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Sample records for collagen ii-induced arthritis

  1. Role of T lymphocytes in collagen II-induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Klareskog, L.; Holmdahl, R.; Larsson, E.; Wigzell, H.

    1983-01-01

    The role of T lymphocytes in collagen II induced arthritis in rats has been investigated. Functional T cells were needed for the development of arthritis since none out of 14 nude rats injected with collagen type II developed arthritis, whereas 11 out of 14 of their normal counterparts did. With the help of antibodies specific for Ia antigens and different T cell subsets in the rats, an immunohistochemical method was used to demonstrate that T cells, predominantly of `helper' type and anti-Ia reactive non-T cells were abundant in the arthritic synovial tissue. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:6219836

  2. Changes and significance of IL-25 in chicken collagen II-induced experimental arthritis (CIA).

    PubMed

    Kaiwen, Wang; Zhaoliang, Su; Yinxia, Zhao; Siamak, Sandoghchian Shotorbani; Zhijun, Jiao; Yuan, Xue; Heng, Yang; Dong, Zheng; Yanfang, Liu; Pei, Shen; Shengjun, Wang; Qixiang, Shao; Xinxiang, Huang; Liwei, Lu; Huaxi, Xu

    2012-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease. It is a systemic inflammatory disease, characterized by chronic, symmetrical, multi-articular synovial arthritis. IL-25 (IL-17E) is a member of the recently emerged cytokine family (IL-17s), which is expressed in Th2 cells and bone marrow-derived mast cells. Unlike the other members of this family, IL-25 is capable of inducing Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and also promotes the release of some pro-immune factors (IL-6 and IL-8). IL-25 is also a pleiotropic factor, which constitutes a tissue-specific pathological injury and chronic inflammation. In this study, we used chicken collagen II-induced experimental arthritis (CIA) model in DBA/1 mice to investigate the relationship between IL-25 and other inflammatory factors, revealing the possible mechanism in CIA. Our results showed that the expression level of IL-25 was enhanced in the late stage of CIA, and IL-17 was increased in the early stage of the disease. It is well known that IL-17 has a crucial role in the development of RA pathogenesis, and IL-25 plays a significant role in humoral immune. For reasons given above, we suggested that the IL-25 inhibited IL-17 expression to some extent, while enhancing the production of IL-4. It was confirmed that IL-25 not only regulated the cellular immune, but also involved the humoral immune in rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. The Predicted Proteomic Network Associated with the Antiarthritic Action of Qingfu Guanjieshu in Collagen-II-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting Yu; Zhou, Hua; Wong, Yuen Fan; Wu, Pui Kei; Hsiao, Wen-Luan Wendy; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Liu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Qingfu Guanjieshu (QFGJS) is an herbal preparation for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Previous studies revealed that QFGJS significantly inhibited experimental arthritis and acute inflammation, accompanied by reduction of proinflammatory cytokines and elevation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. This study aims to identify the targeted proteins and predict the proteomic network associated with the drug action of QFGJS by using 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques. Thirty female Wistar rats were evenly grouped as normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats. The antiarthritic effect of QFGJS was examined with a 19-day treatment course, and the knee synovial tissues of animals from each group were obtained for 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis. Results showed that QFGJS significantly ameliorated collagen II-induced arthritis when administrated at 2.8 g/kg body weight for 19 days. 2D gel image analysis revealed 89 differentially expressed proteins in the synovial tissues among the normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats from over 1000 proteins of which 63 proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis, and 32 proteins were included for classification of functions using Gene Ontology (GO) method. Finally, 14 proteins were analyzed using bioinformatics, and a predicted proteomic network related to the anti-arthritic effect of QFGJS was established, and Pgk1 plays a central role. PMID:23781264

  4. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Son, Youngsook

    2014-10-10

    Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T(reg) and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. PMID:25264193

  5. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Son, Youngsook

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • SP can increase IL-10 levels and reduce TNF-α and IL-17 levels in RA. • SP causes the increase in T{sub reg}, M2 macrophage, and MSCs in RA. • SP-induced immune suppression leads to the blockade of RA progression. • SP can be used as the therapeutics for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. - Abstract: Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T{sub reg} and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases.

  6. IL-35 stimulation of CD39+ regulatory T cells confers protection against collagen II-induced arthritis via the production of IL-10.

    PubMed

    Kochetkova, Irina; Golden, Sarah; Holderness, Kathryn; Callis, Gayle; Pascual, David W

    2010-06-15

    IL-35 is produced by regulatory T cells, and this novel cytokine can downregulate Th17 cell development and inhibit autoimmune inflammation. In this work, an rIL-35, as a single-chain fusion between murine IL-12p35 and EBV-induced gene 3, was expressed in yeast. This rIL-35 inhibited OVA-specific cellular and Ab responses in OVA-challenged recipients of DO11.10 CD4+ T cells. Likewise, IL-35 inhibited clinical manifestation of collagen-induced arthritis or could cease further disease exacerbation upon initiation of IL-35 treatment. Exogenous IL-35 treatments suppressed Th1 and Th17 cells and promoted CD39 expression by CD4+ T cells. Sorted CD25-CD39+CD4+ T cells from IL-35-treated mice produced IL-10 and, upon adoptive transfer, were sufficiently potent to inhibit subsequent development of inflammation in mice with collagen-induced arthritis, whereas sorted CD25+CD39+CD4+ T cells showed reduced potency. IL-35 treatments of IL-10-/- mice failed to induce protective CD39+CD4+ T cells, demonstrating the effector role of IL-10 by IL-35 immunosuppression.

  7. Exposure to Mimivirus Collagen Promotes Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Hülsmeier, Andreas J.; Hochhold, Nina; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in animals, also occur in some recently described nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses such as Mimiviridae, which replicate in amoebae. To clarify the impact of viral collagens on the immune response of animals exposed to Mimiviridae, we have investigated the localization of collagens in Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus particles and the response of mice to immunization with mimivirus particles. Using protein biotinylation, we have first shown that viral collagen encoded by open reading frame L71 is present at the surface of mimivirus particles. Exposure to mimivirus collagens elicited the production of anti-collagen antibodies in DBA/1 mice immunized intradermally with mimivirus protein extracts. This antibody response also targeted mouse collagen type II and was accompanied by T-cell reactivity to collagen and joint inflammation, as observed in collagen-induced arthritis following immunization of mice with bovine collagen type II. The broad distribution of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses in the environment suggests that humans are constantly exposed to such large virus particles. A survey of blood sera from healthy human subjects and from rheumatoid arthritis patients indeed demonstrated that 30% of healthy-subject and 36% of rheumatoid arthritis sera recognized the major mimivirus capsid protein L425. Moreover, whereas 6% of healthy-subject sera recognized the mimivirus collagen protein L71, 22% of rheumatoid arthritis sera were positive for mimivirus L71. Accordingly, our study shows that environmental exposure to mimivirus represents a risk factor in triggering autoimmunity to collagens. PMID:24173233

  8. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  9. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  10. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L

    1980-01-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by individual sera. Removal of the glycoside side chains from native type II collagen had no effect on its antigenicity. The findings suggest that these patients produce highly specific antibodies which react with the triple helix of type II collagen. PMID:6255015

  11. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L

    1980-11-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by individual sera. Removal of the glycoside side chains from native type II collagen had no effect on its antigenicity. The findings suggest that these patients produce highly specific antibodies which react with the triple helix of type II collagen.

  12. Nature and specificity of the immune response to collagen in type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, J M; Townes, A S; Kang, A H

    1982-01-01

    To determine the role of collagen-immunity in the development of collagen-induced arthritis, DBA/1 mice were immunized with type II collagen and observed for the development of polyarthritis. 96% of the mice immunized with native type II collagen developed inflammatory arthritis between 4 and 5 wk after primary immunization. Immunization with denatured type II collagen in exactly the same manner was not effective in inducing arthritis. Cell-mediated immunity in arthritic mice was assessed by measuring [3H]thymidine incorporation by mononuclear cells cultured in the presence of collagen. The maximal proliferative response to collagen occurred at 2 wk after immunization. Equally good incorporation of label occurred when cells were cultured with native or denatured type II collagen or type I collagen. The cellular response of nonarthritic mice immunized with denatured collagen was indistinguishable from that seen in arthritic mice. Humoral immunity was assessed by an ELISA assay for antibodies to collagen. The immunoglobulin M (IgM) response peaked at 2 wk and the IgG response at 5 wk after immunization. Antisera from arthritic mice immunized with native type II collagen were relatively specific for conformational determinants on the native type II molecule although some reactivity with denatured collagen was noted. Antisera from nonarthritic mice immunized with denatured collagen primarily recognized covalent structural determinants. It was concluded that native type II collagen was essential for the induction of arthritis and that an antibody response specific for native type II collagen may be important for the development of arthritis. Images PMID:6174550

  13. Schistosoma japonicum cystatin attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Cheng, Weisheng; Pappoe, Faustina; Hu, Xiaodong; Wen, Huiqin; Luo, Qingli; Wang, Shushu; Deng, Fang; Xie, Yuanyuan; Xu, Yuanhong; Shen, Jilong

    2016-10-01

    Recombinant SjCystatin (rSjCystatin), a recombinant protein of Schistosoma japonicum cystatin, has been reported to have an effect on immunoregulation mediated by IL-10 induction. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune inflammatory arthropathy, and recombinant immune-modulating drugs for RA treatment are under development. We aimed to study the putative immune regulation of rSjCystatin and its prophylactic/therapeutic effects on murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in DBA/1 mice by inoculation with bovine collagen II (CII). rSjCystatin was administered prior or post development of CIA. The severity of CIA was assessed using established clinical and histopathological scoring systems. The incidence was also determined. The CII-specific antibodies in sera and cytokines in splenocyte culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Th1/Th2/Th17 cells and Tregs development in splenocytes were monitored by flow cytometry. The inflammatory mediators in the diseased joint were semiquantitated by qPCR. Prophylactic injection of rSjCystatin attenuated paw clinical scores, incidence, and histopathology scores of joints in CIA mice. The arthritis-alleviative effects were closely associated with the augmentation of IL-4, IL-10, and collagen-specific IgG1, and with the distinct reduction of IFN-γ, collagen-specific IgG2a, and the marked decrease of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-17, and TNF-α and RANKL. The data indicate that rSjCystatin may prevent cartilage destruction and inflammation of joints in CIA mice. The effects are related to the inhibitory modulation of Th1 and Th17 and upregulation of Tregs and Th2 via a shift of cytokines profiling from Th1 to Th2 response. PMID:27393379

  14. Effects of linagliptin and liraglutide on glucose- and angiotensin II-induced collagen formation and cytoskeleton degradation in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-wei; Zhang, Fen-xi; Yang, Fen; Ding, Zu-feng; Agarwal, Nidhi; Guo, Zhi-kun; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors can not only lower blood glucose levels, but also alleviate cardiac remodeling after myocardial ischemia and hypertension. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor (linagliptin) and a GLP-1 activator (liraglutide) on glucose- and angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced collagen formation and cytoskeleton reorganization in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro, and elucidated the related mechanisms. Methods: Cardiac fibroblasts were isolated from the hearts of 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice, and then exposed to different concentrations of glucose or Ang II for 24 h. The expression of fibrotic signals (fibronectin, collagen-1, -3 and -4), as well as ERK1/2 and NF-κB-p65 in the fibroblasts was examined using Western blotting assays. F-actin degradation was detected under inverted laser confocal microscope in fibroblasts stained with Rhodamine phalloidin. Results: Glucose (1–40 mmol/L) and Ang II (10−8–10−5 mol/L) dose-dependently increased the expression of fibronectin, collagens, phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-NF-κB-p65 in cardiac fibroblasts. High concentrations of glucose (≥40 mmol/L) and Ang II (≥10−6 mol/L) caused a significant degradation of F-actin (less assembly F-actin fibers and more disassembly fibers). ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 (10 μmol/L) and NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23 (10 μmol/L) both markedly suppressed glucose- and angiotensin II-induced fibronectin and collagen expressions in cardiac fibroblasts. Furthermore, pretreatment with liraglutide (10–100 nmol/L) or linagliptin (3 and 30 nmol/L) significantly decreased glucose- and Ang II-induced expression of fibrotic signals, phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-NF-κB-p65 in cardiac fibroblasts. Moreover, pretreatment with liraglutide (30 nmol/L) or liraglutide (100 nmol/L) markedly inhibited glucose-induced F-actin degradation, however, only liraglutide inhibited Ang II-induced F-actin degradation. Conclusion

  15. Isorhamnetin attenuates collagen-induced arthritis via modulating cytokines and oxidative stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuewen; Zhong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress were involved in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Isorhamnetin has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities, but its effects on RA have not been investigated. In order to observe the possible therapeutic effects of isorhamnetin on RA, we established a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model and treated the animal with isorhamnetin for 3 weeks. Besides, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and isorhamnetin. The severity of arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, joint destruction score and inflammation score. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-10 and IL-35 in the joint tissue homogenate and cell culture medium as well as anti-type II collagen antibody in serum were measured using ELISA. Contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in joint tissue homogenate were measured using assay kits. We found collagen immunization induced significant arthritis in mice and isorhamnetin at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day could significantly attenuate the collagen-induced arthritis. Isorhamnetin also modulated the production of cytokines and suppressed the oxidative stress in the mice with collagen-induced arthritis at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day. These data suggested that isorhamnetin might be a potential agent for the management of RA. PMID:26629181

  16. Isorhamnetin attenuates collagen-induced arthritis via modulating cytokines and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewen; Zhong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress were involved in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Isorhamnetin has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities, but its effects on RA have not been investigated. In order to observe the possible therapeutic effects of isorhamnetin on RA, we established a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model and treated the animal with isorhamnetin for 3 weeks. Besides, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and isorhamnetin. The severity of arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, joint destruction score and inflammation score. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-10 and IL-35 in the joint tissue homogenate and cell culture medium as well as anti-type II collagen antibody in serum were measured using ELISA. Contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in joint tissue homogenate were measured using assay kits. We found collagen immunization induced significant arthritis in mice and isorhamnetin at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day could significantly attenuate the collagen-induced arthritis. Isorhamnetin also modulated the production of cytokines and suppressed the oxidative stress in the mice with collagen-induced arthritis at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day. These data suggested that isorhamnetin might be a potential agent for the management of RA. PMID:26629181

  17. Effects of Oral Administration of Type II Collagen on Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentham, David E.; Dynesius-Trentham, Roselynn A.; Orav, E. John; Combitchi, Daniel; Lorenzo, Carlos; Sewell, Kathryn Lea; Hafler, David A.; Weiner, Howard L.

    1993-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory synovial disease thought to involve T cells reacting to an antigen within the joint. Type II collagen is the major protein in articular cartilage and is a potential autoantigen in this disease. Oral tolerization to autoantigens suppresses animal models of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, including two models of rheumatoid arthritis. In this randomized, double-blind trial involving 60 patients with severe, active rheumatoid arthritis, a decrease in the number of swollen joints and tender joints occurred in subjects fed chicken type II collagen for 3 months but not in those that received a placebo. Four patients in the collagen group had complete remission of the disease. No side effects were evident. These data demonstrate clinical efficacy of an oral tolerization approach for rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Effect of cadmium chloride exposure during the induction of collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Md Meraj; Neha; Khan, Haider A

    2015-08-01

    The precise cause of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis remains uncertain. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in animals is the most commonly used model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Exposure of humans and animals to toxic metals is widespread. Cadmium is one of the most prevalent nephrotoxic heavy metal, but it may cause other systemic toxicity as well. Cadmium may cause adverse health effects by impairment of the immune systems and induction of reactive oxygen species. Since rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis involve immune system disorder and chronic inflammation, the present study has been designed to find out the effect of cadmium chloride exposure on clinical manifestation of development of collagen induced rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis was induced in rats by intradermal injection of emulsion of type II collagen in Complete Freund's Adjuvant. Rats were treated with cadmium chloride dissolved in drinking water at concentrations of 5ppm and 50ppm for 21 days from day of immunization. The effects of cadmium in the rats were assessed by biochemical parameters (articular elastase, articular nitrite, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase) histopathological analysis and immunohistochemical expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in rat joint tissue. Histopathological changes further confirmed the biochemical and immunohistochemical results. Our results suggest that exposure to cadmium chloride during the induction phase of collagen induced arthritis abrogate disease development at lower dose whereas exacerbates at higher dose in Wistar rats. PMID:26070417

  19. The Staphylococcus aureus collagen adhesin is a virulence determinant in experimental septic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Patti, J M; Bremell, T; Krajewska-Pietrasik, D; Abdelnour, A; Tarkowski, A; Rydén, C; Höök, M

    1994-01-01

    The importance of a collagen-binding adhesin in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis has been examined by comparing the virulence of two sets of Staphylococcus aureus mutants in an animal model. Collagen adhesin-negative mutant PH100 was constructed by replacing the chromosomal collagen adhesin gene (cna) in a clinical strain, Phillips, with an inactivated copy of the gene. Collagen adhesin-positive mutant S. aureus CYL574 was generated by introducing the cna gene into CYL316, a strain that normally lacks the cna gene. Biochemical, immunological, and functional analyses of the generated mutants and their respective parent strains showed that binding of 125I-labeled collagen, expression of an immunoreactive collagen adhesin, and bacterial adherence to cartilage were directly correlated with the presence of a functional cna gene. Greater than 70% of the mice injected with the Cna+ strains developed clinical signs of arthritis, whereas less than 27% of the animals injected with Cna- strains showed symptoms of disease. Furthermore, mice injected with the Cna+ strain Phillips had remarkably elevated levels of immunoglobulin G1 and interleukin-6 compared with mice injected with the Cna- mutant PH100. Taken together, these results demonstrate that collagen adhesin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of septic arthritis induced by S. aureus. Images PMID:8262622

  20. Arthritis instantaneously causes collagen type I and type II degradation in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Landewé, R B M; Geusens, P; van der Heijde, D M F M; Boers, M; van der Linden, S J; Garnero, P

    2006-01-01

    Background Markers of collagen type I (CTX‐1) and type II (CTX‐II) degradation, reflecting bone and cartilage breakdown, appear to predict long term radiographic progression in chronic persistent arthritis. Objective To analyse longitudinally whether changes in arthritis severity are linked to immediate changes in the level of CTX‐I and CTX‐II degradation. Methods CTX‐I and CTX‐II were measured in urine samples from 105 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis who had participated in the COBRA trial at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the start of treatment. The course of the biomarkers over time was compared with the course of ESR, swollen and tender joint counts, and 28 joint disease activity score (DAS28), measured at the same time points, with adjustment for rheumatoid factor, treatment, and baseline radiographic damage, by generalised estimating equations (GEE) with first order autoregression. Results GEE showed that CTX‐I was longitudinally associated with DAS28, but not with ESR, swollen joint count, or tender joint count. CTX‐II, however, was longitudinally associated with ESR, swollen joint count and DAS28, but not with tender joint count. The longitudinal association implies that an increase in the extent of arthritis is immediately followed by an increase in collagen type II degradation, and to a lesser extent collagen type I degradation. Conclusions Cartilage degradation as measured by CTX‐II and to a lesser extent bone degradation as measured by CTX‐I closely follows indices of arthritis. Clinically perceptible arthritis is responsible for immediate damage, which will become visible on plain x rays only much later. PMID:16126801

  1. Anti-arthritic effect of eugenol on collagen-induced arthritis experimental model.

    PubMed

    Grespan, Renata; Paludo, Marcia; Lemos, Henrique de Paula; Barbosa, Carmem Patrícia; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Dalalio, Marcia Machado de Oliveira; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to test the efficacy of eugenol, a compound obtained from the essential oil of cloves (Syzygium aromaticum) in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a well characterized murine model of rheumatoid arthritis. Macroscopic clinical evidence of CIA manifests first as periarticular erythema and edema in the hind paws. Treatment with eugenol starting at the onset of arthritis (day 25) ameliorated these clinical signs of CIA. Furthermore, eugenol inhibited mononuclear cell infiltration into the knee joints of arthritic mice and also lowered the levels of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor growth factor (TGF)-β) within the ankle joints. Eugenol treatment did not affect the in vitro cell viability as assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Therefore, eugenol ameliorates experimental arthritis and could be useful as a beneficial supplement in treating human arthritis. PMID:23037170

  2. Aortic VCAM-1: an early marker of vascular inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Denys, Anne; Clavel, Gaëlle; Lemeiter, Delphine; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Semerano, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There are limited experimental data on vascular involvement in arthritis models. To study the link between CVD and inflammation in RA, we developed a model of vascular dysfunction and articular inflammation by collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. We studied the expression of vascular inflammatory markers in CIA with and without concomitant hyperlipidic diet (HD). Collagen-induced arthritis was induced with intradermal injection of chicken type-II collagen followed by a boost 21 days later. Mice with and without CIA were fed a standard diet or an HD for 12 weeks starting from the day of the boost. Arthritis severity was evaluated with a validated clinical score. Aortic mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-17 were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 localization in the aortic sinus was determined by immunohistochemistry. Atherosclerotic plaque presence was assessed in aortas. Collagen-induced arthritis was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1, independent of diet. VCAM-1 overexpression was detectable as early as 4 weeks after collagen immunization and persisted after 15 weeks. The HD induced atheroma plaque formation and aortic iNOS expression regardless of CIA. Concomitant CIA and HD had no additive effect on atheroma or VCAM-1 or iNOS expression. CIA and an HD diet induced a distinct and independent expression of large-vessel inflammation markers in B6 mice. This model may be relevant for the study of CVD in RA. PMID:26859834

  3. Gallium nitrate ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeog; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Roh, Kug-Hwan; Seo, Su-Kil; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Sae-Gwang; Lim, Jun-Goo; Lee, Won-Jin; Kim, Myoung-Hun; Cho, Kwang-rae; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease. Gallium nitrate has been reported to reserve immunosuppressive activities. Therefore, we assessed the therapeutic effects of gallium nitrate in the mouse model of developed type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced by bovine type II collagen with Complete Freund's adjuvant. CIA mice were intraperitoneally treated from day 36 to day 49 after immunization with 3.5mg/kg/day, 7mg/kg/day gallium nitrate or vehicle. Gallium nitrate ameliorated the progression of mice with CIA. The clinical symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis did not progress after treatment with gallium nitrate. Gallium nitrate inhibited the increase of CD4(+) T cell populations (p<0.05) and also inhibited the type II collagen-specific IgG2a-isotype autoantibodies (p<0.05). Gallium nitrate reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ (p<0.05) and the mRNA expression levels of these cytokine and MMPs (MMP2 and MMP9) in joint tissues. Western blotting of members of the NF-κB signaling pathway revealed that gallium nitrate inhibits the activation of NF-κB by blocking IκB degradation. These data suggest that gallium nitrate is a potential therapeutic agent for autoimmune inflammatory arthritis through its inhibition of the NF-κB pathway, and these results may help to elucidate gallium nitrate-mediated mechanisms of immunosuppression in patients with RA.

  4. Sialylation converts arthritogenic IgG into inhibitors of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Ise, Wataru; Harazono, Akira; Takakura, Daisuke; Fukuyama, Hidehiro; Baba, Yoshihiro; Narazaki, Masashi; Shoda, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Nobunori; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ji, Shuting; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Fujio, Keishi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Furukawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated IgG antibodies such as anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) have diverse glycosylation variants; however, key sugar chains modulating the arthritogenic activity of IgG remain to be clarified. Here, we show that reduced sialylation is a common feature of RA-associated IgG in humans and in mouse models of arthritis. Genetically blocking sialylation in activated B cells results in exacerbation of joint inflammation in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. On the other hand, artificial sialylation of anti-type II collagen antibodies, including ACPAs, not only attenuates arthritogenic activity, but also suppresses the development of CIA in the antibody-infused mice, whereas sialylation of other IgG does not prevent CIA. Thus, our data demonstrate that sialylation levels control the arthritogenicity of RA-associated IgG, presenting a potential target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:27046227

  5. Sialylation converts arthritogenic IgG into inhibitors of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Ise, Wataru; Harazono, Akira; Takakura, Daisuke; Fukuyama, Hidehiro; Baba, Yoshihiro; Narazaki, Masashi; Shoda, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Nobunori; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ji, Shuting; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Fujio, Keishi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Furukawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated IgG antibodies such as anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) have diverse glycosylation variants; however, key sugar chains modulating the arthritogenic activity of IgG remain to be clarified. Here, we show that reduced sialylation is a common feature of RA-associated IgG in humans and in mouse models of arthritis. Genetically blocking sialylation in activated B cells results in exacerbation of joint inflammation in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. On the other hand, artificial sialylation of anti-type II collagen antibodies, including ACPAs, not only attenuates arthritogenic activity, but also suppresses the development of CIA in the antibody-infused mice, whereas sialylation of other IgG does not prevent CIA. Thus, our data demonstrate that sialylation levels control the arthritogenicity of RA-associated IgG, presenting a potential target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:27046227

  6. NLRP3 Inflammasome Plays an Important Role in the Pathogenesis of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Zheng, Yi; Li, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between NLRP3 and the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis. Methods. We used the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. The mice were divided into two groups: the model group (CIA, n = 16) and the control group (Normal, n = 8). The mice were sacrificed seven weeks after immunization. The arthritis score and imaging evaluation (X-rays, Micro-CT, and MRI) were performed. Synovial tissue NLRP3 expression and peripheral blood cytokine levels were analyzed. Results. The arthritis score (6.00 ± 2.52), imaging score (4.63 ± 0.92), and synovial tissue NLRP3 expression (4.00 ± 2.03) significantly increased in the CIA mice. The expression of synovial NLRP3 was positively correlated with arthritis clinical and radiographic scores (r = 0.792 and r = 0.669, resp.). Conclusions. The synovial NLRP3 expression increased at the early onset of RA. Synovial NLRP3 expression level was correlated with the clinical arthritis severity and extent of radiological destruction, suggesting that NLRP3 is involved in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:27034595

  7. Inhibition by Artocarpus tonkinensis of the development of collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ngoc, D D T; Catrina, A I; Lundberg, K; Harris, H E; Ha, N T; Anh, P T; Larsson, P

    2005-03-01

    Extracts of the leaves and roots from the tree Artocarpus tonkinensis A Cheval (family Moraceae) are used in traditional Vietnamese medicine in order to treat backache as well as rheumatic joint diseases. We prepared an ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extract from this plant and tested its anti-inflammatory properties in an experimental arthritis model, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in Dark Agouti rats by means of immunization with collagen type II (CII) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Starting at the day of immunization, the rats were treated daily with intraperitoneal injections of Artocarpus extract. Arthritis progression was measured by means of clinical scoring of paws and anti-CII antibody titres were measured by means of ELISA. In vitro, lymph node (LN) cell cultures were treated with Artocarpus extract and the apoptosis-inducing effect was determined with FACS staining by using annexin V and propidium iodide as well as the TUNEL method. Treatment of the rats with Artocarpus extract decreased arthritis incidence and severity and delayed disease onset. When treatment was started after the onset of arthritis, a tendency towards arthritis amelioration was observed. In vitro, Artocarpus extract acted as a T-cell modulator, inhibiting mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis of activated LN-derived lymphocytes. Thus, we have demonstrated that an EtOAc extract of Artocarpus, a plant traditionally used in Vietnamese folk medicine for treating arthritic conditions, has beneficial effects in an experimental arthritis model. This effect is likely to be T cell-dependent and mediated through apoptosis induction in activated cells.

  8. Type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats. Passive transfer with serum and evidence that IgG anticollagen antibodies can cause arthritis

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We have found that serum from rats with type II collagen-induced arthritis, when fractionated with 50% ammonium sulfate and concentrated, would transfer arthritis to nonimmunized recipients. The arthritis in recipients developed within 18-72 h and displayed all of the major histopathologic characteristics of the early lesion in immunized animals but was transient and less severe. Although consideration was given to the possibility that a circulating immune complex was involved, no evidence of such a complex was detected. Further fractionation of the serum yielded an IgG anticollagen antibody that was fully active in transferring disease. The antibody's reaction was inhibited by the native bovine type II collagen used for immunization of donors and the antibody strongly cross-reacted with homologous type II collage but not with denatured collagen. These studies demonstrate that arthritis in rats can be induced with anti- type II collagen antibodies and suggest that an autoimmune process is involved. Because antibodies to collagen have also been detected in human rheumatic diseases, further investigation of the characteristics of collagen antibodies capable of inducing arthritis seems warranted. PMID:7054355

  9. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Christina D; Akama-Garren, Elliot H; Stein, Emily A; Petralia, Jacob D; Ruiz, Pedro J; Edalati, Abdolhossein; Lindstrom, Tamsin M; Robinson, William H

    2012-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune synovitis characterized by the formation of pannus and the destruction of cartilage and bone in the synovial joints. Although immune cells, which infiltrate the pannus and promote inflammation, play a prominent role in the pathogenesis of RA, other cell types also contribute. Proliferation of synovial fibroblasts, for example, underlies the formation of the pannus, while proliferation of endothelial cells results in neovascularization, which supports the growth of the pannus by supplying it with nutrients and oxygen. The synovial fibroblasts also promote inflammation in the synovium by producing cytokines and chemokines. Finally, osteoclasts cause the destruction of bone. In this study, we show that erlotinib, an inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), reduces the severity of established collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of RA, and that it does so by targeting synovial fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and osteoclasts. Erlotinib-induced attenuation of autoimmune arthritis was associated with a reduction in number of osteoclasts and blood vessels, and erlotinib inhibited the formation of murine osteoclasts and the proliferation of human endothelial cells in vitro. Erlotinib also inhibited the proliferation and cytokine production of human synovial fibroblasts in vitro. Moreover, EGFR was highly expressed and activated in the synovium of mice with collagen-induced arthritis and patients with RA. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGFR plays a central role in the pathogenesis of RA and that EGFR inhibition may provide benefits in the treatment of RA.

  10. Clinical and histological assessment of collagen-induced arthritis progression in the diabetes-resistant BB/Wor rat.

    PubMed

    Knoerzer, D B; Donovan, M G; Schwartz, B D; Mengle-Gaw, L J

    1997-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis in the diabetes-resistant BB (DR BB)/Wor rat is a severe, aggressive disease initiated by immunization with heterologous native Type II collagen. Onset of clinical symptoms reproducibly occurs in 100% of animals between days 10 and 12 following collagen immunization. Hypertrophy of the synovial lining is the first histological manifestation of the early inflammatory arthritis. A mild inflammatory infiltrate in the synovium rapidly becomes a fibrovascular pannus eroding articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Beginning at the joint margins, an active synovitis is present. Light microscopy and immunohistochemical staining show the infiltrate to be comprised of mononuclear (lymphocytes, macrophages) and polymorphonuclear inflammatory cells. In addition, there is histological evidence for chronic inflammatory nodules and necrotizing vasculitis in connective tissue from diseased joints, both morphologic features associated with rheumatoid arthritis in humans. Subchondral bone erosion appears to be mediated largely by the resorptive action of activated osteoclasts. These histological parameters of disease progression in the DR BB/Wor rat are similar to human rheumatoid arthritis. The extensive degree of similarity in the pathology of DR BB/Wor rat collagen-induced arthritis and human rheumatoid arthritis supports the role of this model as an in vivo disease model for human rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:9061845

  11. Effect of γ-tocotrienol in counteracting oxidative stress and joint damage in collagen-induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    RADHAKRISHNAN, AMMU; TUDAWE, DULANTHI; CHAKRAVARTHI, SRIKUMAR; CHIEW, GAN SENG; HALEAGRAHARA, NAGARAJA

    2014-01-01

    Tocotrienols exhibit a significant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect in numerous human diseases. However, the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of tocotrienols in arthritic conditions are not well documented. Therefore, the effect of γ-tocotrienol supplementation against oxidative stress and joint pathology in collagen-induced arthritis in rats was investigated in the present study. Adult female Dark Agouti rats were randomly divided into groups: Control, γ-tocotrienol alone, arthritis alone and arthritis with γ-tocotrienol. Arthritis was induced using 4 mg/kg body weight collagen in complete Freund’s adjuvant. The rats were treated orally with 5 mg/kg body weight of γ-tocotrienol between day 21 and day 45. After 45 days, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total glutathione (GSH) assays were conducted. γ-tocotrienol significantly reduced the arthritis-induced changes in body weight, CRP, TNF-α, SOD and the total GSH levels. There was a significant reduction in the arthritis-induced histopathological changes in the γ-tocotrienol treatment group. The data indicated that administration of γ-tocotrienol resulted in a significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect on collagen-induced arthritis; therefore, γ-tocotrienol may have therapeutic potential as a long-term anti-arthritic agent in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. PMID:24940448

  12. Distinct roles of sphingosine kinase 1 and 2 in murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wen-Qi; Irwan, Anastasia Windy; Goh, Hong Heng; Melendez, Alirio J; McInnes, Iain B; Leung, Bernard P

    2009-08-01

    Sphingosine kinase (SphK) phosphorylates sphingosine into sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). S1P plays a critical role in angiogenesis, inflammation, and various pathologic conditions. To date, two mammalian isoenzymes, SphK1 and SphK2, have been identified. Although both SphK1 and SphK2 share overall homology and produce the common product, S1P, it has been proposed they display different unique and separate functions. In this study, we examined the role of SphK1 and SphK2 in a murine collagen-induced arthritis model by down-regulating each isoenzyme via specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). Prophylactic i.p. administration of SphK1 siRNA significantly reduced the incidence, disease severity, and articular inflammation compared with control siRNA recipients. Treatment of SphK1 siRNA also down-regulated serum levels of S1P, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and IgG2a anti-collagen Ab. Ex vivo analysis demonstrated significant suppression of collagen-specific proinflammatory/Th1 cytokine (IL-6, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma) release in SphK siRNA-treated mice. Interestingly, mice received with SphK2 siRNA develop more aggressive disease; higher serum levels of IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma; and proinflammatory cytokine production to collagen in vitro when compared with control siRNA recipients. Together, these results demonstrate the distinct immunomodulatory roles of SphK1 and SphK2 in the development of inflammatory arthritis by regulating the release of proinflammatory cytokines and T cell responses. These findings raise the possibility that drugs which specifically target SphK1 activity may play a beneficial role in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis.

  13. The role of lipopolysaccharide injected systemically in the reactivation of collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Shin; Ohsawa, Motoyasu

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the role of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the reactivation of autoimmune disease by using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice in which autoimmunity to the joint cartilage component type II collagen (CII) was involved.CIA was induced by immunization with CII emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant at the base of the tail (day 0) followed by a booster injection on day 21. Varying doses of LPS from E. coli were i.p. injected on day 50.Arthritis began to develop on day 25 after immunization with CII and reached a peak on day 35. Thereafter, arthritis subsided gradually but moderate joint inflammation was still observed on day 50. An i.p. injection of LPS on day 50 markedly reactivated arthritis on a dose-related fashion. Histologically, on day 55, there were marked oedema of synovium which had proliferated by the day of LPS injection, new formation of fibrin, and intense infiltration of neutrophils accompanied with a large number of mononuclear cells. The reactivation of CIA by LPS was associated with increases in anti-CII IgG and IgG2a antibodies as well as various cytokines including IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α. LPS from S. enteritidis, S. typhimurium, and K. neumoniae and its component, lipid A from E. coli also reactivated the disease. Polymyxin B sulphate suppressed LPS- or lipid A-induced reactivation of CIA.These results suggest that LPS may play an important role in the reactivation of autoimmune joint inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:10742285

  14. Gm allotypes and HLA in rheumatoid arthritis patients with circulating antibodies to native type II collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, P A; Grennan, D M; Klimiuk, P S; Clague, R B; deLange, G G; Collins, I; Dyer, P A

    1987-01-01

    HLA antigens and immunoglobulin heavy chain allotypes (Gm) were determined in 166 unrelated patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 44 of whom had circulating antibodies to native type II collagen. Collagen antibody positive patients showed an association with HLA-DR3 and DR7 (68% compared with 39% of collagen antibody negative RA, p less than 0.005), and with the Gm phenotype, Gm(zafngb). This contrasted with the collagen antibody negative RA patients where there was an association with HLA-DR4 and, in DR4 positive disease only, with the Gm allotype, G1m(x). The Gm(zafngb) phenotype was found in 26% of DR3 or DR7 positive patients overall and only 9% of RA patients negative for these DR antigens (p less than 0.005), suggesting an interaction between HLA-DR3/7 and Gm(zafngb). The differing Gm associations for collagen antibody positive and negative RA provide further evidence for genetic heterogeneity in susceptibility to RA. PMID:3496057

  15. Adiponectin exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis via enhancing Th17 response and prompting RANKL expression.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoxuan; Feng, Xiaoke; Tan, Wenfeng; Lin, Na; Hua, Minhui; Wei, Yu; Wang, Fang; Li, Ningli; Zhang, Miaojia

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported adiponectin (AD) is highly expressed in the inflamed synovial joint tissue and correlates closely with progressive bone erosion in Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Here, we investigate the role of adiponectin in regulating Th17 response and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) in mice with CIA mice by intraarticularly injection of adiponectin into knee joints on day 17, day 20 and day 23 post first collagen immunization. The increased adiponectin expression was found in inflamed joint tissue of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Adiponectin injection resulted in an earlier onset of arthritis, an aggravated arthritic progression, more severe synovial hyperplasia, bone erosion and osteoporosis in CIA mice. CD4(+)IL-17(+) Th17 cells, IL-17 mRNA and RANKL mRNA expression were markedly increased in the joint tissue of adiponectin treated CIA mice. Moreover, adiponectin treatment markedly enhanced Th17 cell generation from naive CD4(+) T cells in vitro, which accompanied by the high expression of Th17 transcription factor ROR-γt, and Th17 cytokine genes included IL-22 and IL-23. This study reveals a novel effect of adiponectin in exacerbating CIA progression by enhancing Th17 cell response and RANKL expression. PMID:26063682

  16. Down-regulation of collagen arthritis after in vivo treatment with a syngeneic monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody to a cross-reactive idiotope on collagen II auto-antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Nordling, C; Holmdahl, R; Klareskog, L

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies previously shown to react with a cross-reactive idiotope of anti-collagen II auto-antibodies were used for in vivo treatment of DBA/1 mice receiving immunization with arthritogenic native rat collagen type II. Injection of 100 micrograms of the anti-idiotypic antibody 3 weeks before the collagen immunization resulted in a significant suppression of collagen arthritis, compared with mice treated with a monoclonal control antibody. The treatment with anti-idiotypic antibody 3 weeks before collagen immunization could also cause a marked down-regulation of the total serum levels of anti-collagen II antibodies. When the anti-idiotypic antibodies were administered near the time for induction of arthritis (2 days after collagen immunization) a significant effect was seen on the collagen arthritis, but not on the levels of anti-collagen antibody. As collagen-induced arthritis is a disease where both T- and B-cell mediated immunity are believed to play critical roles, the present effects of the in vivo anti-idiotype treatment on arthritis development could provide an interesting system for the study of idiotype regulation on both B- and T-cell arthritis-associated autoimmunity. PMID:2037311

  17. Novel therapeutic compound tuftsin-phosphorylcholine attenuates collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bashi, T; Shovman, O; Fridkin, M; Volkov, A; Barshack, I; Blank, M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2016-04-01

    Treatment with helminthes and helminthes ova improved the clinical symptoms of several autoimmune diseases in patients and in animal models. Phosphorylcholine (PC) proved to be the immunomodulatory molecule. We aimed to decipher the tolerogenic potential of tuftsin-PC (TPC), a novel helminth-based compound in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CIA DBA/1 mice were treated with TPC subcutaneously (5 µg/0.1 ml) or orally (250 µg/0.1 ml), starting prior to disease induction. The control groups were treated with PBS. Collagen antibodies were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), cytokine protein levels by ELISA kits and regulatory T (Treg ) and regulatory B (Breg ) cell phenotypes by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). TPC-treated mice had a significantly lower arthritis score of 1.5 in comparison with control mice 11.8 (P < 0.0001) in both subcutaneous and orally treated groups at day 31. Moreover, histology analysis demonstrated highly inflamed joints in control mice, whereas TPC-treated mice maintained normal joint structure. Furthermore, TPC decreased the titres of circulating collagen II antibodies in mice sera (P < 0.0001), enhanced expression of IL-10 (P < 0.0001) and inhibited production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-1β (P < 0.0001). TPC significantly expanded the CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) Treg cells and CD19(+) IL-10(+) CD5(high) CD1d(high) T cell immunoglobulin mucin-1 (TIM-1(+) ) Breg cell phenotypes (P < 0.0001) in treated mice. Our data indicate that treatment with TPC attenuates CIA in mice demonstrated by low arthritic score and normal joints histology. TPC treatment reduced proinflammatory cytokines and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine expression, as well as expansion of Treg and Breg cells. Our results may lead to a new approach for a natural therapy for early rheumatoid arthritis onset. PMID:26618631

  18. Anti-Arthritic Effect of Chebulanin on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yinglan; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yao; Zhou, Dan; Dai, Qing; Liu, Songqing

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic degenerative autoimmune disease characterized by persistent inflammation of synovial membranes, which leads to cartilage destruction and bone erosion. To date, there are no effective therapies to slow the progress of this degenerative condition. Here, we evaluate the anti-arthritic effect of chebulanin, an abundant anti-inflammatory agent isolated from Terminalia chebula, in collagen induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice by intragastric administration. Arthritic severity was scored by performing histopathological evaluation of the joints and measuring the expression of inflammatory cytokines and relative enzymes by immunohistochemical staining. In parallel, bone destruction and erosion were confirmed by micro-CT. Our data revealed that chebulanin significantly improved the severity of arthritis. Specifically, the histopathological characteristics of the tissues were improved and expression of TNF-α, IL-6, MMP-3 and COX-2 in the paws and joints of the treated mice decreased in a dose-dependent manner compared with control mice. Furthermore, micro-CT analysis revealed that chebulanin induced a dose-dependent reduction in cartilage destruction and bone erosion. Taken together, our findings suggest that chebulanin suppresses the expression of inflammatory mediators and prevents cartilage destruction and bone erosion in mice. Therefore, chebulanin is a strong therapeutic alternative for the treatment of RA. PMID:26402786

  19. Chemically Modified Interleukin-6 Aptamer Inhibits Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Ikuo; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Tomoki; Sumida, Shun-ichiro; Ibaragi, Shigeru; Kasai, Hayato; Horai, Naoto; Drolet, Daniel W.; Gupta, Shashi; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a potent mediator of inflammatory and immune responses, and a validated target for therapeutic intervention of inflammatory diseases. Previous studies have shown that SL1026, a slow off-rate modified aptamer (SOMAmer) antagonist of IL-6, neutralizes IL-6 signaling in vitro. In the present study, we show that SL1026 delays the onset and reduces the severity of rheumatoid symptoms in a collagen-induced arthritis model in cynomolgus monkeys. SL1026 (1 and 10 mg/kg), administered q.i.d., delayed the progression of arthritis and the concomitant increase in serum IL-6 levels compared to the untreated control group. Furthermore, SL1026 inhibited IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation ex vivo in T lymphocytes from human blood and IL-6-induced C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A production in human primary hepatocytes. Importantly, SOMAmer treatment did not elicit an immune response, as evidenced by the absence of anti-SOMAmer antibodies in plasma of treated monkeys. These results demonstrate that SOMAmer antagonists of IL-6 may be attractive agents for the treatment of IL-6-mediated diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26579954

  20. Therapeutic effect of dioscin on collagen-induced arthritis through reduction of Th1/Th2.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yachun; Xing, Enhong; Song, Hongru; Feng, Guiying; Liang, Xiujun; An, Gao; Zhao, Xiaofei; Wang, Mi

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the therapeutic effect of dioscin on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Mice model of CIA was induced by chicken collagen II and arthritis index was assessed. After suspension of dioscin (100mg/kg/d) or triptolide was intragastrically administered, the left paw swelling and body weight of each mouse were measured. Then tissue samples were assayed by histopathological analysis. The levels of Th1 and Th2 were detected by flow cytometry. The expression of p-STAT1, p-STAT4 and p-STAT6 was demonstrated by western blot analysis, and T-bet and GATA-3 expression was detected by RT-PCR. The paw swelling and arthritis index were decreased and body weight was increased in the high dose of dioscin group compared to the model group (P<0.05). Histopathological analysis revealed that the damage of synovium tissue in dioscin and triptolide group alleviated. The ratio of Th1/Th2 in the dioscin group (0.82±0.24) and triptolide group (0.99±0.44) was lower than that in the model group (1.84±0.70, P<0.05). Additionally, p-STAT4 expression was decreased, and both p-STAT6 and GATA3 expression was increased in the dioscin group than that in the model group (P<0.05). Dioscin might have some therapeutic effects on CIA through regulating the proportion of Th1/Th2 cells, which could reduce the expression of p-STAT4, increase the expression of p-STAT6 and GATA3 in the synovial tissue. PMID:27449327

  1. Betahistine attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis by suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 cell responses.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kuo-Tung; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Der-Yuan; Lim, Yun-Ping; Chen, Yi-Ming; Li, Yi-Rong; Yang, Deng-Ho; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic effects of betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. CIA was induced in DBA/1 male mice by primary immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml chicken type II collagen (CII) mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in an 1:1 ratio, and booster immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml CII mixed with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) in an 1:1 ratio. Immunization was performed subcutaneously at the base of the tail. After being boosted on day 21, betahistine (1 and 5mg/kg) was orally administered daily for 2weeks. The severity of CIA was determined by arthritic scores and assessment of histopathological joint destruction. Expression of cytokines in the paw and anti-CII antibodies in the serum was evaluated by ELISA. The proliferative response against CII in the lymph node cells was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. The frequencies of different CII specific CD4(+) T cell subsets in the lymph node were determined by flow-cytometric analysis. Betahistine treatment attenuated the severity of arthritis and reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-23 and IL-17A, in the paw tissues of CIA mice. Lymph node cells from betahistine-treated mice showed a decrease in proliferation, as well as a lower frequency of Th17 cells. In vitro, betahistine suppressed CD4(+) T cell differentiation into Th17 cells. These results indicate that betahistine is effective in suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 responses in mouse CIA and that it may have therapeutic value as an adjunct treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27494687

  2. Unmasking of a Protective TNFR1 Mediated Signal in the Collagen Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Skipp, Cheryll; Raman, Thiagarajan; Valuck, Robert J.; Watkins, Herschel; Palmer, Brent E.; Scheinman, Robert I.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: TNFR1 plays a major role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we explore the relative importance of TNFR1 signaling in the hematopoietic tissue compartment for disease progression. METHODS: DBA/1 mice were lethally irradiated and rescued with bone marrow derived from either DBA/1 or TNFR1−/− animals. The mice were then input into the collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model and disease progression characterized. RESULTS: Surprisingly, TNFR1−/− transplant mice input into the CIA model develop increased disease as compared to controls. This could not be attributed to either an increased primary response to collagen or to the contribution of a non-DBA genetic background. Histological markers of advanced disease were evident in TNFR1−/− transplant mice shortly after initiation of the immune response to collagen and long before clinical evidence of disease. Serum TNFα was undetectable while serum IL-12p40 levels were increased in TNFR1−/− transplant mice at the end point of the study. CONCLUSION: These data raise the intriguing possibility of the existence of an anti-inflammatory TNFR1 mediated circuit in the hematopoietic compartment. This circuit bears a resemblance to emerging data delineating a switch in TNFα function observed in the resolution of bacterial infections. These data suggest that TNFR1 mediated signals in the radio-resistant tissues contributes to disease progression while TNFR1 mediated signals in the radio-sensitive tissues can contribute to protection from disease. We thus put forward the hypothesis that the degree of responce to TNFα blockade in RA is dependent, in part, on the relative genetic strengths of these two pathways. PMID:19180511

  3. Imatinib mesylate inhibits osteoclastogenesis and joint destruction in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA).

    PubMed

    Ando, Wataru; Hashimoto, Jun; Nampei, Akihide; Tsuboi, Hideki; Tateishi, Kosuke; Ono, Takeshi; Nakamura, Norimasa; Ochi, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a key factor for osteoclastogenesis at the bone-pannus interface in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as a receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Imatinib mesylate inhibits the phosphorylation of c-fms, a receptor for M-CSF. The present study investigates the effect of imatinib mesylate on joint destruction in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and on osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Imatinib mesylate (50 or 150 mg/kg), dexamethasone, or vehicle was administered daily to CIA rats for 4 weeks from the onset of arthritis. Hind-paw swelling and body weight were measured weekly. At weeks 2 and 4, the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints and the ankle and subtalar joints were radiographically and histologically assessed. The effect of imatinib mesylate on osteoclast formation from rat bone marrow cells with M-CSF and soluble RANKL (sRANKL) in vitro was also examined. Radiographic assessment showed that 150 mg/kg imatinib mesylate suppressed the destruction of the MTP and the ankle and subtalar joints at week 2, and MTP joint destruction at week 4 in CIA rats, although hind-paw swelling was not suppressed. The number of TRAP-positive cells at the bone-pannus interface was significantly reduced in the group administered with 150 mg/kg imatinib mesylate compared with that given vehicle at week 4. Imatinib mesylate dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of M-CSF-dependent osteoclast precursor cells in vitro as well as osteoclast formation induced by M-CSF and sRANKL. These findings suggest that imatinib mesylate could prevent joint destruction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. Palmitoylethanolamide and luteolin ameliorate development of arthritis caused by injection of collagen type II in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) is an endogenous fatty acid amide belonging to the family of the N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). Recently, several studies demonstrated that PEA is an important analgesic, antiinflammatory, and neuroprotective mediator. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of co-ultramicronized PEA + luteolin formulation on the modulation of the inflammatory response in mice subjected to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods CIA was induced by an intradermally injection of 100 μl of the emulsion (containing 100 μg of bovine type II collagen (CII)) and complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) at the base of the tail. On day 21, a second injection of CII in CFA was administered. Mice subjected to CIA were administered PEA (10 mg/kg 10% ethanol, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) or co-ultramicronized PEA + luteolin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) every 24 hours, starting from day 25 to 35. Results Mice developed erosive hind-paw arthritis when immunized with CII in CFA. Macroscopic clinical evidence of CIA first appeared as periarticular erythema and edema in the hindpaws. The incidence of CIA was 100% by day 28 in the CII-challenged mice, and the severity of CIA progressed over a 35-day period with a resorption of bone. The histopathology of CIA included erosion of the cartilage at the joint. Treatment with PEA or PEA + luteolin ameliorated the clinical signs at days 26 to 35 and improved histologic status in the joint and paw. The degree of oxidative and nitrosative damage was significantly reduced in PEA + luteolin-treated mice, as indicated by nitrotyrosine and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Plasma levels of the proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were significantly reduced by PEA + luteolin treatment. Conclusions We demonstrated that PEA co-ultramicronized with luteolin exerts an antiinflammatory effect during chronic inflammation and ameliorates CIA. PMID:24246048

  5. Resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in SHPS-1 mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzawa, Chie; Kaneko, Yoriaki; Murata, Yoji; Miyake, Astuko; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okajo, Jun; Tomizawa, Takeshi; Kaneko, Yuka; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Matozaki, Takashi Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2008-07-04

    SHPS-1 is a transmembrane protein that binds the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 through its cytoplasmic region and is abundantly expressed on dendritic cells and macrophages. Here we show that mice expressing a mutant form of SHPS-1 fail to develop type-II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA), a model for rheumatoid arthritis in humans. Histological examinations of the arthritic paws from immunized wild-type mice revealed that cartilage was destroyed in association with marked mononuclear cell infiltration, while only mild cell infiltration was observed in immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice. Consistently, the serum levels of both IgG and IgG2a specific to CII and of IL-1{beta} in immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice were markedly reduced compared with those apparent for wild-type mice. The CII-induced proliferation of, and production of cytokines by, T cells from immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice were reduced compared to wild-type cells. These results suggest that SHPS-1 is essential for development of CIA.

  6. Polymorphism of the MHC class II Eb gene determines the protection against collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Zanelli, E.; Krco, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an animal model of auto immune polyarthritis, sharing similarities with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Paradoxally, susceptibility to mouse CIA is controlled by the H2A loci (DQ homologous) while RA is linked to HLA.DR genes (H2E homologous). We recently showed that the E{beta}{sup d} molecule prevents CIA development in susceptible H2{sup q} mice. We addressed the question of whether H2Eb polymorphism will influence CIA incidence as HLA.DRB1 polymorphism does in RA. In F{sub 1} mice, only H2Eb{sup d} and H2Eb{sup s} molecules showed protection. Using recombinant B10.RDD (Eb{sup d/b}) mice, we found that CIA protection was mediated by the first domain of the E{beta}{sup d} molecule. Using peptides covering the third hypervariable region of the E{beta} chain, we found a perfect correlation between presentation of E{beta} peptides by the H2A{sup q} molecule and protection on CIA. Therefore, the mechanism by which H2Eb protects against CIA seems to rely on the affinity of E{beta} peptides for the H2A{sup q} molecule. 35 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Antigen-specific T cell–mediated gene therapy in collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Atsuo; Seroogy, Christine M.; Sandora, Matthew R.; Tarner, Ingo H.; Costa, Gina L.; Taylor-Edwards, Cariel; Bachmann, Michael H.; Contag, Christopher H.; Fathman, C. Garrison

    2001-01-01

    Autoantigen-specific T cells have tissue-specific homing properties, suggesting that these cells may be ideal vehicles for the local delivery of immunoregulatory molecules. We tested this hypothesis by using type II collagen–specific (CII-specific) CD4+ T hybridomas or primary CD4+ T cells after gene transfer, as vehicles to deliver an immunoregulatory protein for the treatment of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CII-specific T cells or hybridomas were transduced using retroviral vectors to constitutively express the IL-12 antagonist, IL-12 p40. Transfer of engineered CD4+ T cells after immunization significantly inhibited the development of CIA, while cells transduced with vector control had no effect. The beneficial effect on CIA of IL-12 p40-transduced T cells required TCR specificity against CII, since transfer of T cells specific for another antigen producing equivalent amounts of IL-12 p40 had no effect. In vivo cell detection using bioluminescent labels and RT-PCR showed that transferred CII-reactive T-cell hybridomas accumulated in inflamed joints in mice with CIA. These results indicate that the local delivery of IL-12 p40 by T cells inhibited CIA by suppressing autoimmune responses at the site of inflammation. Modifying antigen-specific T cells by retroviral transduction for local expression of immunoregulatory proteins thus offers a promising strategy for treating RA. PMID:11375419

  8. A metabolically-stabilized phosphonate analog of lysophosphatidic acid attenuates collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nikitopoulou, Ioanna; Kaffe, Eleanna; Sevastou, Ioanna; Sirioti, Ivi; Samiotaki, Martina; Madan, Damian; Prestwich, Glenn D; Aidinis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a destructive arthropathy with systemic manifestations, characterized by chronic synovial inflammation. Under the influence of the pro-inflammatory milieu synovial fibroblasts (SFs), the main effector cells in disease pathogenesis become activated and hyperplastic while releasing a number of signals that include pro-inflammatory factors and tissue remodeling enzymes. Activated RA SFs in mouse or human arthritic joints express significant quantities of autotaxin (ATX), a lysophospholipase D responsible for the majority of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) production in the serum and inflamed sites. Conditional genetic ablation of ATX from SFs resulted in attenuation of disease symptoms in animal models, an effect attributed to diminished LPA signaling in the synovium, shown to activate SF effector functions. Here we show that administration of 1-bromo-3(S)-hydroxy-4-(palmitoyloxy)butyl-phosphonate (BrP-LPA), a metabolically stabilized analog of LPA and a dual function inhibitor of ATX and pan-antagonist of LPA receptors, attenuates collagen induced arthritis (CIA) development, thus validating the ATX/LPA axis as a novel therapeutic target in RA.

  9. Polymerized-Type I Collagen Induces Upregulation of Foxp3-Expressing CD4 Regulatory T Cells and Downregulation of IL-17-Producing CD4+ T Cells (Th17) Cells in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Macip-Rodríguez, Perla; Galindo-Feria, Angeles S.; Cruz-Robles, David; Soto-Abraham, Virgina; Escobar-Hernández, Sergio; Aguilar, Diana; Alpizar-Rodríguez, Deshiré; Férez-Blando, Karen; Llorente, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that polymerized-type I collagen (polymerized collagen) exhibits potent immunoregulatory properties. This work evaluated the effect of intramuscular administration of polymerized collagen in early and established collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and analyzed changes in Th subsets following therapy. Incidence of CIA was of 100% in mice challenged with type II collagen. Clinimorphometric analysis showed a downregulation of inflammation after administration of all treatments (P < 0.05). Histological analysis showed that the CIA-mice group had extensive bone erosion, pannus and severe focal inflammatory infiltrates. In contrast, there was a remarkable reduction in the severity of arthritis in mice under polymerized collagen, methotrexate or methotrexate/polymerized collagen treatment. Polymerized Collagen but not methotrexate induced tissue joint regeneration. Polymerized Collagen and methotrexate/polymerized collagen but not methotrexate alone induces downregulation of CD4+/IL17A+ T cells and upregulation of Tregs and CD4+/IFN-γ+ T cells. Thus, Polymerized Collagen could be an effective therapeutic agent in early and established rheumatoid arthritis by exerting downregulation of autoimmune inflammation. PMID:22028728

  10. Induction of acute and chronic arthritis by intra-articular injection of preformed collagen-anticollagen complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, C; Kovac, W; Endler, T A; Menzel, J; Smolen, J

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of rabbits were injected intra-articularly into the knee joints with preformed complexes of hydroxamated collagen and antiserum to denatured collagen respectively, with hydroxamated collagen and normal serum, hydroxamated collagen, anticollagen serum or saline as controls. From twelve rabbits, receiving only one injection and investigated 8 h later, only the joint tissues of rabbits which received immune complexes showed acute arthritis with severe infiltration of polymorphonuclears, leucocyte thrombi in vessels and haemorrhages. From six rabbits, receiving two consecutive injections (day 0 and day 2) and investigated 12 h after the last injection, only the joint tissue of rabbits which received immune complexes showed subacute-chronic arthritis. From sixteen rabbits receiving four consecutive injections day 0, day 2, day 7 and day 14) and investigated 7 days after the last injection, only the joint tissue of rabbits which received immune complexes showed severe chronic arthritis with infiltration of plasma cells, lymphocytes and nodule-like accumulation of lymphocytes whilst their joint fluid showed additionally a distinctly increased number of polymorphonuclears (3-15 x 10(6)) which differed with P less than 0-01 statistically from all controls. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:844892

  11. Effects of low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, So Yean; Sim, Joon-Soo; Jeong, Choon Sik; Chang, Seung Yeup; Choi, Don Woong; Toida, Toshihiko; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2004-01-01

    In order to evaluate the improvement in the treatment of chronic arthritis, we investigated chondroitin sulfate depolymerization product (low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate, LMWCS) and intact chondroitin sulfate (CS) in vitro and in vivo. LMWCS was prepared by a chemical depolymerization process induced by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of copper salts. LMWCS (300 mg/kg) and CS (1200 mg/kg) were orally administered to DBA/1J mice once daily for 14 d prior to initial immunization with type II collagen. Their elastase activities and the production of cytokines in sera were examined on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice. We also compared the paracellular transport of LMWCS and CS across Caco-2 cell monolayers and examined the inhibitory effects on elastase activities. LMWCS inhibited elastase activity slightly, but CS did not show inhibition. Hind paw edema was significantly decreased by LMWCS treatment. Levels of anti-type II collagen antibody and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in sera were also reduced by LMWCS treatment but not in case of CS, although no significant difference was observed between LMWCS and CS on interleukin-6 (IL-6) induction. The LMWCS preparation showed preventive effects on the type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and better permeability through Caco-2 cells. PMID:14709897

  12. IL-10 signaling in CD4+ T cells is critical for the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction IL-10 is a very important anti-inflammatory cytokine. However, the role of this cytokine in T cells in the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis is unclear. The purpose of this study was to define the role of IL-10 signaling in T cells in the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis. Methods IL-10 receptor dominant-negative transgenic (Tg) and control mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen to induce arthritis. The severity of arthritis was monitored and examined histologically. T-cell activation and cytokine production were analyzed using flow cytometry. T-cell proliferation was examined by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Antigen-specific antibodies in serum were measured by ELISA. Foxp3 expression in CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) was determined by intracellular staining or Foxp3-RFP reporter mice. The suppressive function of Foxp3+CD4+ Tregs was determined in vitro by performing a T-cell proliferation assay. The level of IL-17 mRNA in joints was measured by real-time PCR. A two-tailed nonparametric paired test (Wilcoxon signed-rank test) was used to calculate the arthritis and histological scores. Student's paired or unpaired t-test was used for all other statistical analyses (InStat version 2.03 software; GraphPad Software, San Diego, CA, USA). Results Blocking IL-10 signaling in T cells rendered mice, especially female mice, highly susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis. T-cell activation and proliferation were enhanced and produced more IFN-γ. The suppressive function of CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells was significantly impaired in Tg mice because of the reduced ability of Tregs from Tg mice to maintain their levels of Foxp3. This was further confirmed by transferring Foxp3-RFP cells from Tg or wild-type (Wt) mice into a congenic Wt host. The higher level of IL-17 mRNA was detected in inflammatory joints of Tg mice, probably due to the recruitment of IL-17+γδ T cells into the arthritic joints. Conclusion IL-10 signaling in T

  13. Expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand is related to sex differences in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Pan, Xiongxiong; Zhu, Qin; Lu, Hao; Wang, Kunpeng; Ni, Xuhao; Lu, Yunjie; Gu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Osteoclasts are responsible for bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis, and women show greater disease activity and functional disability than men. This study aimed to examine differences in the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis and osteoclastogenesis between female and male mice in vivo and in vitro. Female mice exhibited worse disease progression and increased osteoclastogenesis, as measured by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining than male mice. Significantly higher levels of CD11b(+) cells were detected in the bone marrow of female mice than that of male mice. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand was higher in female mice that were immunized with or without collagen II. These findings highlighted sex differences in arthritis morbidity and suggested that female mice are more likely to develop arthritis than male mice. Further studies are needed to investigate the mechanisms of sex differences in collagen-induced arthritis. PMID:25863233

  14. Puerarin attenuates inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody-induced arthritis via TLR4/NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changxing; Wang, Weidong; Jin, Xiaping; Shen, Jianguo; Hu, Weifeng; Jiang, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Puerarin is an important active ingredient in the root of kudzu vine due to its pharmacological properties. The aim of the present study is to contribute to the existing knowledge of the effect of puerarin in the attenuation of inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody-induced arthritis via toll‑like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling. Arthritis was induced using injection of anti‑type II collagen antibodies. Treatment with puerarin was observed to significantly decrease clinical scoring of the collagen antibody‑induced arthritis and suppress oxidative stress and the inflammatory response in mice. Furthermore, puerarin was demonstrated to inhibit mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase‑9 and protein expression of TLR4 following collagen antibody-induced arthritis in mice. The effect of puerarin may be associated with the suppression of NF‑κB activity in collagen antibody‑induced arthritis mice. Furthermore, upregulation of phosphorylated (p)‑Janus kinase 2 and p‑signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 protein expression was suppressed by puerarin. The results of the present study indicate, for the first time, the effect of puerarin to attenuate inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody‑induced arthritis via TLR4/NF-κB signaling. PMID:27278131

  15. Anti-rheumatoid arthritic effects of Saussurea involucrata on type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meihong; Guo, Qianying; Wang, Shuangjia; Wang, Na; Wei, Liren; Wang, Junbo

    2016-02-01

    Saussurea involucrata (SI) has long been used under the herbal name "snow lotus" for treatment of inflammation and pain-related diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. The present study aimed to evaluate the pharmacological effects of SI on collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis in rats. Rats with collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis were orally administered SI (420 mg kg(-1)) for 40 consecutive days. Histopathological examination indicated that SI alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells and synovial hyperplasia and slows joint destruction. SI intervention reduced the serum levels of RF, COMP, CRP and anti-CII IgG. Results also showed that SI is a potential therapeutic agent for alleviating the severity of the disease based on the reduced arthritic index. It was concluded that SI can ameliorate inflammation and joint destruction in CIA rats. PMID:26508519

  16. Treatment of Collagen-Induced Arthritis Using Immune Modulatory Properties of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyu-Hyung; Mun, Chin Hee; Kang, Mi-Il; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Soo-Kon; Park, Yong-Beom

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immune modulatory properties. We investigated the potential therapeutic effects of human bone marrow (BM)-, adipose tissue (AD)-, and cord blood (CB)-derived MSCs in an experimental animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and explored the mechanism underlying immune modulation by MSCs. We evaluated the therapeutic effect of clinically available human BM-, AD-, and CB-derived MSCs in DBA/1 mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA mice were injected intraperitoneally with three types of MSCs. Treatment control animals were injected with 35 mg/kg methotrexate (MTX) twice weekly. Clinical activity in CIA mice, degree of inflammation, cytokine expression in the joint, serum cytokine levels, and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were evaluated. Mice treated with human BM-, AD-, and CB-MSCs showed significant improvement in clinical joint score, comparable to MTX-treated mice. Histologic examination showed greatly reduced joint inflammation and damage in MSC-treated mice compared with untreated mice. Microcomputed tomography also showed little joint damage in the MSC-treated group. MSCs significantly decreased serum interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, and interferon-γ and increased IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β levels. Tregs were increased in mice treated with MSCs compared to untreated or MTX-treated mice. Human BM-, AD-, and CB-MSCs significantly suppressed joint inflammation in CIA mice. The cells decreased proinflammatory cytokines and upregulated anti-inflammatory cytokines and induced Tregs. Therefore, our study suggests that the use of human BM-, AD-, and CB-MSCs could be an effective therapeutic approach for RA. PMID:25853338

  17. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Systemic Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Manasa G.; Kour, Supinder; Piprode, Vikrant; Mittal, Monika; Kumar, Anil; Rani, Lekha; Pote, Satish T.; Mishra, Gyan C.; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammatory synovitis leading to joint destruction and systemic bone loss. The inflammation-induced bone loss is mediated by increased osteoclast formation and function. Current antirheumatic therapies primarily target suppression of inflammatory cascade with limited or no success in controlling progression of bone destruction. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by virtue of their tissue repair and immunomodulatory properties have shown promising results in various autoimmune and degenerative diseases. However, the role of MSCs in prevention of bone destruction in RA is not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) on in vitro formation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and pathological bone loss in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA. We observed that ASCs significantly inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)–induced osteoclastogenesis in both a contact-dependent and -independent manner. Additionally, ASCs inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-17, and IL-1β. Furthermore, treatment with ASCs at the onset of CIA significantly reduced clinical symptoms and joint pathology. Interestingly, ASCs protected periarticular and systemic bone loss in CIA mice by maintaining trabecular bone structure. We further observed that treatment with ASCs reduced osteoclast precursors in bone marrow, resulting in decreased osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, ASCs suppressed autoimmune T cell responses and increased the percentages of peripheral regulatory T and B cells. Thus, we provide strong evidence that ASCs ameliorate inflammation-induced systemic bone loss in CIA mice by reducing osteoclast precursors and promoting immune tolerance. PMID:26538398

  18. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Systemic Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Manasa G; Kour, Supinder; Piprode, Vikrant; Mittal, Monika; Kumar, Anil; Rani, Lekha; Pote, Satish T; Mishra, Gyan C; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammatory synovitis leading to joint destruction and systemic bone loss. The inflammation-induced bone loss is mediated by increased osteoclast formation and function. Current antirheumatic therapies primarily target suppression of inflammatory cascade with limited or no success in controlling progression of bone destruction. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by virtue of their tissue repair and immunomodulatory properties have shown promising results in various autoimmune and degenerative diseases. However, the role of MSCs in prevention of bone destruction in RA is not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) on in vitro formation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and pathological bone loss in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA. We observed that ASCs significantly inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis in both a contact-dependent and -independent manner. Additionally, ASCs inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-17, and IL-1β. Furthermore, treatment with ASCs at the onset of CIA significantly reduced clinical symptoms and joint pathology. Interestingly, ASCs protected periarticular and systemic bone loss in CIA mice by maintaining trabecular bone structure. We further observed that treatment with ASCs reduced osteoclast precursors in bone marrow, resulting in decreased osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, ASCs suppressed autoimmune T cell responses and increased the percentages of peripheral regulatory T and B cells. Thus, we provide strong evidence that ASCs ameliorate inflammation-induced systemic bone loss in CIA mice by reducing osteoclast precursors and promoting immune tolerance.

  19. Autoantibodies to type II collagen: occurrence in rheumatoid arthritis, other arthritides, autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and chronic inflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, E K; Gatenby, P A; McGill, N W; Bateman, J F; Cole, W G; York, J R

    1988-01-01

    Serum IgG antibodies to native and denatured human type II collagen (Col II) were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). One hundred and thirty one patients with various forms of arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis (PSA). Reiter's Syndrome (RS), osteoarthritis (OA), and gout, 60 with autoimmune connective tissue disease, and 37 with the chronic inflammatory conditions--graft versus host disease and leprosy--were studied. With the exception of RS, PSA, OA, and gout, significant levels of Col II antibodies were detected in each disease group. Blocking studies with types I and II collagen on selected serum samples confirmed the specificity to native Col II, though some cross reactivity was apparent with denatured collagen. The patients with RA who were Col II antibody positive tended to fall into stage III of disease progression. There was, however, no correlation with rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, or disease duration and this, together with the finding that Col II antibodies are present in a wide array of diseases, makes their role in the pathogenesis of RA questionable. They may arise as a secondary disease perpetuating mechanism in some patients, or in turn may be an epiphenomenon secondary to generalised disturbed immunoregulation or B cell hyperreactivity, or both, that characterises these clinical conditions. PMID:3365030

  20. Effects of Wutou Decoction on DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications in Rats with Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Fei; Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying; Hu, Yong-Hong; Tu, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wutou decoction (WTD) has been wildly applied in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and experimental arthritis in rats for many years. Epigenetic deregulation is associated with the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the effects of WTD on epigenetic changes are unclear. This study is set to explore the effects of WTD on DNA methylation and histone modifications in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The CIA model was established by the stimulation of collagen and adjuvant. The knee synovium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methylated CpG binding domain 2 (MBD2) expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by Real-Time PCR. The global DNA histone H3-K4/H3-K27 methylation and total histones H3 and H4 acetylation of PBMCs were detected. Results. Our data demonstrated that the DNMT1 mRNA expression was significantly lowered in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). The DNA methylation level was significantly reduced in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). Moreover, H3 acetylation of PBMCs was overexpressed in WTD compared with CIA (P < 0.05). Conclusions. WTD may modulate DNA methylation and histone modifications, functioning as anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:27042192

  1. Exacerbation of collagen induced arthritis by Fcγ receptor targeted collagen peptide due to enhanced inflammatory chemokine and cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Szarka, Eszter; Neer, Zsuzsa; Balogh, Péter; Ádori, Monika; Angyal, Adrienn; Prechl, József; Kiss, Endre; Kövesdi, Dorottya; Sármay, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies specific for bovine type II collagen (CII) and Fcγ receptors play a major role in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our aim was to clarify the mechanism of immune complex-mediated inflammation and modulation of the disease. CII pre-immunized DBA/1 mice were intravenously boosted with extravidin coupled biotinylated monomeric CII-peptide epitope (ARGLTGRPGDA) and its complexes with biotinylated FcγRII/III specific single chain Fv (scFv) fragment. Disease scores were monitored, antibody titers and cytokines were determined by ELISA, and binding of complexes was detected by flow cytometry and immune histochemistry. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was monitored by protein profiler microarray. When intravenously administered into collagen-primed DBA/1 mice, both CII-peptide and its complex with 2.4G2 scFv significantly accelerated CIA and increased the severity of the disease, whereas the monomeric peptide and monomeric 2.4G2 scFv had no effect. FcγRII/III targeted CII-peptide complexes bound to marginal zone macrophages and dendritic cells, and significantly elevated the synthesis of peptide-specific IgG2a. Furthermore, CII-peptide containing complexes augmented the in vivo secretion of cytokines, including IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, IL-23, and chemokines (CXCL13, MIP-1, MIP-2). These data indicate that complexes formed by the CII-peptide epitope aggravate CIA by inducing the secretion of chemokines and the IL-12/23 family of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these results suggest that the in vivo emerging immune complexes formed with autoantigen(s) may trigger the IL-12/23 dependent pathways, escalating the inflammation in RA. Thus blockade of these cytokines may be beneficial to downregulate immune complex-induced inflammation in autoimmune arthritis. PMID:22532778

  2. Exacerbation of collagen induced arthritis by Fcγ receptor targeted collagen peptide due to enhanced inflammatory chemokine and cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Szarka, Eszter; Neer, Zsuzsa; Balogh, Péter; Adori, Monika; Angyal, Adrienn; Prechl, József; Kiss, Endre; Kövesdi, Dorottya; Sármay, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies specific for bovine type II collagen (CII) and Fcγ receptors play a major role in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our aim was to clarify the mechanism of immune complex-mediated inflammation and modulation of the disease. CII pre-immunized DBA/1 mice were intravenously boosted with extravidin coupled biotinylated monomeric CII-peptide epitope (ARGLTGRPGDA) and its complexes with biotinylated FcγRII/III specific single chain Fv (scFv) fragment. Disease scores were monitored, antibody titers and cytokines were determined by ELISA, and binding of complexes was detected by flow cytometry and immune histochemistry. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was monitored by protein profiler microarray. When intravenously administered into collagen-primed DBA/1 mice, both CII-peptide and its complex with 2.4G2 scFv significantly accelerated CIA and increased the severity of the disease, whereas the monomeric peptide and monomeric 2.4G2 scFv had no effect. FcγRII/III targeted CII-peptide complexes bound to marginal zone macrophages and dendritic cells, and significantly elevated the synthesis of peptide-specific IgG2a. Furthermore, CII-peptide containing complexes augmented the in vivo secretion of cytokines, including IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, IL-23, and chemokines (CXCL13, MIP-1, MIP-2). These data indicate that complexes formed by the CII-peptide epitope aggravate CIA by inducing the secretion of chemokines and the IL-12/23 family of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these results suggest that the in vivo emerging immune complexes formed with autoantigen(s) may trigger the IL-12/23 dependent pathways, escalating the inflammation in RA. Thus blockade of these cytokines may be beneficial to downregulate immune complex-induced inflammation in autoimmune arthritis. PMID:22532778

  3. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or have trouble moving around, you might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints ... joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such ...

  4. Serum antibodies to type II collagen in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison of 6 immunological methods and clinical features.

    PubMed Central

    Clague, R B; Firth, S A; Holt, P J; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L; Webley, M

    1983-01-01

    A collaborative study of 75 selected patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) employing 6 different methods for the detection of antibodies to type II collagen showed highly significant correlations between all the assays. The radioimmunoassays showed a greater sensitivity than either the passive haemagglutination or immunofluorescent techniques, and when the native collagen molecule was heat-denatured a higher number of patients showed increased antibody levels. In 33 patients the measurement of serum antibody levels to human, bovine, and rat native type II collagen showed a lack of species specificity, indicating that heterologous collagens can be employed in these assays. A retrospective analysis of the clinical, laboratory, and radiological features in the 41 patients with raised antibody levels and the 34 patients with normal antibody levels showed very few differences, but there was a significantly lower incidence of subcutaneous nodules (24% versus 56%) in patients with raised antibody levels. This study emphasizes the need to standardize assays for the measurement of serum antibody levels to native type II collagen. More extensive studies will be required before the clinical significance of these antibodies can be fully established. Images PMID:6354111

  5. Serum antibodies to type II collagen in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison of 6 immunological methods and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Clague, R B; Firth, S A; Holt, P J; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L; Webley, M

    1983-10-01

    A collaborative study of 75 selected patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) employing 6 different methods for the detection of antibodies to type II collagen showed highly significant correlations between all the assays. The radioimmunoassays showed a greater sensitivity than either the passive haemagglutination or immunofluorescent techniques, and when the native collagen molecule was heat-denatured a higher number of patients showed increased antibody levels. In 33 patients the measurement of serum antibody levels to human, bovine, and rat native type II collagen showed a lack of species specificity, indicating that heterologous collagens can be employed in these assays. A retrospective analysis of the clinical, laboratory, and radiological features in the 41 patients with raised antibody levels and the 34 patients with normal antibody levels showed very few differences, but there was a significantly lower incidence of subcutaneous nodules (24% versus 56%) in patients with raised antibody levels. This study emphasizes the need to standardize assays for the measurement of serum antibody levels to native type II collagen. More extensive studies will be required before the clinical significance of these antibodies can be fully established.

  6. Pattern of humoral reactivity to type II collagen in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Boissier, M C; Chiocchia, G; Texier, B; Fournier, C

    1989-01-01

    Humoral immunity directed against type II collagen (CII) is a common although not specific feature of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We have shown that 10 to 15% of the sera either from RA patients (n = 88) or from healthy controls (n = 149) reacted with native human CII. Conversely, autoantibodies to the alpha-1 (II) chains were significantly more frequent in the RA group (26.1% versus 6.0%, P<0.001), suggestingthatdenaturedCII may bean autoantigenin RA. Thus, human CII was cleaved with cyanogen bromide (CB), and immunoblotting techniques were performed on 19 RA and 21 normal sera. Among the four major CB peptides, CB10 and CB11 were recognized by most of the sera tested without distinction between normal or RA sera. Inhibition experiments using an ELISA have shown that: (i) antibodies to the native CII molecule did not cross-react with those recognizing the CB peptides, and vice-versa; (ii) the binding of the sera to native CII was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with alpha-1 (II) chains, and vice-versa; (iii) pre-incubation of the sera with CB peptides partially blocked the binding to alpha-1 (II) chains, whereas pre-incubation of the sera with alpha-1 (II) chains totally inhibited the reactivity against CB peptides; and (iv) a substantial proportion of the epitopes recognized by anti-CII autoantibodies was neither species specific nor type specific. Taken together, these findings reveal the existence of several populations of anti-CII autoantibodies: some antibodies react exclusively with conformational determinants of the CII molecule, and others are directed towards linear structures of alpha-1 (II) chains. Images Fig. 3 PMID:12412745

  7. Lupeol acetate ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis and osteoclastogenesis of mice through improvement of microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Hsun; Chuang, Hui-Yen; Chen, Chien-Hui; Chen, Wun-Ke; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2016-04-01

    Lupeol has been shown with anti-inflammation and antitumor capability, however, the poor bioavailability limiting its applications in living subjects. Lupeol acetate (LA), a derivative of lupeol, shows similar biological activities as lupeol but with better bioavailability. Here RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were treated with 0-80μM of LA, and assayed for TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, MCP-1 using Western blotting. Moreover, osteoclatogenesis was examined with reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. For in vivo study, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA)-bearing DBA/1J mice were randomly separated into three groups: vehicle, LA-treated (50mg/kg) and curcumin-treated (100mg/kg). Therapeutic efficacies were assayed by the clinical score, expression levels of serum cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) microPET/CT and histopathology. The results showed that LA could inhibit the activation, migration, and formation of osteoclastogenesis of macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. In RA-bearing mice, the expressions of inflammation-related cytokines were suppressed, and clinical symptoms and bone erosion were ameliorated by LA. The accumulation of (18)F-FDG in the joints of RA-bearing mice was also significantly decreased by LA. The results indicate that LA significantly improves the symptoms of RA by down-regulating expressions of inflammatory cytokines and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:27044833

  8. Lack of acetylcholine nicotine alpha 7 receptor suppresses development of collagen-induced arthritis and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Westman, M; Saha, S; Morshed, M; Lampa, J

    2010-10-01

    Activation of the alpha7 receptor (α7nAChR) has been shown to be important in inflammation and immune regulation, and is also essential in the neural cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of α7nAChR in the development of experimental arthritis and immune activation. Mice lacking the α7nAChR were immunized with collagen II and the development of arthritis was assessed. Another group of α7nAChR-deficient mice was immunized with ovalbumin, spleen and lymph node cells were isolated and the proliferative responses to restimulation with ovalbumin or concanavalin A were investigated. We could demonstrate significantly milder arthritis and less cartilage destruction, together with a decrease of T cell content in lymph nodes in mice lacking the α7nAChR compared to wild-type controls. In addition, mice lacking the α7nAChR had a deficient proliferative response to concanavalin A, whereas antigen presentation-dependent proliferation was not affected. These results indicate important roles for α7nAChR in arthritis development as well as in regulation of T cell-dependent immunological mechanisms. In addition, the data implicate α7nAChR as a therapeutic target for modulation of adaptive immune responses.

  9. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells contribute to bone erosion in collagen-induced arthritis by differentiating to osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Huang, Yuefang; Wang, Shuang; Fu, Rong; Guo, Chaohuan; Wang, Hongyue; Zhao, Jijun; Gaskin, Felicia; Chen, Jingxian; Yang, Niansheng; Fu, Shu Man

    2015-12-01

    Bone erosion is a sign of severe rheumatoid arthritis and osteoclasts play a major role in the bone resorption. Recently, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) has been reported to be increased in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The number of circulating MDSCs is shown to correlate with rheumatoid arthritis. These findings suggest that MDSCs are precursor cells involved in bone erosion. In this study, MDSCs isolated from mice with CIA stimulated with M-CSF and RANKL in vitro expressed osteoclast markers and acquired osteoclast bone resorption function. MDSCs sorted from CIA mice were transferred into the tibia of normal DBA/1J mice and bones were subjected to histological and Micro CT analyses. The transferred CIA-MDSCs were shown to differentiate into TRAP(+) osteoclasts that were capable of bone resorption in vivo. MDSCs isolated from normal mice had more potent suppressor activity and much less capability to differentiate to osteoclast. Additional experiments showed that NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 or IκB inhibitor peptide blocked the differentiation of MDSCs to osteoclast and bone resorption. IL-1Ra also blocked this differentiation. In contrast, the addition of IL-1α further enhanced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. These results suggest that MDSCs are a source of osteoclast precursors and inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, contributing significantly to erosive changes seen in rheumatoid arthritis and related disorders. PMID:26318644

  10. Immunosuppressive activity of deer antler extracts of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, on type II collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Koo; Kim, Kap-Sung; Kim, Sung-Il; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Lee, In-Seon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2006-01-01

    Unossified horn or pilose antler cut from deer, which belong to the Cervidae generally is termed Nokyong. Nokyong is one of the most famous Korean traditional medicines and has been considered to possess sexual-reinforcing and antiaging actions. In this study, water extract of deer antler extract (DAA) prepared from the growing antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe was used to investigate the efficacy of the DAA on the development of type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Male rats were immunized with an emulsion of 200 microg of CII and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The rats then were administered by injection a suspension of DAA or phosphate-buffered saline. The effect of DAA on cellular responses to CII was examined. The injection of DAA suppressed the CII-specific secretion of interferon (IFN)-gamma from splenocytes ex vivo. The influence of DAA also was evaluated on the incidence and development of arthritis in rat CIA. Rats were immunized twice at a 3-wk interval with bovine CII, with DAA being given by injection once a d for 14 d with four different regimens. A 14-d course of DAA treatment at a daily dose of 100 microg/kg, which began on the d of the first CII immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis, as well as antibody formation and delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII. Treatment with DAA resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and immune responses to CII.

  11. Evaluation of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody therapy using murine type II collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bailin; Song, Zheng; Wu, Bin; Gardner, Debra; Shealy, David; Song, Xiao-Yu; Wooley, Paul H

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that is critical for T/B-cell differentiation and maturation, immunoglobulin secretion, acute-phase protein production, and macrophage/monocyte functions. Extensive research into the biology of IL-6 has implicated IL-6 in the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of RA. An anti-murine IL-6 mAb that neutralizes mouse IL-6 activities was tested in animal model of collagen-induced arthritis. Prophylactic treatment with anti-IL-6 mAb significantly reduced the incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control mAb treated mice. The mitogenic response of B and T cells isolated from the lymph nodes of anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced compared to cells isolated from control mAb treated mice. The overall histopathology score for paws from the anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced when compared to paws from mice treated with control mAb, including both inflammatory (synovitis and pannus) and erosive (erosions and architecture) parameters. Reduced loss of cartilage matrix components was also observed in the anti-IL-6 treated mice. Collectively, these data suggest that IL-6 plays a major role in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus support the potential benefit of anti-IL-6 mAb treatment in rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:19368720

  12. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells contribute to bone erosion in collagen-induced arthritis by differentiating to osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Huang, Yuefang; Wang, Shuang; Fu, Rong; Guo, Chaohuan; Wang, Hongyue; Zhao, Jijun; Gaskin, Felicia; Chen, Jingxian; Yang, Niansheng; Fu, Shu Man

    2015-12-01

    Bone erosion is a sign of severe rheumatoid arthritis and osteoclasts play a major role in the bone resorption. Recently, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) has been reported to be increased in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The number of circulating MDSCs is shown to correlate with rheumatoid arthritis. These findings suggest that MDSCs are precursor cells involved in bone erosion. In this study, MDSCs isolated from mice with CIA stimulated with M-CSF and RANKL in vitro expressed osteoclast markers and acquired osteoclast bone resorption function. MDSCs sorted from CIA mice were transferred into the tibia of normal DBA/1J mice and bones were subjected to histological and Micro CT analyses. The transferred CIA-MDSCs were shown to differentiate into TRAP(+) osteoclasts that were capable of bone resorption in vivo. MDSCs isolated from normal mice had more potent suppressor activity and much less capability to differentiate to osteoclast. Additional experiments showed that NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 or IκB inhibitor peptide blocked the differentiation of MDSCs to osteoclast and bone resorption. IL-1Ra also blocked this differentiation. In contrast, the addition of IL-1α further enhanced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. These results suggest that MDSCs are a source of osteoclast precursors and inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, contributing significantly to erosive changes seen in rheumatoid arthritis and related disorders.

  13. Immune regulation and anti-inflammatory effects of isogarcinol extracted from Garcinia mangostana L. against collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanxia; Zhou, Hailing; Wang, Mengqi; Cen, Juren; Wei, Qun

    2014-05-01

    Isogarcinol is a natural compound that we extracted from Garcinia mangostana L., and we were the first to report that it is a new immunosuppressant. In the present study, we investigated the immune regulation and anti-inflammatory effects of isogarcinol on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and explored its potential mechanism in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The oral administration of isogarcinol significantly reduced clinical scores, alleviated cartilage and bone erosion, and reduced the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines in CIA mice. Isogarcinol inhibited xylene-induced mouse ear edema in vivo. In vitro, isogarcinol decreased iNOS and COX-2 mRNA expression and NO content by inhibiting NF-κB expression. Furthermore, isogarcinol decreased the activity of NFAT and inhibited IL-2 expression. The mechanism of action of isogarcinol is associated with down-regulation of both autoimmune and inflammatory reactions.

  14. Dopamine D2 Receptor Is Involved in Alleviation of Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Yi-Qian; Deng, Qiao-Wen; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Human and murine lymphocytes express dopamine (DA) D2-like receptors including DRD2, DRD3, and DRD4. However, their roles in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are less clear. Here we showed that lymphocyte DRD2 activation alleviates both imbalance of T-helper (Th)17/T-regulatory (Treg) cells and inflamed symptoms in a mouse arthritis model of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was prepared by intradermal injection of chicken collagen type II (CII) in tail base of DBA/1 mice or Drd2 (-/-) C57BL/6 mice. D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole downregulated expression of proinflammatory Th17-related cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 17 and IL-22 but further upregulated expression of anti-inflammatory Treg-related cytokines transforming growth factor- (TGF-) β and IL-10 in lymphocytes in vitro and in ankle joints in vivo in CIA mice. Quinpirole intraperitoneal administration reduced both clinical arthritis score and serum anti-CII IgG level in CIA mice. However, Drd2 (-/-) CIA mice manifested more severe limb inflammation and higher serum anti-CII IgG level and further upregulated IL-17 and IL-22 expression and downregulated TGF-β and IL-10 expression than wild-type CIA mice. In contrast, Drd1 (-/-) CIA mice did not alter limb inflammation or anti-CII IgG level compared with wild-type CIA mice. These results suggest that DRD2 activation is involved in alleviation of CIA symptoms by amelioration of Th17/Treg imbalance. PMID:26693483

  15. CZ415, a Highly Selective mTOR Inhibitor Showing in Vivo Efficacy in a Collagen Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Cansfield, Andrew D; Ladduwahetty, Tammy; Sunose, Mihiro; Ellard, Katie; Lynch, Rosemary; Newton, Anthea L; Lewis, Ann; Bennett, Gavin; Zinn, Nico; Thomson, Douglas W; Rüger, Anne J; Feutrill, John T; Rausch, Oliver; Watt, Alan P; Bergamini, Giovanna

    2016-08-11

    CZ415, a potent ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor with unprecedented selectivity over any other kinase is described. In addition to a comprehensive characterization of its activities in vitro, in vitro ADME, and in vivo pharmacokinetic data are reported. The suitability of this inhibitor for studying in vivo mTOR biology is demonstrated in a mechanistic mouse model monitoring mTOR proximal downstream phosphorylation signaling. Furthermore, the compound reported here is the first ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor described to show efficacy in a semitherapeutic collagen induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. PMID:27563401

  16. OSCAR-collagen signaling in monocytes plays a proinflammatory role and may contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Heidi S; Guo, Li; Keller, Pernille; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Sun, Mingyi; Guo, Wei; Ma, Chunyan; Hamilton, John A; Bjørkdahl, Olle; Berchtold, Martin W; Panina, Svetlana

    2016-04-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is an activating receptor expressed by human myeloid cells. Collagen type I (ColI) and collagen type II (ColII) serve as ligands for OSCAR. OSCAR-collagen interaction stimulates RANK-dependent osteoclastogenesis. We have recently reported that OSCAR promotes functional maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells. OSCAR is upregulated on monocytes from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with active disease, and these monocytes show an increased proosteoclastogenic potential. In the current study, we have addressed a functional role for an OSCAR-collagen interaction on monocytes. We show that OSCAR-ColII signaling promoted the survival of monocytes. Moreover, ColII stimulated the release of proinflammatory cytokines by monocytes from healthy donors, which could be completely blocked by an anti-OSCAR monoclonal antibody. Mononuclear cells from the synovial fluid of RA patients plated on ColII secreted TNF-α and IL-8 in an OSCAR-dependent manner. Global RNA profiling showed that components of multiple signaling pathways relevant to RA pathogenesis are regulated at the transcriptional level by OSCAR in monocytes. Thus, OSCAR can play a proinflammatory role in monocyte-derived cells and may contribute crucially on multiple levels to RA pathogenesis. PMID:26786702

  17. Non-Enzymatic Decomposition of Collagen Fibers by a Biglycan Antibody and a Plausible Mechanism for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2013-04-08

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune inflammatory and destructive joint disorder that affects tens of millions of people worldwide. Normal healthy joints maintain a balance between the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and the proteolytic degradation of damaged ones. In the case of RA, this balance is shifted toward matrix destruction due to increased production of cleavage enzymes and the presence of (autoimmune) immunoglobulins resulting from an inflammation induced immune response. Herein we demonstrate that a polyclonal antibody against the proteoglycan biglycan (BG) causes tissue destruction that may be analogous to that of RA affected tissues. The effect of the antibody is more potent than harsh chemical and/or enzymatic treatments designed to mimic arthritis-like fibril de-polymerization. In RA cases, the immune response to inflammation causes synovial fibroblasts, monocytes and macrophages to produce cytokines and secrete matrix remodeling enzymes, whereas B cells are stimulated to produce immunoglobulins. The specific antigen that causes the RA immune response has not yet been identified, although possible candidates have been proposed, including collagen types I and II, and proteoglycans (PG's) such as biglycan. We speculate that the initiation of RA associated tissue destruction in vivo may involve a similar non-enzymatic decomposition of collagen fibrils via the immunoglobulins themselves that we observe here ex vivo.

  18. Deacetylase inhibition increases regulatory T cell function and decreases incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Saouaf, Sandra J; Li, Bin; Zhang, Geng; Shen, Yuan; Furuuchi, Narumi; Hancock, Wayne W; Greene, Mark I

    2009-10-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an established mouse model of disease with hallmarks of clinical rheumatoid arthritis. Histone/protein deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are known to inhibit the pathogenesis of CIA and other models of autoimmune disease, although the mechanisms responsible are unclear. Regulatory T cell (Treg) function is defective in rheumatoid arthritis. FOXP3 proteins in Tregs are present in a dynamic protein complex containing histone acetyltransferase and HDAC enzymes, and FOXP3 itself is acetylated on lysine residues. We therefore investigated the effects of HDACi therapy on regulatory T cell function in the CIA model. Administration of an HDACi, valproic acid (VPA), significantly decreased disease incidence (p<0.005) and severity (p<0.03) in CIA. In addition, VPA treatment increased both the suppressive function of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs (p<0.04) and the numbers of CD25(+)FOXP3(+) Tregs in vivo. Hence, clinically approved HDACi such as VPA may limit autoimmune disease in vivo through effects on the production and function of FOXP3(+) Treg cells. PMID:19577564

  19. Deacetylase Inhibition Increases Regulatory T Cell Function and Decreases Incidence and Severity of Collagen-induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Saouaf, Sandra J.; Li, Bin; Zhang, Geng; Shen, Yuan; Furuuchi, Narumi; Hancock, Wayne W.; Greene, Mark I.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an established mouse model of disease with hallmarks of clinical rheumatoid arthritis. Histone/protein deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are known to inhibit the pathogenesis of CIA and other models of autoimmune disease, although the mechanisms responsible are unclear. Regulatory T cell (Treg) function is defective in rheumatoid arthritis. FOXP3 proteins in Tregs are present in a dynamic protein complex containing histone acetyltransferase and HDAC enzymes, and FOXP3 itself is acetylated on lysine residues. We therefore investigated the effects of HDACi therapy on regulatory T cell function in the CIA model. Administration of an HDACi, valproic acid (VPA), significantly decreased disease incidence (p<0.005) and severity (p<0.03) in CIA. In addition, VPA treatment increased both the suppressive function of CD4+CD25+ Tregs (p<0.04) and the numbers of CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs in vivo. Hence, clinically approved HDACi such as VPA may limit autoimmune disease in vivo through effects on the production and function of FOXP3+ Treg cells. PMID:19577564

  20. A new phenylpyrazoleanilide, y-320, inhibits interleukin 17 production and ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Hiroyuki; Ishibuchi, Seigo; Oshita, Koichi; Seki, Noriyasu; Kataoka, Hirotoshi; Sugahara, Kunio; Adachi, Kunitomo; Chiba, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-17 are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) because both pro-inflammatory cytokines are found in synovial fluid of RA patients. In this study, we examined the pharmacological profiles of Y-320, a new phenylpyrazoleanilide immunomodulator. Y-320 inhibited IL-17 production by CD4 T cells stimulated with IL-15 with IC50 values of 20 to 60 nM. Oral administration of Y-320 (0.3 to 3 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the development and progression of arthritis and joint destruction with reduction of IL-17 mRNA expression in arthritic joints of type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1J mice. Y-320 in combination with anti-murine tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibody showed a synergistic effect on mouse CIA. Moreover, therapeutic treatment with Y-320 (0.3 and 1 mg/kg orally) ameliorated CIA in cynomolgus monkeys. Our results suggest that Y-320, an orally active inhibitor for IL-17 production, provides a useful therapy for RA. PMID:24366113

  1. Anti-inflammatory activities of light emitting diode irradiation on collagen-induced arthritis in mice (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Yusuke; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an auto-immune disease afflicting multiple joints of the body, where as a result of the increase in inflammatory cytokines and tissue destructive factors such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, deterioration of the bones and cartilages of the joints occurs. The present investigation was carried out to study the anti-inflammatory activities of light emitting diode (LED) irradiation on hind paw inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice models. Materials and method: RA in the CIA mouse model was induced by immunization of DBA/1J mice with intradermal injections of an emulsion of bovine type II collagen and complete Freund's adjuvant. A total of 20 CIA mice were subdivided into the following groups: control group, CIA group and 2 groups of LED irradiated CIA mice (LED groups) (n=5 per group). The mouse knee joint area in the LED groups (the 570 nm and 940 nm groups) was irradiated with LED energy, three times a week for 500 s per session over 8 weeks at a dose of 5 J/cm2. The hind paw swelling was assessed by the increase in hind paw thickness. The serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines and arthritic factor MMP-3 were determined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In the LED-570 and LED-940 groups at 4 weeks after arthritis induction, the swelling inhibition index was 18.1±4.9 and 29.3±4.0 respectively. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and MMP-3 serum levels were significantly lower in the LED-940 group. Conclusions: LED irradiation, particularly in the near-infrared was effective for inhibition of the inflammatory reactions caused by RA. PMID:25368445

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of lycopene isolated from Chlorella marina on type II collagen induced arthritis in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Renju, G L; Muraleedhara Kurup, G; Saritha Kumari, C H

    2013-04-01

    The role of commercially available lycopene (all-trans) from tomato in controlling arthritis has been reported. Even though many reports are available that the cis form of lycopene is more biologically active, no report seems to be available on lycopene (cis and trans) isolated from an easily available and culturable sources. In the present study, the anti-arthritic effect of lycopene (cis and trans) from the algae Chlorella marina (AL) has been compared with lycopene (all-trans) from tomato (TL) and indomethacin (Indo). Arthritis (CIA) was developed in male Sprague dawley rats by collagen and the following parameters were studied. The activities of inflammatory marker enzymes like cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were found to be decreased on treatment with AL when compared to TL and Indo. Changes in Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cells (RBC) count, hemoglobin (Hb), C-reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF), and ceruloplasmin levels observed in the blood of arthritic animals were brought back to normal by AL when compared to TL and Indo. Histopathology of paw and joint tissues showed marked reduction in edema on supplementation of AL. Thus these results indicate the potential beneficiary effect of algal lycopene on collagen induced arthritis in rats when compared to TL and even to the commonly used anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. Therefore lycopene from C. marina would be recommended as a better natural source with increased activity and without side effects in the treatment of anti-inflammatory diseases. PMID:23237458

  3. Incidence and specificity of antibodies to types I, II, III, IV, and V collagen in rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases as measured by 125I-radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.M.; Huffstutter, E.H.; Townes, A.S.; Kang, A.H.

    1983-07-01

    Antibodies to human native and denatured types I, II, III, IV, and V collagens were measured using 125I-radioimmunoassay. Mean levels of binding by sera from 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients were significantly higher than those from 20 normal subjects against all of the collagens tested. The relative antibody concentration was higher in synovial fluid than in simultaneously obtained serum. Many patients with gout or various other rheumatic diseases also had detectable anticollagen antibodies. With a few notable exceptions, the majority of the reactivity detected in all patient groups was directed against covalent structural determinants present on all of the denatured collagens, suggesting a secondary reaction to tissue injury.

  4. Collagen Specific T-Cell Repertoire and HLA-DR Alleles: Biomarkers of Active Refractory Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Di Sante, Gabriele; Tolusso, Barbara; Fedele, Anna Laura; Gremese, Elisa; Alivernini, Stefano; Nicolò, Chiara; Ria, Francesco; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic joint inflammation and associates with HLA-DRB1*04. The Collagen IIp261-273-specific T cell repertoire in the peripheral blood of DR4 + patients at the onset of the disease shows a restricted TCR-beta chain usage among which the most frequent is TRBV25. To define whether this group of DR4-restricted collagen-specific shared T cell could represent markers of active-severe disease and response to therapy, 90 subjects affected by early-RA were enrolled in the study; peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured with or without the human collagen II peptide p261-273 and were examined by immunoscope analysis for the usage of the previously identified shared TCR-beta chains. We report that the presence of T cells carrying rearrangement TRBV25 associated with HLA-DR haplotype and disease activity. HLA-DRB1* haplotypes 04–04, 04–01 and 04–11 were significantly associated with usage of TRBV25, higher disease activity at the onset of disease and poor response to DMARDs. Finally, the HLA-DRB1* haplotype appeared complementary with current serologic tools to predict good and poor responders in a treat to target strategy. The data reported here offer clues to predict the course of the disease and to foresee personalized treatments in RA patients. PMID:26844284

  5. Collagen Specific T-Cell Repertoire and HLA-DR Alleles: Biomarkers of Active Refractory Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Di Sante, Gabriele; Tolusso, Barbara; Fedele, Anna Laura; Gremese, Elisa; Alivernini, Stefano; Nicolò, Chiara; Ria, Francesco; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic joint inflammation and associates with HLA-DRB1*04. The Collagen IIp261-273-specific T cell repertoire in the peripheral blood of DR4 + patients at the onset of the disease shows a restricted TCR-beta chain usage among which the most frequent is TRBV25. To define whether this group of DR4-restricted collagen-specific shared T cell could represent markers of active-severe disease and response to therapy, 90 subjects affected by early-RA were enrolled in the study; peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured with or without the human collagen II peptide p261-273 and were examined by immunoscope analysis for the usage of the previously identified shared TCR-beta chains. We report that the presence of T cells carrying rearrangement TRBV25 associated with HLA-DR haplotype and disease activity. HLA-DRB1* haplotypes 04-04, 04-01 and 04-11 were significantly associated with usage of TRBV25, higher disease activity at the onset of disease and poor response to DMARDs. Finally, the HLA-DRB1* haplotype appeared complementary with current serologic tools to predict good and poor responders in a treat to target strategy. The data reported here offer clues to predict the course of the disease and to foresee personalized treatments in RA patients.

  6. Systemic gene transfer of binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) prevents disease progression in murine collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shields, A M; Klavinskis, L S; Antoniou, M; Wooley, P H; Collins, H L; Panayi, G S; Thompson, S J; Corrigall, V M

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) has previously demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in multiple models of inflammatory arthritis. We investigated whether these immunoregulatory properties could be exploited using gene therapy techniques. A single intraperitoneal injection of lentiviral vector containing the murine BiP (Lenti-mBiP) or green fluorescent protein (Lenti-GFP) transgene was administered in low- or high-dose studies during early arthritis. Disease activity was assessed by visual scoring, histology, serum cytokine and antibody production measured by cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and ELISA, respectively. Lentiviral vector treatment caused significant induction of interferon (IFN)-γ responses regardless of the transgene; however, further specific effects were directly attributable to the BiP transgene. In both studies Lenti-mBiP suppressed clinical arthritis significantly. Histological examination showed that low-dose Lenti-mBiP suppressed inflammatory cell infiltration, cartilage destruction and significantly reduced pathogenic anti-type II collagen (CII) antibodies. Lenti-mBiP treatment caused significant up-regulation of soluble cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (sCTLA-4) serum levels and down-regulation of interleukin (IL)-17A production in response to CII cell restimulation. In-vitro studies confirmed that Lenti-mBiP spleen cells could significantly suppress the release of IL-17A from CII primed responder cells following CII restimulation in vitro, and this suppression was associated with increased IL-10 production. Neutralization of CTLA-4 in further co-culture experiments demonstrated inverse regulation of IL-17A production. In conclusion, these data demonstrate proof of principle for the therapeutic potential of systemic lentiviral vector delivery of the BiP transgene leading to immunoregulation of arthritis by induction of soluble CTLA-4 and suppression of IL-17A production. PMID:25228326

  7. Myeloid deletion of SIRT1 suppresses collagen-induced arthritis in mice by modulating dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seong Ji; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Lim, Hye Song; Hah, Young-Sool; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Kim, Hyun-Ok; Cheon, Yun-Hong; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Jang, Kyu Yun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Park, Byung-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Il

    2016-01-01

    The type III histone deacetylase silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) is an enzyme that is critical for the modulation of immune and inflammatory responses. However, the data on its role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are limited and controversial. To better understand how SIRT1 regulates adaptive immune responses in RA, we evaluated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in myeloid cell-specific SIRT1 knockout (mSIRT1 KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Arthritis severity was gauged on the basis of clinical, radiographic and pathologic scores. Compared with their WT counterparts, the mSIRT1 KO mice exhibited less severe arthritis, which was less destructive to the joints. The expression levels of inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases and ROR-γT were also reduced in the mSIRT1 KO mice compared with the WT mice and were paralleled by reductions in the numbers of Th1 and Th17 cells and CD80- or CD86-positive dendritic cells (DCs). In addition, impaired DC maturation and decreases in the Th1/Th17 immune response were observed in the mSIRT1 KO mice. T-cell proliferation was also investigated in co-cultures with antigen-pulsed DCs. In the co-cultures, the DCs from the mSIRT1 KO mice showed decreases in T-cell proliferation and the Th1/Th17 immune response. In this study, myeloid cell-specific deletion of SIRT1 appeared to suppress CIA by modulating DC maturation. Thus, a careful investigation of DC-specific SIRT1 downregulation is needed to gauge the therapeutic utility of agents targeting SIRT1 in RA. PMID:26987484

  8. Persistence of collagen type II-specific T-cell clones in the synovial membrane of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Londei, M.; Savill, C.M.; Verhoef, A.; Brennan, F.; Leech, Z.A.; Feldmann, M. ); Duance, V. ); Maini, R.N. )

    1989-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell infiltration of the synovium of joints. Analysis of the phenotype and antigen specificity of the infiltrating cells may thus provide insight into the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. T cells were cloned with interleukin 2, a procedure that selects for in vivo-activated cells. All clones had the CD4 CDW29 phenotype. Their antigen specificity was tested by using a panel of candidate joint autoantigens. Four of 17 reacted against autologous blood mononuclear cells. Two clones proliferated in response to collagen type II. After 21 months, another set of clones was derived from synovial tissue of the same joint. One of eight clones tested showed a strong proliferative response against collagen type II. The uncloned synovial T cells of a third operation from another joint also responded to collagen type II. The persistence of collagen type II-specific T cells in active rheumatoid joints over a period of 3 years suggests that collagen type II could be one of the autoantigens involved in perpetuating the inflammatory process in rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Sterile corneal melting and necrotizing scleritis after cataract surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and collagen vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Perez, Victor L; Azar, Dimitri T; Foster, C Stephen

    2002-01-01

    The onset of post-operative corneal melting and necrotizing scleritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and collagen vascular disease who undergo cataract surgery can have devastating ocular and systemic consequences. Even though ocular surface factors such as sicca and surgical trauma are among the important variables that contribute to this entities, signs and symptoms of systemic disease need to be thoroughly investigated in order to prevent life-threatening complications associated with these ocular manifestations. The management of surgical induced corneal melting and necrotizing scleritis in these patients, include local therapy and in most instances, systemic immuno-modulation. Moreover, the development of corneal melting and necrotizing scleritis in an otherwise "healthy" patient after uncomplicated cataract surgery, can be the first manifestation of a serious occult systemic disease. Therefore, an aggressive approach regarding the diagnosis, workup and treatment should be initiated by the ophthalmologist in order to maximize a successful ophthalmic and medical outcome.

  10. Lactobacillus casei reduces the inflammatory joint damage associated with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) by reducing the pro-inflammatory cytokines: Lactobacillus casei: COX-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Amdekar, Sarika; Singh, Vinod; Singh, Rambir; Sharma, Poonam; Keshav, Poonam; Kumar, Avnish

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of Lactobacillus casei in treating rheumatoid arthritis using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) animal model. Healthy female Wistar rats (weight-180-200 g) were included in this study. Oral administration of L. casei was started on the same day. Indomethacin was used as standard reference drug. Serum level of IL-6, α-TNF, and IL-10 were observed. Four-point arthritis indexes were also assessed at the end of week for 28th day. L. casei-treated rats had shown normal histopathology without any synovial infiltration, pannus formation, cartilage, and bone destruction. Arthritis score was also lower for the group treated with L. casei. Oral administration of L. casei significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines. Present study suggests that L. casei has potent antiarthritic effect in CIA model. Inhibition of COX-2 via inhibiting the pro-inflammatory cytokines is an understanding of the complex interactions involved in these pathways.

  11. SARS Coronavirus Fusion Peptide-Derived Sequence Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zu T.; Sigalov, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    During the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, the viruses have evolved numerous strategies to counter and evade host antiviral immune responses in order to establish a successful infection, replicate and persist in the host. Recently, based on our model of immune signaling, the Signaling Chain HOmoOLigomerization (SCHOOL) model, we suggested specific molecular mechanisms used by different viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) to modulate the host immune response mediated by members of the family of multichain immune recognition receptors (MIRRs). This family includes T cell receptor (TCR) that is critically involved in immune diseases such as autoimmune arthritis. In the present study, we provide compelling experimental in vivo evidence in support of our hypothesis. Using the SCHOOL approach and the SARS-CoV fusion peptide sequence, we rationally designed a novel immunomodulatory peptide that targets TCR. We showed that this peptide ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and protects against bone and cartilage damage. Incorporation of the peptide into self-assembling lipopeptide nanoparticles that mimic native human high density lipoproteins significantly increases peptide dosage efficacy. Together, our data further confirm that viral immune evasion strategies that target MIRRs can be transferred to therapeutic strategies that require similar functionalities. PMID:27349522

  12. SARS Coronavirus Fusion Peptide-Derived Sequence Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zu T; Sigalov, Alexander B

    2016-01-01

    During the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, the viruses have evolved numerous strategies to counter and evade host antiviral immune responses in order to establish a successful infection, replicate and persist in the host. Recently, based on our model of immune signaling, the Signaling Chain HOmoOLigomerization (SCHOOL) model, we suggested specific molecular mechanisms used by different viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) to modulate the host immune response mediated by members of the family of multichain immune recognition receptors (MIRRs). This family includes T cell receptor (TCR) that is critically involved in immune diseases such as autoimmune arthritis. In the present study, we provide compelling experimental in vivo evidence in support of our hypothesis. Using the SCHOOL approach and the SARS-CoV fusion peptide sequence, we rationally designed a novel immunomodulatory peptide that targets TCR. We showed that this peptide ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and protects against bone and cartilage damage. Incorporation of the peptide into self-assembling lipopeptide nanoparticles that mimic native human high density lipoproteins significantly increases peptide dosage efficacy. Together, our data further confirm that viral immune evasion strategies that target MIRRs can be transferred to therapeutic strategies that require similar functionalities. PMID:27349522

  13. Salubrinal acts as a Dusp2 inhibitor and suppresses inflammation in anti-collagen antibody-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Kazunori; Nishimura, Akinobu; Chen, Andy; Takigawa, Shinya; Sudo, Akihiro; Yokota, Hiroki

    2015-04-01

    Dual-specificity phosphatase 2 (Dusp2; also called phosphatase of activated cells 1, PAC1) is highly expressed in activated immune cells. We examined whether a potential inhibitor of Dusp2, salubrinal, prevents inflammatory cytokine expression in immune cells and arthritic responses in a mouse model of anti-collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA). Salubrinal is a synthetic chemical that inhibits de-phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α). In this study, we examined the effects of salubrinal on expression of inflammation linked genes as well as a family of DUSP genes using genome-wide microarrays, qPCR, and RNA interference. We also evaluated the effects of salubrinal on arthritic responses in CAIA mice using clinical and histological scores. The results revealed that salubrinal decreased inflammatory gene expression in macrophages, T lymphocytes, and mast cells. Dusp2 was suppressed by salubrinal in LPS-activated macrophages as well as PMA/ionomycin-activated T lymphocytes and mast cells. Furthermore, a partial silencing of Dusp2 downregulated IL1β and Cox2, and the inflammatory signs of CAIA mice were significantly suppressed by salubrinal. Collectively, this study presents a novel therapeutic possibility of salubrinal for inflammatory arthritis such as RA through inhibition of Dusp2. PMID:25619567

  14. Ethyl pyruvate therapy attenuates experimental severe arthritis caused by type II collagen (CII) in the mouse (CIA).

    PubMed

    Di Paola, R; Mazzon, E; Galuppo, M; Esposito, E; Bramanti, P; Fink, M P; Cuzzocrea, S

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that ethyl pyruvate (EP), a simple aliphatic ester with anti-inflammatory effects, can reduce type II collagen-induced mouse arthritis (CIA). DBA/1J mice were used for the study, developing erosive hind paw arthritis when immunized with CII in an emulsion in complete Freund?s adjuvant (CFA). The incidence of CIA was 100 percent by day 28 in the CII-challenged mice, and the severity of CIA progressed over a 35-day period with radiographic evaluation revealing focal resorption of bone. The histopathology of CIA included erosion of the cartilage at the joint margins. EP-treatment (40 mg/kg/day i.p.) starting at the onset of arthritis (day 25) ameliorated the clinical signs at days 26-35 and improved histological status in the joint and paw. Immunohistochemical analysis for nitrotyrosine, poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) revealed a positive staining in inflamed joints from mice subjected to CIA, while no staining was observed for HO-1 and Nrf-2 in the same group. The degree of staining for nitrotyrosine, PAR, iNOS, was significantly reduced in CII-challenged mice treated with the EP. Immuno-positive-staining for HO-1 and Nrf-2 was observed instead, in joints obtained from the EP-treated group. Plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and the joint tissue levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α and MIP-2 were also significantly reduced by EP treatment. Thirty-five days after immunization, EP-treatment significantly increased plasma levels of IL-10. These data demonstrate that EP treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory effect during chronic inflammation and is able to ameliorate the tissue damage associated with CIA.

  15. The role of high-mobility group box protein 1 in collagen antibody-induced arthritis is dependent on vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Biscetti, F; Flex, A; Pecorini, G; Angelini, F; Arena, V; Stigliano, E; Gremese, E; Tolusso, B; Ferraccioli, G

    2016-04-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been implicated in angiogenesis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to define more clearly the role of HMGB1 in the synovial angiogenesis and pathogenesis of an immune model of arthritis. BALB/c mice were injected with monoclonal anti-collagen antibody cocktail followed by lipopolysaccharide to induce arthritis. HMGB1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were over-expressed in the areas of the synovium where more inflammation and neoangiogenesis were present. The selective blockade of HMGB1 or VEGF resulted alternatively in a lower severity of arthritis evaluated by the arthritis index. Furthermore, exogenous HMGB1 administration caused a worsening of arthritis, associated with VEGF up-regulation and increased synovial angiogenesis. The selective inhibition of VEGF also resulted in no induction of arthritis in mice receiving exogenous HMGB1. Cytokine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analyses performed on peripheral blood and synovial fluid demonstrated a significant reduction of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α in mice where HMGB1 and VEGF pathways were blocked. Interestingly, the selective blockade of HMGB1 and VEGF resulted in an increase of the peripheral IL-17A concentration. The development of arthritis mediated by HMGB1 and the synovial angiogenesis can be blocked by inhibiting the VEGF activity. The proinflammatory and proangiogenic cytokine IL-17A was increased when HMGB1 is inhibited, but the synovial angiogenesis was nevertheless reduced in this model of arthritis. Taken together, these findings shed new light on the role of this nuclear protein in the pathogenesis of arthritis in an RA-like model. PMID:26671547

  16. Sustained Release Myofascial Release as Treatment for a Patient with Complications of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Collagenous Colitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cubick, Erin E.; Quezada, Vanessa Y.; Schumer, Ariel D.; Davis, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Myofascial release (MFR) is a manual therapeutic technique used to release fascial restrictions, which may cause neuromusculoskeletal and systemic pathology. Purpose: This case report describes the use of sustained release MFR techniques in a patient with a primary diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and a secondary diagnosis of collagenous colitis. Changes in pain, cervical range of motion, fatigue, and gastrointestinal tract function, as well as the impact of RA on daily activities, were assessed. Methods: A 54-year-old white woman presented with signs and symptoms attributed to RA and collagenous colitis. Pre and post measurements were taken with each treatment and during the interim between the initial and final treatment series. The patient recorded changes in pain, fatigue, gastrointestinal tract function, and quality of life. Cervical range of motion was assessed. Six sustained release MFR treatment sessions were provided over a 2-week period. Following an 8-week interim, two more treatments were performed. Results: The patient showed improvements in pain, fatigue, gastrointestinal tract function, cervical range of motion, and quality of life following the initial treatment series of six sessions. The patient maintained positive gains for 5 weeks following the final treatment, after which her symptoms returned to near baseline measurements. Following two more treatments, positive gains were achieved once again. Conclusions: In a patient with RA and collagenous colitis, the application of sustained release MFR techniques in addition to standard medical treatment may provide short-term and long-term improvements in comorbid symptoms and overall quality of life. PMID:22016756

  17. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... training for muscle tone. Your provider may suggest physical therapy. This might include: Heat or ice Splints or ... American College of Rheumatology guidelines for management of gout. Part 2: therapy and anti-inflammatory prophylaxis of acute gouty arthritis. ...

  18. Intra-articular nuclear factor-κB blockade ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by eliciting regulatory T cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Min, S-Y; Yan, M; Du, Y; Wu, T; Khobahy, E; Kwon, S-R; Taneja, V; Bashmakov, A; Nukala, S; Ye, Y; Orme, J; Sajitharan, D; Kim, H-Y; Mohan, C

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB is a transcription factor implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we have examined the effect of intra-articular administration of the IKK inhibitor, NEMO-binding domain peptide (NBD), on the severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). NBD peptides were injected intra-articularly into the knee joints of DBA/1J mice after the onset of disease. Collagen-injected mice given a scrambled peptide served as controls. Arthritis severity was determined by visual examination of paws. Intra-articular NBD injection reduced the arthritis score and ameliorated morphological signs of bone destruction compared to the controls. Serum levels of type-II collagen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a antibodies were lower in NBD-treated mice versus the control mice, whereas the levels of type-II collagen-specific IgG1 antibodies were increased by NBD treatment. NBD treatment diminished the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-17 and interferon (IFN)-γ in serum, but increased the regulatory cytokine IL-10. NBD-treated CIA mice exhibited significantly higher percentages and numbers of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3+)CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells than controls. Immunofluorescence analysis of NBD-treated mice revealed that FoxP3 and Ym1, a marker of alternatively activated macrophages, were juxtaposed to each other within draining inguinal lymph nodes. Intra-articular administration of NBD peptide is effective as an experimental therapy in a murine model of RA. Nevertheless, the intra-articular treatment modality is still associated with systemic effects on the immune system. PMID:23574318

  19. Anti-angiogenic effect of total saponins of Rhizoma Dioscorea nipponica on collagen induced-arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiu-Jun; Guo, Ya-Chun; Sun, Tong-You; Song, Hong-Ru; Gao, Ya-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic autoimmune and incurable disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effect and mechanism of the total saponins of Rhizoma Dioscorea nipponica (TSRDN) in RA. A collagen induced-arthritis (CIA) rat model was established. CIA rats were randomly divided into three groups and lavaged with an equal volume of solvent (CIA group), TSRDN (25 mg/kg/day, RDN group) and tripterygium (TP; 12 mg/kg/day, TP group) for 21 days, respectively. Normal rats served as a control group. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining was used to observe the histopathological injury of synovial tissues. The level of CD31, which used for marking and counting, micro vessel density (MVD) and the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) were detected by immunohistochemical analysis. Additionally, the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was determined using an ELISA kit. HE staining showed obvious synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration, pannus formation, cartilage and bone erosion in the CIA group rats. In addition, compared with control group, the level of MVD, the expression of VEGF and STAT3, and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB were all increased in CIA group rat synovial tissue (all P<0.01); however, TSRDN or tripterygium were able to inhibit these changes (all P<0.01). It was speculated that TSRDN may prevent angiogenesis by inhibiting the expression of STAT3 and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB p65, thereby potentially improving CIA.

  20. Assessment of collagen antibody-induced arthritis in BALB/c mice using bioimaging analysis and histopathological examination

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Joo Hye; Lee, Won Kil; Lee, Yun Seok

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the therapeutic potential of sulfasalazine and prednisolone in a mouse collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model. Twenty-five male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into five groups: group 1 (G1): control, group 2 (G2): probe control, group 3 (G3): CAIA, group 4 (G4): CAIA+sulfasalazine (10 mg/kg, oral), and group 5 (G5): CAIA+prednisolone (100 mg/kg, oral). Fluorescence bioimaging was performed in vivo 24 and 48 h after treatment with a fluorescence probe (OsteoSense® 680 EX), and all mice were sacrificed. The hind knee joints were fixed in 10% neutral phosphate-buffered formalin, and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histopathological analyses were performed. The paw thickness increased in a time-dependent manner in G3 mice, but trended toward a decrease in both G4 and G5 mice. Fluorescence intensity increased in G3 mice at 24 and 48 h after fluorescence probe treatment, but the fluorescence intensity in G4 and G5 mice was lower than that in G3. Micro-CT analyses showed that the joint surfaces of G3 mice had a rough and irregular articular appearance, but the occurrence of these irregularities was lower in G4 and G5. Hematoxylin and eosin and Safranin O-fast green staining confirmed that destruction of the cartilage and bony structures, synovial hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltration all occurred in G3, and that the occurrence of these phenomena was lower in G4 and G5 than in G3. Taken together, these results suggest that sulfasalazine and prednisolone can reduce acute rheumatoid arthritis in mice. PMID:27729929

  1. Anti-angiogenic effect of total saponins of Rhizoma Dioscorea nipponica on collagen induced-arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiu-Jun; Guo, Ya-Chun; Sun, Tong-You; Song, Hong-Ru; Gao, Ya-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic autoimmune and incurable disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effect and mechanism of the total saponins of Rhizoma Dioscorea nipponica (TSRDN) in RA. A collagen induced-arthritis (CIA) rat model was established. CIA rats were randomly divided into three groups and lavaged with an equal volume of solvent (CIA group), TSRDN (25 mg/kg/day, RDN group) and tripterygium (TP; 12 mg/kg/day, TP group) for 21 days, respectively. Normal rats served as a control group. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining was used to observe the histopathological injury of synovial tissues. The level of CD31, which used for marking and counting, micro vessel density (MVD) and the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) were detected by immunohistochemical analysis. Additionally, the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was determined using an ELISA kit. HE staining showed obvious synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration, pannus formation, cartilage and bone erosion in the CIA group rats. In addition, compared with control group, the level of MVD, the expression of VEGF and STAT3, and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB were all increased in CIA group rat synovial tissue (all P<0.01); however, TSRDN or tripterygium were able to inhibit these changes (all P<0.01). It was speculated that TSRDN may prevent angiogenesis by inhibiting the expression of STAT3 and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB p65, thereby potentially improving CIA. PMID:27698704

  2. Clinical and histopathological evaluation of MDP/collagen induced arthritis rat model (MCIA) after treatment with Urtica dioica, plantago major and Hypericum perforatum L herbal mixture.

    PubMed

    Khalifeh, Mohammad S; Hananeh, Wael; Al-Rukibat, Raida; Okour, Omar; Boumezrag, Assia

    2008-04-01

    This study was done to assess the effects of Urtica dioica, Plantago major and Hypericum perforatum L herbal mixture in the MCIA rat model. In addition, a new pathological and clinical arthritis lesion assessment was developed. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen and muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Commercial herbal extracts were administered daily to the rats after the immunization for the course of experiment (90 days). Rats were boosted with a second collagen-MDP emulsion 60 days after the first immunization. Paws were daily evaluated macroscopically for redness, swelling, distortion, or ankylosis of the joints. On the day of sacrifice, rat paws were assessed for histopathologic changes. Herbal mixture administration decreased the clinical lesion manifestation in the MCIA rat model and led to development of similar or slightly more severe histopathological lesions compared to rats that did not receive the treatment. The clinical arthritis signs appeared as early as 13 days after the first MDP/collagen injection and with peak incidence at 20 days post-immunization. Histopathologically, animals showed changes ranging from mild to very severe. Administration of the herbal mixture used in this study had a clinical therapeutic effect on the course of the clinical manifestations in the MCIA model, but the herbal treatment had no such effect on the histopathological lesion development and even led to slightly more severe lesions. Rats in the MCIA model developed prominent clinical and histopathological changes that were comparable to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) lesions in humans. PMID:18421172

  3. Clinical and histopathological evaluation of MDP/collagen induced arthritis rat model (MCIA) after treatment with Urtica dioica, plantago major and Hypericum perforatum L herbal mixture.

    PubMed

    Khalifeh, Mohammad S; Hananeh, Wael; Al-Rukibat, Raida; Okour, Omar; Boumezrag, Assia

    2008-04-01

    This study was done to assess the effects of Urtica dioica, Plantago major and Hypericum perforatum L herbal mixture in the MCIA rat model. In addition, a new pathological and clinical arthritis lesion assessment was developed. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen and muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Commercial herbal extracts were administered daily to the rats after the immunization for the course of experiment (90 days). Rats were boosted with a second collagen-MDP emulsion 60 days after the first immunization. Paws were daily evaluated macroscopically for redness, swelling, distortion, or ankylosis of the joints. On the day of sacrifice, rat paws were assessed for histopathologic changes. Herbal mixture administration decreased the clinical lesion manifestation in the MCIA rat model and led to development of similar or slightly more severe histopathological lesions compared to rats that did not receive the treatment. The clinical arthritis signs appeared as early as 13 days after the first MDP/collagen injection and with peak incidence at 20 days post-immunization. Histopathologically, animals showed changes ranging from mild to very severe. Administration of the herbal mixture used in this study had a clinical therapeutic effect on the course of the clinical manifestations in the MCIA model, but the herbal treatment had no such effect on the histopathological lesion development and even led to slightly more severe lesions. Rats in the MCIA model developed prominent clinical and histopathological changes that were comparable to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) lesions in humans.

  4. B-cell depletion inhibits arthritis in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, but does not adversely affect humoral responses in a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccination model.

    PubMed

    Dunussi-Joannopoulos, Kyri; Hancock, Gerald E; Kunz, Arthur; Hegen, Martin; Zhou, Xiaochuan X; Sheppard, Barbara J; Lamothe, Jennifer; Li, Evelyn; Ma, Hak-Ling; Hamann, Philip R; Damle, Nitin K; Collins, Mary

    2005-10-01

    We report the development of a mouse B cell-depleting immunoconjugate (anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody [mAb] conjugated to calicheamicin) and its in vivo use to characterize the kinetics of CD22+ B-cell depletion and reconstitution in murine primary and secondary lymphoid tissues. The effect of B-cell depletion was further studied in a murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model and a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccination model. Our results show that (1) the immunoconjugate has B-cell-specific in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity; (2) B-cell reconstitution starts in the bone marrow and spleen around day 30 after depletion and is completed in all tissues tested by day 50; (3) B-cell depletion inhibits the development of clinical and histologic arthritis in the CIA model; (4) depletion of type II collagen antibody levels is not necessary for clinical and histologic prevention of CIA; and (5) B-cell depletion does not adversely affect memory antibody responses after challenge nor clearance of infectious virus from lungs in the RSV vaccination model. These results demonstrate for the first time that only B-cell reduction but not type II collagen antibody levels correlate with the prevention of arthritis and represent key insights into the role of CD22-targeted B-cell depletion in mouse autoimmunity and vaccination models.

  5. Tetrandrine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by restoring the balance between Th17 and Treg cells via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xusheng; Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Tetrandrine is an alkaloid constituent of the root of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. The long-term clinical uses of tetrandrine for treatments of rheumatalgia and arthralgia as well as the inhibition of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis imply that tetrandrine may have therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we explored its anti-RA mechanism in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in relation to the balance between T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type II collagen and were orally administered tetrandrine for 14 consecutive days. Then, the mice were sacrificed, their joints were removed for histological analysis, and spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were removed to examine the Th17 and Treg cells. Tetrandrine markedly alleviated the severity of arthritis, reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the Th17/Treg balance, as demonstrated by the serum levels of their related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-10) and the proportion of each cell type. Tetrandrine inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and induced Treg cell differentiation in vitro . Notably, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was proven to play a crucial role in tetrandrine-mediated T cell differentiation. The correlation between AhR activation, regulation of Th17/Treg and amelioration of arthritis by tetrandrine was verified in the CIA mice. Moreover, tetrandrine might be a ligand of AhR because it facilitated the expression of the AhR target gene cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and the activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Taken together, tetrandrine exerts its anti-arthritis efficacy by restoring Th17/Treg balance via AhR. PMID:26640276

  6. Tetrandrine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by restoring the balance between Th17 and Treg cells via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xusheng; Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Tetrandrine is an alkaloid constituent of the root of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. The long-term clinical uses of tetrandrine for treatments of rheumatalgia and arthralgia as well as the inhibition of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis imply that tetrandrine may have therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we explored its anti-RA mechanism in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in relation to the balance between T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type II collagen and were orally administered tetrandrine for 14 consecutive days. Then, the mice were sacrificed, their joints were removed for histological analysis, and spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were removed to examine the Th17 and Treg cells. Tetrandrine markedly alleviated the severity of arthritis, reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the Th17/Treg balance, as demonstrated by the serum levels of their related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-10) and the proportion of each cell type. Tetrandrine inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and induced Treg cell differentiation in vitro . Notably, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was proven to play a crucial role in tetrandrine-mediated T cell differentiation. The correlation between AhR activation, regulation of Th17/Treg and amelioration of arthritis by tetrandrine was verified in the CIA mice. Moreover, tetrandrine might be a ligand of AhR because it facilitated the expression of the AhR target gene cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and the activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Taken together, tetrandrine exerts its anti-arthritis efficacy by restoring Th17/Treg balance via AhR.

  7. Effects of Sandimmune Neoral on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DA Rats: Characterization by High Resolution Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and by Histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Nicolau; Bruttel, Konrad; Schuurman, Henk; Mir, Anis

    1998-03-01

    In the present work the time course of collagen-induced arthritis and the effect of Sandimmune Neoral in this model of arthritis were followed in the rat over an extended period of time (70 days) using high resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High resolution 3D gradient-echo (TR = 100 ms; TE = 3.8 ms) images with a voxel size of 94 × 81 × 60 μm3were acquired from the hind paw of DA rats (n= 21) at various time points after injection of type II bovine collagen into the tail. Eleven rats were treated with Neoral (15 mg/kg/day p.o. together with vehicle) for 42 days starting at day 14 after collagen injection. The remaining controls received vehicle. Pathomorphological changes associated with the collagen-induced arthritic process, e.g., increase of joint space and cartilage and bone erosion, could be observedin vivoin the control group. In contrast, no changes in the joint architecture were detected in Neoral-treated animals. Indeed, Neoral showed strong anti-inflammatory effects and marked protection against cartilage and bone destruction in this model. Qualitative information derived from the MR images correlated significantly with histological findings.

  8. Interleukin-35 (IL-35) inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes isolated from mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunxia; Wu, Suqin; Li, Yuxuan; Jiang, Shenyi; Lin, Tiantian; Xia, Liping; Shen, Hui; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disorder of the joints that affects 0.5-1 % of adults. Excessive growth of the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) promotes hyperplasia of synovial tissues and causes its invasion into the bone and cartilage, which eventually causes deformity and dysfunction of affected joints. Interleukin 35 (IL-35) was shown to suppress the inflammatory responses to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) via upregulation of T regulatory cells and suppression of T helper type 17 cells in a mouse model. To study the effects of IL-35 on the proliferation and apoptosis frequency of cultured FLS isolated from mice with CIA as well as to examine the effects of IL-35 on CIA in vivo. Thirty DBA/1 J mice, which are used as an animal model for RA, were divided randomly (ten mice per group) to a CIA group (collagen treatment), a CIA + IL-35 group (collagen and IL-35 treatments), and a control group (no treatment). Starting on the 24th day after collagen administration, IL-35 was injected intraperitoneally into mice of the CIA + IL-35 group once per day for 10 days. An arthritis index was calculated, and pathological analysis of synovial tissue was performed. FLS isolated from CIA mice were treated with various concentrations of IL-35 (12.5-100 ng/ml). The MTT assay was used to examine FLS proliferation, and apoptosis frequency of FLS was detected by flow cytometry. On day 24, the CIA mice began to exhibit arthritis symptoms, and the symptoms rapidly progressed with time. Treatment with IL-35 significantly alleviated arthritis symptoms and reduced the synovial tissue inflammation. In addition, IL-35 treatment inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis in cultured FLS from CIA mice in a dose-dependent manner. IL-35 could ameliorate the symptoms of arthritis in the CIA mouse model in vivo and inhibited FLS proliferation while promoting FLS apoptosis in vitro, thereby exhibited the potential in inhibiting the progression of RA.

  9. Interleukin-35 (IL-35) inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes isolated from mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunxia; Wu, Suqin; Li, Yuxuan; Jiang, Shenyi; Lin, Tiantian; Xia, Liping; Shen, Hui; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disorder of the joints that affects 0.5-1 % of adults. Excessive growth of the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) promotes hyperplasia of synovial tissues and causes its invasion into the bone and cartilage, which eventually causes deformity and dysfunction of affected joints. Interleukin 35 (IL-35) was shown to suppress the inflammatory responses to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) via upregulation of T regulatory cells and suppression of T helper type 17 cells in a mouse model. To study the effects of IL-35 on the proliferation and apoptosis frequency of cultured FLS isolated from mice with CIA as well as to examine the effects of IL-35 on CIA in vivo. Thirty DBA/1 J mice, which are used as an animal model for RA, were divided randomly (ten mice per group) to a CIA group (collagen treatment), a CIA + IL-35 group (collagen and IL-35 treatments), and a control group (no treatment). Starting on the 24th day after collagen administration, IL-35 was injected intraperitoneally into mice of the CIA + IL-35 group once per day for 10 days. An arthritis index was calculated, and pathological analysis of synovial tissue was performed. FLS isolated from CIA mice were treated with various concentrations of IL-35 (12.5-100 ng/ml). The MTT assay was used to examine FLS proliferation, and apoptosis frequency of FLS was detected by flow cytometry. On day 24, the CIA mice began to exhibit arthritis symptoms, and the symptoms rapidly progressed with time. Treatment with IL-35 significantly alleviated arthritis symptoms and reduced the synovial tissue inflammation. In addition, IL-35 treatment inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis in cultured FLS from CIA mice in a dose-dependent manner. IL-35 could ameliorate the symptoms of arthritis in the CIA mouse model in vivo and inhibited FLS proliferation while promoting FLS apoptosis in vitro, thereby exhibited the potential in inhibiting the progression of RA. PMID:27379996

  10. H2-M polymorphism in mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis involves the peptide binding groove

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W.; Loos, M.; Maeurer, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    The ability to develop type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is associated with the major histocompatibility I-A gene and with as yet poorly defined regulatory molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen processing and presentation pathway. H2-M molecules are thought to be involved in the loading of antigenic peptides into the MHC class II binding cleft. We sequenced H2-Ma, H2-Mb1, and H2-Mb2 genes from CIA-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains and identified four different Ma and Mb2 alleles, and three different Mb1 alleles defined by polymorphic residues within the predicted peptide binding groove. Most CIA-resistant mouse strains share common Ma, Mb1, and Mb2 alleles. In contrast, H2-M alleles designated Ma-III, Ma-IV, Mb1-III, and Mb2-IV could be exclusively identified in the CIA-susceptible H2{sup r} and H2{sup q} haplotypes, suggesting that allelic H2-M molecules may modulate the composition of different CII peptides loaded onto MHC class II molecules, presumably presenting {open_quotes}arthritogenic{close_quotes} epitopes to T lymphocytes. 42 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. IL-1 alpha beta blockade prevents cartilage and bone destruction in murine type II collagen-induced arthritis, whereas TNF-alpha blockade only ameliorates joint inflammation.

    PubMed

    Joosten, L A; Helsen, M M; Saxne, T; van De Loo, F A; Heinegard, D; van Den Berg, W B

    1999-11-01

    Anti-TNF-alpha treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients markedly suppresses inflammatory disease activity, but so far no tissue-protective effects have been reported. In contrast, blockade of IL-1 in rheumatoid arthritis patients, by an IL-1 receptor antagonist, was only moderately effective in suppressing inflammatory symptoms but appeared to reduce the rate of progression of joint destruction. We therefore used an established collagen II murine arthritis model (collagen-induced arthritis(CIA)) to study effects on joint structures of neutralization of either TNF-alpha or IL-1. Both soluble TNF binding protein and anti-IL-1 treatment ameliorated disease activity when applied shortly after onset of CIA. Serum analysis revealed that early anti-TNF-alpha treatment of CIA did not decrease the process in the cartilage, as indicated by the elevated COMP levels. In contrast, anti-IL-1 treatment of established CIA normalized COMP levels, apparently alleviating the process in the tissue. Histology of knee and ankle joints corroborated the finding and showed that cartilage and joint destruction was significantly decreased after anti-IL-1 treatment but was hardly affected by anti-TNF-alpha treatment. Radiographic analysis of knee and ankle joints revealed that bone erosions were prevented by anti-IL-1 treatment, whereas the anti-TNF-alpha-treated animals exhibited changes comparable to the controls. In line with these findings, metalloproteinase activity, visualized by VDIPEN production, was almost absent throughout the cartilage layers in anti-IL-1-treated animals, whereas massive VDIPEN appearance was found in control and sTNFbp-treated mice. These results indicate that blocking of IL-1 is a cartilage- and bone-protective therapy in destructive arthritis, whereas the TNF-alpha antagonist has little effect on tissue destruction.

  12. Head-to-head comparison of protocol modifications for the generation of collagen-induced arthritis in a specific-pathogen free facility using DBA/1 mice.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Sherry; Strait, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a widely used mouse model for studying inflammatory arthritis (IA). However, CIA induction protocols differ between laboratories, and direct comparison between protocol variations has not been reported. To address this issue, DBA/1 mice housed in conventional and specific-pathogen free (SPF) facilities were administered various combinations of two doses of collagen type II (CII) in complete (CFA) or incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA); some mice were also injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or additional CII at specific intervals. Mice were evaluated for IA over the subsequent 2 months. Depending directly on the combination of CII, CFA, IFA, and LPS used, the incidence of IA ranged between 20%-100%, and severity extended from mild to severe even in an SPF environment. Our results demonstrate for the first time in head-to-head comparisons that specific variations in the use of CII, CFA, IFA, and LPS can induce a range of arthritic disease intensity and severity in an SPF facility. Thus, distinct experimental settings can be designed for robust assessment of factors that either exacerbate or inhibit arthritis pathogenesis. Furthermore, by achieving 100% incidence in an SPF facility, the protocols provide a practical and humane benefit by reducing the number of mice necessary for experimental assessment. PMID:26956089

  13. Inhibitory effects of deer antler aqua-acupuncture, the pilose antler of Cervus Korean TEMMINCK var mantchuricus Swinhoe, on type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Kye; Kim, Kyung-Sook; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Kap-Sung; Lee, Young-Choon; Chang, Young-Chae; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2003-07-01

    Water extract of deer antler aqua-acupunture (DAA) prepared from the growing antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, was used to investigate the efficacy of a traditional immunosuppressive and immuno-activating Korean aqua-acupuncture, on the development of type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. The onset of arthritis was observed at the 24th day after the CII-immunization in rats, and the severity of CIA was gradually developed. As compared with rats treated with saline, DAA i.p. injected at doses of more than 50 microg/kg once a day for 14 days inhibited the ability of inguinal lymph node cells to produce T cell cytokines interleukin 2 and interferon-gamma when the cells were obtained from rats 24 days after immunization and cultured in vitro with CII. Treatment with DAA also inhibited the production of macrophage cytokines interleukin-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha in response to in vitro stimulation of lymph node and macrophage cells with CII. In addition, in order to evaluate the influence of DAA on the incidence and development of arthritis in rat CIA, rats were immunized twice at a 3-week interval with bovine CII, with DAA being given i.p. once a day for 14 days with four different regimens. A 14-day course of DAA treatment at a daily dose of 100 microg/kg, which began on the day of the first CII immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis, as well as antibody formation and delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII. Treatment with DAA, which started on the same day as the booster immunization, also resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and of immune responses to CII. However, treatment with DAA, which was prophylactically started prior to a primary immunization, did not inhibit the development of arthritis and immune response to CII. Furthermore, DAA extract did not affect the established diseases.

  14. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins.

  15. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins. PMID:27599513

  16. Differential effects of isoflurane and CO2 inhalation on plasma levels of inflammatory markers associated with collagen-induced arthritis in DBA mice.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Christopher C; Lucas, Edralin A; Clarke, Stephen L; Smith, Brenda J; Kuvibidila, Solo

    2009-07-01

    Inhalation of CO2 or isoflurane is a commonly used method of euthanasia with mice, but information related to their effects on serum inflammatory markers in chronic models of inflammation is limited. In the current study, nineteen-week old DBA female mice with (n = 53) or without (n = 51) collagen-induced arthritis were randomly assigned to euthanization with CO2 (n = 55) or isoflurane (n = 49. Plasma was collected for the measurement of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by ELISA. When mice without and with collagen-induced arthritis were pooled, compared to CO2, administration of isoflurane was associated with lower production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha (pg/ml, mean +/- SEM) (26.1 +/- 2.82 versus 48.1 +/- 7.99) and IL-6 (25.18 +/- 2.73 versus 48.1 +/- 6.82) (ANOVA, p < 0.05). In contrast to TNF-alpha and IL-6, administration of CO2 decreased the plasma sICAM-1 level (1170+/- 50 versus 758 +/- 24 for CO2) (p < 0.00001). When data were analyzed as a function of collagen-induced arthritis, the differences between CO2 and isoflurane persisted. Low plasma sICAM-1 levels found in CO2 euthanasia group may be due to degradation. Since mice are the most common animal model for studying inflammation, researchers should be aware of these iatrogenic experimental variables before interpreting their data.

  17. T Cells Stimulated by an Analog Peptide of Type II Collagen Require FcRγ to Secrete IL-4 and Suppress Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Linda K.; Cullins, David L.; Brand, David D.; Kleinau, Sandra; Stuart, John M.; Kang, Andrew H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, we explored the characteristics of the T cell population which responds to an analog peptide (A9) of type II collagen (CII) and regulates autoimmunity. Methods A9 is a 26 amino acid peptide analogous to the sequence of a segment of CII (CII 245-270) but with substitutions made at amino acid positions 260 (alanine for isoleucine), 261 (hydroxyproline for alanine), and 263 (asparagine for phenylalanine). We have previously shown that A9 profoundly suppresses immunity to CII and CIA. In order to determine the mechanism of suppression, we used a transgenic mouse whose T cells express a CII specific receptor (TCR) and performed passive cell transfer experiments. Results The results demonstrate that suppression of CIA by the A9 is dependent upon T cells. Using multiparameter flow cytometry, we determined that the cells responsible for suppression were CD4+ and expressed high levels of FcεRIγ(FcRγ). To establish the significance of this finding, we obtained mice genetically deficient in FcRγ to perform passive transfer experiments. The resulting FcRγ-/- CD4+ T cells when primed by culture with A9 could not transfer the suppression of arthritis nor secrete cytokines in response to A9. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that the suppression of arthritis and the Th2 cytokine profile elicited by A9 is dependent upon the presence of FcRγ in the T cells. These findings are novel and may have therapeutic potential for patients with autoimmune arthritis. PMID:21590683

  18. Blockade of interleukin-6 receptor enhances the anti-arthritic effect of glucocorticoids without decreasing bone mineral density in mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Yoshida, H; Hashizume, M; Tanaka, K; Matsumoto, Y

    2015-11-01

    In a mouse arthritis model, we investigated whether interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) blockade would enhance the anti-arthritic effect of glucocorticoids (GCs). DBA/1J mice were immunized with type II collagen (CII), and were treated with prednisolone (PSL) and/or anti-mouse IL-6R antibody (MR16-1). Also, the effects of IL-6 on gene expression and the nuclear translocation of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) were examined in cultured cells treated with dexamethasone (DEX). PSL reduced the arthritis score dose-dependently in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. The arthritis score in the PSL (3 mg/kg) + MR16-1 group was lower than in the PSL (3 mg/kg) group, and at the same level as in the PSL (6 mg/kg) group. Lumbar vertebra bone mineral density (BMD) was decreased significantly in CIA mice and was higher in the PSL (3 mg/kg) + MR16-1 group than in the PSL (6 mg/kg) group. In the in-vitro synovial cells, IL-6 pretreatment attenuated the inhibitory effect of DEX on cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and inhibited the nuclear translocation of GR induced by DEX. In contrast, in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells, IL-6 pretreatment exacerbated the decrease in expression of osteocalcin and the increase in expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) by DEX. We demonstrated that IL-6 signalling blockade by an anti-IL-6R antibody can augment the anti-arthritic effect of GCs and inhibit the bone loss they cause. PMID:26201536

  19. Effects of the selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator compound A on bone metabolism and inflammation in male mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rauner, Martina; Thiele, Sylvia; Sinningen, Kathrin; Winzer, Maria; Salbach-Hirsch, Juliane; Gloe, Ina; Peschke, Katrin; Haegeman, Guy; Tuckermann, Jan P; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2013-10-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent drugs to treat rheumatoid arthritis but exert adverse skeletal effects. Compound A (CpdA) is a selective GC receptor modulator with an improved risk/benefit profile in mouse models of inflammation and bone loss. Here we tested whether CpdA also exerts bone-sparing effects under proinflammatory circumstances using the collagen-induced arthritis model, a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis. CpdA decreased disease activity, paw swelling, and the paw temperature by 43%, 12%, and 7%, respectively, but was less potent than dexamethasone (DEX), which reduced these parameters by 72%, 22%, and 10%, respectively. Moreover, T cells isolated from CpdA- and DEX-treated animals were less active based on proliferation rates after challenge with type II collagen and produced smaller amounts of interferon-γ and TNF as compared with T cells from PBS-treated mice. Histological assessment of the joints confirmed the weaker potency of CpdA as compared with DEX in preventing infiltration of inflammatory cells, induction of osteoclastogenesis, and destruction of articular cartilage. Due to the lack of GC-susceptible arthritis models, we were not able to fully address the bone-sparing potential of CpdA in inflammatory conditions. Nevertheless, the bone formation marker procollagen type 1 N-terminal peptide, a surrogate marker for GC-mediated suppression of bone formation, was significantly decreased by DEX in arthritic mice but not by CpdA. Our data indicate that CpdA moderately suppresses inflammation, whereas the concurrent effects on bone remain unknown. In light of its narrow therapeutic range, CpdA may be more useful as a molecular tool for dissecting GC actions rather than a therapeutic agent.

  20. Effects of the selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator compound A on bone metabolism and inflammation in male mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rauner, Martina; Thiele, Sylvia; Sinningen, Kathrin; Winzer, Maria; Salbach-Hirsch, Juliane; Gloe, Ina; Peschke, Katrin; Haegeman, Guy; Tuckermann, Jan P; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2013-10-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent drugs to treat rheumatoid arthritis but exert adverse skeletal effects. Compound A (CpdA) is a selective GC receptor modulator with an improved risk/benefit profile in mouse models of inflammation and bone loss. Here we tested whether CpdA also exerts bone-sparing effects under proinflammatory circumstances using the collagen-induced arthritis model, a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis. CpdA decreased disease activity, paw swelling, and the paw temperature by 43%, 12%, and 7%, respectively, but was less potent than dexamethasone (DEX), which reduced these parameters by 72%, 22%, and 10%, respectively. Moreover, T cells isolated from CpdA- and DEX-treated animals were less active based on proliferation rates after challenge with type II collagen and produced smaller amounts of interferon-γ and TNF as compared with T cells from PBS-treated mice. Histological assessment of the joints confirmed the weaker potency of CpdA as compared with DEX in preventing infiltration of inflammatory cells, induction of osteoclastogenesis, and destruction of articular cartilage. Due to the lack of GC-susceptible arthritis models, we were not able to fully address the bone-sparing potential of CpdA in inflammatory conditions. Nevertheless, the bone formation marker procollagen type 1 N-terminal peptide, a surrogate marker for GC-mediated suppression of bone formation, was significantly decreased by DEX in arthritic mice but not by CpdA. Our data indicate that CpdA moderately suppresses inflammation, whereas the concurrent effects on bone remain unknown. In light of its narrow therapeutic range, CpdA may be more useful as a molecular tool for dissecting GC actions rather than a therapeutic agent. PMID:23885015

  1. Deletion of IFT20 in early stage T lymphocyte differentiation inhibits the development of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann; Sarkar, Debanjan; Yang, Shuying

    2014-01-01

    IFT20 is the smallest member of the intraflagellar transport protein (IFT) complex B. It is involved in cilia formation. Studies of IFT20 have been confined to ciliated cells. Recently, IFT20 was found to be also expressed in non-ciliated T cells and have functions in immune synapse formation and signaling in vitro. However, how IFT20 regulates T-cell development and activation in vivo is still unknown. We deleted the IFT20 gene in early and later stages of T-cell development by crossing IFT20flox/flox (IFT20f/f) mice with Lck-Cre and CD4-Cre transgenic mice, and investigated the role of IFT20 in T-cell maturation and in the development of T cell-mediated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We found that both Lck-Cre/IFT20f/f and CD4-Cre/IFT20f/f mice were indistinguishable from their wild-type littermates in body size, as well as in the morphology and weight of the spleen and thymus. However, the number of CD4- and CD8-positive cells was significantly lower in thymus and spleen in Lck-Cre/IFT20f/f mice. Meanwhile, the incidence and severity of CIA symptoms were significantly decreased, and inflammation in the paw was significantly inhibited in Lck-Cre/IFT20f/f mice compared to Lck-Cre/IFT20+/+ littermates. Deletion IFT20 in more mature T cells of CD4-Cre/IFT20f/f mice had only mild effects on the development of T cells and CIA. The expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TGF-β1 were significantly downregulated in the paw of Lck-Cre/IFT20f/f mice, but just slight decreased in CD4-Cre/IFT20f/f mice. These results demonstrate that deletion of IFT20 in the early stage of T-cell development inhibited CIA development through regulating T-cell development and the expression of critical cytokines. PMID:26097753

  2. Remission of Collagen-Induced Arthritis through Combination Therapy of Microfracture and Transplantation of Thermogel-Encapsulated Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Yinan; Yang, Modi; Zhang, Yanbo; Chang, Fei; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-01-01

    The persistent inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) always leads to partial synovial hyperplasia and the destruction of articular cartilage. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) have been proven to possess immunosuppressive effects, and widely explored in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, poor inhibitory effect on local inflammatory state and limited capacity of preventing destruction of articular cartilage by systemic BMMSCs transplantation were observed. Herein, toward the classical type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats, the combination treatment of microfracture and in situ transplantation of thermogel-encapsulated BMMSCs was verified to obviously down-regulate the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In addition, it resulted in the decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and anti-collagen type II antibody, in the serum. Simultaneously, the combination therapy also could inhibit the proliferation of antigen specific lymphocytes and local joint inflammatory condition, and prevent the articular cartilage damage. The results indicated that the treatment programs could effectively stimulate the endogenous and exogenous BMMSCs to exhibit the immunosuppression and cartilage protection capability. This study provided a new therapeutic strategy for autoimmune inflammatory diseases, such as RA. PMID:25774788

  3. Abrogation of collagen-induced arthritis by a peptidyl arginine deiminase inhibitor is associated with modulation of T cell-mediated immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Kawalkowska, Joanna; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Ghari, Fatemeh; Davis, Simon; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul R.; Williams, Richard O.; Fischer, Roman; La Thangue, Nicholas B.; Venables, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing citrulline, a post-translational modification of arginine, are generated by peptidyl arginine deiminases (PAD). Citrullinated proteins have pro-inflammatory effects in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we examine the therapeutic effects in collagen-induced arthritis of the second generation PAD inhibitor, BB-Cl-amidine. Treatment after disease onset resulted in the reversal of clinical and histological changes of arthritis, associated with a marked reduction in citrullinated proteins in lymph nodes. There was little overall change in antibodies to collagen or antibodies to citrullinated peptides, but a shift from pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17-type responses to pro-resolution Th2-type responses was demonstrated by serum cytokines and antibody subtypes. In lymph node cells from the arthritic mice treated with BB-Cl-amidine, there was a decrease in total cell numbers but an increase in the proportion of Th2 cells. BB-Cl-amidine had a pro-apoptotic effect on all Th subsets in vitro with Th17 cells appearing to be the most sensitive. We suggest that these immunoregulatory effects of PAD inhibition in CIA are complex, but primarily mediated by transcriptional regulation. We suggest that targeting PADs is a promising strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27210478

  4. Formulation and evaluation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres loaded with an altered collagen type II peptide for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    He, Jintian; Li, Huiqi; Liu, Chao; Wang, Gaizhen; Ge, Lan; Ma, Shufen; Huang, Lijing; Yan, Shaofeng; Xu, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the potential of water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) and solid-in-oil-in-water (s/o/w) emulsification techniques to prepare the altered collagen type II peptide AP268-270 (ACTP)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres to make ACTP more convenient as an rheumatoid arthritis treatment. Microspheres produced by the s/o/w method had higher drug encapsulation efficiency (69.7-79.8%) than those prepared by the w/o/w method (21.8-39.3%). In vitro drug release was influenced by the microencapsulation technique, molecular weight, and composition of the polymer. After intramuscular injection of the optimal formulation to Lewis rats, the concentration of ACTP peptide in serum reached its maximum level on day 3 and then remained nearly stable for approximately 4 weeks. In a collagen-induced arthritis rat model, a single intramuscular injection of ACTP-loaded PLGA microspheres had comparable efficacy to the intravenous injection of ACTP peptide solution once every other day.

  5. Effect of (3,5,6-trimethylpyrazin-2-yl)methyl 2-[4-(2-methylpropyl)phenyl]propanoate (ITE), a newly developed anti-inflammatory drug, on type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tao; Cao, Ying-Lin; Xu, Bei-Bei; Zhou, Xiao-Mian

    2004-06-01

    The effect of (3,5,6-trimethylpyrazin-2-yl)methyl 2-[4-(2-methylpropyl)phenyl]propanoate (ITE) on type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis in mice was studied. Mice were immunized twice with CII, ITE being given orally once a day for 40 d after the 1st immunization. Clinical assessment showed that ITE had no effect on the day of onset of arthritis but did lowered the incidence rate of arthritis and the arthritis score. And ITE had a marked suppressive effect on the mouse hind paw edema induced by CII. ITE suppressed the delayed-type mouse ear skin reaction to CII but had no effect on the level of serum anti-CII antibodies. These results suggest that ITE inhibits the development of CII-induced arthritis in mice by suppressing delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII.

  6. The therapeutic effect of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dong Hoon; Kim, Myoung Ok; Kim, Sung Hyun; Shin, Mi Jung; Kim, Bong Soo; Kim, Hei Jung; Lee, Sang Ryeul; Lee, Sang Gyu; Yoo, Seung-Ah; Kim, Wan Uk; Hyun, Byung Hwa; Park, Young Sik; Kim, Tae Yoon; Ryoo, Zae Young

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within an inflamed joint has been suggested as playing a significant pathogenic role. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is a major scavenger enzyme of ROS, which has received growing attention for its therapeutic potential. To investigate the therapeutic effect of EC-SOD in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), we used mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) of transgenic mice that overexpresses EC-SOD on the skin by using hK14 promoter. DBA/1 mice that had been treated with bovine type II collagen were administrated subcutaneous injections of EC-SOD transgenic MEF (each at 1.4 x 10(60 cells) on days 28, 35, and 42 after primary immunization. To test EC-SOD activity, blood samples were collected in each group on day 49. The EC-SOD activity was nearly 1.5-fold higher in the transgenic MEF-treated group than in the nontransgenic MEF-treated group (p < 0.05). The severity of arthritis in mice was scored in a double-blind manner, with each paw being assigned a separate clinical score. The severity of arthritis in EC-SOD transgenic MEF-treated mice was significantly suppressed in the arthritic clinical score (p < 0.05). To investigate the alteration of cytokine levels, ELISA was used to measure blood samples. Levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha were reduced in the transgenic MEF-treated group (p < 0.05). Abnormalities of the joints were examined by H&E staining. There were no signs of inflammation except for mild hyperplasia of the synovium in the transgenic MEF-treated group. The proliferation of CII-specific T cells was lower in the transgenic MEF-treated mice than in those in the other groups. The transfer of EC-SOD transgenic MEF has shown a therapeutic effect in CIA mice and this approach may be a safer and more effective form of therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Anti-arthritic activity of Fu-Fang-Lu-Jiao-Shuang on collagen-induced arthritis in Balb/c mice and its underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyan; Sun, Weiguang; Chen, Laxia; Xu, Xin; Wu, Yunxia; Zhang, Jinwen; Zhang, Yonghui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, autoimmune disorder characterized by progressive multiple joint destruction, deformity, disability and premature death in most patients. Fu-Fang-Lu-Jiao-Shuang (FFLJS) is an effective traditional Chinese medicine, which has long been used clinically to treat RA patients. Objective: The objective of this study is aimed to evaluate the anti-rheumatic effects of FFLJS on collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model, as well as the underlying mechanisms, which have not previously been explored. Materials and Methods: CIA was induced by immunization with type II collagen (CII) in male Balb/c mice. The mice in the onset of arthritis were treated daily with FFLJS (125 or 500 mg/kg) or 1% carboxymethyl cellulose-Na for 28 days. Paw thickness and arthritic score were evaluated to confirm the anti-arthritic effect of FFLJS on CIA in mice. Levels of anti-CII antibody, proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1) β, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as well as prostaglandin E-2 (PGE-2) in serum and histological changes in the ankle joint were also analyzed. In addition, expressions of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3 and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases-1 (TIMP-1) in synovial tissue were also detected to further study the molecular mechanism of the anti-arthritic effects of FFLJS. Results: During therapeutic treatment, FFLJS significantly reduced paw thickness and arthritic score in CIA mice, decreased the amounts of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IL-17, PGE-2 and anti-CII antibody in serum. In addition, FFLJS treatment could prevent the bone destruction by reducing the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3, increasing the expression of TIMP-1 in synovial tissue of CIA mice. Conclusion: These findings offer the convincing evidence for the first time that the anti-rheumatic effects of FFLJS might be related to down-regulation of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IL-17 and PGE-2 levels for acute arthritis, and regulation of MMP-1, MMP-3

  8. CARD11 blockade suppresses murine collagen-induced arthritis via inhibiting CARD11/Bcl10 assembly and T helper type 17 response.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Zhao, J; Zhang, H; Huang, Y; Wang, S; Tu, Q; Yang, N

    2014-05-01

    The scaffold protein caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11 (CARD11) is implicated in the regulation of inflammation and autoimmunity. The present study aimed to explore the role of CARD11 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were treated with either CARD11-targeted interfering RNA (CARD11 siRNA) or control siRNA by intraperitoneal injection every 3 days after CIA establishment. The clinical score of arthritis was recorded every other day. Synovial inflammation and cartilage erosion were evaluated by histology and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). Serum anti-type II collagen (anti-CII) antibodies and cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The CARD11/Bcl10 formation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation was assessed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting, and the percentage of T helper type 17 (Th17) cells was determined by flow cytometry. Systemic administration of CARD11 siRNA significantly reduced the clinical score of CIA severity. As indicated by the histology, joint inflammation and destruction were attenuated by CARD11 siRNA treatment. Micro-CT demonstrated less severe joint destruction in CARD11 siRNA-treated mice than in control mice. CARD11 siRNA treatment resulted in inhibition of CARD11/Bcl10 formation and the subsequent NF-κB activation. In addition, treatment with CARD11 siRNA resulted in a pronounced decrease in proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-17. Serum anti-CII antibody and the percentage of Th17 cells were also significantly reduced. CARD11 is involved in the pathogenesis of CIA by formation of the CARD11/Bcl10 complex and enhancement of the Th17 cell response. Targeting CARD11 provides a novel research direction in the development of therapeutic strategies for RA.

  9. CARD11 blockade suppresses murine collagen-induced arthritis via inhibiting CARD11/Bcl10 assembly and T helper type 17 response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Zhao, J; Zhang, H; Huang, Y; Wang, S; Tu, Q; Yang, N

    2014-01-01

    The scaffold protein caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11 (CARD11) is implicated in the regulation of inflammation and autoimmunity. The present study aimed to explore the role of CARD11 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were treated with either CARD11-targeted interfering RNA (CARD11 siRNA) or control siRNA by intraperitoneal injection every 3 days after CIA establishment. The clinical score of arthritis was recorded every other day. Synovial inflammation and cartilage erosion were evaluated by histology and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). Serum anti-type II collagen (anti-CII) antibodies and cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The CARD11/Bcl10 formation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation was assessed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting, and the percentage of T helper type 17 (Th17) cells was determined by flow cytometry. Systemic administration of CARD11 siRNA significantly reduced the clinical score of CIA severity. As indicated by the histology, joint inflammation and destruction were attenuated by CARD11 siRNA treatment. Micro-CT demonstrated less severe joint destruction in CARD11 siRNA-treated mice than in control mice. CARD11 siRNA treatment resulted in inhibition of CARD11/Bcl10 formation and the subsequent NF-κB activation. In addition, treatment with CARD11 siRNA resulted in a pronounced decrease in proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-17. Serum anti-CII antibody and the percentage of Th17 cells were also significantly reduced. CARD11 is involved in the pathogenesis of CIA by formation of the CARD11/Bcl10 complex and enhancement of the Th17 cell response. Targeting CARD11 provides a novel research direction in the development of therapeutic strategies for RA. PMID:24443940

  10. ETP-46321, a dual p110α/δ class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor modulates T lymphocyte activation and collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aragoneses-Fenoll, L; Montes-Casado, M; Ojeda, G; Acosta, Y Y; Herranz, J; Martínez, S; Blanco-Aparicio, C; Criado, G; Pastor, J; Dianzani, U; Portolés, P; Rojo, J M

    2016-04-15

    Class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are essential to function of normal and tumor cells, and to modulate immune responses. T lymphocytes express high levels of p110α and p110δ class IA PI3K. Whereas the functioning of PI3K p110δ in immune and autoimmune reactions is well established, the role of p110α is less well understood. Here, a novel dual p110α/δ inhibitor (ETP-46321) and highly specific p110α (A66) or p110δ (IC87114) inhibitors have been compared concerning T cell activation in vitro, as well as the effect on responses to protein antigen and collagen-induced arthritis in vivo. In vitro activation of naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 was inhibited more effectively by the p110δ inhibitor than by the p110α inhibitor as measured by cytokine secretion (IL-2, IL-10, and IFN-γ), T-bet expression and NFAT activation. In activated CD4(+) T cells re-stimulated through CD3 and ICOS, IC87114 inhibited Akt and Erk activation, and the secretion of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17A, and IFN-γ better than A66. The p110α/δ inhibitor ETP-46321, or p110α plus p110δ inhibitors also inhibited IL-21 secretion by differentiated CD4(+) T follicular (Tfh) or IL-17-producing (Th17) helper cells. In vivo, therapeutic administration of ETP-46321 significantly inhibited responses to protein antigen as well as collagen-induced arthritis, as measured by antigen-specific antibody responses, secretion of IL-10, IL-17A or IFN-γ, or clinical symptoms. Hence, p110α as well as p110δ Class IA PI3Ks are important to immune regulation; inhibition of both subunits may be an effective therapeutic approach in inflammatory autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Alternative complement pathway activation is essential for inflammation and joint destruction in the passive transfer model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Banda, Nirmal K; Thurman, Joshua M; Kraus, Damian; Wood, Allyson; Carroll, Michael C; Arend, William P; Holers, V Michael

    2006-08-01

    Activation of each complement initiation pathway (classical, alternative, and lectin) can lead to the generation of bioactive fragments with resulting inflammation in target organs. The objective of the current study was to determine the role of specific complement activation pathways in the pathogenesis of experimental anti-type II collagen mAb-passive transfer arthritis. C57BL/6 mice were used that were genetically deficient in either the alternative pathway protein factor B (Bf(-/-)) or in the classical pathway component C4 (C4(-/-)). Clinical disease activity was markedly decreased in Bf(-/-) compared with wild-type (WT) mice (0.5 +/- 0.22 (n = 6) in Bf(-/-) vs 8.83 +/- 0.41 (n = 6) in WT mice (p < 0.0001)). Disease activity scores were not different between C4(-/-) and WT mice. Analyses of joints showed that C3 deposition, inflammation, pannus, cartilage, and bone damage scores were all significantly less in Bf(-/-) as compared with WT mice. There were significant decreases in mRNA levels of C3, C4, CR2, CR3, C3aR, and C5aR in the knees of Bf(-/-) as compared with C4(-/-) and WT mice with arthritis; mRNA levels for complement regulatory proteins did not differ between the three strains. These results indicate that the alternative pathway is absolutely required for the induction of arthritis following injection of anti-collagen Abs. The mechanisms by which these target organ-specific mAbs bypass the requirements for engagement of the classical pathway remain to be defined but do not appear to involve a lack of alternative pathway regulatory proteins. PMID:16849503

  12. Involvement of P2X7 receptor signaling on regulating the differentiation of Th17 cells and type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhi-Dan; Zhang, Ya-Yuan; Guo, Yi-Hong; Huang, Na; Ma, Hui-Hui; Huang, Hui; Yu, Hai-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17 producing T helper (Th17) cells are major effector cells in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has emerged as a potential site in the regulation of inflammation in RA but little is known of its functional role on the differentiation of Th17 cells. This study investigates the in vitro and in vivo effects of P2X7R on Th17 cell differentiation during type II collagen (CII) induced experimental arthritis model. In CII-treated dendritic cells (DCs) and DC/CD4+ T coculture system, pretreatment with pharmacological antagonists of P2X7R (Suramin and A-438079) caused strong inhibition of production of Th17-promoting cytokines (IL-1β, TGF-β1, IL-23p19 and IL-6). Exposure to CII induced the elevation of mRNAs encoding retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α and γt, which were abolished by pretreatment with P2X7R antagonists. Furthermore, blocking P2X7R signaling abolished the CII-mediated increase in IL-17A. Blockade of P2X7R remarkably inhibited hind paw swelling and ameliorated pathological changes in ankle joint of the collagen-induced arthritis mice. Thus, we demonstrated a novel function for P2X7R signaling in regulating CII-induced differentiation of Th17 cells. P2X7R signaling facilitates the development of the sophisticated network of DC-derived cytokines that favors a Th17 phenotype. PMID:27775097

  13. A complement C3 inhibitor specifically targeted to sites of complement activation effectively ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongbin; Qiao, Fei; Atkinson, Carl; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2007-12-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) represents an animal model of autoimmune polyarthritis with similarities to human rheumatoid arthritis, and therapy with various systemic complement-inhibitory proteins has been investigated in this model with varying results. We investigated the use of complement receptor 2 (CR2)-Crry, a complement inhibitor with the ability to target C3 breakdown products deposited in a rheumatic joint. Following induction of CIA in DBA/1J mice, animals were treated with either PBS or CR2-Crry (every other day, every 4 days, or with a single injection). The severity of clinical disease was significantly reduced in all CR2-Crry-treated groups compared with controls. Joints from mice receiving multiple doses of CR2-Crry showed significantly decreased inflammatory cell infiltrate, cartilage damage, pannus formation, and bone damage. CR2-Crry treatment also significantly decreased production of anti-collagen IgG and the inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta. IL-10 and IL-1Ra levels were increased in CR2-Crry-treated mice. CR2-Crry localized preferentially in the joints of mice with CIA. Analysis of IgG and C3 deposition in the joints of treated animals indicated that both complement regulation and the modulation of anti-collagen Ab production contributed to the protective effects of CR2-Crry. Of interest, a previous study reported that Crry-Ig, an untargeted counterpart of CR2-Crry, had minimal effect on disease, even when administered at a sufficiently high dose to maintain chronic complement inhibition. PMID:18025232

  14. Allogeneic Murine Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Migration to Inflamed Joints In Vivo and Amelioration of Collagen Induced Arthritis When Transduced to Express CTLA4Ig

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Frank; Ritter, Thomas; O'Flatharta, Cathal; Howard, Linda; Shaw, Georgina; Anegon, Ignacio; Murphy, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Despite the immunosuppressive, homing, and regenerative capabilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), their ability to migrate to arthritic joints and influence the course of arthritis in vivo remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine if allogeneic MSCs migrate to inflamed joints in vivo and to determine if MSCs expressing the costimulation blocker cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4 coupled to immunoglobulin-G (CTLA4Ig) could be used to ameliorate collagen induced arthritis (CIA). The migration of systemically delivered inbred mouse strain (FVB) MSCs to migrate to inflamed joints in CIA was studied using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, the effect of BALB/c MSCs modified with an adenoviral vector to express CTLA4Ig, on T cell function in vitro and on CIA in vivo was assessed. After systemic delivery of FVB MSCs, eGFP DNA was detectable in the joints of mice with CIA confirming that some MSCs had reached to inflamed joints. BALB/c MSCs suppressed the secretion of both TNFα and IFNγ, and reduced the ratio of Th1:Th2 cytokine expression, by DBA/1 T cells in vitro irrespective of viral modification. The expression of CTLA4Ig did not augment this effect. Despite a worsening of disease scores after infusion of BALB/c MSCs in vivo, BALB/c MSCs expressing CTLA4Ig significantly delayed the onset of inflammatory arthritis in CIA. These data demonstrate that allogeneic MSCs can migrate to the inflamed joints of CIA in vivo and that genetically modified allogeneic MSCs may be considered for development of gene therapy strategies for inflammatory arthritis PMID:23895495

  15. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis through modulating oxidative stress and suppressing nuclear factor-kappa B pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinhang; Li, Siming; Liu, Yaonan; Tian, Guiyou; Yuan, Qingyan; Bai, Fuliang; Wang, Wenfei; Zhang, Zhiyi; Ren, Guiping; Zhang, Yu; Li, Deshan

    2015-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that circulating FGF21 levels are elevated in the serum and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study is to investigate efficacy of FGF21 for treatment of RA and the molecular mechanisms of the therapeutic effect on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Mice with CIA were subcutaneously administered with FGF21 (5, 2 or 1mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), IL-1β antibody (5mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), IL-17A antibody (5mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) and dexamethasone (DEX) (1mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), respectively. The effects of treatment were determined by arthritis severity score, histological damage and cytokine production. The activation of NF-κB was analyzed by Western blotting. We also detected the levels of oxidative stress parameters. Our results showed that FGF21 had beneficial effects on clinical symptom and histological lesion of CIA mice. Similar to antibody and DEX, FGF21 treatment alleviated the severity of arthritis by reducing humoral and cellular immune responses and down-regulating the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. FGF21 treatment also reduced the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ and MMP-3 and increased level of IL-10 in the spleen tissue or the plasma of CIA mice in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, FGF21 inhibited IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and induced significant changes of oxidative stress parameters (MDA, SOD, CAT, GSH-PX and GSH) in the plasma. FGF21 exerts therapeutic efficacy for RA through antioxidant reaction and inhibiting NF-κB inflammatory pathway. This study provides evidence that FGF21 may be a promising therapeutic agent for RA patients. PMID:25601498

  16. Celastrol attenuates bone erosion in collagen-Induced arthritis mice and inhibits osteoclast differentiation and function in RANKL-induced RAW264.7.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ke; Xu, Lingxiao; Feng, Xiaoke; Zhang, Qiande; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng

    2015-02-01

    Recently, the traditional Chinese medicine Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f (TwHF) of the Celastraceae family has attracted increasing attention for its potential therapeutic application in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is well accepted that TwHF exerts the antirheumatic activity and mainly depends on its potent anti-inflammatory property. To further explore the therapeutic potential of the well-defined TwHF-derived single compound - celastrol in RA, we study the therapeutic efficacy of celastrol on bone erosion in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice and delineate its effects on osteoclast differentiation and functions in RANKL-induced osteoclast precursors RAW264.7 cell line. In CIA mice, daily injection of celastrol (beginning on day 28 after arthritis induction) markedly suppressed arthritis, and reduced bone damage in the joints as demonstrated by histology and bone micro-computed tomography (CT). The effects were accompanied by reductions of osteoclast cells in joints, serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) 5b, and expression of osteoclastic genes (Trap, Ctsk, Ctr, Mmp-9) and transcriptional factors (c-Fos, c-Jun and NFATc1). When RAW264.7 cells were treated with RANKL, celastrol inhibited the formation of TRAP+ multinucleated cells and the bone-resorbing activity in dose-dependent manners. Furthermore, celastrol reduced the RANKL-induced expression of osteoclastic genes and transcriptional factors, as well as phosphorylation of NF-kB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). These findings show that celastrol could directly inhibit osteoclast formation and function, suggesting a novel therapeutic strategy of celastrol for managing RA, especially in preventing bone destruction.

  17. Helminth Antigens Enable CpG-Activated Dendritic Cells to Inhibit the Symptoms of Collagen-induced Arthritis through Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carranza, Franco; Falcón, Cristian Roberto; Nuñez, Nicolás; Knubel, Carolina; Correa, Silvia Graciela; Bianco, Ismael; Maccioni, Mariana; Fretes, Ricardo; Triquell, María Fernanda; Motrán, Claudia Cristina; Cervi, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) have the potential to control the outcome of autoimmunity by modulating the immune response. In this study, we tested the ability of Fasciola hepatica total extract (TE) to induce tolerogenic properties in CpG-ODN (CpG) maturated DC, to then evaluate the therapeutic potential of these cells to diminish the inflammatory response in collagen induced arthritis (CIA). DBA/1J mice were injected with TE plus CpG treated DC (T/C-DC) pulsed with bovine collagen II (CII) between two immunizations with CII and clinical scores CIA were determined. The levels of CII-specific IgG2 and IgG1 in sera, the histological analyses in the joints, the cytokine profile in the draining lymph node (DLN) cells and in the joints, and the number, and functionality of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells (Treg) were evaluated. Vaccination of mice with CII pulsed T/C-DC diminished the severity and incidence of CIA symptoms and the production of the inflammatory cytokine, while induced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The therapeutic effect was mediated by Treg cells, since the adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ T cells, inhibited the inflammatory symptoms in CIA. The in vitro blockage of TGF-β in cultures of DLN cells plus CII pulsed T/C-DC inhibited the expansion of Treg cells. Vaccination with CII pulsed T/C-DC seems to be a very efficient approach to diminish exacerbated immune response in CIA, by inducing the development of Treg cells, and it is therefore an interesting candidate for a cell-based therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:22848374

  18. Therapeutic Effect of Ergotope Peptides on Collagen-Induced Arthritis by Downregulation of Inflammatory and Th1/Th17 Responses and Induction of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaoyin; Deng, Shaohua; Li, Shan; Xi, Yebin; Li, Chengzhen; Wang, Li; He, Dongyi; Wang, Zhaojun; Chen, Guangjie

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that results in a chronic and inflammatory disorder. Dynamic balance of helper T cells (Th) 1 and 17 and regulatory T cells (Treg) is broken in RA. Since there is no cure for RA at present, it is necessary to find a truly effective and convenient treatment. Several studies have intended to induce ergotopic regulation to treat autoimmune diseases. This study was undertaken to find potential ergotope peptides and investigate their effects in treating the animal model of RA and their underlying regulatory mechanisms. First, we selected functional ergotope peptides from 25 overlapping peptides derived from the interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) α chain, and then used these peptides to treat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We showed ergotope peptides as immunomodulatory factors with great benefits at the clinical and pathologic levels. This effect was associated with inhibition of type II collagen (CII)-specific proliferation and autoantibody production as well as induction of antiergotypic immune response, downregulation of both Th1 and Th17 cells and their related components, and emergence of Treg cells that had suppressive action on autoreactive T cells. We also proved that cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and IL-10 are two important mediators that are critical to Treg suppressive function. Inhibition of Th1 and Th17 in established CIA could be attributed to ergotope-induced Treg cells. Our findings reveal that ergotope peptides induce regulatory immune responses and restore immune tolerance, suggesting that treatment with ergotope peptides may be a novel approach to therapy for RA patients and has good application prospects, with cheap, effective, convenient, wide-spectrum features. PMID:27579476

  19. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-01-01

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27571073

  20. Ossicular Bone Damage and Hearing Loss in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Correlated Functional and High Resolution Morphometric Study in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Mary F.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, a body of comparative case-control studies suggests that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are more prone to developing hearing loss (HL). However, experimental evidence that supports this hypothesis is still lacking because the human auditory organ is not readily accessible. The aim of this study was to determine the association between bone damage to the ossicles of the middle ear and HL, using a widely accepted murine model of collagen-induced arthritis (RA mice). Diarthrodial joints in the middle ear were examined with microcomputer tomography (microCT), and hearing function was assessed by auditory brainstem response (ABR). RA mice exhibited significantly decreased hearing sensitivity compared to age-matched controls. Additionally, a significant narrowing of the incudostapedial joint space and an increase in the porosity of the stapes were observed. The absolute latencies of all ABR waves were prolonged, but mean interpeak latencies were not statistically different. The observed bone defects in the middle ear that were accompanied by changes in ABR responses were consistent with conductive HL. This combination suggests that conductive impairment is at least part of the etiology of RA-induced HL in a murine model. Whether the inner ear sustains bone erosion or other pathology, and whether the cochlear nerve sustains pathology await subsequent studies. Considering the fact that certain anti-inflammatories are ototoxic in high doses, monitoring RA patients’ auditory function is advisable as part of the effort to ensure their well-being. PMID:27690307

  1. Xianfanghuomingyin, a Chinese Compound Medicine, Modulates the Proliferation and Differentiation of T Lymphocyte in a Collagen-Induced Arthritis Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Wei, Yi; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Jingwei; Dong, Bin; Zhu, Lingqun

    2016-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), xianfanghuomingyin (XFHM) is used to treat autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we studied the mechanisms underlying its treatment effects, especially its anti-inflammatory effects in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. We found that cartilage destruction and pannus formation were alleviated by treatment with XFHM. The abnormal differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells was downregulated significantly by XFHM, and Th2 and Treg cells were upregulated. Moreover, the expression levels of specific cytokines and transcription factors related to Th1 cells (interferon γ [IFNγ], T-bet) and Th17 cells (interleukin- [IL-] 17) and the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-gamma (RORγ) were downregulated. Serum IL-4 and GATA-3, which contribute to Th2 cells differentiation, increased significantly after XFHM administration. These results indicate that XFHM can restore the balance of T lymphocytes and reestablish the immunological tolerance to inhibit autoinflammatory disorder of RA. Taken together, XFHM can be used as a complementary or alternative traditional medicine to treat RA.

  2. Anti-inflammatory effects of interleukin-23 receptor cytokine-binding homology region rebalance T cell distribution in rodent collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Yu, Dongmei; Wang, Xin; Luo, Cheng; Chen, Yucong; Lei, Wen; Wang, Chen; Ge, Yaoyao; Xue, Wenyao; Tian, Qiqi; Gao, Xiangdong; Yao, Wenbing

    2016-01-01

    IL-23 is an important cytokine to regulate Th17 cell differentiation and promote the proliferation of inflammatory cells in Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases. The collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rat is a model of rheumatoid arthritis characterized by pronounced inflammatory auto-responses from B and T cells, especially Th17 cells in lesions. In the present study, we used rhIL23R-CHR to block the IL-23 signaling pathway to probe the importance of IL-23 in misbalancing the ratio of Th17/Th9/Treg cells in CIA rats. After treatments with rhIL23R-CHR, the CIA rats showed a significant decrease of secretions of IL-17 and IL-9, whereas FoxP3 was activated in the process, indicating that IL-23 can manipulate the balance of Th17/Th9/Treg cells. Similar to the animal model, IL-23 also possessed remarkable proinflammatory effects on human fibroblast-like synoviocyte cells (HFLS), showing synergetic outcomes with TNF-α. Together, IL-23 could act as a modulator to imbalance the ratio of Th17/Th9/Treg cells, and rhIL23R-CHR could serve as a potential therapeutic agent for RA patients. PMID:27177334

  3. A herbal formula comprising Rosae Multiflorae Fructus and Lonicerae Japonicae Flos, attenuates collagen-induced arthritis and inhibits TLR4 signalling in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Brian Chi Yan; Yu, Hua; Guo, Hui; Su, Tao; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Li, Ting; Cao, Hui-Hui; Tse, Anfernee Kai-Wing; Wu, Zheng-Zhi; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2016-01-01

    RL, a traditional remedy for Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), comprises two edible herbs, Rosae Multiflorae Fructus and Lonicerae Japonicae Flos. We have reported that RL could inhibit the production of inflammatory mediators in immune cells. Here we investigated the effects and the mechanism of action of RL in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. RL significantly increased food intake and weight gain of CIA rats without any observable adverse effect; ameliorated joint erythema and swelling; inhibited immune cell infiltration, bone erosion and osteophyte formation in joints; reduced joint protein expression levels of TLR4, phospho-TAK1, phospho-NF-κB p65, phospho-c-Jun and phospho-IRF3; lowered levels of inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-17A and MCP-1 in sera and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-17A in joints); elevated serum IL-10 level; reinvigorated activities of antioxidant SOD, CAT and GSH-Px in the liver and serum; reduced Th17 cell proportions in splenocytes; inhibited splenocyte proliferation and activation; and lowered serum IgG level. In conclusion, RL at nontoxic doses inhibited TLR4 signaling and potently improved clinical conditions of CIA rats. These findings provide further pharmacological justifications for the traditional use of RL in RA management. PMID:26860973

  4. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-08-26

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway.

  5. Xianfanghuomingyin, a Chinese Compound Medicine, Modulates the Proliferation and Differentiation of T Lymphocyte in a Collagen-Induced Arthritis Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Nie, Bo; Li, Xue; Wei, Yi; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Jingwei; Lou, Lixia; Dong, Bin; Wu, Aiming; Zhang, Dongmei; Zhu, Lingqun; Zhao, Jiuli; Chai, Limin

    2016-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), xianfanghuomingyin (XFHM) is used to treat autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we studied the mechanisms underlying its treatment effects, especially its anti-inflammatory effects in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. We found that cartilage destruction and pannus formation were alleviated by treatment with XFHM. The abnormal differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells was downregulated significantly by XFHM, and Th2 and Treg cells were upregulated. Moreover, the expression levels of specific cytokines and transcription factors related to Th1 cells (interferon γ [IFNγ], T-bet) and Th17 cells (interleukin- [IL-] 17) and the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-gamma (RORγ) were downregulated. Serum IL-4 and GATA-3, which contribute to Th2 cells differentiation, increased significantly after XFHM administration. These results indicate that XFHM can restore the balance of T lymphocytes and reestablish the immunological tolerance to inhibit autoinflammatory disorder of RA. Taken together, XFHM can be used as a complementary or alternative traditional medicine to treat RA. PMID:27656238

  6. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-01-01

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27571073

  7. Chemical characterization of a red raspberry fruit extract and evaluation of its pharmacological effects in experimental models of acute inflammation and collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Figueira, M E; Câmara, M B; Direito, R; Rocha, J; Serra, A T; Duarte, C M M; Fernandes, A; Freitas, M; Fernandes, E; Marques, M C; Bronze, M R; Sepodes, B

    2014-12-01

    Berries are an important dietary source of fibres, vitamins, minerals and some biologically active non-nutrients. A red raspberry fruit extract was characterized in terms of phenolic content and the anti-inflammatory properties and protective effects were evaluated in two experimental models of inflammation. The antioxidant potential of the extract, the cellular antioxidant activity and the effects over neutrophils' oxidative burst were also studied to provide a mechanistic insight for the anti-inflammatory effects observed. The extract was administered in a dose of 15 mg kg(-1), i.p. and significantly inhibited paw oedema formation in the rat. The same dose was administered via i.p. and p.o. routes in the collagen-induced arthritis model in the rat. The extract showed pharmacological activity and was able to significantly reduce the development of clinical signs of arthritis and markedly reduce the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, preventing articular destruction in treated animals.

  8. MZ B cells migrate in a T-bet dependent manner and might contribute to the remission of collagen-induced arthritis by the secretion of IL-10.

    PubMed

    Huber, Krisztina; Sármay, Gabriella; Kövesdi, Dorottya

    2016-09-01

    In mice, marginal zone (MZ) B cells are found principally in the MZ of the spleen and characterized as CD23-negative cells, primarily express polyreactive BCRs, high levels of complement receptor-2 and TLRs. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a commonly used animal model of human rheumatoid arthritis, considered as a Th1-mediated disease. Although the importance of MZ B cells in the initiation of CIA is well established, their role in remission is unexplored. Besides, playing a central role in Th1 cell development, T-box transcription factor (T-bet) has important functions in B cells. T-bet is regulated by IFN-γ and through the BCR and TLR9, the signals that have an impact on regulatory IL-10 production. In this work, we aimed to analyze the contribution of T-bet to the function of IL-10-positive MZ B cells. We demonstrate that during the remission phase of CIA, MZ B cells express an elevated level of T-bet and confirm the existence of IL-10/T-bet coexpressing cells. Moreover, we show that T-bet-expressing MZ B cells migrate toward CXCR3 ligand and secrete IL-10 by inflammatory stimuli. Our data suggest that T-bet might contribute to the remission of CIA by facilitating the regulatory potential of IL-10-positive MZ B cells. PMID:27343199

  9. Xianfanghuomingyin, a Chinese Compound Medicine, Modulates the Proliferation and Differentiation of T Lymphocyte in a Collagen-Induced Arthritis Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Wei, Yi; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Jingwei; Dong, Bin; Zhu, Lingqun

    2016-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), xianfanghuomingyin (XFHM) is used to treat autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we studied the mechanisms underlying its treatment effects, especially its anti-inflammatory effects in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. We found that cartilage destruction and pannus formation were alleviated by treatment with XFHM. The abnormal differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells was downregulated significantly by XFHM, and Th2 and Treg cells were upregulated. Moreover, the expression levels of specific cytokines and transcription factors related to Th1 cells (interferon γ [IFNγ], T-bet) and Th17 cells (interleukin- [IL-] 17) and the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-gamma (RORγ) were downregulated. Serum IL-4 and GATA-3, which contribute to Th2 cells differentiation, increased significantly after XFHM administration. These results indicate that XFHM can restore the balance of T lymphocytes and reestablish the immunological tolerance to inhibit autoinflammatory disorder of RA. Taken together, XFHM can be used as a complementary or alternative traditional medicine to treat RA. PMID:27656238

  10. Korean Red Ginseng Saponin Fraction Rich in Ginsenoside-Rb1, Rc and Rb2 Attenuates the Severity of Mouse Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Endale, Mehari; Im, Eun Ju; Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Sung Dae; Song, Yong-Bum; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Chaekyun; Kim, Seung-Hyung; Roh, Seong-Soo; Rhee, Man Hee

    2014-01-01

    Despite a multitude of reports on anti-inflammatory properties of ginseng extracts or individual ginsenosides, data on antiarthritic effect of ginseng saponin preparation with mixed ginsenosides is limited. On the other hand, a combined therapy of safe and inexpensive plant-derived natural products such as ginsenosides can be considered as an alternative to treat arthritis. Our previous in vitro data displayed a strong anti-inflammatory action of red ginseng saponin fraction-A (RGSF-A). We, herein, report a marked antiarthritic property of RGSF-A rich in ginsenoside Rb1, Rc, and Rb2. Collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) mice were treated with RGSF-A or methotrexate (MTX) for 5 weeks. Joint pathology, serum antibody production and leukocye activation, cytokine production in the circulation, lymph nodes, and joints were examined. RGSF-A markedly reduced severity of arthritis, cellular infiltration, and cartilage damage. It suppressed CD3+/CD69+, CD4+/CD25+, CD8+ T-cell, CD19+, B220/CD23+ B-cell, MHCII+/CD11c+, and Gr-1+/CD11b+ cell activations. It further suppressed anti-CII- or anti-RF-IgG/IgM, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-17, and IL-6 secretions but stimulated IL-10 levels in the serum, joint, or splenocyte. RGSF-A attenuated arthritis severity, modified leukocyte activations, and restored cytokine imbalances, suggesting that it can be considered as an antiarthritic agent with the capacity to ameliorate the immune and inflammatory responses in CIA mice. PMID:24833816

  11. Methyl salicylate lactoside inhibits inflammatory response of fibroblast-like synoviocytes and joint destruction in collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Wenyu; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Xue; Xin, Sheng; Zhou, Yiming; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dan; Li, Yongjie; Zhou, Sibai; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-d-lactoside (MSL), whose chemical structure is similar to that of salicylic acid, is a natural product derivative isolated from a traditional Chinese herb. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of MSL in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and explore its underlying mechanism. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The anti-arthritic effects of MSL were evaluated on human rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in vitro and CIA in mice in vivo by obtaining clinical scores, measuring hind paw thickness and inflammatory cytokine levels, radiographic evaluations and histopathological assessments. KEY RESULTS Treatment with MSL after the onset of arthritis significantly prevented the progression and development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in CIA mice without megascopic gastric mucosa damage. In addition, MSL inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, the phosphorylation and translocation of NF-κB, and cell proliferation induced by TNF-α in FLS. MSL non-selectively inhibited the activity of COX in vitro, but was a more potent inhibitor of COX-2 than COX-1. MSL also inhibited the phosphorylation of inhibitor of NF-κB kinase, IκBα and p65, thus blocking the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in TNF-α-stimulated FLS. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS MSL exerts therapeutic effects on CIA mice, suppressing the inflammatory response and joint destruction by non-selectively inhibiting the activity of COX and suppressing activation of the NF-κB signalling pathway, but without damaging the gastric mucosa. Therefore, MSL has great potential to be developed into a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA. PMID:24712652

  12. A Rationally Designed TNF-α Epitope-Scaffold Immunogen Induces Sustained Antibody Response and Alleviates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Jin; Xu, Aizhang; Zhong, Conghao; Lu, Wuguang; Deng, Li; Li, Rongxiu

    2016-01-01

    The TNF-α biological inhibitors have significantly improved the clinical outcomes of many autoimmune diseases, in particular rheumatoid arthritis. However, the practical uses are limited due to high costs and the risk of anti-drug antibody responses. Attempts to develop anti-TNF-α vaccines have generated encouraging data in animal models, however, data from clinical trials have not met expectations. In present study, we designed a TNF-α epitope-scaffold immunogen DTNF7 using the transmembrane domain of diphtheria toxin, named DTT as a scaffold. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that the grafted TNF-α epitope is entirely surface-exposed and presented in a native-like conformation while the rigid helical structure of DTT is minimally perturbed, thereby rendering the immunogen highly stable. Immunization of mice with alum formulated DTNF7 induced humoral responses against native TNF-α, and the antibody titer was sustained for more than 6 months, which supports a role of the universal CD4 T cell epitopes of DTT in breaking self-immune tolerance. In a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, DTNF7-alum vaccination markedly delayed the onset of collagen-induced arthritis, and reduced incidence as well as clinical score. DTT is presumed safe as an epitope carrier because a catalytic inactive mutant of diphtheria toxin, CRM197 has good clinical safety records as an active vaccine component. Taken all together, we show that DTT-based epitope vaccine is a promising strategy for prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27658047

  13. Rapid-onset clinical and mechanistic effects of anti-C5aR treatment in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, C; Wenander, C S; Usher, P A; Hebsgaard, J B; Sondergaard, B-C; Rønø, B; Mackay, C; Friedrichsen, B; Chang, C; Tang, R; Hornum, L

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical evidence supports targeting the C5a receptor (C5aR) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To support ongoing clinical development of an anti-C5aR monoclonal antibody, we have investigated for the first time the mechanism of action and the pharmacodynamics of a blocking anti-murine C5aR (anti-mC5aR) surrogate antibody in mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). First, efficacy was demonstrated in a multiple-dose treatment study. Almost complete inhibition of clinical disease progression was obtained, including reduced bone and cartilage destruction in anti-mC5aR-treated mice. Then, the mechanism of action was examined by looking for early effects of anti-mC5aR treatment in single-dose treatment studies. We found that 48 h after single-dose treatment with anti-mC5aR, the neutrophil and macrophage infiltration into the paws was already reduced. In addition, several inflammatory markers, including tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-17A were reduced locally in the paws, indicating reduction of local inflammation. Furthermore, dose-setting experiments supported a beneficial clinical effect of dosing above the C5aR saturation level. In conclusion, these preclinical data demonstrated rapid onset effects of antibody blockade of C5aR. The data have translational value in supporting the Novo Nordisk clinical trials of an anti-C5aR antibody in rheumatoid arthritis patients, by identifying potential biomarkers of treatment effects as well as by providing information on pharmacodynamics and novel insights into the mechanism of action of monoclonal antibody blockade of C5aR. PMID:24665841

  14. Rapid-onset clinical and mechanistic effects of anti-C5aR treatment in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Andersson, C; Wenander, C S; Usher, P A; Hebsgaard, J B; Sondergaard, B-C; Rønø, B; Mackay, C; Friedrichsen, B; Chang, C; Tang, R; Hornum, L

    2014-07-01

    Preclinical evidence supports targeting the C5a receptor (C5aR) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To support ongoing clinical development of an anti-C5aR monoclonal antibody, we have investigated for the first time the mechanism of action and the pharmacodynamics of a blocking anti-murine C5aR (anti-mC5aR) surrogate antibody in mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). First, efficacy was demonstrated in a multiple-dose treatment study. Almost complete inhibition of clinical disease progression was obtained, including reduced bone and cartilage destruction in anti-mC5aR-treated mice. Then, the mechanism of action was examined by looking for early effects of anti-mC5aR treatment in single-dose treatment studies. We found that 48 h after single-dose treatment with anti-mC5aR, the neutrophil and macrophage infiltration into the paws was already reduced. In addition, several inflammatory markers, including tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-17A were reduced locally in the paws, indicating reduction of local inflammation. Furthermore, dose-setting experiments supported a beneficial clinical effect of dosing above the C5aR saturation level. In conclusion, these preclinical data demonstrated rapid onset effects of antibody blockade of C5aR. The data have translational value in supporting the Novo Nordisk clinical trials of an anti-C5aR antibody in rheumatoid arthritis patients, by identifying potential biomarkers of treatment effects as well as by providing information on pharmacodynamics and novel insights into the mechanism of action of monoclonal antibody blockade of C5aR.

  15. Two Novel α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Ligands: In Vitro Properties and Their Efficacy in Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van Maanen, Marjolein A.; Papke, Roger L.; Koopman, Frieda A.; Koepke, Jessica; Bevaart, Lisette; Clark, Roger; Lamppu, Diana; Elbaum, Daniel; LaRosa, Gregory J.; Tak, Paul P.; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can downregulate inflammation via the release of acetylcholine (ACh) by the vagus nerve. This neurotransmitter binds to the α7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChR), expressed on macrophages and other immune cells. We tested the pharmacological and functional profile of two novel compounds, PMP-311 and PMP-072 and investigated their role in modulating collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. Methods Both compounds were characterized with binding, electrophysiological, and pharmacokinetic studies. For in vivo efficacy studies in the CIA model the compounds were administered daily by oral gavage from day 20 till sacrifice at day 34. Disease progression was monitored by visual clinical scoring and measurement of paw swelling. Inflammation and joint destruction were examined by histology and radiology. Results Treatment with PMP-311 was effective in preventing disease onset, reducing clinical signs of arthritis, and reducing synovial inflammation and bone destruction. PMP-072 also showed a trend in arthritis reduction at all concentrations tested. The data showed that while both compounds bind to α7nAChR with high affinity, PMP-311 acts like a classical agonist of ion channel activity, and PMP-072 can actually act as an ion channel antagonist. Moreover, PMP-072 was clearly distinct from typical competitive antagonists, since it was able to act as a silent agonist. It synergizes with the allosteric modulator PNU-120596, and subsequently activates desensitized α7nAChR. However, PMP-072 was less efficacious than PMP-311 at both channel activation and desensitization, suggesting that both conducting and non-conducting states maybe of importance in driving an anti-inflammatory response. Finally, we found that the anti-arthritic effect can be observed despite limited penetration of the central nervous system. Conclusions These data provide direct evidence that the α7nAChR in immune cells does not

  16. Amelioration of collagen-induced arthritis by Salix nigra bark extract via suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Sahu, Debasis; Das, Hasi Rani; Sharma, Deepak

    2011-12-01

    Our study goals to investigate the anti-arthritic potential of Salix nigra bark methanol extract (SNME) against both inflammation and oxidative stress in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Results showed that SNME exhibited maximum scavenging activity against superoxide, hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide radicals along with the suppression of lipid peroxidation. Female wistar rats were immunized with porcine type II collagen and treated with SNME (100 mg/kg body weight) for 15 days starting on day 20. SNME significantly inhibited the paw swelling and arthritic score; exhibited maximum CIA inhibition of 93.7% by the end of the experimental period. Administration of SNME to arthritic rats significantly improved the histological findings in joints as evident by reduced infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells and smooth synovial lining. Roentgenograms of tibiotarsal joints of both SNME and indomethacin-treated rats showed protection against osteophyte formation, soft tissue swelling and bone resorption. Furthermore, levels of inflammatory mediators (nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) measured in both plasma and joint exudates were significantly reduced by SNME treatment. Increased oxidative stress observed in the arthritic animals was also found to be significantly restored in SNME- treated rats. Taken together, our studies clearly indicate the potential of S. nigra as an anti-arthritic agent.

  17. Changes in focal adhesion kinase expression in rats with collagen-induced arthritis and efficacy of intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs alone or in combination.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui-Ying; Luo, Jing; Li, Xiao-Feng; Lv, Qian; Wen, Hong-Yan; Song, Qing-Zhen; Zhao, Wen-Peng; Zhao, Xiang-Cong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Si-Yu; Zhi, Jian-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is known to promote the proliferation, migration and survival of synovial cells and plays an important role in the occurrence, development and pathological process of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to observe FAK changes in synovial cells of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and after intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or in combination in a CIA female SD rat model induced by collagen type II. The rats were randomized to 8 groups: normal control group, CIA model control group, methotrexate (MTX, 0.9 mg/kg/w) group, cyclophosphamide (CTX, 24 mg/kg/3 w) group, leflunomide (LEF, 1.2 mg/kg/d) group, MTX + CTX group, LEF + CTX group, and MTX + LEF group. They were intervened with DMARDs alone or in combination for six weeks. The experiment lasted a total of 9 weeks in vivo. Articular inflammation was measured during the process of drug intervention in terms of the degree of swelling degree in the right hind foot using a venire caliper. All animals were sacrificed by breaking the neck after 9 weeks. Then, the ankle was fixed, decalcified, embedded, and HE stained, and prepared into slices to observe pathological changes in the synovial tissue. FAK expression in synovial cells was assayed by immunohistochemistry and the mean optical density (OD) value was measured using the HPIAS-2000 image analysis system. It was found that FAK expression was negative in normal control group, positive in CIA model control group, and decreased in the three DMARD combination treatment groups significantly as compared with that in the three single-drug groups (P < 0.05). FAK expression in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group decreased more significantly than that in MTX + LEF group (P < 0.05), and there was no statistically significant difference between LEF + CTX and MTX + CTX groups. The arthritis index and pathological change in the synovial tissue in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group

  18. ETP-46321, a dual p110α/δ class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor modulates T lymphocyte activation and collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aragoneses-Fenoll, L; Montes-Casado, M; Ojeda, G; Acosta, Y Y; Herranz, J; Martínez, S; Blanco-Aparicio, C; Criado, G; Pastor, J; Dianzani, U; Portolés, P; Rojo, J M

    2016-04-15

    Class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are essential to function of normal and tumor cells, and to modulate immune responses. T lymphocytes express high levels of p110α and p110δ class IA PI3K. Whereas the functioning of PI3K p110δ in immune and autoimmune reactions is well established, the role of p110α is less well understood. Here, a novel dual p110α/δ inhibitor (ETP-46321) and highly specific p110α (A66) or p110δ (IC87114) inhibitors have been compared concerning T cell activation in vitro, as well as the effect on responses to protein antigen and collagen-induced arthritis in vivo. In vitro activation of naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 was inhibited more effectively by the p110δ inhibitor than by the p110α inhibitor as measured by cytokine secretion (IL-2, IL-10, and IFN-γ), T-bet expression and NFAT activation. In activated CD4(+) T cells re-stimulated through CD3 and ICOS, IC87114 inhibited Akt and Erk activation, and the secretion of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17A, and IFN-γ better than A66. The p110α/δ inhibitor ETP-46321, or p110α plus p110δ inhibitors also inhibited IL-21 secretion by differentiated CD4(+) T follicular (Tfh) or IL-17-producing (Th17) helper cells. In vivo, therapeutic administration of ETP-46321 significantly inhibited responses to protein antigen as well as collagen-induced arthritis, as measured by antigen-specific antibody responses, secretion of IL-10, IL-17A or IFN-γ, or clinical symptoms. Hence, p110α as well as p110δ Class IA PI3Ks are important to immune regulation; inhibition of both subunits may be an effective therapeutic approach in inflammatory autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26883061

  19. Low Dietary c9t11-Conjugated Linoleic Acid Intake from Dairy Fat or Supplements Reduces Inflammation in Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Shane M; Olson, Jake M; Campbell, James P; Bishop, Jeffrey W; Crump, Peter M; Cook, Mark E

    2016-07-01

    Dietary cis-9,trans-11 (c9t11) conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) fed at 0.5 % w/w was previously shown to attenuate inflammation in the murine collagen-induced (CA) arthritis model, and growing evidence implicates c9t11-CLA as a major anti-inflammatory component of dairy fat. To understand c9t11-CLA's contribution to dairy fat's anti-inflammatory action, the minimum amount of dietary c9t11-CLA needed to reduce inflammation must be determined. This study had two objectives: (1) determine the minimum dietary anti-inflammatory c9t11-CLA intake level in the CA model, and (2) compare this to anti-inflammatory effects of dairy fat (non-enriched, naturally c9t11-CLA-enriched, or c9t11-CLA-supplemented). Mice received the following dietary fat treatments (w/w) post arthritis onset: corn oil (6 % CO), 0.125, 0.25, 0.375, and 0.5 % c9t11-CLA, control butter (6 % CB), c9t11-enriched butter (6 % EB), or c9t11-CLA-supplemented butter (6 % SB, containing 0.2 % c9t11-CLA). Paw arthritic severity and pad swelling were scored and measured, respectively, over an 84-day study period. All c9t11-CLA and butter diets decreased the arthritic score (25-51 %, P < 0.01) and paw swelling (8-11 %, P < 0.01). Throughout the study, plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) was elevated in CO-fed arthritic mice compared to non-arthritic (NA) mice but was reduced in 0.5 % c9t11-CLA- and EB-fed mice. Interleukin-1β and IL-6 were increased in arthritic CO-fed mice compared to NA mice but were reduced in 0.5 % c9t11-CLA- and EB-fed mice through day 42. In conclusion, 0.125 % c9t11-CLA reduced clinical arthritis as effectively as higher doses, and decreased arthritis in CB-fed mice suggested that the minimal anti-inflammatory levels of c9t11-CLA might be below 0.125 %. PMID:27270404

  20. Effects of type II collagen epitope carbamylation and citrullination in human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4(+) monozygotic twins discordant for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    De Santis, M; Ceribelli, A; Cavaciocchi, F; Generali, E; Massarotti, M; Isailovic, N; Crotti, C; Scherer, H U; Montecucco, C; Selmi, C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the native, citrullinated or carbamylated type II human collagen T cell- and B cell-epitopes on the adaptive immune response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Peripheral blood T and B cells obtained from a human leucocyte D4-related (antigen DR4(-) HLA-DR4)(+) woman with early RA, her healthy monozygotic twin and an unrelated HLA-DR3(+) woman with early RA were analysed for activation (CD154/CD69), apoptosis (annexin/7-aminoactinomycin), cytokine production [interferon (IFN)γ/interleukin (IL)-17/IL-4/IL-10/IL-6] and functional phenotype (CD45Ra/CCR7) after stimulation with the collagen native T cell epitope (T261-273), the K264 carbamylated T cell epitope (carT261-273), the native B cell epitope (B359-369) or the R360 citrullinated B cell epitope (citB359-369), and the combinations of these. The T cell memory compartment was activated by T cell epitopes in both discordant DR4(+) twins, but not in the DR3(+) RA. The collagen-specific activation of CD4(+) T cells was induced with both the native and carbamylated T cell epitopes only in the RA twin. Both T cell epitopes also induced IL-17 production in the RA twin, but a greater IL-4 and IL-10 response in the healthy twin. The citrullinated B cell epitope, particularly when combined with the carbamylated T cell epitope, induced B cell activation and an increased IL-6/IL-10 ratio in the RA twin compared to a greater IL-10 production in the healthy twin. Our data suggest that circulating collagen-specific T and B cells are found in HLA-DR4(+) subjects, but only RA activated cells express co-stimulatory molecules and produce proinflammatory cytokines. Carbamylation and citrullination further modulate the activation and cytokine polarization of T and B cells. PMID:27314557

  1. Norisoboldine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis through regulating the balance between Th17 and regulatory T cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wang, Ting; Yu, Juntao; Wu, Xin; Lu, Qian; Chou, Guixin; Wang, Zhengtao; Kong, Lingyi; Dai, Yue; Xia, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Norisoboldine (NOR), the main active ingredient of the dry root of Lindera aggregata, was previously proven to have substantial therapeutic effects on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice by oral administration. However, it exhibited a very poor bioavailability in normal rats. The pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamics disconnection attracts us to explore its anti-arthritic mechanism in more detail. In this study, NOR, administered orally, markedly attenuated the pathological changes in CIA rats, which was accompanied by the down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that the plasma concentration of NOR was moderately elevated in CIA rats compared with normal rats, but it was still far lower than the minimal effective concentration required for inhibiting the proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes in vitro. Interestingly, NOR was shown to regulate the balance between Th17 and regulatory T (Treg) cells in the intestinal lymph nodes more strikingly than in other tissues. It could increase the expression of Foxp3 mRNA in both gut and joints, and markedly up-regulate the number of integrin α4β7 (a marker of gut source)-positive Foxp3{sup +} cells in the joints of CIA rats. These results suggest that the gut might be the primary action site of NOR, and NOR exerts anti-arthritis effect through regulating the balance between Th17 and Treg cells in intestinal lymph nodes and yielding a trafficking of lymphocytes (especially Treg cells) from the gut to joint. The findings of the present study also provide a plausible explanation for the anti-arthritic effects of poorly absorbed compounds like NOR. - Highlights: • Norisoboldine, administered orally, markedly attenuates the clinical signs of CIA. • Norisoboldine regulates the balance of Th17/Treg cells in the intestinal lymph node. • Norisoboldine induces the migration of Treg cells from the gut to joint.

  2. Selective oestrogen receptor modulators lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene inhibit joint inflammation and osteoporosis in ovariectomised mice with collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Angelina I.; Stubelius, Alexandra; Nurkkala-Karlsson, Merja; Ohlsson, Claes; Carlsten, Hans; Islander, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Objective. RA predominantly affects post-menopausal women and is strongly associated with development of generalised osteoporosis. To find treatments that target both joint manifestations and osteoporosis in RA is desirable. The third generation of selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) [lasofoxifene (LAS) and bazedoxifene (BZA)] are new treatment options for post-menopausal osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of LAS and BZA on arthritic disease and inflammation-associated bone loss using CIA in mice. Methods. Female DBA/1 mice were ovariectomised and subjected to CIA as a model of post-menopausal RA. Mice received treatment with LAS, BZA, 17β-estradiol (E2) as reference or vehicle. Arthritis development was assessed and BMD was determined by peripheral quantitative CT of the femurs. Serologic markers of inflammation and cartilage destruction were analysed. Immune cells in lymph nodes were studied by flow cytometry. Results. LAS and BZA reduced the clinical severity of arthritis as well as the grade of histologic synovitis and erosions on cartilage and bone. Moreover, SERMs protected against generalised bone loss in CIA by increasing trabecular BMD. Both SERMs decreased serum marker of cartilage destruction and LAS reduced serum IL-6 levels. SERMs did not alter Th17 cells in lymph nodes as E2 did. Conclusion. The anti-osteoporotic drugs LAS and BZA were found to be potent inhibitors of joint inflammation and bone destruction in experimental arthritis. This study provides new important knowledge regarding the treatment regimen of post-menopausal women with RA who suffer from increased risk for osteoporosis. PMID:26424839

  3. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in mice features regulatory transcriptional network connecting major histocompatibility complex (MHC H2) with autoantigen genes in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Donate, Paula B; Fornari, Thaís A; Junta, Cristina M; Magalhães, Danielle A; Macedo, Cláudia; Cunha, Thiago M; Nguyen, Catherine; Cunha, Fernando Q; Passos, Geraldo A

    2011-05-01

    Considering that imbalance of central tolerance in the thymus contributes to aggressive autoimmunity, we compared the expression of peripheral tissue autoantigens (PTA) genes, which are involved in self-representation in the thymic stroma, of two mouse strains; DBA-1/J (MHC-H2(q)) susceptible and DBA-2/J (MHC-H2(d)) resistant to collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We evaluate whether these strains differ in their thymic gene expression, allowing identification of genes that might play a role in susceptibility/resistance to CIA. Microarray profiling showed that 1093 PTA genes were differentially modulated between collagen immunized DBA-1/J and DBA-2/J mice. These genes were assigned to 17 different tissues/organs, including joints/bone, characterizing the promiscuous gene expression (PGE), which is implicated in self-representation. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that Aire (autoimmune regulator), an important regulator of the PGE process, Aire-dependent (insulin), Aire-independent (Col2A1 and Gad67), and other 22 joint/bone autoantigen genes were down-regulated in DBA-1/J compared with DBA-2/J in the thymus. Considering the importance of MHC-H2 in peptide-self presentation and autoimmunity susceptibility, we reconstructed transcriptional networks of both strains based on actual microarray data. The networks clearly demonstrated different MHC-H2 transcriptional interactions with PTAs genes. DBA-1/J strain featured MHC-H2 as a node influencing downstream genes. Differently, in DBA-2/J strain network MHC-H2 was exclusively self-regulated and does not control other genes. These findings provide evidence that CIA susceptibility in mice may be a reflex of a cascade-like transcriptional control connecting different genes to MHC-H2 in the thymus.

  4. Experimental African Trypanosome Infection by Needle Passage or Natural Tsetse Fly Challenge Thwarts the Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1 Prone Mice via an Impairment of Antigen Specific B Cell Autoantibody Titers

    PubMed Central

    De Trez, Carl; Katsandegwaza, Brunette; Caljon, Guy; Magez, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis is a B cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Recently published studies have demonstrated that in some rare cases pathogens can confer protection from autoimmunity. Trypanosoma brucei parasites are tsetse fly transmitted extracellular protozoans causing sleeping sickness disease in humans and Nagana in livestock in sub-Saharan endemic areas. In the past, we demonstrated that trypanosome infections impair B cell homeostasis and abolish vaccine-induced protection against unrelated antigens. Hence, here we hypothesized that trypanosome infection can affect the onset of CIA by specifically dampening specific B-cell responses and type II collagen antibody titers in DBA/1 prone mice. We observed a substantial delay in the onset of collagen-induced arthritis in T. brucei-infected DBA/1 mice that correlates with a drastic decrease of type II collagen titers of the different IgG isotypes in the serum. Treatment of infected mice with Berenil, a trypanocidal drug, restored the development of CIA-associated clinical symptoms. Interestingly, these data were confirmed by the challenge of immunized DBA/1 prone mice with T. brucei-infected tsetse flies. Together, these results demonstrate that T. brucei infection is impairing the maintenance of the antigen specific plasma B cell pool driving the development of CIA in DBA/1 prone mice. PMID:26110416

  5. IL-35 is a novel cytokine with therapeutic effects against collagen-induced arthritis through the expansion of regulatory T cells and suppression of Th17 cells.

    PubMed

    Niedbala, Wanda; Wei, Xiao-Qing; Cai, Beilei; Hueber, Axel J; Leung, Bernard P; McInnes, Iain B; Liew, Foo Y

    2007-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) and the p35 subunit of IL-12 have been reported to form a heterodimeric hematopoietin in human and mouse. We have constructed a heterodimeric protein covalently linking EBI3 and p35, to form a novel cytokine which we now call IL-35. The Fc fusion protein of IL-35 induced proliferation of murine CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells when stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies in vitro. The IL-35-expanded CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell population expressed Foxp3 and produced elevated levels of IL-10, whereas the IL-35-induced CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells produced IFN-gamma but not IL-4. The in vitro expanded CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells retained their suppressive functions against CD4(+)CD25(-) effector cells. Furthermore, when cultured with soluble anti-CD3 antibody and antigen-presenting cells, IL-35 suppressed the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) effector cells. Moreover, IL-35 inhibited the differentiation of Th17 cells in vitro. In vivo, IL-35 effectively attenuated established collagen-induced arthritis in mice, with concomitant suppression of IL-17 production but enhanced IFN-gamma synthesis. Thus, IL-35 is a novel anti-inflammatory cytokine suppressing the immune response through the expansion of regulatory T cells and suppression of Th17 cell development.

  6. Designing Anti-inflammatory Drugs from Parasitic Worms: A Synthetic Small Molecule Analogue of the Acanthocheilonema viteae Product ES-62 Prevents Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In spite of increasing evidence that parasitic worms may protect humans from developing allergic and autoimmune diseases and the continuing identification of defined helminth-derived immunomodulatory molecules, to date no new anti-inflammatory drugs have been developed from these organisms. We have approached this matter in a novel manner by synthesizing a library of drug-like small molecules based upon phosphorylcholine, the active moiety of the anti-inflammatory Acanthocheilonema viteae product, ES-62, which as an immunogenic protein is unsuitable for use as a drug. Following preliminary in vitro screening for inhibitory effects on relevant macrophage cytokine responses, a sulfone-containing phosphorylcholine analogue (11a) was selected for testing in an in vivo model of inflammation, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Testing revealed that 11a was as effective as ES-62 in protecting DBA/1 mice from developing CIA and mirrored its mechanism of action in downregulating the TLR/IL-1R transducer, MyD88. 11a is thus a novel prototype for anti-inflammatory drug development. PMID:24228757

  7. The adaptor molecule signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) is essential in mechanisms involving the Fyn tyrosine kinase for induction and progression of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André

    2013-11-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) is an Src homology 2 domain-only adaptor involved in multiple immune cell functions. It has also been linked to immunodeficiencies and autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we examined the role and mechanism of action of SAP in autoimmunity using a mouse model of autoimmune arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We found that SAP was essential for development of CIA in response to collagen immunization. It was also required for production of collagen-specific antibodies, which play a key role in disease pathogenesis. These effects required SAP expression in T cells, not in B cells. In mice immunized with a high dose of collagen, the activity of SAP was nearly independent of its ability to bind the protein tyrosine kinase Fyn and correlated with the capacity of SAP to promote full differentiation of follicular T helper (TFH) cells. However, with a lower dose of collagen, the role of SAP was more dependent on Fyn binding, suggesting that additional mechanisms other than TFH cell differentiation were involved. Further studies suggested that this might be due to a role of the SAP-Fyn interaction in natural killer T cell development through the ability of SAP-Fyn to promote Vav-1 activation. We also found that removal of SAP expression during progression of CIA attenuated disease severity. However, it had no effect on disease when CIA was clinically established. Together, these results indicate that SAP plays an essential role in CIA because of Fyn-independent and Fyn-dependent effects on TFH cells and, possibly, other T cell types.

  8. Dendritic Cell-Specific Deletion of β-Catenin Results in Fewer Regulatory T-Cells without Exacerbating Autoimmune Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Alves, C. Henrique; Ober-Blöbaum, Julia L.; Brouwers-Haspels, Inge; Asmawidjaja, Patrick S.; Mus, Adriana M. C.; Razawy, Wida; Molendijk, Marlieke; Clausen, Björn E.; Lubberts, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells that have the dual ability to stimulate immunity and maintain tolerance. However, the signalling pathways mediating tolerogenic DC function in vivo remain largely unknown. The β-catenin pathway has been suggested to promote a regulatory DC phenotype. The aim of this study was to unravel the role of β-catenin signalling to control DC function in the autoimmune collagen-induced arthritis model (CIA). Deletion of β-catenin specifically in DCs was achieved by crossing conditional knockout mice with a CD11c-Cre transgenic mouse line. Bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) were generated and used to study the maturation profile of these cells in response to a TLR2 or TLR4 ligand stimulation. CIA was induced by intra-dermal immunization with 100 μg chicken type II collagen in complete Freund’s adjuvant on days 0 and 21. CIA incidence and severity was monitored macroscopically and by histology. The T cell profile as well as their cytokine production were analysed by flow cytometry. Lack of β-catenin specifically in DCs did not affect the spontaneous, TLR2- or TLR4-induced maturation and activation of BMDCs or their cytokine production. Moreover, no effect on the incidence and severity of CIA was observed in mice lacking β-catenin in CD11c+ cells. A decreased frequency of splenic CD3+CD8+ T cells and of regulatory T cells (Tregs) (CD4+CD25highFoxP3+), but no changes in the frequency of splenic Th17 (CCR6+CXCR3-CCR4+), Th2 (CCR6-CXCR3-CCR4+) and Th1 (CCR6-CXCR3+CCR4-) cells were observed in these mice under CIA condition. Furthermore, the expression of IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, IL-4 or IFNγ was also not affected. Our data indicate that ablation of β-catenin expression in DCs did not alter the course and severity of CIA. We conclude that although deletion of β-catenin resulted in a lower frequency of Tregs, this decrease was not sufficient to aggravate the onset and severity of CIA. PMID:26587585

  9. Cytoplasmic translocation of HuR contributes to angiotensin II induced cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Danna; Ge, Lan; Gao, Yan; Lu, Xiaozhao; Wang, Haichang; Yang, Guodong

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is one of the key structural changes of the hypertrophied left ventricle in hypertensive heart disease. Increased angiotensin II was found to be important in the hypertension related fibrosis, while the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, we found that angiotensin II dose-dependently increased the expression of Col1a1, Col3a1 and α-smooth muscle actin, which were blocked by ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Mechanistically, angiotensin II induced robust ROS generation, which in turn induced cytoplasmic translocation of RNA binding protein HuR. Cytoplasmic translocated HuR increased TGFβ pathway activity and subsequent collagen synthesis. In contrast, knockdown of HuR nearly blocked angiotensin II induced TGFβ activation and collagen synthesis. Taken together, we here identified that angiotensin II promotes collagen synthesis in cardiac fibroblast through ROS-HuR-TGFβ pathway.

  10. Cytoplasmic translocation of HuR contributes to angiotensin II induced cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Danna; Ge, Lan; Gao, Yan; Lu, Xiaozhao; Wang, Haichang; Yang, Guodong

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is one of the key structural changes of the hypertrophied left ventricle in hypertensive heart disease. Increased angiotensin II was found to be important in the hypertension related fibrosis, while the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, we found that angiotensin II dose-dependently increased the expression of Col1a1, Col3a1 and α-smooth muscle actin, which were blocked by ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Mechanistically, angiotensin II induced robust ROS generation, which in turn induced cytoplasmic translocation of RNA binding protein HuR. Cytoplasmic translocated HuR increased TGFβ pathway activity and subsequent collagen synthesis. In contrast, knockdown of HuR nearly blocked angiotensin II induced TGFβ activation and collagen synthesis. Taken together, we here identified that angiotensin II promotes collagen synthesis in cardiac fibroblast through ROS-HuR-TGFβ pathway. PMID:26093296

  11. Protective and anti-arthritic effects of deer antler aqua-acupuncture (DAA), inhibiting dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, on phosphate ions-mediated chondrocyte apoptosis and rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kanp-Sung; Choi, Yoo-Haeng; Kim, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Moon, Sang-Ho; Kang, Seung-Goo; Park, Young-Guk

    2004-07-01

    The effect of water extract of deer antler aqua-acupuncture (DAA; Cervi Pantotrichum Cornu) prepared from the pilose antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe (Nokyong in Korean), a traditional immunosuppressive and immunoactivating Korean herbal acupuncture [Int. Immunopharm. 3 7 (2003) 1001] on rat chondrocyte apoptosis was studied. Terminally differentiated hypertrophic chondrocytes were isolated from rat costochondrial cartilage and cell death was measured in the presence of 3-5 mM phosphate ions (Pi). The effect of 10 microg/ml DAA was compared to that of phosphonoformic acid (PFA), a competitive inhibitor of the Na-Pi co-transport on Pi-induced apoptosis in chondrocytes. A total of 1 mM PFA blocked anion-induced cell death and prevented an increase in the cell Pi content. In a parallel study, we determined that the DAA also protected chondrocytes from death. On the other hand, the effect of DAA was also evaluated as an inhibitor of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHO-DHase) and tested in the rat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Female 7-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the evaluation of DAA in the CIA model. Arthritis was evaluated by arthritis score, body weight loss, bone destruction score. DAA was administered by bilateral Shinsu (B23) acupuncture five times per week (10, 20, 30, and 100 microg/kg/day). DAA inhibited rat liver DHO-DHase in vitro with Ki = 843 +/- 43 microg/ml. The anti-proliferative effect of DAA was caused by cell cycle arrest at the S-phase. Treatment with 300 mg/kg/day of DAA completely prevented the development of CIA based on the reduction of the arthritis score. The 50% effective dose (ED50) of DAA on arthritis score was 64 mg/kg. DAA ameliorated body weight loss associated with disease onset. DAA suppressed the development of arthritis, even when it was administered after a booster immunization of collagen. DAA is a novel immunosuppressant which inhibits DHO-DHase and its effects in CIA suggest that

  12. Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Arthritis - psoriatic; Psoriasis - psoriatic arthritis; Spondylitis - psoriatic arthritis ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. Nail psoriasis is linked ...

  13. Collagen Induces Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells by Signaling through Osteoclast-Associated Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Heidi S.; Nitze, Louise M.; Zeuthen, Louise H.; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J.; Hamilton, John A.; Berchtold, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB–dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR–collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs. PMID:25725106

  14. Collagen induces maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by signaling through osteoclast-associated receptor.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Heidi S; Nitze, Louise M; Zeuthen, Louise H; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Hamilton, John A; Berchtold, Martin W; Panina, Svetlana

    2015-04-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB-dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR-collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs.

  15. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  16. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  17. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Mycotic arthritis; Infectious arthritis - fungal ... Marquez J, Espinoza LR. Infectious arthritis II: mycobacterial, brucellar, fungal, and parasitic arthritis. In: Hochberg MC, Silman AJ, Smolen JS, Weinblatt ME, Weisman MH, eds. Rheumatology . ...

  18. Therapeutic effects of estradiol benzoate on development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in the Lewis rat are mediated via suppression of the humoral response against denatured collagen type II (CII)

    PubMed Central

    WAKSMAN, Y.; HOD, I.; FRIEDMAN, A.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of estradiol benzoate (EB) on the development of anti-CII antibodies and their pathogenic potential were studied during the progress of established CIA in the rat. CIA was induced in mature female Lewis rats by two subcutaneous inoculations containing bovine native CII (BCIIn), emulsified in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Clinical arthritis fully developed by day 18 and then EB (1 mg/kg body wt per day, diluted in corn oil (CO)) was administered intramuscularly every second day thereafter. Antibodies binding four different CIIs (bovine or rat, either native or heat-denatured) were detected in sera and joint tissue extracts by means of solid-phase ELISA. Pharmacological doses of EB (>0·2 mg/kg body wt per day) caused significant remission of established CIA 5-7 days after treatment, and selectively suppressed the production of antibodies specific for denatured CII. To evaluate the arthritogenic potential of circulating anti-CIId IgG, transfer experiments were performed. IgG anti-CIIn, purified from EB-treated CIA rats, was not arthritogenic, whereas IgG anti-denatured (CIId), purified from CO-treated CIA rats, caused severe passive arthritis. Furthermore, pretreatment with rat CIId protected against subsequent induction of CIA, and this protection was associated with suppressed antibody production against CIId. Collectively, our results indicate that antibodies specific for CIId are involved in the pathogenesis of CIA, and that oestrogen-related remission of clinical arthritis may be caused by a selective suppression of antibodies produced against degraded/denatured CII. PMID:8608634

  19. Nitrosonifedipine ameliorates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling via antioxidative effects.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Takumi; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Imanishi, Masaki; Izawa-Ishizawa, Yuki; Fujii, Shoko; Tominaga, Erika; Tsuneishi, Teppei; Horinouchi, Yuya; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Ikeda, Yasumasa; Tomita, Shuhei; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Minakuchi, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    Nifedipine is unstable under light and decomposes to a stable nitroso analog, nitrosonifedipine (NO-NIF). The ability of NO-NIF to block calcium channels is quite weak compared with that of nifedipine. Recently, we have demonstrated that NO-NIF reacts with unsaturated fatty acid leading to generate NO-NIF radical, which acquires radical scavenging activity. However, the effects of NO-NIF on the pathogenesis related with oxidative stress, such as atherosclerosis and hypertension, are unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of NO-NIF on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced vascular remodeling. Ang II-induced thickening and fibrosis of aorta were inhibited by NO-NIF in mice. NO-NIF decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the aorta and urinary 8-hydroxy-20-deoxyguanosine. Ang II-stimulated mRNA expressions of p22(phox), CD68, F4/80, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and collagen I in the aorta were inhibited by NO-NIF. Moreover, NO-NIF inhibited Ang II-induced cell migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). NO-NIF reduced Ang II-induced ROS to the control level detected by dihydroethidium staining and lucigenin chemiluminescence assay in VSMCs. NO-NIF suppressed phosphorylations of Akt and epidermal growth factor receptor induced by Ang II. However, NO-NIF had no effects on intracellular Ca(2+) increase and protein kinase C-δ phosphorylation induced by Ang II in VSMCs. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra indicated the continuous generation of NO-NIF radical of reaction with cultured VSMCs. These findings suggest that NO-NIF improves Ang II-induced vascular remodeling via the attenuation of oxidative stress.

  20. Hyperoside exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects in LPS-stimulated human fibroblast-like synoviocytes in vitro and in mice with collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiang-nan; Yan, En-zhi; Wang, Han-ming; Sui, Hai-juan; Liu, Zhou; Gao, Wei; Jin, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Hyperoside is a flavonol glycoside mainly found in plants of the genera Hypericum and Crataegus, which has shown anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the effects of hyperoside on human rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) in vitro and on mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in vivo. Methods: FLSs were isolated from primary synovial tissues obtained from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and exposed to LPS (1 μg/mL). Cell viability and proliferation were measured with MTT and BrdU assay. Cell migration was assessed using wound-healing assay and Transwell assay. DNA binding of NF-κB was measured using a TransAM-NFkappaB kit. The localization of p65 subunit was detected with immunocytochemistry. CIA was induced in mice by primary immunization with Bovine Type II collagen (CII) emulsified in CFA, followed by a booster injection 3 weeks later. The arthritic mice were treated with hyperoside (25, 50 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) for 3 weeks, and the joint tissues were harvested for histological analysis. Results: Hyperoside (10, 50, 100 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced proliferation and migration of human RA FLSs in vitro. Furthermore, hyperoside decreased LPS-stimulated production of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1 and MMP-9 in the cells. Moreover, hyperoside inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p65 and IκBα, and suppressed LPS-induced nuclear translocation of p65 and DNA biding of NF-κB in the cells. Three-week administration of hyperoside significantly decreased the clinical scores, and alleviated synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration and cartilage damage in mice with CIA. Conclusion: Hyperoside inhibits LPS-induced proliferation, migration and inflammatory responses in human RA FLSs in vitro by suppressing activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, which contributes to the therapeutic effects observed in mice with CIA. PMID:27041460

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  2. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss ... common type of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of ...

  3. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of experimentally collagen-induced arthritis in rats using the nonspecific dye tetrasulfocyanine in comparison with gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, histology, and clinical score

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemeinhardt, Ines; Puls, Dorothee; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Susanne; Schnorr, Beatrix; Licha, Kai; Schirner, Michael; Ebert, Bernd; Petzelt, Diethard; Macdonald, Rainer; Schnorr, Jörg

    2012-10-01

    Using 15 rats with collagen-induced arthritis (30 joints) and 7 control rats (14 joints), we correlated the intensity of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) of the nonspecific dye tetrasulfocyanine (TSC) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), histopathology, and clinical score. Fluorescence images were obtained in reflection geometry using a NIRF camera system. Normalized fluorescence intensity (INF) was determined after intravenous dye administration on different time points up to 120 min. Contrast-enhanced MRI using gadodiamide was performed after NIRF imaging. Analyses were performed in a blinded fashion. Histopathological and clinical scores were determined for each ankle joint. INF of moderate and high-grade arthritic joints were significantly higher (p<0.005) than the values of control and low-grade arthritic joints between 5 and 30 min after TSC-injection. This result correlated well with post-contrast MRI signal intensities at about 5 min after gadodiamide administration. Furthermore, INF and signal increase on contrast-enhanced MRI showed high correlation with clinical and histopathological scores. Sensitivities and specificities for detection of moderate and high-grade arthritic joints were slightly lower for NIRF imaging (89%/81%) than for MRI (100%/91%). NIRF imaging using TSC, which is characterized by slower plasma clearance compared to indocyanine green (ICG), has the potential to improve monitoring of inflamed joints.

  4. The B cell repertoire of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Frequencies and specificities of peripheral blood B cells reacting with human IgG, human collagens, a mycobacterial heat shock protein and other antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Rudolphi, U; Hohlbaum, A; Lang, B; Peter, H H; Melchers, I

    1993-01-01

    Using a potent in vitro limiting dilution culture system, we have activated human peripheral blood B cells to proliferate and to differentiate into antibody-secreting cells (ASC). Under these conditions 25-100% of B cells are clonally expanded and produce IgM, IgG or IgA. Culture supernatants were tested for antibodies binding to human IgG-Fc fragments (RF), the 65-kD heat shock protein of Mycobacterium bovis (hsp60), human collagens type I, II, IV, V, transferrin, lactoferrin, albumins, and gelatine. All blood samples contained precursors of ASC (p-ASC) able to produce IgM binding to these antigens in frequencies above 0.03% of B cells. Most interestingly, a significant difference exists between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and controls, concerning the relative frequencies of p-ASC able to produce monospecific or multireactive RF. Whereas most p-ASC(RF) in RA patients are monospecific (mean ratio 3.7), most p-ASC(RF) in healthy control persons are cross-reactive with at least one of five other antigens tested (mean ratio 0.2). The data suggest a disease-specific expansion of p-ASC committed to the production of monospecific rheumatoid factors. PMID:8099856

  5. Collagenous gastroduodenitis.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rai, Mridula; Scholes, John V

    2011-10-01

    Collagenous gastroduodenitis is a rare histopathologic entity characterized by marked subepithelial collagen deposition with associated mucosal inflammatory infiltrate. Only 4 cases have been reported, of which 3 had associated collagenous colitis. Collagenous gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement is exceptionally rare with only 1 case reported so far in the literature. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with dyspepsia and mild anemia, who was found to have nodular gastric and duodenal mucosa on endoscopic examination. Histopathology showed collagenous gastroduodenitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second (and first in English literature) reported case of isolated collagenous gastroduodenitis.

  6. Collagenous gastroduodenitis.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rai, Mridula; Scholes, John V

    2011-10-01

    Collagenous gastroduodenitis is a rare histopathologic entity characterized by marked subepithelial collagen deposition with associated mucosal inflammatory infiltrate. Only 4 cases have been reported, of which 3 had associated collagenous colitis. Collagenous gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement is exceptionally rare with only 1 case reported so far in the literature. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with dyspepsia and mild anemia, who was found to have nodular gastric and duodenal mucosa on endoscopic examination. Histopathology showed collagenous gastroduodenitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second (and first in English literature) reported case of isolated collagenous gastroduodenitis. PMID:21346601

  7. Collagen fillers.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Leslie; Kaufman, Joely; Saghari, Sogol

    2006-01-01

    Collagen implants, both animal and human derived, have been used for soft tissue augmentation for many years. Bovine collagen fillers were the most popular injectable implants for nearly two decades in the United States. Since then, human bioengineered collagen products have been available in addition to hyaluronic acid-containing fillers. This article outlines the different types of injectable collagen implants, injection techniques, preferred methods of treatment, and possible adverse reactions to the injectable materials.

  8. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  9. Citrus nobiletin suppresses bone loss in ovariectomized ddY mice and collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice: possible involvement of receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis regulation.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Akira; Song, Meiyu; Katsumata, Shin-Ichi; Uehara, Mariko; Suzuki, Kazuharu; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    Bone resorption is known to accelerate during the onset of several disorders, including osteoporosis (OP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Some epidemiological surveys have suggested that a high intake of vegetables and fruits has an inverse relation to such disease incidence, though the number of active constituents elucidated thus far is limited. In the present study, we examined the efficacy of various food phytochemicals using two animal models. First, female ddY mice were ovariectomized (OVX) or sham-operated (sham), after which five different compounds (phenethyl isothiocyanate, zerumbone, auraptene, 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, and nobiletin) were administered separately to OVX mice with a mini-osmotic pump at doses of 0.25 or 0.5 mg/day for 4 weeks, with 17beta-estradiol (E_{2}, 0.03 microg/day) used as a positive control. Nobiletin, in contrast to the other tested phytochemicals, significantly (P<0.05) suppressed the reduction of whole bone mineral density by 61%, which was comparable to or higher than the efficacy of E_{2}. Next, nobiletin given as an i.p. administration at 20 mg/kg of body weight, but not 2 mg/kg, to male DBA/1J mice every 2 days for 12 days led to a marked decrease in type II collagen-induced arthritis by 45% (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the flavonoid (4-50 microM) attenuated receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis of RAW264.7 cells, as detected by tartarate-resistant acid phosphatase activity and microscopic observations. Of note, nobiletin also suppressed RANKL-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase1/2, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activities, and thereby regulated the promoter activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) and activator protein-1, key transcription factors for differentiation. Together, our results suggest that nobiletin is a promising phytochemical for the prevention or treatment of osteoclastogenesis-related disorders, including

  10. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Colletti, R B; Trainer, T D

    1989-12-01

    Subepithelial fibrosis has previously been reported in the small intestine (collagenous sprue) and colon (collagenous colitis). We report a 15-yr-old girl with chronic gastritis and subepithelial fibrosis of the gastric corpus who presented with recurrent abdominal pain and acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Nodularity and erythema of the gastric corpus were persistent endoscopic findings. Biopsies revealed patchy chronic active gastritis with a striking focal thick band of collagen immediately beneath the surface epithelial cells that did not extend to deeper portions of the lamina propria. Contrast radiography demonstrated an abnormal mucosa of the gastric corpus with a mosaiclike surface pattern. Numerous studies have failed to elucidate the etiology. Despite treatment with ranitidine, sucralfate, and furazolidone, there has been no clinical or pathologic improvement. The pathogenesis and prognosis of collagenous gastritis, and its relationship to collagenous sprue and collagenous colitis, remain to be defined. PMID:2583419

  11. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Richa; Chetty, Runjan

    2010-12-01

    A 25-year-old patient presented with epigastric pain, which on gastric biopsy revealed the characteristic appearance of collagenous gastritis. There was a thick prominent subepithelial band that was confirmed to be collagen with a Masson's trichrome stain. There was associated Helicobacter pylori gastritis but no evidence of a lymphocytic gastritis. The patient did not have watery diarrhea. Collagenous gastritis can occur in young patients, be restricted to the stomach, and can be associated with celiac disease. PMID:19103610

  12. Septic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute septic arthritis are caused by Staphylococcus or Streptococcus bacteria . Chronic septic arthritis (which is less common) ... cases are caused by the bacteria group B streptococcus. Another common cause is Haemophilus influenza , especially if ...

  13. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  14. Viral arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Ohl CA, Forster D. Infectious arthritis of native joints. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious ...

  15. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ... from another part of the body. Symptoms of infectious arthritis include Intense pain in the joint Joint redness ...

  16. Bioengineered collagens

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  17. Reactive arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hind, C. R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is a rare complication of certain infections. The similar features and HLA associations with the seronegative arthropathies have raised the possibility that the latter may be forms of reactive arthritis. This review describes the clinical and epidemiological features, and the recent advances in our understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of reactive arthritis. PMID:7100033

  18. High anti‐collagen type‐II antibody levels and induction of proinflammatory cytokines by anti‐collagen antibody‐containing immune complexes in vitro characterise a distinct rheumatoid arthritis phenotype associated with acute inflammation at the time of disease onset

    PubMed Central

    Mullazehi, Mohammed; Mathsson, Linda; Lampa, Jon; Rönnelid, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the cytokine‐inducing properties of surface‐bound collagen type II (CII)‐containing immune complexes (IC), which were reported earlier, have any clinical impact. Methods Anti‐CII serology was analysed in 274 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with increased levels of anti‐CII were followed serially for 1–5 years with regard to anti‐CII IC‐induced levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α, interleukin (IL)1β and IL8. Levels of antibodies and IC‐induced cytokines were compared with clinical indices over 5 years of follow‐up. Results 5/100 healthy controls and 24/274 (8.8%) patients with RA exhibited increased levels (>29 arbitrary units (AU)/ml) of anti‐native CII antibodies, a non‐significant difference. 9/274 (3.3%) patients with RA and no controls comprised a discrete group with high anti‐CII levels >450 AU/ml. These high anti‐CII level sera were associated with induction of pro‐inflammatory cytokines by anti‐CII‐containing IC formed in vitro. 8/9 patients with high baseline anti‐CII levels exhibited a parallel decline in antibody levels, IC‐induced cytokines, C reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Anti‐CII‐positive patients had significantly increased levels of CRP and ESR at baseline, but not later during the follow‐up. Conclusions Anti‐native CII‐positive patients with RA have a distinct clinical phenotype characterised by an early acute phase response that might be driven by anti‐CII‐containing IC in joint cartilage. PMID:17040962

  19. Castration of male mice prevents the progression of established angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Thatcher, Sean; Wu, Congqing; Daugherty, Alan; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Male sex is a non-modifiable risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. Similar to humans, male mice are more susceptible to angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AAAs than females. Previous studies demonstrated that castration of males markedly reduced the formation of AngII-induced AAAs. Progression of AAA size is associated with increased risk of aneurysm rupture. In this study, we hypothesized that castration of male mice would reduce the progression of established AngII-induced AAAs. Methods Male apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-/- mice were infused with AngII for 1 month to induce AAA formation. Aortic diameters were measured by ultrasound and mice were stratified into 2 groups that were either sham-operated or castrated. AngII infusions were continued for a further 2 months. Ultrasound was used to quantify lumen diameters, and excised aortas were processed for quantification of AAA size, volume, and tissue characteristics. Results Sham-operated mice exhibited progressive dilation of suprarenal aortic lumen diameters during continued AngII infusion. Castration significantly decreased aortic lumen diameters (study endpoint: 1.88 ± 0.05 mm vs 1.63 ± 0.04 mm; P<.05; sham-operated [n = 15] vs castration [n = 17], respectively). However, maximal external AAA diameters were not significantly different between sham-operated and castrated mice. The vascular volume/lumen volume ratio of excised AAAs imaged by ultrasound was significantly increased by castration (sham-operated, 4.8 ± 0.9; castration, 9.5 ± 2.0 %; n = 11/group; P<.05). Moreover, compared to thin walled AAAs of sham-operated mice, aneurysm sections from castrated mice exhibited increased smooth muscle -actin and collagen. Conclusions Removal of endogenous male hormones by castration selectively reduces aortic lumen expansion while not altering the external AAA dimensions. PMID:24439319

  20. Collagenous gastroduodenitis on collagenous colitis.

    PubMed

    Stolte, M; Ritter, M; Borchard, F; Koch-Scherrer, G

    1990-07-01

    We report on a case of collagenous gastroduodenitis with concomitant collagenous colitis in a 75-year-old woman with watery diarrhea of approximately six months' standing. The step biopsy material obtained from the colon revealed continuous collagenous colitis with thickening of the basal membrane to 30 microns. The biopsies taken from the stomach and duodenum also revealed a band-like deposition of collagen in the duodenum (bulb and proximal portion of the descending portion) along the basal membrane of the lining epithelium, associated with partial atrophy of the villi. In the stomach, this band of collagen was located, parallel to the mucosal surface, at the level of the floor of the foveolae. PMID:2209504

  1. Bacterial arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, G

    2001-07-01

    The septic arthritis literature of 2000 revisited several topics previously examined in some detail. These include septic arthritis in rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatic manifestations of bacterial endocarditis, and infectious complications of prosthetic joints. The trend in antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent late infections in total joint replacement is to narrow the targeted hosts to those most at risk, to define the procedures associated with the greatest risk of bacteremia, and to simplify the antibiotic regimen. The diagnoses of septic arthritis of the lumbar facet joint and septic arthritis caused by direct inoculation of bacteria by a foreign object penetrating the joint are facilitated by noninvasive imaging technologies. Septic arthritis caused by uncommon microorganisms and septic arthritis in immunocompromised hosts are other noteworthy topics in this year's literature. PMID:11555734

  2. TNF Receptor 1 Signaling is Critically Involved in Mediating Angiotensin-II-induced Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duerrschmid, Clemens; Crawford, Jeffrey R.; Reineke, Erin; Taffet, George E.; Trial, JoAnn; Entman, Mark L.; Haudek, Sandra B.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) is associated with many conditions involving heart failure and pathologic hypertrophy. Ang-II induces the synthesis of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 that mediates the uptake of CD34+CD45+ monocytic cells into the heart. These precursor cells differentiate into collagen-producing fibroblasts and are responsible for the Ang-II-induced development of non-adaptive cardiac fibrosis. In this study, we demonstrate that in vitro, using a human monocyte-to-fibroblast differentiation model, Ang-II required the presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) to induce fibroblast maturation from monocytes. In vivo, mice deficient in both TNF receptors did not develop cardiac fibrosis in response to 1 week Ang-II infusion. We then subjected mice deficient in either TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1-KO) or TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2-KO) to continuous Ang-II infusion. Compared to wild-type, in TNFR1-KO, but not in TNFR2-KO hearts, collagen deposition was greatly attenuated, and markedly fewer CD34+CD45+ cells were present. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated a striking reduction of key fibrosis-related, as well as inflammation-related mRNA expression in Ang-II-treated TNFR1-KO hearts. TNFR1-KO animals also developed less cardiac remodeling, cardiac hypertrophy, and hypertension compared to wild-type and TNFR2-KO in response to Ang-II. Our data suggest that TNF induced Ang-II-dependent cardiac fibrosis by signaling through TNFR1, which enhances the generation of monocytic fibroblast precursors in the heart. PMID:23337087

  3. Imaging Denatured Collagen Strands In vivo and Ex vivo via Photo-triggered Hybridization of Caged Collagen Mimetic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.; Yu, S. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Collagen is a major structural component of the extracellular matrix that supports tissue formation and maintenance. Although collagen remodeling is an integral part of normal tissue renewal, excessive amount of remodeling activity is involved in tumors, arthritis, and many other pathological conditions. During collagen remodeling, the triple helical structure of collagen molecules is disrupted by proteases in the extracellular environment. In addition, collagens present in many histological tissue samples are partially denatured by the fixation and preservation processes. Therefore, these denatured collagen strands can serve as effective targets for biological imaging. We previously developed a caged collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) that can be photo-triggered to hybridize with denatured collagen strands by forming triple helical structure, which is unique to collagens. The overall goals of this procedure are i) to image denatured collagen strands resulting from normal remodeling activities in vivo, and ii) to visualize collagens in ex vivo tissue sections using the photo-triggered caged CMPs. To achieve effective hybridization and successful in vivo and ex vivo imaging, fluorescently labeled caged CMPs are either photo-activated immediately before intravenous injection, or are directly activated on tissue sections. Normal skeletal collagen remolding in nude mice and collagens in prefixed mouse cornea tissue sections are imaged in this procedure. The imaging method based on the CMP-collagen hybridization technology presented here could lead to deeper understanding of the tissue remodeling process, as well as allow development of new diagnostics for diseases associated with high collagen remodeling activity. PMID:24513868

  4. Effect of green tea extract and vitamin C on oxidant or antioxidant status of rheumatoid arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Meki, Abdel-Raheim M A; Hamed, Enas Ahmed; Ezam, Khaled A

    2009-07-01

    Elevated free radical generation in inflamed joints and impaired antioxidant system has been implicated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Green tea extracts (GTE) have been shown to reduce inflammation in inflammatory arthritis murine model. This study investigates possible mechanisms by which vitamin C and GTE protect joints in RA rat model. This study included forty adult male rats that were divided into four groups (10 rats each); control group, collagen II induced RA group (CII), CII treated with vitamin C (CII + Vit C) and CII treated with GTE (CII + GTE) in physiology laboratory, Assiut University, Egypt. After 45 days of treatment, plasma levels of lipid peroxides (LPO), nitric oxide (NO), ceruloplasmin (CP), superoxide dismutase (SOD), uric acid (UA) and glutathione (GSH) were detected using colorimetric methods, PGE(2) using ELISA and copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) using spectrometer. In CII group, levels of LPO, NO, PGE(2), UA, CP, Cu were higher while SOD, GSH, Zn were lower than controls. In groups treated with vitamin C and GTE, levels of SOD, GSH were increased while levels of LPO, NO, PGE(2), Cu, CP were decreased compared with CII group. Levels of UA were decreased and Zn increased in GTE treated group compared with CII group. GTE treated group showed higher Zn and low Cu levels compared with vitamin C treated group. This study suggests proper GTE and vitamin C intake may effectively normalize the impaired oxidant/antioxidant system and delaying complication of RA.

  5. Cilostazol suppresses angiotensin II-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    SHI, MIAO-QIAN; SU, FEI-FEI; XU, XUAN; LIU, XIONG-TAO; WANG, HONG-TAO; ZHANG, WEI; LI, XUE; LIAN, CHENG; ZHENG, QIANG-SUN; FENG, ZHI-CHUN

    2016-01-01

    Patients with essential hypertension undergo endothelial dysfunction, particularly in the conduit arteries. Cilostazol, a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor, serves a role in the inhibition of platelet aggregation and it is widely used in the treatment of peripheral vascular diseases. Previous studies have suggested that cilostazol suppresses endothelial dysfunction; however, it remains unknown whether cilostazol protects the endothelial function in essential hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether, and how, cilostazol suppresses angiotensin II (angII)-induced endothelial dysfunction. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to angII and treated with cilostazol. Endothelial cell apoptosis and function, nitric oxide and superoxide production, phosphorylation (p) of Akt, and caspase-3 protein expression levels were investigated. AngII exposure resulted in the apoptosis of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, cilostazol significantly suppressed the angII-induced apoptosis of HUVECs; however, this effect was reduced in the presence of LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Furthermore, cilostazol suppressed the angII-induced p-Akt downregulation and cleaved caspase-3 upregulation. These effects were also alleviated by LY294002. In vivo, cilostazol suppressed the angII-induced endothelial cell apoptosis and dysfunction. Cilostazol was also demonstrated to partially reduced the angII-induced increase in superoxide production. The results of the present study suggested that cilostazol suppresses endothelial apoptosis and dysfunction by modulating the PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:26862035

  6. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  7. Fibulin-2 is essential for angiotensin II-induced myocardial fibrosis mediated by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shaukat A; Dong, Hailong; Joyce, Jennifer; Sasaki, Takako; Chu, Mon-Li; Tsuda, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Fibrosis is an ominous pathological process in failing myocardium, but its pathogenesis is poorly understood. We recently reported that loss of an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, fibulin-2, protected against ventricular dysfunction after myocardial infarction (MI) in association with absence of activation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling and suppressed upregulation of ECM protein expression during myocardial remodeling. Here we investigated the role of fibulin-2 in the development of myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis induced by continuous pressor-dosage of angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion. Both wild type (WT) and fibulin-2 null (Fbln2KO) mice developed comparable hypertension and myocardial hypertrophy by Ang II infusion. However, myocardial fibrosis with significant upregulation of collagen type I and III mRNA was only seen in WT but not in Fbln2KO mice.Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 mRNA and its downstream signal, Smad2, were significantly upregulated in WT by Ang II, whereas there were no Ang II-induced changes in Flbn2KO, suggesting fibulin-2 is necessary for Ang II-induced TGF-β signaling that induces myocardial fibrosis. To test whether fibulin-2 is sufficient for Ang II-induced TGF-β upregulation, isolated Flbn2KO cardiac fibroblasts were treated with Ang II after transfecting with fibulin-2 expression vector or pretreating with recombinant fibulin-2 protein. Ang II-induced TGF-β signaling in Fbln2KO cells was partially rescued by exogenous fibulin-2, suggesting that fibulin-2 is required and probably sufficient for Ang II-induced TGF-β activation. Smad2 phosphorylation was induced just by adding recombinant fibulin-2 to KO cells, suggesting that extracellular interaction between fibulin-2 and latent TGF-β triggered initial TGF-β activation. Our study indicates that Ang II cannot induce TGF-β activation without fibulin-2 and that fibulin-2 has an essential role in Ang II-induced TGF-β signaling and subsequent myocardial

  8. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam as well as x rays or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the affected joints. Although there is no lab test to diagnose psoriatic arthritis, your doctor may order tests on blood or joint fluid to rule out other forms of arthritis with ...

  9. Effect of pine pollen extract on experimental chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Hee; Choi, Eun-Mi

    2009-05-01

    The effects of pine pollen extract (PE) on Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA)-induced arthritis and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were investigated. The oral administration of PE (100 and 200 mg/kg per day) for 21 days after subcutaneous immunization with FCA, significantly reduced hindpaw swelling and the production of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6) compared with the FCA-induced arthritis group. Treatment with the PE (100 mg/kg) also decreased the serum levels of LDL-cholesterol and increased HDL-cholesterol contents compared with those of the arthritis group. Since CIA is a model of some types of human autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the study examined whether PE is efficacious against CIA in mice and investigated the possible antioxidant potential of PE on CIA. Arthritis in DBA/1J mice was induced by subcutaneous immunization with bovine type II collagen. PE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was orally administered once daily for 49 days after initial immunization with type II collagen. The arthritis score and paw edema were markedly suppressed in the groups treated with PE. Moreover, administration of PE (100 mg/kg) for 49 days reduced the serum levels of rheumatoid factor, anti-type II collagen antibody, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, protein carbonyl, advanced glycation endproducts, malondialdehyde and LDL-cholesterol compared with that of CIA mice. These results suggest that the pine pollen might be beneficial in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders.

  10. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoyi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Takashi; Kondo, Yutaka; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Iijima, Katsunori; Imatani, Akira; Watanabe, Mika; Shirane, Akio; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we report a case of rare collagenous gastritis. The patient was a 25-year-old man who had experienced nausea, abdominal distention and epigastralgia since 2005. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) carried out at initial examination by the patient's local doctor revealed an extensively discolored depression from the upper gastric body to the lower gastric body, mainly including the greater curvature, accompanied by residual mucosa with multiple islands and nodularity with a cobblestone appearance. Initial biopsies sampled from the nodules and accompanying atrophic mucosa were diagnosed as chronic gastritis. In August, 2011, the patient was referred to Tohoku University Hospital for observation and treatment. EGD at our hospital showed the same findings as those by the patient's local doctor. Pathological findings included a membranous collagen band in the superficial layer area of the gastric mucosa, which led to a diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic findings to make a diagnosis. PMID:23363075

  11. Qiliqiangxin inhibits angiotensin II-induced transdifferentiation of rat cardiac fibroblasts through suppressing interleukin-6

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jingmin; Jiang, Kun; Ding, Xuefeng; Fu, Mingqiang; Wang, Shijun; Zhu, Lingti; He, Tao; Wang, Jingfeng; Sun, Aijun; Hu, Kai; Chen, Li; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2015-01-01

    Qiliqiangxin (QL), a traditional Chinese medicine, had long been used to treat chronic heart failure. Recent studies revealed that differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) into myofibroblasts played an important role in cardiac remodelling and development of heart failure, however, little was known about the underlying mechanism and whether QL treatment being involved. This study aimed to investigate the effects of QL on angiotensin II (AngII)-induced CFs transdifferentiation. Study was performed on in vitro cultured CFs from Sprague–Dawley rats. CFs differentiation was induced by AngII, which was attenuated by QL through reducing transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Our data showed that AngII-induced IL-6 mRNA as well as typeI and typeIII collagens were reduced by QL. IL-6 deficiency could suppress TGF-β1 and α-SMA, and both IL-6 siRNA and QL-mediated such effect was reversed by foresed expression of recombined IL-6. Increase in actin stress fibres reflected the process of CFs differentiation, we found stress fibres were enhanced after AngII stimulation, which was attenuated by pre-treating CFs with QL or IL-6 siRNA, and re-enhanced after rIL-6 treatment. Importantly, we showed that calcineurin-dependent NFAT3 nuclear translocation was essential to AngII-mediated IL-6 transcription, QL mimicked the effect of FK506, the calcineurin inhibitor, on suppression of IL-6 expression and stress fibres formation. Collectively, our data demonstrated the negative regulation of CFs differentiation by QL through an IL-6 transcriptional mechanism that depends on inhibition of calcineurin/NFAT3 signalling. PMID:25752645

  12. Effect of Lysyl Oxidase Inhibition on Angiotensin II-Induced Arterial Hypertension, Remodeling, and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Eberson, Lance S.; Sanchez, Pablo A.; Majeed, Beenish A.; Tawinwung, Supannikar; Secomb, Timothy W.; Larson, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that angiotensin II (Ang II) induces altered vascular stiffness through responses including both structural and material remodeling. Concurrent with remodeling is the induction of the enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) through which ECM proteins are cross-linked. The study objective was to determine the effect of LOX mediated cross-linking on vascular mechanical properties. Three-month old mice were chronically treated with Ang II with or without the LOX blocker, β -aminopropionitrile (BAPN), for 14 days. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) from Doppler measurements of the aortic flow wave was used to quantify in vivo vascular stiffness in terms of an effective Young’s modulus. The increase in effective Young’s modulus with Ang II administration was abolished with the addition of BAPN, suggesting that the material properties are a major controlling element in vascular stiffness. BAPN inhibited the Ang II induced collagen cross-link formation by 2-fold and PWV by 44% (P<0.05). Consistent with this observation, morphometric analysis showed that BAPN did not affect the Ang II mediated increase in medial thickness but significantly reduced the adventitial thickness. Since the hypertensive state contributes to the measured in vivo PWV stiffness, we removed the Ang II infusion pumps on Day 14 and achieved normal arterial blood pressures. With pump removal we observed a decrease of the PWV in the Ang II group to 25% above that of the control values (P=0.002), with a complete return to control values in the Ang II plus BAPN group. In conclusion, we have shown that the increase in vascular stiffness with 14 day Ang II administration results from a combination of hypertension-induced wall strain, adventitial wall thickening and Ang II mediated LOX ECM cross-linking, which is a major material source of vascular stiffening, and that the increased PWV was significantly inhibited with co-administration of BAPN. PMID:25875748

  13. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... It typically begins during the early-adult years. Juvenile arthritisarthritis that is diagnosed before age 16. The most common form of juvenile arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, affects between 30,000 and ...

  14. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals form in the joints. But in this ... CPPD arthritis can be confused with: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Exams and Tests Most arthritic ...

  15. Gonococcal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis affects women more often than ... Saunders; 2013:chap 109. Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonnorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser ...

  16. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scott, David L; Wolfe, Frederick; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2010-09-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by persistent synovitis, systemic inflammation, and autoantibodies (particularly to rheumatoid factor and citrullinated peptide). 50% of the risk for development of rheumatoid arthritis is attributable to genetic factors. Smoking is the main environmental risk. In industrialised countries, rheumatoid arthritis affects 0·5-1·0% of adults, with 5-50 per 100 000 new cases annually. The disorder is most typical in women and elderly people. Uncontrolled active rheumatoid arthritis causes joint damage, disability, decreased quality of life, and cardiovascular and other comorbidities. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), the key therapeutic agents, reduce synovitis and systemic inflammation and improve function. The leading DMARD is methotrexate, which can be combined with other drugs of this type. Biological agents are used when arthritis is uncontrolled or toxic effects arise with DMARDs. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors were the first biological agents, followed by abatacept, rituximab, and tocilizumab. Infections and high costs restrict prescription of biological agents. Long-term remission induced by intensive, short-term treatment selected by biomarker profiles is the ultimate goal.

  18. Immunopathological features of rat Staphylococcus aureus arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Bremell, T; Lange, S; Holmdahl, R; Rydén, C; Hansson, G K; Tarkowski, A

    1994-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial species found in nongonococcal bacterial arthritis in humans. We present the first description, to our knowledge, of an outbreak of spontaneous staphylococcal arthritis in a rat colony. In a group of 10 rats, 9 displayed arthritis. Clinically, the most obvious findings were arthritis of one or both hindpaws and malaise. Bacteriophage typing showed the common phage type 85 in isolates recovered from the joints, blood, and bedding of rats and from the nose and cheeks of one person from the staff of the animal facility. The S. aureus strain proved to produce staphylococcal enterotoxin A and exhibited strong binding to collagen types I and II and bone sialoprotein, which are potentially important virulence factors. When the recovered S. aureus strain was injected intravenously into healthy rats, severe septic arthritis was induced in almost all of the animals. The arthritic lesions were characterized by infiltration of phagocytic cells and T lymphocytes into the synovium. Many of the synovial cells strongly expressed major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. Increased levels of interleukin 6 in serum as well as a prominent polyclonal B-cell activation were noted throughout the disease course. Pretreatment of S. aureus-injected rats in vivo with an antibody to the alpha beta T-cell receptor significantly decreased the severity of the arthritis. Our results indicate that alpha beta + T lymphocytes contribute to an erosive and persistent course of S. aureus arthritis. Images PMID:8188356

  19. 6β-hydroxytestosterone, a cytochrome P450 1B1 metabolite of testosterone, contributes to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and its pathogenesis in male mice.

    PubMed

    Pingili, Ajeeth K; Kara, Mehmet; Khan, Nayaab S; Estes, Anne M; Lin, Zongtao; Li, Wei; Gonzalez, Frank J; Malik, Kafait U

    2015-06-01

    Previously, we showed that Cyp1b1 gene disruption minimizes angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated pathophysiological changes in male mice. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that cytochrome P450 1B1-generated metabolites of testosterone, 6β-hydroxytestosterone and 16α-hydroxytestosterone, contribute to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and its pathogenesis. Angiotensin II infusion for 2 weeks increased cardiac cytochrome P450 1B1 activity and plasma levels of 6β-hydroxytestosterone, but not 16α-hydroxytestosterone, in Cyp1b1(+/+) mice without altering Cyp1b1 gene expression; these effects of angiotensin II were not observed in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II-induced increase in systolic blood pressure and associated cardiac hypertrophy, and fibrosis, measured by intracardiac accumulation of α-smooth muscle actin, collagen, and transforming growth factor-β, and increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity and production of reactive oxygen species; these changes were minimized in Cyp1b1(-/-) or castrated Cyp1b1(+/+) mice, and restored by treatment with 6β-hydroxytestoterone. In Cyp1b1(+/+) mice, 6β-hydroxytestosterone did not alter the angiotensin II-induced increase in systolic blood pressure; the basal systolic blood pressure was also not affected by this agent in either genotype. Angiotensin II or castration did not alter cardiac, angiotensin II type 1 receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme, Mas receptor, or androgen receptor mRNA levels in Cyp1b1(+/+) or in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. These data suggest that the testosterone metabolite, 6β-hydroxytestosterone, contributes to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated cardiac pathogenesis in male mice, most probably by acting as a permissive factor. Moreover, cytochrome P450 1B1 could serve as a novel target for developing agents for treating renin-angiotensin and testosterone-dependent hypertension and associated pathogenesis in males.

  20. Haemophilic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Steven, M M; Yogarajah, S; Madhok, R; Forbes, C D; Sturrock, R D

    1986-02-01

    A detailed clinical and radiological examination of the joints and laboratory studies were carried out on 139 haemophiliacs attending a single centre. The group included more patients with mild and moderate haemophilia (factor levels 6 to 60 per cent) than in previous studies. Haemarthrosis, the most common bleeding manifestation, had affected more than two-thirds of patients including many with mild or moderate disease. Restriction and contracture of the knees and elbows were the most common clinical features and, with the ankles, these joints were most frequently affected both clinically and radiologically. Using a combination of clinical and radiological features, 42 per cent of the patients could be classed as having 'definite' and a further 14 per cent 'possible' haemophilic arthritis. Although haemarthroses were equally prevalent in patients with classical haemophilia and Christmas disease, arthritis was more frequently present in the former. Haemarthrosis and joint disease were exceptional in von Willebrand's disease. The prevalence of arthritis generally related to disease severity as measured by factor level but, in contrast to earlier studies, definite arthritis was seen in some patients with factor levels up to 20 per cent of normal although the number of affected joints was less in these patients with milder disease. Laboratory test abnormalities including circulating immune complexes and hypocomplementaemia were noted in some patients but the abnormalities correlated poorly with clinical features. The present results suggest a recent slight reduction in the prevalence or severity of haemophilic arthritis, possibly attributable to recent improvements in factor replacement treatment. Longer-term studies are required to show whether arthritis is indeed lessening or whether the onset is merely being delayed.

  1. Thoracic manifestations of collagen vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Julia; Grimberg, Alexandre; Thompson, Bruna M; Antunes, Viviane B; Jasinowodolinski, Dany; Meirelles, Gustavo S P

    2012-01-01

    Collagen vascular diseases are a diverse group of immunologically mediated systemic disorders that often lead to thoracic changes. The collagen vascular diseases that most commonly involve the lung are rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis and dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, and Sjögren syndrome. Interstitial lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension are the main causes of mortality and morbidity among patients with collagen vascular diseases. Given the broad spectrum of possible thoracic manifestations and the varying frequency with which different interstitial lung diseases occur, the interpretation of thoracic images obtained in patients with collagen vascular diseases can be challenging. The task may be more difficult in the presence of treatment-related complications such as drug toxicity and infections, which are common in this group of patients. Although chest radiography is most often used for screening and monitoring of thoracic alterations, high-resolution computed tomography can provide additional information about lung involvement in collagen vascular diseases and may be especially helpful for differentiating specific disease patterns in the lung. General knowledge about the manifestations of thoracic involvement in collagen vascular diseases allows radiologists to provide better guidance for treatment and follow-up of these patients.

  2. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  3. Inhibition of inflammatory arthritis using fullerene nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Dellinger, Anthony L; Cunin, Pierre; Lee, David; Kung, Andrew L; Brooks, D Bradford; Zhou, Zhiguo; Nigrovic, Peter A; Kepley, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA) is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC). Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA) were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis.

  4. Inhibition of Inflammatory Arthritis Using Fullerene Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Dellinger, Anthony L.; Cunin, Pierre; Lee, David; Kung, Andrew L.; Brooks, D. Bradford; Zhou, Zhiguo; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Kepley, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA) is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC). Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA) were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis. PMID:25879437

  5. Effects of Libby amphibole exposure on two models of arthritis in the Lewis rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological data suggest that occupational exposure to the amphibole-containing venniculite in Libby, MT was associated with increased risk for developing autoimmune diseases and had an odds ratio of 3.23 for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The collagen induced arthriti...

  6. Arthritis of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by just two types: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive condition that ... other, it results in pain, stiffness, and weakness. Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that ...

  7. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  8. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bursitis and Tendinitis, Q&A Fibromyalgia, Q&A Gout, Q&A Juvenile Arthritis, Q&A Childhood Arthritis ( ... Many people also experience fatigue and sleep disturbances. Gout. A type of arthritis resulting from deposits of ...

  9. Pepsinogen--an immunoglobulin binding artefact in 'collagen' preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, A P; O'Hara, B P; Mageed, R A; McMahon, M S; McCarthy, D; Menashi, S; Archer, J R; Currey, H L

    1986-01-01

    It has previously been shown that extracts of human articular cartilage, many many of which contain type II collagen, react with heat-aggregated immunoglobulin and artificially prepared immune complexes. Sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis, but not from patients with inflammatory bowel disease, react with these extracts. There are two distinct patterns of binding, either as low molecular weight immune complexes or as free antibody directed against collagen. Aggregate-binding activity identified in extracts of human articular cartilage following pepsin digestion was found to be distinct from collagen in its salt solubility. Further purification of this aggregate-binding factor by SDS gel electrophoresis has shown it to be an artefact resulting from the binding of small immune complexes to pepsinogen present in the pepsin preparation used to digest the cartilage. Images Fig. 4 PMID:3780048

  10. Regulatory T cells in human and angiotensin II-induced mouse abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Wu, Wenxue; Lindholt, Jes S.; Sukhova, Galina K.; Libby, Peter; Yu, Xueqing; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Aims Regulatory T cells (Tregs) protect mice from angiotensin II (Ang-II)-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). This study tested whether AAA patients are Treg-insufficient and the Treg molecular mechanisms that control AAA pathogenesis. Methods and results ELISA determined the Foxp3 concentration in blood cell lysates from 485 AAA patients and 204 age- and sex-matched controls. AAA patients exhibited lower blood cell Foxp3 expression than controls (P < 0.0001). Pearson's correlation test demonstrated a significant but negative correlation between Foxp3 and AAA annual expansion rate before (r = –0.147, P = 0.007) and after (r = –0.153, P = 0.006) adjustment for AAA risk factors. AAA in apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe–/–) mice that received different doses of Ang-II exhibited a negative correlation of lesion Foxp3+ Treg numbers with AAA size (r = –0.883, P < 0.0001). Adoptive transfer of Tregs from wild-type (WT) and IL10-deficient (Il10–/–) mice increased AAA lesion Treg content, but only WT mice Tregs reduced AAA size, AAA incidence, blood pressure, lesion macrophage and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell accumulation, and angiogenesis with concurrent increase of lesion collagen content. Both AAA lesion immunostaining and plasma ELISA demonstrated that adoptive transfer of WT Tregs, but not Il10–/– Tregs, reduced the expression of MCP-1. In vitro cell culture and aortic ring assay demonstrated that only Tregs from WT mice, but not those from Il10–/– mice, reduced macrophage MCP-1 secretion, macrophage and vascular cell protease expression and activity, and aortic ring microvessel formation. Conclusion This study supports a protective role of Tregs in human and experimental AAA by releasing IL10 to suppress inflammatory cell chemotaxis, arterial wall remodelling, and angiogenesis. PMID:25824145

  11. Cia27 is a novel non-MHC arthritis severity locus on rat chromosome 10 syntenic to the rheumatoid arthritis 17q22-q25 locus.

    PubMed

    Brenner, M; Laragione, T; Yarlett, N C; Li, W; Mello, A; Gulko, P S

    2006-07-01

    Cia27 on rat chromosome 10 is a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) severity quantitative trait locus originally identified in a study of (DA x ACI) F2. As an initial step towards the positional cloning of the Cia27 gene, a 17 cM (21 Mb) interval from the DA strain (arthritis-susceptible) containing the two-logarithm of odds support interval comprising Cia27 was introgressed into the ACI (arthritis-resistant) background through genotype-guided congenic breeding. ACI.DA(Cia27) congenics developed a significantly more severe form of arthritis (CIA), with a 5.9-fold increase in median arthritis severity index, a parameter known to correlate with synovial inflammation, and cartilage and bone erosions, compared with ACI (P< or =0.001). The arthritis severity enhancing effect could be detected from day 21 onwards. Rats heterozygous at the congenic interval developed a disease similar to ACI rats, suggesting that DA alleles operate in a recessive manner. Levels of autoantibodies anti-rat type II collagen did not correlate with arthritis severity. Synovial tissue mRNA levels of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) were significantly increased in ACI.DA(Cia27) congenics compared with ACI. These results demonstrate that Cia27 harbors a novel arthritis severity regulatory gene. The identification of this gene should facilitate the identification of the rheumatoid arthritis gene mapped to the human syntenic region on chromosome 17q22-q25. PMID:16691185

  12. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  13. Peach (Prunus persica) extract inhibits angiotensin II-induced signal transduction in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kono, Ryohei; Okuno, Yoshiharu; Nakamura, Misa; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tokuda, Akihiko; Yamashita, Miki; Hidaka, Ryu; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi

    2013-08-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a vasoactive hormone that has been implicated in cardiovascular diseases. Here, the effect of peach, Prunus persica L. Batsch, pulp extract on Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and signal transduction events in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was investigated. Pretreatment of peach ethyl acetate extract inhibited Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation in VSMCs. Furthermore, Ang II-induced ROS generation, essential for signal transduction events, was diminished by the peach ethyl acetate extract. The peach ethyl acetate extract also attenuated the Ang II-induced phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor and myosin phosphatase target subunit 1, both of which are associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension. These results suggest that peach ethyl acetate extract may have clinical potential for preventing cardiovascular diseases by interfering with Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation, the generation of ROS, and then blocking signal transduction events.

  14. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Renita E.; Yadid, Moran; McCain, Megan L.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Pasqualini, Francesco S.; Park, Sung-Jin; Cho, Alexander; Campbell, Patrick; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II) to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF), allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics. PMID:26808388

  15. Angiotensin II Induced Cardiac Dysfunction on a Chip.

    PubMed

    Horton, Renita E; Yadid, Moran; McCain, Megan L; Sheehy, Sean P; Pasqualini, Francesco S; Park, Sung-Jin; Cho, Alexander; Campbell, Patrick; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    In vitro disease models offer the ability to study specific systemic features in isolation to better understand underlying mechanisms that lead to dysfunction. Here, we present a cardiac dysfunction model using angiotensin II (ANG II) to elicit pathological responses in a heart-on-a-chip platform that recapitulates native laminar cardiac tissue structure. Our platform, composed of arrays of muscular thin films (MTF), allows for functional comparisons of healthy and diseased tissues by tracking film deflections resulting from contracting tissues. To test our model, we measured gene expression profiles, morphological remodeling, calcium transients, and contractile stress generation in response to ANG II exposure and compared against previous experimental and clinical results. We found that ANG II induced pathological gene expression profiles including over-expression of natriuretic peptide B, Rho GTPase 1, and T-type calcium channels. ANG II exposure also increased proarrhythmic early after depolarization events and significantly reduced peak systolic stresses. Although ANG II has been shown to induce structural remodeling, we control tissue architecture via microcontact printing, and show pathological genetic profiles and functional impairment precede significant morphological changes. We assert that our in vitro model is a useful tool for evaluating tissue health and can serve as a platform for studying disease mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutics.

  16. Pulmonary manifestations of the collagen vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, H P; Matthay, R A

    1989-12-01

    The collagen vascular diseases are a heterogeneous group of immunologically mediated inflammatory disorders. The organs and tissues that compose the respiratory system are frequently affected by these diseases. Potential targets of the inflammation and injury include the lung parenchyma, tracheobronchial tree, pulmonary vasculature, pleura, larynx, and respiratory muscles. In this article, the spectrum of respiratory disease caused by systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, ankylosing spondylitis, relapsing polychondritis, and Sjögren's syndrome is reviewed. Where appropriate, therapeutic options are discussed.

  17. [Rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Strunk, J; Lange, U; Müller-Ladner, U

    2005-07-29

    The development of novel anti-rheumatic drugs revolutionizes currently therapeutic strategies and diagnostic management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, facilitating the goal of true remission instead of only symptomatic treatment as in former years. Since early treatment is known to be crucial for the longterm outcome, imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and high-frequency ultrasonography including Doppler sonography, which allow direct visualization of very early pathologic alterations of synovitis, or even initial destruction, become increasingly important. Besides the established therapy with methotrexate, new drugs such as leflunomide or the use of various combination therapies have been successfully introduced into the therapeutic armamentarium. Especially the introduction of cytokine-antagonists such as TNF-a inhibitors target the aim of remission. In addition, the upcoming therapeutic agents, which influence very effectively the inflammatory and destructive process need also to be integrated into the concert of different therapeutic strategies in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, which includes the mandatory complementary factors such as physiotherapy, ergotherapy and orthopedic surgery.

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you ... Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P. ...

  19. MicroRNA-21 Promotes Proliferation of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes through Mediation of NF-κB Nuclear Translocation in a Rat Model of Collagen-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xian, Pei-Feng; Yang, Lu; Wang, Sheng-Xu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is overexpressed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was designed to investigate the effect and mechanism of miR-21 on cell proliferation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) of RA. FLS were primary-cultured from a rat RA model. RA-FLS and normal FLS were infected with lentivirus (anti-miR-21 or pro-miR-21) for overexpression or downregulation of miR-21, respectively. The effects of miR-21 overexpression or inhibition on nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and FLS cell proliferation were evaluated by western blotting and MTT assays. The effects of an inhibitor of NF-κB nuclear translocation (BAY 11-7082) were also evaluated. The results showed that the levels of miR-21 and nucleoprotein NF-κB were increased in FLS of RA model rats compared to the control group. Downregulation of miR-21 in RA FLS led to a significant decrease in nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the antinegative control (NC) group. However, miR-21 overexpression in normal FLS resulted in a significant increase of nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the pro-NC group. The effects of miR-21 overexpression were reversed by BAY 11-7082. We concluded that upregulated miR-21 in FLS in RA model rats may promote cell proliferation by facilitating NF-κB nuclear translocation, thus affecting the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27429986

  20. MicroRNA-21 Promotes Proliferation of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes through Mediation of NF-κB Nuclear Translocation in a Rat Model of Collagen-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Xian, Pei-Feng; Yang, Lu; Wang, Sheng-Xu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is overexpressed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was designed to investigate the effect and mechanism of miR-21 on cell proliferation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) of RA. FLS were primary-cultured from a rat RA model. RA-FLS and normal FLS were infected with lentivirus (anti-miR-21 or pro-miR-21) for overexpression or downregulation of miR-21, respectively. The effects of miR-21 overexpression or inhibition on nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and FLS cell proliferation were evaluated by western blotting and MTT assays. The effects of an inhibitor of NF-κB nuclear translocation (BAY 11-7082) were also evaluated. The results showed that the levels of miR-21 and nucleoprotein NF-κB were increased in FLS of RA model rats compared to the control group. Downregulation of miR-21 in RA FLS led to a significant decrease in nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the antinegative control (NC) group. However, miR-21 overexpression in normal FLS resulted in a significant increase of nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the pro-NC group. The effects of miR-21 overexpression were reversed by BAY 11-7082. We concluded that upregulated miR-21 in FLS in RA model rats may promote cell proliferation by facilitating NF-κB nuclear translocation, thus affecting the NF-κB pathway.

  1. Complications of collagenous colitis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh-James

    2008-03-21

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis. This disorder generally has an apparently benign clinical course. However, a number of gastric and intestinal complications, possibly coincidental, may develop with collagenous colitis. Distinctive inflammatory disorders of the gastric mucosa have been described, including lymphocytic gastritis and collagenous gastritis. Celiac disease and collagenous sprue (or collagenous enteritis) may occur. Colonic ulceration has been associated with use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may evolve from collagenous colitis. Submucosal "dissection", colonic fractures or mucosal tears and perforation from air insufflation during colonoscopy may occur and has been hypothesized to be due to compromise of the colonic wall from submucosal collagen deposition. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressure during barium enema contrast studies. Finally, malignant disorders have also been reported, including carcinoma and lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:18350593

  2. Mechanisms underlying angiotensin II-induced calcium oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Aurélie; Pallone, Thomas L.

    2008-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms that underlie angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca]cyt) oscillations in medullary pericytes, we expanded a prior model of ion fluxes. ANG II stimulation was simulated by doubling maximal inositol trisphosphate (IP3) production and imposing a 90% blockade of K+ channels. We investigated two configurations, one in which ryanodine receptors (RyR) and IP3 receptors (IP3R) occupy a common store and a second in which they reside on separate stores. Our results suggest that Ca2+ release from stores and import from the extracellular space are key determinants of oscillations because both raise [Ca] in subplasmalemmal spaces near RyR. When the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) threshold of RyR is exceeded, the ensuing Ca2+ release is limited by Ca2+ reuptake into stores and export across the plasmalemma. If sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) pumps do not remain saturated and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores are replenished, that phase is followed by a resumption of leak from internal stores that leads either to [Ca]cyt elevation below the CICR threshold (no oscillations) or to elevation above it (oscillations). Our model predicts that oscillations are more prone to occur when IP3R and RyR stores are separate because, in that case, Ca2+ released by RyR during CICR can enhance filling of adjacent IP3 stores to favor a high subsequent leak that generates further CICR events. Moreover, the existence or absence of oscillations depends on the set points of several parameters, so that biological variation might well explain the presence or absence of oscillations in individual pericytes. PMID:18562632

  3. The Preventive Effects of Nanopowdered Peanut Sprout-added Caciocavallo Cheese on Collagen-induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoon Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (NPCC) on the prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in DBA/IJ mice immunized with type II collagen. After the induction of arthritis, the mice were being divided into five groups: (1) normal, no immunization; (2) CIA, collagen-induced arthritis; (3) MTX, collagen-induced arthritis treated with methotrexate (0.3 mg/kg body weight); (4) CC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d); (5) NPCC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d). Nanopowdered peanut sprout was ranged from 300 to 350 nm, while regular powdered peanut sprouts were ranged from 50 to 150 μm. The NPCC group had considerable reductions of clinical scores and paw thicknesses at the end of experiment as compared to the CIA group. In the serum analysis, the TNF-α, IL-1β, IL- 6 and IgG1 levels in the NPCC group have decreased by 69.4, 75.9, 66.6, and 61.9%, respectively, when compared to the CIA group. The histological score and spleen index of the NPCC group were significantly lower than the CIA group. In conclusion, the feeding NPCC method could delay and/or prevent the rheumatoid arthritis in the collagen-induced arthritis mouse model. Based on this study, nanopowdered peanut sprouts could be applied to various functional cheeses. PMID:26760745

  4. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  5. Regulation of immune reactivity to collagen in human beings

    SciTech Connect

    Solinger, A.M.; Stobo, J.D.

    1981-08-01

    Denaturated beef collagen was tested for its ability to induce the production of leukocyte inhibition factor among the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal individuals. Responsiveness, defined as the production of leukocyte inhibition factor sufficient to cause greater than 20% inhibition of leukocyte migration, was significantly (P less than 0.001, X2 . 31.1) associated with HLA-DR4. All HLA-DR4 positive individuals, including subjects without any evidence of synovitis, were collagen responders. There was no significant (P . 0.3) difference in the absolute reactivity of HLA-DR4+ versus HLA-DR4- individuals to respond to another antigen, Candida albicans. Collagen reactivity required interactions between macrophages and T cells and was directed against determinants inherent in the linear polypeptide, (Gly-Pro)n. In 5 normal HLA-DR4- nonresponders tested, absence of discernable reactivity to collagen was associated with the presence of antigen-specific, radiosensitive suppressive T cells. These studies suggest that during the physiologic metabolism of collagen all individuals are exposed to Gly-Pro determinants normally buried in the interstices of the collagen triple helix. In individuals whose major histocompatibility complex contains genes linked to those coding for HLA-DR4, this results in the activation of reactive T cells. Conversely, in individuals lacking these genes, collagen-specific suppressive cells predominate.

  6. Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  7. Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  8. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  10. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It is thought to be an autoimmune illness . This means the body attacks ...

  11. Metformin Prevents Renal Fibrosis in Mice with Unilateral Ureteral Obstruction and Inhibits Ang II-Induced ECM Production in Renal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Miao, Naijun; Xu, Jinlan; Gan, Xinxin; Xu, Dan; Zhou, Li; Xue, Hong; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Limin

    2016-01-22

    Renal fibrosis is the final common pathway of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and no effective medication is available clinically for managing its progression. Metformin was initially developed as an anti-diabetic drug and recently gained attention for its potential in the treatment of other diseases. In this study, we investigated its effects on renal fibrosis in a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in vivo and in angiotensin II (Ang II)-treated renal fibroblast NRK-49F cells in vitro. Our data showed that UUO induced renal fibrosis and combined with the activation of ERK signaling, the upregulation of fibronectin, collagen I, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). The administration of metformin inhibited the activation of ERK signaling and attenuated the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and collagen deposition in the obstructed kidneys. In cultured renal fibroblasts, Ang II increased the expression of fibronectin and collagen I and also activated ERK signaling and TGF-β in a time-dependent manner. Pretreatment of the cells with metformin blocked Ang II-induced ERK signaling activation and ECM overproduction. Our results show that metformin prevents renal fibrosis, possibly through the inhibition of ERK signaling, and may be a novel strategy for the treatment of renal fibrosis.

  12. Enigmatic insight into collagen.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  13. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen.

  14. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  15. The Nox1/4 Dual Inhibitor GKT137831 or Nox4 Knockdown Inhibits Angiotensin-II-Induced Adult Mouse Cardiac Fibroblast Proliferation and Migration. AT1 Physically Associates With Nox4.

    PubMed

    Somanna, Naveen K; Valente, Anthony J; Krenz, Maike; Fay, William P; Delafontaine, Patrice; Chandrasekar, Bysani

    2016-05-01

    Both oxidative stress and inflammation contribute to chronic hypertension-induced myocardial fibrosis and adverse cardiac remodeling. Here we investigated whether angiotensin (Ang)-II-induced fibroblast proliferation and migration are NADPH oxidase (Nox) 4/ROS and IL-18 dependent. Our results show that the potent induction of mouse cardiac fibroblast (CF) proliferation and migration by Ang-II is markedly attenuated by Nox4 knockdown and the Nox inhibitor DPI. Further, Nox4 knockdown and DPI pre-treatment attenuated Ang-II-induced IL-18, IL-18Rα and collagen expression, and MMP9 and LOX activation. While neutralization of IL-18 blunted Ang-II-induced CF proliferation and migration, knockdown of MMP9 attenuated CF migration. The antioxidant NAC and the cell-permeable SOD mimetics Tempol, MnTBAP, and MnTMPyP attenuated oxidative stress and inhibited CF proliferation and migration. The Nox1/Nox4 dual inhibitor GKT137831 also blunted Ang-II-induced H2 O2 production and CF proliferation and migration. Further, AT1 bound Nox4, and Ang-II enhanced their physical association. Notably, GKT137831 attenuated the AT1/Nox4 interaction. These results indicate that Ang-II induces CF proliferation and migration in part via Nox4/ROS-dependent IL-18 induction and MMP9 activation, and may involve AT1/Nox4 physical association. Thus, either (i) neutralizing IL-18, (ii) blocking AT1/Nox4 interaction or (iii) use of the Nox1/Nox4 inhibitor GKT137831 may have therapeutic potential in chronic hypertension-induced adverse cardiac remodeling.

  16. The circadian clock regulates inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hand, Laura E.; Hopwood, Thomas W.; Dickson, Suzanna H.; Walker, Amy L.; Loudon, Andrew S. I.; Ray, David W.; Bechtold, David A.; Gibbs, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    There is strong diurnal variation in the symptoms and severity of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, disruption of the circadian clock is an aggravating factor associated with a range of human inflammatory diseases. To investigate mechanistic links between the biological clock and pathways underlying inflammatory arthritis, mice were administered collagen (or saline as a control) to induce arthritis. The treatment provoked an inflammatory response within the limbs, which showed robust daily variation in paw swelling and inflammatory cytokine expression. Inflammatory markers were significantly repressed during the dark phase. Further work demonstrated an active molecular clock within the inflamed limbs and highlighted the resident inflammatory cells, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs), as a potential source of the rhythmic inflammatory signal. Exposure of mice to constant light disrupted the clock in peripheral tissues, causing loss of the nighttime repression of local inflammation. Finally, the results show that the core clock proteins cryptochrome (CRY) 1 and 2 repressed inflammation within the FLSs, and provide novel evidence that a CRY activator has anti-inflammatory properties in human cells. We conclude that under chronic inflammatory conditions, the clock actively represses inflammatory pathways during the dark phase. This interaction has exciting potential as a therapeutic avenue for treatment of inflammatory disease.—Hand, L. E., Hopwood, T. W., Dickson, S. H., Walker, A. L., Loudon, A. S. I., Ray, D. W., Bechtold, D. A., Gibbs, J. E. The circadian clock regulates inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27488122

  17. Effect of simvastatin on high glucose- and angiotensin II-induced activation of the JAK/STAT pathway in mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Banes-Berceli, Amy K; Shaw, Sean; Ma, Guochuan; Brands, Michael; Eaton, Douglas C; Stern, David M; Fulton, David; Caldwell, R William; Marrero, Mario B

    2006-07-01

    In the current study, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the ability of high glucose (HG) and ANG II to activate the JAK2-STAT signaling cascade and induce glomerular mesangial cell (GMC) growth. We found that pretreatment with simvastatin significantly inhibited HG- and ANG II-induced collagen IV production, JAK2 activation, and phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 in GMC. We also found that the activation of JAK2 by HG and ANG II was dependent on the Rho family of GTPases. Consistent with these in vitro results, both albumin protein excretion and phosphorylation of JAK2, STAT1, and STAT3 were attenuated in renal glomeruli by administration of simvastatin in a streptozotocin-induced rat model of HG diabetes. This study demonstrates that simvastatin blocks ANG II-induced activation of the JAK/STAT pathway in the diabetic environment, in vitro and in vivo, and, thereby, provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying early diabetic nephropathy. PMID:16449352

  18. Collagenous gastritis: Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease characterized by the subepithelial deposition of collagen bands thicker than 10 μm and the infiltration of inflammatory mononuclear cells in the lamina propria. Collagenous colitis and collagenous sprue have similar histological characteristics to collagenous gastritis and are thought to be part of the same disease entity. However, while collagenous colitis has become more common in the field of gastroenterology, presenting with clinical symptoms of chronic diarrhea in older patients, collagenous gastritis is rare. Since the disease was first reported in 1989, only 60 cases have been documented in the English literature. No safe and effective treatments have been identified from randomized, controlled trials. Therefore, better understanding of the disease and the reporting of more cases will help to establish diagnostic criteria and to develop therapeutic strategies. Therefore, here we review the clinical characteristics, endoscopic and histological findings, treatment, and clinical outcomes from case reports and case series published to date, and provide a summary of the latest information on the disease. This information will contribute to improved knowledge of collagenous gastritis so physicians can recognize and correctly diagnose the disease, and will help to develop a standard therapeutic strategy for future clinical trials. PMID:25789098

  19. Collagenous gastritis: Review.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Kenya; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji

    2015-03-16

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease characterized by the subepithelial deposition of collagen bands thicker than 10 μm and the infiltration of inflammatory mononuclear cells in the lamina propria. Collagenous colitis and collagenous sprue have similar histological characteristics to collagenous gastritis and are thought to be part of the same disease entity. However, while collagenous colitis has become more common in the field of gastroenterology, presenting with clinical symptoms of chronic diarrhea in older patients, collagenous gastritis is rare. Since the disease was first reported in 1989, only 60 cases have been documented in the English literature. No safe and effective treatments have been identified from randomized, controlled trials. Therefore, better understanding of the disease and the reporting of more cases will help to establish diagnostic criteria and to develop therapeutic strategies. Therefore, here we review the clinical characteristics, endoscopic and histological findings, treatment, and clinical outcomes from case reports and case series published to date, and provide a summary of the latest information on the disease. This information will contribute to improved knowledge of collagenous gastritis so physicians can recognize and correctly diagnose the disease, and will help to develop a standard therapeutic strategy for future clinical trials. PMID:25789098

  20. Collagen: Biochemistry, biomechanics, biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Nimni, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date reference for new ideas, information, and concepts in collagen research. The first volume emphasizes the relationship between the molecular structure and function of collagen, including descriptions of collagen types which exist in tissues as well as how these molecules organize into fibrils and the nature of the chemical crosslinks which stabilize them. In Volume II the biomechanical behavior of various specialized tissues, abnormal accumulation of collagen in the form of scars of fibrous infiltration are examined/and wound healing, tissue regulation and repair are covered in detail. Volume III explores the increasing application of collagen technology to the field of bioprosthesis, including the production of heart valve bioprosthesis, blood vessels, ligament substitutes, and bone substitutes.

  1. Backbone dynamics in collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.

    2004-11-01

    Peptide backbone motions of collagen have been extensively studied in the past. The experimental results were interpreted using a model of a collagen rod librating about its helix axis. Considering the size of the collagen molecule and the presence of cross-linked molecules, motional amplitudes derived for the helix axis libration were unusually high. Using solid-state NMR 13C chemical shift anisotropy and 2H quadrupolar lineshape analysis for five different isotope labelled collagens we show that motional averaging of the NMR interactions occurs primarily via small-angle librations about internal bond directions. This type of dynamics is compatible with both the presence of cross-links in collagen and the X-ray data, as well as dynamic models used for other proteins.

  2. Angiotensin(1-7) attenuated Angiotensin II-induced hepatocyte EMT by inhibiting NOX-derived H2O2-activated NLRP3 inflammasome/IL-1β/Smad circuit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Li; Huang, Shan; Ma, Xiao-Xin; Zhang, Wen-Yong; Wang, Dan; Jin, Si-Yi; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Li, Yang; Li, Xu

    2016-08-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is correlated with NAPDH oxidase (NOX)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS-induced NOD-like receptor pyrin domain containing-3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a novel mechanism of EMT. Angiotensin II (AngII) induces EMT by regulating intracellular ROS. Nevertheless, it has not been reported whether AngII could induce hepatocyte EMT. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] can inhibit the effects of AngII via a counter-regulatory mechanism. However, whether Ang-(1-7) attenuated the effects of AngII on hepatocyte EMT remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether Ang-(1-7) attenuated AngII-induced hepatocyte EMT by inhibiting the NOX-derived ROS-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome/IL-1ß/Smad circuit. In vivo, two animal models were established. In the first model, rats were infused AngII. In the second model, Ang-(1-7) was constantly infused into double bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. In vitro, hepatocytes were pretreated with antioxidant, NLRP3 siRNA, NOX4 siRNA, or Ang-(1-7) before exposure to AngII. In vitro, AngII induced hepatocyte EMT, which was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), diphenylene iodonium (DPI), and NOX4 siRNA. NLRP3 inflammasome, which was activated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), mediated AngII-induced hepatocyte EMT. Ang-(1-7) suppressed AngII-induced EMT by inhibiting the NOX-derived H2O2-activated NLRP3 inflammasome/IL-1ß/Smad circuit. In vivo, infusion of AngII induced activation of H2O2-correlated NLRP3 inflammasome in rat livers and accumulation of α-collagen I (Col1A1) in hepatocytes. Infusion of Ang-(1-7) alleviated BDL-induced liver fibrosis and inhibited the expression of Col1A1 and the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in hepatocytes. Ang-(1-7) attenuated AngII-induced hepatocyte EMT by inhibiting the NOX-derived H2O2-activated NLRP3 inflammasome/IL-1ß/Smad circuit.

  3. IL-12p40 Homodimer Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon-Yeong; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kang, Chang-Min; Moon, Young-Mee; Heo, Yu-Jung; Oh, Hye-Jwa; Park, Seong-Jeong; Yang, Se-Hwan; Kwok, Seung Ki; Ju, Ji-Hyeon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Sung, Young Chul; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La

    2015-10-01

    IL-23 is the key cytokine that induces the expansion of Th17 cells. It is composed of p19 and p40 subunits of IL-12. The p40 subunit binds competitively to the receptor of IL-23 and blocks its activity. Our aim was to assess the preventive and therapeutic effect of the IL-12p40 homodimer (p40)2 subunit in autoimmune arthritis animal models. In the current study, using IL-1R antagonist-knockout mice and a collagen-induced arthritis model, we investigated the suppressive effect of (p40)2 on inflammatory arthritis. We demonstrated that the recombinant adenovirus-expressing mouse (p40)2 model prevented the development of arthritis when given before the onset of arthritis. It also decreased the arthritis index and joint erosions in the mouse model if transferred after arthritis was established. (p40)2 inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines and Ag-specific T cell proliferation. It also induced CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3 regulatory T (Treg) cells in vitro and in vivo, whereas the generation of retinoic acid receptor-related organ receptor γt and Th17 cells was suppressed. The induction of Treg cells and the suppression of Th17 cells were mediated via activated STAT5 and suppressed STAT3. Our data suggest that (p40)2 suppressed inflammatory arthritis successfully. This could be a useful therapeutic approach in autoimmune arthritis to regulate the Th17/Treg balance and IL-23 signaling. PMID:26324771

  4. IL-12p40 Homodimer Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon-Yeong; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kang, Chang-Min; Moon, Young-Mee; Heo, Yu-Jung; Oh, Hye-Jwa; Park, Seong-Jeong; Yang, Se-Hwan; Kwok, Seung Ki; Ju, Ji-Hyeon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Sung, Young Chul

    2015-01-01

    IL-23 is the key cytokine that induces the expansion of Th17 cells. It is composed of p19 and p40 subunits of IL-12. The p40 subunit binds competitively to the receptor of IL-23 and blocks its activity. Our aim was to assess the preventive and therapeutic effect of the IL-12p40 homodimer (p40)2 subunit in autoimmune arthritis animal models. In the current study, using IL-1R antagonist–knockout mice and a collagen-induced arthritis model, we investigated the suppressive effect of (p40)2 on inflammatory arthritis. We demonstrated that the recombinant adenovirus-expressing mouse (p40)2 model prevented the development of arthritis when given before the onset of arthritis. It also decreased the arthritis index and joint erosions in the mouse model if transferred after arthritis was established. (p40)2 inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines and Ag-specific T cell proliferation. It also induced CD4+CD25+Foxp3 regulatory T (Treg) cells in vitro and in vivo, whereas the generation of retinoic acid receptor–related organ receptor γt and Th17 cells was suppressed. The induction of Treg cells and the suppression of Th17 cells were mediated via activated STAT5 and suppressed STAT3. Our data suggest that (p40)2 suppressed inflammatory arthritis successfully. This could be a useful therapeutic approach in autoimmune arthritis to regulate the Th17/Treg balance and IL-23 signaling. PMID:26324771

  5. Arthritis: joints inflamed.

    PubMed

    Casey, Georgina

    2015-06-01

    ARTHRITIS IS a generic term for inflammatory joint disease. There are various forms of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Arthritis can be a chronic debilitating condition or a transient effect of bacterial or viral infections. As a chronic condition, arthritis can cause loss of quality of life, disability and, with rheumatoid disease, early death. The economic burden of arthritis, in terms of management and loss of productivity due to disability, is high and set to increase with the ageing population. Recent advances in our understanding of the causes and progression of a number of forms of arthritis have raised hopes of better management and possible remission. Pharmacotherapy has moved from symptom management to addressing underlying disease processes. However, therapies that prevent or cure arthritis remain elusive. Current care for people with arthritis relies on a multidisciplinary approach and substantial pharmacological intervention. Nurses have a key role to play in guiding patients through treatment, ensuring they receive optimal therapy to reduce the impact of arthritis and its management on their lives.

  6. The fibrillar collagen family.

    PubMed

    Exposito, Jean-Yves; Valcourt, Ulrich; Cluzel, Caroline; Lethias, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Collagens, or more precisely collagen-based extracellular matrices, are often considered as a metazoan hallmark. Among the collagens, fibrillar collagens are present from sponges to humans, and are involved in the formation of the well-known striated fibrils. In this review we discuss the different steps in the evolution of this protein family, from the formation of an ancestral fibrillar collagen gene to the formation of different clades. Genomic data from the choanoflagellate (sister group of Metazoa) Monosiga brevicollis, and from diploblast animals, have suggested that the formation of an ancestral alpha chain occurred before the metazoan radiation. Phylogenetic studies have suggested an early emergence of the three clades that were first described in mammals. Hence the duplication events leading to the formation of the A, B and C clades occurred before the eumetazoan radiation. Another important event has been the two rounds of "whole genome duplication" leading to the amplification of fibrillar collagen gene numbers, and the importance of this diversification in developmental processes. We will also discuss some other aspects of fibrillar collagen evolution such as the development of the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation of procollagen molecules and of striated fibrils. PMID:20386646

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  8. Suppression of arthritis-induced bone erosion by a CRAC channel antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Harry C; Soboloff, Jonathan; Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina L; Larrouture, Quitterie C; Witt, Michelle R; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Elliott, Meenal; Hirsch, Raphael; Barnett, John B

    2016-01-01

    Objective We have shown in vitro and in vivo that osteoclast maturation requires calcium-release activated calcium (CRAC) channels. In inflammatory arthritis, osteoclasts mediate severe and debilitating bone erosion. In the current study, we assess the value of CRAC channels as a therapeutic target to suppress bone erosion in acute inflammatory arthritis. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in mice. The CRAC channel inhibitor 3,4-dichloropropionaniline (DCPA) and a placebo was administered 1 day prior to collagen II booster to induce arthritis. Effects on swelling, inflammatory cell invasion in joints, serum cytokines and bone erosion were measured. Results Assays, by blinded observers, of arthritis severity showed that DCPA, 21 mg/kg/day, suppressed arthritis development over 3 weeks. Bone and cartilage damage in sections of animal feet was reduced approximately 50%; overall swelling of joints was reduced by a similar amount. Effects on bone density by µCT showed clear separation in DCPA-treated CIA animals from CIA without treatment, while differences between controls without CIA and CIA treated with DCPA differed by small amounts and in most cases were not statistically different. Response was not related to anticollagen titres. There were no adverse effects in the treated group on animal weight or activity, consistent with low toxicity. The effect was maximal 12–17 days after collagen booster, during the rapid appearance of arthritis in untreated CIA. At 20 days after treatment (day 40), differences in arthritis score were reduced and tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-1, or IL-6 in the serum of the animals were similar in treated and untreated animals. Conclusions DCPA, a novel inhibitor of CRAC channels, suppresses bone erosion associated with acute arthritis in mice and might represent a new treatment modality for acute arthrits. PMID:26819750

  9. Infectious arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo Soria, L; Miquel Nolla Solé, J; Rozadilla Sacanell, A; Valverde García, J; Roig Escofet, D

    1992-01-01

    Eleven cases of infectious arthritis occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in eight patients. Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus agalactiae in one patient each, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in two patients. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 days in patients with pyogenic arthritis. The diagnosis of joint infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was especially delayed (57 days). Four patients died; they were found to have a longer time to diagnosis and two of them had multiple joint infection. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most often affecting patients with rheumatoid arthritis, infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis must also be considered in such patients. PMID:1575593

  10. Enthesitis-related arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Amita; Misra, Durga Prasanna

    2015-11-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic arthritis of childhood. Currently, it is characterized by seven categories. The enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) category usually affects boys older than 6 years and presents with lower limb asymmetrical arthritis associated with enthesitis. Later, these children can develop inflammatory lumbosacral pain (IBP). These children are at risk of developing acute anterior uveitis. A recently devised disease activity index, Juvenile Spondyloarthropathy Disease Activity Index (JSpADA), has been validated in retrospective cohorts. The corner stone of treatment is NSAIDs, local corticosteroid injections, and exercise. Methotrexate and sulfasalazine can be used for peripheral arthritis while anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are sometimes used to treat refractory enthesitis and sacroiliitis. Almost two third of patients with ERA have persistent disease and often have impairments in their quality of life. The presence of hip or ankle arthritis and a family history of spondyloarthropathy or polyarticular joint involvement at onset are associated with poorer prognosis.

  11. Role of Leukotriene B4 Receptors in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Steven; Jala, Venkatakrishna R.; Haribabu, Bodduluri

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the role that murine models of arthritis are playing in the understanding of human rheumatoid arthritis and how leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is emerging as an important target in this field. Both the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model and the K/BxN serum transfer arthritis model have contributed to outline the potential mechanisms involved in inflammatory arthritis. Indeed, the CIA model has contributed to the development of effective anti-TNF and anti-IL-1β based treatments for RA that are currently in the clinic. Many recent studies in mouse models have suggested a critical role for LTB4 and its receptors in the development of inflammatory arthritis. Inhibitors of LTB4 biosynthesis as well as LTB4 receptors are protective in mouse models of RA and mice deficient in the LTB4 biosynthetic enzymes or LTB4 receptors are resistant to disease development suggesting several promising targets for RA in this pathway. PMID:17967719

  12. Emerging therapy in arthritis: Modulation of markers of the inflammatory process.

    PubMed

    Mortarino, P A; Goy, D P; Abramson, D B; Cabello, J; Bumaguin, G E; Vitelli, E J; Toledo, J; Sarrio, L; Pezzotto, S M; Mardegan Issa, J P; Cointry, G R; Feldman, S

    2016-02-01

    The induction of tolerance has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy for arthritis aiming to decrease progression of the pathology, probably by promoting suppressor mechanisms of the autoimmune response. This work aimed to confirm whether the treatment with vitamin D3 could synergize oral tolerance induced by hydrolyzed collagen peptides, in our experimental model of antigen induced arthritis in New Zealand rabbits. Clinical observation of the phenomenon indicates that simultaneous treatment with hydrolyzed collagen peptides and vitamin D3 was beneficial when compared with no treatment, for arthritic animals, and for arthritic animals that received treatment with only hydrolyzed collagen peptides or vitamin D3. Treatment with hydrolyzed collagen peptides caused diminished proinflammatory cytokine levels, an effect synergized significantly by the simultaneous treatment with vitamin D3. The anatomical-pathological studies of the animals that received both treatments simultaneously showed synovial tissues without lymphocytic and plasma cell infiltrates, and without vascular proliferation. Some of the synovial tissue of the animals of these groups showed a slight decrease in Galectin-3 expression. We propose that simultaneous oral treatment with vitamin D3 and hydrolyzed collagen peptides could increase the immunoregulatory effect on the process of previously triggered arthritis. We used articular cartilage hydrolysate and not collagen II because peptides best expose antigenic determinants that could induce oral tolerance. Oral tolerance may be considered in the design of novel alternative therapies for autoimmune disease and we have herein presented novel evidence that the simultaneous treatment with vitamin D3 may synergize this beneficial effect. PMID:26748745

  13. Complications of collagen fillers.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Patricia; Goldberg, David J

    2014-12-01

    As the skin ages, a deficiency in collagen occurs, thus injectable collagen products have become a sensible and popular option for dermal filling and volume enhancement. Several types of collagen have been developed over the years, including animal sources such as bovine and porcine collagen, as well as human-based sources derived from pieces of the patient's own skin, cadaver skin, and later cultured from human dermal fibroblasts. While collagen overall has a relatively safe, side effect profile, there are several complications, both early and late onset, that practitioners and patients should be aware of. Early complications, occurring within days of the procedure, can be divided into non-hypersensitivity and hypersensitivity reactions. The non-hypersensitive reactions include injection site reactions, discoloration, maldistribution, infection, skin necrosis, and the very rare but dreaded risk of vision loss, whereas the hypersensitivity reactions present usually as delayed type IV reactions, but can also rarely present as an immediate type I reaction. Late complications, occurring within weeks to even years after injection, include granuloma formation, foreign body reactions, and infection secondary to atypical mycobacteria or biofilms. This review will give a detailed overview of the complications secondary to cutaneous collagen injections.

  14. Nanomechanics of collagen microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Vesentini, Simone; Redaelli, Alberto; Gautieri, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Summary Collagen constitutes one third of the human proteome, providing mechanical stability, elasticity and strength to organisms and is thus the prime construction material in biology. Collagen is also the dominating material in the extracellular matrix where its stiffness controls cell differentiation, growth and pathology. We use atomistic-based hierarchical multiscale modeling to describe this complex biological material from the bottom up. This includes the use and development of large-scale computational modeling tools to investigate several aspects related to collagen-based tissues, including source of visco-elasticity and deformation mechanisms at the nanoscale level. The key innovation of this research is that until now, collagen materials have primarily been described at macroscopic scales, without explicitly understanding the mechanical contributions at the molecular and fibrillar levels. The major impact of this research will be the development of fundamental models of collagenous tissues, important to the design of new scaffolding biomaterials for regenerative medicine as well as for the understanding of collagen-related diseases. PMID:23885342

  15. Relationship between angiogenesis and inflammation in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Gaelle; Valvason, Chiara; Yamaoka, Kunio; Lemeiter, Delphine; Laroche, Liliane; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Bessis, Natacha

    2006-09-01

    Background. Angiogenesis is involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) leading to leucocyte recruitment and inflammation in the synovium. Furthermore, synovial inflammation itself further potentiates endothelial proliferation and angiogenesis. In this study, we aimed at evaluating the reciprocical relationship between synovial inflammation and angiogenesis in a RA model, namely collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. CIA was induced by immunization of DBA/1 mice with collagen type II in adjuvant. Endothelial cells were detected using a GSL-1 lectin-specific immunohistochemical staining on knee joint sections. Angiogenesis, clinical scores and histological signs of arthritis were evaluated from the induction of CIA until the end of the experiment. Angiogenesis was quantified by counting both the isolated endothelial cells and vessels stained on each section. To evaluate the effect of increased angiogenesis on CIA, VEGF gene transfer was performed using an adeno-associated virus encoding VEGF (AAV-VEGF), by intra-muscular or intra-articular injection in mice with CIA. Results. We showed an increase in synovial angiogenesis from day 6 to day 55 after CIA induction, and, moreover, joint vascularization and clinical scores of arthritis were correlated (p < 0.0001, r = 0.61). Vascularization and histological scores were also correlated (p = 0.0006, r = 0.51). Systemic VEGF overexpression in mice with CIA was followed by an aggravation of arthritis as compared to AAV-lacZ control group (p < 0.0001). In contrast, there was no difference in clinical scores between control mice and mice injected within the knee with AAV-VEGF, even if joint vascularization was higher in this group than in all other groups (p = 0,05 versus non-injected group). Intra-articular AAV-VEGF injections induced more severe signs of histological inflammation and bone destruction than AAV-Lac Z or no injection. Conclusion. Angiogenesis and joint inflammation evolve in parallel during collagen

  16. Type V collagen controls the initiation of collagen fibril assembly.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, Richard J; Florer, Jane B; Brunskill, Eric W; Bell, Sheila M; Chervoneva, Inna; Birk, David E

    2004-12-17

    Vertebrate collagen fibrils are heterotypically composed of a quantitatively major and minor fibril collagen. In non-cartilaginous tissues, type I collagen accounts for the majority of the collagen mass, and collagen type V, the functions of which are poorly understood, is a minor component. Type V collagen has been implicated in the regulation of fibril diameter, and we reported recently preliminary evidence that type V collagen is required for collagen fibril nucleation (Wenstrup, R. J., Florer, J. B., Cole, W. G., Willing, M. C., and Birk, D. E. (2004) J. Cell. Biochem. 92, 113-124). The purpose of this study was to define the roles of type V collagen in the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis and matrix assembly. Mouse embryos completely deficient in pro-alpha1(V) chains were created by homologous recombination. The col5a1-/- animals die in early embryogenesis, at approximately embryonic day 10. The type V collagen-deficient mice demonstrate a virtual lack of collagen fibril formation. In contrast, the col5a1+/- animals are viable. The reduced type V collagen content is associated with a 50% reduction in fibril number and dermal collagen content. In addition, relatively normal, cylindrical fibrils are assembled with a second population of large, structurally abnormal collagen fibrils. The structural properties of the abnormal matrix are decreased relative to the wild type control animals. These data indicate a central role for the evolutionary, ancient type V collagen in the regulation of fibrillogenesis. The complete dependence of fibril formation on type V collagen is indicative of the critical role of the latter in early fibril initiation. In addition, this fibril collagen is important in the determination of fibril structure and matrix organization. PMID:15383546

  17. Nickel(II)-induced nasal epithelial toxicity and oxidative mitochondrial damage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lim, Soo-Sung; Baek, Byoung Joon; An, Je-Min; Nam, Hae-Seon; Woo, Kee-Min; Cho, Moon-Kyun; Kim, Sung-Ho; Lee, Sang-Han

    2016-03-01

    In probing the underlying mechanisms of nickel(II)-induced cytotoxicity on nasal epithelium, we investigated the effects of nickel(II) acetate on nasal epithelial RPMI-2650 cells. Nickel(II) elicited apoptosis, as signified by pyknotic and fragmented nuclei, increased caspase-3/7 activity, and an increase in annexin V binding, hypodiploid DNA, and Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio. Nickel(II)-induced G2/M arrest was associated with up-regulation of p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression, decrease in phosphorylation at Thr(161) of Cdc2, and down-regulation of cyclin B1. Associated with these responses, ROS generation and mitochondrial depolarization increased in a nickel(II) concentration-dependent fashion. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) attenuated these changes. p53 reporter gene assay and analyses of p53, Puma, Bax, and Bcl-2 protein levels indicated that NAC inhibited nickel(II)-induced activation of p53-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Collectively, our study provides evidences that nickel(II) may induce oxidative damage on nasal epithelium in which antioxidant NAC protects cells against nickel(II)-induced apoptosis through the prevention of oxidative stress-mediated mitochondrial damage. PMID:26809061

  18. MMP-12 deficiency attenuates angiotensin II-induced vascular injury, M2 macrophage accumulation, and skin and heart fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stawski, Lukasz; Haines, Paul; Fine, Alan; Rudnicka, Lidia; Trojanowska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    MMP-12, a macrophage-secreted elastase, is elevated in fibrotic diseases, including systemic sclerosis (SSc) and correlates with vasculopathy and fibrosis. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of MMP-12 in cardiac and cutaneous fibrosis induced by angiotensin II infusion. Ang II-induced heart and skin fibrosis was accompanied by a marked increase of vascular injury markers, including vWF, Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) and MMP-12, as well as increased number of PDGFRβ+ cells. Furthermore Ang II infusion led to an accumulation of macrophages (Mac3+) in the skin and in the perivascular and interstitial fibrotic regions of the heart. However, alternatively activated (Arg 1+) macrophages were mainly present in the Ang II infused mice and were localized to the perivascular heart regions and to the skin, but were not detected in the interstitial heart regions. Elevated expression of MMP-12 was primarily found in macrophages and endothelial cells (CD31+) cells, but MMP-12 was not expressed in the collagen producing cells. MMP-12 deficient mice (MMP12KO) showed markedly reduced expression of vWF, TSP1, and PDGFRβ around vessels and attenuation of dermal fibrosis, as well as the perivascular fibrosis in the heart. However, MMP-12 deficiency did not affect interstitial heart fibrosis, suggesting a heterogeneous nature of the fibrotic response in the heart. Furthermore, MMP-12 deficiency almost completely prevented accumulation of Arg 1+ cells, whereas the number of Mac3+ cells was partially reduced. Moreover production of profibrotic mediators such as PDGFBB, TGFβ1 and pSMAD2 in the skin and perivascular regions of the heart was also inhibited. Together, the results of this study show a close correlation between vascular injury markers, Arg 1+ macrophage accumulation and fibrosis and suggest an important role of MMP-12 in regulating these processes.

  19. Rosuvastatin prevents angiotensin II-induced vascular changes by inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase and COX-1

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Rocchina; Fornai, Matteo; Duranti, Emiliano; Antonioli, Luca; Rugani, Ilaria; Aydinoglu, Fatma; Ippolito, Chiara; Segnani, Cristina; Bernardini, Nunzia; Taddei, Stefano; Blandizzi, Corrado; Virdis, Agostino

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose NAD(P)H oxidase and COX-1 participate in vascular damage induced by angiotensin II. We investigated the effect of rosuvastatin on endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodelling, changes in extracellular matrix components and mechanical properties of small mesenteric arteries from angiotensin II-infused rats. Experimental Approach Male rats received angiotensin II (120 ng·kg−1·min−1, subcutaneously) for 14 days with or without rosuvastatin (10 mg·kg−1·day−1, oral gavage) or vehicle. Vascular functions and morphological parameters were assessed by pressurized myography. Key Results In angiotensin II-infused rats, ACh-induced relaxation was attenuated compared with controls, less sensitive to L-NAME, enhanced by SC-560 (COX-1 inhibitor) or SQ-29548 (prostanoid TP receptor antagonist), and normalized by the antioxidant ascorbic acid or NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors. After rosuvastatin, relaxations to ACh were normalized, fully sensitive to L-NAME, and no longer affected by SC-560, SQ-29548 or NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors. Angiotensin II enhanced intravascular superoxide generation, eutrophic remodelling, collagen and fibronectin depositions, and decreased elastin content, resulting in increased vessel stiffness. All these changes were prevented by rosuvastatin. Angiotensin II increased phosphorylation of NAD(P)H oxidase subunit p47phox and its binding to subunit p67phox, effects inhibited by rosuvastatin. Rosuvastatin down-regulated vascular Nox4/NAD(P)H isoform and COX-1 expression, attenuated the vascular release of 6-keto-PGF1α, and enhanced copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase expression. Conclusion and Implications Rosuvastatin prevents angiotensin II-induced alterations in resistance arteries in terms of function, structure, mechanics and composition. These effects depend on restoration of NO availability, prevention of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived oxidant excess, reversal of COX-1 induction and its prostanoid production, and stimulation of

  20. Pitavastatin Regulates Ang II Induced Proliferation and Migration via IGFBP-5 in VSMC

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Yu Mi; Nam, Ju-Ock

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), a key mediator of hypertensive, causes structural changes in the arteries (vascular remodeling), which involve alterations in cell growth, vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hypertrophy. Ang II promotes fibrotic factor like IGFBP5, which mediates the profibrotic effects of Ang II in the heart and kidneys, lung and so on. The purpose of this study was to identify the signaling pathway of IGFBP5 on cell proliferation and migration of Ang II-stimulated VSMC. We have been interested in Ang II-induced IGFBP5 and were curious to determine whether a Pitavastatin would ameliorate the effects. Herein, we investigated the question of whether Ang II induced the levels of IGFBP5 protein followed by proliferation and migration in VSMC. Pretreatment with the specific Angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) inhibitor (Losartan), Angiotensin receptor type 2 (AT2) inhibitor (PD123319), MAPK inhibitor (U0126), ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059), P38 inhibitor (SB600125) and PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) resulted in significantly inhibited IGFBP5 production, proliferation, and migration in Ang II-stimulated VSMC. In addition, IGFBP5 knockdown resulted in modulation of Ang II induced proliferation and migration via IGFBP5 induction. In addition, Pitavastatin modulated Ang II induced proliferation and migration in VSMC. Taken together, our results indicated that Ang II induces IGFBP5 through AT1, ERK1/2, P38, and PI3K signaling pathways, which were inhibited by Pitavastatin. These findings may suggest that Pitavastatin has an effect on vascular disease including hypertension. PMID:26557016

  1. Lovastatin prevents angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat heart cells.

    PubMed

    Oi, S; Haneda, T; Osaki, J; Kashiwagi, Y; Nakamura, Y; Kawabe, J; Kikuchi, K

    1999-07-01

    Angiotensin II activates p21ras, and mediates cardiac hypertrophic growth through the type 1 angiotensin II receptor in cardiac myocytes. An inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase has been shown to block the post-translational farnesylation of p21ras and inhibit protein synthesis in several cell types. Primary cultures of neonatal cardiac myocytes were used to determine whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, lovastatin, simvastatin and pravastatin inhibit the angiotensin II-induced hypertrophic growth. Angiotensin II (10(-6) M) significantly increased protein-DNA ratio, RNA-DNA ratio, ratios of protein synthesis and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. Lipid-soluble HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, lovastatin (10(-6) M) and simvastatin (10(-6) M) partially and significantly inhibited the angiotensin II-induced increases in these parameters, but a water-soluble HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, pravastatin (10(-6) M) did not. Mevalonate (10(-4) M) overcame the inhibitory effects of lovastatin and simvastatin on angiotensin II-induced increases in these parameters. A selective protein kinase C inhibitor, calphostin C (10(-6) M) partially and significantly prevented angiotensin II-induced increases in these parameters, and treatment with both lovastatin and calphostin C inhibited completely. Angiotensin II increased p21ras activity and membrane association, and lovastatin inhibited them. These studies demonstrate that a lipid-soluble HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, lovastatin, may prevent angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy, at least in part, through p21ras/MAP kinase pathway, which is linked to mevalonate metabolism.

  2. Postinfectious Arthritis in Pediatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    PLESCA, Doina Anca; LUMINOS, Monica; SPATARIU, Luminita; STEFANESCU, Mihaela; CINTEZA, Eliza; BALGRADEAN, Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Postinfectious arthritis is a relatively often encountered in pediatric practice. The authors present the most important data concerneing this pathology, with up to date informations exemplifying with case presentations. Clinical cases bring to attention the most common forms of postinfectious arthritis (reactive arthritis, postinfectious arthritis bacterial, viral, spirochete, and so on). Although highly studied and commonly found in current pediatric practice, arthritis occurring after infections remains controversial entities, especially regarding terminology. While, according to some authors, postinfectious arthritis belongs to the large group of reactive arthritis, by other authors, these joint events are independent entities. PMID:24371480

  3. Collagen Fibrils: Nanoscale Ropes

    PubMed Central

    Bozec, Laurent; van der Heijden, Gert; Horton, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibrils from staggered repeats of individual molecules has become “accepted” wisdom. However, for over thirty years now, such a model has failed to resolve several structural and functional questions. In a novel approach, it was found, using atomic force microscopy, that tendon collagen fibrils are composed of subcomponents in a spiral disposition—that is, their structure is similar to that of macroscale ropes. Consequently, this arrangement was modeled and confirmed using elastic rod theory. This work provides new insight into collagen fibril structure and will have wide application—from the design of scaffolds for tissue engineering and a better understanding of pathogenesis of diseases of bone and tendon, to the conservation of irreplaceable parchment-based museum exhibits. PMID:17028135

  4. Association of collagenous colitis with prurigo nodularis.

    PubMed

    Székely, Hajnal; Pónyai, Györgyi; Temesvári, Erzsébet; Berczi, Lajos; Hársing, Judit; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Herszényi, László; Tulassay, Zsolt; Juhász, Márk

    2009-08-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of collagenous colitis (CC) is poorly understood and probably multifactorial; many potential pathophysiological mechanisms have been described, although none have been conclusively proved. Circumstantial evidence suggests that CC appears as an autoimmune response to a luminal or epithelial antigen of unknown origin. Infections and certain drugs (e.g. NSAID, lansoprazole) may act as triggers for an immune-mediated process. CC is characterized clinically by chronic watery, nonbloody diarrhea with normal endoscopic appearance and without radiological abnormalities, but specific microscopic changes in the colon. Histopathology is featured by the presence of a thickened subepithelial collagen band adjacent to the basal membrane. Up to 40% of patients with CC have associated diseases of autoimmune or inflammatory origin, such as thyroid disease, coeliac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus, Sjögren's syndrome, CREST syndrome, scleroderma, pernicious anemia, and sarcoidosis. Prurigo nodularis is a chronic condition characterized by intensely pruritic, lichenified, or excoriated papules and nodules of unknown etiology. It is assumed to represent a cutaneous reaction pattern to repeated scrubbing or scratching caused by pruritus. We report a case of CC and prurigo nodularis. To our knowledge, this association has not been reported earlier. PMID:19398916

  5. Collagen in organ development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    It is important to know whether microgravity will adversely affect developmental processes. Collagens are macromolecular structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which may be altered by perturbations in gravity. Interstitial collagens have been shown to be necessary for normal growth and morphogenesis in some embryonic organs, and in the mouse salivary gland, the biosynthetic pattern of these molecules changes during development. Determination of the effects of microgravity on epithelial organ development must be preceded by crucial ground-based studies. These will define control of normal synthesis, secretion, and deposition of ECM macromolecules and the relationship of these processes to morphogenesis.

  6. Hormones and autoimmunity: animal models of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wilder, R L

    1996-05-01

    Hormones, particularly those involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and -adrenal axes (HPG and HPA), play important roles in various animal models of autoimmunity such as systemic lupus erythematosus in mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and rats, and the streptococcal cell wall, adjuvant and avridine arthritis models in rats. Intimately linked to the subject of hormones and autoimmunity are gender, sex chromosomes and age. The importance of these factors in the various animal models is emphasized in this chapter. Several major themes are apparent. First, oestrogens promote B-cell dependent immune-complex mediated disease (e.g. lupus nephritis) but suppress T-cell dependent pathology (CIA in mice and rats), and vice versa. Second, testosterone's effects are complicated and depend on species and disease model. In rats, testosterone suppresses both T-cell and B-cell immunity. In mice, the effects are complex and difficult to interpret, e.g. they tend to enhance CIA arthritis and suppress lupus. Sex chromosome/sex hormone interactions are clearly involved in generating these complicated effects. Third, studies in Lewis and Fischer F344 rats exemplify the importance of corticosteroids, corticotrophin releasing hormone and the HPA axis in the regulation of inflammation and the predisposition to autoimmune diseases. Fourth, the HPA axis is intimately linked to the HPG axis and is sexually dimorphic. Oestrogens stimulate higher corticosteroid responses in females. The animal model data have major implications for understanding autoimmunity in humans. In particular, adrenal and gonadal hormone deficiency is likely to facilitate T-cell dependent diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, while high oestrogen levels or effects, relative to testosterone, are likely to promote B-cell dependent immune-complex-mediated diseases such as lupus nephritis.

  7. Structure and function of collagen types

    SciTech Connect

    Mayne, R.; Burgeson, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Classical Collagens: Types I, II, and III; Type IV Collagen; Type IX Collagen; and Analysis of Collagen Structure by Molecular Biology Techniques.

  8. Involvement of cytochrome P-450 1B1 in renal dysfunction, injury, and inflammation associated with angiotensin II-induced hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Brett L; Anderson, Larry J; Estes, Anne M; Fang, Xiao R; Song, Chi Young; Campbell, William B; Malik, Kafait U

    2012-02-15

    We investigated the contribution of cytochrome P-450 1B1 (CYP1B1) to renal dysfunction and organ damage associated with ANG II-induced hypertension in rats. ANG II (300 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) or vehicle were infused for 2 wk, with daily injections of a selective CYP1B1 inhibitor, 2,4,3',5'-tetramethoxystilbene (TMS; 300 μg/kg ip), or its vehicle. ANG II increased blood pressure and renal CYP1B1 activity that were prevented by TMS. ANG II also increased water intake and urine output, decreased glomerular filtration rate, increased urinary Na(+) and K(+) excretion, and caused proteinuria, all of which were prevented by TMS. ANG II infusion caused hypertrophy, endothelial dysfunction, and increased reactivity of renal and interlobar arteries to vasoconstrictor agents and renal vascular resistance and interstitial fibrosis as indicated by accumulation of α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and collagen, and inflammation as indicated by increased infiltration of CD-3(+) cells; these effects were inhibited by TMS. ANG II infusion also increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activities of NADPH oxidase, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and c-Src that were prevented by TMS. TMS alone had no effect on any of the above parameters. These data suggest that CYP1B1 contributes to the renal pathophysiological changes associated with ANG II-induced hypertension, most likely via increased ROS production and activation of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and c-Src and that CYP1B1 could serve as a novel target for treating renal disease associated with hypertension.

  9. Potential Use of Plectranthus amboinicus in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chun-Ming; Hung, Le-Mei; Chung, Yuh-Shan; Wu, Rey-Yuh

    2010-01-01

    Plectranthus amboinicus (P. amboinicus) is a folk herb that is used to treat inflammatory diseases or swelling symptoms in Taiwan. We investigated therapeutic efficacy of P. amboinicus in treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) using collagen-induced arthritis animal model. Arthritis was induced in Lewis rats by immunization with bovine type II collagen. Serum anti-collagen IgG, IgM and C-reactive protein (CRP) were analyzed. To understand the inflammation condition of treated animals, production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β from peritoneal exudates cells (PEC) were also analyzed. P. amboinicus significantly inhibited the footpad swelling and arthritic symptoms in collagen-induced arthritic rats, while the serum anti-collagen IgM and CRP levels were consistently decreased. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were also decreased in the high dosage of P. amboinicus group. Here, we demonstrate the potential anti-arthritic effect of P. amboinicus for treating RA, which might confer its anti-rheumatic activity. This differs the pharmacological action mode of indomethacin. PMID:18955284

  10. Potential Use of Plectranthus amboinicus in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jia-Ming; Cheng, Chun-Ming; Hung, Le-Mei; Chung, Yuh-Shan; Wu, Rey-Yuh

    2010-03-01

    Plectranthus amboinicus (P. amboinicus) is a folk herb that is used to treat inflammatory diseases or swelling symptoms in Taiwan. We investigated therapeutic efficacy of P. amboinicus in treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) using collagen-induced arthritis animal model. Arthritis was induced in Lewis rats by immunization with bovine type II collagen. Serum anti-collagen IgG, IgM and C-reactive protein (CRP) were analyzed. To understand the inflammation condition of treated animals, production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β from peritoneal exudates cells (PEC) were also analyzed. P. amboinicus significantly inhibited the footpad swelling and arthritic symptoms in collagen-induced arthritic rats, while the serum anti-collagen IgM and CRP levels were consistently decreased. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were also decreased in the high dosage of P. amboinicus group. Here, we demonstrate the potential anti-arthritic effect of P. amboinicus for treating RA, which might confer its anti-rheumatic activity. This differs the pharmacological action mode of indomethacin. PMID:18955284

  11. [Septic arthritis and spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Yosuke

    2014-10-01

    Septic arthritis and spondylitis in elderly adult are uncommon disease. But symptoms and signs of septic arthritis and spondylitis are an important medical emergency, with high mortality and morbidity. Delayed or inadequate treatment can result in irreversible joint destruction and neurological condition. Early diagnoses as well as prompt and effective treatment are essential for avoiding severe outcomes. In spite of advances in diagnostic imaging techniques, the incidence of septic arthritis and spondylitis appears to have been increased. The aging of the population, the widespread use of immunosuppressant therapies, including systemic corticosteroids, cytokines and anticytokines, and growing resistance to conventional antibiotics seem to be the major cause.

  12. In Situ D-periodic Molecular Structure of Type II Collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2010-05-06

    Collagens are essential components of extracellular matrices in multicellular animals. Fibrillar type II collagen is the most prominent component of articular cartilage and other cartilage-like tissues such as notochord. Its in situ macromolecular and packing structures have not been fully characterized, but an understanding of these attributes may help reveal mechanisms of tissue assembly and degradation (as in osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis). In some tissues such as lamprey notochord, the collagen fibrillar organization is naturally crystalline and may be studied by x-ray diffraction. We used diffraction data from native and derivative notochord tissue samples to solve the axial, D-periodic structure of type II collagen via multiple isomorphous replacement. The electron density maps and heavy atom data revealed the conformation of the nonhelical telopeptides and the overall D-periodic structure of collagen type II in native tissues, data that were further supported by structure prediction and transmission electron microscopy. These results help to explain the observed differences in collagen type I and type II fibrillar architecture and indicate the collagen type II cross-link organization, which is crucial for fibrillogenesis. Transmission electron microscopy data show the close relationship between lamprey and mammalian collagen fibrils, even though the respective larger scale tissue architecture differs.

  13. Role of the Gut Microbiome in Modulating Arthritis Progression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaofei; Zeng, Benhua; Zhang, Juan; Li, Wenxia; Mou, Fangxiang; Wang, Heng; Zou, Qinghua; Zhong, Bing; Wu, Like; Wei, Hong; Fang, Yongfei

    2016-01-01

    Genetics alone cannot explain most cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thus, investigating environmental factors such as the gut microbiota may provide new insights into the initiation and progression of RA. In this study, we performed 16S rRNA sequencing to characterise the gut microbiota of DBA1 mice that did or did not develop arthritis after induction with collagen. We found that divergence in the distribution of microbiota after induction was pronounced and significant. Mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) showed enriched operational taxonomic units (OTUs) affiliated with the genus Lactobacillus as the dominant genus prior to arthritis onset. With disease development, the abundance of OTUs affiliated with the families Bacteroidaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and S24-7 increased significantly in CIA-susceptible mice. Notably, germ-free mice conventionalized with the microbiota from CIA-susceptible mice showed a higher frequency of arthritis induction than those conventionalized with the microbiota from CIA-resistant mice. Consistently, the concentration of the cytokine interleukin-17 in serum and the proportions of CD8+T cells and Th17 lymphocytes in the spleen were significantly higher in the former group, whereas the abundances of dendritic cells, B cells, and Treg cells in the spleen were significantly lower. Our results suggest that the gut microbiome influences arthritis susceptibility. PMID:27481047

  14. A novel model of rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease in SKG mice.

    PubMed

    Keith, Rebecca C; Powers, Jennifer L; Redente, Elizabeth F; Sergew, Amen; Martin, Richard J; Gizinski, Alison; Holers, V Michael; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Riches, David W H

    2012-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD) is associated with increased mortality in up to 10% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Lung exposure to cigarette smoke has been implicated in disease development. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying the development of RA-ILD, in part due to the lack of an appropriate mouse model. The objectives of this study were (i) to test the suitability of SKG mice as a model of cellular and fibrotic interstitial pneumonia in the setting of autoimmune arthritis, and (ii) to determine the role of lung injury in the development of arthritis in SKG mice. Lung tissues were evaluated in arthritic SKG mice by quantifying cell accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage, static compliance, collagen levels, and infiltrating cell phenotypes by flow cytometry and histology. Lung injury was induced by exposure to cigarette smoke or bleomycin. Arthritic SKG mice developed a patchy cellular and fibrotic interstitial pneumonia associated with reduced static compliance, increased collagen levels, and accumulation of inflammatory cells. Infiltrating cells comprised CD4+ T cells, B cells, macrophages, and neutrophils. Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke or initiation of lung injury with bleomycin did not cause arthritis. The pattern of lung disease suggests that arthritic SKG mice represent an authentic model of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia in RA-ILD patients. The lack of arthritis development after cigarette smoke or lung injury suggests that a model where breaches in immunologic tolerance are induced by lung inflammation and injury alone may be overly simplistic.

  15. Role of the Gut Microbiome in Modulating Arthritis Progression in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofei; Zeng, Benhua; Zhang, Juan; Li, Wenxia; Mou, Fangxiang; Wang, Heng; Zou, Qinghua; Zhong, Bing; Wu, Like; Wei, Hong; Fang, Yongfei

    2016-01-01

    Genetics alone cannot explain most cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thus, investigating environmental factors such as the gut microbiota may provide new insights into the initiation and progression of RA. In this study, we performed 16S rRNA sequencing to characterise the gut microbiota of DBA1 mice that did or did not develop arthritis after induction with collagen. We found that divergence in the distribution of microbiota after induction was pronounced and significant. Mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) showed enriched operational taxonomic units (OTUs) affiliated with the genus Lactobacillus as the dominant genus prior to arthritis onset. With disease development, the abundance of OTUs affiliated with the families Bacteroidaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and S24-7 increased significantly in CIA-susceptible mice. Notably, germ-free mice conventionalized with the microbiota from CIA-susceptible mice showed a higher frequency of arthritis induction than those conventionalized with the microbiota from CIA-resistant mice. Consistently, the concentration of the cytokine interleukin-17 in serum and the proportions of CD8+T cells and Th17 lymphocytes in the spleen were significantly higher in the former group, whereas the abundances of dendritic cells, B cells, and Treg cells in the spleen were significantly lower. Our results suggest that the gut microbiome influences arthritis susceptibility. PMID:27481047

  16. Genetic disorders of collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Tsipouras, P; Ramirez, F

    1987-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Marfan syndrome form a group of genetic disorders of connective tissue. These disorders exhibit remarkable clinical heterogeneity which reflects their underlying biochemical and molecular differences. Defects in collagen types I and III have been found in all three syndromes. PMID:3543367

  17. Role of the complement system in rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis: relationship with anti-TNF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ballanti, Eleonora; Perricone, Carlo; di Muzio, Gioia; Kroegler, Barbara; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Graceffa, Dario; Perricone, Roberto

    2011-08-01

    The complement system is an essential component of innate immunity and also plays an important role in modulating adaptive immunity. It comprises more than 30 plasma and membrane-bound proteins and can be activated through three pathways: the classical, the alternative and the lectin pathways. Its activation contributes to the pathogenesis of several autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. The evidence of complement activation in synovial fluid of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients is abundant, while few data exist in Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) patients. Levels of complement proteins are generally depressed in the synovial fluid of patients with RA, reflecting consumption of complement. On the other hand, elevated levels of several complement cleavage products have been observed in synovial fluid. Involvement of complement in the pathogenesis of RA was also confirmed in animal models of arthritis: mice deficient for complement proteins are protected against the development of collagen-induced arthritis and administration of the anti-C5 monoclonal antibody prevents the onset of this arthritis. In the last decade anti-tumor necrosis factor agents have shown to be effective for the treatment of both RA and PsA and some studies suggest that the interaction between TNFα and complement system may contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases. Reduction of the complement activation could be one of the mechanism by which TNFα-inhibitors exert their effectiveness in inflammatory arthritides. Because of these findings, complement could be an attractive therapeutic target both in RA and in PsA.

  18. Disruption of the cytochrome P-450 1B1 gene exacerbates renal dysfunction and damage associated with angiotensin II-induced hypertension in female mice.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Brett L; Moore, Joseph A; Pingili, Ajeeth K; Estes, Anne M; Fang, Xiao R; Kanu, Alie; Gonzalez, Frank J; Malik, Kafait U

    2015-05-01

    Recently, we demonstrated in female mice that protection against ANG II-induced hypertension and associated cardiovascular changes depend on cytochrome P-450 (CYP)1B1. The present study was conducted to determine if Cyp1b1 gene disruption ameliorates renal dysfunction and organ damage associated with ANG II-induced hypertension in female mice. ANG II (700 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) infused by miniosmotic pumps for 2 wk in female Cyp1b1(+/+) mice did not alter water consumption, urine output, Na(+) excretion, osmolality, or protein excretion. However, in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice, ANG II infusion significantly increased (P < 0.05) water intake (5.50 ± 0.42 ml/24 h with vehicle vs. 8.80 ± 0.60 ml/24 h with ANG II), urine output (1.44 ± 0.37 ml/24 h with vehicle vs. 4.30 ± 0.37 ml/24 h with ANG II), and urinary Na(+) excretion (0.031 ± 0.016 mmol/24 h with vehicle vs. 0.099 ± 0.010 mmol/24 h with ANG II), decreased osmolality (2,630 ± 79 mosM/kg with vehicle vs. 1,280 ± 205 mosM/kg with ANG II), and caused proteinuria (2.60 ± 0.30 mg/24 h with vehicle vs. 6.96 ± 0.55 mg/24 h with ANG II). Infusion of ANG II caused renal fibrosis, as indicated by an accumulation of renal interstitial α-smooth muscle actin, collagen, and transforming growth factor-β in Cyp1b1(-/-) but not Cyp1b1(+/+) mice. ANG II also increased renal production of ROS and urinary excretion of thiobarburic acid-reactive substances and reduced the activity of antioxidants and urinary excretion of nitrite/nitrate and the 17β-estradiol metabolite 2-methoxyestradiol in Cyp1b1(-/-) but not Cyp1b1(+/+) mice. These data suggest that Cyp1b1 plays a critical role in female mice in protecting against renal dysfunction and end-organ damage associated with ANG II-induced hypertension, in preventing oxidative stress, and in increasing activity of antioxidant systems, most likely via generation of 2-methoxyestradiol from 17β-estradiol.

  19. Disruption of the cytochrome P-450 1B1 gene exacerbates renal dysfunction and damage associated with angiotensin II-induced hypertension in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Brett L.; Moore, Joseph A.; Pingili, Ajeeth K.; Estes, Anne M.; Fang, Xiao R.; Kanu, Alie; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated in female mice that protection against ANG II-induced hypertension and associated cardiovascular changes depend on cytochrome P-450 (CYP)1B1. The present study was conducted to determine if Cyp1b1 gene disruption ameliorates renal dysfunction and organ damage associated with ANG II-induced hypertension in female mice. ANG II (700 ng·kg−1·min−1) infused by miniosmotic pumps for 2 wk in female Cyp1b1+/+ mice did not alter water consumption, urine output, Na+ excretion, osmolality, or protein excretion. However, in Cyp1b1−/− mice, ANG II infusion significantly increased (P < 0.05) water intake (5.50 ± 0.42 ml/24 h with vehicle vs. 8.80 ± 0.60 ml/24 h with ANG II), urine output (1.44 ± 0.37 ml/24 h with vehicle vs. 4.30 ± 0.37 ml/24 h with ANG II), and urinary Na+ excretion (0.031 ± 0.016 mmol/24 h with vehicle vs. 0.099 ± 0.010 mmol/24 h with ANG II), decreased osmolality (2,630 ± 79 mosM/kg with vehicle vs. 1,280 ± 205 mosM/kg with ANG II), and caused proteinuria (2.60 ± 0.30 mg/24 h with vehicle vs. 6.96 ± 0.55 mg/24 h with ANG II). Infusion of ANG II caused renal fibrosis, as indicated by an accumulation of renal interstitial α-smooth muscle actin, collagen, and transforming growth factor-β in Cyp1b1−/− but not Cyp1b1+/+ mice. ANG II also increased renal production of ROS and urinary excretion of thiobarburic acid-reactive substances and reduced the activity of antioxidants and urinary excretion of nitrite/nitrate and the 17β-estradiol metabolite 2-methoxyestradiol in Cyp1b1−/− but not Cyp1b1+/+ mice. These data suggest that Cyp1b1 plays a critical role in female mice in protecting against renal dysfunction and end-organ damage associated with ANG II-induced hypertension, in preventing oxidative stress, and in increasing activity of antioxidant systems, most likely via generation of 2-methoxyestradiol from 17β-estradiol. PMID:25694484

  20. Collagen hydrolysate based collagen/hydroxyapatite composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficai, Anton; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Birsan, Mihaela; Sonmez, Maria; Ficai, Denisa; Trandafir, Viorica; Andronescu, Ecaterina

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to study the influence of collagen hydrolysate (HAS) on the formation of ternary collagen-hydrolysate/hydroxyapatite composite materials (COLL-HAS/HA). During the precipitation process of HA, a large amount of brushite is resulted at pH = 7 but, practically pure HA is obtained at pH ⩾ 8. The FTIR data reveal the duplication of the most important collagen absorption bands due to the presence of the collagen hydrolysate. The presence of collagen hydrolysate is beneficial for the management of bone and joint disorders such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis.

  1. SIRT1 Functions as an Important Regulator of Estrogen-Mediated Cardiomyocyte Protection in Angiotensin II-Induced Heart Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tao; Ding, Ling; Ruan, Yang; Qin, Weiwei; Lin, Yajun; Xi, Chao; Lu, Yonggang; Dou, Lin; Zhu, Yuping; Cao, Yuan; Man, Yong; Bian, Yunfei; Wang, Shu; Xiao, Chuanshi; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Background. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a member of the sirtuin family, which could activate cell survival machinery and has been shown to be protective in regulation of heart function. Here, we determined the mechanism by which SIRT1 regulates Angiotensin II- (AngII-) induced cardiac hypertrophy and injury in vivo and in vitro. Methods. We analyzed SIRT1 expression in the hearts of control and AngII-induced mouse hypertrophy. Female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and pretreated with 17β-estradiol to measure SIRT1 expression. Protein synthesis, cardiomyocyte surface area analysis, qRT-PCR, TUNEL staining, and Western blot were performed on AngII-induced mouse heart hypertrophy samples and cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) to investigate the function of SIRT1. Results. SIRT1 expression was slightly upregulated in AngII-induced mouse heart hypertrophy in vivo and in vitro, accompanied by elevated cardiomyocyte apoptosis. SIRT1 overexpression relieves AngII-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis. 17β-Estradiol was able to protect cardiomyocytes from AngII-induced injury with a profound upregulation of SIRT1 and activation of AMPK. Moreover, estrogen receptor inhibitor ICI 182,780 and SIRT1 inhibitor niacinamide could block SIRT1's protective effect. Conclusions. These results indicate that SIRT1 functions as an important regulator of estrogen-mediated cardiomyocyte protection during AngII-induced heart hypertrophy and injury. PMID:25614777

  2. Mechanism of angiotensin II-induced arachidonic acid metabolite release in aortic smooth muscle cells: involvement of phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, J; Kozawa, O; Suzuki, A; Watanabe-Tomita, Y; Oiso, Y; Uematsu, T

    1997-02-01

    In a previous study, we have shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) activates phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D due to Ang II-induced Ca2+ influx from extracellular space in subcultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells. In the present study, we have investigated the role of phospholipase D in Ang II-induced arachidonic acid (AA) metabolite release and prostacyclin synthesis in subcultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Ang II significantly stimulated AA metabolite release in a concentration-dependent manner in the range between 1 nmol/I and 0.1 mumol/I. D.L.-Propranolol hydrochloride (propranolol), an inhibitor of phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced release of AA metabolites. The Ang II-induced AA metabolite release was reduced by chelating extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA. Genistein, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases, significantly suppressed the Ang II-induced AA metabolite release. 1,6-Bis-(cyclohexyloximinocarbonylamino)-hexane (RHC-80267), a potent and selective inhibitor of diacylglycerol lipase, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced AA metabolite release. Both propranolol and RHC-80267 inhibited the Ang II-induced synthesis of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin. The synthesis was suppressed by genistein. These results strongly suggest that the AA metabolite release induced by Ang II is mediated, at least in part, through phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by phospholipase D activation in aortic smooth muscle cells.

  3. Arthritis and IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Search: What are Crohn's & Colitis? What is Crohn's Disease What is Ulcerative Colitis Types of Medications What’s ... affect as many as 25% of people with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Although arthritis is typically associated ...

  4. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein that are done regularly at the hospital. Physical Therapy An appropriate physical therapy program is essential to the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities ...

  5. Living with Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects. Learn more about biologic treatments . Reducing your sensitivity to pain When the pain of psoriatic arthritis ... your doctor about medication that helps reduce your sensitivity to pain. Prescription pain medications such as Gabapentin ...

  6. Arthritis of the Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... of hand and wrist arthritis. (Note: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not test dietary supplements. These compounds may cause negative interactions with other medications. Always consult your doctor before taking dietary supplements.) ...

  7. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for months, or years, then abate, sometimes permanently. Gout (gouty arthritis) : Gout is a condition caused by a buildup of ... sauces, shellfish, and brandy is popularly associated with gout, there are other protein compounds in foods such ...

  8. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gowdie, Peter J; Tse, Shirley M L

    2012-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) encompasses a complex group of disorders with arthritis as a common feature. This article provides the pediatrician with a review of the epidemiology, classification, clinical manifestations, and complications of JIA. It also provides an update on the current understanding of the cause of JIA and recent developments in management and a recent review of the long-term outcome in JIA.

  9. Thymosin β4 Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiomyocyte Growth by Regulating Wnt/WISP Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Guleria, Rakeshwar S; Thakur, Suresh; Zhang, Cheng-Lin; Pan, Jing; Baker, Kenneth M; Gupta, Sudhiranjan

    2016-08-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. However, the role of Tβ4 in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the cardio-protective effect of Tβ4 in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiomyocyte growth. Neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVM) were pretreated with Tβ4 followed by Ang II stimulation. Cell size, hypertrophy marker gene expression and Wnt signaling components, β-catenin, and Wnt-induced secreted protein-1 (WISP-1) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting and fluorescent microscopy. Pre-treatment of Tβ4 resulted in reduction of cell size, hypertrophy marker genes and Wnt-associated gene expression, and protein levels; induced by Ang II in cardiomyocyte. WISP-1 was overexpressed in NRVM and, the effect of Tβ4 in Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte growth was evaluated. WISP-1 overexpression promoted cardiomyocytes growth and was reversed by pretreatment with Tβ4. This is the first report which demonstrates that Tβ4 targets Wnt/WISP-1 to protect Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte growth. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1737-1744, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Polydatin prevents angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial superoxide generation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yingying; Zhang, Nan; Yao, Fanrong

    2015-01-01

    Our studies and others recently demonstrate that polydatin, a resveratrol glucoside, has antioxidative and cardioprotective effects. This study aims to investigate the direct effects of polydatin on Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy to explore the potential role of polydatin in cardioprotection. Our results showed that in primary cultured cardiomyocytes, polydatin blocked Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy in a dose-dependent manner, which were associated with reduction in the cell surface area and [3H]leucine incorporation, as well as attenuation of the mRNA expressions of atrial natriuretic factor and β-myosin heavy chain. Furthermore, polydatin prevented rat cardiac hypertrophy induced by Ang II infusion, as assessed by heart weight-to-body weight ratio, cross-sectional area of cardiomyocyte, and gene expression of hypertrophic markers. Further investigation demonstrated that polydatin attenuated the Ang II-induced increase in the reactive oxygen species levels and NADPH oxidase activity in vivo and in vitro. Polydatin also blocked the Ang II-stimulated increases of Nox4 and Nox2 expression in cultured cardiomyocytes and the hearts of Ang II-infused rats. Our results indicate that polydatin has the potential to protect against Ang II-mediated cardiac hypertrophy through suppression of NADPH oxidase activity and superoxide production. These observations may shed new light on the understanding of the cardioprotective effect of polydatin. PMID:25488910

  11. Class A scavenger receptor deficiency augments angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lingling; Li, Xiaoyu; Fang, Ru; Wang, Zhuoyun; Xu, Yiming; Zhang, Hanwen; Bai, Hui; Yang, Qing; Zhu, Xudong; Ben, Jingjing; Xu, Yong; Chen, Qi

    2014-08-01

    Class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) is a multifunctional molecule that participates in macrophage-mediated inflammation. Here we evaluated the role of SR-A in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertensive vascular remodeling. Chronic infusion of Ang II leads to an increased systolic blood pressure both in SR-A knockout (SR-A(-/-)) and wild type (SR-A(+/+)) mice with no significant difference between these two groups. SR-A(-/-) hypertensive mice, however, exhibited a marked augmentation of arterial wall thickening and vascular cell proliferation compared with SR-A(+/+) hypertensive mice. M1 macrophage markers were increased whereas M2 macrophage markers were decreased in vascular tissues of SR-A(-/-) mice. Co-culture experiments revealed that more pro-inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α were produced by SR-A(-/-) peritoneal macrophages leading to a stronger proliferation of primary vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro. In addition, SR-A(-/-) macrophages were more prone to lipopolysaccharide-induced M1 differentiation while resisting interleukin-4-induced M2 differentiation. Importantly, transplantation of SR-A(-/-) bone marrow into SR-A(+/+) mice significantly augmented Ang II-induced vascular remodeling. These results show that SR-A is critical for Ang II-induced vascular remodeling by regulating macrophage polarization. Therefore, SR-A may be a useful therapeutic target for the intervention of hypertensive vascular remodeling. PMID:24875449

  12. Topographic mapping of collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, H J

    2001-07-01

    A 74-year-old woman was investigated for abdominal pain and diarrhea. Endoscopic examinations including biopsies of the stomach and colon demonstrated the typical subepithelial deposits characteristic of collagenous gastritis and collagenous colitis. Histochemical and ultrastructural methods confirmed the presence of collagen in the subepithelial deposits. The topographic distribution of these collagen deposits and their relationship to the inflammatory process in the stomach were then defined by endoscopic mapping and multiple site biopsies of the mucosa in the gastric body and antrum. These studies indicate that collagenous gastritis not only is distinctive, but also is a far more extensive and diffuse inflammatory process than has previously been appreciated. PMID:11493952

  13. Angiotensin-(1-7) regulates Angiotensin II-induced VCAM-1 expression on vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ren, Jingyi; Chan, Kenneth; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We for the first time found that Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on VCAM-1 is mediated by MAS receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Ang-(1-7) is due to the suppression of NF-kappaB translocation. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) and Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) are key effector peptides in the renin-angiotensin system. Increased circulatory Ang II level is associated with the development of hypertension and atherosclerosis, whereas Ang-(1-7) is a counter-regulatory mediator of Ang II which appears to be protective against cardiovascular disease. However, whether Ang-(1-7) regulates the action of Ang II on vascular endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. We investigated the effects of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) in the context of atherogenesis, specifically endothelial cell VCAM-1 expression that is implicated in early plaque formation. The results show that Ang II increased VCAM-1 mRNA expression and protein displayed on EC surface, while Ang-(1-7) alone exerted no effects. However, Ang-(1-7) significantly suppressed Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Ang-(1-7) also inhibited the Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity driven by transcription factor NF-KappaB. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay and ELISA showed that Ang II facilitated the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB in ECs, and this was attenuated by the presence of Ang-(1-7). The inhibitory effects of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity and NF-kappaB nuclear translocation were all reversed by the competitive antagonist of Ang-(1-7) at the Mas receptor. Our results suggest that Ang-(1-7) mediates its affects on ECs through the Mas receptor, and negatively regulates Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression by attenuating nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB.

  14. Role of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF) beta in the physiopathology of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Gil, Elena; Galindo-Izquierdo, María

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a cytokine with pleiotropic functions in hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Although its role in rheumatoid arthritis is not well defined, TGF-β activation leads to functional immunomodulatory effects according to environmental conditions. The function of TGF-β in the development of arthritis in murine models has been extensively studied with controversial results. Recent findings point to a non-relevant role for TGF-β in a mice model of collagen-induced arthritis. The study of TGF-β on T-cell responses has shown controversial results as an inhibitor or promoter of the inflammatory response. This paper presents a review of the role of TGF-β in animal models of arthritis.

  15. Collagen Homeostasis and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, S Peter; Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system and its collagen rich tissue is important for ensuring architecture of skeletal muscle, energy storage in tendon and ligaments, joint surface protection, and for ensuring the transfer of muscular forces into resulting limb movement. Structure of tendon is stable and the metabolic activity is low, but mechanical loading and subsequent mechanotransduction and molecular anabolic signaling can result in some adaptation of the tendon especially during youth and adolescence. Within short time, tendon will get stiffer with training and lack of mechanical tissue loading through inactivity or immobilization of the human body will conversely result in a dramatic loss in tendon stiffness and collagen synthesis. This illustrates the importance of regular mechanical load in order to preserve the stabilizing role of the connective tissue for the overall function of the musculoskeletal system in both daily activity and exercise. Adaptive responses may vary along the tendon, and differ between mid-substance and insertional areas of the tendon. PMID:27535245

  16. Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Contact our Patient Navigators for free and confidential ...

  17. Inhibition of CDK9 as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hellvard, Annelie; Zeitlmann, Lutz; Heiser, Ulrich; Kehlen, Astrid; Niestroj, André; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Koziel, Joanna; Delaleu, Nicolas; Jan Potempa; Mydel, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by synovial inflammation and proliferation of fibroblast-like synoviocytes. The induction of apoptosis has long been proposed as a target for proliferative autoimmune diseases, and has further been shown to act as a successful treatment of experimental models of arthritis, such as collagen-induced arthritis. Here we examined the effects of specific oral small-molecule inhibitors of the transcription regulating cyclin-dependent kinase 9 on the development and progression of collagen-induced arthritis. DBA/1 mice were immunised with bovine collagen type II and treated orally with specific CDK9 inhibitors. The effects of CDK9 inhibition on RNA levels and protein expression, apoptosis induction, caspase activation and lymphocyte phenotype were further analysed. Mice showed a significant delay in disease onset and a reduction in disease severity following treatment with CDK9 inhibitors. Inhibiting CDK9 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells resulted in the loss of Mcl-1 expression at both the protein and RNA levels, along with a subsequent increase in apoptosis. CDK9 specific inhibitors may be a potential alternative treatment not only of cancer, but also for autoimmune- and inflammatory diseases. Taken together, these results show that transient inhibition of CDK9 induces apoptosis in leukocyte subsets and modulates the immune response. PMID:27511630

  18. Inhibition of CDK9 as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hellvard, Annelie; Zeitlmann, Lutz; Heiser, Ulrich; Kehlen, Astrid; Niestroj, André; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Koziel, Joanna; Delaleu, Nicolas; Jan Potempa; Mydel, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by synovial inflammation and proliferation of fibroblast-like synoviocytes. The induction of apoptosis has long been proposed as a target for proliferative autoimmune diseases, and has further been shown to act as a successful treatment of experimental models of arthritis, such as collagen-induced arthritis. Here we examined the effects of specific oral small-molecule inhibitors of the transcription regulating cyclin-dependent kinase 9 on the development and progression of collagen-induced arthritis. DBA/1 mice were immunised with bovine collagen type II and treated orally with specific CDK9 inhibitors. The effects of CDK9 inhibition on RNA levels and protein expression, apoptosis induction, caspase activation and lymphocyte phenotype were further analysed. Mice showed a significant delay in disease onset and a reduction in disease severity following treatment with CDK9 inhibitors. Inhibiting CDK9 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells resulted in the loss of Mcl-1 expression at both the protein and RNA levels, along with a subsequent increase in apoptosis. CDK9 specific inhibitors may be a potential alternative treatment not only of cancer, but also for autoimmune- and inflammatory diseases. Taken together, these results show that transient inhibition of CDK9 induces apoptosis in leukocyte subsets and modulates the immune response. PMID:27511630

  19. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type III collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.; Covington, H.I.; Macarak, E.J.

    1988-05-01

    Whole neonate rabbit corneas and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were incubated in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine. Radiolabeled collagen extracted from the corneas and scar tissue were analyzed by sodium dodecylsulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to determine the types and relative quantity of collagen polypeptides present and synthesized by these tissues. In addition to other collagen types, type III was found in both neonate cornea and scar tissue from adult cornea, albeit in relatively small quantities. Type III collagen in normal cornea was associated with the residue after pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction of the tissue, and the same type of collagen was extracted from scar tissue after similar treatment. Type III collagen-specific monoclonal antibody bound to developing normal corneas and healing adult tissue sections, as determined by immunofluorescence. Antibody binding was localized to the endothelium and growing Descemet's membrane in fetal and neonate corneas, and restricted to the most posterior region of the corneal scar tissue. Although monoclonal antibody to keratan sulfate, used as a marker for stromal fibroblasts, bound to most of the scar tissue, the antibody failed to bind to the posterior scar tissue positive for type III collagen. We conclude that endothelial cells from fetal and neonate rabbit cornea and endothelium-derived fibroblasts from healing wounds of adult cornea synthesize and deposit type III collagen. Moreover, this collagen appears to be incorporated into the growing Descemet's membrane of normal corneas and narrow posterior portion of the scar tissue.

  20. Aeromonas hydrophila septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Danaher, Patrick J; Mueller, William P

    2011-12-01

    Septic arthritis is a serious, life and limb threatening infection. If suspected, empiric treatment must begin immediately and account for the most likely pathogens. Eight days following left knee arthroscopic surgery, a 51-year-old active duty male spent approximately 1 hour driving a personal watercraft on Okaloosa Bay near the Gulf of Mexico. Eight days later, he presented to the emergency room with septic arthritis of that knee. Fluid aspirated from the joint yielded Aeromonas hydrophila. The infection resolved with surgical drainage and 21 days of levofloxacin. A. hydrophila is a rare cause of septic arthritis, and reported cases have involved exposure to water after trauma to the affected joint. Many U.S. military bases are located in coastal areas and military members frequently participate in activities which compromise skin integrity and place them at increased risk for contracting waterborne infections. We present the ninth case of A. hydrophila septic arthritis described in the English language literature, highlight the importance of considering this pathogen in at-risk populations, and review the diagnosis and management of septic arthritis.

  1. Serotonin Is Involved in Autoimmune Arthritis through Th17 Immunity and Bone Resorption.

    PubMed

    Chabbi-Achengli, Yasmine; Coman, Tereza; Collet, Corinne; Callebert, Jacques; Corcelli, Michelangelo; Lin, Hilène; Rignault, Rachel; Dy, Michel; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Côté, Francine

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease that results in a disabling and painful condition as it progresses to destruction of the articular cartilage and ankylosis of the joints. Although the cause of the disease is still unknown, evidence argues that autoimmunity plays an important part. There are increasing but contradictory views regarding serotonin being associated with activation of immunoinflammatory pathways and the onset of autoimmune reactions. We studied serotonin's involvement during collagen-induced arthritis in wild-type and Tph1(-/-) mice, which have markedly reduced peripheral serotonin levels. In wild-type mice, induction of arthritis triggered a robust increase in serotonin content in the paws combined with less inflammation. In Tph1(-/-) mice with arthritis, a marked increase in the clinical and pathologic arthritis scores was noticed. Specifically, in Tph1(-/-) mice with arthritis, a significant increase in osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption was observed with an increase in IL-17 levels in the paws and in Th17 lymphocytes in the draining lymph nodes, whereas T-regulatory cells were dampened. Ex vivo serotonin and agonists of the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptors restored IL-17 secretion from splenocytes and Th17 cell differentiation in Tph1(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that serotonin plays a fundamental role in arthritis through the regulation of the Th17/T-regulatory cell balance and osteoclastogenesis.

  2. Collagen macromolecular drug delivery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine collagen for use as a macromolecular drug delivery system by determining the mechanism of release through a matrix. Collagen membranes varying in porosity, crosslinking density, structure and crosslinker were fabricated. Collagen characterized by infrared spectroscopy and solution viscosity was determined to be pure and native. The collagen membranes were determined to possess native vs. non-native quaternary structure and porous vs. dense aggregate membranes by electron microscopy. Collagen monolithic devices containing a model macromolecule (inulin) were fabricated. In vitro release rates were found to be linear with respect to t{sup {1/2}} and were affected by crosslinking density, crosslinker and structure. The biodegradation of the collagen matrix was also examined. In vivo biocompatibility, degradation and {sup 14}C-inulin release rates were evaluated subcutaneously in rats.

  3. Calcium channel blockade attenuates angiotensin II-induced drinking in rats.

    PubMed

    Calcagnetti, D J; Schechter, M D

    1993-01-01

    Lateral ventricular administration of angiotensin II (ANG II) produces potent dipsogenic effects in water-sated rats. ANG II seems to require functional voltage-gated calcium channels on neurons throughout circumventricular brain sites to exert its effects. Although there are at least three types of calcium channels, only L-type calcium channel-blocking drugs have been reported to decrease drinking. (4-(4-Benzofurazanyl)-1-4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-3,5-pyridine-dic arb oxylic acid methyl 1-methyl-ethyl ester) [PN 200-110; isradipine (ISR)], a selective L-type calcium channel blocker, has been shown to attenuate significantly the intake of sweetened water in water-sated rats following either peripheral or ICV administration, but ISR does not affect plain-water intake in water-deprived rats. The present experiment was designed to determine whether ISR would attenuate ANG II-induced drinking that is not either motivated by palatability or dependent on deprivation. Rats, each fitted with chronic indwelling ventricular cannulae, were pretreated with ISR (0.3, 3.0, and 30 micrograms/rat; ICV). ANG II (40 ng/rat; ICV) was administered 10 min later and rats were allowed free access to water for 15 min. Injections of ANG II plus saline and ANG II plus the ISR vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide) did not attenuate ANG II-induced polydipsia, whereas ANG II+ISR (0.3 and 3.0 micrograms) attenuated ANG II-induced drinking to 62 and 22% of control, respectively. Results with the 30-micrograms dose were not different from the 3.0 dose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis - a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T; Mikecz, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2013-10-01

    The "Bermuda triangle" of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci - Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively - have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics. PMID:23288628

  5. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis - a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T; Mikecz, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2013-10-01

    The "Bermuda triangle" of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci - Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively - have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics.

  6. Dermatoglyphics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Roopa; Shubha, R; Nagesh, H V; Johnson, Job; Rajangam, Sayee

    2003-10-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been referred to Division of Human Genetics for counselling. Qualitative dermatoglyphics comprising of finger print pattern, interdigital pattern, hypothenar pattern and palmar crease were studied on 26 female and 11 male rheumatoid arthritis patients. Comparison between patient male and control male; and patient female and control female has been done. 'Chi' square test was performed. In male patients, with hands together, arches were increased, loops/ whorls were decreased. Partial Simian crease was significantly increased. In the right hand, patterns were increased in the 3rd interdigital area. On the other hand, in female patients there was a significant increase in whorls and decrease in loops on the first finger on both the hands, increase in arches on the 3rd finger; both arches and whorls on the 4th finger of left hand. Present study has emphasized that dermatoglyphics could be applied as a diagnostic tool to patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Antibody-based delivery of IL4 to the neovasculature cures mice with arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hemmerle, Teresa; Doll, Fabia; Neri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Antibody–cytokine fusion proteins (immunocytokines) are innovative biopharmaceutical agents, which are being considered for the therapy of cancer and chronic inflammatory conditions. Immunomodulatory fusion proteins capable of selective localization at the sites of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are of particular interest, as they may increase the therapeutic index of the cytokine payload. The F8 antibody recognizes the alternatively spliced extra domain A of fibronectin, a marker of angiogenesis, which is strongly overexpressed at sites of arthritis. In this study, we investigated the targeting and therapeutic activity of the immunocytokine F8-IL4 in the mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis. Different combination regimes were tested and evaluated by the analysis of serum and tissue cytokine levels. We show that F8-IL4 selectively localizes to neovascular structures at sites of rheumatoid arthritis in the mouse, leading to high local concentrations of IL4. When used in combination with dexamethasone, F8-IL4 was able to cure mice with established collagen-induced arthritis. Response to treatment was associated with an elevation of IL13 levels and decreased IL6 plasma concentrations. A fully human version of F8-IL4 is currently being developed for clinical investigations. PMID:25092334

  8. Type XIV Collagen Regulates Fibrillogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ansorge, Heather L.; Meng, Xianmin; Zhang, Guiyun; Veit, Guido; Sun, Mei; Klement, John F.; Beason, David P.; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Koch, Manuel; Birk, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Type XIV collagen is a fibril-associated collagen with an interrupted triple helix. This collagen interacts with the fibril surface and has been implicated as a regulator of fibrillogenesis; however, a specific role has not been elucidated. Functional roles for type XIV collagen were defined utilizing a new type XIV collagen-deficient mouse line. This line was produced using a conventional targeted knock-out approach. Col14a1(–/–) mice were devoid of type XIV collagen, whereas heterozygous mice had reduced synthesis. Both mutant Col14a1 genotypes were viable with a grossly normal phenotype; however, mature skin exhibited altered mechanical properties. Prior to evaluating tendon fibrillogenesis in type XIV collagen-deficient mice, the developmental expression patterns were analyzed in wild-type flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendons. Analyses of mRNA and protein expression indicated tissue-specific temporal expression that was associated with the early stages in fibrillogenesis. Ultrastructural analyses of wild-type and null tendons demonstrated premature fibril growth and larger fibril diameters in tendons from null mice at postnatal day 4 (P4). However, fibril structure in mature tendons was normal. Biomechanical studies established a direct structure/function relationship with reduced strength in P7-null tendons. However, the biomechanical properties in P60 tendons were comparable in null and wild-type mice. Our results indicate a regulatory function for type XIV collagen in early stages of collagen fibrillogenesis with tissue differences. PMID:19136672

  9. Arterial calcification: Conscripted by collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan D.

    2016-03-01

    In atherosclerotic plaques, patterns of calcification -- which have profound implications for plaque stability and vulnerability to rupture -- are determined by the collagen's content and patterning throughout the plaque.

  10. Intraarticular overexpression of Smad7 ameliorates experimental arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Yao; Shiau, Ai-Li; Wu, Chao-Liang; Wang, Chrong-Reen

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn’s disease (CD) are autoimmune disorders with a crosstalk between their pathogenesis such as increased expression of TNF in the target organs. Despite a successful clinical trial with an oral Smad7 antisense oligonucleotide in CD, intraarticular (i.a.) modulation of Smad7 expression has not been performed in rheumatoid joint yet. In this study, contradictory to the findings in CD mucosa, higher levels of pSmad2/3 were found in RA synovium. In vitro experiments with synovial fibroblasts revealed that higher acetylated Smad7 expression was associated with lower activation status. Abundant expression of synovial pSmad2/3 with increased levels during the progression of arthritis was detected in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. To prove the concept that overexpressing Smad7 as a therapeutic strategy in rheumatoid joint, the i.a. injection of lentiviral vectors carrying Smad7 (LVSmad7) was carried out in CIA mice. In LVSmad7-injected joints, there were lower arthritis and histological scores with less synovitis, synovial hyperplasia and erosion on cartilage and bone as well as reduced IL-17 and TNF expression levels in comparison with other control groups. In conclusion, we demonstrate that lentiviral vector-mediated i.a. overexpression of Smad7 can ameliorate rheumatoid joint, implicating a pharmacological development of Smad7-based molecular strategy in RA. PMID:27731365

  11. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonism and its role in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam Trung; Nakahama, Taisuke; Nguyen, Chi Hung; Tran, Trang Thu; Le, Van Son; Chu, Hoang Ha; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Although rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common autoimmune disease, affecting approximately 1% of the population worldwide, its pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Tobacco smoke, an environmental risk factor for RA, contains several ligands of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr), also known as dioxin receptor. Ahr plays critical roles in the immune system. We previously demonstrated that Ahr in helper T-cells contributes to development of collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of RA. Other studies have shown that cigarette smoke condensate and pure Ahr ligands exacerbate RA by altering bone metabolism and inducing proinflammatory responses in fibroblast-like synoviocytes. Consistent with these findings, several Ahr antagonists such as α-naphthoflavone, resveratrol, and GNF351 reverse the effect of Ahr ligands in RA pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of Ahr function in the immune system and the potential clinical benefits of Ahr antagonism in treating RA. PMID:27186143

  12. Glucocorticoids and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joana Fonseca; Ahmed Mohamed, Alaa Abdelkhalik; Emery, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) were discovered in the 1940s and were administered for the first time to patients with rheumatoid arthritis in 1948. However, side effects were subsequently reported. In the last 7 decades, the mechanisms of action for both therapeutic properties and side effects have been elucidated. Mechanisms for minimizing side effects were also developed. GCs are the most frequently used class of drugs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis because of their efficacy in relieving symptoms and their low cost. A review of clinical applications, side effects, and drug interactions is presented. PMID:26611549

  13. Psoriatic Arthritis Registries.

    PubMed

    Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Varisco, Valentina; Ditto, Maria Chiara; Benucci, Maurizio; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of new biological drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis has led to the creation of a number of registries in Europe and the United States. Most of them are sponsored by national rheumatology societies, and provide information that is useful in clinical practice concerning the clinical characteristics, efficacy, and safety of all licensed biological drugs. Their findings also help to improve our understanding of the quality of life and working ability of patients receiving biological drugs, and suggest methods for allocating resources. However, there are only a few registries for psoriatic arthritis, and efforts should be made to increase their number to obtain further reliable and useful data.

  14. Newer drugs for arthritis.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, D C

    1977-01-01

    The major area of new drug discoveries for the treatment of arthritis is in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIA). Unfortunately, as yet no new and safe drug of major significance has appeared. Aspirin still ranks high beside the newcomers. Indomethacin, ibuprofen, naproxen, fenoprofen and tolmetin are described and their roles in therapy are discussed. A further group of older drugs receiving new application in the treatment of arthritis is presented. These include penicillamine and the immunosuppressive drugs. Gold and chloroquin are also discussed to put these agents in their proper perspective.

  15. Angiotensin II induces monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, X L; Tummala, P E; Olbrych, M T; Alexander, R W; Medford, R M

    1998-11-01

    Monocyte infiltration into the vessel wall, a key initial step in the process of atherosclerosis, is mediated in part by monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Hypertension, particularly in the presence of an activated renin-angiotensin system, is a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. To investigate a potential molecular basis for a link between hypertension and atherosclerosis, we studied the effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) on MCP-1 gene expression in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Rat smooth muscle cells treated with Ang II exhibited a dose-dependent increase in MCP-1 mRNA accumulation that was prevented by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan. Ang II also activated MCP-1 gene transcription. Inhibition of NADH/NADPH oxidase, which generates superoxide and H2O2, with diphenylene iodonium or apocynin decreased Ang II-induced MCP-1 mRNA accumulation. Induction of MCP-1 gene expression by Ang II was inhibited by catalase, suggesting a second messenger role for H2O2. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor PD098059 inhibited Ang II-induced MCP-1 gene expression, consistent with a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent signaling mechanism. Ang II may thus promote atherogenesis by direct activation of MCP-1 gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  16. Aspirin suppresses cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen formation through downregulation of angiotensin type 1 receptor transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei Lu, Jingjun; Khaidakov, Magomed; Mitra, Sona; Ding, Zufeng; Raina, Sameer; Goyal, Tanu; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2012-03-15

    Aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid, ASA) is a common drug used for its analgesic and antipyretic effects. Recent studies show that ASA not only blocks cyclooxygenase, but also inhibits NADPH oxidase and resultant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a pathway that underlies pathogenesis of several ailments, including hypertension and tissue remodeling after injury. In these disease states, angiotensin II (Ang II) activates NADPH oxidase via its type 1 receptor (AT1R) and leads to fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. In this study, we examined if ASA would inhibit NADPH oxidase activation, upregulation of AT1R transcription, and subsequent collagen generation in mouse cardiac fibroblasts challenged with Ang II. Mouse heart fibroblasts were isolated and treated with Ang II with or without ASA. As expected, Ang II induced AT1R expression, and stimulated cardiac fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. The AT1R blocker losartan attenuated these effects of Ang II. Similarly to losartan, ASA, and its SA moiety suppressed Ang II-mediated AT1R transcription and fibroblast proliferation as well as expression of collagens and MMPs. ASA also suppressed the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p22{sup phox}, p47{sup phox}, p67{sup phox}, NOX2 and NOX4) and ROS generation. ASA did not affect total NF-κB p65, but inhibited its phosphorylation and activation. These observations suggest that ASA inhibits Ang II-induced NADPH oxidase expression, NF-κB activation and AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts, and fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. The critical role of NADPH oxidase activity in stimulation of AT1R transcription became apparent in experiments where ASA also inhibited AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts challenged with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Since SA had similar effect as ASA on AT1R expression, we suggest that ASA's effect is mediated by its SA moiety. -- Highlights: ► Aspirin in therapeutic concentrations decreases mouse cardiac fibroblast

  17. Collagen for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Marina; Gentile, Piergiorgio; Chiono, Valeria; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2012-09-01

    In the last decades, increased knowledge about the organization, structure and properties of collagen (particularly concerning interactions between cells and collagen-based materials) has inspired scientists and engineers to design innovative collagen-based biomaterials and to develop novel tissue-engineering products. The design of resorbable collagen-based medical implants requires understanding the tissue/organ anatomy and biological function as well as the role of collagen's physicochemical properties and structure in tissue/organ regeneration. Bone is a complex tissue that plays a critical role in diverse metabolic processes mediated by calcium delivery as well as in hematopoiesis whilst maintaining skeleton strength. A wide variety of collagen-based scaffolds have been proposed for different tissue engineering applications. These scaffolds are designed to promote a biological response, such as cell interaction, and to work as artificial biomimetic extracellular matrices that guide tissue regeneration. This paper critically reviews the current understanding of the complex hierarchical structure and properties of native collagen molecules, and describes the scientific challenge of manufacturing collagen-based materials with suitable properties and shapes for specific biomedical applications, with special emphasis on bone tissue engineering. The analysis of the state of the art in the field reveals the presence of innovative techniques for scaffold and material manufacturing that are currently opening the way to the preparation of biomimetic substrates that modulate cell interaction for improved substitution, restoration, retention or enhancement of bone tissue function. PMID:22705634

  18. Cardiovascular lesions in collagen-vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Ferrans, V J; Rodríguez, E R

    1985-01-01

    In this review, the cardiac lesions which develop in association with the various collagen-vascular diseases are described. In rheumatoid arthritis, the most frequent lesions are: fibrous obliterative pericarditis, with pericardial deposits of calcium, fibrin, cholesterol, and rheumatoid granulomas; granulomatous or nonspecific myocarditis; valvulitis, vasculitis, and amyloid deposits. In ankylosing spondylitis, the lesions involve mainly the valves (aortic and mitral valves) and the aorta. In systemic lupus erythematosus, the predominant cardiovascular lesions are: pericarditis, Libman-Sacks endocarditis, nonspecific myocarditis, vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis, and acceleration of atherosclerosis. In scleroderma, the main cardiac lesion is fibrosis with only scanty inflammatory cells; pericarditis and nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis also occur. In dermatomyositis/polymyositis, fibrous or fibrinous pericarditis can occur, as well as myocarditis with infiltrates of lymphocytes and plasma cells and with degeneration and necrosis of myocytes; valvulitis is uncommon except when the disease is related to mucinous adenocarcinoma. In polyarteritis nodosa, various stages of necrotizing vasculitis involve all layers of the arterial walls; foci of myocardial necrosis of various sizes can occur in association with these lesions; cardiac hypertrophy related to hypertension and pericarditis related to uremia, may also be found. In Wegener's granulomatosis, pericarditis, inflammatory infiltrates, necrotizing granulomas, and vasculitis have been observed in the heart.

  19. Ginsenoside Rc from Korean Red Ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) Attenuates Inflammatory Symptoms of Gastritis, Hepatitis and Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Rhee, Man Hee; Lee, Jongsung; Kim, Seung Hyung; Yang, Yanyan; Kim, Han Gyung; Kim, Yong; Kim, Chaekyun; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-01-01

    Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) is an herbal medicine prescribed worldwide that is prepared from Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae). Out of ginseng's various components, ginsenosides are regarded as the major ingredients, exhibiting anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. Although recent studies have focused on understanding the anti-inflammatory activities of KRG, compounds that are major anti-inflammatory components, precisely how these can suppress various inflammatory processes has not been fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to identify inhibitory saponins, to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of the saponins, and to understand the inhibitory mechanisms. To do this, we employed in vitro lipopolysaccharide-treated macrophages and in vivo inflammatory mouse conditions, such as collagen (type II)-induced arthritis (CIA), EtOH/HCl-induced gastritis, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-triggered hepatitis. Molecular mechanisms were also verified by real-time PCR, immunoblotting analysis, and reporter gene assays. Out of all the ginsenosides, ginsenoside Rc (G-Rc) showed the highest inhibitory activity against the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[Formula: see text], interleukin (IL)-1[Formula: see text], and interferons (IFNs). Similarly, this compound attenuated inflammatory symptoms in CIA, EtOH/HCl-mediated gastritis, and LPS/D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-triggered hepatitis without altering toxicological parameters, and without inducing gastric irritation. These anti-inflammatory effects were accompanied by the suppression of TNF-[Formula: see text] and IL-6 production and the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in mice with CIA. G-Rc also attenuated the increased levels of luciferase activity by IRF-3 and AP-1 but not NF-[Formula: see text]B. In support of this phenomenon, G-Rc reduced TBK1, IRF-3, and ATF2 phosphorylation in the joint and liver tissues of mice with hepatitis. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that

  20. Type I Collagen and Collagen Mimetics as Angiogenesis Promoting Superpolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Twardowski, T.; Fertala, A.; Orgel, J.P.R.O.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2008-07-18

    Angiogenesis, the development of blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, is a key component of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Angiogenesis also drives pathologies such as tumor growth and metastasis, and hemangioma development in newborns. On the other hand, promotion of angiogenesis is needed in tissues with vascular insufficiencies, and in bioengineering, to endow tissue substitutes with appropriate microvasculatures. Therefore, much research has focused on defining mechanisms of angiogenesis, and identifying pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules. Type I collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, potently stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to its angiogenic activity appears to be ligation and possibly clustering of endothelial cell (EC) surface {alpha}1{beta}1/{alpha}2{beta}1 integrin receptors by the GFPGER502-507 sequence of the collagen fibril. However, additional aspects of collagen structure and function that may modulate its angiogenic properties are discussed. Moreover, type I collagen and fibrin, another angiogenic polymer, share several structural features. These observations suggest strategies for creating 'angiogenic superpolymers', including: modifying type I collagen to influence its biological half-life, immunogenicity, and integrin binding capacity; genetically engineering fibrillar collagens to include additional integrin binding sites or angiogenic determinants, and remove unnecessary or deleterious sequences without compromising fibril integrity; and exploring the suitability of poly(ortho ester), PEG-lysine copolymer, tubulin, and cholesteric cuticle as collagen mimetics, and suggesting means of modifying them to display ideal angiogenic properties. The collagenous and collagen mimetic angiogenic superpolymers described here may someday prove useful for many applications in tissue engineering and human medicine.

  1. Lymphocytic and Collagenous Colitis.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Correa; Giardiello

    2000-06-01

    Patients with symptomatic collagenous-lymphocytic colitis should eliminate dietary secretagogues such as caffeine- or lactose-containing food from their diet. When possible, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be discontinued. If steatorrhea is documented, a low-fat diet may be helpful. In the presence of bile salt malabsorption, binding resins such as cholestyramine might be useful. Nonspecific diarrheal agents such as loperamide hydrochloride, diphenoxylate hydrochloride and atropine, deodorized tincture of opium, or codeine might prove effective in some patients. Antibacterial agents such as bismuth subsalicylate (8 chewable 262-mg tablets daily) have been effective in symptom control. Metronidazole and erythromycin achieve response rates of 60%. Sulfasalazine, at the usual dose of 2 to 4 g daily, used in collagenous-lymphocytic colitis, demonstrated cessation of diarrhea in 1 to 2 weeks for 50% of patients. Other 5-aminosalicylic (5-ASA) compounds are preferred for patients with a history of sulfa allergy, and those who experience adverse reactions to sulfasalazine. Adrenocorticoid medication is reserved for patients whose conventional treatment with sulfasalazine or 5-ASA has failed. Resolution of diarrhea has been documented in 80% to 90% of patients within 1 week of treatment, however, in most patients, long-term therapy is required. Surgical management is reserved for those patients with disease refractory to medical therapy. Colectomy with ileostomy resulted in clinical and histologic resolution in small case series. If there is no abatement of symptoms, rule out other etiologies of diarrhea such as thyroid dysfunction, celiac disease, or bacterial overgrowth. PMID:11097741

  2. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Cation Channel Kinase: New Player in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; He, Ying; Yogi, Alvaro; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Zhai, Alexander; Stewart, Duncan J; Shrier, Alvin; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a magnesium (Mg(2+))/cation channel and a kinase domain. We previously demonstrated that vasoactive agents regulate vascular TRPM7. Whether TRPM7 plays a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and associated cardiovascular dysfunction is unknown. We studied TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice (TRPM7Δkinase; heterozygous for TRPM7 kinase) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II; 400 ng/kg per minute, 4 weeks). TRPM7 kinase expression was lower in heart and aorta from TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice, effects that were further reduced by Ang II infusion. Plasma Mg(2+) was lower in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice in basal and stimulated conditions. Ang II increased blood pressure in both strains with exaggerated responses in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT groups (P<0.05). Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was reduced in Ang II-infused TRPM7Δkinase mice, an effect associated with Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in Ang II-infused TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice. TRPM7 kinase targets, calpain, and annexin-1, were activated by Ang II in WT but not in TRPM7Δkinase mice. Echocardiographic and histopathologic analysis demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in Ang II-treated groups. In TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice, Ang II-induced cardiac functional and structural effects were amplified compared with WT counterparts. Our data demonstrate that in TRPM7Δkinase mice, Ang II-induced hypertension is exaggerated, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction are amplified, and endothelial function is impaired. These processes are associated with hypomagnesemia, blunted TRPM7 kinase expression/signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and proinflammatory vascular responses. Our findings identify TRPM7 kinase as a novel player in Ang II-induced hypertension

  3. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Cation Channel Kinase: New Player in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; He, Ying; Yogi, Alvaro; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Zhai, Alexander; Stewart, Duncan J; Shrier, Alvin; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a magnesium (Mg(2+))/cation channel and a kinase domain. We previously demonstrated that vasoactive agents regulate vascular TRPM7. Whether TRPM7 plays a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and associated cardiovascular dysfunction is unknown. We studied TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice (TRPM7Δkinase; heterozygous for TRPM7 kinase) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II; 400 ng/kg per minute, 4 weeks). TRPM7 kinase expression was lower in heart and aorta from TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice, effects that were further reduced by Ang II infusion. Plasma Mg(2+) was lower in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice in basal and stimulated conditions. Ang II increased blood pressure in both strains with exaggerated responses in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT groups (P<0.05). Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was reduced in Ang II-infused TRPM7Δkinase mice, an effect associated with Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in Ang II-infused TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice. TRPM7 kinase targets, calpain, and annexin-1, were activated by Ang II in WT but not in TRPM7Δkinase mice. Echocardiographic and histopathologic analysis demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in Ang II-treated groups. In TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice, Ang II-induced cardiac functional and structural effects were amplified compared with WT counterparts. Our data demonstrate that in TRPM7Δkinase mice, Ang II-induced hypertension is exaggerated, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction are amplified, and endothelial function is impaired. These processes are associated with hypomagnesemia, blunted TRPM7 kinase expression/signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and proinflammatory vascular responses. Our findings identify TRPM7 kinase as a novel player in Ang II-induced hypertension

  4. Exploitation of the IDO Pathway in the Therapy of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Richard O

    2013-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the first and rate-limiting step along the kynurenine pathway and is thought to play a key role in immune homeostasis through depletion of tryptophan and accumulation of kynurenines. In this review we summarize recent research into the possibility of harnessing the IDO pathway for the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis. Inhibition of IDO activity, or knockout of the gene encoding IDO, was shown to cause an increase in the severity of collagen-induced arthritis, an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis. The increased severity of disease was associated with elevated numbers of pathogenic Th1 and Th17 cells in the joints and draining lymph nodes. In another study, analysis of the kinetics of expression of downstream kynurenine pathway enzymes during the course of arthritis revealed a potential role for tryptophan metabolites in resolution of arthritis. Furthermore, the therapeutic administration of L-kynurenine or [3,4-dimethoxycinnamonyl]-anthranilic acid (a synthetic derivative of 3-hydroxy-anthranilic acid) significantly reduced both clinical and histological progression of experimental arthritis. These findings raise the possibility of exploiting the IDO pathway for the therapy of autoimmune disease.

  5. Collagen fibril formation during development

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmajer, R.; Perlish, J.S.; Timpl, R.; Olsen, B.R.

    1987-05-01

    Studies with embryonic skin and bone suggested that the aminopropeptide (AP) and carboxylpropeptide (CP) of type I pro-callagen (pro-col) play a role in fibril formation. Chick leg metatarsal tendons were studied by electron microscopy. AP and CP of type I pro-col were purified from chick leg tendons; antibodies developed in rabbits and purity tested by radioimmunoassays. Antibodies were used for immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunoblotting (IB). The peritendineum, consisting of thin 20-30 nm fibrils, revealed the AP of type I and type III procol. In the tendon area, collagen fibrils were arranged within small compartments and were of uniform diameter at 10d, 14d and 18d. However, beyond 21d, there was confluency of the compartments and a wide range of fibril diameters. IFM revealed fine streaks of collagen, staining with the AP of type I throughout the tendon. The CP was mainly intracellular with only a small amount present in the extracellular space. IB revealed procollagen, pN-collagen (AP+collagen) and pC-collagen, (CP+collagen) at all stages of development. Ratios of pN/pC collagen, determined by spectrophotometric scanning of autoradiographs, correlated well with the distribution of fibril diameter. This study suggests the hypothesis that AP initiates fibrillogenesis while CP may regulate additional fibril growth.

  6. Clinical management of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sharff, Katie A; Richards, Eric P; Townes, John M

    2013-06-01

    Septic arthritis is a rheumatologic emergency as joint destruction occurs rapidly and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate diagnosis can be particularly challenging in patients with underlying inflammatory joint disease. This review outlines the risk factors for septic arthritis and summarizes the causative bacterial organisms. We highlight advances in antibiotic management with a focus on new drugs for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and discuss the use of adjunctive therapies for treatment of septic arthritis in adults.

  7. Arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, R; Sequeira, W

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To review the presentation and clinical findings of arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa. METHOD--Medical records from the rheumatology clinics of two major teaching hospitals were reviewed for arthritis and hidradenitis suppurativa. The nine patient records fulfilling these criteria were reviewed and compared with 20 previous reports. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION--The arthritis associated with hidradenitis suppurativa is rare and most commonly affects the peripheral joints. The axial skeleton is less frequently involved and is often asymptomatic. Images PMID:8311560

  8. Angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial Nox4 is a major endogenous source of oxidative stress in kidney tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Mi; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Tae-Won; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo; Moon, Ju-Young

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H) oxidase leads to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), an important intracellular second messenger in renal disease. Recent findings suggest that Ang II induces mitochondrial depolarization and further amplifies mitochondrial generation of ROS. We examined the hypothesis that ROS injury mediated by Ang II-induced mitochondrial Nox4 plays a pivotal role in mitochondrial dysfunction in tubular cells and is related to cell survival. In addition, we assessed whether angiotensin (1-7) peptide (Ang-(1-7)) was able to counteract Ang II-induced ROS-mediated cellular injury. Cultured NRK-52E cells were stimulated with 10(-6) M Ang II for 24 h with or without Ang-(1-7) or apocynin. Ang II simulated mitochondrial Nox4 and resulted in the abrupt production of mitochondrial superoxide (O(2) (-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Ang II also induced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and cytosolic secretion of cytochrome C and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). Ang-(1-7) attenuated Ang II-induced mitochondrial Nox4 expression and apoptosis, and its effect was comparable to that of the NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor. These findings suggest that Ang II-induced activation of mitochondrial Nox4 is an important endogenous source of ROS, and is related to cell survival. The ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-Mas receptor axis should be investigated further as a novel target of Ang II-mediated ROS injury.

  9. SREBP-1 Mediates Angiotensin II-Induced TGF-β1 Upregulation and Glomerular Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tony N.; Chen, Xing; Li, Renzhong; Gao, Bo; Mohammed-Ali, Zahraa; Lu, Chao; Yum, Victoria; Dickhout, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II is an important mediator of CKD of diverse etiology. A common pathologic feature of CKD is glomerular fibrosis, a central mediator of which is the profibrotic cytokine TGF-β. The mechanisms underlying the induction of TGF-β and matrix by angiotensin II are not completely understood. Recent studies showed that overexpression of the transcription factor SREBP-1 induces glomerular sclerosis and that angiotensin II can activate SREBP-1 in tubular cells. We thus studied whether SREBP-1 is activated by angiotensin II and mediates angiotensin II–induced profibrogenic responses in primary rat mesangial cells. Treatment of cells with angiotensin II induced the upregulation and activation of SREBP-1. Angiotensin II–induced activation of SREBP-1 required signaling through the angiotensin II type I receptor and activation of PI3K/Akt in addition to the chaperone SCAP and protease S1P. Notably, angiotensin II-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress was identified as a key mediator of Akt-SREBP-1 activation, and inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress or SREBP-1 prevented angiotensin II–induced SREBP-1 binding to the TGF-β promoter, TGF-β upregulation, and downstream fibronectin upregulation. Endoplasmic reticulum stress alone, however, did not induce TGF-β upregulation despite activating SREBP-1. Although not required for SREBP-1 activation by angiotensin II, EGF receptor signaling was necessary for activation of the SREBP-1 cotranscription factor Sp1, which provided a required second signal for TGF-β upregulation. In vivo, endoplasmic reticulum stress and SREBP-1-dependent effects were induced in glomeruli of angiotensin II-infused mice, and administration of the SREBP inhibitor fatostatin prevented angiotensin II–induced TGF-β upregulation and matrix accumulation. SREBP-1 and endoplasmic reticulum stress thus provide potential novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of CKD. PMID:25398788

  10. Arthritis in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Aarli, J A; Milde, E J; Thunold, S

    1975-11-01

    Seven patients with myasthenia gravis developed clinical signs of arthropathy. In two patients, the symptoms were due to a deforming rheumatoid arthritis and the myasthenic symptoms appeared as a transitory phase during the course of the disease. Muscle antibodies of IgG class were demonstrated with sera from both patients. Autoreactivity between muscle antibodies and rheumatoid factor was detected in one patient. Both patients died from sudden cardiac failure. Necropsy was performed in one and revealed a spotty myocardial necrosis. One patient had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Two patients had mild articular symptoms with indices of multivisceral disease and serological findings indicating a systemic lupus erythematous. One patient had classical ankylosing spondylitis, and one, unspecified arthropathy.

  11. Staphylococcal peptidoglycans induce arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zai-Qing; Deng, Guo-Min; Foster, Simon; Tarkowski, Andrej

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important pathogens in septic arthritis. To analyse the arthritogenic properties of staphylococcal peptidoglycan (PGN), highly purified PGN from S. aureus was intra-articularly injected into murine joints. The results demonstrate that PGN will trigger arthritis in a dose-dependent manner. A single injection of this compound leads to massive infiltration of predominantly macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells with occasional signs of cartilage and/or bone destruction, lasting for at least 14 days. Further studies showed that this condition is mediated by the combined impact of acquired and innate immune systems. Our results indicate that PGN exerts a central role in joint inflammation triggered by S. aureus. PMID:11714392

  12. [Reactive arthritis. A review].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, F; Espinoza, L R

    1990-07-01

    The arthritides that meet the definition or reactive arthritis include the so-called seronegative spondyloarthropathies. Patients are usually aged less than thirty-two. Preceding infection is generally intestinal or venereal, although the involved agent may remain unknown. Enteric forms occur in small epidemics, whereas venereal forms correlate with a recent new sexual partner. The clinical picture varies in severity, with manifestations overlapping between disorders, and often the first complaint is extra-articular. Highly suggestive of reactive arthritis is "sausage" deformity of fingers and toes, pain and stiffness about multiple joints accompanied by radiating lower back discomfort, and enthesitis, particularly at the Achilles tendon. One out of six or seven patients becomes disabled; therapy aimed at preventing disability is vital since medication has little effect on spinal involvement. Antibiotic therapy may be effective in cases in which specific etiologic agents are well defined.

  13. Function and regulation of self-reactive marginal zone B cells in autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Anna-Karin E; Friedrich, Heike C; Mezger, Anja; Salomonsson, Maya; Myers, Linda K; Kleinau, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Polyreactive innate-type B cells account for many B cells expressing self-reactivity in the periphery. Improper regulation of these B cells may be an important factor that underlies autoimmune disease. Here we have explored the influence of self-reactive innate B cells in the development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis. We show that splenic marginal zone (MZ), but not B-1 B cells exhibit spontaneous IgM reactivity to autologous collagen II in naïve mice. Upon immunization with heterologous collagen II in complete Freund's adjuvant the collagen-reactive MZ B cells expanded rapidly, while the B-1 B cells showed a modest anti-collagen response. The MZ B cells were easily activated by toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and 9-ligands in vitro, inducing proliferation and cytokine secretion, implying that dual engagement of the B-cell receptor and TLRs may promote the immune response to self-antigen. Furthermore, collagen-primed MZ B cells showed significant antigen-presenting capacity as reflected by cognate T-cell proliferation in vitro and induction of IgG anti-collagen antibodies in vivo. MZ B cells that were deficient in complement receptors 1 and 2 demonstrated increased proliferation and cytokine production, while Fcγ receptor IIb deficiency of the cells lead to increased cytokine production and antigen presentation. In conclusion, our data highlight self-reactive MZ B cells as initiators of the autoimmune response in CIA, where complement and Fc receptors are relevant in controlling the self-reactivity in the cells. PMID:25958842

  14. Characterization of recombinant type II collagen: arthritogenicity and tolerogenicity in DBA/1 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, L K; Brand, D D; Ye, X J; Cremer, M A; Rosloniec, E F; Bodo, M; Myllyharju, J; Helaakoski, T; Nokelainen, M; Pihlajaniemi, T; Kivirikko, K; Yang, C L; Ala-Kokko, L; Prockop, D J; Notbohm, H; Fietzek, P; Stuart, J M; Kang, A H

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant human type II collagen (rhCII) was produced using both the HT1080 mammalian cell expression system (rhCIIht) and a baculovirus expression system (rhCIIbac). The biosynthesis of CII requires extensive post-translational modifications, such as the hydroxylation of prolyl and lysyl residues and glycosylation of hydroxylysyl residues. Amino acid analyses indicated that the rhCIIbac was adequately hydroxylated at prolyl residues but underhydroxylated at lysyl residues and underglycosylated compared with tissue-derived hCII, while rhCIIht was hyperhydroxylated and hyperglycosylated at lysyl residues. When the murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model was used to investigate the immunological properties of the two forms of recombinant CII, each induced a high incidence of arthritis following immunization of susceptible mice when emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). However, the severity of the arthritis, as assessed by the number of affected limbs, was significantly higher in mice immunized with rhCIIht than in mice immunized with rhCIIbac. These data indicate that the degree of hydroxylysine glycosylation may play a role in the induction of the arthritogenic response to CII. Each of the recombinant collagens was comparable to tissue-derived hCII in their ability to induce tolerance and suppress arthritis when given as intravenous or oral tolerogens. Taken together, our data suggest that recombinant CII can be prepared in adequate amounts for therapeutic uses and that the material is immunologically comparable to tissue-derived hCII when used to induce tolerance. Images Figure 1 PMID:9893056

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis: vocational rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, G M

    1982-01-01

    The consequences of inflation and accelerating introduction of automation and microprocessors into industry are a shift from unskilled to skilled work, the lessening of opportunities for the unskilled worker, and growing unemployment. If disabled people are competing for employment they must take every opportunity to extend education and acquire skills. Juvenile chronic arthritis presents one set of problems in vocational rehabilitation at the beginning of a working career and adult rheumatoid arthritis another, commonly in those over 45 years old and previously established in work. The prevalence of severe disability in juvenile chronic arthritis is about 1 in 20 000 of the population, females are affected twice as often as males and 1 in 10 has defective vision or blindness due to chronic iridocyclitis. At school, besides education, there must be emphasis on encouraging independence, self-confidence, mobility and determination. A School Leavers' Conference early in the last year at school gives the adolescent the best chance of choosing a career. Rheumatoid arthritis is three times more common in women and increasingly, over the last 40 years, women are working besides home-making. Morning stiffness, fatigue, immobility and pain are the common symptoms of widespread involvement of joints and systemic disturbance. The principal determinant in the success of vocational rehabilitation is personality, and the social and environmental factors are more significant than the degree of disability. The Disablement Resettlement Officer can assure continuity of rehabilitation between the health and employment services: a favourable outcome is work, self-derived income independence and freedom of movement using whatever technical aids are required to achieve this.

  16. Chronic arthritis in children.

    PubMed

    Prieur, A M

    1994-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory arthritides in children include a wide range of various diseases. One of the main concerns of physicians who treat these disorders is the risk of permanent physical disability resulting from joint damage. Actual classification relies mainly on clinical features, particularly the number of joints affected at onset, although the general feeling is that chronic childhood arthritis exists in many different entities gathered together under the common names juvenile chronic arthritis or juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The past 2 years were rather fertile in debates for proposing a progression for more objectivity in nomenclature, which was the theme of the Pediatric Rheumatology Study Group session at the American College of Rheumatology annual meeting held in Atlanta in 1992. The viewpoints from North America and Europe addressed at this meeting were published in a supplement of the Journal of Rheumatology in 1993. A debate on this topic was also organized at the International League Against Rheumatism Congress held in Barcelona in 1993. At present, the main criteria rely on clinical experience and natural history of the diseases and on biology and immunogenetics. Another important concern among pediatric rheumatologists is efficacy of treatment. Questions include, "Are we doing enough?" and "How safe are the therapeutic strategies?" In this review some of the recent studies that may be important for classification and nomenclature and therapy and management are discussed.

  17. Sulfonamide inhibitors of α2β1 integrin reveal the essential role of collagen receptors in in vivo models of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nissinen, Liisa; Ojala, Marika; Langen, Barbara; Dost, Rita; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Käpylä, Jarmo; Marjamäki, Anne; Heino, Jyrki

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of α2β1 integrin, a major cellular collagen receptor, have been reported to inhibit platelet function, kidney injury, and angiogenesis. Since α2β1 integrin is abundantly expressed on various inflammation-associated cells, we tested whether recently developed α2β1 blocking sulfonamides have anti-inflammatory properties. Integrin α2β1 inhibitors were shown to reduce the signs of inflammation in arachidonic acid-induced ear edema, PAF stimulated air pouch, ovalbumin-induced skin hypersensitivity, adjuvant arthritis, and collagen-induced arthritis. Thus, these sulfonamides are potential drugs for acute and allergic inflammation, hypersensitivity, and arthritis. One sulfonamide with potent anti-inflammatory activity has previously been reported to be selective for activated integrins, but not to inhibit platelet function. Thus, the experiments also revealed fundamental differences in the action of nonactivated and activated α2β1 integrins in inflammation when compared to thrombosis. PMID:26171226

  18. Pannocytes: distinctive cells found in rheumatoid arthritis articular cartilage erosions.

    PubMed Central

    Zvaifler, N. J.; Tsai, V.; Alsalameh, S.; von Kempis, J.; Firestein, G. S.; Lotz, M.

    1997-01-01

    A distinctive cell was identified from sites of rheumatoid arthritis cartilage injury. Similar cells are not found in lesions of osteoarthritis cartilage. We have designated them as pannocytes (PCs). Their rhomboid morphology differs from the bipolar shape of fibroblast-like synoviocytes or the spherical configuration of primary human articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes are short-lived, whereas the original PC line grew for 25 passages before becoming senescent. Features in common with cultured primary chondrocytes include maximal proliferation in response to transforming growth factor-beta a catabolic response to interleukin-1 beta, collagenase production, and mRNA for the induced lymphocyte antigen and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Despite the presence of the inducible nitric oxide synthase message, PCs do not produce NO either constitutively or when cytokine stimulated. Each of the mesenchymal cells, fibroblast-like synoviocytes, primary chondrocytes, and PCs have the gene for type I collagen, but the type II collagen gene is detected only in primary chondrocytes. PCs can be distinguished from fibroblast-like synoviocytes and primary chondrocytes by their morphology, bright VCAM-1 staining, and growth response to cytokines and growth factors. Their prolonged life span in vitro suggests that PCs might represent an earlier stage of mesenchymal cell differentiation, and they could have a heretofore unrecognized role in rheumatoid arthritis joint destruction. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 PMID:9060847

  19. Hyaluronan nanoparticles bearing γ-secretase inhibitor: in vivo therapeutic effects on rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Heo, Roun; Park, Jong-Sung; Jang, Hye Jin; Kim, Seol-Hee; Shin, Jung Min; Suh, Yung Doug; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Park, Jae Hyung

    2014-10-28

    γ-Secretase inhibitors which prevent Notch activation are emerging as potent therapeutics for various inflammatory diseases, including ischemic stroke and rheumatoid arthritis. However, their indiscriminate distribution in the body causes serious side effects after systemic administration, since Notch proteins are ubiquitous receptors that play an important role in cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. In this study, hyaluronan nanoparticles (HA-NPs) bearing a γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) were prepared as potential therapeutics for rheumatoid arthritis. In vivo biodistribution of the DAPT-loaded HA-NPs (DNPs), labeled with near-infrared dye, were observed using a non-invasive optical imaging system after systemic administration to a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. The results demonstrated that DNPs were effectively accumulated at the inflamed joint of the CIA mice. From the in vivo therapeutic efficacy tests, DNPs (1mg DAPT/kg) significantly attenuated the severity of RA induction compared to DAPT alone (2mg/kg), which was judged from clinical scores, tissue damage, and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, DNPs dramatically reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and IL-6, -12, -17) and collagen-specific auto-antibodies (IgG1 and IgG2a) in the serum of the CIA mice. These results suggest that DNPs have potential as therapeutics for rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Supplementation of diet with krill oil protects against experimental rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the efficacy of standard fish oil has been the subject of research in arthritis, the effect of krill oil in this disease has yet to be investigated. The objective of the present study was to evaluate a standardised preparation of krill oil and fish oil in an animal model for arthritis. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis susceptible DBA/1 mice were provided ad libitum access to a control diet or diets supplemented with either krill oil or fish oil throughout the study. There were 14 mice in each of the 3 treatment groups. The level of EPA + DHA was 0.44 g/100 g in the krill oil diet and 0.47 g/100 g in the fish oil diet. Severity of arthritis was determined using a clinical scoring system. Arthritis joints were analysed by histopathology and graded. Serum samples were obtained at the end of the study and the levels of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-7, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17 and TGF-β were determined by a Luminex™ assay system. Results Consumption of krill oil and supplemented diet significantly reduced the arthritis scores and hind paw swelling when compared to a control diet not supplemented with EPA and DHA. However, the arthritis score during the late phase of the study was only significantly reduced after krill oil administration. Furthermore, mice fed the krill oil diet demonstrated lower infiltration of inflammatory cells into the joint and synovial layer hyperplasia, when compared to control. Inclusion of fish oil and krill oil in the diets led to a significant reduction in hyperplasia and total histology score. Krill oil did not modulate the levels of serum cytokines whereas consumption of fish oil increased the levels of IL-1α and IL-13. Conclusions The study suggests that krill oil may be a useful intervention strategy against the clinical and histopathological signs of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:20587038

  1. Nonlinear microscopy of collagen fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, M.; Pena, A.-M.; Hernest, M.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Fabre, A.; Marchal-Somme, J.; Crestani, B.; Débarre, D.; Martin, J.-L.; Beaurepaire, E.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2007-02-01

    We used intrinsic Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) by fibrillar collagen to visualize the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibrosis at the micrometer scale using laser scanning nonlinear microscopy. We showed that SHG signals are highly specific to fibrillar collagen and provide a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in tissues. Moreover, recording simultaneously other nonlinear optical signals in a multimodal setup, we visualized the tissue morphology using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) signals from endogenous chromophores such as NADH or elastin. We then compared different methods to determine accurate indexes of collagen fibrosis using nonlinear microscopy, given that most collagen fibrils are smaller than the microscope resolution and that second harmonic generation is a coherent process. In order to define a robust method to process our three-dimensional images, we either calculated the fraction of the images occupied by a significant SHG signal, or averaged SHG signal intensities. We showed that these scores provide an estimation of the extension of renal and pulmonary fibrosis in murine models, and that they clearly sort out the fibrotic mice.

  2. Analysis of human collagen sequences.

    PubMed

    Nassa, Manisha; Anand, Pracheta; Jain, Aditi; Chhabra, Aastha; Jaiswal, Astha; Malhotra, Umang; Rani, Vibha

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is fast emerging as important component mediating cell-cell interactions, along with its established role as a scaffold for cell support. Collagen, being the principal component of extracellular matrix, has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions. However, collagens are complex protein structures belonging to a large family consisting of 28 members in humans; hence, there exists a lack of in depth information about their structural features. Annotating and appreciating the functions of these proteins is possible with the help of the numerous biocomputational tools that are currently available. This study reports a comparative analysis and characterization of the alpha-1 chain of human collagen sequences. Physico-chemical, secondary structural, functional and phylogenetic classification was carried out, based on which, collagens 12, 14 and 20, which belong to the FACIT collagen family, have been identified as potential players in diseased conditions, owing to certain atypical properties such as very high aliphatic index, low percentage of glycine and proline residues and their proximity in evolutionary history. These collagen molecules might be important candidates to be investigated further for their role in skeletal disorders. PMID:22359431

  3. Human collagen produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2014-01-01

    Consequential to its essential role as a mechanical support and affinity regulator in extracellular matrices, collagen constitutes a highly sought after scaffolding material for regeneration and healing applications. However, substantiated concerns have been raised with regard to quality and safety of animal tissue-extracted collagen, particularly in relation to its immunogenicity, risk of disease transmission and overall quality and consistency. In parallel, contamination with undesirable cellular factors can significantly impair its bioactivity, vis-a-vis its impact on cell recruitment, proliferation and differentiation. High-scale production of recombinant human collagen Type I (rhCOL1) in the tobacco plant provides a source of an homogenic, heterotrimeric, thermally stable “virgin” collagen which self assembles to fine homogenous fibrils displaying intact binding sites and has been applied to form numerous functional scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In addition, rhCOL1 can form liquid crystal structures, yielding a well-organized and mechanically strong membrane, two properties indispensable to extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicry. Overall, the shortcomings of animal- and cadaver-derived collagens arising from their source diversity and recycled nature are fully overcome in the plant setting, constituting a collagen source ideal for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23941988

  4. Characterisations of collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, C. S.; Popa, C. L.; Petre, C. C.; Jiga, G.; Trusca, R.; Predoi, D.

    2016-05-01

    The XRD analysis were performed to confirm the formation of hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The molecular interaction in collagen-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites was highlighted by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The SEM showed a nanostructure of collagen-silverhydroxyapatite nanocomposites composed of nano needle-like particles in a veil with collagen texture. The presence of vibrational groups characteristics to the hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite (AgHApColl) nanocomposites was investigated by FTIR.

  5. Suppression of Experimental Arthritis and Associated Bone Loss by a Tissue-Selective Estrogen Complex.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Annica; Bernardi, Angelina I; Nurkkala-Karlsson, Merja; Stubelius, Alexandra; Grahnemo, Louise; Ohlsson, Claes; Carlsten, Hans; Islander, Ulrika

    2016-03-01

    In addition to the systemic inflammation present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), decreased estradiol levels in postmenopausal RA patients further accelerate bone loss in these patients. The tissue-selective estrogen complex (TSEC), an estrogen combined with a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is a new hormone replacement therapy option. The first approved TSEC, containing conjugated estrogens and bazedoxifene (BZA), reduces menopausal symptoms and prevents osteoporosis with an improved safety profile compared with conventional hormone replacement therapy. Previous studies have shown that estrogens strongly inhibit experimental arthritis whereas BZA is mildly suppressive. In this study the antiarthritic potential of combined BZA and estradiol is explored for the first time. Female ovariectomized DBA/1 mice were subjected to collagen-induced arthritis, an experimental postmenopausal RA model, and treated with BZA, 17β-estradiol (E2), combined BZA and E2 (BZA/E2), or vehicle. BZA/E2 suppressed arthritis severity and frequency, synovitis, and joint destruction, equally efficient as E2 alone. Unwanted estrogenic proliferative effects on the endometrium were blocked by the addition of BZA, determined by collecting uterine weights. Bone mineral density was measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and all treatments protected collagen-induced arthritis mice from both trabecular and cortical bone loss. Moreover, BZA/E2, but not E2 alone, inhibited preosteoclast formation and reduced serum anticollagen type II antibodies. In conclusion, a TSEC, herein combined BZA/E2, suppresses experimental arthritis and prevents associated bone loss as efficiently as E2 alone but with minimal uterine effects, highlighting the need for clinical trials that evaluate the addition of a TSEC to conventional postmenopausal RA treatment. PMID:26745543

  6. Specificity Evaluation and Disease Monitoring in Arthritis Imaging with Complement Receptor of the Ig superfamily targeting Nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fang; Perlman, Harris; Matthys, Patrick; Wen, Yurong; Lahoutte, Tony; Muyldermans, Serge; Lu, Shemin; De Baetselier, Patrick; Schoonooghe, Steve; Devoogdt, Nick; Raes, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography combined with micro-CT (SPECT/μCT) imaging using Nanobodies against complement receptor of the Ig superfamily (CRIg), found on tissue macrophages such as synovial macrophages, has promising potential to visualize joint inflammation in experimental arthritis. Here, we further addressed the specificity and assessed the potential for arthritis monitoring. Signals obtained with 99mTc-labelled NbV4m119 Nanobody were compared in joints of wild type (WT) versus CRIg−/− mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) or K/BxN serum transfer-induced arthritis (STIA). In addition, SPECT/μCT imaging was used to investigate arthritis development in STIA and in CIA under dexamethasone treatment. 99mTc-NbV4m119 accumulated in inflamed joints of WT, but not CRIg−/− mice with CIA and STIA. Development and spontaneous recovery of symptoms in STIA was reflected in initially increased and subsequently reduced joint accumulation of 99mTc-NbV4m119. Dexamethasone treatment of CIA mice reduced 99mTc-NbV4m119 accumulation as compared to saline control in most joints except knees. SPECT/μCT imaging with 99mTc-NbV4m119 allows specific assessment of inflammation in different arthritis models and provides complementary information to clinical scoring for quantitatively and non-invasively monitoring the pathological process and the efficacy of arthritis treatment. PMID:27779240

  7. Chronic Calcium Channel Inhibitor Verapamil Antagonizes TNF-α-Mediated Inflammatory Reaction and Protects Against Inflammatory Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhan; Li, Zhong; Meng, Qingjuan; Zhang, Pei; Yan, Pengcheng; Zhang, Zhenbiao; Zhang, Hao; Pan, Jingrui; Zhai, Yujia; Liu, Yaoge; Wang, Xiaokai; Li, Weiwei; Zhao, Yunpeng

    2016-10-01

    It is well established that the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays a dominant role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Calcium channel is recently reported to be closely associated with various inflammatory diseases. However, whether chronic calcium channel blocker verapamil plays a role in RA still remains unknown. To investigate the role of verapamil in antagonizing TNF-α-mediated inflammation reaction and the underlying mechanisms, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) cells were cultured with stimulation of TNF-α, in the presence or absence of verapamil. Inflammation-associated cytokines, including IL-1, IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS-2), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), were assessed, and verapamil suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice models were established, and arthritis progression was evaluated by clinical and histological signs of arthritis. Treatment of verapamil attenuated inflammation as well as joint destruction in arthritis models. In addition, activity of NF-kB signaling pathway was determined both in vitro and in mice arthritis models, and verapamil inhibited TNF-α-induced activation of NF-kB signaling both in vitro and in mice models. Collectively, chronic calcium channel blocker verapamil may shed light on treatment of inflammatory arthritis and provide a potential therapeutic instrument for RA in the future. PMID:27438468

  8. Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates angiotensin II-induced lipid raft clustering in mesenteric endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei-Qing; Chen, Wen-Dong; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Jian-Jun; Wu, Yong-Jie; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that intracellular Ca2+ is involved in lysosome fusion and membrane repair in skeletal cells. Given that angiotensin II (Ang II) elicits an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and that lysosome fusion is a crucial mediator of lipid raft (LR) clustering, we hypothesized that Ang II induces lysosome fusion and activates LR formation in rat mesenteric endothelial cells (MECs). We found that Ang II acutely increased intracellular Ca2+ content, an effect that was inhibited by the extracellular Ca2+ chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca2+ release inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Further study showed that EGTA almost completely blocked Ang II-induced lysosome fusion, the translocation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) to LR clusters, ASMase activation and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase activation. In contrast, 2-APB had a slight inhibitory effect. Functionally, both the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and the ASMase inhibitor amitriptyline reversed Ang II-induced impairment of vasodilation. We conclude that Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates the Ang II-induced regulation of the LR-redox signaling pathway and mesenteric endothelial dysfunction.

  9. Nickel (II)-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human proximal tubule cells through a ROS- and mitochondria-mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Fen; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Chang, Yi-Chuang; Tseng, Wei-Chang; Huang, Yeou-Lih; Lin, Kuan-Hua; Chou, Miao-Chen; Liu, Heng-Ling; Chen, Chang-Yu

    2012-03-01

    Nickel compounds are known to be toxic and carcinogenic in kidney and lung. In this present study, we investigated the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria in nickel (II) acetate-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in the HK-2 human renal cell line. The results showed that the cytotoxic effects of nickel (II) involved significant cell death and DNA damage. Nickel (II) increased the generation of ROS and induced a noticeable reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Analysis of the sub-G1 phase showed a significant increase in apoptosis in HK-2 cells after nickel (II) treatment. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) not only inhibited nickel (II)-induced cell death and DNA damage, but also significantly prevented nickel (II)-induced loss of MMP and apoptosis. Cell apoptosis triggered by nickel (II) was characterized by the reduced protein expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and the induced the protein expression of Bad, Bcl-Xs, Bax, cytochrome c and caspases 9, 3 and 6. The regulation of the expression of Bcl-2-family proteins, the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspases 9, 3 and 6 were inhibited in the presence of NAC. These results suggest that nickel (II) induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HK-2 cells via ROS generation and that the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway may be involved in the positive regulation of nickel (II)-induced renal cytotoxicity.

  10. Septic arthritis in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Carstanjen, B; Boehart, S; Cislakova, M

    2010-01-01

    Septic arthritis in horses is a serious disease which can become life-threatening. In case the infection can be eliminated before irreversible joint damage occurs, complete recovery is possible. This article gives an overview of the literature concerning etiology, diagnosis and strategies of therapy in cases of septic arthritis in adult horses, with special reference to novel options of treatment.

  11. Polychlorinated biphenyl 77 augments angiotensin II-induced atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms in male apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenescu, Violeta; Arsenescu, Razvan; Parulkar, Madhura; Karounos, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Baker, Nicki; Cassis, Lisa A.

    2011-11-15

    Infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) to hyperlipidemic mice augments atherosclerosis and causes formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Each of these AngII-induced vascular pathologies exhibit pronounced inflammation. Previous studies demonstrated that coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) promote inflammation in endothelial cells and adipocytes, two cell types implicated in AngII-induced vascular pathologies. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that administration of PCB77 to male apolipoprotein E (ApoE) -/- mice promotes AngII-induced atherosclerosis and AAA formation. Male ApoE-/- mice were administered vehicle or PCB77 (49 mg/kg, i.p.) during week 1 and 4 (2 divided doses/week) of AngII infusion. Body weights and total serum cholesterol concentrations were not influenced by administration of PCB77. Systolic blood pressure was increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle (156 {+-} 6 vs 137 {+-} 5 mmHg, respectively). The percentage of aortic arch covered by atherosclerotic lesions was increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle (2.0 {+-} 0.4 vs 0.9 {+-} 0.1%, respectively). Lumen diameters of abdominal aortas determined by in vivo ultrasound and external diameters of excised suprarenal aortas were increased in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77 compared to vehicle. In addition, AAA incidence increased from 47 to 85% in AngII-infused mice administered PCB77. Adipose tissue in close proximity to AAAs from mice administered PCB77 exhibited increased mRNA abundance of proinflammatory cytokines and elevated expression of components of the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensinogen, angiotensin type 1a receptor (AT1aR)). These results demonstrate that PCB77 augments AngII-induced atherosclerosis and AAA formation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polychlorinated biphenyl 77 (PCB77) promotes AngII-induced hypertension. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCB77 augments AngII-induced

  12. Angiotensin II induces phosphatidic acid formation in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts: evaluation of the roles of phospholipases C and D.

    PubMed

    Booz, G W; Taher, M M; Baker, K M; Singer, H A

    1994-12-21

    Phosphatidic acid has been proposed to contribute to the mitogenic actions of various growth factors. In 32P-labeled neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts, 100 nM [Sar1]angiotensin II was shown to rapidly induce formation of 32P-phosphatidic acid. Levels peaked at 5 min (1.5-fold above control), but were partially sustained over 2 h. Phospholipase D contributed in part to phosphatidic acid formation, as 32P- or 3H-phosphatidylethanol was produced when cells labeled with [32P]H3PO4 or 1-O-[1,2- 3H]hexadecyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine were stimulated in the presence of 1% ethanol. [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phospholipase D activity was transient and mainly mediated through protein kinase C (PKC), since PKC downregulation reduced phosphatidylethanol formation by 68%. Residual activity may have been due to increased intracellular Ca2+, as ionomycin also activated phospholipase D in PKC-depleted cells. Phospholipase D did not fully account for [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid: 1) compared to PMA, a potent activator of phospholipase D, [Sar1]angiotensin II produced more phosphatidic acid relative to phosphatidylethanol, and 2) PKC downregulation did not affect [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid formation. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59949 depressed [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid formation by only 21%, indicating that activation of a phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase also can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid. Thus, additional pathways not involving phospholipases C and D, such as de novo synthesis, may contribute to [Sar1]angiotensin II-induced phosphatidic acid in these cells. Finally, as previously shown for [Sar1]angiotensin II, phosphatidic acid stimulated mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 gene expression modulates angiotensin II-induced increase in blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Quan, Shuo; Nasjletti, Alberto; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Abraham, Nader G

    2004-06-01

    The heme-heme oxygenase (HO) system has been implicated in the regulation of vascular reactivity and blood pressure. This study examines the notion that overexpression of HO decreases pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II (Ang II). Five-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats received an intraleft ventricular injection of approximately 5x10(9) cfu/mL of retroviruses containing human HO-1 sense (LSN-HHO-1), rat HO-1 antisense (LSN-RHO-1-AS), or control retrovirus (LXSN). Three months later, rats were instrumented with femoral arterial and venous catheters for mean arterial pressure (MAP) determination and Ang II administration, respectively. Rats injected with LSN-HHO-1, but not with LXSN, expressed human HO-1 mRNA and protein in several tissues. BP increased with administration of Ang II in rats expressing and not expressing human HO-1. However, the Ang II-induced pressor response (mm Hg) in LSN-HHO-1 rats (16+/-3, 27+/-3, and 38+/-3 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng) was surpassed (P<0.05) in LXSN rats (23+/-1, 37+/-2, and 52+/-2 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng). Importantly, treating LSN-HHO-1 rats with the HO inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) enhanced (P<0.05) the Ang II-induced pressor response to a level not different from that observed in LXSN rats. Rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS showed a decrease in renal HO-1 protein expression and HO activity relative to control LXSN rats. Administration of Ang II (0.1 to 2 ng) caused small (4 to 5 mm Hg) but significant increases in MAP in rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS (P<0.05) compared with rats injected with LXSN. These data demonstrate that overexpression of HO-1 brings about a reduction in pressor responsiveness to Ang II, which is most likely due to increased generation of an HO-1 product, presumably CO, with the ability to inhibit vascular reactivity to constrictor stimuli.

  14. Nanomechanics of Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-07-12

    Type I collagen is the predominant collagen in mature tendons and ligaments, where it gives them their load-bearing mechanical properties. Fibrils of type I collagen are formed by the packing of polypeptide triple helices. Higher-order structures like fibril bundles and fibers are assembled from fibrils in the presence of other collagenous molecules and noncollagenous molecules. Curiously, however, experiments show that fibrils/fibril bundles are less resistant to axial stress compared to their constituent triple helices-the Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles are an order-of-magnitude smaller than the Young's moduli of triple helices. Given the sensitivity of the Young's moduli of triple helices to solvation environment, a plausible explanation is that the packing of triple helices into fibrils perhaps reduces the Young's modulus of an individual triple helix, which results in fibrils having smaller Young's moduli. We find, however, from molecular dynamics and accelerated conformational sampling simulations that the Young's modulus of the buried core of the fibril is of the same order as that of a triple helix in aqueous phase. These simulations, therefore, suggest that the lower Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles cannot be attributed to the specific packing of triple helices in the fibril core. It is not the fibril core that yields initially to axial stress. Rather, it must be the portion of the fibril exposed to the solvent and/or the fibril-fibril interface that bears the initial strain. Overall, this work provides estimates of Young's moduli and persistence lengths at two levels of collagen's structural assembly, which are necessary to quantitatively investigate the response of various biological factors on collagen mechanics, including congenital mutations, posttranslational modifications and ligand binding, and also engineer new collagen-based materials. PMID:27410733

  15. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides.

  16. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (p<0.04) and showed a 3-fold increase in Young's modulus (p<0.04) at higher concentration. Furfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications.

  17. Extracellular collagenous spherules in salivary gland tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis of laminin and various types of collagen.

    PubMed

    Skalova, A; Leivo, I

    1992-06-01

    Collagenous spherulosis is a benign breast lesion involving lobular acini and ductules and containing eosinophilic spherules measuring up to 100 microns in diameter. We present an immunohistochemical analysis of similar collagen-rich spherules that are also found in salivary gland tumors. These collagenous spherules contain varying amounts of acidic mucins, elastin, basement membrane proteins including type IV collagen and laminin, and considerable amounts of interstitial collagen types I and III. Types II and VI collagen were not detected in collagenous spherules of salivary gland tumors. The cells surrounding these collagenous spherules expressed muscle actin, S100 protein, vimentin, and cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19, indicating that these cells have myoepithelial characteristics.

  18. Mechanisms underlying the cerebral microvascular responses to angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vital, Shantel A; Terao, Satoshi; Nagai, Mutsumi; Granger, D Neil

    2010-11-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) and AngII type-1 receptors (AT1r) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and ischemic stroke. The objectives of this study was to determine if/how chronic AngII administration affects blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and blood cell adhesion in the cerebral microvasculature. AngII-loaded osmotic pumps were implanted in wild type (WT) and mutant mice. Leukocyte and platelet adhesion were monitored in cerebral venules by intravital microscopy and BBB permeability detected by Evans blue leakage. AngII (two week) infusion increased blood pressure in WT mice. This was accompanied by an increased BBB permeability and a high density of adherent leukocytes and platelets. AT1r (on the vessel wall, but not on blood cells) was largely responsible for the microvascular responses to AngII. Immunodeficient (Rag-1(-/-) ) mice exhibited blunted blood cell recruitment responses without a change in BBB permeability. A similar protection pattern was noted in RANTES(-/-) and P-selectin(-/-) mice, with bone marrow chimeras (blood cell deficiency only) yielding responses comparable to the respective knockouts. These findings implicate AT1r in the microvascular dysfunction associated with AngII-induced hypertension and suggest that immune cells and blood cell-associated RANTES and P-selectin contribute to the blood cell recruitment, but not the BBB failure, elicited by AngII. PMID:21044218

  19. A Food-Derived Flavonoid Luteolin Protects against Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiac Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Atsuko; Morita, Hiroyuki; Nakao, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Toshihiro; Sumida, Tomokazu; Ikeda, Yuichi; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Motozawa, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Tsukasa; Imaizumi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Tadashi; Nagai, Ryozo; Komuro, Issei

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in cardiac remodeling (cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy), which impairs cardiac function and metabolism; therefore, it is anticipated antioxidative compounds will have protective properties against cardiac remodeling. Luteolin (3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a widely distributed flavonoid found in many herbal extracts including celery, green pepper, perilla leaves and seeds, and chamomile, is a known to be a potent antioxidant and was previously demonstrated to exert an antifibrotic effect in the lungs and the liver. In this study, we clearly demonstrate that oral pretreatment with the higher-luteolin diet (0.035% (wt/wt)) protected against cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy as well as a hyperoxidative state in Ang II-infused rats. In cardiac tissue, increased gene expression levels of TGFβ1, CTGF, Nox2, Nox4, ANP, and BNP induced by Ang II were restored by oral pretreatment of this high-luteolin diet. In cultured rat cardiac fibroblasts, H2O2-induced TGFβ1 expression and the phosphorylation of JNK were suppressed by luteolin pretreatment. In conclusion, food-derived luteolin has protective actions against Ang II-induced cardiac remodeling, which could be mediated through attenuation of oxidative stress. PMID:26327560

  20. Complement regulator CD59 protects against angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gongxiong; Chen, Ting; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Hu, Weiguo; Bronson, Rod T.; Shi, Guo-Ping; Halperin, Jose A; Aktas, Huseyin; Qin, Xuebin

    2010-01-01

    Background Complement system, an innate immunity, has been well documented to play a critical role in many inflammatory diseases. However, the role of complement in pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), which is considered as an immune and inflammatory disease, remains obscure. Methods and Results Here, we evaluated the pathogenic roles of complement membrane attack complex (MAC) and CD59, a key regulator that inhibits MAC, in the development of AAA. We demonstrated that in the angiotensin II-induced AAA model, deficiency of MAC regulator CD59 in ApoE-null mice (mCd59ab−/−/ApoE−/−) accelerated the disease development, while transgenic over-expression of human CD59 (hCD59ICAM-2+/−/ApoE−/−) in this model attenuated progression of AAA. The severity of aneurysm among these three groups positively correlates with C9 deposition, and/or the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and/or the levels of phosphor (p)-c-Jun, p-c-Fos, p-IKK-α/β, and p-65. Furthermore, we demonstrated that MAC directly induced gene expression of MMP2 and MMP9 in vitro, which required activation of AP-1 and NF-κB signaling pathways. Conclusions Together, these results defined the protective role of CD59 and shed light on the important pathogenic role of MAC in AAA. PMID:20212283

  1. Electrochemistry of copper(II) induced complexes in mycorrhizal maize plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Zitka, Ondrej; Merlos, Miguel-Angel; Adam, Vojtech; Ferrol, Nuria; Pohanka, Miroslav; Hubalek, Jaromir; Zehnalek, Josef; Trnkova, Libuse; Kizek, Rene

    2012-02-15

    Aim of the present paper was to study the electrochemical behavior of copper(II) induced complexes in extracts obtained from mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal maize (Zea mays L.) plants grown at two concentrations of copper(II): physiological (31.7 ng/mL) and toxic (317 μg/mL). Protein content was determined in the plant extracts and, after dilution to proper concentration, various concentrations of copper(II) ions (0, 100, 200 and 400 μg/mL) were added and incubated for 1h at 37°C. Further, the extracts were analyzed using flow injection analysis with electrochemical detection. The hydrodynamic voltammogram (HDV), which was obtained for each sample, indicated the complex creation. Steepness of measured dependencies was as follows: control 317 μg/mL of copper

  2. TRIF promotes angiotensin II-induced cross-talk between fibroblasts and macrophages in atrial fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Dao-Liang; Zhang, Ming-Jian; Guo, Meng; Zhan, Yang-Yang; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Li; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Quan-Xing; Liu, Xu

    2015-08-14

    Aims: Atrial fibroblasts and macrophages have long been thought to participate in atrial fibrillation (AF). However, which specific mediator may regulate the interaction between them remains unclear. Methods and results: We provided the evidence for the involvement of Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β (TRIF), an important inflammation-related molecule, in the pathophysiology of AF. Patients with AF showed higher levels of angiotensin II (AngII) and TRIF expression and larger number of macrophages infiltration in left atria appendage than individuals with sinus rhythm (SR). In the cell study, AngII induced chemokines expressions in mouse atrial fibroblasts and AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblasts induced the chemotaxis of macrophages, which were reduced by losartan and TRIF siRNA. Meanwhile, AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblasts proliferation was enhanced by macrophages. Conclusions: Our data demonstrated that TRIF may be a crucial factor promoting the interaction between atrial fibroblasts and macrophages, leading to atrial fibrosis. - Highlights: • Compared with SR, AF showed higher TRIF expression in left atrial appendage. • TRIF siRNA reversed macrophage chemotaxis induced by AngII-treated fibroblast. • TRIF siRNA reversed chemokines expressions induced by AngII in fibroblast. • AngII-stimulated atrial fibroblast proliferation was enhanced by macrophage.

  3. Factors secreted from dental pulp stem cells show multifaceted benefits for treating experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Jun; Takahashi, Nobunori; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshioka, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Nishikawa, Masaya; Hibi, Hideharu; Ishigro, Naoki; Ueda, Minoru; Furukawa, Koichi; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by synovial hyperplasia and chronic inflammation, which lead to the progressive destruction of cartilage and bone in the joints. Numerous studies have reported that administrations of various types of MSCs improve arthritis symptoms in animal models, by paracrine mechanisms. However, the therapeutic effects of the secreted factors alone, without the cell graft, have been uncertain. Here, we show that a single intravenous administration of serum-free conditioned medium (CM) from human deciduous dental pulp stem cells (SHED-CM) into anti-collagen type II antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), markedly improved the arthritis symptoms and joint destruction. The therapeutic efficacy of SHED-CM was associated with an induction of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in the CAIA joints and the abrogation of RANKL expression. SHED-CM specifically depleted of an M2 macrophage inducer, the secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9 (ED-Siglec-9), exhibited a reduced ability to induce M2-related gene expression and attenuate CAIA. SHED-CM also inhibited the RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Collectively, our findings suggest that SHED-CM provides multifaceted therapeutic effects for treating CAIA, including the ED-Siglec-9-dependent induction of M2 macrophage polarization and inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Thus, SHED-CM may represent a novel anti-inflammatory and reparative therapy for RA. PMID:26603475

  4. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Paolo, Julie A; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H; Bravo, Brandon J; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R; DeForge, Laura E; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L; Giannetti, Anthony M; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E; Lee, Wyne P; Maciejewski, Patricia M; Mitchell, Scott A; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L; Whitney, J Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S

    2011-08-29

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor–dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes FcγRIII-induced TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and FcγR-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell– or myeloid cell–driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Paolo, Julie A.; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H.; Bravo, Brandon J.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R.; DeForge, Laura E.; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L.; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Wyne P.; Maciejewski, Patricia M.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L.; Whitney, J. Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B.; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S.

    2011-09-20

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor-dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes Fc{gamma}RIII-induced TNF{alpha}, IL-1{beta} and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and Fc{gamma}R-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell- or myeloid cell-driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. Factors secreted from dental pulp stem cells show multifaceted benefits for treating experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Jun; Takahashi, Nobunori; Matsumoto, Takuya; Yoshioka, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Nishikawa, Masaya; Hibi, Hideharu; Ishigro, Naoki; Ueda, Minoru; Furukawa, Koichi; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by synovial hyperplasia and chronic inflammation, which lead to the progressive destruction of cartilage and bone in the joints. Numerous studies have reported that administrations of various types of MSCs improve arthritis symptoms in animal models, by paracrine mechanisms. However, the therapeutic effects of the secreted factors alone, without the cell graft, have been uncertain. Here, we show that a single intravenous administration of serum-free conditioned medium (CM) from human deciduous dental pulp stem cells (SHED-CM) into anti-collagen type II antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), markedly improved the arthritis symptoms and joint destruction. The therapeutic efficacy of SHED-CM was associated with an induction of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in the CAIA joints and the abrogation of RANKL expression. SHED-CM specifically depleted of an M2 macrophage inducer, the secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9 (ED-Siglec-9), exhibited a reduced ability to induce M2-related gene expression and attenuate CAIA. SHED-CM also inhibited the RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Collectively, our findings suggest that SHED-CM provides multifaceted therapeutic effects for treating CAIA, including the ED-Siglec-9-dependent induction of M2 macrophage polarization and inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Thus, SHED-CM may represent a novel anti-inflammatory and reparative therapy for RA.

  7. Management of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Avinash K; Gedalia, Abraham

    2004-09-01

    Septic arthritis in children remains a serious disease with the potential for significant systemic and musculoskeletal morbidity. Staphlococcus aureus is the most common cause of bone and joint infections in all age groups. Microbial invasion of the synovial space occurs typically results from hematogenous seeding. Diagnosis in neonates and young infants can be difficult since the clinical signs are much less specific in these age groups. Early diagnosis by needle aspiration of the affected joint and prompt initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in conjunction with drainage of the affected joint is critical to avoid destruction of the articular cartilage and prevent disability. Septic arthritis in infants and children should always be managed by a pediatrician in close consultation with an orthopedic surgeon. Empiric antibiotic regimens should always include adequate anti-staphylococcal coverage. Antibiotic treatment should be started with appropriate doses of intravenous antibiotics. Switch to oral antibiotic therapy can be made when patient demonstrates clinical improvement. A minimum of 3-4 weeks of therapy is recommended. Close follow-up is warranted to monitor the growth of the affected limb until skeletal maturity.

  8. Collagen shield delivery of trifluorothymidine.

    PubMed

    Gussler, J R; Ashton, P; VanMeter, W S; Smith, T J

    1990-11-01

    Corneal and aqueous levels of topically applied trifluorothymidine (F3T) were compared with and without the collagen shield in normal and damaged rabbit eyes. Shields were presoaked in 1% F3T for 15 minutes prior to application. Rabbits received either a presoaked shield, 1% F3T drops every two hours, or both. Corneal and aqueous levels of F3T were measured at 30 minutes, two, four, and eight hours. If 5 mm epithelial defects were created, the collagen shield and topical F3T drops produced significantly higher levels of F3T than drops alone at all periods tested (P less than .05). A presoaked shield alone produced greater levels of F3T than drops alone at 30 minutes and two hours (P less than .05). Collagen shields did not enhance F3T levels in eyes with intact epithelium. Implications for treatment of herpetic keratouveitis are discussed.

  9. Salidroside ameliorates arthritis-induced brain cognition deficits by regulating Rho/ROCK/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingpeng; Chen, Tong; Chang, Xiayun; Zhou, Rui; Luo, Fen; Liu, Jingyan; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Yue; Yang, Ying; Long, Hongyan; Liu, Yu; Yan, Tianhua; Ma, Chunhua

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of cognitive impairment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients was increasingly serious nowadays. The purpose of the current study was to explore whether salidroside (Sal) could alleviate arthritis-induced cognition deficits and examine the relationship between the impairment and Rho/ROCK/NF-κB pathway. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was established by the injection of chicken type II collagen (CII), complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). Arthritic lesions of CIA rats were assessed by arthritis index score, swelling of paws and histological analysis. Cognitive deficits symptoms of CIA rats were monitored through Morris water maze test. The contents of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in hippocampus and serum were significantly reduced with salidroside (20 mg/kg, 40 mg/kg) treatment compared with those in the CIA group. In parallel, we demonstrated that the expressions of RhoA, ROCK1, ROCK2, p-NF-κBp65, p-IκBα, p-IKKα and p-IKKβ were enhanced accompanying the investigation arthritis-induced cognition deficits, which were remarkably down-regulated by salidroside and confirmed by the results obtained from western blot and immunohistochemistry. LC-MS/MS results ascertained that Sal could enter into the blood and brain tissues to exhibit the protective effect on arthritis-induced cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, it was assumed that Sal might be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat arthritis-induced brain cognition deficits through the regulation of Rho/ROCK/NF-κB signaling. PMID:26690894

  10. Collagen VI related muscle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, A; Bushby, K

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding collagen VI (COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3) cause Bethlem myopathy (BM) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), two conditions which were previously believed to be completely separate entities. BM is a relatively mild dominantly inherited disorder characterised by proximal weakness and distal joint contractures. UCMD was originally described as an autosomal recessive condition causing severe muscle weakness with proximal joint contractures and distal hyperlaxity. Here we review the clinical phenotypes of BM and UCMD and their diagnosis and management, and provide an overview of the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of collagen VI related disorders. PMID:16141002

  11. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signalling is increased in rheumatoid synovium but TGF-β blockade does not modify experimental arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo-Gil, E; Criado, G; Santiago, B; Dotor, J; Pablos, J L; Galindo, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the distribution of regulatory and inhibitory mothers against decapentaplegic homologue (Smad) proteins as markers of active transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signalling in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial tissue and to investigate the effect of TGF-β blockade in the development and progression of collagen-induced arthritis. The expression of Smad proteins in synovial tissues from RA, osteoarthritic and healthy controls was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Arthritis was induced in DBA/1 mice by immunization with chicken type-II collagen (CII). TGF-β was blocked in vivo with the specific peptide p17 starting at the time of immunization or on the day of arthritis onset. T cell population frequencies and specific responses to CII were analysed. The expression of cytokines and transcription factors was quantified in spleen and joint samples. Statistical differences between groups were compared using the Mann–Whitney U-test or one-way analysis of variance (anova) using the Kruskal–Wallis test. p-Smad-2/3 and inhibitory Smad-7 expression were detected in RA and control tissues. In RA, most lymphoid infiltrating cells showed nuclear p-Smad-2/3 without Smad-7 expression. Treatment with TGF-β antagonist did not affect clinical severity, joint inflammation and cartilage damage in collagen-induced arthritis. Frequency of T cell subsets, mRNA levels of cytokines and transcription factors, specific proliferation to CII, serum interleukin (IL)-6 and anti-CII antibodies were comparable in p17 and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated groups. The pattern of Smad proteins expression demonstrates active TGF-β signalling in RA synovium. However, specific TGF-β blockade does not have a significant effect in the mice model of collagen-induced arthritis. PMID:23869798

  12. The evolution of fibrillar collagens: a sea-pen collagen shares common features with vertebrate type V collagen.

    PubMed

    Tillet, E; Franc, J M; Franc, S; Garrone, R

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular matrix of marine primitive invertebrates (sponges, polyps and jellyfishes) contains collagen fibrils with narrow diameters. From various data, it has been hypothesized that these primitive collagens could represent ancestral forms of the vertebrate minor collagens, i.e., types V or XI. Recently we have isolated a primitive collagen from the soft tissues of the sea-pen Veretillum cynomorium. This report examines whether the sea-pen collagen shares some features with vertebrate type V collagen. Rotary shadowed images of acid-soluble collagen molecules extracted from beta-APN treated animals, positive staining of segment-long-spacing crystallites precipitated from pepsinized collagen, Western blots of the pepsinized alpha1 and alpha2 chains with antibodies to vertebrate types I, III and V collagens, and in situ gold immunolabeling of ECM collagen fibrils were examined. Our results showed that the tissue form of the sea-pen collagen is a 340-nm threadlike molecule, which is close to the vertebrate type V collagen with its voluminous terminal globular domain, the distribution of most of its polar amino-acid residues, and its antigenic properties.

  13. The evolution of fibrillar collagens: a sea-pen collagen shares common features with vertebrate type V collagen.

    PubMed

    Tillet, E; Franc, J M; Franc, S; Garrone, R

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular matrix of marine primitive invertebrates (sponges, polyps and jellyfishes) contains collagen fibrils with narrow diameters. From various data, it has been hypothesized that these primitive collagens could represent ancestral forms of the vertebrate minor collagens, i.e., types V or XI. Recently we have isolated a primitive collagen from the soft tissues of the sea-pen Veretillum cynomorium. This report examines whether the sea-pen collagen shares some features with vertebrate type V collagen. Rotary shadowed images of acid-soluble collagen molecules extracted from beta-APN treated animals, positive staining of segment-long-spacing crystallites precipitated from pepsinized collagen, Western blots of the pepsinized alpha1 and alpha2 chains with antibodies to vertebrate types I, III and V collagens, and in situ gold immunolabeling of ECM collagen fibrils were examined. Our results showed that the tissue form of the sea-pen collagen is a 340-nm threadlike molecule, which is close to the vertebrate type V collagen with its voluminous terminal globular domain, the distribution of most of its polar amino-acid residues, and its antigenic properties. PMID:8653581

  14. Neo-Epitopes—Fragments of Cartilage and Connective Tissue Degradation in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis and Unclassified Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karsdal, Morten Asser; Gerlag, Daniëlle M.; Tak, Paul Peter; Bay-Jensen, Anne Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objective Tissue destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is predominantly mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), thereby generating protein fragments. Previous studies have revealed that these fragments include MMP-mediated collagen type I, II, and III degradation, citrullinated and MMP-degraded vimentin and MMP degraded C-reactive protein. We evaluated if biomarkers measuring serum levels of specific sequences of the mentioned fragments would provide further information of diagnostic and/or prognostic processes in early arthritis. Methods Ninety-two early arthritis patients (arthritis duration<1 year, DMARD naïve) were enrolled. Patients either fulfilled the ACR/EULAR2010 criteria for RA (n = 60) or had unclassified arthritis (UA) (n = 32). Patients fulfilling the RA criteria after 2 years follow-up were classified into non-erosive (n = 25), or erosive disease (n = 13). Concentrations of the biomarkers: C1M, C2M, C3M, VICM and CRPM were measured in baseline serum. Results C1M, C3M and CRPM were able to discriminate between the UA and RA baseline diagnosis in 92 patients with an AUROC of 0.64 (95%CI 0.517 to 0.762), 0.73 (95%CI 0.622 to 0.838) and 0.68 (95%CI 0.570 to 0.795). C2M showed a potential for discrimination between non-erosive and erosive disease in 38 patients with an AUROC of 0.75 (95%CI 0.597 to 0.910). All of the applied biomarkers correlated with one or more of the disease activity parameters: DAS28, ESR, CRP, SJC66, TJC68 and/or HAQ. Conclusion This is the first study evaluating the applied biomarkers at this early stage of arthritis. C1M, C3M, CRPM might be the best diagnostic marker, whereas high levels of C2M indicated progression of disease at follow-up in early RA patients. PMID:27019199

  15. Biology, chemistry and pathology of collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmajer, R.; Olsen, B.R.; Kuhn, K.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the articles are: Structure of the Type II Collagen Gene; Structural and Functional Analysis of the Genes for ..cap alpha..2(1) and ..cap alpha..1(III) collagens; Structure and Expression of the Collagen Genes of C. Elegans; Molecular Basis of Clinical Heterogeneity in the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; and Normal and Mutant Human Collagen Genes.

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis and ocular involvement.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Chittaranjan; Banik, Sujoy; Islam, Md Nazarul; Biswas, Mukul Chandra; Biswas, Gautam; Biswas, Sobhan

    2003-09-01

    To study the occurrence and incidence of different ocular manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis a random cross-sectional study was carried out among 54 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. The patients were examined thoroughly to detect any ocular disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Complete ocular examination with special emphasis on anterior segment evaluation and tearfilm study was done. Two-thirds of the patients examined had some kind of visual problem at presentation. Three patients (5.55%) had marked dry eye with another 20 (37.03%) having borderline tear deficiency. Two cases ( 3.70% ) of episcleritis were also seen. No cases of scleritis or retinopathy were found. The most common ocular association with rheumatoid arthritis was secondary Sjogren's syndrome. Other conditions include episcleritis and marginal keratitis.

  17. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your overall health and sense of well-being. Exercise keeps your muscles strong and increases your range ... Water exercises may be the best exercise for your arthritis. Swimming laps, water aerobics, or even just walking in ...

  18. Therapy strategies in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Coates, Laura C

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous condition with a myriad of different clinical presentations. It commonly affects the skin and musculoskeletal system causing psoriasis, peripheral arthritis, axial arthritis, enthesitis and dactylitis. Many patients also have related conditions, such as those within the metabolic syndrome and associated spondyloarthritis (SpA) conditions including inflammatory bowel disease and uveitis. Any therapeutic strategy must be tailored to the individual patient, taking into account her/his complete clinical presentation and comorbidities. New treatment recommendations from the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) provide evidence based recommendations on effective therapies for the management of each different manifestation of PsA, and how treatment may be affected by comorbidities (1). However, the limited evidence comparing different treatment strategies in PsA is recognised as a limitation in these recommendations and further information is detailed below.

  19. Activation of central PPAR-γ attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that the activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg per minute) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor: A Mechanistic Link between Angiotensin-II-Induced Cardiac Inflammation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duerrschmid, Clemens; Trial, JoAnn; Wang, Yanlin; Entman, Mark L.; Haudek, Sandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuous angiotensin-II (Ang-II) infusion induced the uptake of monocytic fibroblast precursors that initiated the development of cardiac fibrosis; these cells and concurrent fibrosis were absent in mice lacking tumor necrosis factor-alpha receptor 1 (TNFR1). We now investigated their cellular origin and temporal uptake, and the involvement of TNFR1 in monocyte-to-fibroblast differentiation. Methods and Results Within a day, Ang-II induced a pro-inflammatory environment characterized by production of inflammatory chemokines, cytokines, and TH1-interleukins and uptake of bone marrow-derived M1-cells. After a week, the cardiac environment changed to profibrotic with growth-factor and TH2-interleukin synthesis, uptake of bone marrow-derived M2-cells, and presence of M2-related fibroblasts. TNFR1 signaling was not necessary for early M1 uptake, but its absence diminished the amount of M2-cells. TNFR1-KO hearts also showed reduced levels of cytokine expression, but not of TH-related lymphokines. Reconstitution of wild-type bone marrow into TNFR1-KO mice was sufficient to restore M2 uptake, upregulation of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic genes, and development of fibrosis in response to Ang-II. We also developed an in vitro mouse monocyte-to-fibroblast-maturation assay that confirmed the essential role of TNFR1 in the sequential progression of monocyte activation and fibroblast formation. Conclusions Development of cardiac fibrosis in response to Ang-II was mediated by myeloid precursors and consisted of two stages. A primary M1 inflammatory response was followed by a subsequent M2 fibrotic response. While the first phase appeared to be independent of TNFR1 signaling, the later phase (and development of fibrosis) was abrogated by deletion of TNFR1. PMID:25550440

  1. Activation of Central PPAR-γ Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg/min) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and angiotensin II type-1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26101342

  2. Differential Phenotypes of Tissue-Infiltrating T Cells during Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zihui; Spizzo, Iresha; Diep, Henry; Drummond, Grant R.; Widdop, Robert E.; Vinh, Antony

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension remains the leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Experimental hypertension is associated with increased T cell infiltration into blood pressure-controlling organs, such as the aorta and kidney; importantly in absence of T cells of the adaptive immune system, experimental hypertension is significantly blunted. However, the function and phenotype of these T cell infiltrates remains speculative and undefined in the setting of hypertension. The current study compared T cell-derived cytokine and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from normotensive and hypertensive mice. Splenic, blood, aortic, kidney and brain T cells were isolated from C57BL/6J mice following 14-day vehicle or angiotensin (Ang) II (0.7 mg/kg/day, s.c.) infusion. T cell infiltration was increased in aorta, kidney and brain from hypertensive mice. Cytokine analysis in stimulated T cells indicated an overall Th1 pro-inflammatory phenotype, but a similar proportion (flow cytometry) and quantity (cytometric bead array) of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-17 between vehicle- and Ang II- treated groups. Strikingly, elevated T cell-derived production of a chemokine, chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2), was observed in aorta (∼6-fold) and kidney in response to Ang II, but not in brain, spleen or blood. Moreover, T cell-derived ROS production in aorta was elevated ∼3 -fold in Ang II-treated mice (n = 7; P<0.05). Ang II-induced hypertension does not affect the overall T cell cytokine profile, but enhanced T cell-derived ROS production and/or leukocyte recruitment due to elevated CCL2, and this effect may be further amplified with increased infiltration of T cells. We have identified a potential hypertension-specific T cell phenotype that may represent a functional contribution of T cells to the development of hypertension, and likely several other associated vascular disorders. PMID:25501574

  3. Changes in antenna of photosystem II induced by short-term heating.

    PubMed

    Kochubey, Svetlana M

    2010-12-01

    Changes in antenna of photosystem II, induced by short-term heating, were studied using characteristics of a short-wavelength band in low-temperature fluorescence spectra (77 K) of pea chloroplasts. Heating for 5 min was carried out at 25 and 45°C in the darkness or in the presence of white light with intensity of 260 or 1,400 μmol/m(2)s. Most modes of thermal treating induced a decrease in integral intensity of the band and an increase of its half-width. The changes were more prominent at high-temperature heating. The second derivative of the contour of a short-wavelength band showed its three components around 680, 685, and 693 nm, the first of which belongs to emission of the outer antenna of Photosystem II, and the other two to its inner antenna. As the fourth derivative shows, high-temperature heating in the presence of light evokes an appearance of some additional components in a short-wavelength region (654, 658, 661, 666, 672, and 675 nm) as well as of two additional components, 682 and 689 nm, in the region of 685-nm peak. Two subcomponents, 692 and 694 nm, can be detected in the 693-nm component. The results are discussed on the basis of the data concerning energy levels and pathways of energy transfer in pigment-protein complexes of the outer and the inner antennas of photosystem II. It is assumed that a protective role of low light relates to inducing of an essential disarrangement in the outer and the inner antennas and of a subsequent decrease in energy funneling to reaction centers, which, in turn, lowers the extent of photoinhibition.

  4. TGF-β Neutralization Enhances AngII-Induced Aortic Rupture and Aneurysm in Both Thoracic and Abdominal Regions

    PubMed Central

    Howatt, Deborah A.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2016-01-01

    AngII and TGF-β interact in development of thoracic and abdominal aortic diseases, although there are many facets of this interaction that have not been clearly defined. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of TGF-β neutralization on AngII induced-aortic pathologies. Male C57BL/6J mice were administered with either a rabbit or mouse TGF-β neutralizing antibody and then infused with AngII. The rabbit TGF-β antibody modestly reduced serum TGF-β concentrations, with no significant enhancements to AngII-induced aneurysm or rupture. Administration of this rabbit TGF-β antibody in mice led to high serum titers against rabbit IgG that may have attenuated the neutralization. In contrast, a mouse TGF-β antibody (1D11) significantly increased rupture in both the ascending and suprarenal aortic regions, but only at doses that markedly decreased serum TGF-β concentrations. High doses of 1D11 antibody significantly increased AngII-induced ascending and suprarenal aortic dilatation. To determine whether TGF-β neutralization had effects in mice previously infused with AngII, the 1D11 antibody was injected into mice that had been infused with AngII for 28 days and were observed during continued infusion for a further 28 days. Despite near ablations of serum TGF-β concentrations, the mouse TGF-β antibody had no effect on aortic rupture or dimensions in either ascending or suprarenal region. These data provide further evidence that AngII-induced aortic rupture is enhanced greatly by TGF-β neutralization when initiated before pathogenesis. PMID:27104863

  5. TGF-β Neutralization Enhances AngII-Induced Aortic Rupture and Aneurysm in Both Thoracic and Abdominal Regions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Rateri, Debra L; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2016-01-01

    AngII and TGF-β interact in development of thoracic and abdominal aortic diseases, although there are many facets of this interaction that have not been clearly defined. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of TGF-β neutralization on AngII induced-aortic pathologies. Male C57BL/6J mice were administered with either a rabbit or mouse TGF-β neutralizing antibody and then infused with AngII. The rabbit TGF-β antibody modestly reduced serum TGF-β concentrations, with no significant enhancements to AngII-induced aneurysm or rupture. Administration of this rabbit TGF-β antibody in mice led to high serum titers against rabbit IgG that may have attenuated the neutralization. In contrast, a mouse TGF-β antibody (1D11) significantly increased rupture in both the ascending and suprarenal aortic regions, but only at doses that markedly decreased serum TGF-β concentrations. High doses of 1D11 antibody significantly increased AngII-induced ascending and suprarenal aortic dilatation. To determine whether TGF-β neutralization had effects in mice previously infused with AngII, the 1D11 antibody was injected into mice that had been infused with AngII for 28 days and were observed during continued infusion for a further 28 days. Despite near ablations of serum TGF-β concentrations, the mouse TGF-β antibody had no effect on aortic rupture or dimensions in either ascending or suprarenal region. These data provide further evidence that AngII-induced aortic rupture is enhanced greatly by TGF-β neutralization when initiated before pathogenesis.

  6. Klotho inhibits angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through suppression of the AT1R/beta catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liangzhu; Meng, Wei; Ding, Jieqiong; Cheng, Menglin

    2016-04-29

    Myocardial hypertrophy is an independent risk factor for cardiac morbidity and mortality. The antiaging protein klotho reportedly possesses a protective role in cardiac diseases. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effects of klotho remain unknown. This study was aimed to determine the effects of klotho on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertrophy in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and the possible mechanism of actions. We found that klotho significantly inhibited Ang II-induced hypertrophic growth of neonatal cardiomyocytes, as evidenced by decreased [(3)H]-Leucine incorporation, cardiomyocyte surface area and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) mRNA expression. Meanwhile, klotho inhibited Ang II-stimulated activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in cardiomyocytes, as evidenced by decreased protein expression of active β-catenin, downregulated protein and mRNA expression of the β-catenin target genes c-myc and cyclin D1, and increased β-catenin phosphorylation. Inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by the specific inhibitor XAV939 markedly attenuated Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The further study revealed that klotho treatment significantly downregulated protein expression of Ang II receptor type I (AT1R) but not type II (AT2R). The AT1R antagonist losartan inhibited Ang II-stimulated activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Our findings suggest that klotho inhibits Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through suppression of the AT1R/β-catenin signaling pathway, which may provide new insights into the mechanism underlying the protective effects of klotho in heart diseases, and raise the possibility that klotho may act as an endogenous antihypertrophic factor by inhibiting the Ang II signaling pathway. PMID:26970306

  7. Gene silencing of endothelial von Willebrand Factor attenuates angiotensin II-induced endothelin-1 expression in porcine aortic endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Dushpanova, Anar; Agostini, Silvia; Ciofini, Enrica; Cabiati, Manuela; Casieri, Valentina; Matteucci, Marco; Del Ry, Silvia; Clerico, Aldo; Berti, Sergio; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Expression of endothelin (ET)-1 is increased in endothelial cells exposed to angiotensin II (Ang II), leading to endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disorders. Since von Willebrand Factor (vWF) blockade improves endothelial function in coronary patients, we hypothesized that targeting endothelial vWF with short interference RNA (siRNA) prevents Ang II-induced ET-1 upregulation. Nearly 65 ± 2% silencing of vWF in porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAOECs) was achieved with vWF-specific siRNA without affecting cell viability and growth. While showing ET-1 similar to wild type cells at rest, vWF-silenced cells did not present ET-1 upregulation during exposure to Ang II (100 nM/24 h), preserving levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity similar to wild type. vWF silencing prevented AngII-induced increase in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (NOX) activity and superoxide anion (O2−) levels, known triggers of ET-1 expression. Moreover, no increase in O2− or ET-1 levels was found in silenced cells treated with AngII or NOX-agonist phorbol ester (PMA 5 nM/48 h). Finally, vWF was required for overexpression of NOX4 and NOX2 in response to AngII and PMA. In conclusion, endothelial vWF knockdown prevented Ang II-induced ET-1 upregulation through attenuation of NOX-mediated O2− production. Our findings reveal a new role of vWF in preventing of Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27443965

  8. Vaccination with a recombinant fragment of collagen adhesin provides protection against Staphylococcus aureus-mediated septic death.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, I M; Patti, J M; Bremell, T; Höök, M; Tarkowski, A

    1998-06-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Morbidity and mortality due to infections such as sepsis, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, and invasive endocarditis remain high despite the use of antibiotics. The emergence of antibiotic resistant super bugs mandates that alternative strategies for the prevention and treatment of S. aureus infections are developed. We investigated the ability of vaccination with a recombinant fragment of the S. aureus collagen adhesin to protect mice against sepsis-induced death. Actively immunized NMRI mice were intravenously inoculated with the S. aureus clinical isolate strain Phillips. 14 d after inoculation, mortality in the collagen adhesin-vaccinated group was only 13%, compared with 87% in the control antigen immunized group (P < 0.001). To determine if the protective effect was antibody mediated, we passively immunized naive mice with collagen adhesin-specific antibodies. Similar to the active immunization strategy, passive transfer of collagen adhesin-specific antibodies protected mice against sepsis-induced death. In vitro experiments indicated that S. aureus opsonized with sera from collagen adhesin immunized mice promoted phagocytic uptake and enhanced intracellular killing compared with bacteria opsonized with sera from control animals. These results indicate that the collagen adhesin is a viable target in the development of immunotherapeutics against S. aureus.

  9. Inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation by antibodies to distinct types of collagens.

    PubMed Central

    Balleisen, L; Nowack, H; Gay, S; Timpl, R

    1979-01-01

    Aggregation of platelets by fibrils formed from collagens type I, II and III could be inhibited by coating the fibrils with anti-collagen antibodies or Fab fragments. Similar results were obtained in a clot-retraction assay. Inhibition was achieved with stoichiometric amounts of antibodies and was specific for each type of collagen. Aggregation caused by a mixture of type-I and -III collagens could only be inhibited by a mixture of antibodies against both collagens. The data show that each interstitial collagen is capable of interacting with platelets and do not support the concept of an outstanding activity of type-III collagen. Images PLATE 1 PMID:395952

  10. Collagens in the aged human macula.

    PubMed

    Marshall, G E; Konstas, A G; Reid, G G; Edwards, J G; Lee, W R

    1994-03-01

    Immunogold cytochemistry was used to investigate the fine structural distribution of collagen types I-VI in Bruch's membrane and choroid of the aged human macula. Macular tissue was obtained from ten eyes, and processed for cryoultramicrotomy and London Resin white embedding. Striated collagen fibrils within the inner and outer collagenous layers were found to contain collagen types I, III and V. In addition, type V collagen was also present in the basement membrane of the choriocapillaris. Gross thickening of the choriocapillaris basement membrane was attributed to the deposition of type IV collagen. However, type IV collagen appeared to be absent from the basement membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium. The interesting location of type VI collagen on the choroidal side of the choriocapillaris suggested that its function is to anchor the choriocapillaris onto the choroid. The collagens studied were absent from fibrous banded material, long-spacing collagen, the elastic layer and amorphous granular material. It was concluded that, of the collagen types studied, only the deposition of type IV collagen contributes to the age-related thickening of Bruch's membrane.

  11. Collagen binding to OSCAR: the odd couple.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    In this issue of Blood, Zhou et al reported the high-resolution structure of the collagen-activated osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) bound to a collagen model peptide. Together with binding studies, the results confirm a novel recognition mechanism for collagen by immunoglobulin-like motifs. PMID:26847065

  12. Adenosine restores angiotensin II-induced contractions by receptor-independent enhancement of calcium sensitivity in renal arterioles.

    PubMed

    Lai, En Yin; Martinka, Peter; Fähling, Michael; Mrowka, Ralf; Steege, Andreas; Gericke, Adrian; Sendeski, Mauricio; Persson, P B; Persson, A Erik G; Patzak, Andreas

    2006-11-10

    Adenosine is coupled to energy metabolism and regulates tissue blood flow by modulating vascular resistance. In this study, we investigated isolated, perfused afferent arterioles of mice, which were subjected to desensitization during repeated applications of angiotensin II. Exogenously applied adenosine restores angiotensin II-induced contractions by increasing calcium sensitivity of the arterioles, along with augmented phosphorylation of the regulatory unit of the myosin light chain. Adenosine restores angiotensin II-induced contractions via intracellular action, because inhibition of adenosine receptors do not prevent restoration, but inhibition of NBTI sensitive adenosine transporters does. Restoration was prevented by inhibition of Rho-kinase, protein kinase C, and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which modulate myosin light chain phosphorylation and thus calcium sensitivity in the smooth muscle. Furthermore, adenosine application increased the intracellular ATP concentration in LuciHEK cells. The results of the study suggest that restoration of the angiotensin II-induced contraction by adenosine is attributable to the increase of the calcium sensitivity by phosphorylation of the myosin light chain. This can be an important component of vascular control during ischemic and hypoxic conditions. Additionally, this mechanism may contribute to the mediation of the tubuloglomerular feedback by adenosine in the juxtaglomerular apparatus of the kidney. PMID:17038642

  13. Nitro-Arachidonic Acid Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Cell Line of Kidney Proximal Tubular Cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Cassina, Adriana; Rios, Natalia; Peluffo, Gonzalo; Boggia, José; Radi, Rafael; Rubbo, Homero; Trostchansky, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Nitro-arachidonic acid (NO2-AA) is a cell signaling nitroalkene that exerts anti-inflammatory activities during macrophage activation. While angiotensin II (ANG II) produces an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial dysfunction in renal tubular cells, little is known regarding the potential protective effects of NO2-AA in ANG II-mediated kidney injury. As such, this study examines the impact of NO2-AA on ANG II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in an immortalized renal proximal tubule cell line (HK-2 cells). Treatment of HK-2 cells with ANG II increases the production of superoxide (O2●-), nitric oxide (●NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) expression, peroxynitrite (ONOO-) and mitochondrial dysfunction. Using high-resolution respirometry, it was observed that the presence of NO2-AA prevented ANG II-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Attempting to address mechanism, we treated isolated rat kidney mitochondria with ONOO-, a key mediator of ANG II-induced mitochondrial damage, in the presence or absence of NO2-AA. Whereas the activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and ATP synthase (ATPase) were diminished upon exposure to ONOO-, they were restored by pre-incubating the mitochondria with NO2-AA. Moreover, NO2-AA prevents oxidation and nitration of mitochondrial proteins. Combined, these data demonstrate that ANG II-mediated oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction is abrogated by NO2-AA, identifying this compound as a promising pharmacological tool to prevent ANG II-induced renal disease. PMID:26943326

  14. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell damage via protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yuji; Matsui, Takanori; Ojima, Ayako; Nishino, Yuri; Nakashima, Sae; Maeda, Sayaka; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2012-11-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that renin-angiotensin system plays a role in diabetic nephropathy. Recently, we have found that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), one of the incretins, a gut hormone secreted from L cells in the intestine in response to food intake, inhibits advanced glycation end product-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in mesangial cells thorugh the interaction with the receptor of GLP-1. However, effects of GLP-1 on angiotensin II-exposed mesangial cells are unknown. This study investigated whether and how GLP-1 blocked the angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell damage in vitro. GLP-1 completely blocked the angiotensin II-induced superoxide generation, NF-κB activation, up-regulation of mRNA levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in mesangial cells, all of which were prevented by the treatments with H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A. The present results demonstrated for the first time that GLP-1 blocked the angiotensin II-induced mesangial cell injury by inhibiting superoxide-mediated NF-κB activation via protein kinase C pathway. Our present study suggests that strategies to enhance the biological actions of GLP-1 may be a promising strategy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  15. [Rheumatoid arthritis and cytokines].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Shunta; Kondo, Yuya; Yokosawa, Masahiro; Sumida, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    The cytokines are an important substance involved in the immune reaction and maintenance of homeostasis. An imbalance in the cytokine network may lead to inflammation and autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is an autoimmune and systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by synovial inflammation, destruction of cartilage and bone and systemic manifestations. The pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6 and IL-17 induce the inflammation of the joints and destruction of bone and cartilage via activation of macrophages, fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS), helper T (Th) cells and osteoclasts. Recently, the available therapeutic agents that target these cytokines have excellent clinical effects in RA patients.

  16. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  17. [Septic arthritis in adults].

    PubMed

    Loock, J; Haustedt, N; Wollenhaupt, J

    2014-09-01

    Septic arthritis is a true rheumatological emergency requiring immediate and thoughtful effort for rapid diagnosis establishment and treatment initiation. Children and elderly persons as well as immunocompromised individuals, patients with pre-existing joint damage and with inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases are preferentially affected. Bacteremia, joint surgery and intra-articular injections pose risk situations for the development of joint infections. The most frequent causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus but other relevant pathogens include coagulase-negative staphylococci, streptococci and mycobacteria. Synovial fluid analysis (e.g. appearance, cell count and microbiological examination) is the most important step to establish the diagnosis. The two main components of therapy consist of joint drainage and antibiotic treatment. The approach to periprosthetic joint infections depends on the duration of symptoms, causative organism and individual factors.

  18. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-05-17

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented.

  19. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Maria; Gottlieb, Beth S

    2012-07-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthrithis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease of childhood.JIA is a chronic disease that is associated with periods of disease flares and periods of disease inactivity.Early, aggressive treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, intra-articular corticosteroid injections, or methotrexate, has significantly improved the outcome of most children who have JIA. Biologics have been shown to be both safe and effective for the treatment of more aggressive forms of arthritis and for uveitis. Long-term safety data of biologics is still uncertain. In the near future, it is hoped that genetic testing will allow earlier diagnosis of JIA as well as help predict the disease course of children who have JIA. Genetic analysis also may allow physicians to target therapies more effectively. It is hoped that development of more specific therapies will decrease overall immunosuppression and other associated toxicities.

  20. Serotonin uptake rates in platelets from angiotensin II-induced hypertensive mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Preeti; Fletcher, Terry W; Li, Yicong; Rusch, Nancy J; Kilic, Fusun

    2013-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a critical component of the renin-angiotensin system that contributes to hypertension. Although platelets in blood from hypertensive subjects have an abnormal biological profile, it is unclear if circulating Ang II influences platelet aggregation or thrombus formation. One of the abnormalities presented to the platelets during hypertension is an elevated plasma concentration of serotonin (5-HT) caused by reduced 5-HT uptake secondary to loss of the 5-HT transporter (SERT) on the platelet plasma membrane. In the current study, we evaluated in vivo platelet function after 7 days of subcutaneous Ang II infusion to establish hypertension in mice and additionally assessed the biology of isolated platelets exposed to Ang II in vitro. The administration of Ang II elevated systolic blood pressure, but markers of platelet activation including P-selectin and (PE)Jon/A staining were not changed. However, the aggregation response to collagen was reduced in isolated platelets from Ang II-infused mice, which also showed reduced 5-HT uptake by SERT. In vitro exposure of isolated platelets to Ang II also resulted in a loss of surface SERT associated with a reduced aggregation response to collagen. These abnormalities were reversed by increasing concentrations of the Ang II receptor antagonist, valsartan. Interestingly, SERT KO mice failed to fully develop hypertension in response to Ang II infusion and isolated platelets from these animals were insensitive to the anti-aggregatory influence of Ang II. Thus, Ang II blunts the aggregation responses of platelets and the mechanism underlying this action may involve a loss of SERT on the platelet plasma membrane. The latter event depletes intracellular 5-HT in platelets, an event that is associated with reduced aggregation. The widespread use of antihypertensive drugs that target the renin-angiotensin system suggest the potential clinical utility of our findings and emphasize the importance of understanding

  1. Serotonin uptake rates in platelets from angiotensin II-induced hypertensive mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Preeti; Fletcher, Terry W.; Li, Yicong; Rusch, Nancy J.; Kilic, Fusun

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a critical component of the renin-angiotensin system that contributes to hypertension. Although platelets in blood from hypertensive subjects have an abnormal biological profile, it is unclear if circulating Ang II influences platelet aggregation or thrombus formation. One of the abnormalities presented to the platelets during hypertension is an elevated plasma concentration of serotonin (5-HT) caused by reduced 5-HT uptake secondary to loss of the 5-HT transporter (SERT) on the platelet plasma membrane. In the current study, we evaluated in vivo platelet function after 7 days of subcutaneous Ang II infusion to establish hypertension in mice and additionally assessed the biology of isolated platelets exposed to Ang II in vitro. The administration of Ang II elevated systolic blood pressure, but markers of platelet activation including P-selectin and PEJon/A staining were not changed. However, the aggregation response to collagen was reduced in isolated platelets from Ang II-infused mice, which also showed reduced 5-HT uptake by SERT. In vitro exposure of isolated platelets to Ang II also resulted in a loss of surface SERT associated with a reduced aggregation response to collagen. These abnormalities were reversed by increasing concentrations of the Ang II receptor antagonist, valsartan. Interestingly, SERT KO mice failed to fully develop hypertension in response to Ang II infusion and isolated platelets from these animals were insensitive to the anti-aggregatory influence of Ang II. Thus, Ang II blunts the aggregation responses of platelets and the mechanism underlying this action may involve a loss of SERT on the platelet plasma membrane. The latter event depletes intracellular 5-HT in platelets, an event that is associated with reduced aggregation. The widespread use of antihypertensive drugs that target the renin-angiotensin system suggest the potential clinical utility of our findings and emphasize the importance of understanding the

  2. High sodium augments angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through the ERK 1/2-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Rahman, Asadur; Nakano, Daisuke; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ma, Hong; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced vascular injury is exacerbated by high-salt diets. This study examined the effects of high-sodium level on Ang II-induced cell proliferation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The cells were cultured in a standard medium containing 137.5 mmol l(-1) of sodium. The high-sodium medium (140 mmol l(-1)) contained additional sodium chloride. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation was determined by western blot analysis. Cell proliferation was evaluated by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation. Ang II (100 nmol l(-1)) significantly increased ERK 1/2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation in the both medium containing standard sodium and high sodium. High-sodium level augmented Ang II-induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation compared with standard sodium. Pre-treatment with candesartan (1 μmol l(-1), Ang II type 1 receptor blocker) or PD98095 (10 μmol l(-1), ERK kinase iinhibitor) abolished the proliferative effect induced by high sodium/Ang II. Pre-treatment with 5-N,N-hexamethylene amiloride (30 μmol l(-1), Na(+)/H(+) exchanger type 1 (NHE-1) inhibitor), but not SN-6 (10 μmol l(-1), Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger inhibitor) or ouabain (1 mmol l(-1), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor) attenuated ERK 1/2 phosphorylation or cell proliferation. Osmotic pressure or chloride had no effect on Ang II-induced proliferative changes. High-sodium level did not affect Ang II receptor expression. Ang II increased intracellular pH via NHE-1 activation, and high-sodium level augmented the pH increase induced by Ang II. These data suggest that high-sodium level directly augments Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation through NHE-1- and ERK 1/2-dependent pathways and may offer new insights into the mechanisms of vascular remodeling by high-sodium/Ang II.

  3. The collagenous gastroenteritides: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Purva; McKenna, Barbara J

    2010-10-01

    Collagenous gastritis, collagenous sprue, and collagenous colitis share striking histologic similarities and occur together in some patients. They also share some drug and disease associations. Pediatric cases of collagenous gastritis, however, lack most of these associations. The etiologies of the collagenous gastroenteritides are not known, so it is not clear whether they are similar because they share pathogeneses, or because they indicate a common histologic response to varying injuries. The features, disease and drug associations, and the inquiries into the pathogenesis of these disorders are reviewed. PMID:20923305

  4. Collagen interactions: Drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Collagen is a major component in a wide range of drug delivery systems and biomaterial applications. Its basic physical and structural properties, together with its low immunogenicity and natural turnover, are keys to its biocompatibility and effectiveness. In addition to its material properties, the collagen triple-helix interacts with a large number of molecules that trigger biological events. Collagen interactions with cell surface receptors regulate many cellular processes, while interactions with other ECM components are critical for matrix structure and remodeling. Collagen also interacts with enzymes involved in its biosynthesis and degradation, including matrix metalloproteinases. Over the past decade, much information has been gained about the nature and specificity of collagen interactions with its partners. These studies have defined collagen sequences responsible for binding and the high-resolution structures of triple-helical peptides bound to its natural binding partners. Strategies to target collagen interactions are already being developed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies to interfere with collagen fibril formation and the use of triple-helical peptides to direct liposomes to melanoma cells. The molecular information about collagen interactions will further serve as a foundation for computational studies to design small molecules that can interfere with specific interactions or target tumor cells. Intelligent control of collagen biological interactions within a material context will expand the effectiveness of collagen-based drug delivery.

  5. Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... Molecular differences between knee and hip joints with rheumatoid arthritis may inform more personal treatment strategies. Sebastian Kaulitzki/Hemera/Thinkstock Knee and hip joints with rheumatoid arthritis have differing genetic markers linked to inflammation, suggesting ...

  6. New Treatments Helping Kids with Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159984.html New Treatments Helping Kids With Juvenile Arthritis Several biologics have been approved by the FDA ... 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New treatments for juvenile arthritis offer hope to children with the chronic autoimmune ...

  7. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Definition and classification].

    PubMed

    Deslandre, C

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of diseases defined by the presence of arthritis of more than 6 weeks duration in patients aged less than 16 years and with unknown etiology. The international classification based on clinical and biological criteria define each type of JIA: systemic, oligoarticular, polyarticular with and without rheumatoid factor, enthesitis-related arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. However, some discussions persist concerning systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whose clinical symptoms and pathogenic mechanisms are quite similar to those observed in autoinflammatory diseases, arthritis with antinuclear factors (poly- and oligoarticular) that could be considered as a homogenous group, and a family history of psoriasis that frequently led to unclassified arthritis. Better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms should improve the initial clinical classification with more homogeneous groups of patients and reduce the number of unclassified cases of arthritis. PMID:26968301

  8. Intrarenal mouse renin-angiotensin system during ANG II-induced hypertension and ACE inhibition.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A; Satou, Ryousuke; Ohashi, Naro; Semprun-Prieto, Laura C; Katsurada, Akemi; Kim, Catherine; Upchurch, G M; Prieto, Minolfa C; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition (ACEi) ameliorates the development of hypertension and the intrarenal ANG II augmentation in ANG II-infused mice. To determine if these effects are associated with changes in the mouse intrarenal renin-angiotensin system, the expression of angiotensinogen (AGT), renin, ACE, angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) mRNA (by quanitative RT-PCR) and protein [by Western blot (WB) and/or immunohistochemistry (IHC)] were analyzed. C57BL/6J male mice (9-12 wk old) were distributed as controls (n = 10), ANG II infused (ANG II = 8, 400 ng x kg(-1) x min(-1) for 12 days), ACEi only (ACEi = 10, lisinopril, 100 mg/l), and ANG II infused + ACEi (ANG II + ACEi = 11). When compared with controls (1.00), AGT protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.29 +/- 0.13, P < 0.05), and this was not prevented by ACEi (ACEi + ANG II, 1.31 +/- 0.14, P < 0.05). ACE protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.21 +/- 0.08, P < 0.05), and it was reduced by ACEi alone (0.88 +/- 0.07, P < 0.05) or in combination with ANG II (0.80 +/- 0.07, P < 0.05). AT(1)R protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.27 +/- 0.06, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.17 +/- 0.06, P < 0.05) but not ANG II + ACEi [1.15 +/- 0.06, not significant (NS)]. Tubular renin protein (semiquantified by IHC) was increased by ANG II (1.49 +/- 0.23, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.57 +/- 0.15, P < 0.05), but not ANG II + ACEi (1.10 +/- 0.15, NS). No significant changes were observed in AGT, ACE, or AT(1)R mRNA. In summary, reduced responses of intrarenal tubular renin, ACE, and the AT(1)R protein to the stimulatory effects of chronic ANG II infusions, in the presence of ACEi, are associated with the effects of this treatment to ameliorate augmentations in blood pressure and intrarenal ANG II content during ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:19846570

  9. Intrarenal mouse renin-angiotensin system during ANG II-induced hypertension and ACE inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Satou, Ryousuke; Ohashi, Naro; Semprun-Prieto, Laura C.; Katsurada, Akemi; Kim, Catherine; Upchurch, G. M.; Prieto, Minolfa C.; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition (ACEi) ameliorates the development of hypertension and the intrarenal ANG II augmentation in ANG II-infused mice. To determine if these effects are associated with changes in the mouse intrarenal renin-angiotensin system, the expression of angiotensinogen (AGT), renin, ACE, angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) mRNA (by quanitative RT-PCR) and protein [by Western blot (WB) and/or immunohistochemistry (IHC)] were analyzed. C57BL/6J male mice (9–12 wk old) were distributed as controls (n = 10), ANG II infused (ANG II = 8, 400 ng·kg−1·min−1 for 12 days), ACEi only (ACEi = 10, lisinopril, 100 mg/l), and ANG II infused + ACEi (ANG II + ACEi = 11). When compared with controls (1.00), AGT protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.29 ± 0.13, P < 0.05), and this was not prevented by ACEi (ACEi + ANG II, 1.31 ± 0.14, P < 0.05). ACE protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.21 ± 0.08, P < 0.05), and it was reduced by ACEi alone (0.88 ± 0.07, P < 0.05) or in combination with ANG II (0.80 ± 0.07, P < 0.05). AT1R protein (by WB) was increased by ANG II (1.27 ± 0.06, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.17 ± 0.06, P < 0.05) but not ANG II + ACEi [1.15 ± 0.06, not significant (NS)]. Tubular renin protein (semiquantified by IHC) was increased by ANG II (1.49 ± 0.23, P < 0.05) and ACEi (1.57 ± 0.15, P < 0.05), but not ANG II + ACEi (1.10 ± 0.15, NS). No significant changes were observed in AGT, ACE, or AT1R mRNA. In summary, reduced responses of intrarenal tubular renin, ACE, and the AT1R protein to the stimulatory effects of chronic ANG II infusions, in the presence of ACEi, are associated with the effects of this treatment to ameliorate augmentations in blood pressure and intrarenal ANG II content during ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:19846570

  10. Chronic resveratrol reverses a mild angiotensin II-induced pressor effect in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Gordish, Kevin L; Beierwaltes, William H

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is reported to reduce blood pressure in animal models of hypertension, but the mechanisms are unknown. We have shown that resveratrol infusion increases sodium excretion. We hypothesized that chronic ingestion of resveratrol would reduce angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced increases in blood pressure by decreasing oxidative stress and by also decreasing sodium reabsorption through a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. We infused rats with vehicle or 80 μg Ang II/d over 4 weeks. Vehicle or Ang II-infused rats were individually housed, pair fed, and placed on a diet of normal chow or normal chow plus 146 mg resveratrol/d. Groups included 1) control, 2) resveratrol-fed, 3) Ang II-treated, and 4) Ang II plus resveratrol. Systolic blood pressure was measured by tail cuff. During the 4th week, rats were placed in metabolic caging for urine collection. NO2/NO3 and 8-isoprostane excretion were measured. Ang II increased systolic blood pressure in the 1st week by +14±5 mmHg (P<0.05) in Group 3 and +10±3 mmHg (P<0.05) in Group 4, respectively. Blood pressure was unchanged in Groups 1 and 2. After 4 weeks, blood pressure remained elevated in Group 3 rats with Ang II (+9±3 mmHg, P<0.05), but in Group 4, blood pressure was no longer elevated (+2±2 mmHg). We found no significant differences between the groups in sodium excretion or cumulative sodium balance (18.49±0.12, 17.75±0.16, 17.97±0.17, 18.46±0.18 μEq Na+/7 d in Groups 1-4, respectively). Urinary excretion of NO2/NO3 in the four groups was 1) 1631±207 μmol/24 h, 2) 1045±236 μmol/24 h, 3) 1490±161 μmol/24 h, and 4) 609±17 μmol/24 h. 8-Isoprostane excretion was 1) 63.85±19.39 nmol/24 h, 2) 73.57±22.02 nmol/24 h, 3) 100.69±37.62 nmol/24 h, and 4) 103.00±38.88 nmol/24 h. We conclude that chronic resveratrol supplementation does not blunt Ang II-increased blood pressure, and while resveratrol has mild depressor effects, these do not seem to be due to natriuresis or enhanced renal nitric oxide

  11. Chronic resveratrol reverses a mild angiotensin II-induced pressor effect in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Gordish, Kevin L; Beierwaltes, William H

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is reported to reduce blood pressure in animal models of hypertension, but the mechanisms are unknown. We have shown that resveratrol infusion increases sodium excretion. We hypothesized that chronic ingestion of resveratrol would reduce angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced increases in blood pressure by decreasing oxidative stress and by also decreasing sodium reabsorption through a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. We infused rats with vehicle or 80 μg Ang II/d over 4 weeks. Vehicle or Ang II-infused rats were individually housed, pair fed, and placed on a diet of normal chow or normal chow plus 146 mg resveratrol/d. Groups included 1) control, 2) resveratrol-fed, 3) Ang II-treated, and 4) Ang II plus resveratrol. Systolic blood pressure was measured by tail cuff. During the 4th week, rats were placed in metabolic caging for urine collection. NO2/NO3 and 8-isoprostane excretion were measured. Ang II increased systolic blood pressure in the 1st week by +14±5 mmHg (P<0.05) in Group 3 and +10±3 mmHg (P<0.05) in Group 4, respectively. Blood pressure was unchanged in Groups 1 and 2. After 4 weeks, blood pressure remained elevated in Group 3 rats with Ang II (+9±3 mmHg, P<0.05), but in Group 4, blood pressure was no longer elevated (+2±2 mmHg). We found no significant differences between the groups in sodium excretion or cumulative sodium balance (18.49±0.12, 17.75±0.16, 17.97±0.17, 18.46±0.18 μEq Na+/7 d in Groups 1–4, respectively). Urinary excretion of NO2/NO3 in the four groups was 1) 1631±207 μmol/24 h, 2) 1045±236 μmol/24 h, 3) 1490±161 μmol/24 h, and 4) 609±17 μmol/24 h. 8-Isoprostane excretion was 1) 63.85±19.39 nmol/24 h, 2) 73.57±22.02 nmol/24 h, 3) 100.69±37.62 nmol/24 h, and 4) 103.00±38.88 nmol/24 h. We conclude that chronic resveratrol supplementation does not blunt Ang II-increased blood pressure, and while resveratrol has mild depressor effects, these do not seem to be due to natriuresis or enhanced renal nitric oxide

  12. Anti-inflammatory effects of polyphenolic-enriched red raspberry extract in an antigen-induced arthritis rat model.

    PubMed

    Jean-Gilles, Dinorah; Li, Liya; Ma, Hang; Yuan, Tao; Chichester, Clinton O; Seeram, Navindra P

    2012-06-13

    The red raspberry ( Rubus idaeus ) fruit contains bioactive polyphenols including anthocyanins and ellagitannins with reported anti-inflammatory properties. This study sought to investigate the cartilage-protecting and anti-inflammatory effects of a polyphenolic-enriched red raspberry extract (RRE; standardized to total polyphenol, anthocyanin, and ellagitannin contents) using (1) an in vitro bovine nasal explant cell culture model and (2) an in vivo adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model. RRE contained 20% total polyphenols (as gallic acid equivalents), 5% anthocyanins (as cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents), and 9.25% ellagitannins (as ellagic acid equivalents). In the in vitro studies, bovine nasal explants were stimulated with 10 ng/mL IL-1β to induce the release of proteoglycan and type II collagen. On treatment with RRE (50 μg/mL), there was a decrease in the rate of degradation of both proteoglycan and type II collagen. In the in vivo antigen-induced arthritis rat model, animals were gavaged daily with RRE (at doses of 30 and 120 mg/kg, respectively) for 30 days after adjuvant injection (750 μg of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suspension in squalene). At the higher dose, animals treated with RRE had a lower incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control animals. Also, histological analyses revealed significant inhibition of inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage damage, and bone resorption by RRE. This study suggests that red raspberry polyphenols may afford cartilage protection and/or modulate the onset and severity of arthritis.

  13. Piperlongumine Suppresses Dendritic Cell Maturation by Reducing Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Has Therapeutic Potential for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Youjun; Shi, Maohua; Qiu, Qian; Huang, Mingcheng; Zeng, Shan; Zou, Yaoyao; Zhan, Zhongping; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan; Xu, Hanshi

    2016-06-15

    Piperlongumine (PLM) is a natural product from the plant Piper longum that inhibits platelet aggregation, atherosclerosis plaque formation, and tumor cell growth. It has potential value in immunomodulation and the management of autoimmune diseases. In this study, we investigated the role of PLM in regulating the differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells (DCs), a critical regulator of immune tolerance, and evaluated its clinical effects in a rheumatoid arthritis mouse model. We found that PLM treatment reduced LPS-induced murine bone marrow-derived DC maturation, characterized by reduced expression of CD80/86, secretion of MCP-1, IL-12p70, IL-6, TNFα, IFN-γ, and IL-23, and reduced alloproliferation of T cells; however, PLM does not affect cell differentiation. Furthermore, PLM reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by DCs and inhibited the activation of p38, JNK, NF-κB, and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Conversely, PLM increased the expression of GSTP1 and carbonyl reductase 1, two enzymes that counteract ROS effects. ROS inhibition by exogenous N-acetyl-l-cysteine suppressed DC maturation. PLM treatment improved the severity of arthritis and reduced in vivo splenic DC maturation, collagen-specific CD4(+) T cell responses, and ROS production in mice with collagen-induced arthritis. Taken together, these results suggest that PLM inhibits DC maturation by reducing intracellular ROS production and has potential as a therapeutic agent for rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Systemic Administration of Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells Ameliorates Murine Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Louise J; Collins, Helen L; Thompson, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    The expression of various cell surface molecules and the production of certain cytokines are important mechanisms by which dendritic cells (DC) are able to bias immune responses. This paper describes the effects of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α on DC phenotype and function. TNF-α treatment resulted in upregulation of MHC class II and CD86 in the absence of increased cell surface CD40 and CD80 or the production of IL-12. Additionally TNF-α treated cells were able to bias T cell responses towards an anti-inflammatory profile. On a note of caution this tolerogenic phenotype of the DC was not stable upon subsequent TLR-4 ligation as a 4 hour pulse of the TNF-α treated DC with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in the restoration of IL-12 production and an enhancement of their T cell stimulatory capacity which resulted in an increased IFN-γ production. However, TNF-α treated DC, when administered in vivo, were shown to ameliorate disease in collagen induced arthritis, an experimental model of inflammatory joint disease. Mice receiving TNF-α treated DC but not LPS matured DC had a delayed onset, and significantly reduced severity, of arthritis. Disease suppression was associated with reduced levels of collagen specific IgG2a and decreased inflammatory cell infiltration into affected joints. In summary the treatment of DC with TNF-α generates an antigen presenting cell with a phenotype that can reduce the pro-inflammatory response and direct the immune system towards a disease modifying, anti-inflammatory state. PMID:19156221

  15. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  16. WOUND HEALING AND COLLAGEN FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Russell; Benditt, Earl P.

    1961-01-01

    The regular sequence encountered in healing guinea pig skin wounds has been examined by methods of light and electron microscopy. Observations on cell populations, their fine structure, and fibril formation in the connective tissue have been made. Linear incisions in the skin of normal female guinea pigs weighing 300 to 350 grams were allowed to heal. The wounds were then excised, fixed with buffered 2 per cent osmium tetroxide, and postfixed in neutral buffered formalin, at 16 and 24 hours and at 3, 5, 9, and 14 days after wounding. They were then embedded in epoxy resin. In the inflammatory phase the exudate observed in the early wounds consists largely of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes, macrophages, fibrin, and free extracellular organelles from the disrupted inflammatory cells. These organelles later appear in vacuoles in the cytoplasm of the macrophages. Fibroblasts first appear at 24 hours, and show extensive development and dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum, which sometimes contains moderately dense flocculent material. In addition, these fibroblasts have enlarged mitochondria and condensations of filamentous material within the cytoplasm near the cell surface. Occasional myelin figures and moderately dense, 0.5 to 1.0 micron bodies are found within the cytoplasm of the early fibroblasts. Collagen fibrils are first seen at 3 days extracellularly near the cell surfaces. They appear at the later times in two populations of sizes. With increasing wound age the fibroblasts retain their morphology and the wounds decrease in cellularity concomitantly with the formation of increasing amounts of collagen. Several proposed mechanisms of collagen fibril formation are discussed in relation to the observed phenomena. The problem of correlating fibril diameter with the appearance of the periodic structure of collagen in relation to the minimal size fibril which would be anticipated to display this appearance is discussed. PMID:14494202

  17. Asymmetrical hypersensitivity to bovine collagen.

    PubMed

    Somerville, P; Wray, R C

    1993-05-01

    We report a unique patient with true asymmetrical hypersensitivity to bovine collagen. Hypersensitivity is the development of an inflammatory response at a treatment site after a negative skin test. She developed an inflammatory response in only one of two simultaneously injected sites. About 1.5% of patients with a negative skin test have a hypersensitivity reaction consisting of firmness, erythema, and swelling. The signs and symptoms generally resolve spontaneously in a few months.

  18. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  19. Immunostimulation effect of jellyfish collagen.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Takuya; Ueno, Masashi; Goto, Yoko; Shiraishi, Ryusuke; Doi, Mikiharu; Akiyama, Koichi; Yamauchi, Satoshi

    2006-09-01

    Certain edible large jellyfishes belonging to the order Rhizostomeae are consumed in large quantities in China and Japan. The exumbrella part of the edible jellyfish Stomolophus nomurai was cut and soaked in dilute hydrochloric acid solution (pH 3.0) for 12 h, and heated at 121 degrees C for 20 min. The immunostimulation effects of the jellyfish extract were examined. The jellyfish extract enhanced IgM production of human hybridoma HB4C5 cells 34-fold. IgM and IgG production of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were also accelerated, 2.8- and 1.4-fold respectively. Moreover, production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by human PBL was stimulated 100- and 17-fold respectively. Collagenase treatment inactivated the immunostimulation activity of the jellyfish extract. In addition, purified collagen from bovine Achilles' tendon accelerated IgM production of hybridoma cells. These facts mean that collagen has an immunostimulation effect, and that the active substance in jellyfish extract is collagen.

  20. Immunostimulation effect of jellyfish collagen.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Takuya; Ueno, Masashi; Goto, Yoko; Shiraishi, Ryusuke; Doi, Mikiharu; Akiyama, Koichi; Yamauchi, Satoshi

    2006-09-01

    Certain edible large jellyfishes belonging to the order Rhizostomeae are consumed in large quantities in China and Japan. The exumbrella part of the edible jellyfish Stomolophus nomurai was cut and soaked in dilute hydrochloric acid solution (pH 3.0) for 12 h, and heated at 121 degrees C for 20 min. The immunostimulation effects of the jellyfish extract were examined. The jellyfish extract enhanced IgM production of human hybridoma HB4C5 cells 34-fold. IgM and IgG production of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were also accelerated, 2.8- and 1.4-fold respectively. Moreover, production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha by human PBL was stimulated 100- and 17-fold respectively. Collagenase treatment inactivated the immunostimulation activity of the jellyfish extract. In addition, purified collagen from bovine Achilles' tendon accelerated IgM production of hybridoma cells. These facts mean that collagen has an immunostimulation effect, and that the active substance in jellyfish extract is collagen. PMID:16960386

  1. Pharmaceutical potential of tacrolimus-loaded albumin nanoparticles having targetability to rheumatoid arthritis tissues.

    PubMed

    Thao, Le Quang; Byeon, Hyeong Jun; Lee, Changkyu; Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, Eun Seong; Choi, Han-Gon; Park, Eun-Seok; Youn, Yu Seok

    2016-01-30

    Albumin is considered an attractive dug carrier for hydrophobic drugs to target inflamed joints of rheumatoid arthritis. This study focused on the pharmaceutical potential of albumin-based nanoparticles (NPs) on delivery of tacrolimus (TAC) to enhance targetability and anti-arthritic efficacy. TAC-loaded human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles (TAC HSA-NPs) were prepared using the nab™ technology. The resulting NPs were 185.8 ± 6.8 nm in diameter and had a zeta potential value of -30.5 ± 1.1 mV, as determined by dynamic light scattering. Particles were uniformly spherical in shape as determined by transmission electron microscopy. The encapsulation efficacy of TAC was 79.3 ± 3.7% and the water solubility was over 46 times greater than that of free TAC. TAC was gradually released from NPs over 24h, which is sufficient time for targeting and treatment of the NPs in inflamed arthritis via intravenous injection. In vitro study using splenocytes excised from spleens of mice following induction of arthritis using collagen clearly demonstrated the anti-proliferative activity of TAC HSA-NPs on activated T cells compared with non-activated T cells. Furthermore, TAC HSA-NPs displayed significantly more anti-arthritic activity than TAC formulations including intravenously administered TAC solution or oral TAC suspension, as reflected by the incidence of arthritis and clinical score (1.6 vs. 3.2 and 5.0, respectively). These improvements were due to the targetability of HSA that facilitated the accumulation of TAC HSA-NPs at inflamed arthritis sites. TAC HSA-NPs are a promising drug delivery system to enhance water solubility and increase accumulation in joints for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Chiara; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Gattamelata, Angelica; Vavala, Caterina; Valesini, Guido; Iagnocco, Annamaria

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by synovial inflammation that can lead to structural damage of cartilage, bone and tendons. Assessing the inflammatory activity and the severity is essential in RA to help rheumatologists in adopting proper therapeutic strategies and in evaluating disease outcome and response to treatment. In the last years musculoskeletal (MS) ultrasonography (US) underwent tremendous technological development of equipment with increased sensitivity in detecting a wide set of joint and soft tissues abnormalities. In RA MSUS with the use of Doppler modalities is a useful imaging tool to depict inflammatory abnormalities (i.e. synovitis, tenosynovitis and bursitis) and structural changes (i.e. bone erosions, cartilage damage and tendon lesions). In addition, MSUS has been demonstrated to be able to monitor the response to different therapies in RA to guide local diagnostic and therapeutic procedures such as biopsy, fluid aspirations and injections. Future applications based on the development of new tools may improve the role of MSUS in RA.

  3. Collagen defects in lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Chan, D; Mascara, T; Rogers, J G; Cole, W G

    1986-12-15

    Quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of collagen were observed in tissues and fibroblast cultures from 17 consecutive cases of lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The content of type I collagen was reduced in OI dermis and bone and the content of type III collagen was also reduced in the dermis. Normal bone contained 99.3% type I and 0.7% type V collagen whereas OI bone contained a lower proportion of type I, a greater proportion of type V and a significant amount of type III collagen. The type III and V collagens appeared to be structurally normal. In contrast, abnormal type I collagen chains, which migrated slowly on electrophoresis, were observed in all babies with OI. Cultured fibroblasts from five babies produced a mixture of normal and abnormal type I collagens; the abnormal collagen was not secreted in two cases and was slowly secreted in the others. Fibroblasts from 12 babies produced only abnormal type I collagens and they were also secreted slowly. The slower electrophoretic migration of the abnormal chains was due to enzymic overmodification of the lysine residues. The distribution of the cyanogen bromide peptides containing the overmodified residues was used to localize the underlying structural abnormalities to three regions of the type I procollagen chains. These regions included the carboxy-propeptide of the pro alpha 1(I)-chain, the helical alpha 1(I) CB7 peptide and the helical alpha 1(I) CB8 and CB3 peptides. In one baby a basic charge mutation was observed in the alpha 1(I) CB7 peptide and in another baby a basic charge mutation was observed in the alpha 1(I) CB8 peptide. The primary defects in lethal perinatal OI appear to reside in the type I collagen chains. Type III and V collagens did not appear to compensate for the deficiency of type I collagen in the tissues.

  4. Genetics of Rheumatoid Arthritis — A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T.; Mikecz, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    The “Bermuda triangle” of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11–37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci — Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively — have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics. PMID:23288628

  5. [Differential diagnosis of acute arthritis].

    PubMed

    Eviltis, Egidijus

    2003-01-01

    Acute arthritis can first present as a symptom of dangerous and rapidly progressing disease. It is quite easy to differentiate between arthritis and periarthritis. More problematical is correct early differential diagnosis of the acute arthritis. Determining whether one, several or many joints are affected can narrow the diagnostic possibilities. Arthrocentesis and synovial fluid testing provide much information and should be done at initial evaluation if possible. The presence or absence of fever, rash, family history of joint disease and exposure to infective organisms can further direct diagnostic studies and treatment. In general, to avoid masking clues, drug therapy should be delayed for mild symptoms until diagnosis is complete. This article is designed mostly for primary care physicians, residents and includes author's original data and review of recommended reading. PMID:12794379

  6. Preventive effect of gomisin J from Schisandra chinensis on angiotensin II-induced hypertension via an increased nitric oxide bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Ye, Byeong Hyeok; Lee, Seung Jin; Choi, Young Whan; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae

    2015-03-01

    Gomisin J (GJ) is a small molecular weight lignan found in Schisandra chinensis and has been demonstrated to have vasodilatory activity. In this study, the authors investigated the effect of GJ on blood pressure (BP) in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertensive mice. In addition, we determined the relative potencies of gomisin A (GA) and GJ with respect to vasodilatory activity and antihypertensive effects. C57/BL6 mice infused s.c. with Ang II (2 μg kg(-1) min(-1) for 2 weeks) showed an increase in BP and a decrease in plasma nitric oxide (NO) metabolites. In the thoracic aortas of Ang II-induced hypertensive mice, a decrease in vascular NO was accompanied by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Furthermore, these alterations in BP, plasma concentrations of NO metabolites and in the vascular productions of NO and ROS in Ang II-treated mice were reversed by the co-administration of GJ (1 and 3 μg kg(-1) min(-1)). In in vitro studies, Ang II decreased the cellular concentration of NO, which was accompanied by a reduction in phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and an increase in ROS production. These eNOS phosphorylation and ROS production changes in Ang II-treated cells were also reversed by GJ pretreatment (0-3 μg ml(-1)). Interestingly, the vasodilatory and antihypertensive effects of GJ were more prominent than those of GA. Collectively, an increase in BP in mice treated with Ang II was markedly attenuated by GJ, which was attributed to the preservations of vascular NO bioavailability and eNOS function, and to the inhibition of ROS production in Ang II-induced hypertensive mice.

  7. Caveolin-1 prevents sustained angiotensin II-induced resistance artery constriction and obesity-induced high blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Istvan; Feher, Attila; Lucas, Rudolf; Fulton, David J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The type 1 angiotensin II (ANG II) receptor (AT1R) undergoes internalization following stimulation by ANG II. Internalization reduces cell surface AT1Rs, and it is required for AT1R resensitization. In this process AT1R may interact with caveolin-1 (Cav1), the main scaffolding protein of caveolae. We hypothesized that the interaction between Cav1 and AT1R delays AT1R resensitization and thereby prevents sustained ANG II-induced resistance artery (RA) constriction under normal conditions and in experimental obesity. In rat and mouse skeletal muscle RA (diameter: ∼90–120 μm) ANG II-induced constrictions were reduced upon repeated (30-min apart) administrations. Upon disruption of caveolae with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or in RA of Cav1 knockout mice, repeated ANG II applications resulted in essentially maintained constrictions. In vascular smooth muscle cells, AT1R interacted with Cav1, and the degree of cell surface interactions was reduced by long-term (15-min), but not short-term (2-min), exposure to ANG II. When Cav1 was silenced, the amount of membrane-associated AT1R was significantly reduced by a short-term ANG II exposure. Moreover, Cav1 knockout mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited augmented and sustained RA constriction to ANG II and had elevated systemic blood pressure, when compared with normal or high-fat fed wild-type mice. Thus, Cav1, through a direct interaction, delays internalization and subsequent resensitization of AT1R. We suggest that this mechanism prevents sustained ANG II-induced RA constriction and elevated systemic blood pressure in diet-induced obesity. PMID:25527780

  8. COX-2 mediates angiotensin II-induced (pro)renin receptor expression in the rat renal medulla.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Lu, Xiaohan; Peng, Kexin; Zhou, Li; Li, Chunling; Wang, Weidong; Yu, Xueqing; Kohan, Donald E; Zhu, Shu-Feng; Yang, Tianxin

    2014-07-01

    (Pro)renin receptor (PRR) is predominantly expressed in the distal nephron where it is activated by angiotensin II (ANG II), resulting in increased renin activity in the renal medulla thereby amplifying the de novo generation and action of local ANG II. The goal of the present study was to test the role of cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) in meditating ANG II-induced PRR expression in the renal medulla in vitro and in vivo. Exposure of primary rat inner medullary collecting duct cells to ANG II induced sequential increases in COX-2 and PRR protein expression. When the cells were pretreated with a COX-2 inhibitor NS-398, ANG II-induced upregulation of PRR protein expression was almost completely abolished, in parallel with the changes in medium active renin content. The inhibitory effect of NS-398 on the PRR expression was reversed by adding exogenous PGE2. A 14-day ANG II infusion elevated renal medullary PRR expression and active and total renin content in parallel with increased urinary renin, all of which were remarkably suppressed by the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. In contrast, plasma and renal cortical active and total renin content were suppressed by ANG II treatment, an effect that was unaffected by COX-2 inhibition. Systolic blood pressure was elevated with ANG II infusion, which was attenuated by the COX-2 inhibition. Overall, the results obtained from in vitro and in vivo studies established a crucial role of COX-2 in mediating upregulation of renal medullary PRR expression and renin content during ANG II hypertension.

  9. Tanshinone IIA Prevents Leu27IGF-II-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Mediated by Estrogen Receptor and Subsequent Akt Activation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yueh-Shan; Wang, Hsueh-Fang; Pai, Pei-Ying; Jong, Gwo-Ping; Lai, Chao-Hung; Chung, Li-Chin; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; HsuanDay, Cecilia; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-01-01

    IGF-IIR plays important roles as a key regulator in myocardial pathological hypertrophy and apoptosis, which subsequently lead to heart failure. Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen) is a traditional Chinese medicinal herb used to treat cardiovascular diseases. Tanshinone IIA is an active compound in Danshen and is structurally similar to 17[Formula: see text]-estradiol (E[Formula: see text]. However, whether tanshinone IIA improves cardiomyocyte survival in pathological hypertrophy through estrogen receptor (ER) regulation remains unclear. This study investigates the role of ER signaling in mediating the protective effects of tanshinone IIA on IGF-IIR-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Leu27IGF-II (IGF-II analog) was shown in this study to specifically activate IGF-IIR expression and ICI 182,780 (ICI), an ER antagonist used to investigate tanshinone IIA estrogenic activity. We demonstrated that tanshinone IIA significantly enhanced Akt phosphorylation through ER activation to inhibit Leu27IGF-II-induced calcineurin expression and subsequent NFATc3 nuclear translocation to suppress myocardial hypertrophy. Tanshinone IIA reduced the cell size and suppressed ANP and BNP, inhibiting antihypertrophic effects induced by Leu27IGF-II. The cardioprotective properties of tanshinone IIA that inhibit Leu27IGF-II-induced cell hypertrophy and promote cell survival were reversed by ICI. Furthermore, ICI significantly reduced phospho-Akt, Ly294002 (PI3K inhibitor), and PI3K siRNA significantly reduced the tanshinone IIA-induced protective effect. The above results suggest that tanshinone IIA inhibited cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, which was mediated through ER, by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway and inhibiting Leu27IGF-II-induced calcineurin and NFATC3. Tanshinone IIA exerted strong estrogenic activity and therefore represented a novel selective ER modulator that inhibits IGF-IIR signaling to block cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26621443

  10. Genetic knockdown of estrogen receptor-alpha in the subfornical organ augments ANG II-induced hypertension in female mice.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Zhang, Zhongming; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2015-03-15

    The present study tested the hypotheses that 1) ERα in the brain plays a key role in the estrogen-protective effects against ANG II-induced hypertension, and 2) that the subfornical organ (SFO) is a key site where ERα mediates these protective actions. In this study, a "floxed" ERα transgenic mouse line (ERα(flox)) was used to create models in which ERα was knocked down in the brain or just in the SFO. Female mice with ERα ablated in the nervous system (Nestin-ERα(-) mice) showed greater increases in blood pressure (BP) in response to ANG II. Furthermore, females with ERα knockdown specifically in the SFO [SFO adenovirus-Cre (Ad-Cre) injected ERα(flox) mice] also showed an enhanced pressor response to ANG II. Immunohistochemical (IHC), RT-PCR, and Western blot analyses revealed a marked reduction in the expression of ERα in nervous tissues and, in particular, in the SFO. These changes were not present in peripheral tissues in Nestin-ERα(-) mice or Ad-Cre-injected ERα(flox) mice. mRNA expression of components of the renin-angiotensin system in the lamina terminalis were upregulated in Nestin-ERα(-) mice. Moreover, ganglionic blockade on day 7 after ANG II infusions resulted in a greater reduction of BP in Nestin-ERα(-) mice or SFO Ad-Cre-injected mice, suggesting that knockdown of ERα in the nervous system or the SFO alone augments central ANG II-induced increase in sympathetic tone. The results indicate that interfering with the action of estrogen on SFO ERα is sufficient to abolish the protective effects of estrogen against ANG II-induced hypertension.

  11. The Ang II-induced growth of vascular smooth muscle cells involves a phospholipase D-mediated signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Freeman, E J

    2000-02-15

    Angiotensin (Ang) II acts as a mitogen in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) via the activation of multiple signaling cascades, including phospholipase C, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. However, increasing evidence supports signal-activated phospholipases A(2) and D (PLD) as additional mechanisms. Stimulation of PLD results in phosphatidic acid (PA) formation, and PA has been linked to cell growth. However, the direct involvement of PA or its metabolite diacylglycerol (DAG) in Ang II-induced growth is unclear. PLD activity was measured in cultured rat VSMC prelabeled with [(3)H]oleic acid, while the incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine was used to monitor growth. We have previously reported the Ang II-dependent, AT(1)-coupled stimulation of PLD and growth in VSMC. Here, we show that Ang II (100 nM) and exogenous PLD (0.1-100 units/mL; Streptomyces chromofuscus) stimulated thymidine incorporation (43-208% above control). PA (100 nM-1 microM) also increased thymidine incorporation to 135% of control. Propranolol (100 nM-10 microM), which inhibits PA phosphohydrolase, blocked the growth stimulated by Ang II, PLD, or PA by as much as 95%, an effect not shared by other beta-adrenergic antagonists. Propranolol also increased the production of PA in the presence of Ang II by 320% and reduced DAG and arachidonic acid (AA) accumulation. The DAG lipase inhibitor RHC-80267 (1-10 microM) increased Ang II-induced DAG production, while attenuating thymidine incorporation and release of AA. Thus, it appears that activation of PLD, formation of PA, conversion of PA to DAG, and metabolism of DAG comprise an important signaling cascade in Ang II-induced growth of VSMC.

  12. Feeding transgenic plants that express a tolerogenic fusion protein effectively protects against arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Charlotta; Schön, Karin; Kalbina, Irina; Strid, Åke; Andersson, Sören; Bokarewa, Maria I; Lycke, Nils Y

    2016-04-01

    Although much explored, oral tolerance for treatment of autoimmune diseases still awaits the establishment of novel and effective vectors. We investigated whether the tolerogenic CTA1(R7K)-COL-DD fusion protein can be expressed in edible plants, to induce oral tolerance and protect against arthritis. The fusion protein was recombinantly expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana plants, which were fed to H-2(q) -restricted DBA/1 mice to assess the preventive effect on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The treatment resulted in fewer mice exhibiting disease and arthritis scores were significantly reduced. Immune suppression was evident in treated mice, and serum biomarkers for inflammation as well as anticollagen IgG responses were reduced. In spleen and draining lymph nodes, CD4(+) T-cell responses were reduced. Concomitant with a reduced effector T-cell activity with lower IFNγ, IL-13 and IL-17A production, we observed an increase in IL-10 production to recall antigen stimulation in vitro, suggesting reduced Th1, Th2 and Th17 activity subsequent to up-regulated IL-10 and regulatory T-cell (Treg) functions. This study shows that edible plants expressing a tolerogen were effective at stimulating CD4 T-cell tolerance and in protecting against CIA disease. Our study conveys optimism as to the potential of using edible plants for oral treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26403330

  13. Serum Copper as a Marker of Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Montosh; Changkakati, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Copper is an important trace element for normal growth and development of the body. It is also essential for maturation of collagen tissues. The purpose of the study was to estimate the serum copper levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients and to see its association with the various parameters of disease activity. Materials and Methods The study was carried out among 50 diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis patients (25 each of active disease & remission patients) and 50 age and sex matched controls. Fasting blood sample was collected for estimation of serum copper, haemoglobin level and ESR in the subjects. Results Mean serum copper level in the case group was found to be significantly higher than that of the control group (p-value<0.001). This increase of copper level was more in active disease than those with remission (p-value < 0.0001). A significant positive correlation was found between serum copper level and ESR, serum copper level and morning stiffness and a negative correlation was found between serum copper level and haemoglobin level in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Conclusion In rheumatoid arthritis patients, serum copper level may be used as an additional biochemical marker for estimation of disease activity. PMID:26816881

  14. Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Does Not Drive New Bone Formation in Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    van Tok, Melissa N.; Yeremenko, Nataliya G.; Teitsma, Christine A.; Kream, Barbara E.; Knaup, Véronique L.; Lories, Rik J.; Baeten, Dominique L.; van Duivenvoorde, Leonie M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Insulin like growth factor (IGF)-I can act on a variety of cells involved in cartilage and bone repair, yet IGF-I has not been studied extensively in the context of inflammatory arthritis. The objective of this study was to investigate whether IGF-I overexpression in the osteoblast lineage could lead to increased reparative or pathological bone formation in rheumatoid arthritis and/or spondyloarthritis respectively. Methods Mice overexpressing IGF-I in the osteoblast lineage (Ob-IGF-I+/-) line 324–7 were studied during collagen induced arthritis and in the DBA/1 aging model for ankylosing enthesitis. Mice were scored clinically and peripheral joints were analysed histologically for the presence of hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteocalcin positive osteoblasts. Results 90–100% of the mice developed CIA with no differences between the Ob-IGF-I+/- and non-transgenic littermates. Histological analysis revealed similar levels of hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteocalcin positive osteoblasts in the ankle joints. In the DBA/1 aging model for ankylosing enthesitis 60% of the mice in both groups had a clinical score 1<. Severity was similar between both groups. Histological analysis revealed the presence of hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteocalcin positive osteoblasts in the toes in equal levels. Conclusion Overexpression of IGF-I in the osteoblast lineage does not contribute to an increase in repair of erosions or syndesmophyte formation in mouse models for destructive and remodeling arthritis. PMID:27695067

  15. Beneficial effects of astragaloside IV against angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Li, Su; Wu, Hengfang; Bian, Zhiping; Xu, Jindan; Gu, Chunrong; Chen, Xiangjian; Yang, Di

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent characteristic of the majority of cardiovascular diseases. Astragaloside IV (As-IV), the major active ingredient of Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bge. (a traditional Chinese herbal medicine), possesses antioxidant properties. The present study was carried out to examine whether As-IV can reverse Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cultured rat aortic VSMCs treated with Ang II (1 µM) for 24 h exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction, including a decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates (OCRs), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels, as well as the disruption of mitochondrial structural integrity. Following treatment with Ang II, As-IV (50 µg/ml) was added to the culture medium followed by incubation for a further 24 h. The administration of As-IV significantly increased the mitochondrial OCRs, ATP production and the mtDNA levels, and reversed the mitochondrial morphological changes which occurred in the VSMCs. Treatment with As-IV also reversed the Ang II-induced increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the increase in NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase activity, as well as the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity. Furthermore, treatment with As-IV led to an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), and in the protein expression of PGC-1α, parkin and dynamin 1-like protein 1 (Drp1) in the VSMCs. These results indicate that As-IV exerts beneficial effects on Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat VSMCs and that these effects are mediated through the inhibition of ROS overproduction, as well as the promotion of mitochondrial autophagy and

  16. Reactive oxygen species derived from NADPH oxidase 1 and mitochondria mediate angiotensin II-induced smooth muscle cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Tsai, I-Ching; Pan, Zih-Cian; Cheng, Hui-Pin; Liu, Chen-Hsiu; Lin, Bor-Tyng; Jiang, Meei Jyh

    2016-09-01

    Cellular senescence has emerged as an important player in both physiology and pathology. Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to mediate cellular senescence. NADPH oxidases are major sources for ROS production in the vascular wall; the roles of different NADPH oxidase isoforms in cellular senescence remain unclear, however. We investigated the roles of two NADPH oxidase isoforms in mitochondrial dysfunction during angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cellular senescence of human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Ang II (10(-7)M) stimulated ROS generation, exhibiting early increases between 30 and 60min and sustained increases between 24h and 72h, and induced VSMCs senescence after 48h or 72h treatment as assessed with senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and the expression of two cell cycle inhibitors, p21 and p16. ROS scavengers and membrane-permeable catalase (catalase-PEG) reduced Ang II-stimulated cellular senescence. Furthermore, small interfering RNA (siRNA) of NADPH oxidase catalytic subunit Nox1, but not that of another isoform Nox4, inhibited Ang II-induced cellular senescence. Nox1 siRNA inhibited both early and sustained ROS increases induced by Ang II. In addition, a mitochondrial-specific antioxidant, mitoQ10, effectively inhibited Ang II-induced ROS increases and cellular senescence. Ang II decreased ATP synthesis and induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, which were attenuated by pre-treating cells with Nox1 siRNA, mitoQ10 or catalase-PEG. The effect of Ang II on the mitochondrial regulator peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and its downstream genes was examined. Ang II stimulated S570 phosphorylation of PGC-1α with concomitant decreases in catalase and uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) levels between 12h and 72h, which were inhibited by Nox1 siRNA. Knockdown of both catalase and UCP-2 mimicked Ang II-induced VSMC senescence. These results suggested that Ang II-stimulated Nox1

  17. Childhood arthritis: classification and radiology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karl; Gardner-Medwin, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Childhood arthritis has now been reclassified into a single internationally recognized entity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Radiology provides an important role in the management of JIA, in helping in the differential diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and detecting complications. Traditionally, plain radiographs have been the imaging investigation of choice but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound are now providing a more effective and safer alternative. The appropriate use of sequences in MR imaging is important in the early detection of joint abnormalities in JIA. PMID:11798203

  18. Septic arthritis involving Capnocytophaga ochracea.

    PubMed Central

    Winn, R E; Chase, W F; Lauderdale, P W; McCleskey, F K

    1984-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the knee developed in a 21-month-old child. The causative organism, isolated from two separate arthrocenteses, was identified as Capnocytophaga ochracea morphologically and by biochemical reactions. Previous human infections (bacteremias) have occurred in granulocytopenic hosts with concomitant oral pathology including periodontitis and gingivitis. No abnormalities of oral hygiene were present in this patient, and granulocyte numbers were normal or elevated. Eradication of the infection was accomplished with 8 weeks of antibiotic therapy combined with surgical drainage. Septic arthritis expands the spectrum of infections reported to be caused by Capnocytophaga spp. PMID:6715520

  19. Collagen-Based Biomaterials for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Sayani; Raines, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    With its wide distribution in soft and hard connective tissues, collagen is the most abundant of animal proteins. In vitro, natural collagen can be formed into highly organized, three-dimensional scaffolds that are intrinsically biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic upon exogenous application, and endowed with high tensile strength. These attributes make collagen the material of choice for wound healing and tissue engineering applications. In this article, we review the structure and molecular interactions of collagen in vivo; the recent use of natural collagen in sponges, injectables, films and membranes, dressings, and skin grafts; and the on-going development of synthetic collagen mimetic peptides as pylons to anchor cytoactive agents in wound beds. PMID:24633807

  20. Stress controls the mechanics of collagen networks

    PubMed Central

    Licup, Albert James; Münster, Stefan; Sharma, Abhinav; Sheinman, Michael; Jawerth, Louise M.; Fabry, Ben; Weitz, David A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is the main structural and load-bearing element of various connective tissues, where it forms the extracellular matrix that supports cells. It has long been known that collagenous tissues exhibit a highly nonlinear stress–strain relationship, although the origins of this nonlinearity remain unknown. Here, we show that the nonlinear stiffening of reconstituted type I collagen networks is controlled by the applied stress and that the network stiffness becomes surprisingly insensitive to network concentration. We demonstrate how a simple model for networks of elastic fibers can quantitatively account for the mechanics of reconstituted collagen networks. Our model points to the important role of normal stresses in determining the nonlinear shear elastic response, which can explain the approximate exponential relationship between stress and strain reported for collagenous tissues. This further suggests principles for the design of synthetic fiber networks with collagen-like properties, as well as a mechanism for the control of the mechanics of such networks. PMID:26195769

  1. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Bordoni, M.E.; Thornton, A.K.

    1988-06-21

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium.

  2. [Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Branimir Anić; Miroslav Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic disease that primarily affects joints. Etiology and the pathogenesis of RA are complex, involving many types of cells, among others macrophages, T and B cells, fibro- blasts, chondrocytes and dendritic cells. Despite well documented role of many genes and epigenetic modifications in the development and evolution of the disease, in most RA patients there is no clear predisposing factor present. Environmental factors involved in RA pathogenesis are cigarette smoke, industrial pollutants like silica crystals, disturbances of intestinal, lung, and oral microbiota and some specific bacterial and viral infectious agents and their components. In the initial disease stage there are qualitative and quantitative disturbances ofpeptide citrulination as well as other protein modifications, followed by antigen presenting cell (APC) (macrophages and dendritic cells) and fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS) activation. Some microbes foster this processes by APC and FLS direct and indirect activation. In the second stage APC's elicit specific humoral B cell re- sponse resulting in specific antibodies production and T cell autoreactivity. Inherited and acquired defects in T and B cell responses caused by repeated activation of innate immunity as well as loss of tolerance, elicit chronic autoimmune inflammation, primarily of synovial membranes, and development of cellular panus. Pathologic activation of the osteoclasts and release of the immune system effector molecules and the proteolytic enzymes damage the cartilage, bone and tendons composition and structure. Persistent inflammation through its complex mechanisms results in many systemic and extraarticular RA manifestations of almost all organ systems, resulting in severe complications and comorbidities such as rheumatoid lung, carditis, vasculitis, cahexia, anemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebrovascular vascular disease, lymphoma, osteoporosis, depression etc

  3. Capsaicin inhibits collagen fibril formation and increases the stability of collagen fibers.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Sathiamurthi; Dubey, Kriti; Badhwar, Rahul; George, Kodimattan Joseph; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Bagler, Ganesh; Madhan, Balaraman; Kar, Karunakar

    2015-02-01

    Capsaicin is a versatile plant product which has been ascribed several health benefits and anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. We have investigated the effect of capsaicin on the molecular stability, self-assembly, and fibril stability of type-I collagen. It was found that capsaicin suppresses collagen fibril formation, increases the stability of collagen fibers in tendons, and has no effect on the molecular stability of collagen. Turbidity assay data show that capsaicin does not promote disassembly of collagen fibrils. However, capsaicin moderately protects collagen fibrils from enzymatic degradation. Computational studies revealed the functions of the aromatic group and amide region of capsaicin in the collagen-capsaicin interaction. The results may have significant implications for capsaicin-based therapeutics that target excess collagen accumulation-linked pathology, for example thrombosis, fibrosis, and sclerosis.

  4. Collagenous skeleton of the rat mystacial pad.

    PubMed

    Haidarliu, Sebastian; Simony, Erez; Golomb, David; Ahissar, Ehud

    2011-05-01

    Anatomical and functional integrity of the rat mystacial pad (MP) is dependent on the intrinsic organization of its extracellular matrix. By using collagen autofluorescence, in the rat MP, we revealed a collagenous skeleton that interconnects whisker follicles, corium, and deep collagen layers. We suggest that this skeleton supports MP tissues, mediates force transmission from muscles to whiskers, facilitates whisker retraction after protraction, and limits MP extensibility.

  5. Identification of candidate synovial membrane biomarkers after Achyranthes aspera treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen; Lu, Xianghong; Fu, Zhirong; Zhang, Lin; Li, Ximin; Xu, Xiaobao; Ren, Yina; Lu, Yongzhuang; Fu, Hongwei; Tian, Jingkui

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main symptom is a heightened inflammatory response in synovial tissues. To verify the anti-arthritic activities of Achyranthes aspera and its possible therapy-related factors on the pathogenesis of RA, the saponins in A. aspera root were isolated and identified to treat the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Phytochemical analysis isolated and identified methyl caffeate, 25-S-inokosterone, 25-S-inokosterone β-D-glucopyranosyl 3-(O-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-oleanolate, and β-D-glucopyranosyl 3-(O-β-D-galactopyranosyl (1→2)(O-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-oleanolate as main compounds in the root of A. aspera. Proteomics was performed to determine the differentially expressed proteins in either inflamed or drug-treated synovium of CIA rats. Treatment resulted in dramatically decreased paw swelling, proliferation of inflammatory cells, and bone degradation. Fibrinogen, procollagen, protein disulfide-isomerase A3, and apolipoprotein A-I were all increased in inflamed synovial tissues and were found to decrease when administered drug therapy. Furthermore, Alpha-1-antiproteinase and manganese superoxide dismutase were both increased in drug-treated synovial tissues. The inhibition of RA progression shows that A. aspera is a promising candidate for future treatment of human arthritis. Importantly, the total saponins found within A. aspera are the active component. Finally, autoantigens such as fibrinogen and collagen could act as inducers of RA due to their aggravation of inflammation. Given this, it is possible that the vimentin and PDIA3 could be the candidate biomarkers specific to Achyranthes saponin therapy for rheumatoid arthritis in synovial membrane.

  6. Adventitial gene transfer of catalase attenuates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cun-Fei; Zhang, Jia; Shen, Kai; Gao, Ping-Jin; Wang, Hai-Ya; Jin, Xin; Meng, Chao; Fang, Ning-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Vascular adventitia and adventitia‑derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to vascular remodeling following vascular injury. A previous ex vivo study in adventitial fibroblasts showed that catalase, one of most important anti‑oxide enzymes, was downregulated by angiotensin II (AngII). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether adventitial gene transfer of catalase affects AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in vivo. Adenoviruses co‑expressing catalase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or expressing eGFP only were applied to the adventitial surface of common carotid arteries of Sprague‑Dawley rats. Alzet minipumps administering AngII (0.75 mg/kg/day) were then implanted subcutaneously for 14 days. Systolic blood pressure and biological parameters of vascular remodeling were measured in each group. Adventitial fibroblasts were cultured and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was measured using western blot analysis. The results showed that adventitial gene transfer of catalase had no effect on AngII‑induced systolic blood pressure elevation. However, catalase adenovirus transfection significantly inhibited AngII‑induced media hypertrophy compared with that of the control virus (P<0.05). In addition, catalase transfection significantly attenuated AngII‑induced ROS generation, macrophage infiltration, collagen deposition and adventitial α‑smooth muscle actin expression. Furthermore, catalase transfection significantly inhibited the AngII‑induced increase in p38MAPK phosphorylation. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that adventitial gene transfer of catalase significantly attenuated AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in rats via inhibition of adventitial p38MAPK phosphorylation.

  7. BMP type I receptor ALK2 is required for angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Mohd; Spagnolli, Ester; Ernande, Laura; Thoonen, Robrecht; Kolodziej, Starsha A; Leyton, Patricio A; Cheng, Juan; Tainsh, Robert E T; Mayeur, Claire; Rhee, David K; Wu, Mei X; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Buys, Emmanuel S; Zapol, Warren M; Bloch, Kenneth D; Bloch, Donald B

    2016-04-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling contributes to the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the identity of the BMP type I receptor involved in cardiac hypertrophy and the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. By using quantitative PCR and immunoblotting, we demonstrated that BMP signaling increased during phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs), as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of Smads 1 and 5 and induction of Id1 gene expression. Inhibition of BMP signaling with LDN193189 or noggin, and silencing of Smad 1 or 4 using small interfering RNA diminished the ability of phenylephrine to induce hypertrophy in NRCs. Conversely, activation of BMP signaling with BMP2 or BMP4 induced hypertrophy in NRCs. Luciferase reporter assay further showed that BMP2 or BMP4 treatment of NRCs repressed atrogin-1 gene expression concomitant with an increase in calcineurin protein levels and enhanced activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells, providing a mechanism by which BMP signaling contributes to cardiac hypertrophy. In a model of cardiac hypertrophy, C57BL/6 mice treated with angiotensin II (A2) had increased BMP signaling in the left ventricle. Treatment with LDN193189 attenuated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and collagen deposition in left ventricles. Cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of BMP type I receptor ALK2 (activin-like kinase 2), but not ALK1 or ALK3, inhibited BMP signaling and mitigated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular fibrosis in mice. The results suggest that BMP signaling upregulates the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cell pathway via BMP type I receptor ALK2, contributing to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. PMID:26873969

  8. A nanostructured synthetic collagen mimic for hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek A; Taylor, Nichole L; Jalan, Abhishek A; Hwang, Lyahn K; Wang, Benjamin K; Hartgerink, Jeffery D

    2014-04-14

    Collagen is a major component of the extracellular matrix and plays a wide variety of important roles in blood clotting, healing, and tissue remodeling. Natural, animal derived, collagen is used in many clinical applications but concerns exist with respect to its role in inflammation, batch-to-batch variability, and possible disease transfection. Therefore, development of synthetic nanomaterials that can mimic the nanostructure and properties of natural collagen has been a heavily pursued goal in biomaterials. Previously, we reported on the design and multihierarchial self-assembly of a 36 amino acid collagen mimetic peptide (KOD) that forms nanofibrous triple helices that entangle to form a hydrogel. In this report, we utilize this nanofiber forming collagen mimetic peptide as a synthetic biomimetic matrix useful in thrombosis. We demonstrate that nanofibrous KOD synthetic collagen matrices adhere platelets, activate them (indicated by soluble P-selectin secretion), and clot plasma and blood similar to animal derived collagen and control surfaces. In addition to the thrombotic potential, THP-1 monocytes incubated with our KOD collagen mimetic showed minimal proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-α or IL-1β) production. Together, the data presented demonstrates the potential of a novel synthetic collagen mimetic as a hemostat.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Collagen Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Chesnick, Ingrid E.; Mason, Jeffrey T.; Giuseppetti, Anthony A.; Eidelman, Naomi; Potter, Kimberlee

    2008-01-01

    A model mineralizing system was subjected to magnetic resonance microscopy to investigate how water proton transverse (T2) relaxation times and magnetization transfer ratios can be applied to monitor collagen mineralization. In our model system, a collagen sponge was mineralized with polymer-stabilized amorphous calcium carbonate. The lower hydration and water proton T2 values of collagen sponges during the initial mineralization phase were attributed to the replacement of the water within the collagen fibrils by amorphous calcium carbonate. The significant reduction in T2 values by day 6 (p < 0.001) was attributed to the appearance of mineral crystallites, which were also detected by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. In the second phase, between days 6 and 13, magnetic resonance microscopy properties appear to plateau as amorphous calcium carbonate droplets began to coalesce within the intrafibrillar space of collagen. In the third phase, after day 15, the amorphous mineral phase crystallized, resulting in a reduction in the absolute intensity of the collagen diffraction pattern. We speculate that magnetization transfer ratio values for collagen sponges, with similar collagen contents, increased from 0.25 ± 0.02 for control strips to a maximum value of 0.31 ± 0.04 at day 15 (p = 0.03) because mineral crystals greatly reduce the mobility of the collagen fibrils. PMID:18487295

  10. A nanostructured synthetic collagen mimic for hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek A; Taylor, Nichole L; Jalan, Abhishek A; Hwang, Lyahn K; Wang, Benjamin K; Hartgerink, Jeffery D

    2014-04-14

    Collagen is a major component of the extracellular matrix and plays a wide variety of important roles in blood clotting, healing, and tissue remodeling. Natural, animal derived, collagen is used in many clinical applications but concerns exist with respect to its role in inflammation, batch-to-batch variability, and possible disease transfection. Therefore, development of synthetic nanomaterials that can mimic the nanostructure and properties of natural collagen has been a heavily pursued goal in biomaterials. Previously, we reported on the design and multihierarchial self-assembly of a 36 amino acid collagen mimetic peptide (KOD) that forms nanofibrous triple helices that entangle to form a hydrogel. In this report, we utilize this nanofiber forming collagen mimetic peptide as a synthetic biomimetic matrix useful in thrombosis. We demonstrate that nanofibrous KOD synthetic collagen matrices adhere platelets, activate them (indicated by soluble P-selectin secretion), and clot plasma and blood similar to animal derived collagen and control surfaces. In addition to the thrombotic potential, THP-1 monocytes incubated with our KOD collagen mimetic showed minimal proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-α or IL-1β) production. Together, the data presented demonstrates the potential of a novel synthetic collagen mimetic as a hemostat. PMID:24694012

  11. Collagenous gastritis: a report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Lagorce-Pages, C; Fabiani, B; Bouvier, R; Scoazec, J Y; Durand, L; Flejou, J F

    2001-09-01

    Collagenous gastritis is an exceptional entity with eight cases documented to date characterized by the presence of a thick subepithelial collagen band associated with an inflammatory infiltrate of the gastric mucosa. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical and histologic characteristics of six new cases of collagenous gastritis. All cases showed a subepithelial collagen band that averaged 30 microm but often measured up to 120 microm. This finding was almost always accompanied by mixed chronic inflammation in the lamina propria and by surface epithelial damage of varying severity. Our study seems to delineate two subsets in patients with collagenous gastritis: 1) collagenous gastritis occurring in children and young adults presenting with severe anemia, a nodular pattern on endoscopy, and a disease limited to the gastric mucosa without evidence of colonic involvement, and 2) collagenous gastritis associated with collagenous colitis occurring in adult patients presenting with chronic watery diarrhea. These findings highlight the fact that subepithelial collagen deposition may be a generalized disease affecting the entire gastrointestinal tract. PMID:11688577

  12. Ionic solutes impact collagen scaffold bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Pawelec, K M; Husmann, A; Wardale, R J; Best, S M; Cameron, R E

    2015-02-01

    The structure of ice-templated collagen scaffolds is sensitive to many factors. By adding 0.5 wt% of sodium chloride or sucrose to collagen slurries, scaffold structure could be tuned through changes in ice growth kinetics and interactions of the solute and collagen. With ionic solutes (sodium chloride) the entanglements of the collagen molecule decreased, leading to fibrous scaffolds with increased pore size and decreased attachment of chondrocytes. With non-ionic solutes (sucrose) ice growth was slowed, leading to significantly reduced pore size and up-regulated cell attachment. This highlights the large changes in structure and biological function stimulated by solutes in ice-templating systems. PMID:25649518

  13. Collagenous gastritis and collagenous colitis: a report with sequential histological and ultrastructural findings.

    PubMed

    Pulimood, A B; Ramakrishna, B S; Mathan, M M

    1999-06-01

    The case is reported of a young adult man with collagenous gastritis, an extremely rare disorder with only three case reports in the English literature, who subsequently presented with collagenous colitis. Sequential gastric biopsies showed a notable increase in thickness of the subepithelial collagen band. Ultrastructural study of gastric and rectal mucosa showed the characteristic subepithelial band composed of haphazardly arranged collagen fibres, prominent degranulating eosinophils, and activated pericryptal fibroblasts. PMID:10323893

  14. Exendin-4 alleviates angiotensin II-induced senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells by inhibiting Rac1 activation via a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Li, Ai Q; Zhou, Teng F; Zhang, Meng Q; Qin, Xiao M

    2014-12-15

    Vascular aging has been implicated in the progression of diabetes and age-related cardiovascular disorders. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone capable of cytoprotective actions in addition to its glucose-lowering effect. The present study was undertaken to examine whether Exendin-4, a specific ligand for the GLP-1 receptor, could prevent angiotensin (ANG) II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to determine the underlying mechanism involved. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) assay showed that ANG II induced premature senescence of VSMCs. Pretreatment with Exendin-4 significantly attenuated ANG II-induced generation of H2O2 and the subsequent VSMC senescence. These effects were, however, reversed in the presence of exendin fragment 9-39, a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, or PKI14-22. Moreover, a marked increase in the levels of p53 and p21 induced by ANG II was blunted by the treatment with Exendin-4. Nevertheless, Exendin-4 failed to decrease ANG II-induced expression of NAD(P)H oxidase 1 (Nox1), NAD(P)H oxidase 4 (Nox4), p22(phox), or p47(phox) in VSMCs. Mechanistically, Exendin-4 blocked ANG II-induced Rac1 activation through the cAMP/PKA signaling cascade. Specifically, NSC23766, a Rac1 inhibitor, abrogated the suppressive effects of Exendin-4 on ANG II-induced premature senescence and H2O2 generation, respectively. Thus Exendin-4 confers resistance to ANG II-induced superoxide anion generation from NAD(P)H oxidase and the resultant VSMC senescence by inhibiting Rac1 activation via a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway. These findings demonstrate that GLP-1 as well as its analogs (GLP-1-related reagents) may hold therapeutic potential in the treatment of diabetes with cardiovascular disease.

  15. Arthritis and diagnosis of leprosy: a case report and review of the literature*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tania Rita Moreno de Oliveira; Korinfskin, Juliana Pedrosa; Espíndola, Mariana Mercês Mesquita; Corrêa, Lis Moreno de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is clinically characterized by involvement of peripheral nerves and skin. The immunological profile of the individual defines the diversity of clinical manifestations, from skin disorders to systemic manifestations, especially the articulation ones, common in multibacillary forms, which may mimic collagen diseases and often posing diagnostic difficulties in endemic areas. This is a case report of asymmetric polyarthritis of small and large articulations associated with skin lesions which had been treated by a rheumatologist for 2 years with initial clinical diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, and later, with the appearance of skin lesions, of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:24770512

  16. Biochemical and immunological parameters as indicators of osteoarthritis subjects: role of OH-collagen in auto-antibodies generation

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Jalaluddin M.; Haque, Quazi S.; Tabrez, Shams; Choi, Inho; Ahmad, Saheem

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by inflammation of the knee joint, which is caused by accumulation of cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the extracellular matrix as an early immune response to infection. The articular cartilage destruction is discernible by elevated tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). In this study, blood samples of knee osteoarthritis patients were analyzed for biochemical and physiological parameters based on the lipid profile, uric acid, total leukocyte count (TLC), hemoglobin percentage (Hb%) and absolute lymphocyte count (ALC). Furthermore, immunological parameters including TNF-α , interleukin-6 (IL-6) and CRP were analyzed. The presence of antibodies against hydroxyl radical modified collagen-II (•OH-collagen-II) was also investigated in arthritis patients using direct binding ELISA. The uric acid and lipid profiles changed extensively. Specifically, increased uric acid levels were associated with OA in both genders, as were enhanced immunological parameters. The TNF-α level also increased in both genders suffering from OA. Finally, auto-antibodies against OH-collagen II antigen were found in the sera of arthritis patients. These results indicated that immunological parameters are better predictors or indexes for diagnosis of OA than biochemical parameters. PMID:26933405

  17. Injectable collagen implant--update.

    PubMed

    Castrow, F F; Krull, E A

    1983-12-01

    Injectable collagen implant (ICI), a new biomaterial reportedly useful for correction of scars and certain aging skin lines (wrinkles), was recently introduced. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this product. Data for this study were obtained from a survey which was sent to a group of cutaneous surgeons. They were asked about test site and treatment site reactions and about their satisfaction with ICI. The incidence of adverse reactions is low, and the severity of the reactions does not appear to be serious. The long-term benefit of ICI has not been established.

  18. Excretion of pyridinium crosslinks correlates with disease activity and appendicular bone loss in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Gough, A K; Peel, N F; Eastell, R; Holder, R L; Lilley, J; Emery, P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish if urinary excretion rates of the collagen crosslinks pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline, which are known to be elevated in established rheumatoid arthritis (RA), are useful markers of bone loss in this disease. METHODS--Eight hour urine collections on all patients and 52 controls were performed, and the rates of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline excretion were measured. Bone mineral density (BMD), by dual energy x-ray absorption, and full laboratory and clinical assessments were performed. RESULTS--The rates of excretion of pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline were significantly increased in patients compared with controls (p < 0.001). Pyridinoline excretion was associated with increased disease activity (ESR/CRP) but not disability (HAQ score/Functional Grade), and correlated with BMD loss at the femoral neck (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION--The excretion of collagen crosslinks may be useful as markers of bone and cartilage turnover in patients with RA. PMID:8311548

  19. Ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa protects Fe(II) induced lipid peroxidation in rat's brain, kidney and liver homogenates.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Waseem; Noreen, Hamsa; Khalil, ShafqatUllah; Hussain, Arshad; Rehman, Shakilla; Sajjad, Shagufta; Rahman, Ataur; da Rocha, Joao B T

    2016-01-01

    The study describes the effect of ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa against Fe(II) induced lipid peroxidation. Basal and Fe(II) induced thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) production was significantly inhibited by the ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa at 25-200 μg/ml. Our data revealed that the extract has high DPPH radical scavenging activity at highest tested concentrations. The extract significantly chelated Fe(II) and scavenged hydroxyl (OH) radical at 25-200μg/ml concentration. The nutritional analysis was performed and carbohydrate, fats, fiber, protein, moisture and ash content were measured in the studied extract. The phytochemical analysis confirmed the presence of alkaloid, carbohydrate & sugar, glycosides, phenolic compounds, flavonoids, protein and amino acid, phytosterols, tannins, gum and mucilage. The extract also showed significant antimicrobial activities against 10 bacterial strains i.e. Salmonella typhi, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escheria coli, Xanthomonas, Salmonella heidelberg, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium and Escheria coli (human) and 5 fungal strains i.e. Aspergillus niger, Entomola, Aspergillus flavus, Alternaria alternata and Penicillium. This study confirms the potential antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa which can be considered not only as a diet supplement but can be used against a variety of free radical induced damage diseases.

  20. Angiopoietin-2 attenuates angiotensin II-induced aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongyou; Moran, Corey S.; Trollope, Alexandra F.; Woodward, Lynn; Kinobe, Robert; Rush, Catherine M.; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and inflammation are implicated in aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis and regulated by angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2). The effect of Angpt2 administration on experimental aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis was examined. Six-month-old male apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE−/−) mice were infused with angiotensin II (AngII) and administered subcutaneous human Fc-protein (control) or recombinant Angpt2 (rAngpt2) over 14 days. Administration of rAngpt2 significantly inhibited AngII-induced aortic dilatation and rupture of the suprarenal aorta (SRA), and development of atherosclerosis within the aortic arch. These effects were blood pressure and plasma lipoprotein independent and associated with Tie2 activation and down-regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) within the SRA. Plasma concentrations of MCP-1 and interleukin-6 were significantly lower in mice receiving rAngpt2. Immunostaining for the monocyte/macrophage marker MOMA-2 and the angiogenesis marker CD31 within the SRA were less in mice receiving rAngpt2 than controls. The percentage of inflammatory (Ly6Chi) monocytes within the bone marrow was increased while that in peripheral blood was decreased by rAngpt2 administration. In conclusion, administration of rAngpt2 attenuated angiotensin II-induced aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− mice associated with reduced aortic inflammation and angiogenesis. Up-regulation of Angpt2 may have potential therapeutic value in patients with aortic aneurysm and atherosclerosis. PMID:27767064

  1. NMNAT3 is involved in the protective effect of SIRT3 in Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yue, Zhongbao; Ma, Yunzi; You, Jia; Li, Zhuoming; Ding, Yanqing; He, Ping; Lu, Xia; Jiang, Jianmin; Chen, Shaorui; Liu, Peiqing

    2016-10-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is a maladaptive response in a variety of organic heart disease (OHD), which is characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction that results from disturbed energy metabolism. SIRT3, a mitochondria-localized sirtuin, regulates global mitochondrial lysine acetylation and preserves mitochondrial function. However, the mechanisms by which SIRT3 regulates cardiac hypertrophy remains to be further elucidated. In this study, we firstly demonstrated that expression of SIRT3 was decreased in Angiotension II (Ang II)-treated cardiomyocytes and in hearts of Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophic mice. In addition, SIRT3 overexpression protected myocytes from hypertrophy, whereas SIRT3 silencing exacerbated Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In particular, SIRT3-KO mice exhibited significant cardiac hypertrophy. Mechanistically, we identified NMNAT3 (nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 3), the rate-limiting enzyme for mitochondrial NAD biosynthesis, as a new target and binding partner of SIRT3. Specifically, SIRT3 physically interacts with and deacetylates NMNAT3, thereby enhancing the enzyme activity of NMNAT3 and contributing to SIRT3-mediated anti-hypertrophic effects. Moreover, NMNAT3 regulates the activity of SIRT3 via synthesis of mitochondria NAD. Taken together, these findings provide mechanistic insights into the negative regulatory role of SIRT3 in cardiac hypertrophy.

  2. Nitro-Arachidonic Acid Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in a Cell Line of Kidney Proximal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central