptides while

  5. New strategy for expression of recombinant hydroxylated human collagen α1(III) chains in Pichia pastoris GS115.

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Fenglong; Li, Linbo; Deng, Jianjun; Xue, Wenjiao; Zhu, Chenhui; Fan, Daidi

    2015-01-01

    Type III collagen is one of the most abundant proteins in the human body, which forms collagen fibrils and provides the stiff, resilient characteristics of many tissues. In this paper, a new method for secretory expression of recombinant hydroxylated human collagen α1(III) chain in Pichia pastoris GS115 was applied. The gene encoding for full-length human collagen α1(III) chain (COL3A1) without N-terminal propeptide and C-terminal propeptide was cloned in the pPIC9K expression vector. The prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H, EC 1.14.11.2) α-subunit (P4Hα) and β-subunit (P4Hβ) genes were cloned in the same expression vector, pPICZB. Fluorogenic quantitative PCR indicates that COL3A1 and P4H genes have been expressed in mRNA level. SDS-PAGE shows that secretory expression of recombinant human collagen α1(III) chain was successfully achieved in P. pastoris GS115. In addition, the result of amino acids composition analysis shows that the recombinant human collagen α1(III) chain contains hydroxyproline by coexpression with the P4H. Furthermore, liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates that proline residues of the recombinant human collagen α1(III) chain were hydroxylated in the X or Y positions of Gly-X-Y triplets. PMID:24953863

  6. Collagen structure: new tricks from a very old dog.

    PubMed

    Bella, Jordi

    2016-04-15

    The main features of the triple helical structure of collagen were deduced in the mid-1950s from fibre X-ray diffraction of tendons. Yet, the resulting models only could offer an average description of the molecular conformation. A critical advance came about 20 years later with the chemical synthesis of sufficiently long and homogeneous peptides with collagen-like sequences. The availability of these collagen model peptides resulted in a large number of biochemical, crystallographic and NMR studies that have revolutionized our understanding of collagen structure. High-resolution crystal structures from collagen model peptides have provided a wealth of data on collagen conformational variability, interaction with water, collagen stability or the effects of interruptions. Furthermore, a large increase in the number of structures of collagen model peptides in complex with domains from receptors or collagen-binding proteins has shed light on the mechanisms of collagen recognition. In recent years, collagen biochemistry has escaped the boundaries of natural collagen sequences. Detailed knowledge of collagen structure has opened the field for protein engineers who have used chemical biology approaches to produce hyperstable collagens with unnatural residues, rationally designed collagen heterotrimers, self-assembling collagen peptides, etc. This review summarizes our current understanding of the structure of the collagen triple helical domain (COL×3) and gives an overview of some of the new developments in collagen molecular engineering aiming to produce novel collagen-based materials with superior properties.

  7. Laser welding and collagen crosslinks

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, K.M.; Last, J.A.; Small, W. IV; Maitland, D.J.; Heredia, N.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.

    1997-02-20

    Strength and stability of laser-welded tissue may be influenced, in part, by effects of laser exposure on collagen crosslinking. We therefore studied effects of diode laser exposure (805 nm, 1-8 watts, 30 seconds) + indocyanine green dye (ICG) on calf tail tendon collagen crosslinks. Effect of ICG dye alone on crosslink content prior to laser exposure was investigated; unexpectedly, we found that ICG-treated tissue had significantly increased DHLNL and OHP, but not HLNL. Laser exposure after ICG application reduced elevated DHLNL and OHP crosslink content down to their native levels. The monohydroxylated crosslink HLNL was inversely correlated with laser output (p<0.01 by linear regression analysis). DHLNL content was highly correlated with content of its maturational product, OHP, suggesting that precursor-product relations are maintained. We conclude that: (1)ICG alone induces DHLNL and OHP crosslink formation; (2)subsequent laser exposure reduces the ICG-induced crosslinks down to native levels; (3)excessive diode laser exposure destroys normally occurring HLNL crosslinks.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: collagen VI-related myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions collagen VI-related myopathy collagen VI-related myopathy Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Collagen VI-related myopathy is a group of disorders ...

  9. Collagen breakdown and nitrogen dioxide inhalation.

    PubMed

    Hatton, D V; Leach, C S; Nicogossian, A E

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of urinary hydroxylysine glycosides indicate that considerable collagen degradation occurred during the reentry into the earth's atmosphere of the American astronauts of the Apollo-Soyuz mission. Since the crew accidentally inhaled nitrogen dioxide, a recognized pulmonary irritant, and showed clinical and roentgenographic signs of diffuse chemical pneumonitis, it is likely that collagen degradation occurred in the pulmonary parenchyma.

  10. Cartilage collagen analysis in the chondrodystrophies.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Chou, J W; Machado, M A

    1985-09-01

    A simple and reproducible method for analyzing small samples of cartilage collagens was developed. Following extraction with guanidine HCl, the cartilage specimens were digested directly with CNBr and the resultant peptides separated by gel-permeation high-performance liquid chromatography. Resting cartilage collagen CNBr peptide maps differed from normal in two inherited chondrodystrophies, achondrogenesis II and spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita. PMID:4053564

  11. Formation of apatite-collagen complexes.

    PubMed

    Doi, Y; Horiguchi, T; Moriwaki, Y; Kitago, H; Kajimoto, T; Iwayama, Y

    1996-05-01

    An apatite-collagen complex was prepared in calcium beta-glycerophosphate solutions at pH 9.0 and 37 degrees C with the purpose of developing new bone substitutes that more closely resemble bone than currently available materials. Reconstituted type I collagen as well as sheet collagen were crosslinked in the presence of alkaline phosphatase and egg-yolk phosvitin. The crosslinked collagens were immersed in daily-renewed calcium beta-glycerophosphate solutions for 2 and 4 weeks to induce the deposition of apatite on the collagen fibers. After 2 weeks of reaction, for example, apatites deposited approximately two times the crosslinked collagen in weight. With reconstituted collagen, the complex showed some elasticity but no apatite was visually observed to detach under deformation with fingers and forceps. The complex, moreover, did not disintegrate when immersed in saline or animal blood. Nevertheless, the complex resorbed with no evidence of cytotoxicity when implanted in muscle tissues. These findings suggest that the apatite-collagen complex prepared would be useful as bone substitutes, especially for periodontal osseous lesion repair and alveolar ridge augmentation. PMID:8731148

  12. Collagenous gastritis in a young Japanese woman.

    PubMed

    Kajino, Yuri; Kushima, Ryoji; Koyama, Shigeki; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2003-03-01

    Collagenous gastritis, a counterpart of collagenous colitis, is a rare disorder with less than 20 cases reported in the literature. A case of collagenous gastritis in a Japanese woman in her early 20s who had been receiving treatment for atopic dermatitis and bronchial asthma is reported. The patient complained of repeated epigastric pain, and endoscopy revealed multifocal atrophic areas and scars in the gastric body. Biopsy specimens showed a thickened eosinophilic band-like structure with entrapped capillaries approximately 30-70 micro m thick beneath the surface epithelium. It was regarded as a collagen band because it was positive on Azan staining but negative on amyloid staining. This finding was accompanied by marked infiltration of mononuclear cells and eosinophils in the lamina propria; however, no evidence of lymphocytic gastritis was found. Helicobacter pylori infection was not detected and inflammatory cell infiltration was minimal in the mucosa without the collagen band. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the band was positive for type III and type VI collagen. The size of the collagen band did not change for 2 years. These findings suggest that subepithelial collagen deposition was due to an abnormal local immune response based on generalized allergic disorder. PMID:12608899

  13. Influence of collagen source on fibrillar architecture and properties of vitrified collagen membranes.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Shoumyo; Guo, Qiongyu; Garza-Madrid, Marcos; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Duan, Derek; Carbajal, Priscilla; Schein, Oliver; Trexler, Morgana; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Collagen vitrigel membranes are transparent biomaterials characterized by a densely organized, fibrillar nanostructure that show promise in the treatment of corneal injury and disease. In this study, the influence of different type I collagen sources and processing techniques, including acid-solubilized collagen from bovine dermis (Bov), pepsin-solubilized collagen from human fibroblast cell culture (HuCC), and ficin-solubilized collagen from recombinant human collagen expressed in tobacco leaves (rH), on the properties of the vitrigel membranes was evaluated. Postvitrification carbodiimide crosslinking (CX) was also carried out on the vitrigels from each collagen source, forming crosslinked counterparts BovXL, HuCCXL, and rHXL, respectively. Collagen membrane ultrastructure and biomaterial properties were found to rely heavily on both collagen source and crosslinking. Bov and HuCC samples showed a random fibrillar organization of collagen, whereas rH vitrigels showed remarkable regional fibril alignment. After CX, light transmission was enhanced in all groups. Denaturation temperatures after CX increased in all membranes, of which the highest increase was seen in rH (14.71°C), suggesting improved thermal stability of the collagen fibrils in the membranes. Noncrosslinked rH vitrigels may be reinforced through CX to reach levels of mechanical strength and thermal stability comparable to Bov.

  14. Poly (3-Hydroxybutyrate-co-3-Hydroxyhexanoate)/Collagen Hybrid Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lomas, Alex J.; Webb, William R.; Han, JianFeng; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Zhirong; El Haj, Alicia J.

    2013-01-01

    was sporadically found, while RUNX2 was not present in both hMSC and SDhESC. Hybrid scaffolds were shown to promote retention of osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic differentiation by expression of RUNX2, SOX9, and PPARγ genes, respectively, following exposure to the appropriate induction medium. PHBHHx/collagen scaffolds have been successfully used to culture hMSC and SDhESC over an extended period supporting the potential of this scaffold combination in future tissue engineering applications. PMID:23281705

  15. A novel benign solution for collagen processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoult, Olivier

    Collagen is the main protein constituting the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tissues in the body (skin, cartilage, blood vessels...). It exists many types of collagen, this work studies only fibrillar collagen (e.g. collagen type I contained in the skin) that exhibits a triple helical structure composed of 3 alpha-helical collagen chains. This particular and defined hierarchical structure is essential to the biological and mechanical properties of the collagen. Processing collagen into scaffolds to mimic the ECM is crucial for successful tissue engineering. Recently collagen was processed into fibrous and porous scaffold using electrospinning process. However the solvent (HFIP) used for electrospinning is extremely toxic for the user and expensive. This work shows that HFIP can be replaced by a benign mixture composed of water, salt and alcohol. Yet only three alcohols (methanol, ethanol and iso-propanol) enable the dissolution of large quantity of collagen in the benign mixture, with a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, and conserve the collagen hierarchical structure at least as well as the HFIP. Collagen can be electrospun from the benign mixture into sub-micron fibers with concentrations as low as 6 wt-% for a wide range of alcohol to buffer ratio, with at least 10wt-% of salt, and any of the three alcohols. Specific conditions yield nano size fibers. After processing from HFIP or a benign mixture, collagen is water soluble and needs to be chemically crosslink for tissue engineering application. Post-crosslinking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) results in the loss of the scaffold fibrous aspect and porosity, hence it is useless for tissue engineering. Such issue could be prevented by incorporating the crosslinker into the mixture prior to electrospinning. When EDC is used alone, collagen forms a gel in the mixture within minutes, preventing electrospinning. The addition of N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in excess to EDC

  16. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di

    2015-03-15

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations.

  17. Collagenous gastritis associated with lymphocytic colitis.

    PubMed

    Groisman, G M; Meyers, S; Harpaz, N

    1996-03-01

    Collagenous sprue and collagenous colitis are two well-recognized idiopathic enteritides whose defining histologic attribute is fibrous thickening of the subepithelial basement membrane. Analogous changes in gastric mucosa seem to be quite rare. The term "collagenous gastritis" was recently applied for the first time to an isolated case of refractory gastritis in which distinctive subepithelial gastric fibrosis was noted. We report an additional case of this entity in a 35-year-old woman with refractory dyspepsia. In contrast to the earlier case of collagenous gastritis, our patient also had lymphocytic colitis, a type of colitis associated with watery diarrhea. Collagenous gastritis appears to be a distinct clinicopathologic entity, the histologic changes of which should be sought in patients with unexplained dyspepsia. Increased awareness of this condition and its possible clinical correlates may provide clues to its etiology and pathogenesis. PMID:8742654

  18. MORPHOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL STUDIES OF COLLAGEN FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, D. A.; Green, N. M.; Chapman, J. A.

    1961-01-01

    Electron micrographs of thin sections of nuclear, microsomal, and mitochondrial fractions obtained from a carrageenin-induced granuloma showed considerable contamination of the heavier by the lighter fractions. Striated collagen fibrils could be identified in the nuclei + debris fraction. Only a few striated fibrils occurred in the mitochondrial fraction; very fine filaments (diameter 50 A) could be seen in this fraction, but could not be distinguished with certainty from fibrillar material derived from broken nuclei. 35 per cent of the mitochondrial and 80 per cent of the microsomal collagen was extractable by 0.2 M NaCl and could be purified by the standard methods of solution and reprecipitation. The amino acid composition of these collagen fractions determined by ion exchange chromatography was within the range normally found for collagen and gelatin from other mammalian species, allowing for 10 to 20 per cent of some non-collagenous contaminant of the microsomal collagen. Hydroxyproline and proline were isolated by chromatography on paper from hydrolysates of the nuclear, mitochondrial, and microsomal collagen fractions, after incubation of tissue slices with L-14C-proline. The specific activities of the hydroxyproline from these collagens were in the approximate ratio 1:2:6, while that of bound hydroxyproline derived from the supernatant was only 1, indicating primary synthesis of collagen in the microsomes. Attempts to demonstrate incorporation of L-14C-proline into collagen or into free hydroxyproline in cell free systems were unsuccessful, nor was it possible to demonstrate non-specific incorporation of L-14C-valine into TCA-insoluble material by various combinations of subcellular fractions. PMID:13763869

  19. Guide to collagen characterization for biomaterial studies.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Leah C; Zuena, Erin; Perez-Ramirez, Bernardo; Kaplan, David L

    2008-10-01

    The structure and remodeling of collagen in vivo is critical to the pathology and healing of many human diseases, as well as to normal tissue development and regeneration. In addition, collagen matrices in the form of fibers, coatings, and films are used extensively in biomaterial and biomedical applications. The specific properties of these matrices, both in terms of physical and chemical characteristics, have a direct impact on cellular adhesion, spreading, and proliferation rates, and ultimately on the rate and extent of new extracellular matrix formation in vitro or in vivo. In recent studies, it has also been shown that collagen matrix structure has a major impact on cell and tissue outcomes related to cellular aging and differentiation potential. Collagen structure is complex because of both diversity of source materials, chemistry, and structural hierarchy. With such significant impact of collagen features on biological outcomes, it becomes essential to consider an appropriate set of analytical tools, or guide, so that collagens attained from commercial vendors are characterized in a comparative manner as an integral part of studies focused on biological parameters. The analysis should include as a starting point: (a) structural detail-mainly focused on molecular mass, purity, helical content, and bulk thermal properties, (b) chemical features-mainly focused on surface elemental analysis and hydrophobicity, and (c) morphological features at different length scales. The application of these analytical techniques to the characterization of collagen biomaterial matrices is critical in order to appropriately correlate biological responses from different studies with experimental outcomes in vitro or in vivo. As a case study, the analytical tools employed for collagen biomaterial studies are reviewed in the context of collagen remodeling by fibroblasts. The goal is to highlight the necessity of understanding collagen biophysical and chemical features as a

  20. Immunomodulatory effects of amniotic membrane matrix incorporated into collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hortensius, Rebecca A; Ebens, Jill H; Harley, Brendan A C

    2016-06-01

    Adult tendon wound repair is characterized by the formation of disorganized collagen matrix which leads to decreases in mechanical properties and scar formation. Studies have linked this scar formation to the inflammatory phase of wound healing. Instructive biomaterials designed for tendon regeneration are often designed to provide both structural and cellular support. In order to facilitate regeneration, success may be found by tempering the body's inflammatory response. This work combines collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds, previously developed for tissue regeneration, with matrix materials (hyaluronic acid and amniotic membrane) that have been shown to promote healing and decreased scar formation in skin studies. The results presented show that scaffolds containing amniotic membrane matrix have significantly increased mechanical properties and that tendon cells within these scaffolds have increased metabolic activity even when the media is supplemented with the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta. Collagen scaffolds containing hyaluronic acid or amniotic membrane also temper the expression of genes associated with the inflammatory response in normal tendon healing (TNF-α, COLI, MMP-3). These results suggest that alterations to scaffold composition, to include matrix known to decrease scar formation in vivo, can modify the inflammatory response in tenocytes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1332-1342, 2016.

  1. Moderation of phenotypic severity in dystrophic and junctional forms of epidermolysis bullosa through in-frame skipping of exons containing non-sense or frameshift mutations.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J A; Ashton, G H; Mellerio, J E; Salas-Alanis, J C; Swensson, O; McMillan, J R; Eady, R A

    1999-09-01

    Non-sense mutations on both alleles of either the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) or the genes encoding laminin 5 (LAMA3, LAMB3, or LAMC2) usually result in clinically severe forms of recessive dystrophic or junctional epidermolysis bullosa, respectively. In this study we assessed two unrelated families whose mutations in genomic DNA predicted severe recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa or junctional epidermolysis bullosa phenotypes but in whom the manifestations were milder than expected. The recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa patients had a homozygous single base-pair frameshift mutation in exon 19 of COL7A1 (2470insG). Clinically, there was generalized blistering but only mild scarring. Skin biopsy revealed positive type VII collagen immunoreactivity and recognizable anchoring fibrils. The junctional epidermolysis bullosa patients were compound heterozygotes for a frameshift/non-sense combination of mutations in exons 3 and 17 of LAMB3 (29insC/Q834X). These patients did not have the lethal form of junctional epidermolysis bullosa but, as adults, displayed the milder generalized atrophic benign epidermolysis bullosa variant. There was undetectable laminin 5 staining at the dermal-epidermal junction using an antibody to the beta3 chain, but faintly positive alpha3 and gamma2 chain labeling, and there was variable hypoplasia of hemidesmosomes. To explain the milder recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and junctional epidermolysis bullosa phenotypes in these families, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, using RNA extracted from frozen skin, was able to provide evidence for some rescue of mutant mRNA transcripts with restoration of the open- reading frame. In the recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa patients, transcripts containing in-frame skipping of exon 19 of COL7A1 in the cDNA were detected, and in the junctional epidermolysis bullosa patients transcripts with in-frame skipping of exon 17 of LAMB3 were identified. The

  2. Tenascin-X, Collagen, Elastin and the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, James; Carey, William; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2005-08-31

    Tenascin-X is an extracellular matrix protein initially identified because of its overlap with the human CYP21B gene. Because studies of gene and protein function of other tenascins had been poorly predictive of essential functions in vivo, we used a genetic approach that critically relied on an understanding of the genomic locus to uncover an association between inactivating tenascin-X mutations and novel recessive and dominant forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Tenascin-X provides the first example of a gene outside of the fibrillar collagens and their processing enzymes that causes Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Tenascin-X null mice recapitulate the skin findings of the human disease, confirming a causative role for this gene in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Further evaluation of these mice showed that tenascin-X is an important regulator of collagen deposition in vivo, suggesting a novel mechanism of disease in this form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Further studies suggest that tenascin-X may do this through both direct and indirect interactions with the collagen fibril. Recent studies show that TNX effects on matrix extend beyond the collagen to the elastogenic pathway and matrix remodeling enzymes. Tenascin-X serves as a compelling example of how human experiments of nature can guide us to an understanding of genes whose function may not be evident from their sequence or in vitro studies of their encoded proteins.

  3. The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180 in tissue degradation and cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Melander, Maria C; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Madsen, Daniel H; Engelholm, Lars H; Behrendt, Niels

    2015-10-01

    The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180, the product of the MRC2 gene, is a central component in the collagen turnover process governed by various mesenchymal cells. Through the endocytosis of collagen or large collagen fragments, this recycling receptor serves to direct basement membrane collagen as well as interstitial collagen to lysosomal degradation. This capacity, shared only with the mannose receptor from the same protein family, endows uPARAP/Endo180 with a critical role in development and homeostasis, as well as in pathological disruptions of the extracellular matrix structure. Important pathological functions of uPARAP/Endo180 have been identified in various cancers and in several fibrotic conditions. With a particular focus on matrix turnover in cancer, this review presents the necessary background for understanding the function of uPARAP/Endo180 at the molecular and cellular level, followed by an in-depth survey of the available knowledge of the expression and role of this receptor in various types of cancer and other degenerative diseases.

  4. The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180 in tissue degradation and cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MELANDER, MARIA C.; JÜRGENSEN, HENRIK J.; MADSEN, DANIEL H.; ENGELHOLM, LARS H.; BEHRENDT, NIELS

    2015-01-01

    The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180, the product of the MRC2 gene, is a central component in the collagen turnover process governed by various mesenchymal cells. Through the endocytosis of collagen or large collagen fragments, this recycling receptor serves to direct basement membrane collagen as well as interstitial collagen to lysosomal degradation. This capacity, shared only with the mannose receptor from the same protein family, endows uPARAP/Endo180 with a critical role in development and homeostasis, as well as in pathological disruptions of the extracellular matrix structure. Important pathological functions of uPARAP/Endo180 have been identified in various cancers and in several fibrotic conditions. With a particular focus on matrix turnover in cancer, this review presents the necessary background for understanding the function of uPARAP/Endo180 at the molecular and cellular level, followed by an in-depth survey of the available knowledge of the expression and role of this receptor in various types of cancer and other degenerative diseases. PMID:26316068

  5. Aging decreases collagen IV expression in vivo in the dermo-epidermal junction and in vitro in dermal fibroblasts: possible involvement of TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Feru, Jezabel; Delobbe, Etienne; Ramont, Laurent; Brassart, Bertrand; Terryn, Christine; Dupont-Deshorgue, Aurelie; Garbar, Christian; Monboisse, Jean-Claude; Maquart, Francois-Xavier; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Collagen IV is a major component of the dermo-epidermal junction (DEJ). To study expression of collagen IV upon aging in the DEJ and dermal fibroblasts isolated from the same patients. A model of senescent fibroblasts was developed in order to identify biological compounds that might restore the level of collagen IV. Skin fragments of women (30 to 70 years old) were collected. Localisation of collagen IV expression in the DEJ was studied by immunofluorescence. Fibroblast collagen IV expression was studied by real-time PCR, ELISA, and western blotting. Premature senescence was simulated by exposing fibroblasts to subcytotoxic H2O2 concentrations. Collagen IV decreased in the DEJ and fibroblasts relative to age. TGF-β1 treatment significantly increased collagen IV gene and protein expression in fibroblasts and restored expression in the model of senescence. Addition of TGF-β1-neutralizing antibody to fibroblast cultures decreased collagen IV expression. Taken together, the results suggest that the decrease in collagen IV in the DEJ, relative to age, could be due to a decrease in collagen IV expression by senescent dermal fibroblasts and may involve TGF-β1 signalling. PMID:27124123

  6. The Mineral–Collagen Interface in Bone

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The interface between collagen and the mineral reinforcement phase, carbonated hydroxyapatite (cAp), is essential for bone’s remarkable functionality as a biological composite material. The very small dimensions of the cAp phase and the disparate natures of the reinforcement and matrix are essential to the material’s performance but also complicate study of this interface. This article summarizes what is known about the cAp-collagen interface in bone and begins with descriptions of the matrix and reinforcement roles in composites, of the phases bounding the interface, of growth of cAp growing within the collagen matrix, and of the effect of intra- and extrafibrilar mineral on determinations of interfacial properties. Different observed interfacial interactions with cAp (collagen, water, non-collagenous proteins) are reviewed; experimental results on interface interactions during loading are reported as are their influence on macroscopic mechanical properties; conclusions of numerical modeling of interfacial interactions are also presented. The data suggest interfacial interlocking (bending of collagen molecules around cAp nanoplatelets) and water-mediated bonding between collagen and cAp are essential to load transfer. The review concludes with descriptions of areas where new research is needed to improve understanding of how the interface functions. PMID:25824581

  7. Single-molecule studies of collagen mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Nancy; Rezaei, Naghmeh; Kirkness, Michael

    Collagen is the fundamental structural protein in vertebrates. Its triple helical structure at the molecular level is believed to be strongly related to its mechanical role in connective tissues. However, the mechanics of collagen at the single-molecule level remain contentious. Estimates of its persistence length span an order of magnitude, from 15-180 nm for this biopolymer of 300 nm contour length. How collagen responds to applied force is also controversial, with different single-molecule studies suggesting one of three different responses: extending entropically, overwinding, or unwinding, all at forces below 10 pN. Using atomic force microscopy to image collagens deposited from solution, we find that their flexibility depends strongly on ionic strength and pH. To study force-dependent structural changes, we are performing highly parallelized enzymatic cleavage assays of triple helical collagen in our new compact centrifuge force microscope. Because proteolytic cleavage requires a locally unwound triple helix, these experiments are revealing how local collagen structure changes in response to applied force. Our results can help to resolve long-standing debates about collagen mechanics and structure at the molecular level.

  8. Fibrillogenesis in Continuously Spun Synthetic Collagen Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Wen, Jing; Cui, Wanxing; Martinez, Adam; Apkarian, Robert; Coats, Julie E.; Berland, Keith; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2013-01-01

    The universal structural role of collagen fiber networks has motivated the development of collagen gels, films, coatings, injectables, and other formulations. However, reported synthetic collagen fiber fabrication schemes have either culminated in short, discontinuous fiber segments at unsuitably low production rates, or have incompletely replicated the internal fibrillar structure that dictates fiber mechanical and biological properties. We report a continuous extrusion system with an off-line phosphate buffer incubation step for the manufacture of synthetic collagen fiber. Fiber with a cross-section of 53±14 by 21±3 µm and an ultimate tensile strength of 94±19 MPa was continuously produced at 60 m/hr from an ultrafiltered monomeric collagen solution. The effect of collagen solution concentration, flow rate, and spinneret size on fiber size was investigated. The fiber was further characterized by microdifferential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), second harmonic generation (SHG) analysis, and in a subcutaneous murine implant model. Calorimetry demonstrated stabilization of the collagen triple helical structure, while TEM and SHG revealed a dense, axially aligned D-periodic fibril structure throughout the fiber cross-section. Implantation of glutaraldehyde crosslinked and non-crosslinked fiber in the subcutaneous tissue of mice demonstrated limited inflammatory response and biodegradation after a 6-week implant period. PMID:20024969

  9. The Mineral-Collagen Interface in Bone.

    PubMed

    Stock, S R

    2015-09-01

    The interface between collagen and the mineral reinforcement phase, carbonated hydroxyapatite (cAp), is essential for bone's remarkable functionality as a biological composite material. The very small dimensions of the cAp phase and the disparate natures of the reinforcement and matrix are essential to the material's performance but also complicate study of this interface. This article summarizes what is known about the cAp-collagen interface in bone and begins with descriptions of the matrix and reinforcement roles in composites, of the phases bounding the interface, of growth of cAp growing within the collagen matrix, and of the effect of intra- and extrafibrilar mineral on determinations of interfacial properties. Different observed interfacial interactions with cAp (collagen, water, non-collagenous proteins) are reviewed; experimental results on interface interactions during loading are reported as are their influence on macroscopic mechanical properties; conclusions of numerical modeling of interfacial interactions are also presented. The data suggest interfacial interlocking (bending of collagen molecules around cAp nanoplatelets) and water-mediated bonding between collagen and cAp are essential to load transfer. The review concludes with descriptions of areas where new research is needed to improve understanding of how the interface functions. PMID:25824581

  10. Propranolol-induced elevation of pulmonary collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenschmidt, R.C.; Witschi, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    Current concepts of collagen metabolism suggest that fibroblasts tightly control collagen production. One of the possible mechanisms of control is via the cyclic nucleotides, cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP). Beta adrenergic agonists, by elevating intracellular cAMP levels, have been shown in vitro to suppress fibroblast collagen production; whereas beta adrenergic antagonists were effective in removing this suppression by blocking the rise in cAMP. In the present study with mice, the authors showed that administration of the beta adrenergic antagonists, propranolol, at a dose demonstrated to decrease the ratio of cAMP to cGMP, resulted in an elevation in total lung collagen in vivo. The increase in collagen was evident only when propranolol was administered before and during acute lung damage induced by either butylated hydroxytoluene, bleomycin or high concentrations of oxygen. There was no increase in lung collagen when propranolol administration was delayed after injury or when given to an undamaged lung. The authors propose that via beta adrenergic blockage by propranolol, fibroblasts involved in the normal reparative process may have lost a mechanism for regulatory control, resulting in excessive deposition of collagen. 38 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Probing interactions between collagen proteins via microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Marjan; Forde, Nancy R.

    2012-10-01

    Collagen is the major structural protein of our connective tissues. It provides integrity and mechanical strength through its hierarchical organization. Defects in collagen can lead to serious connective tissue diseases. Collagen is also widely used as a biomaterial. Given that mechanical properties are related to the structure of materials, the main goal of our research is to understand how molecular structure correlates with microscale mechanical properties of collagen solutions and networks. We use optical tweezers to trap and monitor thermal fluctuations of an embedded probe particle, from which viscoelastic properties of the solution are extracted. We find that elasticity becomes comparable to viscous behavior at collagen concentrations of 5mg/ml. Furthermore, by simultaneously neutralizing pH and adding salt, we observe changes in viscosity and elasticity of the solution over time. We attribute this to the self-assembly process of collagen molecules into fibrils with different mechanical properties. Self-assembly of collagen under these conditions is verified by turbidity measurements as well as electron microscopy. By comparing results from these local studies of viscoelasticity, we can detect spatial heterogeneity of fibril formation throughout the solution.

  12. Collagenous spherulosis in an oral mucous cyst.

    PubMed

    Henry, Cathy Renee; Nace, Mindy; Helm, Klaus F

    2008-04-01

    Collagenous spherulosis is a histological pattern that has been described in both benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, proliferative lesions of breast ductal epithelium, chondroid syringomas and schwannomas. Histologic structures of similar appearance have also been reported in oral extravasation mucoceles as questionable myxoglobulosis or myxoglobulosis-like change. We report collagenous spherulosis within a mucocele removed from the lower lip of a 17-year-old female. Based upon histologic appearance, immunophenotypic data and review of the literature, we hypothesize that collagenous spherulosis and myxoglobulosis are morphologically related reaction patterns. PMID:18333906

  13. Collagen stability, hydration and native state.

    PubMed

    Mogilner, Inés G; Ruderman, Graciela; Grigera, J Raúl

    2002-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a collagen-like peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)4-Pro-Hyp-Ala-(Pro-Hyp-Gly)5 have been done in order to study the contribution of the hydration structure on keeping the native structure of collagen. The simulation shows that the absence of water produces a distortion on the molecular conformation and an increase in the number of intra-molecular hydrogen bonds. This is in agreement with previous experimental results showing the stiffness of collagen under severe drying and its increase in the thermal stability. This dehydrated material does not keep, however, the native structure.

  14. Collagenous spherulosis in an oral mucous cyst.

    PubMed

    Henry, Cathy Renee; Nace, Mindy; Helm, Klaus F

    2008-04-01

    Collagenous spherulosis is a histological pattern that has been described in both benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, proliferative lesions of breast ductal epithelium, chondroid syringomas and schwannomas. Histologic structures of similar appearance have also been reported in oral extravasation mucoceles as questionable myxoglobulosis or myxoglobulosis-like change. We report collagenous spherulosis within a mucocele removed from the lower lip of a 17-year-old female. Based upon histologic appearance, immunophenotypic data and review of the literature, we hypothesize that collagenous spherulosis and myxoglobulosis are morphologically related reaction patterns.

  15. Collagen II Is Essential for the Removal of the Notochord and the Formation of Intervertebral Discs

    PubMed Central

    Aszódi, Attila; Chan, Danny; Hunziker, Ernst; Bateman, John F.; Fässler, Reinhard

    1998-01-01

    . Furthermore, biochemical analysis of collagen XI in mutant cartilage showed that α1(XI) and α2 (XI) chains form unstable collagen XI molecules, demonstrating that the α3(XI) chain, which is an alternative, posttranslationally modified form of the Col2a1 gene, is essential for assembly and stability of triple helical collagen XI. PMID:9832566

  16. Hyaluronic acid abrogates ethanol-dependent inhibition of collagen biosynthesis in cultured human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Donejko, Magdalena; Przylipiak, Andrzej; Rysiak, Edyta; Miltyk, Wojciech; Galicka, Elżbieta; Przylipiak, Jerzy; Zaręba, Ilona; Surazynski, Arkadiusz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol on collagen biosynthesis in cultured human skin fibroblasts, and the role of hyaluronic acid (HA) in this process. Regarding the mechanism of ethanol action on human skin fibroblasts we investigated: expression of β1 integrin and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-IR), signaling pathway protein expression: mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), protein kinase B (Akt), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factor, cytotoxicity assay and apoptosis, metalloproteinase activity, as well as the influence of HA on these processes. Materials and methods Collagen biosynthesis, activity of prolidase, DNA biosynthesis, and cytotoxicity were measured in confluent human skin fibroblast cultures that have been treated with 25, 50, and 100 mM ethanol and with ethanol and 500 µg/mL HA. Western blot analysis and zymography were performed to evaluate expression of collagen type I, β1 integrin receptor, IGF-IR, NF-κB protein, phospho-Akt protein, kinase MAPK, caspase 9 activity, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9 and MMP-2). Results Ethanol in a dose-dependent manner lead to the impairment of collagen biosynthesis in fibroblast cultures through decreasing prolidase activity and expression of β1 integrin and IGF-IR. This was accompanied by an increased cytotoxicity, apoptosis and lowered expression of the signaling pathway proteins induced by β1 integrin and IGF-IR, that is, MAPK (ERK1/2) kinases. The lowered amount of synthesized collagen and prolidase activity disturbance may also be due to the activation of NF-κB transcription factor, which inhibits collagen gene expression. It suggests that the decrease in fibroblast collagen production may be caused by the disturbance in its biosynthesis but not degradation. The application of HA has a protective effect on disturbances caused by the examined substances. It seems that regulatory mechanism of ethanol-induced collagen aberration take

  17. Posttranscriptional regulation of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, B; Hellerbrand, C; Holcik, M; Briendl, M; Aliebhaber, S; Brenner, D A

    1997-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cell (HSC) is the primary cell responsible for the dramatic increase in the synthesis of type I collagen in the cirrhotic liver. Quiescent HSCs contain a low level of collagen alpha1(I) mRNA, while activated HSCs contain about 60- to 70-fold more of this mRNA. The transcription rate of the collagen alpha1(I) gene is only two fold higher in activated HSCs than in quiescent HSCs. In assays using actinomycin D or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside collagen alpha1(I) mRNA has estimated half-lives of 1.5 h in quiescent HSCs and 24 h in activated HSCs. Thus, this 16-fold change in mRNA stability is primarily responsible for the increase in collagen alpha1(I) mRNA steady-state level in activated HSCs. We have identified a novel RNA-protein interaction targeted to the C-rich sequence in the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR). This sequence is localized 24 nucleotides 3' to the stop codon. In transient transfection experiments, mutation of this sequence diminished accumulation of an mRNA transcribed from a collagen alpha1(I) minigene and in stable transfections decreased the half-life of collagen alpha1(I) minigene mRNA. Binding to the collagen alpha1(I) 3' UTR is present in cytoplasmic extracts of activated but not quiescent HSCs. It contains as a subunit alphaCP, which is also found in the complex involved in stabilization of alpha-globin mRNA. The auxiliary factors necessary to promote binding of alphaCP to the collagen 3' UTR are distinct from the factors necessary for binding to the alpha-globin sequence. Since alphaCP is expressed in both quiescent and activated HSCs, these auxiliary factors are responsible for the differentially expressed RNA-protein interaction at the collagen alpha1(I) mRNA 3' UTR. PMID:9271398

  18. G to A substitution in 5{prime} donor splice site of introns 18 and 48 of COL1A1 gene of type I collagen results in different splicing alternatives in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, M.; Deschenes, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a G to A substitution in the 5{prime} donor splice site of intron 18 of one COL1A1 allele in two unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. A third OI type I family has a G to A substitution at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele. Both mutations abolish normal splicing and lead to reduced steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant COL1A1 allele. The intron 18 mutation leads to both exon 18 skipping in the mRNA and to utilization of a single alternative splice site near the 3{prime} end of exon 18. The latter results in deletion of the last 8 nucleotides of exon 18 from the mRNA, a shift in the translational reading-frame, and the creation of a premature termination codon in exon 19. Of the potential alternative 5{prime} splice sites in exon 18 and intron 18, the one utilized has a surrounding nucleotide sequence which most closely resembles that of the natural splice site. Although a G to A mutation was detected at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele in another OI type I family, nine complex alternative splicing patterns were identified by sequence analysis of cDNA clones derived from fibroblast mRNA from this cell strain. All result in partial or complete skipping of exon 48, with in-frame deletions of portions of exons 47 and/or 49. The different patterns of RNA splicing were not explained by their sequence homology with naturally occuring 5{prime} splice sites, but rather by recombination between highly homologous exon sequences, suggesting that we may not have identified the major splicing alternative(s) in this cell strain. Both G to A mutations result in decreased production of type I collagen, the common biochemical correlate of OI type I.

  19. Tubular Compressed Collagen Scaffolds for Ureteral Tissue Engineering in a Flow Bioreactor System.

    PubMed

    Vardar, Elif; Engelhardt, Eva-Maria; Larsson, Hans M; Mouloungui, Elodie; Pinnagoda, Kalitha; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Frey, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Ureteral replacement by tissue engineering might become necessary following tissue loss after excessive ureteral trauma, after retroperitoneal cancer, or even after failed reconstructive surgery. This need has driven innovation in the design of novel scaffolds and specific cell culture techniques for urinary tract reconstruction. In this study, compressed tubular collagen scaffolds were evaluated, addressing the physical and biological characterization of acellular and cellular collagen tubes in a new flow bioreactor system, imitating the physiological pressure, peristalsis, and flow conditions of the human ureter. Collagen tubes, containing primary human smooth muscle and urothelial cells, were evaluated regarding their change in gene and protein expression under dynamic culture conditions. A maximum intraluminal pressure of 22.43 ± 0.2 cm H2O was observed in acellular tubes, resulting in a mean wall shear stress of 4 dynes/cm(2) in the tubular constructs. Dynamic conditions directed the differentiation of both cell types into their mature forms. This was confirmed by their gene expression of smooth muscle alpha-actin, smoothelin, collagen type I and III, elastin, laminin type 1 and 5, cytokeratin 8, and uroplakin 2. In addition, smooth muscle cell alignment predominantly perpendicular to the flow direction was observed, comparable to the cell orientation in native ureteral tissue. These results revealed that coculturing human smooth muscle and urothelial cells in compressed collagen tubes under human ureteral flow-mimicking conditions could lead to cell-engineered biomaterials that might ultimately be translated into clinical applications.

  20. Collagen-silica hybrid materials: sodium silicate and sodium chloride effects on type I collagen fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Eglin, David; Coradin, Thibaud; Giraud Guille, Marie M; Helary, Christophe; Livage, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-silica hybrid materials have been considered for potential biomedical applications. Understanding of the collagen-silica interactions is the key to control hybrids structure and properties. For this purpose, the effect of sodium silicate and sodium chloride addition at two concentrations, 0.83 and 10 mM, on the kinetic of the type I collagen fibrillogenesis at 20 degrees C, and pH 7.4 were studied. Absorbance profiles of fibrillogenesis experiments were collected together with measures of silicic acid concentration and transmission electron microscopy analysis. The specific effect of silica addition on the collagen fibrils self-assembly mechanisms was demonstrated by comparison with the sodium chloride. Sodium silicate at 10 mM inhibited the collagen fibrillogenesis. At the same concentration, the sodium chloride decreased the rate of the collagen fibril assembly. Collagen fibrillogenesis kinetic was not significantly disturbed by the presence of 0.83 mM of sodium chloride. However, the same concentration of sodium silicate modified the collagen fibrillogenesis kinetic. Transmission electron microscopy indicated for experiment with 0.83 mM of sodium silicate, the formation of longer and wider fibrils than for the equivalent collagen fibrillogenesis experiment with sodium chloride. The effect of sodium chloride is explained in terms of osmotic exclusion and influence on electrostatic interactions between collagen fibrils. The specific involvement of silicic acid in collagen helices hydrogen-bond interactions is suggested. Finally, the results of this study are discussed regarding the preparation of composites by co-gelation of type I collagen and sodium silicate, for potential application as bone repair device.

  1. Withaferin-A Reduces Type I Collagen Expression In Vitro and Inhibits Development of Myocardial Fibrosis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Challa, Azariyas A.; Vukmirovic, Milica; Blackmon, John; Stefanovic, Branko

    2012-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body. Its excessive synthesis results in fibrosis of various organs. Fibrosis is a major medical problem without an existing cure. Excessive synthesis of type I collagen in fibrosis is primarily due to stabilization of collagen mRNAs. We recently reported that intermediate filaments composed of vimentin regulate collagen synthesis by stabilizing collagen mRNAs. Vimentin is a primary target of Withaferin-A (WF-A). Therefore, we hypothesized that WF-A may reduce type I collagen production by disrupting vimentin filaments and decreasing the stability of collagen mRNAs. This study is to determine if WF-A exhibits anti-fibrotic properties in vitro and in vivo and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of its action. In lung, skin and heart fibroblasts WF-A disrupted vimentin filaments at concentrations of 0.5–1.5 µM and reduced 3 fold the half-lives of collagen α1(I) and α2(I) mRNAs and protein expression. In addition, WF-A inhibited TGF-β1 induced phosphorylation of TGF-β1 receptor I, Smad3 phosphorylation and transcription of collagen genes. WF-A also inhibited in vitro activation of primary hepatic stellate cells and decreased their type I collagen expression. In mice, administration of 4 mg/kg WF-A daily for 2 weeks reduced isoproterenol-induced myocardial fibrosis by 50%. Our findings provide strong evidence that Withaferin-A could act as an anti-fibrotic compound against fibroproliferative diseases, including, but not limited to, cardiac interstitial fibrosis. PMID:22900077

  2. Use of Cis-[18F]Fluoro-Proline for Assessment of Exercise-Related Collagen Synthesis in Musculoskeletal Connective Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Kjaer, Andreas; Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Madsen, Jacob; Kjaer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Protein turnover in collagen rich tissue is influenced by exercise, but can only with difficulty be studied in vivo due to use of invasive procedure. The present study was done to investigate the possibility of applying the PET-tracer, cis-[18F]fluoro-proline (cis-Fpro), for non-invasive assessment of collagen synthesis in rat musculoskeletal tissues at rest and following short-term (3 days) treadmill running. Musculoskeletal collagen synthesis was studied in rats at rest and 24 h post-exercise. At each session, rats were PET scanned at two time points following injection of cis-FPro: (60 and 240 min p.i). SUV were calculated for Achilles tendon, calf muscle and tibial bone. The PET-derived results were compared to mRNA expression of collagen type I and III. Tibial bone had the highest SUV that increased significantly (p<0.001) from the early (60 min) to the late (240 min) PET scan, while SUV in tendon and muscle decreased (p<0.001). Exercise had no influence on SUV, which was contradicted by an increased gene expression of collagen type I and III in muscle and tendon. The clearly, visible uptake of cis-Fpro in the collagen-rich musculoskeletal tissues is promising for multi-tissue studies in vivo. The tissue-specific differences with the highest basal uptake in bone are in accordance with earlier studies relying on tissue incorporation of isotopic-labelled proline. A possible explanation of the failure to demonstrate enhanced collagen synthesis following exercise, despite augmented collagen type I and III transcription, is that SUV calculations are not sensitive enough to detect minor changes in collagen synthesis. Further studies including kinetic compartment modeling must be performed to establish whether cis-Fpro can be used for non-invasive in-vivo assessment of exercise-induced changes in musculoskeletal collagen synthesis. PMID:21347251

  3. Zebrafish Collagen Type I: Molecular and Biochemical Characterization of the Major Structural Protein in Bone and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Gistelinck, C.; Gioia, R.; Gagliardi, A.; Tonelli, F.; Marchese, L.; Bianchi, L.; Landi, C.; Bini, L.; Huysseune, A.; Witten, P. E.; Staes, A.; Gevaert, K.; De Rocker, N.; Menten, B.; Malfait, F.; Leikin, S.; Carra, S.; Tenni, R.; Rossi, A.; De Paepe, A.; Coucke, P.; Willaert, A.; Forlino, A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last years the zebrafish imposed itself as a powerful model to study skeletal diseases, but a limit to its use is the poor characterization of collagen type I, the most abundant protein in bone and skin. In tetrapods collagen type I is a trimer mainly composed of two α1 chains and one α2 chain, encoded by COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes, respectively. In contrast, in zebrafish three type I collagen genes exist, col1a1a, col1a1b and col1a2 coding for α1(I), α3(I) and α2(I) chains. During embryonic and larval development the three collagen type I genes showed a similar spatio-temporal expression pattern, indicating their co-regulation and interdependence at these stages. In both embryonic and adult tissues, the presence of the three α(I) chains was demonstrated, although in embryos α1(I) was present in two distinct glycosylated states, suggesting a developmental-specific collagen composition. Even though in adult bone, skin and scales equal amounts of α1(I), α3(I) and α2(I) chains are present, the presented data suggest a tissue-specific stoichiometry and/or post-translational modification status for collagen type I. In conclusion, this data will be useful to properly interpret results and insights gained from zebrafish models of skeletal diseases. PMID:26876635

  4. Folliculocystic and Collagen Hamartoma: A New Entity?

    PubMed Central

    An, Je Min; Kim, Ye Seul; Park, Young Lip

    2015-01-01

    Folliculocystic and collagen hamartoma is a newly described complex hamartoma characterized by abundant collagen deposition, concentric perifollicular fibrosis, and keratin- filled infundibular cysts that are visible on histopathological examination. Here, we report the case of a 19-year-old Korean man who had large brownish infiltrated plaques with numerous follicular comedo-like openings and subcutaneous cystic masses on his right temporal scalp and ear since birth. Histopathological examination showed abundant collagen deposition in the dermis that extended up to the subcutaneous fat layer, multifocal infundibular cysts packed with keratin, and perifollicular inflammation and fibrosis. Hence, we describe a new type of hamartoma with folliculocystic and collagen components but without tuberous sclerosis. PMID:26512173

  5. In vitro Sirius Red collagen assay measures the pattern shift from soluble to deposited collagen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Zhang, Bingrong; Han, Deping; Ma, Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Hong, Jingshen; Guo, Yansong; Okunieff, Paul; Zhang, Lurong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we compared two in vitro collagen production assays ([(3)H]-proline incorporation and Sirius Red) for their ability to determine the pattern shift from soluble to deposited collagen. The effect of the antifibrotic agent, triptolide (TPL), on collagen production was also studied. The results showed that: (1) 48 h after NIH 3T3 (murine embryo fibroblast) and HFL-1(human fetal lung fibroblast) were exposed to transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β), there was an increase in soluble collagen in the culture medium; (2) on day 4, soluble collagen declined, whereas deposited collagen increased; (3) Sirius Red was easier to use than [(3)H]-proline incorporation and more consistently reflected the collagen pattern shift from soluble to deposited; (4) the in vitro Sirius Red assay took less time than the in vivo assay to determine the effect of TPL. Our results suggest that: (a) the newly synthesized soluble collagen can sensitively evaluate an agent's capacity for collagen production and (b) Sirius Red is more useful than [(3)H]-proline because it is easier to use, more convenient, less time consuming, and does not require radioactive material.

  6. A first census of collagen interruptions: collagen's own stutters and stammers.

    PubMed

    Bella, Jordi

    2014-06-01

    The repetitive Gly-X-Y sequence is the telltale sign of triple helical domains in collagens and collagen-like proteins. Most collagen sequences contain sporadic interruptions of this pattern, which may have functional roles in molecular flexibility, assembly or molecular recognition. However, the structural signatures of the different interruptions are not well defined. Here, a first comprehensive survey of collagen interruptions on collagen sequences from different taxonomic groups is presented. Amino acid preferences at the sites of interruption and the flanking triplets are analysed separately for metazoan and prokaryotic collagens and the concept of commensurateness between interruptions is introduced. Known structural information from model peptides is used to present a common framework for hydrogen bonding topology and variations in superhelical twist for the different types of interruptions. Several collagen interruptions are further classified here as stutters or stammers in analogy to the heptad breaks observed in alpha-helical coiled coils, and the structural consequences of commensurate interruptions in heterotrimeric collagens are briefly discussed. Data presented here will be useful for further investigation on the relation between structure and function of collagen interruptions.

  7. Collagenous gastrobulbitis and collagenous colitis. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Castellano, V M; Muñoz, M T; Colina, F; Nevado, M; Casis, B; Solís-Herruzo, J A

    1999-06-01

    A case is reported of collagenous gastrobulbitis on collagenous colitis in a 57-year-old woman with a 6-month history of watery diarrhea. Low serum levels of total proteins and albumin and increased fecal elimination of alpha1-antitrypsin were the only abnormal laboratory test results. Biopsy specimens from the colon, rectum, antrum, fundus, and duodenal bulb showed a thick subepithelial band composed of ultrastructurally normal collagen immunohistochemically negative for collagen IV and laminin. The diarrhea resolved with prednisone and responded to this treatment after a relapse 6 months later. One year later the patient developed severe alimentary intolerance and secondary weight loss. This symptom also responded to the same treatment. However, the collagen deposition did not disappear in the second biopsy samples of colonic and gastric mucosa. Only six cases have been previously reported with gastric and/or duodenal subepithelial collagenous deposition. Four were associated with collagenous colitis. One of these presented a subepithelial collagenous band in the terminal ileum. All these features suggest that this collagen deposition may affect the entire digestive tract with variable intensity, extension, and symptoms. PMID:10440616

  8. Studies on fish scale collagen of Pacific saury (Cololabis saira).

    PubMed

    Mori, Hideki; Tone, Yurie; Shimizu, Kouske; Zikihara, Kazunori; Tokutomi, Satoru; Ida, Tomoaki; Ihara, Hideshi; Hara, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    We purified and characterized Type I collagen from the scales of the Pacific saury (Cololabis saira) and compared it with collagen from other organisms. Subunit composition of C. saira collagen (2α1+α2) was similar to that of red sea bream (Pagrus major) and porcine collagen. C. saira collagen did not form a firm gel after neutralization of pH in solution. The temperature of denaturation (24-25 °C) of C. saira collagen was slightly lower than that of P. major collagen (26-27 °C). The contents of proline and hydroxyproline were lower in red sea bream and Pacific saury collagen than in porcine collagen. Circular dichroism spectra and Fourier-transformed infrared spectra showed that heat denaturation caused unfolding of the triple helices in all three collagens. PMID:25428059

  9. Targeting and mimicking collagens via triple helical peptide assembly

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Yu, S. Michael

    2013-01-01

    As the major structural component of the extracellular matrix, collagen plays a crucial role in tissue development and regeneration. Since structural and metabolic abnormalities of collagen are associated with numerous debilitating diseases and pathologic conditions, the ability to target collagens of diseased tissues could lead to new diagnostics and therapeutics. Collagen is also a natural biomaterial widely used in drug delivery and tissue engineering, and construction of synthetic collagen-like materials is gaining interests in the biomaterials community. The unique triple helical structure of collagen has been explored for targeting collagen strands, and for engineering collagen-like functional assemblies and conjugates. This review focuses on the forefront of research activities in the use of the collagen mimetic peptide for both targeting and mimicking collagens via its triple helix mediated strand hybridization and higher order assembly. PMID:24210894

  10. Collagenous ileitis: a study of 13 cases.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Blake Hugh; McClymont, Kelly; Brown, Ian

    2011-08-01

    Collagenous ileitis (CI), characterized by subepithelial collagen deposition in the terminal ileum, is an uncommon condition. The few cases reported to date have been associated with collagenous colitis (CC) or lymphocytic colitis. Thirteen cases of CI retrieved over a 9-year period were retrospectively studied. There were 7 female and 6 male patients, with an age range of 39 to 72 years (mean, 64 y). Two groups were identified: (1) CI associated with collagenous or lymphocytic disease elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract and (2) CI as an isolated process. Diarrhea was the presenting symptom in 11 cases. Most patients had no regular medication use. Subepithelial collagen thickness ranged from 15 to 100 μm (mean, 32 μm) and involved 5% to 80% of the subepithelial region of the submitted biopsies. Six cases had >25 intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs)/100 epithelial cells, and villous blunting was observed in 11 cases. Chronic inflammation of the lamina propria was present in 9 cases, and focal neutrophil infiltration was identified in 3 cases. In biopsies taken from other sites, 7 of 13 colonic biopsies showed CC, 4 of 9 gastric biopsies showed collagenous gastritis, and 2 of 10 duodenal biopsies were abnormal with collagenous sprue (n=1) and partial villous atrophy and increased IELs (n=1) (both celiac disease related). Resolution of the subepithelial collagen deposition was found in the 1 case in which follow-up of terminal ileal biopsies were taken. There was partial or complete resolution of symptoms in 6 of 9 patients for whom follow-up information was available. PMID:21716082

  11. Techniques for Type I Collagen Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson-Jackson, LaTecia Diamond

    Tissue Engineering is a process in which cells, engineering, and material methods are used in amalgamation to improve biological functions. The purpose of tissue engineering is to develop alternative solutions to treat or cure tissues and organs that have been severely altered or damaged by diseases, congenital defects, trauma, or cancer. One of the most common and most promising biological materials for tissue engineering to develop scaffolds is Type I collagen. A major challenge in biomedical research is aligning Type I collagen to mimic biological structures, such as ligaments, tendons, bones, and other hierarchal aligned structures within the human body. The intent of this research is to examine possible techniques for organizing Type I collagen and to assess which of the techniques is effective for potential biological applications. The techniques used in this research to organize collagen are soft lithography with solution-assisted sonication embossing, directional freezing, and direct poling. The final concentration used for both soft lithography with solution-assisted sonication embossing and direct poling was 1 mg/ml, whereas for directional freezing the final concentration varied between 4mg/ml, 2mg/ml, and 1 mg/ml. These techniques were characterized using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and Helium Ion Microscope (HIM). In this study, we have found that out of the three techniques, the soft lithography and directional freezing techniques have been successful in organizing collagen in a particular pattern, but not alignment. We concluded alignment may be dependent on the pH of collagen and the amount of acetic acid used in collagen solution. However, experiments are still being conducted to optimize all three techniques to align collagen in a unidirectional arrangement.

  12. Collagen-like antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Ryo; Kudo, Masakazu; Dazai, Yui; Mima, Takehiko; Koide, Takaki

    2016-11-01

    Combinatorial library composed of rigid rod-like peptides with a triple-helical scaffold was constructed. The component peptides were designed to have various combinations of basic and neutral (or hydrophobic) amino acid residues based on collagen-like (Gly-Pro-Yaa)-repeating sequences, inspired from the basic and amphiphilic nature of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. Screening of the peptide pools resulted in identification of antimicrobial peptides. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the position of Arg-cluster at N-terminus and cystine knots at C-terminus in the triple helix significantly contributed to the antimicrobial activity. The most potent peptide RO-A showed activity against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. In addition, Escherichia coli exposed to RO-A resulted in abnormal elongation of the cells. RO-A was also shown to have remarkable stability in human serum and low cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 453-459, 2016. PMID:27271210

  13. Polymethyl methacrylate microspheres in collagen.

    PubMed

    Haneke, Eckart

    2004-12-01

    Artecoll was developed about 20 years ago and underwent a number of production changes until it recently became FDA approved under the new name of Artefill. This product contains 20% polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microspheres with a diameter of 30 to 40 microm, which are suspended in a 3.5% atelo-collagen solution. The PMMA microspheres are now purified and no longer have an electrostatic charge, which in part was the cause for the early granulomatous reactions. Further, PMMA has long been known as bone cement and has been used in cosmetic surgery with a very good safety record. PMMA microspheres are biologically inert and nondegradable. The treatment results are therefore permanent and technical errors as well as incorrect injections will last. Due to the early record of granuloma formation, there is still a debate as to whether this product-as well as all other permanent fillers-should be injected for cosmetic reasons or not. With proper indications, excellent injection techniques, and realistic expectations as to what can be expected, this product has now proved to be one of the superior permanent filler substances.

  14. Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Jankov II, Mirko R.; Jovanovic, Vesna; Nikolic, Ljubisa; Lake, Jonathan C.; Kymionis, Georgos; Coskunseven, Efekan

    2010-01-01

    Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) with riboflavin and ultraviolet-A (UVA) is a new technique of corneal tissue strengthening by using riboflavin as a photosensitizer and UVA to increase the formation of intra and interfibrillar covalent bonds by photosensitized oxidation. Keratocyte apoptosis in the anterior segment of the corneal stroma all the way down to a depth of about 300 microns has been described and a demarcation line between the treated and untreated cornea has been clearly shown. It is important to ensure that the cytotoxic threshold for the endothelium has not been exceeded by strictly respecting the minimal corneal thickness. Confocal microscopy studies show that repopulation of keratocytes is already visible 1 month after the treatment, reaching its pre-operative quantity and quality in terms of functional morphology within 6 months after the treatment. The major indication for the use of CXL is to inhibit the progression of corneal ectasias, such as keratoconus and pellucid marginal degeneration. CXL may also be effective in the treatment and prophylaxis of iatrogenic keratectasia, resulting from excessively aggressive photoablation. This treatment has also been used to treat infectious corneal ulcers with apparent favorable results. Combination with other treatments, such as intracorneal ring segment implantation, limited topography-guided photoablation and conductive keratoplasty have been used with different levels of success. PMID:20543933

  15. Collagen shield delivery of amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, S D; Harrison, S A; Engstrom, R E; Bawdon, R E; Lee, D A; Mondino, B J

    1990-06-15

    By using a high-pressure liquid chromatography assay, we investigated the ability of collagen shield therapeutic contact lenses to release amphotericin B and deliver it to the anterior segment of rabbit eyes. In vitro studies showed that presoaked collagen shields released most of the amphotericin B within the first hour of elution. We compared the corneal and aqueous humor amphotericin B levels produced by collagen shields soaked in amphotericin B and frequent-drop therapy at four time points over a six-hour period. The collagen shields soaked in amphotericin B produced corneal levels that were higher than those produced by frequent-drop therapy at one hour, equivalent to drop therapy at two and three hours, and lower than drop therapy at six hours. There were no differences in amphotericin B levels in aqueous humor at any time point between rabbits treated with collagen shield delivery and rabbits treated with frequent-drop delivery. The results of this study suggest that amphotericin B delivery to the cornea by collagen shields is comparable to frequent-drop delivery but has the potential benefit of added convenience and compliance.

  16. Marine Origin Collagens and Its Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tiago H.; Moreira-Silva, Joana; Marques, Ana L. P.; Domingues, Alberta; Bayon, Yves; Reis, Rui L.

    2014-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant high molecular weight proteins in both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms, including mammals, and possess mainly a structural role, existing different types according with their specific organization in distinct tissues. From this, they have been elected as one of the key biological materials in tissue regeneration approaches. Also, industry is constantly searching for new natural sources of collagen and upgraded methodologies for their production. The most common sources are from bovine and porcine origin, but other ways are making their route, such as recombinant production, but also extraction from marine organisms like fish. Different organisms have been proposed and explored for collagen extraction, allowing the sustainable production of different types of collagens, with properties depending on the kind of organism (and their natural environment) and extraction methodology. Such variety of collagen properties has been further investigated in different ways to render a wide range of applications. The present review aims to shed some light on the contribution of marine collagens for the scientific and technological development of this sector, stressing the opportunities and challenges that they are and most probably will be facing to assume a role as an alternative source for industrial exploitation. PMID:25490254

  17. Thoracic manifestations of collagen vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Julia; Grimberg, Alexandre; Thompson, Bruna M; Antunes, Viviane B; Jasinowodolinski, Dany; Meirelles, Gustavo S P

    2012-01-01

    Collagen vascular diseases are a diverse group of immunologically mediated systemic disorders that often lead to thoracic changes. The collagen vascular diseases that most commonly involve the lung are rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis and dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, and Sjögren syndrome. Interstitial lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension are the main causes of mortality and morbidity among patients with collagen vascular diseases. Given the broad spectrum of possible thoracic manifestations and the varying frequency with which different interstitial lung diseases occur, the interpretation of thoracic images obtained in patients with collagen vascular diseases can be challenging. The task may be more difficult in the presence of treatment-related complications such as drug toxicity and infections, which are common in this group of patients. Although chest radiography is most often used for screening and monitoring of thoracic alterations, high-resolution computed tomography can provide additional information about lung involvement in collagen vascular diseases and may be especially helpful for differentiating specific disease patterns in the lung. General knowledge about the manifestations of thoracic involvement in collagen vascular diseases allows radiologists to provide better guidance for treatment and follow-up of these patients.

  18. Collagenous gastritis: reports and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Brain, Oliver; Rajaguru, Chandima; Warren, Bryan; Booth, Jonathan; Travis, Simon

    2009-12-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disorder first described in 1989. After encountering two cases, we decided to review the literature and evaluate the collagen band. A systematic review of PubMed and EMBASE databases was performed. Twenty-eight cases have been previously described and two patterns of presentations are identifiable: children or young adults (median age 12 years, range 2-22 years) presenting with symptoms attributable to the gastritis (anaemia and pain); and older adults (median age 52 years, range 35-77 years) presenting with loose stools, often associated with collagenous colitis or coeliac disease. Our two cases (one child and one adult) matched this pattern. Immunostaining of the collagen band for collagens II, III, IV and VI, and tenascin showed that the band in our cases was predominantly tenascin. In conclusion, collagenous gastritis is a rare entity whose presentation depends on the age of the patient. An autoimmune aetiology seems possible given its associations. Treatment is empirical. The 30 cases now reported show that the disorder can relapse or persist for years. PMID:19730387

  19. Glucose stabilizes collagen sterilized with gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ohan, Mark P; Dunn, Michael G

    2003-12-15

    Gamma irradiation sterilization (gamma-irradiation) fragments and denatures collagen, drastically decreasing critical physical properties. Our goal was to maintain strength and stability of gamma-irradiated collagen by adding glucose, which in theory can initiate crosslink formation in collagen during exposure to gamma-irradiation. Collagen films prepared with and without glucose were gamma-irradiated with a standard dose of 2.5 Mrad. Relative amounts of crosslinking and denaturation were approximated based on solubility and the mechanical properties of the films after hydration, heat denaturation, or incubation in enzymes (collagenase and trypsin). After exposure to gamma-irradiation, collagen films containing glucose had significantly higher mechanical properties, greater resistance to enzymatic degradation, and decreased solubility compared with control films. The entire experiment was repeated with a second set of films that were exposed first to ultraviolet irradiation (254 nm) to provide higher initial strength and then gamma-irradiated. Again, films containing glucose had significantly greater mechanical properties and resistance to enzymatic degradation compared with controls. Gel electrophoresis showed that glucose did not prevent peptide fragmentation; therefore, the higher strength and stability in glucose-incorporated films may be due to glucose-derived crosslinks. The results of this study suggest that glucose may be a useful additive to stabilize collagenous materials or tissues sterilized by gamma-irradiation.

  20. Annotation and genetic diversity of the chicken collagenous lectins.

    PubMed

    Hamzić, Edin; Pinard-van der Laan, Marie-Hélène; Bed'Hom, Bertrand; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2015-06-01

    Collectins and ficolins are multimeric proteins present in various tissues and are actively involved in innate immune responses. In chickens, six different collagenous lectins have been characterized so far: mannose-binding lectin (MBL), surfactant protein A (SP-A), collectin 10 (COLEC10), collectin 11 (COLEC11), collectin 12 (COLEC12), lung lectin (LL) and one ficolin (FCN). However, the structural and functional features of the chicken collectins and ficolin are still not fully understood. Therefore, the aims of this study were: (i) to make an overview of the genetic structure and function of chicken collectins and the ficolin, (ii) to investigate the variation in the chicken collectins and the ficolin gene in different chicken populations, and (iii) to assess the presence of MBL gene variants in different chicken populations. We performed comparative genomic analysis using publically available data. The obtained results showed that collectins and ficolins have conserved protein sequences and gene structure across all vertebrate groups and this is especially notable for COLEC10, COLEC11 and COLEC12. For the purpose of studying the genetic variation, 179 animals from 14 populations were genotyped using 31 SNPs covering five genomic regions. The obtained results revealed low level of heterozygosity in the collagenous lectins except for the COLEC12 gene and the LL-SPA-MBL region compared to heterozygosity at neutral microsatellite markers. In addition, the MBL gene variants were assessed in different chicken populations based on the polymorphisms in the promoter region. We observed 10 previously identified MBL variants with A2/A8 and A4 as the most frequent alleles.

  1. Null alleles of the COL5A1 gene of type V collagen are a cause of the classical forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (types I and II).

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, U; Atkinson, M; Hoffman, G G; Greenspan, D S; Byers, P H

    2000-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) types I and II, which comprise the classical variety, are well characterized from the clinical perspective, but it has been difficult to identify the molecular basis of the disorder in the majority of affected individuals. Several explanations for this failure to detect mutations have been proposed, including genetic heterogeneity, failure of allele expression, and technical difficulties. Genetic heterogeneity has been confirmed as an explanation for such failure, since causative mutations have been identified in the COL5A1, COL5A2, and tenascin X genes and since they have been inferred in the COL1A2 gene. Nonetheless, in the majority of families with autosomal dominant inheritance of EDS, there appears to be linkage to loci that contain the COL5A1 or COL5A2 genes. To determine whether allele-product instability could explain failure to identify some mutations, we analyzed polymorphic variants in the COL5A1 gene in 16 individuals, and we examined mRNA for the expression of both alleles and for alterations in splicing. We found a splice-site mutation in a single individual, and we determined that, in six individuals, the mRNA from one COL5A1 allele either was not expressed or was very unstable. We identified small insertions or deletions in five of these cell strains, but we could not identify the mutation in the sixth individual. Thus, although as many as one-half of the mutations that give rise to EDS types I and II are likely to lie in the COL5A1 gene, a significant portion of them result in very low levels of mRNA from the mutant allele, as a consequence of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. PMID:10796876

  2. The collagen binding domain of gelatinase A modulates degradation of collagen IV by gelatinase B.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Magda; Monaco, Susanna; Van Den Steen, Philippe E; Sbardella, Diego; Grasso, Giuseppe; Marini, Stefano; Overall, Christopher M; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Coletta, Massimo

    2009-02-20

    Type IV collagen remodeling plays a critical role in inflammatory responses, angiogenesis and metastasis. Its remodeling is executed by a family of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), of which the constitutive gelatinase A (MMP2) and the inducible gelatinase B (MMP9) are key examples. Thus, in many pathological conditions, both gelatinases act together. Kinetic data are reported for the enzymatic processing at 37 degrees C of type IV collagen from human placenta by MMP9 and its modulation by the fibronectin-like collagen binding domain (CBD) of MMP2. The alpha1 and alpha2 chain components of type IV collagen were cleaved by gelatinases and identified by mass spectrometry as well as Edman sequencing. Surface plasmon resonance interaction assays showed that CBD bound type IV collagen at two topologically distinct sites. On the basis of linked-function analysis, we demonstrated that CBD of MMP2 tuned the cleavage of collagen IV by MMP9, presumably by inducing a ligand-linked structural change on the type IV collagen. At low concentrations, the CBD bound the first site and thereby allosterically modulated the binding of MMP9 to collagen IV, thus enhancing the collagenolytic activity of MMP9. At high concentrations, CBD binding to the second site interfered with MMP9 binding to collagen IV, acting as a competitive inhibitor. Interestingly, modulation of collagen IV degradation by inactive forms of MMP2 also occurred in a cell-based system, revealing that this interrelationship affected neutrophil migration across a collagen IV membrane. The regulation of the proteolytic processing by a catalytically inactive domain (i.e., CBD) suggests that the two gelatinases might cooperate in degrading substrates even when either one is inactive. This observation reinforces the idea of exosite targets for MMP inhibitors, which should include all macromolecular substrate recognition sites.

  3. Biology of collagen-proteoglycan interaction.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, L C; Montes, G S

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review our knowledge to date of collagen-proteoglycan interaction. Many topics have been taken into account in order to provide a reasonably complete picture of this highly complex subject. Basic information about collagen biology, and an overview of the current concepts and advances regarding proteoglycans, have served as a basis to elucidate collagen-proteoglycan interaction. The bases of some methods of study have been reviewed in order to provide a fuller understanding of the results that are cited in this article. The experimental models and biological examples discussed herein demonstrate that collagen-proteoglycan interaction is essential to the extracellular matrix resiliency. The organization of these macromolecules is critical: collagen molecules become assembled into fibrils, fibrils aggregate to form fibers, fibers associate into bundles of fibers, and proteoglycans in the ground substance play a major role in the ordering process; on the other hand, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are composed of repeating monomers--GAGs linked to a same protein core form a proteoglycan--which, in turn, may bind to a hyaluronic acid molecule to form a proteoglycan aggregate together with other proteoglycans. Further growth of these complex macromolecules at higher hierarchical levels occurs by interaction of collagen with proteoglycans. A striking correlation between the tissue distribution of the genetically-distinct types of interstitial collagen and the occurrence of the different GAGs (which argues strongly in favour of a specific interaction) is demonstrated comprehensively in this review. Tissues composed of collagen type I possess small amounts of proteoglycans which contain almost exclusively dermatan sulfate; while tissues containing only collagen type II have high amounts of chondroitin sulfates. Collagen type III is the major fibrillary constituent of tissues that possess intermediate levels of proteoglycans, which contain great

  4. Imaging Denatured Collagen Strands In vivo and Ex vivo via Photo-triggered Hybridization of Caged Collagen Mimetic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.; Yu, S. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Collagen is a major structural component of the extracellular matrix that supports tissue formation and maintenance. Although collagen remodeling is an integral part of normal tissue renewal, excessive amount of remodeling activity is involved in tumors, arthritis, and many other pathological conditions. During collagen remodeling, the triple helical structure of collagen molecules is disrupted by proteases in the extracellular environment. In addition, collagens present in many histological tissue samples are partially denatured by the fixation and preservation processes. Therefore, these denatured collagen strands can serve as effective targets for biological imaging. We previously developed a caged collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) that can be photo-triggered to hybridize with denatured collagen strands by forming triple helical structure, which is unique to collagens. The overall goals of this procedure are i) to image denatured collagen strands resulting from normal remodeling activities in vivo, and ii) to visualize collagens in ex vivo tissue sections using the photo-triggered caged CMPs. To achieve effective hybridization and successful in vivo and ex vivo imaging, fluorescently labeled caged CMPs are either photo-activated immediately before intravenous injection, or are directly activated on tissue sections. Normal skeletal collagen remolding in nude mice and collagens in prefixed mouse cornea tissue sections are imaged in this procedure. The imaging method based on the CMP-collagen hybridization technology presented here could lead to deeper understanding of the tissue remodeling process, as well as allow development of new diagnostics for diseases associated with high collagen remodeling activity. PMID:24513868

  5. Stable isotope-labeled collagen: a novel and versatile tool for quantitative collagen analyses using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taga, Yuki; Kusubata, Masashi; Ogawa-Goto, Kiyoko; Hattori, Shunji

    2014-08-01

    Collagens are the most abundant proteins in animals and are involved in many physiological/pathological events. Although various methods have been used to quantify collagen and its post-translational modifications (PTMs) over the years, it is still difficult to accurately quantify type-specific collagen and minor collagen PTMs. We report a novel quantitative method targeting collagen using stable isotope-labeled collagen named "SI-collagen", which was labeled with isotopically heavy lysine, arginine, and proline in fibroblasts culture. We prepared highly labeled and purified SI-collagen for use as an internal standard in mass spectrometric analysis, particularly for a new approach using amino acid hydrolysis. Our method enabled accurate collagen analyses, including quantification of (1) type-specific collagen (types I and III in this paper), (2) total collagen, and (3) collagen PTMs by LC-MS with high sensitivity. SI-collagen is also applicable to other diverse analyses of collagen and can be a powerful tool for various studies, such as detailed investigation of collagen-related disorders.

  6. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment targeting tumors with a collagen-rich extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hui; Li, Xiaoran; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Shi, Jiajia; Shen, He; Zhang, Zhijun; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors over-express collagen, which constitutes the physical scaffold of tumor microenvironment. Collagen has been considered to be a target for cancer therapy. The collagen-binding domain (CBD) is a short peptide, which could bind to collagen and achieve the sustained release of CBD-fused proteins in collagen scaffold. Here, a collagen-binding EGFR antibody fragment was designed and expressed for targeting the collagen-rich extracellular matrix in tumors. The antibody fragment (Fab) of cetuximab was fused with CBD (CBD-Fab) and expressed in Pichia pastoris. CBD-Fab maintained antigen binding and anti-tumor activity of cetuximab and obtained a collagen-binding ability in vitro. The results also showed CBD-Fab was mainly enriched in tumors and had longer retention time in tumors in A431 s.c. xenografts. Furthermore, CBD-Fab showed a similar therapeutic efficacy as cetuximab in A431 xenografts. Although CBD-Fab hasn’t showed better therapeutic effects than cetuximab, its smaller molecular and special target may be applicable as antibody–drug conjugates (ADC) or immunotoxins. PMID:26883295

  7. Hydroxyapatite-reinforced collagen tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Robert J.

    Scaffolds have been fabricated from a wide variety of materials and most have showed some success, either as bone graft substitutes or as tissue engineering scaffolds. However, all current scaffold compositions and architectures suffer from one or more flaws including poor mechanical properties, lack of biological response, nondegradability, or a scaffold architecture not conducive to osteointegration. Biomimetic approaches to scaffold design using the two main components of bone tissue, collagen and hydroxyapatite, resulted in scaffolds with superior biological properties but relatively poor mechanical properties and scaffold architecture. It was hypothesized that by optimizing scaffold composition and architecture, HA-collagen bone tissue engineering scaffolds could provide both an excellent biological response along with improved structural properties. The mechanical properties of freeze-dried HA-collagen scaffolds, the most common type of porous HA-collagen material, were first shown to be increased by the addition of HA reinforcements, but scaffold stiffness still fell far short of the desired range. Based on limitations inherent in the freeze-dried process, a new type of leached-porogen scaffold fabrication process was developed. Proof-of-concept scaffolds demonstrated the feasibility of producing leached-porogen HA-collagen materials, and the scaffold architecture was optimized though careful selection of porogen particle size and shape along with an improved crosslinking technique. The final scaffolds exhibited substantially increased compressive modulus compared to previous types HA-collagen scaffolds, while the porosity, pore size, and scaffold permeability were tailored to be suitable for bone tissue ingrowth. An in vitro study demonstrated the capacity of the leached-porogen scaffolds to serve as a substrate for the differentiation of osteoblasts and subsequent production of new bone tissue. The new leached-porogen scaffold HA-collagen scaffolds were

  8. Daily consumption of the collagen supplement Pure Gold Collagen® reduces visible signs of aging.

    PubMed

    Borumand, Maryam; Sibilla, Sara

    2014-01-01

    With age, changes in the metabolic processes of structural components of the skin lead to visible signs of aging, such as increased dryness and wrinkle formation. The nutritional supplement, Pure Gold Collagen(®), which consists of hydrolyzed collagen, hyaluronic acid, vitamins, and minerals, was developed to counteract these signs. An open-label study was conducted to investigate the effects of this nutritional supplement on skin properties. Supplementation with 50 mL of Pure Gold Collagen on a daily basis for 60 days led to a noticeable reduction in skin dryness, wrinkles, and nasolabial fold depth. In addition, a significant increase in collagen density and skin firmness was observed after 12 weeks. The data from this study suggest that Pure Gold Collagen can counteract signs of natural aging.

  9. Plasma clot-promoting effect of collagen in relation to collagen-platelet interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, P.A.; Schneider, M.D.; Miller, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    The hemostatic function of several acid-soluble collagen preparations and a fibrillar-form collagen preparation have been compared. Pepsin-treated acid-soluble collagen isolated from burro and horse aortic tissue and acid-soluble colagen isolated from human umbilical cord readily promoted platelet aggregation, but failed to activate the coagulation mechanism even after prolonged incubation with plasma at 37 C. By contrast, fibrillar-form collagen isolated from burro aorta was both an efficient stimulant for the induction of platelet aggregation and a potent clot-promoting agent. Similar results were found for all the collagen preparations irrespective of whether the studies were conducted with sheep or with burro plasma. Heat denaturation studies showed that the hemostatic functon of the fibrillar-form colagen was dependent on an intact tirple-helical structure.

  10. Daily consumption of the collagen supplement Pure Gold Collagen® reduces visible signs of aging

    PubMed Central

    Borumand, Maryam; Sibilla, Sara

    2014-01-01

    With age, changes in the metabolic processes of structural components of the skin lead to visible signs of aging, such as increased dryness and wrinkle formation. The nutritional supplement, Pure Gold Collagen®, which consists of hydrolyzed collagen, hyaluronic acid, vitamins, and minerals, was developed to counteract these signs. An open-label study was conducted to investigate the effects of this nutritional supplement on skin properties. Supplementation with 50 mL of Pure Gold Collagen on a daily basis for 60 days led to a noticeable reduction in skin dryness, wrinkles, and nasolabial fold depth. In addition, a significant increase in collagen density and skin firmness was observed after 12 weeks. The data from this study suggest that Pure Gold Collagen can counteract signs of natural aging. PMID:25342893

  11. Lipoid proteinosis: an inherited disorder of collagen metabolism?

    PubMed

    Harper, J I; Duance, V C; Sims, T J; Light, N D

    1985-08-01

    The dermal collagen of a patient with lipoid proteinosis was investigated by immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis. The affected skin was found to contain significantly less collagen per unit dry weight than normal dermis but showed elevated levels of type 3 collagen with respect to type I. Purification of collagen types from affected skin after pepsin digestion showed no novel forms, but a doubling in the yield of type 5 collagen. These results correlated well with those of immunohistochemistry which showed a patchy, diffuse, widely distributed type 3 collagen and an increase in types 4 and 5 collagens associated with 'onion skin' endothelial basement membrane thickening. Estimation of collagen cross-links showed an abnormal pattern with a preponderance of the keto-imine form not normally associated with skin. These results strongly suggest that lipoid proteinosis involves a primary perturbation of collagen metabolism.

  12. Lipoid proteinosis: an inherited disorder of collagen metabolism?

    PubMed

    Harper, J I; Duance, V C; Sims, T J; Light, N D

    1985-08-01

    The dermal collagen of a patient with lipoid proteinosis was investigated by immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis. The affected skin was found to contain significantly less collagen per unit dry weight than normal dermis but showed elevated levels of type 3 collagen with respect to type I. Purification of collagen types from affected skin after pepsin digestion showed no novel forms, but a doubling in the yield of type 5 collagen. These results correlated well with those of immunohistochemistry which showed a patchy, diffuse, widely distributed type 3 collagen and an increase in types 4 and 5 collagens associated with 'onion skin' endothelial basement membrane thickening. Estimation of collagen cross-links showed an abnormal pattern with a preponderance of the keto-imine form not normally associated with skin. These results strongly suggest that lipoid proteinosis involves a primary perturbation of collagen metabolism. PMID:3896292

  13. Identification and characterization of enolase as a collagen-binding protein in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Salzillo, Marzia; Vastano, Valeria; Capri, Ugo; Muscariello, Lidia; Sacco, Margherita; Marasco, Rosangela

    2015-07-01

    Collagen is a target of pathogens for adhesion, colonization, and invasion of host tissue. Probiotic bacteria can mimic the same mechanism as used by the pathogens in the colonization process, expressing cell surface proteins that specifically interact with extracellular matrix component proteins. The capability to bind collagen is expressed by several Lactobacillus isolates, including some Lactobacillus plantarum strains. In this study we report the involvement of the L. plantarum EnoA1 alfa-enolase in type I collagen (CnI) binding. By adhesion assays, we show that the mutant strain LM3-CC1, carrying a null mutation in the enoA1 gene, binds to immobilized collagen less efficiently than wild type strain. CnI overlay assay and Elisa tests, performed on the purified EnoA1, show that this protein can bind collagen both under denaturing and native conditions. By using truncated recombinant enolase proteins, we also show that the region spanning from 73rd to the 140th amino acid residues is involved in CnI binding.

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibition downregulates collagen 3A1 in fibrotic lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Liu, Hui; Hock, Thomas; Thannickal, Victor J; Sanders, Yan Y

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a deadly disease characterized by chronic inflammation and excessive collagen accumulation in the lung. Myofibroblasts are the primary collagen-producing cells in pulmonary fibrosis. Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) can affect gene expression, and some, such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), are US FDA approved for cancer treatment. In this study, we investigated SAHA's effects on the expression of collagen III alpha 1 (COL3A1) in primary human IPF fibroblasts and in a murine model of pulmonary fibrosis. We observed that increased COL3A1 expression in IPF fibroblasts can be substantially reduced by SAHA treatment at the level of transcription as detected by RT-PCR; collagen III protein level was also reduced, as detected by Western blots and immunofluorescence. The deacetylation inhibitor effect of SAHA was verified by observing higher acetylation levels of both histone H3 and H4 in treated IPF cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments demonstrated that the reduced expression of COL3A1 by SAHA is with increased association of the repressive chromatin marker, H3K27Me3, and decreased association of the active chromatin marker, H3K9Ac. In our murine model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, the SAHA treated group demonstrated significantly less collagen III, as detected by immunohistochemistry. Our data indicate that the HDACi SAHA alters the chromatin associated with COL3A1, resulting in its decreased expression. PMID:24084714

  15. Collagen-functionalised titanium surfaces for biological sealing of dental implants: effect of immobilisation process on fibroblasts response.

    PubMed

    Marín-Pareja, Nathalia; Salvagni, Emiliano; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Aparicio, Conrado; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2014-10-01

    The clinical success of a dental implant requires not only an optimum osseointegration, but also the development of a biological sealing; i.e., a soft tissue seal around the transmucosal part of the implant. A promising approach to improve the biological seal of dental implants is the biomimetic modification of titanium surfaces with proteins or peptides that have specific cell-binding moieties. In this work we investigated the process of immobilising collagen on smooth and rough titanium surfaces and its effect on human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cell response. Titanium samples were activated by either oxygen plasma or acid etching to generate a smooth or nanorough surface, respectively. Subsequently, collagen grafting was achieved by either physisorption or covalent bonding through organosilane chemistry. The biofunctionalised titanium samples were then tested for stability and characterised by fluorescent labelling, wettability, OWLS and XPS studies. Biological characterisation was also performed through HDF adhesion, proliferation and gene expression. Covalent-bonded collagen showed higher stability than physisorbed collagen. A significant overexpression of the genes involved in fibroblast activation and extracellular matrix remodelling was observed in the collagen-coated surfaces. This effect was more pronounced on smooth than on rough surfaces. Immobilised collagen on the smooth plasma-treated surfaces favoured both fibroblast adhesion and activation. This study provides essential information for the design of implants with optimal biological sealing, a key aspect to avoid peri-implantitis and ensure long-lasting implant fixation.

  16. Collagenous colitis: new diagnostic possibilities with endomicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A.; Goetz, M.; Biesterfeld, S.; Galle, P. R.; Neurath, M. F.; Kiesslich, R.

    2006-02-01

    Collagenous colitis is a kind of microscopic colitis. It is characterized by chronic watery diarrhea and abdominal pain. The etiology is still unknown. So far, for the diagnose a histological evaluation was necessary with the presence of thickened subepithelial collagneous bands in the lamina propria. A new developed endoscope with a confocal laser allows analysing cellular and subcellular details of the mucosal layer at high resolution in vivo. In this case report we describe for the first time to diagnose collagenous colitis during ongoing colonoscopy by using this confocal endomicroscopy. In a 67 year old female patient with typical symptoms the characteristic histological changes could be identified in the endomicroscopic view. Biopsies could be targeted to affected areas and endomicroscopic prediction of the presence of collagenous bands could be confirmed in all targeted biopsies. First endomicroscopic experience in microscopic colitis could be confirmed in four additional patients. Future prospective studies are warranted to further evaluate these initial findings. However, collagenous colitis is frequently missed and endomicroscopy seems to be the ideal tool for accurate diagnosing collagenous colitis during ongoing endoscopy.

  17. New recommendations for measuring collagen solubility.

    PubMed

    Latorre, María E; Lifschitz, Adrian L; Purslow, Peter P

    2016-08-01

    The heat-solubility of intramuscular collagen is usually conducted in 1/4 Ringer's solution at pH7.4, despite this ionic strength and pH being inappropriate for post-rigor meat. The current work studied the percentage of soluble collagen and hydrothermal isometric tension characteristics of perimysial strips on bovine semitendinosus muscles in either 1/4 Ringer's solution, distilled water, PBS, or a solution of the same salt concentration as 1/4 Ringer's but at pH5.6. Values of % soluble collagen were lower at pH7.4 than 5.6. Increasing ionic strength reduced % soluble collagen. The maximum perimysial isometric tension was independent of the bathing medium, but the percent relaxation was higher at pH7.4 than at pH5.6, and increased with ionic strength of the media. It is recommended that future measurements of collagen solubility and tests on connective tissue components of post-rigor meat should be carried out in a solution of concentrations NaCl and KCl equivalent to those in 1/4 Ringer's, but at pH5.6, a pH relevant to post-rigor meat. PMID:27057755

  18. Collagen degrading activity associated with Mycobacterium species

    PubMed Central

    Masso, F; Paez, A; Varela, E; d Diaz; Zenteno, E; Montano, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis penetration into tissues is poorly understood but it is reasonable to assume that there is a contribution from proteases capable of disrupting the extracellular matrix of the pulmonary epithelium and the blood vessels. A study was undertaken to identify and characterise collagen degrading activity of M tuberculosis.
METHODS—Culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) was obtained from reference mycobacterial strains and mycobacteria isolated from patients with tuberculosis. The collagen degrading activity of CFPE was determined according to the method of Johnson-Wint using 3H-type I collagen. The enzyme was identified by the Birkedal-Hansen and Taylor method and its molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration chromatography using an electroelution purified enzyme.
RESULTS—CFPE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv showed collagenolytic activity that was four times higher than that of the avirulent strain H37Ra. The 75 kDa enzyme responsible was divalent cation dependent. Other mycobacterial species and those isolated from patients with tuberculosis also had collagen degrading activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Mycobacterium species possess a metalloprotease with collagen degrading activity. The highest enzymatic activity was found in the virulent reference strain H37Rv.

 PMID:10212111

  19. Collagenous gastritis: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Ravikumara, Madhur; Ramani, Pramila; Spray, Christine H

    2007-08-01

    In this article, we report a case of collagenous gastritis in a child and review the paediatric cases reported to date. Collagenous gastritis is a rare entity, with only less than 30 cases reported so far, including 12 children, since the first description of this entity by Colletti and Trainer in 1989. This is a histological diagnosis characterised by a dramatically thickened subepithelial collagen band in the gastric mucosa associated with an inflammatory infiltrate. Children with this condition often present with epigastric pain and severe anaemia, with no evidence of extragastric involvement, in contrast to the adult patients, where chronic watery diarrhoea is the main presentation due to associated collagenous colitis. A macroscopic pattern of gastritis with nodularity of gastric mucosa, erythema and erosions are characteristic endoscopic findings in paediatric patients. Specific therapy has not been established and resolution of the abnormalities, either endoscopic or histological, has not been documented. In conclusion, collagenous gastritis is a rare entity of unknown aetiology, pathogenesis and prognosis. Gastroenterologists and pathologists need to be aware of this condition when evaluating a child with epigastric pain, anaemia and upper gastrointestinal bleeding, particularly when endoscopy reveals the nodularity of gastric mucosa. The identification, reporting and long-term follow-up of cases will shed more light on this puzzling condition. PMID:17453238

  20. Expression of collagen and related growth factors in rat tendon and skeletal muscle in response to specific contraction types.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, K M; Olesen, J L; Haddad, F; Langberg, H; Kjaer, M; Baldwin, K M; Schjerling, P

    2007-08-01

    Acute exercise induces collagen synthesis in both tendon and muscle, indicating an adaptive response in the connective tissue of the muscle-tendon unit. However, the mechanisms of this adaptation, potentially involving collagen-inducing growth factors (such as transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-beta-1)), as well as enzymes related to collagen processing, are not clear. Furthermore, possible differential effects of specific contraction types on collagen regulation have not been investigated. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 4 days of concentric, eccentric or isometric training (n = 7-9 per group) of the medial gastrocnemius, by stimulation of the sciatic nerve. RNA was extracted from medial gastrocnemius and Achilles tendon tissue 24 h after the last training bout, and mRNA levels for collagens I and III, TGF-beta-1, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), lysyl oxidase (LOX), metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and -9) and their inhibitors (TIMP-1 and 2) were measured by Northern blotting and/or real-time PCR. In tendon, expression of TGF-beta-1 and collagens I and III (but not CTGF) increased in response to all types of training. Similarly, enzymes/factors involved in collagen processing were induced in tendon, especially LOX (up to 37-fold), which could indicate a loading-induced increase in cross-linking of tendon collagen. In skeletal muscle, a similar regulation of gene expression was observed, but in contrast to the tendon response, the effect of eccentric training was significantly greater than the effect of concentric training on the expression of several transcripts. In conclusion, the study supports an involvement of TGF-beta-1 in loading-induced collagen synthesis in the muscle-tendon unit and importantly, it indicates that muscle tissue is more sensitive than tendon to the specific mechanical stimulus.

  1. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  2. Regional differences in water content, collagen content, and collagen degradation in the cervix of nonpregnant cows.

    PubMed

    Breeveld-Dwarkasing, V N A; de Boer-Brouwer, M; te Koppele, J M; Bank, R A; van der Weijden, G C; Taverne, M A M; van Dissel-Emiliani, F M F

    2003-11-01

    The cow could be a suitable model for studies concerning functional changes of the cervix. However, as in many species, the bovine cervix becomes softer in texture during the follicular phase of the estrous cycle compared to the luteal phase. In the present study, we explored if changes in the collagen network take place that could be responsible for this phenomenon and if regional differences in water content, collagen content, and collagen degradation along the cross-sectional and longitudinal axes of the cervix were present. Two groups of nonpregnant animals with different progesterone status were studied. One group (n = 11) was under high progesterone influence, and the other group (n = 12) was under low progesterone influence. The water content was derived from the weight of the samples before and after lyophilization. The collagen content and the ratio of collagenous to noncollagenous proteins (hydroxyproline:proline ratio) were determined by performing amino acid analysis on hydrolyzed samples using high-performance liquid chromatography. Collagen denaturation was quantified with a colorimetric assay by determining the amount of hydroxyproline released from samples treated with alpha-chymotrypsine. The water content of the superficial layer of the submucosa was always significantly (P < 0.01) higher than the water content of the deep layer in the vaginal, mid, and uterine segments, but this was unrelated to the progesterone status of the animals. No effect of the tissue layers or of the progesterone status of the animals on the collagen content was observed, but an effect of segment was noted. The collagen content (mug/mg dry wt) in the vaginal segment of the cervix was significantly higher than in the mid (P < 0.05) and the uterine (P < 0.01) segments. The hydroxyproline:proline ratio showed the same pattern as the collagen content. The percentage of collagen denaturation in the superficial layer was always significantly (P < 0.01) higher than that in the

  3. Enhanced osteoprogenitor elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by bioactive glass ionic silicon dependent on Sp7 (osterix) transcription.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Venu G; Odatsu, Tetsurou; Bishop, Timothy; Chang, Joyce; Owyoung, Jeremy; Loomer, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive glasses release ions, those enhance osteoblast collagen matrix synthesis and osteogenic marker expression during bone healing. Collagen matrix density and osteogenic marker expression depend on osteogenic transcription factors, (e.g., Osterix (OSX)). We hypothesize that enhanced expression and formation of collagen by Si(4+) depends on enhanced expression of OSX transcription. Experimental bioactive glass (6P53-b) and commercial Bioglass(TM) (45S5) were dissolved in basal medium to make glass conditioned medium (GCM). ICP-MS analysis was used to measure bioactive glass ion release rates. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured for 20 days, and gene expression and extracellular matrix collagen formation was analyzed. In a separate study, siRNA was used to determine the effect of OSX knockdown on impacting the effect of Si(4+) on osteogenic markers and matrix collagen formation. Each bioactive glass exhibited similar ion release rates for all ions, except Mg(2+) released by 6P53-b. Gene expression results showed that GCM markedly enhanced many osteogenic markers, and 45S5 GCM showed higher levels of expression and collagen matrix fiber bundle density than 6P53-b GCM. Upon knockdown of OSX transcription, collagen type 5, alkaline phosphatase, and matrix density were not enhanced as compared to wild type cells. This study illustrates that the enhancement of elongated collagen fiber matrix formation by Si(±) depends on OSX transcription. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2604-2615, 2016. PMID:27279631

  4. On the Collagen Mineralization. A Review

    PubMed Central

    TOMOAIA, GHEORGHE; PASCA, ROXANA-DIANA

    2015-01-01

    Collagen mineralization (CM) is a challenging process that has received a lot of attention in the past years. Among the reasons for this interest, the key role is the importance of collagen and hydroxyapatite in natural bone, as major constituents. Different protocols of mineralization have been developed, specially using simulated body fluid (SBF) and many methods have been used to characterize the systems obtained, starting with methods of determining the mineral content (XRD, FTIR, Raman, High-Resolution Spectral Ultrasound Imaging), continuing with imaging methods (AFM, TEM, SEM, Fluorescence Microscopy), thermal analysis (DSC and TGA), evaluation of the mechanical and biological properties, including statistical methods and molecular modeling. In spite of the great number of studies regarding collagen mineralization, its mechanism, both in vivo and in vitro, is not completely understood. Some of the methods used in vitro and investigation methods are reviewed here. PMID:26528042

  5. Regulation of collagen synthesis by ascorbic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Murad, S; Grove, D; Lindberg, K A; Reynolds, G; Sivarajah, A; Pinnell, S R

    1981-01-01

    After prolonged exposure to ascorbate, collagen synthesis in cultured human skin fibroblasts increased approximately 8-fold with no significant change in synthesis of noncollagen protein. This effect of ascorbate appears to be unrelated to its cofactor function in collagen hydroxylation. The collagenous protein secreted in the absence of added ascorbate was normal in hydroxylysine but was mildly deficient in hydroxyproline. In parallel experiments, lysine hydroxylase (peptidyllysine, 2-oxoglutarate:oxygen 5-oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.11.4) activity increased 3-fold in response to ascorbate administration whereas proline hydroxylase (prolyl-glycyl-peptide, 2-oxoglutarate:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.11.2) activity decreased considerably. These results suggest that collage polypeptide synthesis, posttranslational hydroxylations, and activities of the two hydroxylases are independently regulated by ascorbate. PMID:6265920

  6. Physical crosslinkings of edible collagen casing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhang; Zhang, Yi; Ye, Ran; Ni, Yonghao

    2015-11-01

    Although edible collagen casing has been commercially used in meat industry, the safety and effectiveness of collagen cross-linking with minimally invasive treatments are still big concerns for manufacturers. In this study, ultraviolet irradiation (UV) and dehydrothermal treatment (DHT) were used to improve the properties of casing. UV, DHT, and their combination (UV+DHT) significantly increased tensile strength and decreased elongation at break of casing, in which DHT showed the best performance. Swelling of casing was also partially inhibited by the treatments. Furthermore, UV and DHT slightly improved thermal stability of the casings. In addition, X-ray diffraction patterns showed the treatments caused different extents of denaturation of collagen. No obvious effects in thickness and light transparency except for surface roughness were observed in the treated casings. The physical treatments could potentially be used as safe and effective alternatives to chemical cross-linking for the production of collage casing.

  7. Biomimetic silicification of demineralized hierarchical collagenous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ryou, Heonjune; Diogenes, Anibal; Yiu, Cynthia K.Y.; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Chen, Ji-hua; Arola, Dwayne D.; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike man-made composite materials, natural biominerals containing composites usually demonstrate different levels of sophisticated hierarchical structures which are responsible for their mechanical properties and other metabolic functions. However, the complex spatial organizations of the organic-inorganic phases are far beyond what they be achieved by contemporary engineering techniques. Here, we demonstrate that carbonated apatite present in collagen matrices derived from fish scale and bovine bone may be replaced by amorphous silica, using an approach that simulates what is utilized by phylogenetically ancient glass sponges. The structural hierarchy of these collagen-based biomaterials is replicated by the infiltration and condensation of fluidic polymer-stabilized silicic acid precursors within the intrafibrillar milieu of type I collagen fibrils. This facile biomimetic silicification strategy may be used for fabricating silica-based, three-dimensional functional materials with specific morphological and hierarchical requirements. PMID:23586938

  8. Biomimetic silicification of demineralized hierarchical collagenous tissues.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-na; Jiao, Kai; Ryou, Heonjune; Diogenes, Anibal; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Chen, Ji-hua; Arola, Dwayne D; Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2013-05-13

    Unlike man-made composite materials, natural biominerals containing composites usually demonstrate different levels of sophisticated hierarchical structures which are responsible for their mechanical properties and other metabolic functions. However, the complex spatial organizations of the organic-inorganic phases are far beyond what they achieved by contemporary engineering techniques. Here, we demonstrate that carbonated apatite present in collagen matrices derived from fish scale and bovine bone may be replaced by amorphous silica, using an approach that simulates what is utilized by phylogenetically ancient glass sponges. The structural hierarchy of these collagen-based biomaterials is replicated by the infiltration and condensation of fluidic polymer-stabilized silicic acid precursors within the intrafibrillar milieu of type I collagen fibrils. This facile biomimetic silicification strategy may be used for fabricating silica-based, three-dimensional functional materials with specific morphological and hierarchical requirements.

  9. Collagenous gastritis in the pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Rosell-Camps, Antonio; Riera-Llodrá, Joana María; Colom-Segui, Marina; Zibetti, Sara; Amengual-Antich, Isabel

    2015-05-01

    Collagenous gastritis (CG) is an uncommon condition known in the pediatric age. It is characterized by the presence of subepithelial collagen bands (> 10 microm) associated with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the stomach's lamina propria. Symptoms manifested by patients with CG may be common with many other disorders. It typically manifests with epigastralgia, vomiting, and iron deficiency during pre-adolescence. This condition's pathophysiology remains unclear. In contrast to adults, where association with collagenous colitis and other autoimmune conditions is more common, pediatric involvement is usually confined to the stomach. Drugs of choice include proton pump inhibitors and corticoids. A case is reported of a 12-year-old girl with abdominal pain and ferritin deficiency who was diagnosed with CG based on gastric biopsy and experienced a favorable outcome. PMID:25952808

  10. Genetic elimination of α3(IV) collagen fails to rescue anti-collagen B cells

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Amy G.; Mackin, Katherine M.; Foster, Mary H.

    2011-01-01

    Organ deposition of autoantibodies against the noncollagenous-1 domain of the α3 chain of type IV collagen leads to severe kidney and lung injury in anti-glomerular basement membrane disease. The origin and regulation of these highly pathogenic autoantibodies remains unknown. Anti-α3(IV) collagen B lymphocytes are predicted to mature in vivo ignorant of target antigen because α3(IV) collagen expression is highly tissue restricted and pathogenic epitopes are cryptic. However, a recent analysis of an anti-α3(IV)NC1 collagen autoantibody transgenic mouse model revealed that developing B cells are rapidly silenced by deletion and editing in the bone marrow. To dissect the role of collagen as central tolerogen in this model, we determined B cell fate in autoantibody transgenic mice genetically lacking α3(IV) collagen. We found that absence of the tissue target autoantigen has little impact on the fate of anti-α3(IV)NC1 B cells. This implies a more complex regulatory mechanism for preventing anti-glomerular basement membrane disease than has been previously considered, including the possibility that a second antigen present in bone marrow engages and tolerizes anti-α3(IV)NC1 collagen B cells. PMID:21963654

  11. Reprogramming cellular phenotype by soft collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Ali, M Yakut; Chuang, Chih-Yuan; Saif, M Taher A

    2014-11-28

    A variety of cell types exhibit phenotype changes in response to the mechanical stiffness of the substrate. Many cells excluding neurons display an increase in the spread area, actin stress fiber formation and larger focal adhesion complexes as substrate stiffness increases in a sparsely populated culture. Cell proliferation is also known to directly correlate with these phenotype changes/changes in substrate stiffness. Augmented spreading and proliferation on stiffer substrates require nuclear transcriptional regulator YAP (Yes associated protein) localization in the cell nucleus and is tightly coupled to larger traction force generation. In this study, we show that different types of fibroblasts can exhibit spread morphology, well defined actin stress fibers, and larger focal adhesions even on very soft collagen gels (modulus in hundreds of Pascals) as if they are on hard glass substrates (modulus in GPa, several orders of magnitude higher). Strikingly, we show, for the first time, that augmented spreading and other hard substrate cytoskeleton architectures on soft collagen gels are not correlated with the cell proliferation pattern and do not require YAP localization in the cell nucleus. Finally, we examine the response of human colon carcinoma (HCT-8) cells on soft collagen gels. Recent studies show that human colon carcinoma (HCT-8) cells form multicellular clusters by 2-3 days when cultured on soft polyacrylamide (PA) gels with a wide range of stiffness (0.5-50 kPa) and coated with an extracellular matrix, ECM (collagen monomer/fibronectin). These clusters show limited spreading/wetting on PA gels, form 3D structures at the edges, and eventually display a remarkable, dissociative metastasis like phenotype (MLP), i.e., epithelial to rounded morphological transition after a week of culture on PA gels only, but not on collagen monomer coated stiff polystyrene/glass where they exhibit enhanced wetting and form confluent monolayers. Here, we show that HCT-8 cell

  12. Ordered collagen membranes: production and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ruderman, G; Mogilner, I G; Tolosa, E J; Massa, N; Garavaglia, M; Grigera, J R

    2012-01-01

    A collagen membrane with microscopic order is presented. The membranes were produced with acid-soluble collagen, using two different methods to obtain orientation. The product was characterized by mean of UV and IR spectra, scanning electronic microscopy, optical microscopy and laser diffractometry. The results clearly show a high level of order in the membranes obtained by both techniques. Permeability for rifamycin, ascorbic acid and NaCl was also measured. Due to the characteristics of the membranes, they have a potential application for treatment of surface injuries.

  13. Collagen Type I Improves the Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells towards Definitive Endoderm

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Camilla Holzmann; Petersen, Dorthe Roenn; Moeller, Jonas Bech

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the ability to generate all cell types in the body and can potentially provide an unlimited source of cells for cell replacement therapy to treat degenerative diseases such as diabetes. Current differentiation protocols of human embryonic stem cells towards insulin producing beta cells focus on soluble molecules whereas the impact of cell-matrix interactions has been mainly unattended. In this study almost 500 different extracellular matrix protein combinations were screened to systemically identify extracellular matrix proteins that influence differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to the definitive endoderm lineage. The percentage of definitive endoderm cells after differentiation on collagen I and fibronectin was >85% and 65%, respectively. The cells on collagen I substrates displayed different morphology and gene expression during differentiation as assessed by time lapse studies compared to cells on the other tested substrates. Global gene expression analysis showed that cells differentiated on collagen I were largely similar to cells on fibronectin after completed differentiation. Collectively, the data suggest that collagen I induces a more rapid and consistent differentiation of stem cells to definitive endoderm. The results shed light on the importance of extracellular matrix proteins for differentiation and also points to a cost effective and easy method to improve differentiation. PMID:26713616

  14. A collagenous protective coat enables Metarhizium anisopliae to evade insect immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengshu; St. Leger, Raymond J.

    2006-01-01

    The ubiquitous fungal pathogen Metarhizium anisopliae kills a wide range of insects. Host hemocytes can recognize and ingest its conidia, but this capacity is lost on production of hyphal bodies. We show that the unusual ability of hyphal bodies to avoid detection depends on a gene (Mcl1) that is expressed within 20 min of the pathogen contacting hemolymph. A mutant disrupted in Mcl1 is rapidly attacked by hemocytes and shows a corresponding reduction of virulence to Manduca sexta. Mcl1 encodes a three domain protein comprising a hydrophilic, negatively charged N-terminal region with 14 cysteine residues, a central region comprising tandem repeats (GXY) characteristic of collagenous domains, and a C-terminal region that includes a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-dependent cell wall attachment site. Immunofluorescence assay showed that hyphal bodies are covered by the N-terminal domains of MCL1. The collagen domain became antibody accessible after treatment with DTT, suggesting that the N termini are linked by interchain disulfide bonds and are presented on the cell surface by extended collagenous fibers. Studies with staining reagents and hemocyte monolayers showed that MCL1 functions as an antiadhesive protective coat because it masks antigenic structural components of the cell wall such as β-glucans, and because its hydrophilic negatively charged nature makes it unattractive to hemocytes. A survey of 54 fungal genomes revealed that seven other species have proteins with collagenous domains suggesting that MCL1 is a member of a patchily distributed gene family. PMID:16614065

  15. 3D in vitro bioengineered tumors based on collagen I hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Szot, Christopher S.; Buchanan, Cara F.; Freeman, Joseph W.; Rylander, Marissa N.

    2011-01-01

    Cells cultured within a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro environment have the ability to acquire phenotypes and respond to stimuli analogous to in vivo biological systems. This approach has been utilized in tissue engineering and can also be applied to the development of a physiologically relevant in vitro tumor model. In this study, collagen I hydrogels cultured with MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were bioengineered as a platform for in vitro solid tumor development. The cell–cell and cell-matrix interactions present during in vivo tissue progression were encouraged within the 3D hydrogel architecture, and the biocompatibility of collagen I supported unconfined cellular proliferation. The development of necrosis beyond a depth of ~150–200 μm and the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α were demonstrated in the in vitro bioengineered tumors. Oxygen and nutrient diffusion limitations through the collagen I matrix as well as competition for available nutrients resulted in growing levels of intra-cellular hypoxia, quantified by a statistically significant (p < 0.01) upregulation of HIF-1α gene expression. The bioengineered tumors also demonstrated promising angiogenic potential with a statistically significant (p < 0.001) upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A gene expression. In addition, comparable gene expression analysis demonstrated a statistically significant increase of HIF-1α (p < 0.05) and VEGF-A (p < 0.001) by MDA-MB-231 cells cultured in the 3D collagen I hydrogels compared to cells cultured in a monolayer on two-dimensional tissue culture polystyrene. The results presented in this study demonstrate the capacity of collagen I hydrogels to facilitate the development of 3D in vitro bioengineered tumors that are representative of the pre-vascularized stages of in vivo solid tumor progression. PMID:21782234

  16. Novel chitosan/collagen scaffold containing transforming growth factor-{beta}1 DNA for periodontal tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yufeng; Cheng Xiangrong . E-mail: Xiangrongcheng@hotmail.com; Wang Jiawei; Wang Yining; Shi Bin; Huang Cui; Yang Xuechao; Liu Tongjun

    2006-05-26

    The current rapid progression in tissue engineering and local gene delivery system has enhanced our applications to periodontal tissue engineering. In this study, porous chitosan/collagen scaffolds were prepared through a freeze-drying process, and loaded with plasmid and adenoviral vector encoding human transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1). These scaffolds were evaluated in vitro by analysis of microscopic structure, porosity, and cytocompatibility. Human periodontal ligament cells (HPLCs) were seeded in this scaffold, and gene transfection could be traced by green fluorescent protein (GFP). The expression of type I and type III collagen was detected with RT-PCR, and then these scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously into athymic mice. Results indicated that the pore diameter of the gene-combined scaffolds was lower than that of pure chitosan/collagen scaffold. The scaffold containing Ad-TGF-{beta}1 exhibited the highest proliferation rate, and the expression of type I and type III collagen up-regulated in Ad-TGF-{beta}1 scaffold. After implanted in vivo, EGFP-transfected HPLCs not only proliferated but also recruited surrounding tissue to grow in the scaffold. This study demonstrated the potential of chitosan/collagen scaffold combined Ad-TGF-{beta}1 as a good substrate candidate in periodontal tissue engineering.

  17. Fully automated, quantitative, noninvasive assessment of collagen fiber content and organization in thick collagen gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayan, Christopher; Levitt, Jonathan M.; Miller, Eric; Kaplan, David; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2009-05-01

    Collagen is the most prominent protein of human tissues. Its content and organization define to a large extent the mechanical properties of tissue as well as its function. Methods that have been used traditionally to visualize and analyze collagen are invasive, provide only qualitative or indirect information, and have limited use in studies that aim to understand the dynamic nature of collagen remodeling and its interactions with the surrounding cells and other matrix components. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging emerged as a promising noninvasive modality for providing high-resolution images of collagen fibers within thick specimens, such as tissues. In this article, we present a fully automated procedure to acquire quantitative information on the content, orientation, and organization of collagen fibers. We use this procedure to monitor the dynamic remodeling of collagen gels in the absence or presence of fibroblasts over periods of 12 or 14 days. We find that an adaptive thresholding and stretching approach provides great insight to the content of collagen fibers within SHG images without the need for user input. An additional feature-erosion and feature-dilation step is useful for preserving structure and noise removal in images with low signal. To quantitatively assess the orientation of collagen fibers, we extract the orientation index (OI), a parameter based on the power distribution of the spatial-frequency-averaged, two-dimensional Fourier transform of the SHG images. To measure the local organization of the collagen fibers, we access the Hough transform of small tiles of the image and compute the entropy distribution, which represents the probability of finding the direction of fibers along a dominant direction. Using these methods we observed that the presence and number of fibroblasts within the collagen gel significantly affects the remodeling of the collagen matrix. In the absence of fibroblasts, gels contract, especially during the first few

  18. Probing multiscale mechanics of collagen with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Marjan; Rezaei, Naghmeh; Lam, Norman H.; Altindal, Tuba; Wieczorek, Andrew; Forde, Nancy R.

    2013-09-01

    How the molecular structure of the structural, extracellular matrix protein collagen correlates with its mechanical properties at different hierarchical structural levels is not known. We demonstrate the utility of optical tweezers to probe collagen's mechanical response throughout its assembly hierarchy, from single molecule force-extension measurements through microrheology measurements on solutions of collagen molecules, collagen fibrillar gels and gelatin. These experiments enable the determination of collagen's flexibility, mechanics, and timescales and strengths of interaction at different levels of hierarchy, information critical to developing models of how collagen's physiological function and stability are influenced by its chemical composition. By investigating how the viscoelastic properties of collagen are affected by the presence of telopeptides, protein domains that strongly influence fibril formation, we demonstrate that these play a role in conferring transient elasticity to collagen solutions.

  19. Fish collagen is an important panallergen in the Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Akiyama, H; Huge, J; Kubota, H; Chikazawa, S; Satoh, T; Miyake, T; Uhara, H; Okuyama, R; Nakagawara, R; Aihara, M; Hamada-Sato, N

    2016-05-01

    Collagen was identified as a fish allergen in early 2000s. Although its allergenic potential has been suggested to be low, risks associated with collagen as a fish allergen have not been evaluated to a greater extent. In this study, we aimed to clarify the importance of collagen as a fish allergen. Our results showed that 50% of Japanese patients with fish allergy had immunoglobulin E (IgE) against mackerel collagen, whereas 44% had IgE against mackerel parvalbumin. IgE inhibition assay revealed high cross-reactivity of mackerel collagen to 22 fish species (inhibition rates: 87-98%). Furthermore, a recently developed allergy test demonstrated that collagen triggered IgE cross-linking on mast cells. These data indicate that fish collagen is an important and very common panallergen in fish consumed in Japan. The high rate of individuals' collagen allergy may be attributable to the traditional Japanese custom of raw fish consumption. PMID:26785247

  20. Visualisation of newly synthesised collagen in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Oostendorp, Corien; Uijtdewilligen, Peter J.E.; Versteeg, Elly M.; Hafmans, Theo G.; van den Bogaard, Ellen H.; de Jonge, Paul K.J.D.; Pirayesh, Ali; Von den Hoff, Johannes W.; Reichmann, Ernst; Daamen, Willeke F.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying collagen produced de novo by cells in a background of purified collagenous biomaterials poses a major problem in for example the evaluation of tissue-engineered constructs and cell biological studies to tumor dissemination. We have developed a universal strategy to detect and localize newly deposited collagen based on its inherent association with dermatan sulfate. The method is applicable irrespective of host species and collagen source. PMID:26738984

  1. Characterization of pepsin-solubilized bovine heart-valve collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Bashey, R I; Bashey, H M; Jimenez, S A

    1978-01-01

    Collagens extracted from heart valves by using limited pepsin digestion were fractionated by differential salt precipitation. Collagen types were identified by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, amino acid analysis and cleavage with CNBr. Heart-valve collagen was heterogeneous in nature, consisting of a mixture of type-I and type-III collagens. The identity of type-III collagen was established on the basis of (a) insolubility in 1.7 M-NaC1 at neutral pH, (b) behaviour of this collagen fraction on gel electrophoresis under reducing and non-reducing conditions, (c) amino acid analysis showing a hydroxyproline/proline ratio greater than 1, and (d) profile of CNBr peptides on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis showing a peak characteristic for type-III collagen containing peptides alpha1(III)CB8 and alpha1(III)CB3. In addition to types-I and -III collagen, a collagen polypeptide not previously described in heart valves was identified. This polypeptide represented approx. 30% of the collagen fraction precipitated at 4.0 M-NaCl, it migrated between beta- and alpha1-collagen chains on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and its electrophoretic behaviour was not affected by disulphide-bond reduction. All collagen fractions from the heart valves contained increased amounts of hydroxylysine when compared with type-I and -III collagens from other tissues. The presence of beta- and gamma-chains and higher aggregates in pepsin-solubilized collagen indicated that these collagens were highly cross-linked and suggested that some of these cross-links involved the triple-helical regions of the molecule. It is likely that the higher hydroxylysine content of heart-valve collagen is responsible for the high degree of intermolecular cross-linking and may be the result of an adaptive mechanism for the specialized function of these tissues. Images Fig. 5. PMID:361035

  2. Collagen fibril diameter and leather strength.

    PubMed

    Wells, Hannah C; Edmonds, Richard L; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen T; Haverkamp, Richard G

    2013-11-27

    The main structural component of leather and skin is type I collagen in the form of strong fibrils. Strength is an important property of leather, and the way in which collagen contributes to the strength is not fully understood. Synchrotron-based small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to measure the collagen fibril diameter of leather from a range of animals, including sheep and cattle, that had a range of tear strengths. SAXS data were fit to a cylinder model. The collagen fibril diameter and tear strength were found to be correlated in bovine leather (r(2) = 0.59; P = 0.009), with stronger leather having thicker fibrils. There was no correlation between orientation index, i.e., fibril alignment, and fibril diameter for this data set. Ovine leather showed no correlation between tear strength and fibril diameter, nor was there a correlation across a selection of other animal leathers. The findings presented here suggest that there may be a different structural motif in skin compared with tendon, particularly ovine skin or leather, in which the diameter of the individual fibrils contributes less to strength than fibril alignment does.

  3. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases.

  4. Temporary granulomatous inflammation following collagen implantation.

    PubMed

    Heise, H; Zimmermann, R; Heise, P

    2001-08-01

    Injections of bovine collagen are a common procedure for correction of folds in the face. However, this therapy is not free from side effects. We present a patient in whom a granulomatous inflammation occurred following implantation of this material. We therefore now insist on an observation interval of 4 weeks between test injection and actual treatment, as is recommended by the manufacturer.

  5. Collagenous spherulosis. A comment on its histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Michal, M; Skálova, A

    1990-06-01

    Collagenous spherulosis is a benign breast lesion involving lobular acini and ductules consisting of eosinophilic spherules measuring up to 100 mu in diameter. It is a myoepithelial product. We described similar lesions in salivary gland tumors and a benign lymphoepithelial lesion of the parotid gland.

  6. Photodynamically crosslinked and chitosan-incorporated dentin collagen.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, A; Friedman, S; Kishen, A

    2011-11-01

    A lingering concern with restored root-filled teeth is the loss of structural integrity of the dentin and dentin-sealer interface over time. We hypothesized that crosslinking of dentin collagen with simultaneous incorporation of a biopolymer into collagen matrix would improve its structural stability. This study aimed to investigate the effects of combining chemical/photodynamic crosslinking of dentin collagen with the incorporation of carboxymethyl-chitosan (CMCS) on the resistance to enzymatic degradation and mechanical properties of dentin collagen. Ninety-six demineralized dentin collagen specimens (human, n = 72; and bovine, n = 24) were prepared and crosslinked chemically/ photodynamically, with/without CMCS. Glutaraldehyde and carbodiimides were used for chemical crosslinking, while rose Bengal activated with a non-coherent light (540 nm) at 20 J/cm(2) was applied for photodynamic crosslinking. The crosslinked human dentin collagen was subjected to chemical characterization, 7 days enzymatic degradation, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), while the bovine dentin collagen was used for tensile-testing. Crosslinked collagen showed significantly higher resistance to enzymatic degradation (p < 0.01), stable ultrastructure, and increased tensile strength (p < 0.05). Crosslinking CMCS with collagen matrix as observed in the TEM further improved the mechanical properties of dentin collagen (p < 0.01). This study highlighted the possibility of improving the resistance and toughness of dentin collagen by chemically/photodynamically crosslinking collagen matrix with CMCS.

  7. Spontaneous Gastric Perforation in a Case of Collagenous Gastritis.

    PubMed

    Appelman, Marly H; de Meij, Tim G J; Neefjes-Borst, E Andra; Kneepkens, C M F

    2016-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, both in children and adults. Symptoms vary depending on the extent of collagenous changes in the bowel. In most of the children, iron deficiency anemia and abdominal pain are the presenting symptoms. We present a 15-year-old boy with acute abdomen due to gastric perforation the cause of which was collagenous gastritis. PMID:26816680

  8. Urethral tissue regeneration using collagen scaffold modified with collagen binding VEGF in a beagle model.

    PubMed

    Jia, Weisheng; Tang, He; Wu, Jianjian; Hou, Xianglin; Chen, Bing; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Yannan; Shi, Chunying; Zhou, Feng; Yu, Wei; Huang, Shengquan; Ye, Gang; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-11-01

    Extensive urethral defects have a serious impact on quality of life, and treatment is challenging. A shortage of material for reconstruction is a key limitation. Improving the properties of biomaterials and making them suitable for urethral reconstruction will be helpful. Previously, we constructed a fusion protein, collagen-binding VEGF (CBD-VEGF), which can bind to collagen scaffold, stimulate cell proliferation, and promote angiogenesis and tissue regeneration. We proposed that CBD-VEGF could improve the performance of collagen in reconstruction of extensive urethral defects. Our results showed that collagen scaffolds modified with CBD-VEGF could promote urethral tissue regeneration and improve the function of the neo-urethra in a beagle extensive urethral defect model. Thus, modifying biomaterials with bioactive factors provides an alternative strategy for the production of suitable biomaterials for urethral reconstruction.

  9. Surface Chemistry of Nanoscale Mineralized Collagen Regulates Periodontal Ligament Stem Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Liu, Shuai; Cui, Sheng-Jie; Kou, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Xue-Dong; Liu, Xiao-Mo; Sun, Yue; Wang, Gao-Nan; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Yan-Heng

    2016-06-29

    The interplay between stem cells and their extracellular microenvironment is of critical importance to the stem cell-based therapeutics in regenerative medicine. Mineralized collagen is the main component of bone extracellular matrix, but the effect of interfacial properties of mineralized collagen on subsequent cellular behaviors is unclear. This study examined the role of surface chemistry of nanoscale mineralized collagen on human periodontal ligament stem cell (hPDLSC) fate decisions. The intrafibrillarly mineralized collagen (IMC), fabricated by a biomimetic bottom-up approach, showed a bonelike hierarchy with nanohydroxyapatites (HAs) periodically embedded within fibrils. The infrared spectrum of the IMC showed the presence of phosphate, carbonate, amide I and II bands; and infrared mapping displayed uniform and higher spatial distribution of mineralization in the IMC. However, the distribution of the phosphate group differed far from that of the amide I group in the extrafibrillarly mineralized collagen (EMC), in which flowerlike HA clusters randomly depositing around the surface of the fibrils. Moreover, a large quantity of extrafibrillar HAs covered up the C═O stretch and N-H in-plane bend, resulting in substantial reduction of amide I and II bands. Cell experiments demonstrated that the hPDLSCs seeded on the IMC exhibited a highly branched, osteoblast-like polygonal shape with extended pseudopodia and thick stress fiber formation; while cells on the EMC displayed a spindle shape with less branch points and thin actin fibril formation. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of EMC was much lower than that of IMC. Interestingly, even without osteogenic induction, mRNA levels of major osteogenic differentiation genes were highly expressed in the IMC during cultivation time. These data suggest that the IMC with a similar nanotopography and surface chemistry to natural mineralized collagen directs hPDLSCs toward osteoblast differentiation, providing a promising

  10. Surface Chemistry of Nanoscale Mineralized Collagen Regulates Periodontal Ligament Stem Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Liu, Shuai; Cui, Sheng-Jie; Kou, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Xue-Dong; Liu, Xiao-Mo; Sun, Yue; Wang, Gao-Nan; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Yan-Heng

    2016-06-29

    The interplay between stem cells and their extracellular microenvironment is of critical importance to the stem cell-based therapeutics in regenerative medicine. Mineralized collagen is the main component of bone extracellular matrix, but the effect of interfacial properties of mineralized collagen on subsequent cellular behaviors is unclear. This study examined the role of surface chemistry of nanoscale mineralized collagen on human periodontal ligament stem cell (hPDLSC) fate decisions. The intrafibrillarly mineralized collagen (IMC), fabricated by a biomimetic bottom-up approach, showed a bonelike hierarchy with nanohydroxyapatites (HAs) periodically embedded within fibrils. The infrared spectrum of the IMC showed the presence of phosphate, carbonate, amide I and II bands; and infrared mapping displayed uniform and higher spatial distribution of mineralization in the IMC. However, the distribution of the phosphate group differed far from that of the amide I group in the extrafibrillarly mineralized collagen (EMC), in which flowerlike HA clusters randomly depositing around the surface of the fibrils. Moreover, a large quantity of extrafibrillar HAs covered up the C═O stretch and N-H in-plane bend, resulting in substantial reduction of amide I and II bands. Cell experiments demonstrated that the hPDLSCs seeded on the IMC exhibited a highly branched, osteoblast-like polygonal shape with extended pseudopodia and thick stress fiber formation; while cells on the EMC displayed a spindle shape with less branch points and thin actin fibril formation. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of EMC was much lower than that of IMC. Interestingly, even without osteogenic induction, mRNA levels of major osteogenic differentiation genes were highly expressed in the IMC during cultivation time. These data suggest that the IMC with a similar nanotopography and surface chemistry to natural mineralized collagen directs hPDLSCs toward osteoblast differentiation, providing a promising

  11. The mechanism of hydralazine-induced collagen biosynthesis in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Karna, Ewa; Szoka, Lukasz; Palka, Jerzy A

    2013-04-01

    The finding that hydralazine (HYD) affects collagen metabolism led us to investigate the mechanism of its action on collagen biosynthesis, prolidase expression and activity, expression of α2β1 integrin, insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases (ERK1, ERK2), and transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and nuclear factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) in human dermal fibroblasts. Confluent fibroblasts were treated with micromolar concentrations (50-500 μM) of HYD for 24 h. HYD had no influence on cell viability. It was found that HYD-dependent increase in collagen biosynthesis was accompanied by a parallel increase in prolidase activity and expression, HIF-1α expression, and decrease in DNA biosynthesis, compared to untreated cells. Since collagen biosynthesis and prolidase activity are regulated by a signal induced by activated α2β1 integrin receptor as well as IGF-IR, the expression of these receptors was measured by Western immunoblot analysis. The exposure of the cells to HYD contributed to the increase in IGF-IR expression without any effect on α2β1 integrin receptor and FAK expressions. It was accompanied by a decrease in expression of MAP kinases and NF-κB p65, the known inhibitor of collagen gene expression. The data suggest that the HYD-dependent increase of collagen biosynthesis in cultured human skin fibroblasts results from activation of IGF-IR expression and prolidase activity and downregulation of NF-κB p65.

  12. Molecular Crowding of Collagen: A Pathway to Produce Highly-Organized Collagenous Structures

    PubMed Central

    Saeidi, Nima; Karmelek, Kathryn N.; Paten, Jeffrey. A; Zareian, Ramin; DiMasi, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Collagen in vertebrate animals is often arranged in alternating lamellae or in bundles of aligned fibrils which are designed to withstand in vivo mechanical loads. The formation of these organized structures is thought to result from a complex, large-area integration of individual cell motion and locally-controlled synthesis of fibrillar arrays via cell-surface fibripositors (direct matrix printing). The difficulty of reproducing such a process in vitro has prevented tissue engineers from constructing clinically useful load-bearing connective tissue directly from collagen. However, we and others have taken the view that long-range organizational information is potentially encoded into the structure of the collagen molecule itself, allowing the control of fibril organization to extend far from cell (or bounding) surfaces. We here demonstrate a simple, fast, cell-free method capable of producing highly-organized, anistropic collagen fibrillar lamellae de novo which persist over relatively long-distances (tens to hundreds of microns). Our approach to nanoscale organizational control takes advantage of the intrinsic physiochemical properties of collagen molecules by inducing collagen association through molecular crowding and geometric confinement. To mimic biological tissues which comprise planar, aligned collagen lamellae (e.g. cornea, lamellar bone or annulus fibrosus), type I collagen was confined to a thin, planar geometry, concentrated through molecular crowding and polymerized. The resulting fibrillar lamellae show a striking resemblance to native load-bearing lamellae in that the fibrils are small, generally aligned in the plane of the confining space and change direction en masse throughout the thickness of the construct. The process of organizational control is consistent with embryonic development where the bounded planar cell sheets produced by fibroblasts suggest a similar confinement/concentration strategy. Such a simple approach to nanoscale

  13. Ovine-Based Collagen Matrix Dressing: Next-Generation Collagen Dressing for Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Gregory; Liden, Brock; Schultz, Gregory; Yang, Qingping; Gibson, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Broad-spectrum metalloproteinase (MMP) reduction along with inherent aspects of an extracellular matrix (ECM) dressing can bring about improved wound healing outcomes and shorter treatment duration. Initial reports of clinical effectiveness of a new ovine-based collagen extracellular matrix (CECM) dressing demonstrate benefits in chronic wound healing. Recent Advances: CECM dressings are processed differently than oxidized regenerated cellulose/collagen dressings. CECM dressings consist primarily of collagens I and III arranged as native fibers that retain the three-dimensional architecture present in tissue ECM. As such, ovine-based ECM dressings represent a new generation of collagen dressings capable of impacting a broad spectrum of MMP excess known to be present in chronic wounds. Critical Issues: While MMPs are essential in normal healing, elevated presence of MMPs has been linked to wound failure. Collagen has been shown to reduce levels of MMPs, acting as a sacrificial substrate for excessive proteases in a chronic wound. Preserving collagen dressings in a more native state enhances bioactivity in terms of the ability to affect the chronic wound environment. Clinical observation and assessment may not be sufficient to identify a wound with elevated protease activity that can break down ECM, affect wound fibroblasts, and impair growth factor response. Future Directions: Collagen dressings that target broad-spectrum excessive MMP levels and can be applied early in the course of care may positively impact healing rates in difficult wounds. Next-generation collagen dressings offer broader MMP reduction capacity while providing a provisional dermal matrix or ECM. PMID:26858910

  14. Molecular crowding of collagen: a pathway to produce highly-organized collagenous structures.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Nima; Karmelek, Kathryn P; Paten, Jeffrey A; Zareian, Ramin; DiMasi, Elaine; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2012-10-01

    Collagen in vertebrate animals is often arranged in alternating lamellae or in bundles of aligned fibrils which are designed to withstand in vivo mechanical loads. The formation of these organized structures is thought to result from a complex, large-area integration of individual cell motion and locally-controlled synthesis of fibrillar arrays via cell-surface fibripositors (direct matrix printing). The difficulty of reproducing such a process in vitro has prevented tissue engineers from constructing clinically useful load-bearing connective tissue directly from collagen. However, we and others have taken the view that long-range organizational information is potentially encoded into the structure of the collagen molecule itself, allowing the control of fibril organization to extend far from cell (or bounding) surfaces. We here demonstrate a simple, fast, cell-free method capable of producing highly-organized, anistropic collagen fibrillar lamellae de novo which persist over relatively long-distances (tens to hundreds of microns). Our approach to nanoscale organizational control takes advantage of the intrinsic physiochemical properties of collagen molecules by inducing collagen association through molecular crowding and geometric confinement. To mimic biological tissues which comprise planar, aligned collagen lamellae (e.g. cornea, lamellar bone or annulus fibrosus), type I collagen was confined to a thin, planar geometry, concentrated through molecular crowding and polymerized. The resulting fibrillar lamellae show a striking resemblance to native load-bearing lamellae in that the fibrils are small, generally aligned in the plane of the confining space and change direction en masse throughout the thickness of the construct. The process of organizational control is consistent with embryonic development where the bounded planar cell sheets produced by fibroblasts suggest a similar confinement/concentration strategy. Such a simple approach to nanoscale

  15. Collagen studies in newborn rat kidneys with incomplete ureteric obstruction.

    PubMed

    Haralambous-Gasser, A; Chan, D; Walker, R G; Powell, H R; Becker, G J; Jones, C L

    1993-09-01

    Collagen studies in newborn rats with incomplete ureteric obstruction were performed to describe and quantify changes in collagen deposition resulting from urinary tract obstruction at an early developmental age. Incomplete ureteric obstruction was created in three-day-old rats by placing the left ureter in a tunnel formed by the psoas muscle, and sham-operated controls underwent a laparotomy. The rats were sacrificed at 10, 17, 24 or 31 days. Collagen types I, III, IV, and V were localized by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, the total collagen content of the kidney was quantitated using hydroxyproline analysis, and collagen types I and III were quantitated using cyanogen bromide (CNBr) peptide analysis. Increased immunofluorescent staining for all of the collagens was found in the diffusely widened medullary interstitium of the obstructed kidney, and more focally in the cortical interstitium. Collagen types I, III and V, but not collagen type IV, were also found in bands in the interstitium at the junction of the cortex with the medulla. Increased staining for collagen type IV was found in thickened and tortuous tubular basement membranes (TBM) of the obstructed kidneys. The total collagen content of the obstructed kidney was significantly increased compared to the amounts in both the contralateral kidneys and in the kidneys from sham-operated controls at 24 and 31 days of age (P < 0.01 in each case, Wilcoxon matched pairs rank sum test and Mann Whitney U-test, respectively). The amount of collagen in the kidneys correlated with the degree of hydronephrosis (Spearman correlation test, r = 0.78, P < 0.02). CNBr peptide analysis demonstrated that over 50% of the collagen in the normal neonatal rat kidney was collagen type I and approximately 25% was collagen type III. In the obstructed kidneys most of the collagen was also collagen type I and collagen type III, although the proportion of total collagen comprised by these collagen types was decreased compared

  16. Extracellular Protease Inhibition Alters the Phenotype of Chondrogenically Differentiating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in 3D Collagen Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Han, Sejin; Li, Yuk Yin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Matrix remodeling of cells is highly regulated by proteases and their inhibitors. Nevertheless, how would the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) be affected, when the balance of the matrix remodeling is disturbed by inhibiting matrix proteases, is incompletely known. Using a previously developed collagen microencapsulation platform, we investigated whether exposing chondrogenically differentiating MSCs to intracellular and extracellular protease inhibitors will affect the extracellular matrix remodeling and hence the outcomes of chondrogenesis. Results showed that inhibition of matrix proteases particularly the extracellular ones favors the phenotype of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage in chondrogenically differentiating hMSCs by upregulating type I collagen protein deposition and type II collagen gene expression without significantly altering the hypertrophic markers at gene level. This study suggests the potential of manipulating extracellular proteases to alter the outcomes of hMSC chondrogenesis, contributing to future development of differentiation protocols for fibrocartilage tissues for intervertebral disc and meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:26760956

  17. Extracellular Protease Inhibition Alters the Phenotype of Chondrogenically Differentiating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in 3D Collagen Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sejin; Li, Yuk Yin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Matrix remodeling of cells is highly regulated by proteases and their inhibitors. Nevertheless, how would the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) be affected, when the balance of the matrix remodeling is disturbed by inhibiting matrix proteases, is incompletely known. Using a previously developed collagen microencapsulation platform, we investigated whether exposing chondrogenically differentiating MSCs to intracellular and extracellular protease inhibitors will affect the extracellular matrix remodeling and hence the outcomes of chondrogenesis. Results showed that inhibition of matrix proteases particularly the extracellular ones favors the phenotype of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage in chondrogenically differentiating hMSCs by upregulating type I collagen protein deposition and type II collagen gene expression without significantly altering the hypertrophic markers at gene level. This study suggests the potential of manipulating extracellular proteases to alter the outcomes of hMSC chondrogenesis, contributing to future development of differentiation protocols for fibrocartilage tissues for intervertebral disc and meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:26760956

  18. Extracellular Protease Inhibition Alters the Phenotype of Chondrogenically Differentiating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in 3D Collagen Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Han, Sejin; Li, Yuk Yin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Matrix remodeling of cells is highly regulated by proteases and their inhibitors. Nevertheless, how would the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) be affected, when the balance of the matrix remodeling is disturbed by inhibiting matrix proteases, is incompletely known. Using a previously developed collagen microencapsulation platform, we investigated whether exposing chondrogenically differentiating MSCs to intracellular and extracellular protease inhibitors will affect the extracellular matrix remodeling and hence the outcomes of chondrogenesis. Results showed that inhibition of matrix proteases particularly the extracellular ones favors the phenotype of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage in chondrogenically differentiating hMSCs by upregulating type I collagen protein deposition and type II collagen gene expression without significantly altering the hypertrophic markers at gene level. This study suggests the potential of manipulating extracellular proteases to alter the outcomes of hMSC chondrogenesis, contributing to future development of differentiation protocols for fibrocartilage tissues for intervertebral disc and meniscus tissue engineering.

  19. Nature and specificity of the immune response to collagen in type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, J M; Townes, A S; Kang, A H

    1982-01-01

    To determine the role of collagen-immunity in the development of collagen-induced arthritis, DBA/1 mice were immunized with type II collagen and observed for the development of polyarthritis. 96% of the mice immunized with native type II collagen developed inflammatory arthritis between 4 and 5 wk after primary immunization. Immunization with denatured type II collagen in exactly the same manner was not effective in inducing arthritis. Cell-mediated immunity in arthritic mice was assessed by measuring [3H]thymidine incorporation by mononuclear cells cultured in the presence of collagen. The maximal proliferative response to collagen occurred at 2 wk after immunization. Equally good incorporation of label occurred when cells were cultured with native or denatured type II collagen or type I collagen. The cellular response of nonarthritic mice immunized with denatured collagen was indistinguishable from that seen in arthritic mice. Humoral immunity was assessed by an ELISA assay for antibodies to collagen. The immunoglobulin M (IgM) response peaked at 2 wk and the IgG response at 5 wk after immunization. Antisera from arthritic mice immunized with native type II collagen were relatively specific for conformational determinants on the native type II molecule although some reactivity with denatured collagen was noted. Antisera from nonarthritic mice immunized with denatured collagen primarily recognized covalent structural determinants. It was concluded that native type II collagen was essential for the induction of arthritis and that an antibody response specific for native type II collagen may be important for the development of arthritis. Images PMID:6174550

  20. Microscale Mechanical Testing of Individual Collagen Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poissant, Jeffrey

    Collagen is a key constituent for a large number of biological materials including bone, tendon, cartilage, skin and fish scales. Understanding the mechanical behavior of collagen's microscale structural components (fibers and fibrils) is therefore of utmost importance for fields such as biomimetics and biomedical engineering. However, the mechanics of collagen fibers and fibrils remain largely unexplored. The main research challenges are the small sample sizes (diameters less than 1 im) and the need to maintain physiologically relevant conditions. In this work, a microscale mechanical testing device (MMTD) capable of measuring the stress-strain response of individual collagen fibers and fibrils was developed. The MMTD consists of: (i) a transducer from a commercial nanoindenter to measure load and displacement, (ii) an optical microscope to observe the deformation of the sample in-situ and (iii) micromanipulators to isolate, position and fix samples. Collagen fibers and fibrils were extracted from fish scales using a novel dissection procedure and tested using the MMTD. A variety of tensile tests were performed including monotonic loading and cyclic tests with increasing loading rate or maximum displacement. The monotonic test results found that the elastic modulus, ultimate tensile strength and strain at failure range from 0.5 to 1.3 GPa, 100 to 200 MPa and 20% to 60%, respectively. The cyclic tests revealed that the largest increase in damage accumulation occurs at strains between 10% and 20%, when hydrogen bonds at the molecular level are ruptured. Further straining the fibril causes little additional damage accumulation and signals the approach of failure. The addition of water is shown to increase damage tolerance and strain to failure.

  1. Tuning 3D Collagen Matrix Stiffness Independently of Collagen Concentration Modulates Endothelial Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Brooke N.; Starchenko, Alina; Williams, Rebecca M.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have described the effects of matrix stiffening on cell behavior using two dimensional (2D) synthetic surfaces; however less is known about the effects of matrix stiffening on cells embedded in three dimensional (3D) in vivo-like matrices. A primary limitation in investigating the effects of matrix stiffness in 3D is the lack of materials that can be tuned to control stiffness independently of matrix density. Here, we use collagen-based scaffolds where the mechanical properties are tuned using non-enzymatic glycation of the collagen in solution, prior to polymerization. Collagen solutions glycated prior to polymerization result in collagen gels with a 3-fold increase in compressive modulus without significant changes to the collagen architecture. Using these scaffolds, we show that endothelial cell spreading increases with matrix stiffness, as does the number and length of angiogenic sprouts and the overall spheroid outgrowth. Differences in sprout length are maintained even when the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts is inhibited. Our results demonstrate the ability to de-couple matrix stiffness from matrix density and structure in collagen gels, and that increased matrix stiffness results in increased sprouting and outgrowth. PMID:22902816

  2. Human-mouse interspecies collagen I heterotrimer is functional during embryonic development of Mov13 mutant mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Bateman, J F; Schnieke, A; Sharpe, A; Barker, D; Mascara, T; Eyre, D; Bruns, R; Krimpenfort, P; Berns, A

    1990-04-01

    To investigate whether the human pro alpha 1(I) collagen chain could form an in vivo functional interspecies heterotrimer with the mouse pro alpha 2(I) collagen chain, we introduced the human COL1A1 gene into Mov13 mice which have a functional deletion of the endogenous COL1A1 gene. Transgenic mouse strains (HucI and HucII) carrying the human COL1A1 gene were first generated by microinjecting the COL1A1 gene into wild-type mouse embryos. Genetic evidence indicated that the transgene in the HucI strain was closely linked to the endogenous mouse COL1A1 gene and was X linked in the HucII transgenic strain. Northern (RNA) blot and S1 protection analyses showed that the transgene was expressed in the appropriate tissue-specific manner and as efficiently as the endogenous COL1A1 gene. HucII mice were crossed with Mov13 mice to transfer the human transgene into the mutant strain. Whereas homozygous Mov13 embryos die between days 13 and 14 of gestation, the presence of the transgene permitted apparently normal development of the mutant embryos to birth. This indicated that the mouse-human interspecies collagen I heterotrimer was functional in the animal. The rescue was, however, only partial, as all homozygotes died within 36 h after delivery, with signs of internal bleeding. This could have been due to a functional defect in the interspecies hybrid collagen. Extensive analysis failed to reveal any biochemical or morphological abnormalities of the collagen I molecules in Mov13-HucII embryos. This may indicate that there was a subtle functional defect of the interspecies hybrid protein which was not revealed by our analysis or that another gene has been mutated by the retroviral insertion in the Mov13 mutant strain.

  3. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jae Hyung; Kim, Yang Hee; Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song; Park, Si-Nae; Shim, In Kyong; Kim, Song Cheol

    2015-08-07

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release.

  4. “Target” and “Sandwich” Signs in Thigh Muscles have High Diagnostic Values for Collagen VI-related Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jun; Zheng, Yi-Ming; Jin, Su-Qin; Yi, Jun-Fei; Liu, Xiu-Juan; Lyn, He; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Jiang-Xi; Yuan, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Collagen VI-related myopathies are autosomal dominant and recessive hereditary myopathies, mainly including Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM). Muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely used to diagnosis muscular disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of thigh muscles MRI for collagen VI-related myopathies. Methods: Eleven patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies were enrolled in this study. MRI of the thigh muscles was performed in all patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies and in 361 patients with other neuromuscular disorders (disease controls). T1-weighted images were used to assess fatty infiltration of the muscles using a modified Mercuri's scale. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the MRI features of collagen VI-related myopathies. The relationship between fatty infiltration of muscles and specific collagen VI gene mutations was also investigated. Results: Eleven patients with collagen VI gene mutation-related myopathies included six UCMD patients and five BM patients. There was no significant difference between UCMD and BM patients in the fatty infiltration of each thigh muscle except sartorius (P = 0.033); therefore, we combined the UCMD and BM data. Mean fatty infiltration scores were 3.1 and 3.0 in adductor magnus and gluteus maximus, while the scores were 1.3, 1.3, and 1.5 in gracilis, adductor longus, and sartorius, respectively. A “target” sign in rectus femoris (RF) was present in seven cases, and a “sandwich” sign in vastus lateralis (VL) was present in ten cases. The “target” and “sandwich” signs had sensitivities of 63.6% and 90.9% and specificities of 97.3% and 96.9% for the diagnosis of collagen VI-related myopathies, respectively. Fatty infiltration scores were 2.0–3.0 in seven patients with mutations in the triple-helical domain, and 1.0–1.5 in three of four patients with

  5. Uncommon structural motifs dominate the antigen binding site in human autoantibodies reactive with basement membrane collagen.

    PubMed

    Foster, Mary H; Buckley, Elizabeth S; Chen, Benny J; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Clark, Amy G

    2016-08-01

    Autoantibodies mediate organ destruction in multiple autoimmune diseases, yet their origins in patients remain poorly understood. To probe the genetic origins and structure of disease-associated autoantibodies, we engrafted immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and immunized with the non-collagenous-1 (NC1) domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. This antigen is expressed in lungs and kidneys and is targeted by autoantibodies in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), prototypic human organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Using Epstein Barr virus transformation and cell fusion, six human anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen monoclonal autoantibodies (mAb) were recovered, including subsets reactive with human kidney and with epitopes recognized by patients' IgG. Sequence analysis reveals a long to exceptionally long heavy chain complementarity determining region3 (HCDR3), the major site of antigen binding, in all six mAb. Mean HCDR3 length is 25.5 amino acids (range 20-36), generated from inherently long DH and JH genes and extended regions of non-templated N-nucleotides. Long HCDR3 are suited to forming noncontiguous antigen contacts and to binding recessed, immunologically silent epitopes hidden from conventional antibodies, as seen with self-antigen crossreactive broadly neutralizing anti-HIV Ig (bnAb). The anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen mAb also show preferential use of unmutated variable region genes that are enriched among human chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies that share features with natural polyreactive Ig. Our findings suggest unexpected relationships between pathogenic anti-collagen Ig, bnAb, and autoreactive Ig associated with malignancy, all of which arise from B cells expressing unconventional structural elements that may require transient escape from tolerance for successful expansion. PMID:27450516

  6. Thickness sensing of hMSCs on collagen gel directs stem cell fate

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Wen Shing; Tay, Chor Yong; Yu, Haiyang; Li, Ang; Wu, Shu Cheng; Duc, Duong-Hong; Lim, Chwee Teck; Tan, Lay Poh

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} hMSCs appeared to sense thin collagen gel (130 {mu}m) with higher effective modulus as compared to thick gel (1440 {mu}m). {yields} Control of collagen gel thickness can modulate cellular behavior, even stem cell fate (neuronal vs. Quiescent). {yields} Distinct cellular behavior of hMSCs on thin and thick collagen gel suggests long range interaction of hMSCs with collagen gel. -- Abstract: Mechanically compliant substrate provides crucial biomechanical cues for multipotent stem cells to regulate cellular fates such as differentiation, proliferation and maintenance of their phenotype. Effective modulus of which cells sense is not only determined by intrinsic mechanical properties of the substrate, but also the thickness of substrate. From our study, it was found that interference from underlying rigid support at hundreds of microns away could induce significant cellular response. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured on compliant biological gel, collagen type I, of different thickness but identical ECM composition and local stiffness. The cells sensed the thin gel (130 {mu}m) as having a higher effective modulus than the thick gel (1440 {mu}m) and this was reflected in their changes in morphology, actin fibers structure, proliferation and tissue specific gene expression. Commitment into neuronal lineage was observed on the thin gel only. Conversely, the thick gel (1440 {mu}m) was found to act like a substrate with lower effective modulus that inhibited actin fiber polymerization. Stem cells on the thick substrate did not express tissue specific genes and remained at their quiescent state. This study highlighted the need to consider not only the local modulus but also the thickness of biopolymer gel coating during modulation of cellular responses.

  7. Collagen sponge: theory and practice of medical applications.

    PubMed

    Chvapil, M

    1977-09-01

    Theoretical as well as practical-clinical applications of one form of collagen (collagen sponge) as a biodegradable material is reviewed. The role of porosity of the sponge and surface characteristics of the meshwork in relation to cell ingrowth are considered essential features of collagen sponge. Rate of resorption and antigenicity could be controlled by graded crosslinking of collagenous framework. Four basic examples of clinical use of collagen sponge are presented: as wound (burn) dressing material, as a matrix, for bone and cartilage repair, as an intravaginal contraceptive diaphragm, and as surgical tampons.

  8. Comparative effects of biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction, and tocopherol in enhancing collagen synthesis and inhibiting collagen degradation in stress-induced premature senescence model of human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Makpol, Suzana; Jam, Faidruz Azura; Khor, Shy Cian; Ismail, Zahariah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2013-01-01

    Biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF), and tocopherol have shown antiaging properties. However, the combined effects of these compounds on skin aging are yet to be investigated. This study aimed to elucidate the skin aging effects of biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol on stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) model of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) by determining the expression of collagen and MMPs at gene and protein levels. Primary HDFs were treated with biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol prior to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure. The expression of COL1A1, COL3A1, MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, and MMP9 genes was determined by qRT-PCR. Type I and type III procollagen proteins were measured by Western blotting while the activities of MMPs were quantified by fluorometric Sensolyte MMP Kit. Our results showed that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol upregulated collagen genes and downregulated MMP genes (P < 0.05). Type I procollagen and type III procollagen protein levels were significantly increased in response to biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol treatment (P < 0.05) with reduction in MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 activities (P < 0.05). These findings indicated that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol effectively enhanced collagen synthesis and inhibited collagen degradation and therefore may protect the skin from aging.

  9. Comparative effects of biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction, and tocopherol in enhancing collagen synthesis and inhibiting collagen degradation in stress-induced premature senescence model of human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Makpol, Suzana; Jam, Faidruz Azura; Khor, Shy Cian; Ismail, Zahariah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2013-01-01

    Biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF), and tocopherol have shown antiaging properties. However, the combined effects of these compounds on skin aging are yet to be investigated. This study aimed to elucidate the skin aging effects of biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol on stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) model of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) by determining the expression of collagen and MMPs at gene and protein levels. Primary HDFs were treated with biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol prior to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure. The expression of COL1A1, COL3A1, MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, and MMP9 genes was determined by qRT-PCR. Type I and type III procollagen proteins were measured by Western blotting while the activities of MMPs were quantified by fluorometric Sensolyte MMP Kit. Our results showed that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol upregulated collagen genes and downregulated MMP genes (P < 0.05). Type I procollagen and type III procollagen protein levels were significantly increased in response to biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol treatment (P < 0.05) with reduction in MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 activities (P < 0.05). These findings indicated that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol effectively enhanced collagen synthesis and inhibited collagen degradation and therefore may protect the skin from aging. PMID:24396567

  10. Comparative Effects of Biodynes, Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction, and Tocopherol in Enhancing Collagen Synthesis and Inhibiting Collagen Degradation in Stress-Induced Premature Senescence Model of Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Jam, Faidruz Azura; Ismail, Zahariah; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah

    2013-01-01

    Biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF), and tocopherol have shown antiaging properties. However, the combined effects of these compounds on skin aging are yet to be investigated. This study aimed to elucidate the skin aging effects of biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol on stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) model of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) by determining the expression of collagen and MMPs at gene and protein levels. Primary HDFs were treated with biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol prior to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure. The expression of COL1A1, COL3A1, MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, and MMP9 genes was determined by qRT-PCR. Type I and type III procollagen proteins were measured by Western blotting while the activities of MMPs were quantified by fluorometric Sensolyte MMP Kit. Our results showed that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol upregulated collagen genes and downregulated MMP genes (P < 0.05). Type I procollagen and type III procollagen protein levels were significantly increased in response to biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol treatment (P < 0.05) with reduction in MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 activities (P < 0.05). These findings indicated that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol effectively enhanced collagen synthesis and inhibited collagen degradation and therefore may protect the skin from aging. PMID:24396567

  11. Northern pike (Esox lucius) collagen: Extraction, characterization and potential application.

    PubMed

    Kozlowska, J; Sionkowska, A; Skopinska-Wisniewska, J; Piechowicz, K

    2015-11-01

    Acid soluble collagen (ASC) and pepsin soluble collagen (PSC) from the scales of northern pike (Esox lucius) were extracted and characterized. It was the first time that this species was used as sources of collagen. FT-IR and amino acid analysis results revealed the presence of collagen. Glycine accounts for one-third of its amino acid residues and specific for collagen amino acid - hydroxyproline - is present in isolated protein. The content of imino acid: proline and hydroxyproline in ASC and PSC was similar (12.5% Pro and 6.5% Hyp). Both ASC and PSC were type I collagen. The denaturation temperature of ASC and PSC were 28.5 and 27°C, respectively. Thin collagen films were obtained by casting of collagen solution onto glass plates. The surface properties of ASC and PSC films were different - the surface of ASC collagen film was more polar and less rough than PSC and we can observe the formation of collagen fibrils after solvent evaporation. ASC films showed much higher tensile properties than PSC. The obtained results suggest that northern pike scales have potential as an alternative source of collagen for use in various fields.

  12. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L

    1980-01-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by individual sera. Removal of the glycoside side chains from native type II collagen had no effect on its antigenicity. The findings suggest that these patients produce highly specific antibodies which react with the triple helix of type II collagen. PMID:6255015

  13. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L

    1980-11-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by individual sera. Removal of the glycoside side chains from native type II collagen had no effect on its antigenicity. The findings suggest that these patients produce highly specific antibodies which react with the triple helix of type II collagen.

  14. Transdermal Delivery of Functional Collagen Via Polyvinylpyrrolidone Microneedles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenchao; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Manoukian, Martin A C; Malkovskiy, Andrey V; Manickam, Sathish; Marinkovich, M Peter; Lane, Alfred T; Tayebi, Lobat; Seifalian, Alexander M; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2015-12-01

    Collagen makes up a large proportion of the human body, particularly the skin. As the body ages, collagen content decreases, resulting in wrinkled skin and decreased wound healing capabilities. This paper presents a method of delivering type I collagen into porcine and human skin utilizing a polyvinylpyrrolidone microneedle delivery system. The microneedle patches were made with concentrations of 1, 2, 4, and 8% type I collagen (w/w). Microneedle structures and the distribution of collagen were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. Patches were then applied on the porcine and human skin, and their effectiveness was examined using fluorescence microscopy. The results illustrate that this microneedle delivery system is effective in delivering collagen I into the epidermis and dermis of porcine and human skin. Since the technique presented in this paper is quick, safe, effective and easy, it can be considered as a new collagen delivery method for cosmetic and therapeutic applications. PMID:26066056

  15. Recombinant human-like collagen directed growth of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Y.; Cui, F. Z.

    2006-05-01

    Bones are biocomposites with hierarchical structure that require controlled mineral deposition during their self-assembly to form tissues with unique mechanical properties. Type I collagen proteins, acidic extracellular matrix proteins, play a critical role in mineral formation and many researches on artificial bones have been made inspired by nature using type I collagen derived from animal tissues. Here we report that recombinant human-like type I collagen, an acidic protein, can direct growth of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystals in vitro in the form of self-assembly of nano-fibrils of mineralized collagen resembling extracellular matrix. The mineralized collagen fibrils aligned parallel to each other to form mineralized collagen fibers. HA nanocrystals grew on the surface of these collagen fibrils with the c-axis of nanocrystals of HA orienting along the longitudinal axis of the fibrils. These artificial analogs of bone have a potential clinical application in bone repair.

  16. Transdermal Delivery of Functional Collagen Via Polyvinylpyrrolidone Microneedles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenchao; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Manoukian, Martin A C; Malkovskiy, Andrey V; Manickam, Sathish; Marinkovich, M Peter; Lane, Alfred T; Tayebi, Lobat; Seifalian, Alexander M; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2015-12-01

    Collagen makes up a large proportion of the human body, particularly the skin. As the body ages, collagen content decreases, resulting in wrinkled skin and decreased wound healing capabilities. This paper presents a method of delivering type I collagen into porcine and human skin utilizing a polyvinylpyrrolidone microneedle delivery system. The microneedle patches were made with concentrations of 1, 2, 4, and 8% type I collagen (w/w). Microneedle structures and the distribution of collagen were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. Patches were then applied on the porcine and human skin, and their effectiveness was examined using fluorescence microscopy. The results illustrate that this microneedle delivery system is effective in delivering collagen I into the epidermis and dermis of porcine and human skin. Since the technique presented in this paper is quick, safe, effective and easy, it can be considered as a new collagen delivery method for cosmetic and therapeutic applications.

  17. Human-mouse interspecies collagen I heterotrimer is functional during embryonic development of Mov13 mutant mouse embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Bateman, J F; Schnieke, A; Sharpe, A; Barker, D; Mascara, T; Eyre, D; Bruns, R; Krimpenfort, P; Berns, A

    1990-01-01

    To investigate whether the human pro alpha 1(I) collagen chain could form an in vivo functional interspecies heterotrimer with the mouse pro alpha 2(I) collagen chain, we introduced the human COL1A1 gene into Mov13 mice which have a functional deletion of the endogenous COL1A1 gene. Transgenic mouse strains (HucI and HucII) carrying the human COL1A1 gene were first generated by microinjecting the COL1A1 gene into wild-type mouse embryos. Genetic evidence indicated that the transgene in the HucI strain was closely linked to the endogenous mouse COL1A1 gene and was X linked in the HucII transgenic strain. Northern (RNA) blot and S1 protection analyses showed that the transgene was expressed in the appropriate tissue-specific manner and as efficiently as the endogenous COL1A1 gene. HucII mice were crossed with Mov13 mice to transfer the human transgene into the mutant strain. Whereas homozygous Mov13 embryos die between days 13 and 14 of gestation, the presence of the transgene permitted apparently normal development of the mutant embryos to birth. This indicated that the mouse-human interspecies collagen I heterotrimer was functional in the animal. The rescue was, however, only partial, as all homozygotes died within 36 h after delivery, with signs of internal bleeding. This could have been due to a functional defect in the interspecies hybrid collagen. Extensive analysis failed to reveal any biochemical or morphological abnormalities of the collagen I molecules in Mov13-HucII embryos.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1690840

  18. LARP6 Meets Collagen mRNA: Specific Regulation of Type I Collagen Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujie; Stefanovic, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant structural protein in all vertebrates, but its constitutive rate of synthesis is low due to long half-life of the protein (60–70 days). However, several hundred fold increased production of type I collagen is often seen in reparative or reactive fibrosis. The mechanism which is responsible for this dramatic upregulation is complex, including multiple levels of regulation. However, posttranscriptional regulation evidently plays a predominant role. Posttranscriptional regulation comprises processing, transport, stabilization and translation of mRNAs and is executed by RNA binding proteins. There are about 800 RNA binding proteins, but only one, La ribonucleoprotein domain family member 6 (LARP6), is specifically involved in type I collagen regulation. In the 5′untranslated region (5’UTR) of mRNAs encoding for type I and type III collagens there is an evolutionally conserved stem-loop (SL) structure; this structure is not found in any other mRNA, including any other collagen mRNA. LARP6 binds to the 5′SL in sequence specific manner to regulate stability of collagen mRNAs and their translatability. Here, we will review current understanding of how is LARP6 involved in posttranscriptional regulation of collagen mRNAs. We will also discuss how other proteins recruited by LARP6, including nonmuscle myosin, vimentin, serine threonine kinase receptor associated protein (STRAP), 25 kD FK506 binding protein (FKBP25) and RNA helicase A (RHA), contribute to this process. PMID:27011170

  19. Upregulation of heme oxygenase and collagen type III in the rat bladder after partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Mitsuhiko; Ukimura, Osamu; Yaoi, Takeshi; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Fushiki, Shinji; Miki, Tsuneharu

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate possible changes of the gene expression and localization of the enzymes, heme oxygenase and nitric oxide synthase (NOS), with reference to increase of collagen type III in response to the partial obstruction of the bladder. Following initial obstruction, whole rat bladders were removed for real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated significantly enhanced expression of HO (p < 0.01) and collagen type III (p < 0.001) gene on postoperative day 14. Enhanced expression of NOS gene was seen only on postoperative day 4 (p < 0.01). Immunohistochemistry revealed that immunoreactivity to HO-1 had much in common in neural cells and fibers, although immunoreactivity to HO-2 and iNOS was relatively weak. This study suggested gene expression of HO, especially HO-1, was more dramatically changed than NOS, and was upregulated simultaneously with increase of collagen type III after obstruction. HO systems could be involved in the pathogenesis of bladder dysfunction related to increase of collagen type III after obstruction. PMID:17406140

  20. Cloning, expression and antioxidant activity of a novel collagen from Pelodiscus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ran; Li, Dengfeng; Peng, Jiao; Fang, Jing; Zhang, Liping; Liu, Lianguo

    2016-06-01

    Collagen is the main structural protein of various connective tissues in animals and naturally plays an important role within the body. It is increasingly used within certain areas, such as medicine, citology and cosmetology. The soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) is a commercially important aquatic species rich in collagen. In this study, a novel collagen gene fragment of 756 bp, which encodes 252 deduced amino acid residues, including 25 conserved Gly-X-Y motifs, was cloned from a soft-shelled turtle. Recombinant soft-shelled turtle collagen (rSTC) was stably expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta and purified by His GraviTrap affinity columns. The antioxidant activities of rSTC were measured using hydroxyl and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals. The results showed that rSTC quenched the free radicals in a dose-dependent manner. The hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (HRSA) of rSTC was 98.9 % at a concentration of 3 mg/mL. At a concentration of 5 mg/mL, rSTC exhibited a DPPH radical scavenging activity of 32.7 %. At the tested concentrations, rSTC exhibited higher HRSA and lower DPPH radical scavenging activity. PMID:27116966

  1. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation.

  2. Central tolerance regulates B cells reactive with Goodpasture antigen alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Su, Susan C.; Hecox, Douglas B.; Brady, Graham F.; Mackin, Katherine M.; Clark, Amy G.; Foster, Mary H.

    2008-01-01

    Patients and rodents with Goodpasture’s syndrome (GPS) develop severe autoimmune crescentic glomerulonephritis, kidney failure, and lung hemorrhage due to binding of pathogenic autoantibodies to the NC1 domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. Target epitopes are cryptic, normally hidden from circulating antibodies by protein-protein interactions and the highly tissue-restricted expression of the alpha3(IV) collagen chain. Based on this limited antigen exposure, it has been suggested that target epitopes are not available as B cell tolerogens. To determine how pathogenic anti-GPS autoantibody responses are regulated, we generated an immunoglobulin (Ig) transgenic (Tg) mouse model that expresses an Ig that binds alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen epitopes recognized by serum IgG of patients with GPS. Phenotypic analysis reveals B cell depletion and light chain editing in Tg mice. To determine the default tolerance phenotype in the absence of receptor editing and endogenous lymphocyte populations, we crossed Tg mice two generations with mice deficient in recombinase activating gene (Rag). Resulting Tg Rag-deficient mice have central B cell deletion. Thus development of Tg anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen B cells is halted in the bone marrow, at which point the cells are deleted unless rescued by a Rag enzyme-dependent process, such as editing. The central tolerance phenotype implies that tolerizing self antigen is expressed in bone marrow. PMID:18941198

  3. Peroxidase Enzymes Regulate Collagen Biosynthesis and Matrix Mineralization by Cultured Human Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Shoubridge, Alexandra J; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The early recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of bone fracture and trauma is a critical determinant in successful fracture healing. Released by infiltrating inflammatory cells, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are heme-containing enzymes, whose functional involvement in bone repair has mainly been studied in the context of providing a mechanism for oxidative defense against invading microorganisms. We report here novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes have the capacity to stimulate osteoblastic cells to secrete collagen I protein and generate a mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured osteoblasts show that peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl hydroxylase-dependent manner, which does not require ascorbic acid. Our studies demonstrate that osteoblasts rapidly bind and internalize both MPO and EPO, and the catalytic activity of these peroxidase enzymes is essential to support collagen I biosynthesis and subsequent release of collagen by osteoblasts. We show that EPO is capable of regulating osteogenic gene expression and matrix mineralization in culture, suggesting that peroxidase enzymes may play an important role not only in normal bone repair, but also in the progression of pathological states where infiltrating inflammatory cells are known to deposit peroxidases.

  4. Impaired intestinal wound healing in Fhl2-deficient mice is due to disturbed collagen metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Kirfel, Jutta Pantelis, Dimitrios; Kabba, Mustapha; Kahl, Philip; Roeper, Anke; Kalff, Joerg C.; Buettner, Reinhard

    2008-12-10

    Four and one half LIM domain protein FHL2 participates in many cellular processes involved in tissue repair such as regulation of gene expression, cytoarchitecture, cell adhesion, migration and signal transduction. The repair process after wounding is initiated by the release of peptides and bioactive lipids. These molecules induce synthesis and deposition of a provisional extracellular matrix. We showed previously that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) triggers a signal transduction cascade mediating nuclear translocation of FHL2 in response to activation of the RhoA GTPase. Our present study shows that FHL2 is an important signal transducer influencing the outcome of intestinal anastomotic healing. Early wound healing is accompanied by reconstitution and remodelling of the extracellular matrix and collagen is primarily responsible for wound strength. Our results show that impaired intestinal wound healing in Fhl2-deficient mice is due to disturbed collagen III metabolism. Impaired collagen III synthesis reduced the mechanical stability of the anastomoses and led to lower bursting pressure in Fhl2-deficient mice after surgery. Our data confirm that FHL2 is an important factor regulating collagen expression in the early phase of wound healing, and thereby is critically involved in the physiologic process of anastomosis healing after bowel surgery and thus may represent a new therapeutic target.

  5. Long-term overproduction of collagen in radiation-induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Remy, J.; Wegrowski, J.; Crechet, F.; Martin, M.; Daburon, F. )

    1991-01-01

    Collagen metabolism was investigated in the fibrotic tissue which developed in pig thigh muscle 6 to 15 months after acute gamma irradiation. During this period, total collagen deposits in the fibrotic tissue increased 10-fold compared to the healthy muscle tissue. These deposits were composed mainly of type I and III collagen, and the type I/type III ratio was lower in the fibrotic than in the muscle tissue. Small pieces of both fibrotic and muscle tissue were incubated with (14C)proline. The (14C)hydroxyproline content of the fibrotic tissue reflected large concomitant increases in the synthesis of total collagen, mainly of types I and III, which rose 14- and 17-fold, respectively. Similarly, the level of type I and type III procollagen mRNAs rose 9- and 5-fold, respectively, in the fibrotic tissue versus the muscle tissue. These results suggest that procollagen gene transcription or RNA maturation in the cell nuclei is activated in the fibrotic tissue. The possibility that such activation is due to the long-term inflammatory state of this tissue is discussed.

  6. Regulatory role of collagen V in establishing mechanical properties of tendons and ligaments is tissue dependent.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Freedman, Benjamin R; Fried, Joanna H; Sun, Mei; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with classic (type I) Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), characterized by heterozygous mutations in the Col5a1 and Col5a2 genes, exhibit connective tissue hyperelasticity and recurrent joint dislocations, indicating a potential regulatory role for collagen V in joint stabilizing soft tissues. This study asked whether the contribution of collagen V to the establishment of mechanical properties is tissue dependent. We mechanically tested four different tissues from wild type and targeted collagen V-null mice: the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon, Achilles tendon (ACH), the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and the supraspinatus tendon (SST). Area was significantly reduced in the Col5a1(ΔTen/ΔTen) group in the FDL, ACH, and SST. Maximum load and stiffness were reduced in the Col5a1(ΔTen/ΔTen) group for all tissues. However, insertion site and midsubstance modulus were reduced only for the ACL and SST. This study provides evidence that the regulatory role of collagen V in extracellular matrix assembly is tissue dependent and that joint instability in classic EDS may be caused in part by insufficient mechanical properties of the tendons and ligaments surrounding each joint. PMID:25876927

  7. Mutations in collagen 18A1 and their relevance to the human phenotype.

    PubMed

    Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Suzuki, Oscar T; Armelin-Correa, Lucia M; Sertié, Andréa L; Errera, Flavia I V; Bagatini, Kelly; Kok, Fernando; Leite, Katia R M

    2006-03-01

    Collagen XVIII, a proteoglycan, is a component of basement membranes (BMs). There are three distinct isoforms that differ only by their N-terminal, but with a specific pattern of tissue and developmental expression. Cleavage of its C-terminal produces endostatin, an inhibitor of angiogenesis. In its N-terminal, there is a frizzled motif which seems to be involved in Wnt signaling. Mutations in this gene cause Knobloch syndrome KS), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by vitreoretinal and macular degeneration and occipital encephalocele. This review discusses the effect of both rare and polymorphic alleles in the human phenotype, showing that deficiency of one of the collagen XVIII isoforms is sufficient to cause KS and that null alleles causing deficiency of all collagen XVIII isoforms are associated with a more severe ocular defect. This review besides illustrating the functional importance of collagen XVIII in eye development and its structure maintenance throughout life, it also shows its role in other tissues and organs, such as nervous system and kidney.

  8. Mice lacking alpha 1 (IX) collagen develop noninflammatory degenerative joint disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fässler, R; Schnegelsberg, P N; Dausman, J; Shinya, T; Muragaki, Y; McCarthy, M T; Olsen, B R; Jaenisch, R

    1994-01-01

    Type IX collagen is a nonfibrillar collagen composed of three gene products, alpha 1(IX), alpha 2(IX), and alpha 3(IX). Type IX molecules are localized on the surface of type II-containing fibrils and consist of two arms, a long arm that is crosslinked to type II collagen and a short arm that projects into the perifibrillar space. In hyaline cartilage, the alpha 1(IX) collagen transcript encodes a polypeptide with a large N-terminal globular domain (NC4), whereas in many other tissues an alternative transcript encodes an alpha 1(IX) chain with a truncated NC4 domain. It has been proposed that type IX molecules are involved in the interaction of fibrils with each other or with other components of the extracellular matrix. To test this hypothesis, we have generated a mouse strain lacking both isoforms of the alpha 1(IX) chain. Homozygous mutant mice are viable and show no detectable abnormalities at birth but develop a severe degenerative joint disease resembling human osteoarthritis. Images PMID:8197187

  9. Cryptic Peptides from Collagen: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pradipta; Shanthi, C

    2016-01-01

    Collagen, a predominant structural protein in extracellular matrix (ECM), is now considered to have probable roles in many biological activities and hence, in different forms have found application as nutraceutical or pharmaceutical therapy option. Many of the biological properties are believed to be due to small hidden peptide residues in the collagen molecules, which come into play after the biodegradation or biosorption of the parent molecule. These peptide regions are called cryptic peptides or by some, as cryptides. The proteolytic hydrolysis of the ECM protein releases the cryptic peptides with many novel biological activities not exhibited directly by the parental protein which include angiogenic, antimicrobial, mitogenic and chemotactic properties. The research for understanding the role of these cryptic peptide regions and making use of them in medical field is very active. Such an understanding could lead to the development of peptide supplements for many biomedical applications. The prolific research in this area is reviewed in this paper. PMID:27173646

  10. Study of Native Type I Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, August

    2006-03-01

    Presented in this work is direct imaging and force microscopy of native, intact type I collagen fibrils extracted from the sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa dermis with affiliated proteoglycan molecules. The prototypical collagen fibril structure is well conserved through higher mammalian species and presents a model for study of the mechanical properties of the primary individual components of the dermis and skeletal ligature. Common practice is to use reconstituted fibrils which lack the precise conformal structure and affiliated proteoglycans. We have performed force microscopy to probe the mechanical properties of native fibrils and extract the elastic modulus under natural conditions. This knowledge is combined transmission and atomic force imaging, in conjunction with applied computation models, to demonstrate an inherent semitubular structure of these fibrils.

  11. About collagen, a tribute to Yves Bouligand.

    PubMed

    Charvolin, Jean; Sadoc, Jean-François

    2012-10-01

    Yves Bouligand's analysis of the organizations of biological materials in relation to those of liquid crystals enabled the development of the idea that physical forces exerting their actions under strong spatial constraints determine the structures and morphologies of these materials. The different levels of organization in collagen have preoccupied him for a long time. We present here our recent works in this domain that we were still discussing with him a few months before his death at the age of 76 on 21 January 2011. After recalling the hierarchical set of structures built by collagen molecules, we analyse them, exploiting the properties of the curved space of the hypersphere and of the algorithm of phyllotaxis. Those two geometrical concepts can be proposed as structural archetypes founding the polymorphism of this complex material of biological origin. PMID:24098840

  12. About collagen, a tribute to Yves Bouligand

    PubMed Central

    Charvolin, Jean; Sadoc, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Yves Bouligand's analysis of the organizations of biological materials in relation to those of liquid crystals enabled the development of the idea that physical forces exerting their actions under strong spatial constraints determine the structures and morphologies of these materials. The different levels of organization in collagen have preoccupied him for a long time. We present here our recent works in this domain that we were still discussing with him a few months before his death at the age of 76 on 21 January 2011. After recalling the hierarchical set of structures built by collagen molecules, we analyse them, exploiting the properties of the curved space of the hypersphere and of the algorithm of phyllotaxis. Those two geometrical concepts can be proposed as structural archetypes founding the polymorphism of this complex material of biological origin. PMID:24098840

  13. Urinary polypeptides related to collagen synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Krane, Stephen M.; Muñoz, Alberto J.; Harris, Edward D.

    1970-01-01

    Of the total urinary hydroxyproline in normal subjects and those with skeletal disorders, between 4 and 20% was nondialyzable. In some patients with Paget's disease of bone, hyperparathyroidism with osteitis fibrosa, hyperphosphatasia, and extensive fibrous dysplasia the total urinary hydroxyproline was sufficiently high to permit purification of this polypeptide hydroxyproline by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. The partially purified polypeptides had molecular weights between 4500 and 10,000 and amino acid compositions and physical properties resembling those of gelatin. The polypeptide fractions also contained neutral sugar and glucosamine. These fragments had been shown to be susceptible to cleavage by purified bacterial collagenase suggesting the presence of the sequence-Pro-X-Gly-Pro-Y-. After administration of proline-14C to patients with Paget's disease hydroxyproline-14C was excreted in the urine. The hydroxyproline-14C specific activity reached a peak in 2-4 hr and declined rapidly. The specific activity of the polypeptide (retentate) portion was severalfold greater than that of the raw urine and diffusate. When the labeled urines were subjected to gel filtration the hydroxyproline-14C fractions of highest molecular weight which were eluted first from the columns had the highest specific activities. Exposure of the hydroxyproline-14C-containing polypeptides to bacterial collagenase rendered them dialyzable. Four patients with hyperparathyroidism and osteitis fibrosa were studied before and after removal of a parathyroid adenoma, a period of transition from a predominance of bone collagen resorption to one of relatively increased bone collagen synthesis. The total urinary hydroxyproline fell rapidly after operation whereas the ratio of the polypeptide fraction to the total rose three- to fourfold. The results of these studies suggest that the urinary polypeptides represent fragments of collagen related to collagen synthesis. Changes in the

  14. Dynamics of collagen from bovine connective tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renou, J.-P.; Foucat, L.; Corsaro, C.; Ollivier, J.; Zanotti, J.-M.; Middendorf, H. D.

    2004-07-01

    We present first results from neutron studies of ns to ps relaxations in bovine collagen, comparing data for a minimally cross-linked sample (young calf) with those for a highly cross-linked one (old cow). Proton displacements derived from quasielastic scans (30

  15. MORPHOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL STUDIES OF COLLAGEN FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, J. A.

    1961-01-01

    This paper describes electron microscopic studies of developing connective tissue in granulomata induced by the subcutaneous injection of carrageenin into guinea pigs. Seven days after injection the granulomata contained many fibroblasts and exhibited rapid production of collagen. The fibroblasts were characterised by an extensively developed endoplasmic reticulum and showed numbers of fine, unstriated filaments in the outer regions of the cytoplasm. The filaments, about 50 A in diameter, tended to lie parallel to and closely adjacent to the cell boundary. The cytoplasmic membrane was frequently ill defined or disrupted, particularly bordering regions in which filaments occurred. In longitudinal sections of extended cell processes, filaments were abundant and, in some instances, the cytoplasmic membrane was barely detectable. In the extracellular space striated collagen fibrils were usually accompanied by filaments, 50 to 100 A in diameter, and these often exhibited the characteristic periodicity of collagen, particularly after intense electron bombardment. Much cellular debris was present in the extracellular space. These observations have led to the suggestion that connective tissue precursors are released from fibroblasts by the disintegration or dissolution of the cytoplasmic membrane and the shedding of cytoplasmic material, as in the apocrine gland cells. In some instances this release may take the form of the elongation from the cell of extended processes; disintegration of the cytoplasmic membrane surrounding these processes then leaves the contents in the extracellular phase. PMID:13692398

  16. Strain-Induced Alignment in Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    Vader, David; Kabla, Alexandre; Weitz, David; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayana

    2009-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant extracellular-network-forming protein in animal biology and is important in both natural and artificial tissues, where it serves as a material of great mechanical versatility. This versatility arises from its almost unique ability to remodel under applied loads into anisotropic and inhomogeneous structures. To explore the origins of this property, we develop a set of analysis tools and a novel experimental setup that probes the mechanical response of fibrous networks in a geometry that mimics a typical deformation profile imposed by cells in vivo. We observe strong fiber alignment and densification as a function of applied strain for both uncrosslinked and crosslinked collagenous networks. This alignment is found to be irreversibly imprinted in uncrosslinked collagen networks, suggesting a simple mechanism for tissue organization at the microscale. However, crosslinked networks display similar fiber alignment and the same geometrical properties as uncrosslinked gels, but with full reversibility. Plasticity is therefore not required to align fibers. On the contrary, our data show that this effect is part of the fundamental non-linear properties of fibrous biological networks. PMID:19529768

  17. Viscoelastic properties of isolated collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Kahn, Harold; Ballarini, Roberto; Eppell, Steven J

    2011-06-22

    Understanding the viscoelastic behavior of collagenous tissues with complex hierarchical structures requires knowledge of the properties at each structural level. Whole tissues have been studied extensively, but less is known about the mechanical behavior at the submicron, fibrillar level. Using a microelectromechanical systems platform, in vitro coupled creep and stress relaxation tests were performed on collagen fibrils isolated from the sea cucumber dermis. Stress-strain-time data indicate that isolated fibrils exhibit viscoelastic behavior that could be fitted using the Maxwell-Weichert model. The fibrils showed an elastic modulus of 123 ± 46 MPa. The time-dependent behavior was well fit using the two-time-constant Maxwell-Weichert model with a fast time response of 7 ± 2 s and a slow time response of 102 ± 5 s. The fibrillar relaxation time was smaller than literature values for tissue-level relaxation time, suggesting that tissue relaxation is dominated by noncollagenous components (e.g., proteoglycans). Each specimen was tested three times, and the only statistically significant difference found was that the elastic modulus is larger in the first test than in the subsequent two tests, indicating that viscous properties of collagen fibrils are not sensitive to the history of previous tests.

  18. Viscoelastic Properties of Isolated Collagen Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhilei Liu; Kahn, Harold; Ballarini, Roberto; Eppell, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the viscoelastic behavior of collagenous tissues with complex hierarchical structures requires knowledge of the properties at each structural level. Whole tissues have been studied extensively, but less is known about the mechanical behavior at the submicron, fibrillar level. Using a microelectromechanical systems platform, in vitro coupled creep and stress relaxation tests were performed on collagen fibrils isolated from the sea cucumber dermis. Stress-strain-time data indicate that isolated fibrils exhibit viscoelastic behavior that could be fitted using the Maxwell-Weichert model. The fibrils showed an elastic modulus of 123 ± 46 MPa. The time-dependent behavior was well fit using the two-time-constant Maxwell-Weichert model with a fast time response of 7 ± 2 s and a slow time response of 102 ± 5 s. The fibrillar relaxation time was smaller than literature values for tissue-level relaxation time, suggesting that tissue relaxation is dominated by noncollagenous components (e.g., proteoglycans). Each specimen was tested three times, and the only statistically significant difference found was that the elastic modulus is larger in the first test than in the subsequent two tests, indicating that viscous properties of collagen fibrils are not sensitive to the history of previous tests. PMID:21689535

  19. Collagenous gastritis: a case report, morphologic evaluation, and review.

    PubMed

    Vesoulis, Z; Lozanski, G; Ravichandran, P; Esber, E

    2000-05-01

    Collagenous gastritis is rare; there are only four previous case reports. Histologic features seem to overlap with the other "collagenous enterocolitides"; however, pathologic criteria are not yet established for the diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. We describe an additional case of ostensible collagenous gastritis in a patient who initially presented with celiac sprue and subsequently developed colonic manifestations of mucosal ulcerative colitis. Endoscopic biopsies of the stomach revealed deposition of patchy, very thick bandlike subepithelial collagen in gastric antral mucosa, focal superficial epithelial degeneration, numerous intraepithelial lymphocytes, and a dense lamina propria lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Image analysis evaluation of gastric antral biopsies demonstrated a mean thickness of subepithelial collagen of 27.07 micron. Morphologic comparison was made with age-matched control groups of 10 patients who had normal gastric mucosal biopsies and 10 patients who had "chronic" gastritis, which revealed mean subepithelial collagen measures of 1.37 micron and 1.19 micron, respectively. We compared these morphologic findings with those of all previous case reports of collagenous gastritis and propose a pathologic definition based on the limited combined data. It seems that subepithelial collagen is dramatically thickened in reported cases of collagenous gastritis, with a cumulative mean measure of 36.9 micron. It is also apparent from this and previous reports that the thickened subepithelial collagen is accompanied by a chronic or chronic active gastritis and sometimes intraepithelial lymphocytes and surface epithelial damage. Recently described associations of lymphocytic gastritis, sprue, and lymphocytic colitis as well as collagenous and lymphocytic colitis suggest a common pathogenesis that empirically may include collagenous gastritis in the same disease spectrum. We propose that collagenous gastritis can be confidently identified by using

  20. Type VI Collagen Regulates Dermal Matrix Assembly and Fibroblast Motility.

    PubMed

    Theocharidis, Georgios; Drymoussi, Zoe; Kao, Alexander P; Barber, Asa H; Lee, David A; Braun, Kristin M; Connelly, John T

    2016-01-01

    Type VI collagen is a nonfibrillar collagen expressed in many connective tissues and implicated in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization. We hypothesized that type VI collagen regulates matrix assembly and cell function within the dermis of the skin. In the present study we examined the expression pattern of type VI collagen in normal and wounded skin and investigated its specific function in new matrix deposition by human dermal fibroblasts. Type VI collagen was expressed throughout the dermis of intact human skin, at the expanding margins of human keloid samples, and in the granulation tissue of newly deposited ECM in a mouse model of wound healing. Generation of cell-derived matrices (CDMs) by human dermal fibroblasts with stable knockdown of COL6A1 revealed that type VI collagen-deficient matrices were significantly thinner and contained more aligned, thicker, and widely spaced fibers than CDMs produced by normal fibroblasts. In addition, there was significantly less total collagen and sulfated proteoglycans present in the type VI collagen-depleted matrices. Normal fibroblasts cultured on de-cellularized CDMs lacking type VI collagen displayed increased cell spreading, migration speed, and persistence. Taken together, these findings indicate that type VI collagen is a key regulator of dermal matrix assembly, composition, and fibroblast behavior and may play an important role in wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:26763426

  1. In vivo determination of arterial collagen synthesis in atherosclerotic rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Opsahl, W.P.; DeLuca, D.J.; Ehrhart, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    Collagen and non-collagen protein synthesis rates were determined in vivo in tissues from rabbits fed a control or atherogenic diet supplemented with 2% peanut oil and 0.25% cholesterol for 4 months. Rabbits received a bolus intravenous injection of L-(/sup 3/H)-proline (1.0 mCi/kg) and unlabeled L-proline (7 mmoles/kg) in 0.9% NaCl. Plasma proline specific activity decreased only 20% over 5 hr and was similar to the specific activity of free proline in tissues. Thoracic aortas from atherosclerotic rabbits exhibited raised plaques covering at least 75% of the surface. Thoracic intima plus a portion of the media (TIM) was separated from the remaining media plus adventitia (TMA). Dry delipidated weight, total collagen content, and collagen as a percent of dry weight were increased significantly in the TIM of atherosclerotic rabbits. Collagen synthesis rates and collagen synthesis as a percent of total protein synthesis were likewise increased both in the TIM and in the abdominal aortas. No differences from controls either in collagen content or collagen synthesis rates were observed in the TMA, lung or skin. These results demonstrate for the first time in vivo that formation of atherosclerotic plaques is associated with increased rates of collagen synthesis. Furthermore, as previously observed with incubations in vitro, collagen synthesis was elevated to a greater extent than noncollagen protein synthesis in atherosclerotic aortas from rabbits fed cholesterol plus peanut oil.

  2. Binding of collagens to an enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Visai, L.; Speziale, P.; Bozzini, S. )

    1990-02-01

    An enterotoxigenic strain of Escherichia coli, B34289c, has been shown to bind the N-terminal region of fibronectin with high affinity. We now report that this strain also binds collagen. The binding of 125I-labeled type II collagen to bacteria was time dependent and reversible. Bacteria expressed a limited number of collagen receptors (2.2 x 10(4) per cell) and bound collagen with a Kd of 20 nM. All collagen types tested (I to V) as well as all tested cyanogen bromide-generated peptides (alpha 1(I)CB2, alpha 1(I)CB3, alpha 1(I)CB7, alpha 1(I)CB8, and alpha 2(I)CB4) were recognized by bacterial receptors, as demonstrated by the ability of these proteins to inhibit the binding of 125I-labeled collagen to bacteria. Of several unlabeled proteins tested in competition experiments, fibronectin and its N-terminal region strongly inhibited binding of the radiolabeled collagen to E. coli cells. Conversely, collagen competed with an 125I-labeled 28-kilodalton fibronectin fragment for bacterial binding. Collagen bound to bacteria could be displaced by excess amounts of either unlabeled fibronectin or its N-terminal fragment. Similarly, collagen could displace 125I-labeled N-terminal peptide of fibronectin bound to the bacterial cell surface. Bacteria grown at 41 degrees C or in the presence of glucose did not express collagen or fibronectin receptors. These results indicate the presence of specific binding sites for collagen on the surface of E. coli cells and furthermore that the collagen and fibronectin binding sites are located in close proximity, possibly on the same structure.

  3. Collagen Structural Hierarchy and Susceptibility to Degradation by Ultraviolet Radiation.

    PubMed

    Rabotyagova, Olena S; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L

    2008-12-01

    Collagen type I is the most abundant extracellular matrix protein in the human body, providing the basis for tissue structure and directing cellular functions. Collagen has complex structural hierarchy, organized at different length scales, including the characteristic triple helical feature. In the present study, the relationship between collagen structure (native vs. denatured) and sensitivity to UV radiation was assessed, with a focus on changes in primary structure, changes in conformation, microstructure and material properties. A brief review of free radical reactions involved in collagen degradation is also provided as a mechanistic basis for the changes observed in the study. Structural and functional changes in the collagens were related to the initial conformation (native vs. denatured) and the energy of irradiation. These changes were tracked using SDS-PAGE to assess molecular weight, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to study changes in the secondary structure, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize changes in mechanical properties. The results correlate differences in sensitivity to irradiation with initial collagen structural state: collagen in native conformation vs. heat-treated (denatured) collagen. Changes in collagen were found at all levels of the hierarchical structural organization. In general, the native collagen triple helix is most sensitive to UV-254nm radiation. The triple helix delays single chain degradation. The loss of the triple helix in collagen is accompanied by hydrogen abstraction through free radical mechanisms. The results received suggest that the effects of electromagnetic radiation on biologically relevant extracellular matrices (collagen in the present study) are important to assess in the context of the state of collagen structure. The results have implications in tissue remodeling, wound repair and disease progression.

  4. Demineralized bone promotes chondrocyte or osteoblast differentiation of human marrow stromal cells cultured in collagen sponges.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuanhu; Yates, Karen E; Eid, Karim; Glowacki, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Demineralized bone implants have been used for many types of craniomaxillofacial, orthopedic, periodontal, and hand reconstruction procedures. In previous studies, we showed that demineralized bone powder (DBP) induces chondrogenesis of human dermal fibroblasts in a DBP/collagen sponge system that optimized interactions between particles of DBP and target cells in cell culture. In this study, we test the hypothesis that DBP promotes chondrogenesis or osteogenesis of human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) in 3-D collagen sponge culture, depending upon the culture conditions. We first confirmed that hMSCs have chondrogenic potential when treated with TGF-beta, either in 2-D monolayer cultures or in 3-D porous collagen sponges. Second, we found that DBP markedly enhanced chondrogenesis in hMSCs in 3-D sponges, as assessed by metachromasia and expression of chondrocyte-specific genes AGGRECAN, COL II, and COL X. Human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) were used to define mechanisms of chondroinduction because unlike hMSCs they have no inherent chondrogenic potential. In situ hybridization revealed that hDFs vicinal to DBPs express chondrocyte-specific genes AGGRECAN or COL II. Macroarray analysis showed that DBP activates TGF-beta/BMP signaling pathway genes in hDFs. Finally, DBP induced hMSCs to express the osteoblast phenotype when cultured with osteogenic supplements. These studies show how culture conditions can influence the differentiation pathway that human marrow stromal cells follow when stimulated by DBP. These results support the potential to engineer cartilage or bone in vitro by using human bone marrow stromal cells and DBP/collagen scaffolds. PMID:15735899

  5. Nanointerfacial strength between non-collagenous protein and collagen fibrils in antler bone

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Fei; Gupta, Himadri S.; Barber, Asa H.

    2014-01-01

    Antler bone displays considerable toughness through the use of a complex nanofibrous structure of mineralized collagen fibrils (MCFs) bound together by non-collagenous proteins (NCPs). While the NCP regions represent a small volume fraction relative to the MCFs, significant surface area is evolved upon failure of the nanointerfaces formed at NCP–collagen fibril boundaries. The mechanical properties of nanointerfaces between the MCFs are investigated directly in this work using an in situ atomic force microscopy technique to pull out individual fibrils from the NCP. Results show that the NCP–fibril interfaces in antler bone are weak, which highlights the propensity for interface failure at the nanoscale in antler bone and extensive fibril pullout observed at antler fracture surfaces. The adhesion between fibrils and NCP is additionally suggested as being rate dependent, with increasing interfacial strength and fracture energy observed when pullout velocity decreases. PMID:24352676

  6. Alpha 1(XVIII), a collagen chain with frequent interruptions in the collagenous sequence, a distinct tissue distribution, and homology with type XV collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Rehn, M; Pihlajaniemi, T

    1994-01-01

    We report on the isolation of mouse cDNA clones which encode a collagenous sequence designated here as the alpha 1 chain of type XVIII collagen. The overlapping clones cover 2.8 kilobases and encode an open reading frame of 928 amino acid residues comprising a putative signal peptide of 25 residues, an amino-terminal noncollagenous domain of 301 residues, and a primarily collagenous stretch of 602 residues. The clones do not cover the carboxyl-terminal end of the polypeptide, since the translation stop codon is absent. Characteristic of the deduced polypeptide is the possession of eight noncollagenous interruptions varying in length from 10 to 24 residues in the collagenous amino acid sequence. Other features include the presence of several putative sites for both N-linked glycosylation and O-linked glycosaminoglycan attachment and homology of the amino-terminal noncollagenous domain with thrombospondin. It is of particular interest that five of the eight collagenous sequences of type XVIII show homology to the previously reported type XV collagen, suggesting that the two form a distinct subgroup among the diverse family of collagens. Northern blot hybridization analysis revealed a striking tissue distribution for type XVIII collagen mRNAs, as the clones hybridized strongly with mRNAs of 4.3 and 5.3 kilobases that were present only in lung and liver of the eight mouse tissues studied. Images PMID:8183894

  7. Mass transfer of large molecules through collagen and collagen-silica hybrid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre-Lora, Pedro

    Diabetes is a growing concern in the United States and around the world that must be addressed through new treatment options. Current standard treatment options of diabetes are limiting and have tremendous impacts on patient's lives. Emerging therapies, such as the implantation of encapsulated islets, are promising treatment options, but have not yet materialized due to unsolved problems with material properties. Hybrid silica-collagen membranes address some of these unsolved problems and are a promising material for cell encapsulation. However, the mass transfer properties of large molecules, such as insulin, TNF-alpha, IL1beta, and other important proteins in the etiology of diabetes, through these hybrid membranes are poorly characterized. In order to begin characterizing these properties, a device was constructed to accurately and efficiently measure the mass transfer of other similar large molecules, fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FITC-dextran), through collagen-silica hybrid membranes. The device was used to measure diffusion coefficients of 4, 20, 40, and 150 kDa FITC-dextrans through non-silicified and silicified samples of 200 and 1000 Pa porcine skin collagen. Diffusion coefficients were found to be in the 10-7-10-6 cm2s -1 range, which is in agreement with previously published data for similar molecules through similar hydrogels. The effects of collagen stiffness, FITC-dextran molecular weight, and silicification treatment on diffusion were investigated. It was found that collagen stiffness and FITC-dextran molecular weight had a negative correlation with diffusion, whereas silicification treatment had no global impact on diffusion. The device created, and the results of this preliminary investigation, can be used to develop collagen-silica hybrid membranes as an alternative material for cell encapsulation in a forward-design manner.

  8. ISOCT study of collagen crosslinking of collagen in cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Graham; Young, Scott T.; Yi, Ji; Shea, Lonnie D.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The role of extracellular matrix modification and signaling in cancer progression is an increasingly recognized avenue for the progression of the disease. Previous study of field effect carcinogenesis with Inverse Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (ISOCT) has revealed pronounced changes in the nanoscale-sensitive mass fractal dimension D measured from field effect tissue when compared to healthy tissue. However, the origin of this difference in tissue ultrastructure in field effect carcinogenesis has remained poorly understood. Here, we present findings supporting the idea that enzymatic crosslinking of the extracellular matrix is an effect that presents at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. We use a model of collagen gel with crosslinking induced by lysyl oxidase (LOXL4) to recapitulate the difference in D previously reported from healthy and cancerous tissue biopsies. Furthermore, STORM imaging of this collagen gel model verifies the morphologic effects of enzymatic crosslinking at length scales as small as 40 nm, close to the previously reported lower length scale sensitivity threshold of 35 nm for ISOCT. Analysis of the autocorrelation function from STORM images of collagen gels and subsequent fitting to the Whittle-Matérn correlation function shows a similar effect of LOXL4 on D from collagen measured with ISOCT and STORM. We extend this to mass spectrometric study of tissue to directly measure concentrations of collagen crosslink residues. The validation of ISOCT as a viable tool for non-invasive rapid quantification of collagen ultrastructure lends it to study other physiological phenomena involving ECM restructuring such as atherosclerotic plaque screening or cervical ripening during pregnancy.

  9. Collagen-IV supported embryoid bodies formation and differentiation from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Taru Sharma, G.; Dubey, Pawan K.; Verma, Om Prakash; Pratheesh, M.D.; Nath, Amar; Sai Kumar, G.

    2012-08-03

    Graphical abstract: EBs formation, characterization and expression of germinal layers marker genes of in vivo developed teratoma using four different types of extracellular matrices. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV matrix is found cytocompatible for EBs formation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Established 3D microenvironment for ES cells development and differentiation into three germ layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV may be useful as promising candidate for ES cells based therapeutic applications. -- Abstract: Embryoid bodies (EBs) are used as in vitro model to study early extraembryonic tissue formation and differentiation. In this study, a novel method using three dimensional extracellular matrices for in vitro generation of EBs from buffalo embryonic stem (ES) cells and its differentiation potential by teratoma formation was successfully established. In vitro derived inner cell masses (ICMs) of hatched buffalo blastocyst were cultured on buffalo fetal fibroblast feeder layer for primary cell colony formation. For generation of EBs, pluripotent ES cells were seeded onto four different types of extracellular matrices viz; collagen-IV, laminin, fibronectin and matrigel using undifferentiating ES cell culture medium. After 5 days of culture, ESCs gradually grew into aggregates and formed simple EBs having circular structures. Twenty-six days later, they formed cystic EBs over collagen matrix with higher EBs formation and greater proliferation rate as compared to other extracellular matrices. Studies involving histological observations, fluorescence microscopy and RT-PCR analysis of the in vivo developed teratoma revealed that presence of all the three germ layer derivatives viz. ectoderm (NCAM), mesoderm (Flk-1) and endoderm (AFP). In conclusion, the method described here demonstrates a simple and cost-effective way of generating EBs from buffalo ES cells. Collagen-IV matrix was found cytocompatible as it

  10. In vivo bioengineered ovarian tumors based on collagen, matrigel, alginate and agarose hydrogels: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Hu, Xuefeng; Huang, Yuanjie; Xu, Guojie; Yang, Jinsong; Li, Li

    2015-01-29

    Scaffold-based tumor engineering is rapidly evolving the study of cancer progression. However, the effects of scaffolds and environment on tumor formation have seldom been investigated. In this study, four types of injectable hydrogels, namely, collagen type I, Matrigel, alginate and agarose gels, were loaded with human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells and then injected into nude mice subcutaneously. The growth of the tumors in vitro was also investigated. After four weeks, the specimens were harvested and analyzed. We found that tumor formation by SKOV3 cells was best supported by collagen, followed by Matrigel, alginate, control (without scaffold) and agarose in vivo. The collagen I group exhibited a larger tumor volume with increased neovascularization and increased necrosis compared with the other materials. Further, increased MMP activity, upregulated expression of laminin and fibronectin and higher levels of HIF-1α and VEGF-A in the collagen group revealed that the engineered tumor is closer to human ovarian carcinoma. In order, collagen, Matrigel, alginate, control (without scaffold) and agarose exhibited decreases in tumor formation. All evidence indicated that the in vivo engineered tumor is scaffold-dependent. Bioactive hydrogels are superior to inert hydrogels at promoting tumor regeneration. In particular, biomimetic hydrogels are advantageous because they provide a microenvironment that mimics the ECM of natural tumors. On the other hand, typical features of cancer cells and the expression of genes related to cancer malignancy were far less similar to the natural tumor in vitro, which indicated the importance of culture environment in vivo. Superior to the in vitro culture, nude mice can be considered satisfactory in vivo 'bioreactors' for the screening of favorable cell vehicles for tumor engineering in vitro.

  11. Collagenous colitis and collagenous gastritis in a 9 year old girl: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Camarero Salces, C; Enes Romero, P; Redondo, C; Rizo Pascual, J M; Roy Ariño, G

    2011-09-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease in the general population and collagenous colitis has seldom been reported in children. We report a girl with both diseases and review the literature on this association afetr a systematic search of Pubmed, Medline and Embase databases.. The girl, diagnosed of collagenous colitis at the age of 2 years, started with abdominal pain and anaemia at the age of 9 years and was diagnosed of collagenous gastritis in the gastric biopsies. After review of the literature, we found 66 reported cases (33 children, 33 adults, 68% females), 56 patients with collagenous gastritis and 16 children with collagenous colitis. Both disorders coexisted in 20 patients. The main presenting symptoms are abdominal pain and anaemia in patients with collagenous gastritis and diarrhoea and weight loss in patients with both disorders. Hypoalbuminemia was found in 9 patients with both diseases and protein losing enteropathy was demonstrated in 3 cases. Deposits of collagen in the duodenum were observed in 13 of 19 patients with both diseases. Seventeen of 66 patients had associated autoimmune disorders, particularly in patients with both diseases (35%). These conditions have a chronic course but gastric or colonic malignancies have not been communicated to date. In conclusion, collagenous gastritis and collagenous colitis mainly affects women and can occur at any age. Their association is exceptional. These disorders, although rare, should be considered in patients with anaemia and epigastric pain, watery diarrhoea or protein losing enteropathy. PMID:22103057

  12. A composite SWNT-collagen matrix: characterization and preliminary assessment as a conductive peripheral nerve regeneration matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosun, Z.; McFetridge, P. S.

    2010-12-01

    Unique in their structure and function, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have received significant attention due to their potential to create unique conductive materials. For neural applications, these conductive materials hold promise as they may enhance regenerative processes. However, like other nano-scaled biomaterials it is important to have a comprehensive understanding how these materials interact with cell systems and how the biological system responds to their presence. These investigations aim to further our understanding of SWNT-cell interactions by assessing the effect SWNT/collagen hydrogels have on PC12 neuronal-like cells seeded within and (independently) on top of the composite material. Two types of collagen hydrogels were prepared: (1) SWNTs dispersed directly within the collagen (SWNT/COL) and (2) albumin-coated SWNTs prepared using the surfactant 'sodium cholate' to improve dispersion (AL-SWNT/COL) and collagen alone serving as a control (COL). SWNT dispersion was significantly improved when using surfactant-assisted dispersion. The enhanced dispersion resulted in a stiffer, more conductive material with an increased collagen fiber diameter. Short-term cell interactions with PC12 cells and SWNT composites have shown a stimulatory effect on cell proliferation relative to plain collagen controls. In parallel to these results, p53 gene displayed normal expression levels, which indicates the absence of nanoparticle-induced DNA damage. In summary, these mechanically tunable SWNT-collagen scaffolds show the potential for enhanced electrical activity and have shown positive in vitro biocompatibility results offering further evidence that SWNT-based materials have an important role in promoting neuronal regeneration.

  13. Loss of fibulin-4 disrupts collagen synthesis and maturation: implications for pathology resulting from EFEMP2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Papke, Christina L; Tsunezumi, Jun; Ringuette, Léa-Jeanne; Nagaoka, Hideaki; Terajima, Masahiko; Yamashiro, Yoshito; Urquhart, Greg; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Davis, Elaine C; Yanagisawa, Hiromi

    2015-10-15

    Homozygous recessive mutations in either EFEMP2 (encoding fibulin-4) or FBLN5 (encoding fibulin-5), critical genes for elastogenesis, lead to autosomal recessive cutis laxa types 1B and 1A, respectively. Previously, fibulin-4 was shown to bind lysyl oxidase (LOX), an elastin/collagen cross-linking enzyme, in vitro. Consistently, reported defects in humans with EFEMP2 mutations are more severe and broad in range than those due to FBLN5 mutations and encompass both elastin-rich and collagen-rich tissues. However, the underlying disease mechanism in EFEMP2 mutations has not been fully addressed. Here, we show that fibulin-4 is important for the integrity of aortic collagen in addition to elastin. Smooth muscle-specific Efemp2 loss in mouse (termed SMKO) resulted in altered fibrillar collagen localization with larger, poorly organized fibrils. LOX activity was decreased in Efemp2-null cells, and collagen cross-linking was diminished in SMKO aortas; however, elastin cross-linking was unaffected and the level of mature LOX was maintained to that of wild-type aortas. Proteomic screening identified multiple proteins involved in procollagen processing and maturation as potential fibulin-4-binding partners. We showed that fibulin-4 binds procollagen C-endopeptidase enhancer 1 (Pcolce), which enhances proteolytic cleavage of the procollagen C-terminal propeptide during procollagen processing. Interestingly, however, procollagen cleavage was not affected by the presence or absence of fibulin-4 in vitro. Thus, our data indicate that fibulin-4 serves as a potential scaffolding protein during collagen maturation in the extracellular space. Analysis of collagen in other tissues affected by fibulin-4 loss should further increase our understanding of underlying pathologic mechanisms in patients with EFEMP2 mutations.

  14. Chemical and histochemical studies of human alveolar collagen fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, W.

    1977-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies have established that the normal human alveolar argyrophilic (reticulum) fiber is collagen fiber. The silver impregnation method is highly sensitive and specific for histologic demonstration of the elaborate collagen fiber network of alveolar septa. The argyrophilic alveolar collagen fiber does not stain with the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) or periodic acid-thiocarbohydrazide-osmium tetroxide (PTO) reaction. The materials positive for the PAS and PTO reactions in alveolar septa are epithelial and endothelial basal laminas, which are nonargyrophilic. Chemically, lung collagen fibers are composed of Type I and Type III collagens, which differ in amino acid composition, chain composition, and carbohydrate content. The chemical heterogeneity of lung collagen may have important biologic implications in the maintenance of normal structure and in the repair of lung injury. Images Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:64120

  15. Immunogold labelling of human von Willebrand factor adsorbed to collagen.

    PubMed

    Furlan, M; Robles, R; Lämmle, B; Zimmermann, J; Hunziker, E

    1991-06-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) mediates adhesion of platelets to the exposed subendothelium at sites of vascular injury. This function is expressed through binding of vWF to both collagen and receptors on the platelet membrane. We have developed a new method using immunogold staining and electron microscopy, permitting visualization of human vWF adsorbed to collagen fibrils. The electron micrographs revealed strings of gold beads reflecting the polymeric structure of vWF. Our data showed dramatic differences in the binding of vWF to collagens of different sources: high binding density was observed using a collagen preparation isolated from aortic tissue whereas colloidal gold was virtually absent from tendon collagen. Using the immunogold labelling method we demonstrated that high shear rate enhanced vWF binding to aortic collagen.

  16. Gap Dependent Rheology in Type I Collagen Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arevalo, Richard; Urbach, Jeffrey; Blair, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Branched type I collagen fiber networks provide extracellular support in mammalian tissues. The intricate network structure can succumb to partial or complete tearing under sufficient applied strain. Under small shear strains, in vitro collagen gels exhibit strain-stiffening while maintaining overall network integrity. Higher shear strains lead to network failure through discrete yielding events. We perform rheology and confocal-rheology experiments to fully elucidate the strain-stiffening and yielding behavior in these highly nonlinear materials. We apply continuous shear strains to collagen gels confined within the rheometer at fixed gaps. We observe that sheared collagen in the strain-stiffening and yielding regime has an apparent modulus that is strongly dependent on the collagen thickness. Moreover, we demonstrate that network yielding is universally controlled by the ratio of the collagen thickness to the mesh size. These results have broad implications for the interpretation of rheological data of extracellular matrix proteins and for the design of biomimetic scaffolds.

  17. Alternating potentials assisted electrochemical deposition of mineralized collagen coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Junjun; Lin, Jun; Li, Juan; Weng, Wenjian; Cheng, Kui; Wang, Huiming

    2015-12-01

    Mineralized collagen coatings were synthesized by electrochemical deposition with alternating negative and positive potentials. The obtained coatings demonstrated a multi-layer structure alternating consisting of weakly and highly mineralized collagen layers and the proportion of each layer could be controlled by adjusting the deposition time. The coatings deposited using alternating potentials assisted electrochemical deposition (AP-ECD) showed significantly enhanced osteoblasts proliferation, and rhBMP-2 loading capability compared to those of the coatings deposited using constant potential electrochemical deposition (CP-ECD). The enhanced cytocompatibility and rhBMP-2 loading capability of the coatings might be attributed to their high proportion of weakly mineralized collagen layer. Furthermore, the deposition mechanism for alternating potentials is proposed as that positive potential induces deposition of negatively charged collagen fibrils to form a weakly mineralized collagen layer. Our results suggest that the present deposition method could be a promising approach to engineer mineralized collagen coating with better biological performances.

  18. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: increased solubility of skin collagen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    We studied the solubility of skin collagen from six patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and six controls. The amount of collagen extracted with neutral salt solution was significantly greater in patients with ALS than in controls. In addition, there was a statistically significant increase in the proportion of collagen extracted from ALS patients with increased duration of illness. The collagen solubilized by pepsin and cyanogen bromide treatments was significantly higher in ALS patients than in controls, and its proportion was positively and significantly associated with duration of illness in ALS patients. These results indicate that the metabolism of skin collagen may be affected in the disease process of ALS, causing an increase in immature soluble collagen in the tissue, which is the opposite to that which occurs in the normal aging process.

  19. Nanorod mediated collagen scaffolds as extra cellular matrix mimics.

    PubMed

    Vedhanayagam, Mohan; Mohan, Ranganathan; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan

    2015-12-01

    Creating collagen scaffolds that mimic extracellular matrices without using toxic exogenous materials remains a big challenge. A new strategy to create scaffolds through end-to-end crosslinking through functionalized nanorods leading to well-designed architecture is presented here. Self-assembled scaffolds with a denaturation temperature of 110 °C, porosity of 70%, pore size of 0.32 μm and Young's modulus of 231 MPa were developed largely driven by imine bonding between 3-mercapto-1-propanal (MPA) functionalized ZnO nanorods and collagen. The mechanical properties obtained were much higher than that of native collagen, collagen-MPA, collagen-3-mercapto-1-propanol (3MPOH) or collagen- 3-MPOH-ZnO, clearly bringing out the relevance of nanorod mediated assembly of fibrous networks. This new strategy has led to scaffolds with mechanical properties much higher than earlier reports and can provide support for cell growth and facilitation of cell attachment. PMID:26586667

  20. Collagenous gastritis associated with lymphocytic gastritis and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Stancu, M; De Petris, G; Palumbo, T P; Lev, R

    2001-12-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disorder, with only 8 cases reported in the literature, 2 in children and 6 in adults. We report an additional case of collagenous gastritis in a 42-year-old man with celiac disease. A thickened (>10 microm) subepithelial collagen band with entrapped capillaries, fibroblasts, and inflammatory cells was seen in the stomach, associated with lymphocytic gastritis. The duodenal mucosa showed severe villous atrophy but no subepithelial collagen deposition. No evidence of lymphocytic or collagenous colitis was found in the colon. The patient became symptom-free on a gluten exclusion diet and showed partial improvement of histopathologic findings after 3 months. Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease, but a wider recognition of its histopathologic features and clinical associations may bring more cases to light and provide additional clues in determining its etiology and pathogenesis. PMID:11735694

  1. Dense collagen matrix accelerates osteogenic differentiation and rescues the apoptotic response to MMP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Buxton, P G; Bitar, M; Gellynck, K; Parkar, M; Brown, R A; Young, A M; Knowles, J C; Nazhat, S N

    2008-08-01

    Bone is distinguished from other tissues by its mechanical properties, in particular stiffness. However, we know little of how osteoblasts react to the stiffness of their microenvironment; in this study we describe their response to a dense (>10 wt.%) collagenous 3D environment. Primary pre-osteoblasts were seeded within a novel form of native collagen, dense collagen, and cultured for up to 14 days in the presence and absence of osteogenic supplements: analysis was via Q-PCR, histology, fluorescent in situ zymography, MMP loss-of-function and tensile testing. Differentiation as measured through the up-regulation of Bsp (247-fold), Alp (14.2-fold), Col1A1 (4.5-fold), Mmp-13 (8.0-fold) and Runx2 (1.2-fold) transcripts was greatly accelerated compared to 2D plastic at 7 and 14 days in the same medium. The scale of this enhancement was confirmed through the use of growth factor stimulation on 2D via the addition of BMP-6 and the Hedgehog agonist purmorphamine. In concert, these molecules were capable of the same level of osteo-induction (measured by Bsp and Alp expression) as the dense collagen alone. Mineralisation was initially localised to remodelled pericellular regions, but by 14 days embedded cells were discernible within regions of apatite (confirmed by MicroRaman). Tensile testing of the matrices showed that this had resulted in a significant increase in Young's modulus at low strain values, consistent with a stiffening of the matrix. To determine the need for matrix remodelling in the mineralisation event the broad spectrum MMP Inhibitor Ilomastat was used. It was found that in its presence mineralisation could still occur (though serum-specific) and the apoptosis associated with MMP inhibition in hydrated collagen gels was abrogated. Analysis of gene expression indicated that this was due to the up-regulation of Mmp-13 in the presence of Ilomastat in dense collagen (400-fold), demonstrating a powerful feedback loop and a potential mechanism for the rescue

  2. Dense collagen matrix accelerates osteogenic differentiation and rescues the apoptotic response to MMP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Buxton, P G; Bitar, M; Gellynck, K; Parkar, M; Brown, R A; Young, A M; Knowles, J C; Nazhat, S N

    2008-08-01

    Bone is distinguished from other tissues by its mechanical properties, in particular stiffness. However, we know little of how osteoblasts react to the stiffness of their microenvironment; in this study we describe their response to a dense (>10 wt.%) collagenous 3D environment. Primary pre-osteoblasts were seeded within a novel form of native collagen, dense collagen, and cultured for up to 14 days in the presence and absence of osteogenic supplements: analysis was via Q-PCR, histology, fluorescent in situ zymography, MMP loss-of-function and tensile testing. Differentiation as measured through the up-regulation of Bsp (247-fold), Alp (14.2-fold), Col1A1 (4.5-fold), Mmp-13 (8.0-fold) and Runx2 (1.2-fold) transcripts was greatly accelerated compared to 2D plastic at 7 and 14 days in the same medium. The scale of this enhancement was confirmed through the use of growth factor stimulation on 2D via the addition of BMP-6 and the Hedgehog agonist purmorphamine. In concert, these molecules were capable of the same level of osteo-induction (measured by Bsp and Alp expression) as the dense collagen alone. Mineralisation was initially localised to remodelled pericellular regions, but by 14 days embedded cells were discernible within regions of apatite (confirmed by MicroRaman). Tensile testing of the matrices showed that this had resulted in a significant increase in Young's modulus at low strain values, consistent with a stiffening of the matrix. To determine the need for matrix remodelling in the mineralisation event the broad spectrum MMP Inhibitor Ilomastat was used. It was found that in its presence mineralisation could still occur (though serum-specific) and the apoptosis associated with MMP inhibition in hydrated collagen gels was abrogated. Analysis of gene expression indicated that this was due to the up-regulation of Mmp-13 in the presence of Ilomastat in dense collagen (400-fold), demonstrating a powerful feedback loop and a potential mechanism for the rescue

  3. Utilizing Core–Shell Fibrous Collagen-Alginate Hydrogel Cell Delivery System for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Roman A.; Kim, Meeju; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Jeong-Hui; Knowles, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional matrices that encapsulate and deliver stem cells with defect-tuned formulations are promising for bone tissue engineering. In this study, we designed a novel stem cell delivery system composed of collagen and alginate as the core and shell, respectively. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were loaded into the collagen solution and then deposited directly into a fibrous structure while simultaneously sheathing with alginate using a newly designed core–shell nozzle. Alginate encapsulation was achieved by the crosslinking within an adjusted calcium-containing solution that effectively preserved the continuous fibrous structure of the inner cell-collagen part. The constructed hydrogel carriers showed a continuous fiber with a diameter of ∼700–1000 μm for the core and 200–500 μm for the shell area, which was largely dependent on the alginate concentration (2%–5%) as well as the injection rate (20–80 mL/h). The water uptake capacity of the core–shell carriers was as high as 98%, which could act as a pore channel to supply nutrients and oxygen to the cells. Degradation of the scaffolds showed a weight loss of ∼22% at 7 days and ∼43% at 14 days, suggesting a possible role as a degradable tissue-engineered construct. The MSCs encapsulated within the collagen core showed excellent viability, exhibiting significant cellular proliferation up to 21 days with levels comparable to those observed in the pure collagen gel matrix used as a control. A live/dead cell assay also confirmed similar percentages of live cells within the core–shell carrier compared to those in the pure collagen gel, suggesting the carrier was cell compatible and was effective for maintaining a cell population. Cells allowed to differentiate under osteogenic conditions expressed high levels of bone-related genes, including osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, and osteopontin. Further, when the core–shell fibrous carriers were implanted in a rat calvarium defect, the bone

  4. Jellyfish collagen and alginate: Combined marine materials for superior chondrogenesis of hMSC.

    PubMed

    Pustlauk, W; Paul, B; Gelinsky, M; Bernhardt, A

    2016-07-01

    Marine, hybrid constructs of porous scaffolds from fibrillized jellyfish collagen and alginate hydrogel are mimicking both of the main tissue components of cartilage, thus being a promising approach for chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Investigating their potential for articular cartilage repair, the present study examined scaffolds being either infiltrated with an alginate-cell-suspension (ACS) or seeded with hMSC and embedded in alginate after cell adhesion (EAS). Hybrid constructs with 2×10(5) and 4.5×10(5)hMSC/scaffold were compared to hMSC encapsulated in pure alginate discs, both chondrogenically stimulated for 21days. Typical round, chondrocyte-like morphology was observed in pure alginate gels and ACS scaffolds, while cells in EAS were elongated and tightly attached to the collagen pores. Col 2 gene expression was comparable in all scaffold types examined. However, the Col 2/Col 1 ratio was higher for pure alginate discs and ACS scaffolds compared to EAS. In contrast, cells in EAS scaffolds displayed higher gene expression of Sox 9, Col 11 and ACAN compared to ACS and pure alginate. Secretion of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG) was comparable for ACS and EAS scaffolds. In conclusion hybrid constructs of jellyfish collagen and alginate support hMSC chondrogenic differentiation and provide more stable and constructs compared to pure hydrogels. PMID:27127044

  5. Raman study of the shockwave effect on collagens.

    PubMed

    Cárcamo, José J; Aliaga, Alvaro E; Clavijo, R Ernesto; Brañes, Manuel R; Campos-Vallette, Marcelo M

    2012-02-01

    The Raman spectra (1800-200 cm(-1)) of isolated dried collagen types I and III were recorded at different times after shockwave (SW) application in aqueous media. SWs were applied in a single session. One week after the SW application the vibrational data analysis indicates changes in the conformation of the collagens; orientational changes are also inferred. During the next three weeks collagens tended to recover the conformation and orientation existing before SW application.

  6. [The use of collagen in the cicatrization of wounds].

    PubMed

    Torra i Bou, J E; Casaroli-Marano, R P; Martínez Cuervo, F; Reina, M; Soldevilla Agreda, J J; Vilaró, S

    2000-10-01

    The authors review the use of collagen in the cicatrization of wounds, analyzing what this process consists of and what its regeneration and reparation phases are. The authors also summarize some fundamental biological aspects collagen has, their functions in hemostasia and in cicatrization; they develop the use of heterologous collagen in the cicatrization process. Expressive illustrations and a selection of bibliographical references accompany this article.

  7. Fibrous long-spacing collagen in bacillary angiomatosis.

    PubMed

    Borczuk, A C; Niedt, G; Sablay, L B; Kress, Y; Mannion, C M; Factor, S M; Tanaka, K E

    1998-01-01

    Fibrous long-spacing (FLS) collagen is a distinct ultrastructural form of collagen present in normal tissue, various tumors, and tissues degraded by bacterial collagenases in vivo and in vitro. An association between FLS collagen and bacillary angiomatosis has not been previously described. Six cases of bacillary angiomatosis, including one autopsy case with disseminated disease, were examined ultrastructurally. In addition, Kaposi sarcoma (3), pyogenic granuloma (3), capillary hemangioma (3), and cavernous hemangioma (2) were examined for comparison. A vascular proliferation in a lymph node from a patient with AIDS (1) and a case of pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (1), also in an AIDS patient, were studied. Abundant FLS collagen was identified in 4 of 6 cases of bacillary angiomatosis, in close association with the organisms. FLS collagen was not seen beyond the immediate vicinity of the organisms. The FLS collagen in bacillary angiomatosis was seen in skin biopsies and in lung and skeletal muscle in the autopsy case; in the latter case, as well as in the two AIDS-associated, nonbacillary angiomatosis, non-Kaposi sarcoma vascular proliferations, there was a striking distribution of FLS collagen around small blood vessels. Occasional FLS collagen was observed in all three pyogenic granuloma. When present in pyogenic granuloma, FLS collagen was intermixed with subendothelial collagen. Abundant FLS collagen was identified in close association with the organisms of bacillary angiomatosis in four cases; this morphologic alteration was seen in skin as well as lung and skeletal muscle. An association between FLS collagen and endothelial cells in normal tissue (Descemet's membrane) and in certain vascular proliferations appears to exist.

  8. Collagenous gastritis: a morphologic and immunohistochemical study of 40 patients.

    PubMed

    Arnason, Thomas; Brown, Ian S; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D; Anderson, William; O'Brien, Blake H; Wilson, Claire; Winter, Harland; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2015-04-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare condition defined histologically by a superficial subepithelial collagen layer. This study further characterizes the morphologic spectrum of collagenous gastritis by evaluating a multi-institutional series of 40 patients (26 female and 14 male). The median age at onset was 16 years (range 3-89 years), including 24 patients (60%) under age 18. Twelve patients (30%) had associated celiac disease, collagenous sprue, or collagenous colitis. Hematoxylin and eosin slides were reviewed in biopsies from all patients and tenascin, gastrin, eotaxin, and IgG4/IgG immunohistochemical stains were applied to a subset. The distribution of subepithelial collagen favored the body/fundus in pediatric patients and the antrum in adults. There were increased surface intraepithelial lymphocytes (>25 lymphocytes/100 epithelial cells) in five patients. Three of these patients had associated celiac and/or collagenous sprue/colitis, while the remaining two had increased duodenal lymphocytosis without specific etiology. An eosinophil-rich pattern (>30 eosinophils/high power field) was seen in 21/40 (52%) patients. Seven patients' biopsies demonstrated atrophy of the gastric corpus mucosa. Tenascin immunohistochemistry highlighted the subepithelial collagen in all 21 specimens evaluated and was a more sensitive method of collagen detection in biopsies from two patients with subtle subepithelial collagen. No increased eotaxin expression was identified in 16 specimens evaluated. One of the twenty-three biopsies tested had increased IgG4-positive cells (100/high power field) with an IgG4/IgG ratio of 55%. In summary, collagenous gastritis presents three distinct histologic patterns including a lymphocytic gastritis-like pattern, an eosinophil-rich pattern, and an atrophic pattern. Eotaxin and IgG4 were not elevated enough to implicate these pathways in the pathogenesis. Tenascin immunohistochemistry can be used as a sensitive method of collagen detection. PMID

  9. Collagenous gastritis: an unusual association with profound weight loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanlin L; Shah, Amit G; Yerian, Lisa M; Cohen, Russell D; Hart, John

    2004-02-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a distinctive disorder characterized by thickening of the subepithelial collagen layer in the gastric mucosa. Although this entity was recognized in 1989, its etiology, pathogenesis, and clinicopathologic features remain poorly understood because of its rarity. An unusual case of collagenous gastritis was observed in a 37-year-old man who presented with profound weight loss, a feature that has not previously been emphasized. PMID:14736276

  10. The Role of Collagen Organization on the Properties of Bone.

    PubMed

    Garnero, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Bone is a complex tissue constituted by a collagen matrix filled in with crystal of hydroxyapatite (HAP). Bone mechanical properties are influenced by the collagen matrix which is organized into hierarchical structures from the individual type I collagen heterotrimer flanked by linear telopeptides at each end to the collagen fibrils that are interconnected by enzymatic and non-enzymatic cross-links. Although most studies focused on the role of collagen cross-links in bone strength, other organizational features may also play a role. At the molecular level it has been shown that homotrimer of type I collagen found in bone tissue of some patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is characterized by decreased mechanical competence compared to the regular heterotrimer. The state of C-telopeptide isomerization-which can be estimated by the measurement in body fluids of the native and isomerized isoforms-has also been shown to be associated with bone strength, particularly the post-yield properties independent of bone size and bone mineral density. Other higher hierarchical features of collagen organization have shown to be associated with changes in bone mechanical behavior in ex vivo models and may also be relevant to explain bone fragility in diseases characterized by collagen abnormalities e.g., OI and Paget's disease. These include the orientation of collagen fibrils in a regular longitudinal direction, the D-spacing period between collagen fibrils and the collagen-HAP interfacial bonding. Preliminary data indicate that some of these organizational features can change during treatment with bisphosphonate, raloxifene, and PTH suggesting that they may contribute to their anti-fracture efficacy. It remains however to be determined which of these parameters play a specific and independent role in bone matrix properties, what is the magnitude of mechanical strength explained by collagen organization, whether they are relevant to explain osteoporosis-induced bone

  11. IL-13 mediates collagen deposition via STAT6 and microRNA-135b: a role for epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Steven; Ciechomska, Marzena; Fullard, Nicola; Przyborski, Stefan; van Laar, Jacob M.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune connective tissue disease in which T cells play a prominent role. We and others have previously demonstrated a role for T cell-derived IL-13 in mediating the induction of collagen in dermal fibroblasts and that blockade with IL-13 antibodies attenuates this increase. In this study we want to probe the signalling that underpins IL-13 mediated matrix deposition. Isolated dermal fibroblasts were incubated with recombinant IL-13 and gene expression by qRT-PCR was performed for collagen1A1 and TGF-β1. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to knock down STAT6 and a small molecule inhibitor was also used to block this pathway. MiR-135b was transfected into fibroblasts plus and minus IL-13 to see if this miR plays a role. miR-135b was measured in systemic sclerosis fibroblasts isolated from patients and also in serum. Results showed that IL-13 increased collagen expression and that this is independent from TGF-β1. This is dependent on STAT6 as targeting this blocked induction. MiR-135b reduces collagen induction in fibroblasts and scleroderma fibroblasts have lower constitutive levels of the miR. We further demonstrate that miR135b is repressed by methylation and may include MeCP2. In conclusion we show that STAT6 and miR-135b regulate IL-13-mediated collagen production by fibroblasts. PMID:27113293

  12. Intrafibrillar silicification of collagen scaffolds for sustained release of stem cell homing chemokine in hard tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-Na; Jiao, Kai; Qi, Yi-Pin; Nikonov, Sergey; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Arola, Dwayne D; Gong, Shi-Qiang; El-Marakby, Ahmed; Carrilho, Marcela R O; Hamrick, Mark W; Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Diogenes, Anibal; Chen, Ji-Hua; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2012-11-01

    Traditional bone regeneration strategies relied on supplementation of biomaterials constructs with stem or progenitor cells or growth factors. By contrast, cell homing strategies employ chemokines to mobilize stem or progenitor cells from host bone marrow and tissue niches to injured sites. Although silica-based biomaterials exhibit osteogenic and angiogenic potentials, they lack cell homing capability. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) plays a pivotal role in mobilization and homing of stem cells to injured tissues. In this work, we demonstrated that 3-dimensional collagen scaffolds infiltrated with intrafibrillar silica are biodegradable and highly biocompatible. They exhibit improved compressive stress-strain responses and toughness over nonsilicified collagen scaffolds. They are osteoconductive and up-regulate expressions of osteogenesis- and angiogenesis-related genes more significantly than nonsilicified collagen scaffolds. In addition, these scaffolds reversibly bind SDF-1α for sustained release of this chemokine, which exhibits in vitro cell homing characteristics. When implanted subcutaneously in an in vivo mouse model, SDF-1α-loaded silicified collagen scaffolds stimulate the formation of ectopic bone and blood capillaries within the scaffold and abrogate the need for cell seeding or supplementation of osteogenic and angiogenic growth factors. Intrafibrillar-silicified collagen scaffolds with sustained SDF-1α release represent a less costly and complex alternative to contemporary cell seeding approaches and provide new therapeutic options for in situ hard tissue regeneration.

  13. miRNA-29a targets COL3A1 to regulate the level of type III collagen in pig.

    PubMed

    Chuan-Hao, Li; Wei, Chen; Jia-Qing, Hu; Yan-Dong, Wang; Shou-Dong, Wang; Yong-Qing, Zeng; Hui, Wang

    2016-10-30

    COL3A1 encodes the protein, collagen type III alpha 1, which is an important component of collagen. Collagen can have a considerable effect on the processing quality of meat, and is nutritious. Bioinformatic analysis using Targetscan showed that COL3A1 could be a target gene of miRNA-29a. Moreover, we found that Laiwu pigs have higher levels of type III collagen and lower levels of miRNA-29a than Landrace pigs. Therefore, we hypothesized that miRNA-29a suppresses the expression of COL3A1 by targeting its 3'-UTR. miRNA-29a appears to play an inhibitory role in the regulation of COL3A1 in PK15 cells because of the following: (1) overexpression of miRNA-29a resulted in a significant down-regulation of COL3A1 protein levels (2) overexpression of miRNA-29a significantly decreased the level of COL3A1 mRNA. (3) The activity of a COL3A1 luciferase reporter was significant reduced by miRNA-29a. Furthermore, the levels of miRNA-29a and collagen type III in four tissues in Laiwu and Landrace pigs were consistent with the above observations. In this study, we identified COL3A1 as a direct target for miRNA-29a, which will inform further studies of meat quality. PMID:27476968

  14. Degradation of type IV collagen by neoplastic human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sheela, S.; Barrett, J.C.

    1985-02-01

    An assay for the degradation of type IV (basement membrane) collagen was developed as a biochemical marker for neoplastic cells from chemically transformed human skin fibroblasts. Type IV collagen was isolated from basement membrane of Syrian hamster lung and type I collagen was isolated from rat tails; the collagens were radioactively labelled by reductive alkylation. The abilities of normal (KD) and chemically transformed (Hut-11A) human skin fibroblasts to degrade the collagens were studied. A cell-associated assay was performed by growing either normal or transformed cells in the presence of radioactively labelled type IV collagen and measuring the released soluble peptides in the medium. This assay also demonstrated that KD cells failed to synthesize an activity capable of degrading type IV collagen whereas Hut-11A cells degraded type IV collagen in a linear manner for up to 4 h. Human serum at very low concentrations, EDTA and L-cysteine inhibited the enzyme activity, whereas protease inhibitors like phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride, N-ethyl maleimide or soybean trypsin inhibitor did not inhibit the enzyme from Hut-11A cells. These results suggest that the ability to degrade specifically type IV collagen may be an important marker for neoplastic human fibroblasts and supports a role for this collagenase in tumor cell invasion.

  15. Polarized Microscopy in Lesions With Altered Dermal Collagen.

    PubMed

    Elbendary, Amira; Valdebran, Manuel; Parikh, Kruti; Elston, Dirk M

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in dermal collagen are noted in dermatofibroma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, morphea, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, hypertrophic scars, and keloids. The authors sought to determine whether variations in birefringence of collagen by polarized microscopy could be of help in diagnosing such conditions. Representative hematoxylin and eosin sections of 400 cases, including dermatofibroma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, hypertrophic scars, keloid, morphea, and lichen sclerosus, were examined under polarized microscopy. Distinct patterns of birefringence of collagen for each disease were noted under polarized microscopy. This study highlights the use of polarized microscopy as adjunctive tool in differentiating different diseases with collagen alteration. PMID:26959692

  16. Collagen fibril arrangement and size distribution in monkey oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    OTTANI, V.; FRANCHI, M.; DE PASQUALE, V.; LEONARDI, L.; MOROCUTTI, M.; RUGGERI, A.

    1998-01-01

    Collagen fibre organisation and fibril size were studied in the buccal gingival and hard palate mucosa of Macacus rhesus monkey. Light and electron microscopy analysis showed connective papillae exhibiting a similar inner structure in the different areas examined, but varying in distribution, shape and size. Moving from the deep to surface layers of the buccal gingival mucosa (free and attached portions), large collagen fibril bundles became smaller and progressively more wavy with decreasing collagen fibril diameter. This gradual diameter decrease did not occur in the hard palate mucosa (free portion, rugae and interrugal regions) where the fibril diameter remained constant. A link between collagen fibril diameter and mechanical function is discussed. PMID:9688498

  17. Photo-active collagen systems with controlled triple helix architecture

    PubMed Central

    Tronci, Giuseppe; Russell, Stephen J.; Wood, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The design of photo-active collagen systems is presented as a basis for establishing biomimetic materials with varied network architecture and programmable macroscopic properties. Following in-house isolation of type I collagen, reaction with vinyl-bearing compounds of varied backbone rigidity, i.e. 4-vinylbenzyl chloride (4VBC) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), was carried out. TNBS colorimetric assay, 1H-NMR and ATR-FTIR confirmed covalent and tunable functionalization of collagen lysines. Depending on the type and extent of functionalization, controlled stability and thermal denaturation of triple helices were observed via circular dichroism (CD), whereby the hydrogen-bonding capability of introduced moieties was shown to play a major role. Full gel formation was observed following photo-activation of functionalized collagen solutions. The presence of a covalent network only slightly affected collagen triple helix conformation (as observed by WAXS and ATR-FTIR), confirming the structural organization of functionalized collagen precursors. Photo-activated hydrogels demonstrated an increased denaturation temperature (DSC) with respect to native collagen, suggesting that the formation of the covalent network successfully stabilized collagen triple helices. Moreover, biocompatibility and mechanical competence of obtained hydrogels were successfully demonstrated under physiologically-relevant conditions. These results demonstrate that this novel synthetic approach enabled the formation of biocompatible collagen systems with defined network architecture and programmable macroscopic properties, which can only partially be obtained with current synthetic methods. PMID:27398214

  18. Fabrication of homobifunctional crosslinker stabilized collagen for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Sai, Korrapati Purna

    2015-12-01

    Collagen biopolymer has found widespread application in the field of tissue engineering owing to its excellent tissue compatibility and negligible immunogenicity. Mechanical strength and enzymatic degradation of the collagen necessitates the physical and chemical strength enhancement. One such attempt deals with the understanding of crosslinking behaviour of EGS (ethylene glycol-bis (succinic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester)) with collagen to improve the physico-chemical properties. The incorporation of a crosslinker during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. EGS crosslinked collagen films exhibited higher denaturation temperature (T d) and the residue left after thermogravimetric analysis was about 16 ± 5.2%. Mechanical properties determined by uniaxial tensile tests showed a threefold increase in tensile strength and Young's modulus at higher concentration (100 μM). Water uptake capacity reduced up to a moderate extent upon crosslinking which is essential for the transport of nutrients to the cells. Cell viability was found to be 100% upon treatment with 100 μM EGS whereas only 30% viability could be observed with glutaraldehyde. Rheological studies of crosslinked collagen showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity at 37 °C. Crosslinking with EGS resulted in the formation of a uniform fibrillar network. Trinitrobenzene sulfonate (TNBS) assay confirmed that EGS crosslinked collagen by forming a covalent interaction with ε-amino acids of collagen. The homobifunctional crosslinker used in this study enhanced the effectiveness of collagen as a biomaterial for biomedical application. PMID:26610606

  19. Specific collagen XVIII isoforms promote adipose tissue accrual via mechanisms determining adipocyte number and affect fat deposition.

    PubMed

    Aikio, Mari; Elamaa, Harri; Vicente, David; Izzi, Valerio; Kaur, Inderjeet; Seppinen, Lotta; Speedy, Helen E; Kaminska, Dorota; Kuusisto, Sanna; Sormunen, Raija; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Jones, Emma L; Muilu, Mikko; Jauhiainen, Matti; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Savolainen, Markku J; Shoulders, Carol C; Pihlajaniemi, Taina

    2014-07-29

    Collagen XVIII is an evolutionary conserved ubiquitously expressed basement membrane proteoglycan produced in three isoforms via two promoters (P). Here, we assess the function of the N-terminal, domain of unknown function/frizzled-like sequences unique to medium/long collagen XVIII by creating P-specific null mice. P2-null mice, which only produce short collagen XVIII, developed reduced bulk-adiposity, hepatic steatosis, and hypertriglyceridemia. These abnormalities did not develop in P1-null mice, which produce medium/long collagen XVIII. White adipose tissue samples from P2-null mice contain larger reserves of a cell population enriched in early adipocyte progenitors; however, their embryonic fibroblasts had ∼ 50% lower adipocyte differentiation potential. Differentiating 3T3-L1 fibroblasts into mature adipocytes produced striking increases in P2 gene-products and dramatic falls in P1-transcribed mRNA, whereas Wnt3a-induced dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes produced reciprocal changes in P1 and P2 transcript levels. P2-derived gene-products containing frizzled-like sequences bound the potent adipogenic inhibitor, Wnt10b, in vitro. Previously, we have shown that these same sequences bind Wnt3a, inhibiting Wnt3a-mediated signaling. P2-transcript levels in visceral fat were positively correlated with serum free fatty acid levels, suggesting that collagen α1 (XVIII) expression contributes to regulation of adipose tissue metabolism in visceral obesity. Medium/long collagen XVIII is deposited in the Space of Disse, and interaction between hepatic apolipoprotein E and this proteoglycan is lost in P2-null mice. These results describe a previously unidentified extracellular matrix-directed mechanism contributing to the control of the multistep adipogenic program that determines the number of precursors committing to adipocyte differentiation, the maintenance of the differentiated state, and the physiological consequences of its impairment on ectopic fat

  20. Venturing into the New Science of Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Tolarová, Markéta; McGrath, John A; Tolar, Jakub

    2016-04-01

    Gene editing with zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated proteins system, or meganucleases can, in principle, mediate any genome modification. Recent studies have shown that COL7A1 mutations in cells of patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa can be corrected by homology-directed DNA repair. PMID:27012560

  1. Elastic Response of Crimped Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Doehring, Todd C.

    2005-01-01

    A physiologic constitutive expression is presented in algorithmic format for the elastic response of wavy collagen fibrils found in soft connective tissues. The model is based on the observation that crimped fibrils have a three-dimensional structure at the micrometer scale that we approximate as a helical spring. The symmetry of this waveform allows the force/displacement relationship derived from Castigliano's theorem to be solved in closed form. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations for mitral-valve chordae tendineae

  2. Elastic model for crimped collagen fibrils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.; Doehring, Todd C.

    2005-01-01

    A physiologic constitutive expression is presented in algorithmic format for the nonlinear elastic response of wavy collagen fibrils found in soft connective tissues. The model is based on the observation that crimped fibrils in a fascicle have a three-dimensional structure at the micron scale that we approximate as a helical spring. The symmetry of this wave form allows the force/displacement relationship derived from Castigliano's theorem to be solved in closed form: all integrals become analytic. Model predictions are in good agreement with experimental observations for mitral-valve chordae tendinece.