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Sample records for collagen induced ear

  1. Prostaglandins in the perilymph of guinea pig with type II collagen induced ear diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, T.; Chiang, T.; Kitano, H.; Sudo, N.; Kim, S.Y.; Ha, S.; Woo, V.; Wolf, B.; Floyd, R.; Yoo, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have studied the prostaglandins (PGs) in the perilymph from guinea pig with type II collagen induced autoimmune ear disease. Hartly guinea pigs were immunized with type II collagen in CFA and auditory brain stem responses (ABR) were measured at 2, 3, 4, and 6 months after initial immunization perilymph was obtained and the levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha.. were measured by radioimmunoassays. Temporal bones were examined for the histopathologic changes. Immunized guinea pigs showed the evidence of hearing loss by ABR. The temporal bones showed the following changes: spiral ganglia degeneration, mild to moderate degree of degeneration in organ of Corti, infrequent very mild endolymphatic hydrops and labrynthitis. The perilymph from immunized animals contained about 5 times more PGE2 and about 3 times more 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha.. than control animals. However, between these two groups, there was no difference in the CSF and sera levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha... Thus, this study suggests that these inflammatory mediators might be involved in the pathogenesis of collagen induced autoimmune inner ear disease.

  2. Collagen hydrolysate inhibits zymosan-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Anita; Cozijnsen, Miranda; de Vrij, Gerrit; Garssen, Johan

    2013-07-01

    During the past years, evidence accumulated showing that glycine comprises anti-inflammatory activities. These effects occur, at least in part, via the activation of glycine-gated chloride channels (GlyR). Glycine is one of the major structural units of collagen, making up about 30% of the amino acids. This study aims to investigate the anti-inflammatory potential of collagen hydrolysate (CH) using the zymosan-induced ear-skin inflammation mouse model. After oral intake of 12.5, 25 or 50 mg CH the plasma levels of glycine increased in a concentration-dependent manner. CH was able to counteract zymosan-induced ear-skin inflammation locally (ear swelling) as well as systemically (IL-6 production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated whole blood cells). The LPS-stimulated IL-6 production in whole blood correlated positively with the ear swelling response. This correlation was abolished by strychnine (a glycine receptor antagonist), indicating the involvement of GlyR. Collectively, these data show that CH is able to modulate inflammatory responses both locally as well as systemically. This effect might be constituted by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokine production via GlyR.

  3. Detection of endogenous and food-derived collagen dipeptide prolylhydroxyproline (Pro-Hyp) in allergic contact dermatitis-affected mouse ear.

    PubMed

    Kusubata, Masashi; Koyama, Yoh-Ichi; Tometsuka, Chisa; Shigemura, Yasutaka; Sato, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Generation of collagen dipeptides and deposition of orally administered prolylhydroxyproline (Pro-Hyp) in local inflammatory sites were examined in mice with hapten (2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene)-induced dermatitis in the ear. Pro-Hyp content in the hapten-treated ear was significantly higher in the chronic phase of contact dermatitis than the vehicle control. In contrast, hydroxyprolylglycine contents remained at lower levels in all cases compared to Pro-Hyp. Four hours after the ingestion of [(13)C5,(15)N]Pro and [(13)C5,(15)N]Pro-Hyp, labeled-Pro-Hyp and Pro, respectively, appeared only in the ear with dermatitis. Thus, Pro-Hyp is generated and degraded as part of the rapid synthesis and degradation of collagen in the ear with dermatitis. In addition to the endogenously generated Pro-Hyp, the orally administered Pro-Hyp was deposited in the ears.

  4. Eupatilin ameliorates collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juryun; Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Jung, Hyerin; Rim, Yeri Alice; Park, Narae; Jung, Seung Min; Park, Sung-Hwan; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2015-03-01

    Eupatilin is the main active component of DA-9601, an extract from Artemisia. Recently, eupatilin was reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the anti-arthritic effect of eupatilin in a murine arthritis model and human rheumatoid synoviocytes. DA-9601 was injected into collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Arthritis score was regularly evaluated. Mouse monocytes were differentiated into osteoclasts when eupatilin was added simultaneously. Osteoclasts were stained with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and then manually counted. Rheumatoid synoviocytes were stimulated with TNF-α and then treated with eupatilin, and the levels of IL-6 and IL-1β mRNA expression in synoviocytes were measured by RT-PCR. Intraperitoneal injection of DA-9601 reduced arthritis scores in CIA mice. TNF-α treatment of synoviocytes increased the expression of IL-6 and IL-1β mRNAs, which was inhibited by eupatilin. Eupatilin decreased the number of osteoclasts in a concentration dependent manner. These findings, showing that eupatilin and DA-9601 inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines and the differentiation of osteoclasts, suggest that eupatilin and DA-9601 is a candidate anti-inflammatory agent.

  5. Electrical ear acupuncture reduces histamine-induced itch (alloknesis).

    PubMed

    Kesting, Marco Rainer; Thurmüller, Petra; Hölzle, Frank; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Holland-Letz, Tim; Stücker, Markus

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess an objective measure for the outcome of ear acupuncture, we evaluated the effect of electrical ear acupuncture on areas of histamine-induced alloknesis in 32 healthy volunteers. In a first assessment 5 min after histamine application on both volar forearms, 16 subjects received right ear and 16 left ear acupuncture. Immediately before and 5 min after acupuncture, alloknesis areas on both forearms were planimetrically evaluated. A second assessment was carried out 4 weeks later with the same patients. They underwent histamine application once more, but received no acupuncture. Alloknesis areas were then compared with reference to time, assessment and therapy side. Forearms relating to ipsilateral acupuncture showed significantly reduced or even no alloknesis areas after therapy. On the contralateral sides and during the "non-acupuncture" assessment 4 weeks later, alloknesis areas were significantly enlarged compared with sides ipsilateral to right and left ear acupuncture. Hence, results verify the effects of electrical ear acupuncture by objective measures.

  6. Propranolol-induced elevation of pulmonary collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenschmidt, R.C.; Witschi, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    Current concepts of collagen metabolism suggest that fibroblasts tightly control collagen production. One of the possible mechanisms of control is via the cyclic nucleotides, cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP). Beta adrenergic agonists, by elevating intracellular cAMP levels, have been shown in vitro to suppress fibroblast collagen production; whereas beta adrenergic antagonists were effective in removing this suppression by blocking the rise in cAMP. In the present study with mice, the authors showed that administration of the beta adrenergic antagonists, propranolol, at a dose demonstrated to decrease the ratio of cAMP to cGMP, resulted in an elevation in total lung collagen in vivo. The increase in collagen was evident only when propranolol was administered before and during acute lung damage induced by either butylated hydroxytoluene, bleomycin or high concentrations of oxygen. There was no increase in lung collagen when propranolol administration was delayed after injury or when given to an undamaged lung. The authors propose that via beta adrenergic blockage by propranolol, fibroblasts involved in the normal reparative process may have lost a mechanism for regulatory control, resulting in excessive deposition of collagen. 38 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Proton pump inhibitor induced collagen expression in colonocytes is associated with collagenous colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shiori; Kadochi, Yui; Luo, Yi; Fujiwara-Tani, Rina; Nishiguchi, Yukiko; Kishi, Shingo; Fujii, Kiyomu; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    AIM To elucidate the role of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in collagenous disease, direct effect of PPI on colonocytes was examined. METHODS Collagenous colitis is a common cause of non-bloody, watery diarrhea. Recently, there has been increasing focus on the use of proton PPIs as a risk factor for developing collagenous colitis. Mouse CT26 colonic cells were treated with PPI and/or PPI-induced alkaline media. Expression of fibrosis-associated genes was examined by RT-PCR. In human materials, collagen expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS CT26 cells expressed a Na+-H+ exchanger gene (solute carrier family 9, member A2). Treatment with PPI and/or PPI-induced alkaline media caused growth inhibition and oxidative stress in CT26 cells. The treatment increased expression of fibrosis inducing factors, transforming growth factor β and fibroblast growth factor 2. The treatment also decreased expression of a negative regulator of collagen production, replication factor C1, resulting in increased expression of collagen types III and IV in association with lipid peroxide. In biopsy specimens from patients with collagenous colitis, type III and IV collagen were increased. Increase of type III collagen was more pronounced in PPI-associated collagenous colitis than in non-PPI-associated disease. CONCLUSION From these findings, the reaction of colonocytes to PPI might participate in pathogenesis of collagenous colitis. PMID:28321159

  8. [Vertigo induced by noise or pressure to the left ear].

    PubMed

    Seidel, D U; Dülks, A; Remmert, S

    2011-06-01

    A 49-year-old male patient presented with recently acquired vertigo induced by noise or pressure to the left ear. With appropriate stimulation, oscillopsia with a rotatory component could be reproduced in videooculography. Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) showed increased amplitudes and a lowered threshold on the left side. CT of the petrous bone showed a bony dehiscence of the left superior semicircular canal. Conservative therapy was initiated as a first step.

  9. Effects of cyclosporin on collagen induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Takagishi, K; Kaibara, N; Hotokebuchi, T; Arita, C; Morinaga, M; Arai, K

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the effect of the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporin on collagen induced arthritis in mice. Cyclosporin, when given prophylactically, was capable of suppressing the development of collagen induced arthritis and the immunological response to native type II collagen in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment with cyclosporin, started on the same day as the booster injection with type II collagen, also resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and of immunity to collagen. These findings suggest that the time of a booster injection, three weeks after the initial immunisation, might be still within the induction phase of arthritis since reinoculation is required to produce a high incidence of arthritis in mice. In addition, therapeutic treatment with cyclosporin did not affect the clinical course of the disease or the immune response to collagen. PMID:3754714

  10. Perforin deficiency attenuates collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Kristin; Knipper, Annika; Tu-Rapp, Hoang; Koczan, Dirk; Kreutzer, Hans-Jürgen; Nizze, Horst; Mix, Eilhard; Thiesen, Hans-Juergen; Holmdahl, Rikard; Ibrahim, Saleh M

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an approved animal model for rheumatoid arthritis, is thought to be a T cell-dependent disease. There is evidence that CD8+ T cells are a major subset controlling the pathogenesis of CIA. They probably contribute to certain features of disease, namely tissue destruction and synovial hyperplasia. In this study we examined the role of perforin (pfp), a key molecule of the cytotoxic death pathway that is expressed mainly in CD8+ T cells, for the pathogenesis of CIA. We generated DBA/1J mice suffering from mutations of the pfp molecule, DBA/1J-pfp-/-, and studied their susceptibility to arthritis. As a result, pfp-deficient mice showed a reduced incidence (DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 64%; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 54%), a slightly delayed onset (onset of disease: DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 53 ± 3.6; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 59 ± 4.9 (mean ± SEM), and milder form of the disease (maximum disease score: DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 7.3 ± 1.1; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 3.4 ± 1.4 (mean ± SEM); P < 0.05). Concomitantly, peripheral T cell proliferation in response to the specific antigen bovine collagen II was increased in pfp-/- mice compared with pfp+/+ mice, arguing for an impaired killing of autoreactive T cells caused by pfp deficiency. Thus, pfp-mediated cytotoxicity is involved in the initiation of tissue damage in arthritis, but pfp-independent cytotoxic death pathways might also contribute to CIA. PMID:15987490

  11. Amelioration of estrogen deficiency-induced obesity by collagen hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Tsay-I; Chang, I-Chang; Lee, Hsueh-Hui; Hsieh, Kuang hui; Chiu, Yung-Wei; Lai, Te-Jen; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Hsu, Li-Sung; Kao, Shao-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Menopausal transition with declining estrogen levels significantly affects the physiological properties of women and consequently contributes to a series of medical conditions, including obesity. Obesity is a crucial risk factor associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, and breast cancer. Increasing dietary protein content improves satiety and energy expenditure. Thus, we hypothesize that supplementing with collagen, a common dietary protein, may alleviate menopause-induced obesity. Methods: We used ovariectomized (OVX) rats to mimic a menopausal human. The body weight of OVX rats significantly increased compared with that of sham-operated rats (P<0.05), but uterus weight was decreased. Adipocyte size in perigonadal adipose tissue also increased (P<0.05). Results: By contrast, OVX rats supplemented with aqueous collagen hydrolysate (2.5 mg/mL) exhibited significant attenuation in body weight gain and adipocyte enlargement (P<0.05), but insignificant change in uterus weight. Further investigation indicated that collagen hydrolysate supplementation insignificantly affected the levels of dorsal fat, serum total cholesterol, and serum triacylglycerol. Levels of serum biochemical factors, calcium, phosphorus, and glucose were also insignificantly altered by collagen hydrolysate supplementation. Conclusion: Collagen hydrolysate supplementation reduced body weight gain and adipocyte enlargement in response to ovariectomy but slightly affected blood lipids, calcium, and glucose in both sham-operated and OVX rats. Collagen hydrolysate supplementation is beneficial in ameliorating estrogen deficiency-induced obesity and its associated risk factors. PMID:27877077

  12. Amelioration of estrogen deficiency-induced obesity by collagen hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Tsay-I; Chang, I-Chang; Lee, Hsueh-Hui; Hsieh, Kuang Hui; Chiu, Yung-Wei; Lai, Te-Jen; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Hsu, Li-Sung; Kao, Shao-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Menopausal transition with declining estrogen levels significantly affects the physiological properties of women and consequently contributes to a series of medical conditions, including obesity. Obesity is a crucial risk factor associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, and breast cancer. Increasing dietary protein content improves satiety and energy expenditure. Thus, we hypothesize that supplementing with collagen, a common dietary protein, may alleviate menopause-induced obesity. Methods: We used ovariectomized (OVX) rats to mimic a menopausal human. The body weight of OVX rats significantly increased compared with that of sham-operated rats (P<0.05), but uterus weight was decreased. Adipocyte size in perigonadal adipose tissue also increased (P<0.05). Results: By contrast, OVX rats supplemented with aqueous collagen hydrolysate (2.5 mg/mL) exhibited significant attenuation in body weight gain and adipocyte enlargement (P<0.05), but insignificant change in uterus weight. Further investigation indicated that collagen hydrolysate supplementation insignificantly affected the levels of dorsal fat, serum total cholesterol, and serum triacylglycerol. Levels of serum biochemical factors, calcium, phosphorus, and glucose were also insignificantly altered by collagen hydrolysate supplementation. Conclusion: Collagen hydrolysate supplementation reduced body weight gain and adipocyte enlargement in response to ovariectomy but slightly affected blood lipids, calcium, and glucose in both sham-operated and OVX rats. Collagen hydrolysate supplementation is beneficial in ameliorating estrogen deficiency-induced obesity and its associated risk factors.

  13. Microscale mechanisms of agarose-induced disruption of collagen remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Theresa A; Lee, Tae Geol; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Moon, Dae Won; Kumar, Sanjay

    2011-08-01

    Cells are strongly influenced by the local structure and mechanics of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We recently showed that adding agarose to soft collagen ECMs can mechanically stiffen these hydrogels by two orders of magnitude while limiting 3D cell motility, which we speculated might derive from agarose-mediated inhibition of collagen fiber deformation and remodeling. Here, we directly address this hypothesis by investigating the effects of agarose on cell-collagen interactions at the microscale. Addition of agarose progressively restricts cell spreading, reduces stress fiber and focal adhesion assembly, and inhibits macroscopic gel compaction. While time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy fail to reveal agarose-induced alterations in collagen ligand presentation, the latter modality shows that agarose strongly impairs cell-directed assembly of large collagen bundles. Agarose-mediated inhibition of cell spreading and cytoarchitecture can be rescued by β-agarase digestion or by covalently crosslinking the matrix with glutaraldehyde. Based on these results, we argue that cell spreading and motility on collagen requires local matrix stiffening, which can be achieved via cell-mediated fiber remodeling or by chemically crosslinking the fibers. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the regulatory function of agarose and bear general implications for cell adhesion and motility in fibrous ECMs.

  14. Water-soluble undenatured type II collagen ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Orie; Shiojima, Yoshiaki; Moriyama, Hiroyoshi; Shinozaki, Junichi; Nakane, Takahisa; Masuda, Kazuo; Bagchi, Manashi

    2013-11-01

    Earlier studies have reported the efficacy of type II collagen (C II) in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, a few studies have investigated the ability of the antigenic collagen to induce oral tolerance, which is defined as active nonresponse to an orally administered antigen. We hypothesized that water-soluble undenatured C II had a similar effect as C II in RA. The present study was designed to examine the oral administration of a novel, water-soluble, undenatured C II (commercially known as NEXT-II) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. In addition, the underlying mechanism of NEXT-II was also identified. After a booster dose (collagen-Freund's complete adjuvant), mice were assigned to control CIA group, or NEXT-II treatment group, to which saline and NEXT-II were administered, respectively. The arthritis index in the NEXT-II group was significantly lower compared with the CIA group. Serum IL-6 levels in the NEXT-II group were significantly lower compared with the CIA group, while serum IL-2 level was higher. Furthermore, oral administration of NEXT-II enhanced the proportion of CD4+CD25+T (Treg) cells, and gene expressions of stimulated dendritic cells induced markers for regulatory T cells such as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and CD25. These results demonstrated that orally administered water-soluble undenatured C II (NEXT-II) is highly efficacious in the suppression of CIA by inducing CD4+CD25+ Treg cells.

  15. Modulation by glycyrrhetinic acid derivatives of TPA-induced mouse ear oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, H.; Mori, T.; Shibata, S.; Koshihara, Y.

    1989-01-01

    1. The anti-inflammatory effects of glycyrrhetinic acid and its derivatives on TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate)-induced mouse ear oedema were studied. The mechanisms of TPA-induced ear oedema were first investigated with respect to the chemical mediators. 2. The formation of ear oedema reached a maximum 5 h after TPA application (2 micrograms per ear) and the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production of mouse ear increased with the oedema formation. 3. TPA-induced ear oedema was prevented by actinomycin D and cycloheximide (0.1 mg per ear, respectively) when applied during 60 min after TPA treatment. 4. Of glycyrrhetinic acid derivatives examined, dihemiphthalate derivatives (IIe, IIe', IIIa, IIIa', IVa, IVa') most strongly inhibited ear oedema on both topical (ID50, 1.6 mg per ear for IIe, 2.0 mg per ear for IIIa and 1.6 mg per ear for IVa) and oral (ID50, 88 mg kg-1 for IIe', 130 mg kg-1 for IIIa' and 92 mg kg-1 for IVa') administration. 5. Glycyrrhetinic acid (Ia) and its derivatives applied 30 min before TPA treatment were much more effective in inhibiting oedema than when applied 30 min after TPA. A dihemiphthalate of triterpenoid compound IVa completely inhibited oedema, even when applied 3 h before TPA treatment. 6. Glycyrrhetinic acid (Ia) and deoxoglycyrrhetol (IIa), the parent compounds, produced little inhibition by oral administration at less than 200 mg kg-1. 7. These results suggest that the dihemiphthalate derivatives of triterpenes derived from glycyrrhetinic acid by chemical modification are useful for the treatment of skin inflammation by both topical and oral application. PMID:2924072

  16. Characteristics of laser-induced shock wave injury to the inner ear of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Niwa, Katsuki; Tamura, Atsushi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Satoh, Yasushi; Sato, Shunichi; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the number of blast injuries of the inner ear has increased in the general population. In blast-induced inner ear injury, a shock wave (SW) component in the blast wave is considered to play an important role in sensorineural hearing loss. However, the mechanisms by which an SW affects inner ear tissue remain largely unknown. We aimed to establish a new animal model for SW-induced inner ear injury by using laser-induced SWs (LISWs) on rats. The LISWs were generated by irradiating an elastic laser target with 694-nm nanosecond pulses of a ruby laser. After LISW application to the cochlea through bone conduction, auditory measurements revealed the presence of inner ear dysfunction, the extent of which depended on LISW overpressure. A significantly lower survival rate of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons, as well as severe oxidative damage, were observed in the inner ear exposed to an LISW. Although considerable differences in the pressure characteristics exist between LISWs and SWs in real blast waves, the functional and morphological changes shown by the present LISW-based model were similar to those observed in real blast-induced injury. Thus, our animal model is expected to be useful for laboratory-based research of blast-induced inner ear injury.

  17. Chemical Leucoderma Induced by Ear-ring Stoppers Made of Polyvinyl Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Reena; Singal, Archana; Verma, Prashant; Grover, Chander

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of chemical leucoderma (CL) in a 15-year-old girl, who developed patterned depigmentation at the back of both ear lobules after contact with plastic ear-ring stoppers made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) after continuous use for 6–7 months. Patch test with Indian standard series and cosmetic series was negative after 48 h, but she refused patch testing for extended duration as the possibility of induced depigmentation at the test site was unacceptable to her. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of plastic ear-ring stopper induced CL. PMID:23060712

  18. Ear Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outer Ear Ear Blockages Ear Tumors External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear) Malignant External Otitis Perichondritis Tumors of the ... Outer Ear Ear Blockages Ear Tumors External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear) Malignant External Otitis Perichondritis NOTE: This is ...

  19. Ear Infection (Middle Ear)

    MedlinePlus

    Ear infection (middle ear) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff An ear infection (acute otitis media) is most often a bacterial or viral infection that affects the middle ear, the air-filled space behind the eardrum that ...

  20. Assessment of thermal treatment via irrigation of external ear to reduce cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Spankovich, Christopher; Lobarinas, Edward; Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard; Le Prell, Colleen G

    2016-02-01

    Systemic and local changes in body temperature can have a profound effect on traumatic injuries including those to the inner ear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of acutely increasing or decreasing the temperature of the external ear canal on cisplatin-induced hearing loss. The external auditory canals of male guinea pigs were acutely irrigated with warm (44 °C), euthermic (37 °C), or cool (30 °C) water and subsequently injected with cisplatin (12 mg/kg, i.p.). Hearing was assessed by the auditory brainstem response and cochleograms were prepared to determine loss of hair cells. Ear canal irrigation with warm water potentiated cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss whereas cool ear canal irrigation showed significant protection from cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss. These results suggest that non-invasive cool water ear canal irrigation may be highly effective clinical procedure for protecting against cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

  1. Changes induced by ozone and ultraviolet light in type I collagen. Bovine Achilles tendon collagen versus rat tail tendon collagen.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, E

    1985-10-15

    High-molecular-mass aggregates were made soluble from insoluble collagens of bovine Achilles tendon and rat tail tendon by limited thermal hydrolysis. These polymeric collagen aggregates were cross-linked by 390-nm-fluorescent 3-hydroxy-pyridinium residues (excited at 325 nm) in the former tendon and by unknown non-fluorescent residues in the latter. With the solubilized insoluble-collagens from both tendons, as well as with acid-soluble collagen from rat tail tendon, other 350-385-nm fluorescence intensities (excited at 300 nm) were found to be higher in monomeric chains than in dimeric and polymeric chains. Low levels of ozone inhibited fibril formation of acid-soluble collagen particularly from young rat tail tendon, reacting with tyrosine residues and the 350-385-nm fluorophores. Aldehyde groups, involved in cross-linking, were not effectively modified by ozone. beta-Components (alpha-chain dimers) were not efficiently dissociated even by higher doses of ozone compared to gamma-components (alpha-chain trimers). Polymeric chain aggregates from bovine Achilles tendon collagen, whose 3-hydroxy-pyridinium cross-links are cleaved by ozone, were more readily dissociated by ozone than those from rat tail tendon collagen. Ultraviolet (300-nm) light, which destroyed the 350-385-nm fluorophores, inhibited fibril formation less effectively than ultraviolet (275-nm) light, which is absorbed by tyrosine residues, and did not dissociate collagen polymers from rat tail tendon. On the other hand, ultraviolet (320-nm) light, absorbed by 3-hydroxy-pyridinium cross-links which were rapidly photolyzed, partially dissociated polymeric collagen aggregates from bovine Achilles tendon after subsequent heating.

  2. Therapeutic effect of quercetin in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Miranda-Hernandez, Socorro; Alim, Md Abdul; Hayes, Linda; Bird, Guy; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2017-03-22

    Quercetin, a bioactive flavonoid with anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and protective properties, is a potential agent for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is the most commonly used animal model for studying the pathogenesis of RA. This study analysed the therapeutic role of quercetin in collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice. The animals were allocated into five groups that were subjected to the following treatments: negative (untreated) control, positive control (arthritis-induced), arthritis+methotrexate, arthritis+quercetin, and arthritis+methotrexate+quercetin. Assessments of weight, oedema, joint damage, and cytokine production were used to determine the therapeutic effect of quercetin. This study demonstrated for the first time the anti-inflammatory and protective effects of quercetin in vivo in CIA. The results also showed that the concurrent administration of quercetin and methotrexate did not offer greater protection than the administration of a single agent. The use of quercetin as a monotherapeutic agent resulted in the lowest degree of joint inflammation and the highest protection. The reduced severity of the disease in animals treated with quercetin was associated with decreased levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-17, and MCP-1. In conclusion, this study determined that quercetin, which was non-toxic, produced better results than methotrexate for the protection of joints from arthritic inflammation in mice. Quercetin may be an alternative treatment for RA because it modulates the main pathogenic pathways of RA.

  3. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  4. Suppression of collagen induced arthritis by idiotype coupled lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nagler-Anderson, C.; Gurish, M.F.; Robinson, M.E.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were initiated to evaluate the regulatory influence of idiotype (Id) networks in an experimental auto-immune disease. Collagen induced arthritis is an animal model of polyarthritis induced in susceptible mice by immunization with collagen II (CII). A humoral immune response to CII appears to be critical for the development of diseases. If subpopulations of the anti-CII abs, important for the induction of arthritis, could be identified and manipulated through the presence of a major Id, it should be possible to decrease arthritis incidence by suppressing the production of these Ids. Specifically purified anti-CII abs from arthritic DBA/1 mice were coupled to syngeneic spleen cells and administered IV prior to intradermal immunization with CII. By day 34 after 1/sup 0/ immunization, 100% of control mice and 50% of treated mice had developed arthritis. Suppression of the Id population administered to the treated group was confirmed by RIA. Sera from individual mice were tested as inhibitors of binding of /sup 125/I-labelled polyclonal DBA/1 anti-CII to a rabbit anti-Id directed against polyclonal anti-CII isolated from the sera of arthritic mice. Mean percentage of inhibition of binding of /sup 125/I-Id to rabbit anti-Id by sera from non-arthritic treated mice was found to be significantly lower than that observed in the arthritic control group (p = .045), but did not correlate with total anti-CII ab titers.

  5. Immune regulation and anti-inflammatory effects of isogarcinol extracted from Garcinia mangostana L. against collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanxia; Zhou, Hailing; Wang, Mengqi; Cen, Juren; Wei, Qun

    2014-05-07

    Isogarcinol is a natural compound that we extracted from Garcinia mangostana L., and we were the first to report that it is a new immunosuppressant. In the present study, we investigated the immune regulation and anti-inflammatory effects of isogarcinol on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and explored its potential mechanism in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The oral administration of isogarcinol significantly reduced clinical scores, alleviated cartilage and bone erosion, and reduced the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines in CIA mice. Isogarcinol inhibited xylene-induced mouse ear edema in vivo. In vitro, isogarcinol decreased iNOS and COX-2 mRNA expression and NO content by inhibiting NF-κB expression. Furthermore, isogarcinol decreased the activity of NFAT and inhibited IL-2 expression. The mechanism of action of isogarcinol is associated with down-regulation of both autoimmune and inflammatory reactions.

  6. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  7. Paclitaxel suppresses collagen-induced arthritis: a reevaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi; Chang, Zhi-Fang; Li, Ru; Li, Zhan-Guo; Li, Xiao-Xia; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To reevaluate the suppressive effect of paclitaxel (PTX) liposome on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and explore its mechanisms. Methods: Female Lewis rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen (CII) to induce arthritis. The rats with CIA were randomly divided into three groups: 5% GS control group, 2.5 mg/kg PTX treatment group and 1 mg/kg methotrexate (MTX) positive control group. The drugs were administered by intraperitoneal injection on the second day after arthritis onset. The body weights, arthritis scores and paw volumes were observed consecutively. The ankle joints of rats were collected for X-ray examination and histological evaluation. Serum samples were collected to test the levels of anti-CII antibodies and cytokines. Results: Body weights were not significantly affected after PTX or MTX treatments (p>0.05). Compared with 5% GS control or MTX treatment groups, PTX group showed significant decrease of arthritis scores and paw volumes (p<0.05). Radiographic and histologic evaluation provided evidence that rats with PTX treatment had less synovial proliferation and bone erosion. In addition, the levels of anti-CII antibodies as well as serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were remarkably lower in PTX group than those in 5% GS controls (p<0.05). Conclusions: PTX inhibits the progression of CIA in rats and prevents the destruction of joints. The mechanism might be related to its inhibition on the levels of serum anti-CII antibodies, TNF-α and VEGF. PMID:27904705

  8. Diabetes-induced alterations in tissue collagen and carboxymethyllysine in rat kidneys: Association with increased collagen-degrading proteinases and amelioration by Cu(II)-selective chelation.

    PubMed

    Brings, Sebastian; Zhang, Shaoping; Choong, Yee S; Hogl, Sebastian; Middleditch, Martin; Kamalov, Meder; Brimble, Margaret A; Gong, Deming; Cooper, Garth J S

    2015-08-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) comprise a group of non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of proteins and are elevated in diabetic tissues. AGE-modification impairs the digestibility of collagen in vitro but little is known about its relation to collagen-degrading proteinases in vivo. N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) is a stable AGE that forms on lysyl side-chains in the presence of glucose, probably via a transition metal-catalysed mechanism. Here, rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes and non-diabetic controls were treated for 8weeks with placebo or the Cu(II)-selective chelator, triethylenetetramine (TETA), commencing 8weeks after disease induction. Actions of diabetes and drug treatment were measured on collagen and collagen-degrading proteinases in kidney tissue. The digestibility and CML content of collagen, and corresponding levels of mRNAs and collagen, were related to changes in collagen-degrading-proteinases. Collagen-degrading proteinases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) were increased in diabetic rats. CTSL-levels correlated strongly and positively with increased collagen-CML levels and inversely with decreased collagen digestibility in diabetes. The collagen-rich mesangium displayed a strong increase of CTSL in diabetes. TETA treatment normalised kidney collagen content and partially normalised levels of CML and CTSL. These data provide evidence for an adaptive proteinase response in diabetic kidneys, affected by excessive collagen-CML formation and decreased collagen digestibility. The normalisation of collagen and partial normalisation of CML- and CTSL-levels by TETA treatment supports the involvement of Cu(II) in CML formation and altered collagen metabolism in diabetic kidneys. Cu(II)-chelation by TETA may represent a treatment option to rectify collagen metabolism in diabetes independent of alterations in blood glucose levels.

  9. Pathophysiology of the inner ear after blast injury caused by laser-induced shock wave

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Katsuki; Mizutari, Kunio; Matsui, Toshiyasu; Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Satoh, Yasushi; Sato, Shunichi; Shiotani, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The ear is the organ that is most sensitive to blast overpressure, and ear damage is most frequently seen after blast exposure. Blast overpressure to the ear results in sensorineural hearing loss, which is untreatable and is often associated with a decline in the quality of life. In this study, we used a rat model to demonstrate the pathophysiological and structural changes in the inner ear that replicate pure sensorineural hearing loss associated with blast injury using laser-induced shock wave (LISW) without any conductive hearing loss. Our results indicate that threshold elevation of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) after blast exposure was primarily caused by outer hair cell dysfunction induced by stereociliary bundle disruption. The bundle disruption pattern was unique; disturbed stereocilia were mostly observed in the outermost row, whereas those in the inner and middle rows stereocilia remained intact. In addition, the ABR examination showed a reduction in wave I amplitude without elevation of the threshold in the lower energy exposure group. This phenomenon was caused by loss of the synaptic ribbon. This type of hearing dysfunction has recently been described as hidden hearing loss caused by cochlear neuropathy, which is associated with tinnitus or hyperacusis. PMID:27531021

  10. Novel CC chemokine receptor 4 antagonist RS-1154 inhibits ovalbumin-induced ear swelling in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Yasuhiro; Kawashima, Kayo; Yonekubo, Kazuki; Etori, Maki; Jojima, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Shojiro; Sawamura, Ryoko; Hirahara, Kazuki; Nara, Futoshi; Yamashita, Makoto

    2009-12-10

    CC chemokine ligand 17 (CCL17/thymus and activation-regulated chemokine: TARC) and CCL22 (macrophage-derived chemokine: MDC) selectively bind to CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4). The CCR4 system is considered to be responsible for the pathology of allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis. To find and develop potential medicines against allergic diseases, we screened an in-house library to search for compounds having a profile as a CCR4 antagonist. From among the screening hits, we focused on 3-{2-[(2R)-2-phenyl-4-(4-pyridin-4-ylbenzyl)morpholin-2-yl]ethyl}quinazoline-2,4(1H,3H)-dione (named RS-1154), which had been newly synthesized in our laboratory. This compound inhibited the binding of [(125)I]CCL17 to human CCR4-expressing CHO cells with an IC(50) value of 27.7 nM and moreover inhibited CCL17-induced migration of DO11.10 mice-derived T helper 2 cells with an IC(50) value of 1.5 nM in vitro. We then examined the effect of RS-1154 in an ovalbumin-induced ear swelling assay. The ear thickness was decreased by intravenous administration of anti-CCL17 or anti-CCL22 antibodies, suggesting that the CCR4 system is involved in the ear swelling. Though partially, the oral administration of RS-1154 also significantly ameliorated the ear swelling at the doses of 30 and 100 mg/kg. Furthermore, the serum level of interleukin-4 decreased after the administration of RS-1154. In this study, we succeeded in obtaining a newly-synthesized compound, RS-1154, which has a potential to inhibit the chemotaxis of T helper 2 cells in vitro and to ameliorate ovalbumin-induced ear swelling in vivo. These results raise the possibility that RS-1154 or one of derivatives might become a therapeutic agent for atopic dermatitis patients.

  11. A Mouse Ear Model for Bystander Studies Induced by Microbeam Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Buonanno, M.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Smilenov, L. B.; Kleiman, N. J.; Young, E.; Ponnayia, B.; Brenner, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been observed in vitro and in cell and tissue culture models, however, there are few reported studies showing these effects in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study on bystander effects induced by microbeam irradiation in an intact living mammal. The mouse ear was used to investigate radiation-induced bystander effects in keratinocytes, utilizing a 3 MeV proton microbeam (LET 13.1 keV/µm) with a range in skin of about 135 µm. Using a custom-designed holder, the ear of an anesthetized C57BL/6J mouse was flattened by gentle suction and placed over the microbeam port to irradiate cells along a 35 µm wide, 6 mm long path. Immunohistochemical analysis of γ-H2AX foci formation in tissue sections revealed, compared to control tissue, proton-induced γ-H2AX foci formation in one of the two epidermal layers of the mouse ear. Strikingly, a higher number of cells than expected showed foci from direct irradiation effects. Although the proton-irradiated line was ~35 µm wide, the average width spanned by γ-H2AX-positive cells exceeded 150 µm. Cells adjacent to or in the epidermal layer opposite the γ-H2AX-positive region did not exhibit foci. These findings validate this mammalian model as a viable system for investigating radiation-induced bystander effects in an intact living organism. PMID:26207682

  12. Ossicular Bone Damage and Hearing Loss in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Correlated Functional and High Resolution Morphometric Study in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Mary F.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, a body of comparative case-control studies suggests that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are more prone to developing hearing loss (HL). However, experimental evidence that supports this hypothesis is still lacking because the human auditory organ is not readily accessible. The aim of this study was to determine the association between bone damage to the ossicles of the middle ear and HL, using a widely accepted murine model of collagen-induced arthritis (RA mice). Diarthrodial joints in the middle ear were examined with microcomputer tomography (microCT), and hearing function was assessed by auditory brainstem response (ABR). RA mice exhibited significantly decreased hearing sensitivity compared to age-matched controls. Additionally, a significant narrowing of the incudostapedial joint space and an increase in the porosity of the stapes were observed. The absolute latencies of all ABR waves were prolonged, but mean interpeak latencies were not statistically different. The observed bone defects in the middle ear that were accompanied by changes in ABR responses were consistent with conductive HL. This combination suggests that conductive impairment is at least part of the etiology of RA-induced HL in a murine model. Whether the inner ear sustains bone erosion or other pathology, and whether the cochlear nerve sustains pathology await subsequent studies. Considering the fact that certain anti-inflammatories are ototoxic in high doses, monitoring RA patients’ auditory function is advisable as part of the effort to ensure their well-being. PMID:27690307

  13. Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Miki; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Real time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.

  14. Pierced Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Pierced Ears KidsHealth > For Kids > Pierced Ears A A A ... cool, but infected ears do not! Getting Your Ears Pierced It's important to get your ears pierced ...

  15. Pregnancy-induced remodeling of collagen architecture and content in the mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Pierlot, Caitlin M; Lee, J Michael; Amini, Rouzbeh; Sacks, Michael S; Wells, Sarah M

    2014-10-01

    Pregnancy produces rapid, non-pathological volume-overload in the maternal circulation due to the demands of the growing fetus. Using a bovine model for human pregnancy, previous work in our laboratory has shown remarkable pregnancy-induced changes in leaflet size and mechanics of the mitral valve. The present study sought to relate these changes to structural alterations in the collagenous leaflet matrix. Anterior mitral valve leaflets were harvested from non-pregnant heifers and pregnant cows (pregnancy stage estimated by fetal length). We measured changes in the thickness of the leaflet and its anatomic layers via Verhoeff-Van Gieson staining, and in collagen crimp (wavelength and percent collagen crimped) via picrosirius red staining and polarized microscopy. Collagen concentration was determined biochemically: hydroxyproline assay for total collagen and pepsin-acid extraction for uncrosslinked collagen. Small-angle light scattering (SALS) assessed changes in internal fiber architecture (characterized by degree of fiber alignment and preferred fiber direction). Pregnancy produced significant changes to collagen structure in the mitral valve. Fiber alignment decreased 17% with an 11.5° rotation of fiber orientation toward the radial axis. Collagen fiber crimp was dramatically lost, accompanied by a 53% thickening of the fibrosa, and a 16% increase in total collagen concentration, both suggesting that new collagen is being synthesized. Extractable collagen concentration was low, both in the non-pregnant and pregnant state, suggesting early crosslinking of newly-synthesized collagen. This study has shown that the mitral valve is strongly adaptive during pregnancy, with significant changes in size, collagen content and architecture in response to rapidly changing demands.

  16. Cell Alignment Driven by Mechanically Induced Collagen Fiber Alignment in Collagen/Alginate Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Chaubaroux, Christophe; Perrin-Schmitt, Fabienne; Senger, Bernard; Vidal, Loïc; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Schaaf, Pierre; Haikel, Youssef; Boulmedais, Fouzia; Lavalle, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    For many years it has been a major challenge to regenerate damaged tissues using synthetic or natural materials. To favor the healing processes after tendon, cornea, muscle, or brain injuries, aligned collagen-based architectures are of utmost interest. In this study, we define a novel aligned coating based on a collagen/alginate (COL/ALG) multilayer film. The coating exhibiting a nanofibrillar structure is cross-linked with genipin for stability in physiological conditions. By stretching COL/ALG-coated polydimethylsiloxane substrates, we developed a versatile method to align the collagen fibrils of the polymeric coating. Assays on cell morphology and alignment were performed to investigate the properties of these films. Microscopic assessments revealed that cells align with the stretched collagen fibrils of the coating. The degree of alignment is tuned by the stretching rate (i.e., the strain) of the COL/ALG-coated elastic substrate. Such coatings are of great interest for strategies that require aligned nanofibrillar biological material as a substrate for tissue engineering. PMID:25658028

  17. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  18. Autologous Collagen-Induced Chondrogenesis Technique for Knee Chondral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Paz, Matias; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Yacuzzi, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate a series of patients with osteochondral lesions who underwent a microfractures treatment and autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis technique (ACIC). Methods: Microfracture treatment and ACIC was performed in eight patients with grade IV cartilage lesion of more than 3 cm2 long. Two patients were discarded due to short follow-up. Four women and two men were evaluated with 50 year-old mean age. The average follow-up was 12.5 months. An associated valgus osteotomy was performed in two patients. Patients were evaluated using the Lysholm score and IKDC. Radiographs were evaluated and a Magnetic Resonance (MRI) was performed in 3 patients. Results: Six patients were evaluated with a 1 B, 2 C and 3 D arthrosis grade according to IKDC classification. Atelocollagen was placed in the medial femoral condyle in four patients (2 associated to tibial valgus osteotomy), in the trochlea in one patient and in both in one patient. Pre and post operative average score IKDC was 38/58 and Lysholm 34/89. One case of postoperative artrofibrosis was registered which was mobilized under anesthesia with satisfactory results. The MRI showed signal with coverage of the chondral defect in more than 70%. There were no cases of infection or reactive synovitis. Conclusion: Atelocollagen combined with microfractures improved the clinical conditions in patients with articular cartilage lesions of the knee. It is necessary more patients and longer follow-up to verify this data.

  19. Nutrient-Enhanced Diet Reduces Noise-Induced Damage to the Inner Ear and Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, C. G.; Gagnon, P. M; Bennett, D. C.; Ohlemiller, K. K.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been broadly implicated as a cause of cell death and neural degeneration in multiple disease conditions; however, the evidence for successful intervention with dietary antioxidant manipulations has been mixed. In this study, we investigated the potential for protection of cells in the inner ear using a dietary supplement with multiple antioxidant components, selected for their potential interactive effectiveness. Protection against permanent threshold shift (PTS) was observed in CBA/J mice maintained on a diet supplemented with a combination of β-carotene, vitamins C and E, and magnesium when compared to PTS in control mice maintained on a nutritionally complete control diet. Although hair cell survival was not enhanced, noise-induced loss of Type II fibrocytes in the lateral wall was significantly reduced (p<0.05), and there was a trend towards less noise-induced loss in strial cell density in animals maintained on the supplemented diet. Taken together, our data suggest that pre-noise oral treatment with the high-nutrient diet can protect cells in the inner ear and reduce PTS in mice. Demonstration of functional and morphological preservation of cells in the inner ear with oral administration of this antioxidant supplemented diet supports the possibility of translation to human patients, and suggests an opportunity to evaluate antioxidant protection in mouse models of oxidative stress-related disease and pathology. PMID:21708355

  20. Magnetically induced behaviour of ferritin corpuscles in avian ears: can cuticulosomes function as magnetosomes?

    PubMed

    Jandacka, Petr; Burda, Hynek; Pistora, Jaromir

    2015-01-06

    Magnetoreception is an enigmatic, poorly understood sensory ability, described mainly on the basis of behavioural studies in animals of diverse taxa. Recently, corpuscles containing superparamagnetic iron-storage protein ferritin were found in the inner ear hair cells of birds, a predominantly single ferritin corpuscle per cell. It was suggested that these corpuscles might represent magnetosomes and function as magnetosensors. Here we determine ferritin low-field paramagnetic susceptibility to estimate its magnetically induced intracellular behaviour. Physical simulations show that ferritin corpuscles cannot be deformed or rotate in weak geomagnetic fields, and thus cannot provide magnetoreception via deformation of the cuticular plate. Furthermore, we reached an alternative hypothesis that ferritin corpuscle in avian ears may function as an intracellular electromagnetic oscillator. Such an oscillator would generate additional cellular electric potential related to normal cell conditions. Though the phenomenon seems to be weak, this effect deserves further analyses.

  1. Riboflavin-induced photo-crosslinking of collagen hydrogel and its application in meniscus tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jiseung; Koh, Rachel H; Shim, Whuisu; Kim, Hwan D; Yim, Hyun-Gu; Hwang, Nathaniel S

    2016-04-01

    A meniscus tear is a common knee injury, but its regeneration remains a clinical challenge. Recently, collagen-based scaffolds have been applied in meniscus tissue engineering. Despite its prevalence, application of natural collagen scaffold in clinical setting is limited due to its extremely low stiffness and rapid degradation. The purpose of the present study was to increase the mechanical properties and delay degradation rate of a collagen-based scaffold by photo-crosslinking using riboflavin (RF) and UV exposure. RF is a biocompatible vitamin B2 that showed minimal cytotoxicity compared to conventionally utilized photo-initiator. Furthermore, collagen photo-crosslinking with RF improved mechanical properties and delayed enzyme-triggered degradation of collagen scaffolds. RF-induced photo-crosslinked collagen scaffolds encapsulated with fibrochondrocytes resulted in reduced scaffold contraction and enhanced gene expression levels for the collagen II and aggrecan. Additionally, hyaluronic acid (HA) incorporation into photo-crosslinked collagen scaffold showed an increase in its retention. Based on these results, we demonstrate that photo-crosslinked collagen-HA hydrogels can be potentially applied in the scaffold-based meniscus tissue engineering.

  2. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J.; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone.

  3. A Mouse Ear Model for Bystander Studies Induced by Microbeam Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, M; Randers-Pehrson, G; Smilenov, L B; Kleiman, N J; Young, E; Ponnayia, B; Brenner, D J

    2015-08-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been observed in vitro and in cell and tissue culture models, however, there are few reported studies showing these effects in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study on bystander effects induced by microbeam irradiation in an intact living mammal. The mouse ear was used to investigate radiation-induced bystander effects in keratinocytes, utilizing a 3 MeV proton microbeam (LET 13.1 keV/μm) with a range in skin of about 135 μm. Using a custom-designed holder, the ear of an anesthetized C57BL/6J mouse was flattened by gentle suction and placed over the microbeam port to irradiate cells along a 35 μm wide, 6 mm long path. Immunohistochemical analysis of γ-H2AX foci formation in tissue sections revealed, compared to control tissue, proton-induced γ-H2AX foci formation in one of the two epidermal layers of the mouse ear. Strikingly, a higher number of cells than expected showed foci from direct irradiation effects. Although the proton-irradiated line was ~35 μm wide, the average width spanned by γ-H2AX-positive cells exceeded 150 μm. Cells adjacent to or in the epidermal layer opposite the γ-H2AX-positive region did not exhibit foci. These findings validate this mammalian model as a viable system for investigating radiation-induced bystander effects in an intact living organism.

  4. Temperature induced denaturation of collagen in acidic solution.

    PubMed

    Mu, Changdao; Li, Defu; Lin, Wei; Ding, Yanwei; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2007-07-01

    The denaturation of collagen solution in acetic acid has been investigated by using ultra-sensitive differential scanning calorimetry (US-DSC), circular dichroism (CD), and laser light scattering (LLS). US-DSC measurements reveal that the collagen exhibits a bimodal transition, i.e., there exists a shoulder transition before the major transition. Such a shoulder transition can recover from a cooling when the collagen is heated to a temperature below 35 degrees C. However, when the heating temperature is above 37 degrees C, both the shoulder and major transitions are irreversible. CD measurements demonstrate the content of triple helix slowly decreases with temperature at a temperature below 35 degrees C, but it drastically decreases at a higher temperature. Our experiments suggest that the shoulder transition and major transition arise from the defibrillation and denaturation of collagen, respectively. LLS measurements show the average hydrodynamic radius R(h), radius of gyration R(g)of the collagen gradually decrease before a sharp decrease at a higher temperature. Meanwhile, the ratio R(g)/R(h) gradually increases at a temperature below approximately 34 degrees C and drastically increases in the range 34-40 degrees C, further indicating the defibrillation of collagen before the denaturation.

  5. Monitoring the thermally induced structural transitions of collagen by use of second-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Hsiao, Chih-Yuan; Sun, Yen; Lo, Wen; Lin, Wei-Chou; Jan, Gwo-Jen; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2005-03-01

    The thermal disruption of collagen I in rat tail tendon is investigated with second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. We investigate its effects on SHG images and intensity in the temperature range 25°-60°C. We find that the SHG signal decreases rapidly starting at 45°C. However, SHG imaging reveals that breakage of collagen fibers is not evident until 57°C and worsens with increasing temperature. At 57°C, structures of both molten and fibrous collagen exist, and the disruption of collagen appears to be complete at 60°C. Our results suggest that, in addition to intensity measurement, SHG imaging is necessary for monitoring details of thermally induced changes in collagen structures in biomedical applications.

  6. Biphasic function of focal adhesion kinase in endothelial tube formation induced by fibril-forming collagens.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Junko; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Keishi; Takeda, Teiji; Yamazaki, Masanori; Kakizawa, Tomoko; Hashizume, Kiyoshi

    2008-10-03

    Migration and tube formation of endothelial cells are important in angiogenesis and require a coordinated response to the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) and growth factor. Since focal adhesion kinase (FAK) integrates signals from both ECM and growth factor, we investigated its role in angiogenesis. Type I and II collagens are fibril-forming collagens and stimulate human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to form tube structure. Although knockdown of FAK restrained cell motility and resulted in inhibition of tube formation, FAK degradation and tube formation occurred simultaneously after incubation with fibril-forming collagens. The compensation for the FAK degradation by a calpain inhibitor or transient over-expression of FAK resulted in disturbance of tube formation. These phenomena are specific to fibril-forming collagens and mediated via alpha2beta1 integrin. In conclusion, our data indicate that FAK is functioning in cell migration, but fibril-forming collagen-induced FAK degradation is necessary for endothelial tube formation.

  7. Swimmer's Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Swimmer's Ear KidsHealth > For Kids > Swimmer's Ear Print A ... continue How Do I Know if I Have Swimmer's Ear? Swimmer's ear may start with some itching, ...

  8. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Tubes Ear Tubes Patient Health Information News media interested ... throat specialist) may be considered. What are ear tubes? Ear tubes are tiny cylinders placed through the ...

  9. Selective deficiency in collagen-induced platelet aggregation during L-asparaginase therapy.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, R S; Gerrard, J M; Ramsay, N K; Nesbit, M E; Coccia, P F; Stoddard, S F; Plow, E F; White, J G; Krivit, W

    1980-01-01

    Platelet aggregation studies were performed on 10 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving induction therapy with vincristine, prednisone, and L-asparaginase. An isolated abnormality in platelet aggregation in response to collagen was found in all patients during the course of therapy. Platelet aggregation in response to collagen normalized following the discontinuation of L-asparaginase, while patients were still on vincristine and prednisone. In contrast to the abnormal collagen response, platelet aggregation induced by epinephrine, arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and thrombin were normal both during and following therapy. In the one patient with a normal platelet count before therapy, aggregation induced by all agents was normal. This selective abnormality in collagen aggregation therefore appears to result from therapy, with the use of L-asparaginase in particular being implicated.

  10. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Svoboda, Kathy K.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Gordon, Marion K.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2013-04-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin γ2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing from 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin γ2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin γ2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. - Highlights: ► We demonstrated ER stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model. ► We described the asymmetrical nature of wound repair in the MEVM. ► We identified the distribution of various ER stress markers in the MEVM.

  11. Non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush induces HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingsheng; Zhang, Ying; Dusevich, Vladimir; Liu, Yi; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) brush has been regarded as a promising technique to enhance dental interfacial bonding. However, the principal enhancement mechanisms have not been well identified. In this study, the effect of non-thermal plasmas on grafting of HEMA, a typical dental monomer, onto dentin collagen thin films was investigated. Methods Human dentin was sectioned into 10-um-thick films. After total demineralization in 0.5 M EDTA solution for 30 min, the dentin collagen films were water-rinsed, air-dried, treated with 35 wt% HEMA aqueous solution. The films were then subject to plasma-exposure under a NTAP brush with different time (1–8 min) / input power (5–15 w). For comparison, the dentin collagen films were also treated with the above HEMA solution containing photo-initiators, then subject to light-curing. After plasma-exposure or light-curing, the HEMA-collagen films were rinsed in deionized water, and then examined by FTIR spectroscopy and TEM. Results The FITR results indicated that plasma-exposure could induce significant HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen thin films. In contrast, light-curing led to no detectable interaction of HEMA with dentin collagen. Quantitative IR spectral analysis (i.e., 1720/3075 or 749/3075, HEMA/collagen ratios) further suggested that the grafting efficacy of HEMA onto the plasma-exposed collagen thin films strongly depended on the treatment time and input power of plasmas. TEM results indicated that plasma treatment did not alter collagen’s banding structure. Significance The current study provides deeper insight into the mechanism of dental adhesion enhancement induced by non-thermal plasmas treatment. The NTAP brush could be a promising method to create chemical bond between resin monomers and dentin collagen. PMID:25458523

  12. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Svoboda, Kathy K.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Gordon, Marion K.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin γ2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing from 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin γ2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin γ2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. PMID:23357548

  13. Autoantibodies to Multiple Epitopes on the Non-Collagenous-1 Domain of Type VII Collagen Induce Blisters.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, Artem; Ujiie, Hideyuki; Recke, Andreas; Buijsrogge, Jacqueline J A; Jonkman, Marcel F; Pas, Hendri H; Iwata, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kim, Soo-Chan; Hoon Kim, Jong; Groves, Richard; Samavedam, Unni; Gupta, Yask; Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2015-06-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes, characterized by autoantibodies against type VII collagen (COL7), a major component of anchoring fibrils. Different clinical EBA phenotypes are described, including mechanobullous and inflammatory variants. Most EBA patients' sera react with epitopes located within the non-collagenous 1 (NC1) domain of human COL7. However, it has remained unclear whether antibody binding to these different epitopes is pathogenically relevant. To address this issue, we generated recombinant proteins covering the entire NC1 domain. IgG reactivity with these proteins was analyzed in sera of 69 EBA patients. Most recognized clusters of epitopes throughout the NC1 domain. No correlation was detected between antibody specificity and clinical phenotype. To study the pathogenicity of antibodies specific to different NC1 subdomains, rabbit antibodies were generated. All these antibodies caused dermal-epidermal separation ex vivo. Antibodies against two of these subdomains were injected into mice carrying null mutations of mouse COL7 and the human COL7 transgene and induced subepidermal blisters. We here document that autoantibodies to COL7, independent of the targeted epitopes, induce blisters both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, using COL7-humanized mice, we provide in vivo evidence of pathogenicity of autoantibodies binding to human COL7.

  14. Electrospun tilapia collagen nanofibers accelerating wound healing via inducing keratinocytes proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Nanping; Xue, Yang; Ding, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Mo, Xiumei; Sun, Jiao

    2016-07-01

    The development of biomaterials with the ability to induce skin wound healing is a great challenge in biomedicine. In this study, tilapia skin collagen sponge and electrospun nanofibers were developed for wound dressing. The collagen sponge was composed of at least two α-peptides. It did not change the number of spleen-derived lymphocytes in BALB/c mice, the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+) lymphocytes, and the level of IgG or IgM in Sprague-Dawley rats. The tensile strength and contact angle of collagen nanofibers were 6.72±0.44MPa and 26.71±4.88°, respectively. They also had good thermal stability and swelling property. Furthermore, the nanofibers could significantly promote the proliferation of human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and stimulate epidermal differentiation through the up-regulated gene expression of involucrin, filaggrin, and type I transglutaminase in HaCaTs. The collagen nanofibers could also facilitate rat skin regeneration. In the present study, electrospun biomimetic tilapia skin collagen nanofibers were succesfully prepared, were proved to have good bioactivity and could accelerate rat wound healing rapidly and effectively. These biological effects might be attributed to the biomimic extracellular matrix structure and the multiple amino acids of the collagen nanofibers. Therefore, the cost-efficient tilapia collagen nanofibers could be used as novel wound dressing, meanwhile effectively avoiding the risk of transmitting animal disease in the future clinical apllication.

  15. Hernia fibroblasts lack β-estradiol induced alterations of collagen gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Background Estrogens are reported to increase type I and type III collagen deposition and to regulate Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) expression. These proteins are reported to be dysregulated in incisional hernia formation resulting in a significantly decreased type I to III ratio. We aimed to evaluate the β-estradiol mediated regulation of type I and type III collagen genes as well as MMP-2 gene expression in fibroblasts derived from patients with or without history of recurrent incisional hernia disease. We compared primary fibroblast cultures from male/female subjects without/without incisional hernia disease. Results Incisional hernia fibroblasts (IHFs) revealed a decreased type I/III collagen mRNA ratio. Whereas fibroblasts from healthy female donors responded to β-estradiol, type I and type III gene transcription is not affected in fibroblasts from males or affected females. Furthermore β-estradiol had no influence on the impaired type I to III collagen ratio in fibroblasts from recurrent hernia patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that β-estradiol does not restore the imbaired balance of type I/III collagen in incisional hernia fibroblasts. Furthermore, the individual was identified as an independent factor for the β-estradiol induced alterations of collagen gene expression. The observation of gender specific β-estradiol-dependent changes of collagen gene expression in vitro is of significance for future studies of cellular response. PMID:17010202

  16. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  17. Effect of drill-induced noise on hearing in non-operated ear

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, Seyyed Hamidreza; Fazel, Alireza; Rogha, Mehrdad; Nilforoush, Mohamadhosein; Solooki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of drill-generated noise on hearing loss in non-operated ear and if any, was temporary or persistent. Materials and Methods: In this prospective clinical study, 23 patients who had undergone mastoidectomy and normal contralateral hearing were enrolled. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively (1 and 7 days) following surgery using low and high-frequency pure tone audiometry (PTA) and low and high-frequency transient evoked and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) testing. Results: Comparing preoperative and 1-day after surgery, PTA averages were significantly different at low frequencies, but no statistical significant differences were observed at 0.25 KHz and high-frequencies. Comparing 1-day after surgery and 7 days after surgery showed that, PTA averages at 0.5, 2 and 2 KHz were significantly different with no significant differences at the other average of thresholds in low and high frequencies; PTA average at 1 KHz was significantly different with, no significant differences at the other averages of thresholds in low and high frequencies. DPOAEs showed a significant difference preoperative and 1-day after surgery, 1-day and 7 days after, but DPOAEs were not significantly different. Transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) had a significant difference preoperative and 1-day after surgery, 1-day and 7 days after but when comparing preoperative and 7 days after surgery, TEOAEs were not significantly different. Conclusions: Drill-induced noise during ear surgery (mastoidectomy) can cause reversible changes in PTA, DPOAEs and TEOAEs in the non-operated ear. PMID:27274502

  18. Polymerized-Type I Collagen Induces Upregulation of Foxp3-Expressing CD4 Regulatory T Cells and Downregulation of IL-17-Producing CD4+ T Cells (Th17) Cells in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Macip-Rodríguez, Perla; Galindo-Feria, Angeles S.; Cruz-Robles, David; Soto-Abraham, Virgina; Escobar-Hernández, Sergio; Aguilar, Diana; Alpizar-Rodríguez, Deshiré; Férez-Blando, Karen; Llorente, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that polymerized-type I collagen (polymerized collagen) exhibits potent immunoregulatory properties. This work evaluated the effect of intramuscular administration of polymerized collagen in early and established collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and analyzed changes in Th subsets following therapy. Incidence of CIA was of 100% in mice challenged with type II collagen. Clinimorphometric analysis showed a downregulation of inflammation after administration of all treatments (P < 0.05). Histological analysis showed that the CIA-mice group had extensive bone erosion, pannus and severe focal inflammatory infiltrates. In contrast, there was a remarkable reduction in the severity of arthritis in mice under polymerized collagen, methotrexate or methotrexate/polymerized collagen treatment. Polymerized Collagen but not methotrexate induced tissue joint regeneration. Polymerized Collagen and methotrexate/polymerized collagen but not methotrexate alone induces downregulation of CD4+/IL17A+ T cells and upregulation of Tregs and CD4+/IFN-γ+ T cells. Thus, Polymerized Collagen could be an effective therapeutic agent in early and established rheumatoid arthritis by exerting downregulation of autoimmune inflammation. PMID:22028728

  19. Mechanism of UV-Induced Damage to Mammalian Collagen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-12

    other properties (e.g. electrophoresis , appearance) may not be sensitive to age and temperature, probably because these fluorophores form a very small...component of the interstitial gel . Collagen has several covalently – bound fluorescent molecules that are unstable to solar UV wavelengths. Very...correlate these viscosity measurements with electrophoresis Year 02 : Period 01 September, 2011 – 31 August, 2012 Aim (1) In the previous year we

  20. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo; Kim, So Young; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Taehoon G.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify a function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in Hs27. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YIGSR peptide enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis both of gene and protein levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There were no changes in cell proliferation and MMP-1 level in YIGSR treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR effect on collagen synthesis mediated activation of FAK, pyk2 and ERK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR-induced FAK and ERK activation was modulated by FAK and MEK inhibitors. -- Abstract: The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the {beta}1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67 kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate

  1. Apigenin induces dermal collagen synthesis via smad2/3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Wang, J; Cheng, X; Yi, B; Zhang, X; Li, Q

    2015-04-13

    Decrease in fibroblast-produced collagen has been proven to be the pivotal cause of skin aging, but there is no satisfactory drug which directly increases dermal thickness and collage density. Here we found that a flavonoid natural product, apigenin, could significantly increase collagen synthesis. NIH/3T3 and primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) were incubated with various concentrations of apigenin, with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) serving as the negative control. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western Blot, and Toluidine blue staining demonstrated that apigenin stimulated type-I and type-III collagen synthesis of fibroblasts on the mRNA and protein levels. Meanwhile, apigenin did not induce expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in vitro and in vivo, a fibrotic marker in living tissues. Then the production of collagen was confirmed by Masson's trichrome stain, Picrosirius red stain and immunohistochemistry in mouse models. We also clarified that this compound induced collagen synthesis by activating smad2/3 signaling pathway. Taken together, without obvious influence on fibroblasts' apoptosis and viability, apigenin could promote the type-I and type-III collagen synthesis of dermal fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo, thus suggesting that apigenin may serve as a potential agent for esthetic and reconstructive skin rejuvenation.

  2. Apigenin Induces Dermal Collagen Synthesis Via smad2/3 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, J.; Cheng, X.; Yi, B.; Zhang, X.; Li, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Decrease in fibroblast-produced collagen has been proven to be the pivotal cause of skin aging, but there is no satisfactory drug which directly increases dermal thickness and collage density. Here we found that a flavonoid natural product, apigenin, could significantly increase collagen synthesis. NIH/3T3 and primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) were incubated with various concentrations of apigenin, with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) serving as the negative control. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western Blot, and Toluidine blue staining demonstrated that apigenin stimulated type-I and type-III collagen synthesis of fibroblasts on the mRNA and protein levels. Meanwhile, apigenin did not induce expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in vitro and in vivo, a fibrotic marker in living tissues. Then the production of collagen was confirmed by Masson’s trichrome stain, Picrosirius red stain and immunohistochemistry in mouse models. We also clarified that this compound induced collagen synthesis by activating smad2/3 signaling pathway. Taken together, without obvious influence on fibroblasts’ apoptosis and viability, apigenin could promote the type-I and type-III collagen synthesis of dermal fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo, thus suggesting that apigenin may serve as a potential agent for esthetic and reconstructive skin rejuvenation. PMID:26150153

  3. Isorhamnetin attenuates collagen-induced arthritis via modulating cytokines and oxidative stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuewen; Zhong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress were involved in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Isorhamnetin has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities, but its effects on RA have not been investigated. In order to observe the possible therapeutic effects of isorhamnetin on RA, we established a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model and treated the animal with isorhamnetin for 3 weeks. Besides, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and isorhamnetin. The severity of arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, joint destruction score and inflammation score. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-10 and IL-35 in the joint tissue homogenate and cell culture medium as well as anti-type II collagen antibody in serum were measured using ELISA. Contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in joint tissue homogenate were measured using assay kits. We found collagen immunization induced significant arthritis in mice and isorhamnetin at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day could significantly attenuate the collagen-induced arthritis. Isorhamnetin also modulated the production of cytokines and suppressed the oxidative stress in the mice with collagen-induced arthritis at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day. These data suggested that isorhamnetin might be a potential agent for the management of RA. PMID:26629181

  4. Isorhamnetin attenuates collagen-induced arthritis via modulating cytokines and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewen; Zhong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress were involved in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Isorhamnetin has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities, but its effects on RA have not been investigated. In order to observe the possible therapeutic effects of isorhamnetin on RA, we established a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model and treated the animal with isorhamnetin for 3 weeks. Besides, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and isorhamnetin. The severity of arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, joint destruction score and inflammation score. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-10 and IL-35 in the joint tissue homogenate and cell culture medium as well as anti-type II collagen antibody in serum were measured using ELISA. Contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in joint tissue homogenate were measured using assay kits. We found collagen immunization induced significant arthritis in mice and isorhamnetin at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day could significantly attenuate the collagen-induced arthritis. Isorhamnetin also modulated the production of cytokines and suppressed the oxidative stress in the mice with collagen-induced arthritis at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day. These data suggested that isorhamnetin might be a potential agent for the management of RA.

  5. Substance P Inhibits the Collagen Synthesis of Rat Myocardial Fibroblasts Induced by Ang II.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xinzhong; Guo, Naipeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Sheng

    2016-12-16

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to explore the regulating effects of Substance P (SP) on the collagen synthesis of rat myocardial fibroblasts (CFBs) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and its potential mechanism. MATERIAL AND METHODS The CFBs of a neonatal SD rat were separately cultured and divided into the control group, Ang II treatment group, and treatment groups with different concentrations of SP, Ang II +; each group was given corresponding treatment respectively. RESULTS Ang II successfully induced the collagen synthesis of CFBs. Compared with the control group, the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β, erk, and smad2/3 were higher (p<0.05). Different concentrations of SP had an effect on Ang II-induced CFBs, reduced the collagen synthesis of CFBs, and increased the expressions of SP receptors, accompanied by lowering TGF-β protein, erk protein phosphorylation level, and smad2/3 protein phosphorylation level (p<0.05). Moreover, the higher the concentrations of SP, the more obvious of an effect it exerted. Treating the Ang II + SP group with aprepitant reduced the inhibiting effects of SP on collagen synthesis. The expression changes of collagen I and collagen III detected by immunocytochemistry were exactly in accordance with the results of qPCR and Western blotting. CONCLUSIONS SP can inhibit collagen synthesis of CFBs after Ang II inducing which may adjust the downstream signaling pathways associated protein including TGF-β, erk and smad2/3. SP can block the progress of myocardial fibrosis and is dose dependent, which is expected to be a promising target for the treatment of myocardial fibrosis.

  6. Substance P Inhibits the Collagen Synthesis of Rat Myocardial Fibroblasts Induced by Ang II

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xinzhong; Guo, Naipeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the regulating effects of Substance P (SP) on the collagen synthesis of rat myocardial fibroblasts (CFBs) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and its potential mechanism. Material/Methods The CFBs of a neonatal SD rat were separately cultured and divided into the control group, Ang II treatment group, and treatment groups with different concentrations of SP, Ang II +; each group was given corresponding treatment respectively. Results Ang II successfully induced the collagen synthesis of CFBs. Compared with the control group, the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β, erk, and smad2/3 were higher (p<0.05). Different concentrations of SP had an effect on Ang II-induced CFBs, reduced the collagen synthesis of CFBs, and increased the expressions of SP receptors, accompanied by lowering TGF-β protein, erk protein phosphorylation level, and smad2/3 protein phosphorylation level (p<0.05). Moreover, the higher the concentrations of SP, the more obvious of an effect it exerted. Treating the Ang II + SP group with aprepitant reduced the inhibiting effects of SP on collagen synthesis. The expression changes of collagen I and collagen III detected by immunocytochemistry were exactly in accordance with the results of qPCR and Western blotting. Conclusions SP can inhibit collagen synthesis of CFBs after Ang II inducing which may adjust the downstream signaling pathways associated protein including TGF-β, erk and smad2/3. SP can block the progress of myocardial fibrosis and is dose dependent, which is expected to be a promising target for the treatment of myocardial fibrosis. PMID:27980320

  7. Collagen V-induced nasal tolerance downregulates pulmonary collagen mRNA gene and TGF-beta expression in experimental systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate collagen deposition, mRNA collagen synthesis and TGF-beta expression in the lung tissue in an experimental model of scleroderma after collagen V-induced nasal tolerance. Methods Female New Zealand rabbits (N = 12) were immunized with 1 mg/ml of collagen V in Freund's adjuvant (IM). After 150 days, six immunized animals were tolerated by nasal administration of collagen V (25 μg/day) (IM-TOL) daily for 60 days. The collagen content was determined by morphometry, and mRNA expressions of types I, III and V collagen were determined by Real-time PCR. The TGF-beta expression was evaluated by immunostaining and quantified by point counting methods. To statistic analysis ANOVA with Bonferroni test were employed for multiple comparison when appropriate and the level of significance was determined to be p < 0.05. Results IM-TOL, when compared to IM, showed significant reduction in total collagen content around the vessels (0.371 ± 0.118 vs. 0.874 ± 0.282, p < 0.001), bronchioles (0.294 ± 0.139 vs. 0.646 ± 0.172, p < 0.001) and in the septal interstitium (0.027 ± 0.014 vs. 0.067 ± 0.039, p = 0.026). The lung tissue of IM-TOL, when compared to IM, showed decreased immunostaining of types I, III and V collagen, reduced mRNA expression of types I (0.10 ± 0.07 vs. 1.0 ± 0.528, p = 0.002) and V (1.12 ± 0.42 vs. 4.74 ± 2.25, p = 0.009) collagen, in addition to decreased TGF-beta expression (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Collagen V-induced nasal tolerance in the experimental model of SSc regulated the pulmonary remodeling process, inhibiting collagen deposition and collagen I and V mRNA synthesis. Additionally, it decreased TGF-beta expression, suggesting a promising therapeutic option for scleroderma treatment. PMID:20047687

  8. Nimesulide improves the symptomatic and disease modifying effects of leflunomide in collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A; Nofal, Salwa M; Khalifa, Amani E; Williams, Richard O; El-Eraky, Wafaa I; Nagy, Ayman A; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2014-01-01

    Nimesulide is a COX-2 inhibitor used for symptomatic relief of rheumatoid arthritis. Leflunomide is an anti-pyrimidine used to manage the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Herein we studied the influence of nimesulide and leflunomide combination in terms of disease symptoms and progression using collagen-induced arthritis model in mice, as a model for rheumatoid arthritis. Collagen induced arthritis was induced by immunization with type II collagen. Assessment of joint stiffness and articular hyperalgesia were evaluated using a locomotor activity cage and the Hargreaves method, respectively. Disease progression was assessed via arthritic index scoring, X-ray imaging, myeloperoxidase enzyme activity and histopathologic examination. Nimesulide induced only transient symptomatic alleviation on the top of decreased leucocytic infiltration compared to arthritis group. However, nimesulide alone failed to induce any significant improvement in the radiological or pathological disease progression. Leflunomide alone moderately alleviates the symptoms of arthritis and moderately retarded the radiological and pathological disease progression. Combination of nimesulide and leflunomide significantly improved symptomatic (analgesia and joint stiffness) and arthritic disease progression (radiological, pathological and Myeloperoxidase enzyme activity) in collagen induced arthritis animal model.

  9. Blister-inducing antibodies target multiple epitopes on collagen VII in mice

    PubMed Central

    Csorba, Kinga; Chiriac, Mircea Teodor; Florea, Florina; Ghinia, Miruna Georgiana; Licarete, Emilia; Rados, Andreea; Sas, Alexandra; Vuta, Vlad; Sitaru, Cassian

    2014-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease of mucous membranes and the skin caused by autoantibodies against collagen VII. In silico and wet laboratory epitope mapping studies revealed numerous distinct epitopes recognized by EBA patients' autoantibodies within the non-collagenous (NC)1 and NC2 domains of collagen VII. However, the distribution of pathogenic epitopes on collagen VII has not yet been described. In this study, we therefore performed an in vivo functional epitope mapping of pathogenic autoantibodies in experimental EBA. Animals (n = 10/group) immunized against fragments of the NC1 and NC2 domains of collagen VII or injected with antibodies generated against the same fragments developed to different extent experimental EBA. Our results demonstrate that antibodies targeting multiple, distinct epitopes distributed over the entire NC1, but not NC2 domain of collagen VII induce blistering skin disease in vivo. Our present findings have crucial implications for the development of antigen-specific B- and T cell-targeted therapies in EBA. PMID:25091020

  10. Hindlimb unloading induces a collagen isoform shift in the soleus muscle of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. A.; Lesniewski, L. A.; Muller-Delp, J. M.; Majors, A. K.; Scalise, D.; Delp, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether hindlimb unloading (HU) alters the extracellular matrix of skeletal muscle, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 0 (n = 11), 1 (n = 11), 14 (n = 13), or 28 (n = 11) days of unloading. Remodeling of the soleus and plantaris muscles was examined biochemically for collagen abundance via measurement of hydroxyproline, and the percentage of cross-sectional area of collagen was determined histologically with picrosirius red staining. Total hydroxyproline content in the soleus and plantaris muscles was unaltered by HU at any time point. However, the relative proportions of type I collagen in the soleus muscle decreased relative to control (Con) with 14 and 28 days HU (Con 68 +/- 5%; 14 days HU 53 +/- 4%; 28 days HU 53 +/- 7%). Correspondingly, type III collagen increased in soleus muscle with 14 and 28 days HU (Con 32 +/- 5%; 14 days HU 47 +/- 4%; 28 days HU 48 +/- 7%). The proportion of type I muscle fibers in soleus muscle was diminished with HU (Con 96 +/- 2%; 14 days HU 86 +/- 1%; 28 days HU 83 +/- 1%), and the proportion of hybrid type I/IIB fibers increased (Con 0%; 14 days HU 8 +/- 2%; 28 days HU 14 +/- 2%). HU had no effect on the proportion of type I and III collagen or muscle fiber composition in plantaris muscle. The data demonstrate that HU induces a shift in the relative proportion of collagen isoform (type I to III) in the antigravity soleus muscle, which occurs concomitantly with a slow-to-fast myofiber transformation.

  11. Ear Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... ear, where they make your eardrum vibrate. The vibrations are transmitted through three tiny bones, called ossicles, in your middle ear. The vibrations travel to your inner ear, a snail-shaped ...

  12. Your Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... gross and useful. continue The Middle Ear: Good Vibrations After sound waves enter the outer ear, they ... take those sound waves and turn them into vibrations that are delivered to the inner ear. To ...

  13. Ear emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ear injury, avoid nose blowing and getting water in the injured ear. Treat ear infections right ... FDR Medical Services/Millard Fillmore Suburban Hospital, Buffalo, NY. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, ...

  14. Ear barotrauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ear popping - barotrauma; Pressure-related ear pain; Eustachian tube dysfunction - barotrauma ... air pressure outside of the body. The Eustachian tube is a connection between the middle ear and ...

  15. Interleukin 17 induces cartilage collagen breakdown: novel synergistic effects in combination with proinflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, P; Henderson, N; Logan, C; Life, P; Cawston, T; Rowan, A

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether interleukin 17 (IL17), derived specifically from T cells, can promote type II collagen release from cartilage. The ability of IL17 to synergise with other proinflammatory mediators to induce collagen release from cartilage, and what effect anti-inflammatory agents had on this process, was also assessed. Methods: IL17 alone, or in combination with IL1, IL6, oncostatin M (OSM), or tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), was added to bovine nasal cartilage explant cultures. Proteoglycan and collagen release were determined. Collagenolytic activity was determined by bioassay. Chondroprotective effects of IL4, IL13, transforming growth factor ß1 (TGFß1) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) were assessed by inclusion in the explant cultures. Results: IL17 alone stimulated a dose dependent release of proteoglycan and type II collagen from bovine nasal cartilage explants. Suboptimal doses of IL17 synergised potently with TNFα, IL1, OSM, and IL6 to promote collagen degradation. This collagen release was completely inhibited by tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and BB-94 (a synthetic metalloproteinase inhibitor), and was significantly reduced by IL4, IL13, TGFß1, and IGF1. In IL17 treated chondrocytes, mRNA expression for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 was detected. Moreover, a synergistic induction of these MMPs was seen when IL17 was combined with other proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusions: IL17 can, alone and synergistically in combination with other proinflammatory cytokines, promote chondrocyte mediated MMP dependent type II collagen release from cartilage. Because levels of all these proinflammatory cytokines are raised in rheumatoid synovial fluids, this study suggests that IL17 may act as a potent upstream mediator of cartilage collagen breakdown in inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:12117676

  16. Cancer-associated Fibroblasts Induce a Collagen Cross-link Switch in Tumor Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Pankova, Daniela; Chen, Yulong; Terajima, Masahiko; Schliekelman, Mark J.; Baird, Brandi N.; Fahrenholtz, Monica; Sun, Li; Gill, Bartley J.; Vadakkan, Tegy J.; Kim, Min P.; Ahn, Young-Ho; Roybal, Jonathon D.; Liu, Xin; Parra Cuentas, Edwin Roger; Rodriguez, Jaime; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Creighton, Chad J.; Gibbons, Don L.; Hicks, John M.; Dickinson, Mary E.; West, Jennifer L.; Grande-Allen, K. Jane; Hanash, Samir M.; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Intratumoral collagen cross-links heighten stromal stiffness and stimulate tumor cell invasion, but it is unclear how collagen cross-linking is regulated in epithelial tumors. To address this question, we used KrasLA1 mice, which develop lung adenocarcinomas from somatic activation of a KrasG12D allele. The lung tumors in KrasLA1 mice were highly fibrotic and contained cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) that produced collagen and generated stiffness in collagen gels. In xenograft tumors generated by injection of wild-type mice with lung adenocarcinoma cells alone or in combination with CAFs, the total concentration of collagen cross-links was the same in tumors generated with or without CAFs, but co-injected tumors had higher hydroxylysine aldehyde-derived collagen cross-links (HLCCs) and lower lysine-aldehyde-derived collagen cross-links (LCCs). Therefore, we postulated that an LCC-to-HLCC switch induced by CAFs promotes the migratory and invasive properties of lung adenocarcinoma cells. To test this hypothesis, we created co-culture models in which CAFs are positioned interstitially or peripherally in tumor cell aggregates, mimicking distinct spatial orientations of CAFs in human lung cancer. In both contexts, CAFs enhanced the invasive properties of tumor cells in 3-dimensional (3D) collagen gels. Tumor cell aggregates that attached to CAF networks on a Matrigel surface dissociated and migrated on the networks. Lysyl hydroxylase 2 (PLOD2/LH2), which drives HLCC formation, was expressed in CAFs, and LH2 depletion abrogated the ability of CAFs to promote tumor cell invasion and migration. PMID:26631572

  17. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor deficiency in T cells suppresses the development of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nakahama, Taisuke; Kimura, Akihiro; Nguyen, Nam Trung; Chinen, Ichino; Hanieh, Hamza; Nohara, Keiko; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2011-01-01

    The contributions of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis have not been elucidated. Here, we show that Ahr deficiency ameliorated collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of RA. Collagen-immunized Ahr KO mice showed decreased serum levels of such proinflammatory cytokines as IL-1β and IL-6. The Th17 and Th1 cell populations in lymph nodes from these mice decreased and increased, respectively, whereas the percentage of regulatory T cells was unchanged. Interestingly, a lack of Ahr specifically in T cells significantly suppressed collagen-induced arthritis development, whereas Ahr deficiency in macrophages had no effect. These finding indicate that the development of experimental autoimmune arthritis depends on the presence of Ahr in T cells, and that Th1/Th17 balance may be particularly important for this process. PMID:21825138

  18. Aortic VCAM-1: an early marker of vascular inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Denys, Anne; Clavel, Gaëlle; Lemeiter, Delphine; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Semerano, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There are limited experimental data on vascular involvement in arthritis models. To study the link between CVD and inflammation in RA, we developed a model of vascular dysfunction and articular inflammation by collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. We studied the expression of vascular inflammatory markers in CIA with and without concomitant hyperlipidic diet (HD). Collagen-induced arthritis was induced with intradermal injection of chicken type-II collagen followed by a boost 21 days later. Mice with and without CIA were fed a standard diet or an HD for 12 weeks starting from the day of the boost. Arthritis severity was evaluated with a validated clinical score. Aortic mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-17 were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 localization in the aortic sinus was determined by immunohistochemistry. Atherosclerotic plaque presence was assessed in aortas. Collagen-induced arthritis was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1, independent of diet. VCAM-1 overexpression was detectable as early as 4 weeks after collagen immunization and persisted after 15 weeks. The HD induced atheroma plaque formation and aortic iNOS expression regardless of CIA. Concomitant CIA and HD had no additive effect on atheroma or VCAM-1 or iNOS expression. CIA and an HD diet induced a distinct and independent expression of large-vessel inflammation markers in B6 mice. This model may be relevant for the study of CVD in RA.

  19. Regulation of collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts by ascorbic-induced lipid peroxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Geesin, J.C. Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products, Inc., Skillman, NJ ); Gordon, J.S. ); Gordon, J.S. ); Berg, R.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Ascorbic acid has been shown to stimulate collagen synthesis through the induction of lipid peroxidation which leads to increased transcription of the collagen genes. To test the ability of aldehyde products of lipid peroxidation to mediate this effect, the authors treated cultured fibroblasts with 1-200{mu}M of malondialdehyde, acetaldehyde, glyoxal or hexenal in the presence of lipid peroxidation inducing or noninducing concentrations of ascorbic acid. The treatment process involved either pretreatment of cells for 66hrs with either concentration of ascorbate before a 6hr treatment in the presence of ascorbate and the aldehydes, or 6 or 72hr treatment of the cells in the presence of either concentration of ascorbate plus the aldehydes. No effect of any of these aldehydes was seen on ascorbate-stimulated collagen synthesis. Also, pretreatment of fibroblasts for 24hrs with 100nM phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which produces down regulation of protein kinase C(PKC), failed to alter the ascorbate-stimulation of collagen synthesis. Additionally, the authors tested the ability of benzamide, a poly ACP ribosylation inhibitor, to inhibit the ascorbate response with no specific effect noted. These results do not support the proposed roles for aldehydes, PKC, or poly ADP ribosylation in the mediation of the lipid peroxidation induced stimulation of collagen synthesis.

  20. Bacopa monniera (L.) wettst inhibits type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Viji, V; Kavitha, S K; Helen, A

    2010-09-01

    Bacopa monniera (L.) Wettst is an Ayurvedic herb with antirheumatic potential. This study investigated the therapeutic efficacy of Bacopa monniera in treating rheumatoid arthritis using a type II collagen-induced arthritis rat model. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by immunization with bovine type II collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant. Bacopa monniera extract (BME) was administered after the development of arthritis from day 14 onwards. The total duration of experiment was 60 days. Paw swelling, arthritic index, inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, myeloperoxidase and serum anti-collagen IgG and IgM levels were analysed in control and experimental rats. Arthritic induction significantly increased paw edema and other classical signs of arthritis coupled to upregulation of inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, neutrophil infiltration and increased anti-collagen IgM and IgG levels in serum. BME significantly inhibited the footpad swelling and arthritic symptoms. BME was effective in inhibiting cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase activities in arthritic rats. Decreased neutrophil infiltration was evident from decreased myeloperoxidase activity and histopathological data where an improvement in joint architecture was also observed. Serum anti-collagen IgM and IgG levels were consistently decreased. Thus the study demonstrates the potential antiarthritic effect of Bacopa monniera for treating arthritis which might confer its antirheumatic activity.

  1. Regional alterations of type I collagen in rat tibia induced by skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, Masashi; Arnaud, Sara B.; Tanzawa, Hideki; Kitamura, Eiji; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of mineral density in weight-bearing bones that leads to inferior bone mechanical strength. This appears to be caused by a failure of bone formation; however, its mechanisms still are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize collagen, the predominant matrix protein in bone, in various regions of tibia of rats that were subjected to skeletal unloading by 4 weeks tail suspension. Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (4 months old) were divided into tail suspension and ambulatory controls (eight rats each). After the tail suspension, tibias from each animal were collected and divided into five regions and collagen was analyzed. The collagen cross-linking and the extent of lysine (Lys) hydroxylation in unloaded bones were significantly altered in proximal epiphysis, diaphysis, and, in particular, proximal metaphysis but not in distal regions. The pool of immature/nonmineralized collagen measured by its extractability with a chaotropic solvent was significantly increased in proximal metaphysis. These results suggest that skeletal unloading induced an accumulation of post-translationally altered nonmineralized collagen and that these changes are bone region specific. These alterations might be caused by impaired osteoblastic function/differentiation resulting in a mineralization defect.

  2. Piperlongumine Blocks JAK2-STAT3 to Inhibit Collagen-Induced Platelet Reactivity Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species†

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hengjie; Houck, Katie L.; Tian, Ye; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Hull, Ken; Zhou, Zhou; Zhou, Mingzhao; Wu, Xiaoping; Tweardy, David J.; Romo, Daniel; Fu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhang, Jianning; Dong, Jing-fei

    2015-01-01

    Background Piperlongumine (PL) is a compound isolated from the piper longum plant. It possesses anti-cancer activities through blocking the transcription factor STAT3 and by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer, but not normal cells. It also inhibits platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but the underlying mechanism is not known. Objective We conducted in vitro experiments to test the hypothesis that PL regulates a non-transcriptional activity of STAT3 to specifically reduce the reactivity of human platelets to collagen. Results PL dose-dependently blocked collagen-induced platelet aggregation, calcium influx, CD62p expression and thrombus formation on collagen with a maximal inhibition at 100 μM. It reduced platelet microvesiculation induced by collagen. PL blocked the activation of JAK2 and STAT3 in collagen-stimulated platelets. This inhibitory effect was significantly reduced in platelets pretreated with a STAT3 inhibitor. Although PL induced ROS production in platelets; quenching ROS using excessive reducing agents: 20 μM GSH and 0.5 mM L-Cysteine, did not block the inhibitory effects. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor Apocynin also had no effect. Conclusions PL inhibited collagen-induced platelet reactivity by targeting the JAK2-STAT3 pathway. We also provide experimental evidence that PL and collagen induce different oxidants that have differential effects on platelets. Studying these differential effects may uncover new mechanisms of regulating platelet functions by oxidants in redox signals. PMID:26645674

  3. Ear Pieces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students make fanciful connections between art and medicine. This project challenges students to interpret "ear idioms" (e.g. "blow it out your ear," "in one ear and out the other") by relying almost entirely on realistic ear drawings, the placement of them, marks, and values. In that…

  4. Gallium nitrate ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeog; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Roh, Kug-Hwan; Seo, Su-Kil; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Sae-Gwang; Lim, Jun-Goo; Lee, Won-Jin; Kim, Myoung-Hun; Cho, Kwang-rae; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease. Gallium nitrate has been reported to reserve immunosuppressive activities. Therefore, we assessed the therapeutic effects of gallium nitrate in the mouse model of developed type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced by bovine type II collagen with Complete Freund's adjuvant. CIA mice were intraperitoneally treated from day 36 to day 49 after immunization with 3.5mg/kg/day, 7mg/kg/day gallium nitrate or vehicle. Gallium nitrate ameliorated the progression of mice with CIA. The clinical symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis did not progress after treatment with gallium nitrate. Gallium nitrate inhibited the increase of CD4(+) T cell populations (p<0.05) and also inhibited the type II collagen-specific IgG2a-isotype autoantibodies (p<0.05). Gallium nitrate reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ (p<0.05) and the mRNA expression levels of these cytokine and MMPs (MMP2 and MMP9) in joint tissues. Western blotting of members of the NF-κB signaling pathway revealed that gallium nitrate inhibits the activation of NF-κB by blocking IκB degradation. These data suggest that gallium nitrate is a potential therapeutic agent for autoimmune inflammatory arthritis through its inhibition of the NF-κB pathway, and these results may help to elucidate gallium nitrate-mediated mechanisms of immunosuppression in patients with RA.

  5. Lack of collagen VI promotes neurodegeneration by impairing autophagy and inducing apoptosis during aging

    PubMed Central

    Castagnaro, Silvia; Gregorio, Ilaria; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein with a broad distribution in different tissues and mostly deposited at the close periphery of the cell surface. Previous studies revealed that collagen VI protects neurons from the toxicity of amyloid-βpeptides and from UV-induced damage. However, the physiological role of this protein in the central nervous system (CNS) remains unknown. Here, we established primary neural cultures from murine cortex and hippocampus, and carried out in vitro and in vivo studies in wild-type and collagen VI null (Col6a1−/−) mice. Col6a1−/− neural cultures displayed an increased incidence of spontaneous apoptosis and higher vulnerability to oxidative stress, accompanied by altered regulation of autophagy with increased p62 protein levels and decreased LC3 lipidation. Analysis of brain sections confirmed increased apoptosis and abnormal regulation of autophagy in the CNS of collagen VI-deficient animals. To investigate the in vivo physiological consequences of these CNS defects, we carried out functional studies and found that motor and memory task performances were impaired in aged Col6a1−/− mice. These findings indicate that lack of collagen VI leads to spontaneous apoptosis and defective autophagy in neural cells, and point at a protective role for this ECM protein in the CNS during physiological aging. PMID:27060109

  6. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament insufficiency induces morphological changes of anterior cruciate ligament collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ochi, M; Murao, T; Sumen, Y; Kobayashi, K; Adachi, N

    1999-04-01

    We studied the ultrastructural changes of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with transmission electron micrograph cross-sections following isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury. Biopsy specimens were obtained from the proximal third and anteromedial aspect of the ACL. Fourteen patients with PCL-deficient knees at a mean of 22.1 months from injury to surgery and 5 normal knees amputated secondary to malignant tumors or traumatic injuries were used as controls. A significant difference was found in the number of collagen fibrils per 1 microm2 between the PCL-deficient knee group and the control group. There was a significant difference found in the collagen fibril diameter between the PCL-deficient knee group and the control group. The collagen packing density (the percentage of sampled area occupied by collagen fibrils) was also significantly different between the PCL-deficient knee and the control group. The current study shows that an isolated PCL insufficiency can induce morphological changes in ACL collagen fibrils, suggesting that a PCL insufficiency can have adverse effects on other ligamentous structures in the knee joint.

  7. Contribution of elastin and collagen to the pathogenesis of monocrotaline induced pulmonary hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Todorovich, L.; Johnson, D.; Ranger, P.; Keeley, F.; Rabinovitch, M.

    1986-03-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were selected randomly for subcutaneous injections, 24 with monocrotaline (M) (60mg/kg) and 24 with an equivolume of saline, and studied 8, 16 or 28 days later. The right (RV) and left ventricle with septum (LV + S) were separated and weighed. The pulmonary artery (PA) was assessed by light and electron microscopy. Synthesis of elastin collagen and non-collagenous proteins was determined by measuring incorporations of /sup 3/H-valine, /sup 14/C-OH-proline and /sup 14/C-proline respectively. Total content of elastin was determined by weight of residue after CNBr digestion, and of collagen by total OH-proline content in SDS and CNBr extracts. At 16 days, the M injected rats developed a 6-fold increase in PA elastin synthesis and a 2-fold increase in medial wall thickness. Ultrastructural changes included increased microtubules and golgi apparatus in endothelium, decreased proportion of mature elastin in subendothelium and increased ground substance in media. By 28 days, M rats showed a progressive increase in PA elastin and collagen synthesis, greater than 20-fold, and in medial wall thickness, 3-fold. This was associated with a 2-fold increase in total elastin in proportion to the increase in PA weight and the development of RV hypertrophy (RV/LV + S increased more than 2-fold). Progressive irreversible pulmonary hypertension induced by M may be related to continuing stimulation of PA elastin and collagen synthesis.

  8. Simulating Reflex Induced Changes in the Acoustic Impedance of the Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirlin, Mindy W.; Levitt, Harry

    1991-01-01

    A simple procedure for measuring changes in the acoustic impedance of the ear is described. The technique has several applications, including simulation using a standard coupler of changes in real ear impedance produced by the acoustic reflex, and calibration of response time of an otoadmittance meter. (Author/DB)

  9. Ear trauma.

    PubMed

    Eagles, Kylee; Fralich, Laura; Stevenson, J Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Understanding basic ear anatomy and function allows an examiner to quickly and accurately identify at-risk structures in patients with head and ear trauma. External ear trauma (ie, hematoma or laceration) should be promptly treated with appropriate injury-specific techniques. Tympanic membrane injuries have multiple mechanisms and can often be conservatively treated. Temporal bone fractures are a common cause of ear trauma and can be life threatening. Facial nerve injuries and hearing loss can occur in ear trauma.

  10. Inner ear disturbances related to middle ear inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sone, Michihiko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The inner and middle ear are connected mainly through round and oval windows, and inflammation in the middle ear cavity can spread into the inner ear, which might induce a disturbance. In cases with intractable otitis media, attention should also be paid to symptoms related to the inner ear. In this paper, middle ear inflammation and related inner ear disturbances are reviewed with a focus on representative middle ear diseases (such as acute otitis media, chronic otitis media, otitis media with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, eosinophilic otitis media, cholesteatoma with labyrinthine fistula, and reflux-related otitis media). Their clinical concerns are then discussed with reference to experimental studies. In these diseases, early diagnosis and adequate treatment are required to manage not only middle ear but also inner ear conditions. PMID:28303055

  11. Two-photon induced collagen cross-linking in bioartificial cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuetemeyer, Kai; Kensah, George; Heidrich, Marko; Meyer, Heiko; Martin, Ulrich; Gruh, Ina; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2011-08-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a promising strategy for regenerative therapies to overcome the shortage of donor organs for transplantation. Besides contractile function, the stiffness of tissue engineered constructs is crucial to generate transplantable tissue surrogates with sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the high pressure present in the heart. Although several collagen cross-linking techniques have proven to be efficient in stabilizing biomaterials, they cannot be applied to cardiac tissue engineering, as cell death occurs in the treated area. Here, we present a novel method using femtosecond (fs) laser pulses to increase the stiffness of collagen-based tissue constructs without impairing cell viability. Raster scanning of the fs laser beam over riboflavin-treated tissue induced collagen cross-linking by two-photon photosensitized singlet oxygen production. One day post-irradiation, stress-strain measurements revealed increased tissue stiffness by around 40% being dependent on the fibroblast content in the tissue. At the same time, cells remained viable and fully functional as demonstrated by fluorescence imaging of cardiomyocyte mitochondrial activity and preservation of active contraction force. Our results indicate that two-photon induced collagen cross-linking has great potential for studying and improving artificially engineered tissue for regenerative therapies.

  12. CALCOSPHERULITES* ISOLATED FROM THE MINERALIZATION FRONT OF BONE INDUCE THE MINERALIZATION OF TYPE I COLLAGEN

    PubMed Central

    Midura, Ronald J.; Vasanji, Amit; Su, Xiaowei; Wang, Aimin; Midura, Sharon B.; Gorski, Jeff P.

    2007-01-01

    Previous work has suggested that “calcospherulites” actively participate in the mineralization of developing and healing bone. This study sought to directly test this hypothesis by developing a method to isolate calcospherulites and analyzing their capacity to seed mineralization of fibrillar collagen. The periosteal surface of juvenile rat tibial diaphysis was enriched in spherulites of ~0.5-micron diameter exhibiting a Ca/P ratio of 1.3. Their identity as calcospherulites was confirmed by their uptake of calcein at the tibial mineralization front 24 h following in vivo injection. Periosteum was dissected and unmineralized osteoid removed by collagenase in order to expose calcospherulites. Calcein-labeled calcospherulites were then released from the mineralization front by dispase digestion and isolated via fluorescence flow sorting. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed they contained apatite crystals (c-axis length of 17.5 ± 0.2 nm), though their Ca/P ratio of 1.3 is lower than that of hydroxyapatite. Much of their non-mineral phosphorous content was removed by ice-cold ethanol, elevating their Ca/P ratio to 1.6, suggesting the presence of phospholipids. Western blot analyses showed the presence of bone matrix proteins and type I collagen in these preparations. Incubating isolated calcospherulites in collagen hydrogels demonstrated that they could seed a mineralization reaction on type I collagen fibers in vitro. Ultrastructural analyses revealed crystals on the collagen fibers that were distributed rather uniformly along the fiber lengths. Furthermore, crystals were observed at distances well away from the observed calcospherulites. Our results directly support an active role for calcospherulites in inducing the mineralization of type I collagen fibers at the mineralization front of bone. PMID:17936099

  13. Protective Effect of Pyruvate Against Radiation-Induced Damage in Collagenized Tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griko, Y. V.; Yan, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation produces both acute and late effects on the collagenized tissues and have profound effects on wound healing. Because of the crucial practical importance for new radioprotective agents, our study has been focused on evaluation of the efficacy of non-toxic naturally occurring compounds to protect tissue integrity against high-dose gamma radiation. Here, we demonstrate that molecular integrity of collagen may serve as a sensitive biological marker for quantitative evaluation of molecular damage to collagenized tissue and efficacy of radioprotective agents. Increasing doses of gamma radiation (0-50kGy) result in progressive destruction of the native collagen fibrils, which provide a structural framework, strength, and proper milieu for the regenerating tissue. The strategy used in this study involved the thermodynamic specification of all structural changes in collagenized matrix of skin, aortic heart valve, and bone tissue induced by different doses and conditions of g-irradiation. This study describes a simple biophysical approach utilizing the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to characterize the structural resistance of the aortic valve matrix exposed to different doses of g-irradiation. It allows us to identify the specific response of each constituent as well as to determine the influence of the different treatments on the characteristic parameters of protein structure. We found that pyruvate, a substance that naturally occurs in the body, provide significant protection (up to 80%) from biochemical and biomechanical damage to the collagenized tissue through the effective targeting of reactive oxygen species. The recently discovered role of pyruvate in the cell antioxidant defense to O2 oxidation, and its essential constituency in the daily human diet, indicate that the administration of pyruvate-based radioprotective formulations may provide safe and effective protection from deleterious effects of ionizing

  14. Involvement of calpain-I and microRNA34 in kanamycin-induced apoptosis of inner ear cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Tang, Hao; Jiang, Xiao Hua; Tsang, Lai Ling; Chung, Yiu Wa; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2010-12-01

    Inner ear cells, including hair cells, spiral ganglion cells, stria vascularis cells and supporting cells on the basilar membrane, play a major role in transducing hearing signals and regulating inner ear homoeostasis. However, their functions are often damaged by antibiotic-induced ototoxicity. Apoptosis is probably involved in inner ear cell injury following aminoglycoside treatment. Calpain, a calcium-dependent protease, is essential for mediating and promoting cell death. We have therefore investigated the involvement of calpain in the molecular mechanism underlying ototoxicity induced by the antibiotic kanamycin in mice. Kanamycin (750 mg/kg) mainly induced cell death of cochlear cells, including stria vascularis cells, supporting cells and spiral ganglion cells, but not hair cells within the organ of Corti. Cell death due to apoptosis occurred in a time-dependent manner with concomitant up-regulation of calpain expression. Furthermore, the expression levels of two microRNAs, mir34a and mir34c, were altered in a dose-dependent manner in cochlear cells. These novel findings demonstrated the involvement of both calpain and microRNAs in antibiotic-induced ototoxicity.

  15. Neural Representation of Scale Illusion: Magnetoencephalographic Study on the Auditory Illusion Induced by Distinctive Tone Sequences in the Two Ears

    PubMed Central

    Kuriki, Shinya; Yokosawa, Koichi; Takahashi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The auditory illusory perception “scale illusion” occurs when a tone of ascending scale is presented in one ear, a tone of descending scale is presented simultaneously in the other ear, and vice versa. Most listeners hear illusory percepts of smooth pitch contours of the higher half of the scale in the right ear and the lower half in the left ear. Little is known about neural processes underlying the scale illusion. In this magnetoencephalographic study, we recorded steady-state responses to amplitude-modulated short tones having illusion-inducing pitch sequences, where the sound level of the modulated tones was manipulated to decrease monotonically with increase in pitch. The steady-state responses were decomposed into right- and left-sound components by means of separate modulation frequencies. It was found that the time course of the magnitude of response components of illusion-perceiving listeners was significantly correlated with smooth pitch contour of illusory percepts and that the time course of response components of stimulus-perceiving listeners was significantly correlated with discontinuous pitch contour of stimulus percepts in addition to the contour of illusory percepts. The results suggest that the percept of illusory pitch sequence was represented in the neural activity in or near the primary auditory cortex, i.e., the site of generation of auditory steady-state response, and that perception of scale illusion is maintained by automatic low-level processing. PMID:24086676

  16. Native Australian plant extracts differentially induce Collagen I and Collagen III in vitro and could be important targets for the development of new wound healing therapies.

    PubMed

    Adams, Damian H; Shou, Qingyao; Wohlmuth, Hans; Cowin, Allison J

    2016-03-01

    Australian native plants have a long history of therapeutic use in indigenous cultures, however, they have been poorly studied scientifically. We analysed the effects of 14 plant derived compounds from the species Pilidiostigma glabrum, Myoporum montanum, Geijera parviflora, and Rhodomyrtus psidioides for their potential wound healing properties by assessing their ability to induce or suppress Collagen I and Collagen III expression in human skin fibroblasts in culture. The compound 7-geranyloxycoumarin was able to significantly increase Collagen I (23.7%, p<0.0002) expression in comparison to control. Significant suppression of Collagen III was observed for the compounds flindersine (11.1%, p<0.02), and (N-acetoxymethyl) flindersine (27%, p<0.00005). The implications of these finding is that these compounds could potentially alter the expression of different collagens in the skin allowing for the potential development of new wound healing therapies and new approaches for treating various skin diseases as well as photo (sun) damaged, and aged skin.

  17. Loudness changes resulting from an electrically induced middle-ear reflex.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in order to determine the changes in loudness brought about by electro-cutaneous elicitation of the middle-ear reflex. Subjects were required to judge the relative loudness of the second of three consecutive 30-msec bursts of tone, the second tone being accompanied by an electrical shock to the external auditory meatus, capable of eliciting a contraction of the middle-ear muscles. The difference between these judgments and those of the control condition (shock on the arm) was taken to represent a measure of the attenuation provided by contraction of the middle-ear muscles. Test tones were 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 Hz at levels of 65, 75, 85, 95, and 105 dB. The results indicate that the middle-ear reflex decreases the middle-ear's transmission mainly for low-frequency sounds. The results fail to lend support to the Loeb-Riopelle hypothesis that the middle-ear reflex acts as a limiter, rather than a linear attenuator.

  18. Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery. An ENT surgically inserts tubes inside your child’s middle ear. The tubes relieve the pressure and allow ... the risks of surgically inserting tubes inside my child's middle ear? What are the risks of not?Should ...

  19. Your Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Protect your hearing by wearing earplugs at loud music concerts and around noisy machinery, like in wood ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? What Is an Ear Infection? ...

  20. Ear tag

    MedlinePlus

    ... the opening of the ear are common in newborn infants. In most cases, these are normal. However, they ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Common Infant and Newborn Problems Ear Disorders Skin Conditions Browse the Encyclopedia ...

  1. Ear examination

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003340.htm Ear examination To use the sharing features on this page, ... ear References King EF, Couch ME. History, physical examination, and the preoperative evaluation. In: Flint PW, Haughey ...

  2. ALTERATIONS IN STATE OF MOLECULAR AGGREGATION OF COLLAGEN INDUCED IN CHICK EMBRYOS BY β-AMINOPROPIONITRILE (LATHYRUS FACTOR)

    PubMed Central

    Levene, Charles I.; Gross, Jerome

    1959-01-01

    The lathyrogenic agents, β-aminopropionitrile and semicarbizide, when applied to the chorio-allantoic membrane of the chick embryo produced a dramatic increase in fragility of the embryo. This alteration was not associated with a change in the concentration of collagen, except in aorta, but was accompanied by a sharp increase in the amount of collagen extractible in cold 1 M NaCl from skin, bone, and aorta. Increase in fragility and extractible collagen began within 3 hours after introduction of the agent and rose steadily for at least 72 hours. Essentially no collagen could be extracted from tissues of normal chick embryos. Both fragility and amount of extractible collagen were dosage- and time-dependent. It is concluded that the extractible collagen in lathyrism consists of a large proportion of dissolved fibers previously insoluble and formed prior to administration of the agent. The data also suggest that the "lathyritic" collagen in vivo is not in molecular dispersion but in an aggregate or fibrillar form. It is dispersed by cooling. The extracted collagen could be reconstituted to typical striated fibrils in vitro and the molecule appeared to be normal in the gross, with regard to asymmetry ratio and intramolecular helical structure. The evidence at hand suggests that at least one of the defects induced by lathyrogenic agents is an interference with the normal intermolecular cross-linking within the collagen fibril. PMID:14416144

  3. SND-117, a sinomenine bivalent alleviates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Ren; Zhao, Yang; Bao, Bei-Hua; Li, Jian-Xin

    2015-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic inflammatory disorder that affects about 1% of the population worldwide. RA is mainly manifested by persistent synovitis and progressive joint destruction. The aim of the present study was to examine the anti-arthritis effects of SND-117, a sinomenine bivalent that is obtained from the structure modification of a clinically available anti-RA drug, sinomenine. The arthritis model (CIA) was established by immunizing DBA/1 mice with type II collagen, and the arthritis scores including inflammation, joint destruction and bone erosion were assessed after booster immunization for 3weeks. The levels of cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were analyzed by quantitative PCR and ELISA. The TNF-α induced NF-κB activation in fibroblast-like synovial cells (FLSCs) was analyzed by Western blot. SND-117 significantly relieved the inflammatory symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis, reduced bone erosion and joint destruction in CIA mice. The serum levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α of CIA mice were markedly decreased by SND-117. SND-117 also strongly inhibited the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in FLSCs upon TNF-α stimulation. These data demonstrated that SND-117 could effectively block the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis in CIA mice via inhibition of NF-κB signaling, and might provide potential clinic benefits in rheumatoid arthritis management.

  4. Osteoblasts extracellular matrix induces vessel like structures through glycosylated collagen I

    SciTech Connect

    Palmieri, D.; Valli, M.; Viglio, S.; Ferrari, N.; Ledda, B.; Volta, C.; Manduca, P.

    2010-03-10

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a fundamental role in angiogenesis affecting endothelial cells proliferation, migration and differentiation. Vessels-like network formation in vitro is a reliable test to study the inductive effects of ECM on angiogenesis. Here we utilized matrix deposed by osteoblasts as substrate where the molecular and structural complexity of the endogenous ECM is preserved, to test if it induces vessel-like network formation by endothelial cells in vitro. ECM is more similar to the physiological substrate in vivo than other substrates previously utilized for these studies in vitro. Osteogenic ECM, prepared in vitro from mature osteoblasts at the phase of maximal deposition and glycosylation of collagen I, induces EAhy926, HUVEC, and HDMEC endothelial cells to form vessels-like structures and promotes the activation of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2); the functionality of the p-38/MAPK signaling pathway is required. Osteogenic ECM also induces a transient increase of CXCL12 and a decrease of the receptor CXCR4. The induction of vessel-like networks is dependent from proper glycosylation of collagens and does not occur on osteogenic ECMs if deglycosylated by -galactosidase or on less glycosylated ECMs derived from preosteoblasts and normal fibroblasts, while is sustained on ECM from osteogenesis imperfecta fibroblasts only when their mutation is associated with over-glycosylation of collagen type I. These data support that post-translational glycosylation has a role in the induction in endothelial cells in vitro of molecules conductive to self-organization in vessels-like structures.

  5. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic study on the thermally induced structural changes of glutaraldehyde-crosslinked collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Wu, Kun; Liu, Wentao; Shen, Lirui; Li, Guoying

    2015-04-01

    The thermal stability of collagen solution (5 mg/mL) crosslinked by glutaraldehyde (GTA) [GTA/collagen (w/w) = 0.5] was measured by differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the thermally induced structural changes were analyzed using two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectra. The denaturation temperature (Td) and enthalpy change (ΔH) of crosslinked collagen were respectively about 27 °C and 88 J/g higher than those of native collagen, illuminating the thermal stability increased. With the increase of temperature, the red-shift of absorption bands and the decreased AIII/A1455 value obtained from FTIR spectra indicated that hydrogen bonds were weakened and the unwinding of triple helix occurred for both native and crosslinked collagens; whereas the less changes in red-shifting and AIII/A1455 values for crosslinked collagen also confirmed the increase in thermal stability. Additionally, the 2D correlation analysis provided information about the thermally induced structural changes. In the 2D synchronous spectra, the intensities of auto-peaks at 1655 and 1555 cm-1, respectively assigned to amide I band (Cdbnd O stretching vibration) and amide II band (combination of Nsbnd H bending and Csbnd N stretching vibrations) in helical conformation were weaker for crosslinked collagen than those for native collagen, indicating that the helical structure of crosslinked collagen was less sensitive to temperature. Moreover, the sequence of the band intensity variations showed that the band at 1555 cm-1 moved backwards owing to the addition of GTA, demonstrating that the response of helical structure of crosslinked collagen to the increased temperature lagged. It was speculated that the stabilization of collagen by GTA was due to the reinforcement of triple helical structure.

  6. Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 Mediates Collagen-Induced Activation of Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase in Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Majkowska, Iwona; Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Ito, Noriko; Gray, Nathanael S; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2017-03-07

    Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-bound MMP that is highly expressed in cells with invading capacity including fibroblasts and invasive cancer cell. A potential physiological stimulus for MT1-MMP expression is fibrillar collagen, and it has been shown that it upregulates both MT1-MMP gene and functions in various cell types. However, the mechanisms of collagen-mediated MT1-MMP activation is not clearly understood. In this study we identified discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) as a crucial receptor that mediates this process in human fibroblasts. Knocking down DDR2, but not β1 integrin subunit, a common subunit for all collagen-binding integrins, inhibited collagen-induced activation of proMMP-2 and upregulation of MT1-MMP at the gene and protein level. Interestingly DDR2 knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of DDR2 also inhibited MT1-MMP-dependent cellular degradation of collagen film, suggesting that cell surface collagen degradation by MT1-MMP involves DDR2-mediated collagen signalling. This DDR2-mediated mechanism is only present in non-transformed mesenchymal cells, as collagen-induced MT1-MMP activation in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells and MT1-MMP function in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells were not affected by DDR kinase inhibition. DDR2 activation was found to be noticeably more effective when cells were stimulated by collagen without non-helical telopeptides region compared to intact collagen fibrils. Those data suggest that DDR2 is a microenvironmental sensor that regulates fibroblasts migration in collagen-rich environment.

  7. Protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta-induced annulus fibrosus type II collagen degeneration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Duan, Deyu; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu; Wang, Hong; Xiong, Xiaoqian

    2007-02-01

    The protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-induced annulus fibrosus (AF) type II collagen degeneration in vitro and the mechanism were investigated. Chiba's intervertebral disc (IVD) culture models in rabbits were established and 48 IVDs from 12 adult Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: normal control group, niacinamide-treated group, type II collagen degneration group (IL-1beta) and treatment group (niacinamide+IL-1beta). After culture for one week, AFs were collected for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cysteine containing aspartate specific protease-3 (Caspase-3) and type II collagen immunohistochemical examination, and type II collagen reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that rate of iNOS positive staining AF cells in the 4 groups was 17.6%, 10.9%, 73.9% and 19.3% respectively. The positive rate in treatment group was significantly lower than in the type II collagen degeneration group (P<0.01). Rate of Caspase-3 positive staining AF cells in the 4 groups was 3.4%, 4.2%, 17.6% and 10.3% respectively. The positive rate in treatment group was lower than in the type II collagen degeneration group (P<0.01). Type II collagen staining demonstrated that lamellar structure and continuity of collagen in treatment group was better reversed than in the degeneration group. RT-PCR revealed that the expression of type II collagen in treatment group was significantly stronger than that in type II collagen degeneration group (P<0.01). It was concluded that niacinamide could effectively inhibit IL-1beta stimulated increase of iNOS and Caspase-3 in AF, and alleviate IL-1beta-caused destruction and synthesis inhibition of type II collagen. Niacinamide is of potential for clinical treatment of IVD degeneration.

  8. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopic study on the thermally induced structural changes of glutaraldehyde-crosslinked collagen.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhenhua; Wu, Kun; Liu, Wentao; Shen, Lirui; Li, Guoying

    2015-04-05

    The thermal stability of collagen solution (5 mg/mL) crosslinked by glutaraldehyde (GTA) [GTA/collagen (w/w)=0.5] was measured by differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the thermally induced structural changes were analyzed using two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectra. The denaturation temperature (Td) and enthalpy change (ΔH) of crosslinked collagen were respectively about 27°C and 88 J/g higher than those of native collagen, illuminating the thermal stability increased. With the increase of temperature, the red-shift of absorption bands and the decreased AIII/A1455 value obtained from FTIR spectra indicated that hydrogen bonds were weakened and the unwinding of triple helix occurred for both native and crosslinked collagens; whereas the less changes in red-shifting and AIII/A1455 values for crosslinked collagen also confirmed the increase in thermal stability. Additionally, the 2D correlation analysis provided information about the thermally induced structural changes. In the 2D synchronous spectra, the intensities of auto-peaks at 1655 and 1555 cm(-1), respectively assigned to amide I band (CO stretching vibration) and amide II band (combination of NH bending and CN stretching vibrations) in helical conformation were weaker for crosslinked collagen than those for native collagen, indicating that the helical structure of crosslinked collagen was less sensitive to temperature. Moreover, the sequence of the band intensity variations showed that the band at 1555 cm(-1) moved backwards owing to the addition of GTA, demonstrating that the response of helical structure of crosslinked collagen to the increased temperature lagged. It was speculated that the stabilization of collagen by GTA was due to the reinforcement of triple helical structure.

  9. Ear wax

    MedlinePlus

    ... wax plug. Tip your head to allow the water to drain. You may need to repeat irrigation several times. To avoid damaging your ear or causing an infection: Never irrigate the ear if the eardrum may have a hole in it. Do not irrigate the ear with ...

  10. Cauliflower Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? What's Cauliflower Ear? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Cauliflower Ear? A A A Have you ever seen ... looks bumpy and lumpy? The person might have cauliflower ear. That sure is a funny name. Let's ...

  11. Cauliflower Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray What's Cauliflower Ear? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Cauliflower Ear? Print A A A Have you ever ... looks bumpy and lumpy? The person might have cauliflower ear. That sure is a funny name. Let's ...

  12. Proteoglycan and Collagen Biochemical Variations during Fluoroquinolone-Induced Chondrotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Marie-Agnès; Gegout-Pottie, Pascale; Minn, Alain; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Terlain, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    Although fluoroquinolone antibacterials have a broad therapeutic use, with a relatively low incidence of severe side effects, they have been reported to induce lesions in the cartilage of growing animals by a mechanism that remains unclear. This study was undertaken to determine the potentially deleterious effect of a high dose of pefloxacin (400 mg/kg of body weight) on two main constituents of cartilage in mice, i.e., proteoglycans and collagen. Variations in levels of proteoglycan anabolism measured by in vivo [35S]sulfate incorporation into cartilage and oxidative modifications of collagen assessed by detection of carbonyl derivatives were monitored after administration of pefloxacin. Treatment of mice with 1 day of pefloxacin treatment significantly decreased the rate of biosynthesis of proteoglycan for the first 24 h. However, no difference was observed after 48 h. The decrease in proteoglycan synthesis was accompanied by a marked drop in serum sulfate concentration and a concomitant increase in urinary sulfate excretion. The decrease in proteoglycan synthesis, also observed ex vivo, may suggest a direct effect of pefloxacin on this process, rather than it being a consequence of a low concentration of sulfate. On the other hand, treatment with pefloxacin for 10 days induced oxidative damage to collagen. In conclusion, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that pefloxacin administration to mice leads to modifications in the metabolism and integrity of extracellular proteins, such as collagen and proteoglycans, which may account for the side effects observed. These results offer new insights to explain quinolone-induced disorders in growing articular cartilage. PMID:10582882

  13. Clinical and histopathological characterization of a large animal (ovine) model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Abdalmula, A; Washington, E A; House, J V; Dooley, L M; Blacklaws, B A; Ghosh, P; Bailey, S R; Kimpton, W G

    2014-05-15

    Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) is the most studied and used rheumatoid arthritis (RA) model in animals, as it shares many pathological and immunological features of the human disease. The aim of this study was to characterize clinical and immunological aspects of the ovine CIA model, and develop lameness and histopathological scoring systems, in order to validate this model for use in therapeutic trials. Sheep were sensitized to bovine type II collagen (BCII), arthritis was induced by injection of bovine collagen type II into the hock joint and the response was followed for two weeks. Clinical signs of lameness and swelling were evident in all sheep and gross thickening of the synovium surrounding the tibiotarsal joint and erosion on the cartilage surface in the arthritic joints. Leucocyte cell counts were increased in synovial fluid and there was synovial hyperplasia, thickening of the intimal layer, inflammation and marked angiogenesis in the synovial tissue. There was a large influx of monocytes and lymphocytes into the synovial tissue, and increased expression of TNF-α and IL-1β in arthritic intima, angiogenesis and upregulation of VCAM-1. CIA in sheep appears to be an excellent large animal model of RA and has the potential for testing biological therapeutics for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Collagen-induced platelet activation mainly involves the protein kinase C pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Karniguian, A; Grelac, F; Levy-Toledano, S; Legrand, Y J; Rendu, F

    1990-01-01

    This study analyses early biochemical events in collagen-induced platelet activation. An early metabolic event occurring during the lag phase was the activation of PtdIns(4,5)P2-specific phospholipase C. Phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) formation, phosphorylation of P43 and P20, thromboxane B2 (TXB2) synthesis and platelet secretion began after the lag phase, and were similarly time-dependent, except for TXB2 synthesis, which was delayed. Collagen induced extensive P43 phosphorylation, whereas P20 phosphorylation was weak and always lower than with thrombin. The dose-response curves of P43 phosphorylation and granule secretion were similar, and both reached a peak at 7.5 micrograms of collagen/ml, a dose which induced half-maximal PtdOH and TXB2 formation. Sphingosine, assumed to inhibit protein kinase C, inhibited P43 phosphorylation and secretion in parallel. However, sphingosine was not specific for protein kinase C, since a 15 microM concentration, which did not inhibit P43 phosphorylation, blocked TXB2 synthesis by 50%. Sphingosine did not affect PtdOH formation at all, even at 100 microM, suggesting that collagen itself induced this PtdOH formation, independently of TXB2 generation. The absence of external Ca2+ allowed the cleavage of polyphosphoinositides and the accumulation of InsP3 to occur, but impaired P43 phosphorylation, PtdOH and TXB2 formation, and secretion; these were only restored by adding 0.11 microM-Ca2+. In conclusion, stimulation of platelet membrane receptors for collagen initiates a PtdInsP2-specific phospholipase C activation, which is independent of external Ca2+, and might be the immediate receptor-linked response. A Ca2+ influx is indispensable to the triggering of subsequent platelet responses. This stimulation predominantly involves the protein kinase C pathway associated with secretion, and appears not to be mediated by TXB2, at least during its initial stage. Images Fig. 6. PMID:2163606

  15. Collagen-binding vascular endothelial growth factor attenuates CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kangkang; Huang, Rui; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Yong; Yang, Chenchen; Cao, Shufeng; Hou, Xianglin; Chen, Bing; Dai, Jianwu; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) serves an important role in promoting angiogenesis and tissue regeneration. However, the lack of an effective delivery system that can target this growth factor to the injured site reduces its therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, in the current study, collagen-binding VEGF was constructed by fusing a collagen-binding domain (CBD) to the N-terminal of native VEGF. The CBD-VEGF can specifically bind to collagen which is the major component of the extracellular matrix in fibrotic liver. The anti-fibrotic effects of this novel material were investigated by the carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver fibrotic mouse model. Mice were injected with CCl4 intraperitoneally to induce liver fibrosis. CBD-VEGF was injected directly into the liver tissue of mice. The liver tissues were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for general observation or with Masson's trichrome staining for detection of collagen deposition. The hepatic stellate cell activation, blood vessel formation and hepatocyte proliferation were measured by immunohistochemical staining for α-smooth muscle actin, CD31 and Ki67 in the liver tissue. The fluorescent TUNEL assay was performed to evaluate the hepatocyte apoptosis. The present study identified that the CBD-VEGF injection could significantly promote vascularization of the liver tissue of fibrotic mice and attenuate liver fibrosis. Furthermore, hepatocyte apoptosis and hepatic stellate cell activation were attenuated by CBD-VEGF treatment. CBD-VEGF treatment could additionally promote hepatocyte regeneration in the liver tissue of fibrotic mice. Thus, it was suggested that CBD-VEGF may be used as a novel therapeutic intervention for liver fibrosis. PMID:27748931

  16. CCK1 and CCK2 Receptors Are Expressed on Pancreatic Stellate Cells and Induce Collagen Production

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Seiz, Oliver; Nast, Jan Friso; Benten, Daniel; Bläker, Michael; Koch, Johannes; Lohse, Ansgar W.; Pace, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) can induce acute pancreatitis in rodents through its action on acinar cells. Treatment with CCK, in combination with other agents, represents the most commonly used model to induce experimental chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) are responsible for pancreatic fibrosis and therefore play a predominant role in the genesis of chronic pancreatitis. However, it is not known whether PSC express CCK receptors. Using real time PCR techniques, we demonstrate that CCK1 and CCK2 receptors are expressed on rat PSC. Interestingly both CCK and gastrin significantly induced type I collagen synthesis. Moreover, both inhibit proliferation. These effects are comparable with TGF-β-stimulated PSC. Furthermore, the natural agonists CCK and gastrin induce activation of pro-fibrogenic pathways Akt, ERK, and Src. Using specific CCK1 and CCK2 receptor (CCK2R) inhibitors, we found that Akt activation is mainly mediated by CCK2R. Akt activation by CCK and gastrin could be inhibited by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Activation of ERK and the downstream target Elk-1 could be inhibited by the MEK inhibitor U0126. These data suggest that CCK and gastrin have direct activating effects on PSC, are able to induce collagen synthesis in these cells, and therefore appear to be important regulators of pancreatic fibrogenesis. Furthermore, similar to TGF-β, both CCK and gastrin inhibit proliferation in PSC. PMID:20843811

  17. Modulation of heat shock protein 90 affects TGF-β-induced collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae Bin; Lim, A-Ram; Rah, Dong Kyun; Kim, Kyung Soo; Min, Hyun Jin

    2016-12-01

    Heat shock protein 90 is a chaperone molecule that aids in proper folding of target proteins. Recently, heat shock protein 90 was found to play a role in would healing through regulation of fibroblast functions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of heat shock protein 90 in collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. The effects of transforming growth factor-β, 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin, and transfection of heat shock protein 90 were evaluated by real-time PCR, western blot, and immunofluorescence assays. The Smad 2/3 and Akt pathways were evaluated to identify the signaling pathways involved in collagen synthesis. Heat shock protein 90 and collagen levels were compared in keloid and control tissues by immunohistochemical analysis. The expression of collagen was significantly increased after treatment with transforming growth factor-β, while 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin inhibited transforming growth factor-β-induced collagen synthesis. Overexpression of heat shock protein 90 itself with or without transforming growth factor-β increased collagen synthesis. These effects were dependent on Smad 2/3 pathway signaling. Finally, expression of heat shock protein 90 was increased in keloid tissue compared with control tissues. Taken together, these results demonstrate that modulation of heat shock protein 90 influences transforming growth factor-β-induced collagen synthesis via regulation of Smad 2/3 phosphorylation.

  18. Mechanical strain- and high glucose-induced alterations in mesangial cell collagen metabolism: role of TGF-beta.

    PubMed

    Riser, B L; Cortes, P; Yee, J; Sharba, A K; Asano, K; Rodriguez-Barbero, A; Narins, R G

    1998-05-01

    Cultured mesangial cells (MC) exposed to cyclic mechanical strain or high glucose levels increase their secretion of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and collagen, suggesting possible mechanisms for the development of diabetic renal sclerosis resulting from intraglomerular hypertension and/or hyperglycemia. This study examines whether glucose interacts with mechanical strain to influence collagen metabolism and whether this change is mediated by TGF-beta. Accordingly, rat MC were grown on flexible-bottom plates in 8 or 35 mM glucose media, subjected to 2 to 5 d of cyclic stretching, and assayed for TGF-beta1 mRNA, TGF-beta1 secretion, and the incorporation of 14C-proline into free or protein-associated hydroxyproline to assess the dynamics of collagen metabolism. Stretching or high glucose exposure increased TGF-beta1 secretion twofold and TGF-beta1 mRNA levels by 30 and 45%, respectively. However, the combination of these stimuli increased secretion greater than fivefold without further elevating mRNA. In 8 mM glucose medium, stretching significantly increased MC collagen synthesis and breakdown, but did not alter accumulation, whereas those stretched in 35 mM glucose markedly increased collagen accumulation. TGF-beta neutralization significantly reduced baseline collagen synthesis, breakdown, and accumulation in low glucose, but had no significant effect on the changes induced by stretch. In contrast, the same treatment of MC in high glucose medium greatly reduced stretch-induced synthesis and breakdown of collagen and totally abolished the increase in collagen accumulation. These results indicate that TGF-beta plays a positive regulatory role in MC collagen synthesis, breakdown, and accumulation. However, in low glucose there is no stretch-induced collagen accumulation, and the effect of TGF-beta is limited to basal collagen turnover. In high glucose media, TGF-beta is a critical mediator of stretch-induced collagen synthesis and catabolism, and

  19. Human-induced contaminant impacts on migratory birds: lessons from the North American eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sladky, Kurt K.; Quist, Charlotte; Ramirez, Pedro; Hill, David; Dein, F. Joshua

    2003-01-01

    The effects of aquatic contaminants generated by soda ash mining processes on the North American eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis) population illustrates important issues associated with human-induced habitat degradation on the health of migratory species. Eared grebes have been extensively studied in their staging and breeding habitats, but little is known about their 2- to 3-day migratory periods. During migration, few bodies of water are available to the birds for refuge between freshwater breeding areas in Canada and hypersaline lakes (e.g., Great Salt Lake in Utah or Mono Lake in California) to which they migrate. One geographic refuge area includes a series of "tailings" ponds associated with soda ash mining operations in southwestern Wyoming. The ponds range from 100-1200 acres, with water containing high concentrations of sodium decahydrate (Na2CO3•10H2O). At cool temperatures (generally < 40°F) sodium decahydrate precipitates out of the water and crystallizes on solid objects in the ponds or on the water surface. Bird mortality on these ponds has been recognized since the early 1970's, and the mining companies have developed hazing strategies and rehabilitation programs in order to minimize mortality. In order to determine causes of grebe mortality and devise strategies to reduce mortality, a field epidemiologic investigation was developed with the following objectives: 1) to determine whether eared grebes have quantifiable physiologic abnormalities associated with exposure to soda ash mine pond water; 2) to evaluate physical effects of sodium decahydrate crystallization on grebe survival; 3) to establish cause of death based on necropsy of deceased grebes; 4) to determine long-term survivability of eared grebes after exposure to the pond water; and 5) to evaluate water quality and determine whether aquatic invertebrates are present in the ponds as a possible food source.

  20. Dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver injury in rats: the early deposition of collagen.

    PubMed

    George, J; Rao, K R; Stern, R; Chandrakasan, G

    2001-01-02

    Dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) is a potent hepatotoxin that can cause fibrosis of the liver. It's ability to provide a suitable rapid experimental murine model for early human cirrhosis was examined. The drug was administered to adult male albino rats in order to document sequential pathological and biochemical alterations. Injury was produced by intraperitoneal injections of DMN on three consecutive days of each week over a 3-week period. A rapid increase in collagen content was documented, with linear increases occurring from days 7 to 21. Livers were examined for histopathological changes on days 7, 14 and 21 following the beginning of exposure. Severe centrilobular congestion and haemorrhagic necrosis could be observed on day 7. Centrilobular necrosis and intense neutrophilic infiltration were observed on day 14. By day 21, collagen fiber deposition could be observed, together with severe centrilobular necrosis, with focal fatty changes, bile duct proliferation, bridging necrosis and fibrosis surrounding the central veins. A decrease in total protein and increase in DNA were also documented. DMN-induced liver injury in rats appears to be a potential animal model for early human cirrhosis and the rapid deposition of collagen, and may serve as a convenient procedure for screening antifibrotic agents.

  1. Attenuation of collagen-induced arthritis in mice by salmon proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Sayuri; Asano, Krisana; Nakane, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious autoimmune disease caused by chronic inflammation of connective tissues. The basic principle of RA treatment is aimed to reduce joint inflammation. Our previous studies demonstrated that salmon cartilage proteoglycan (PG) suppresses excess inflammation in different mouse inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the prophylactic effect of PG on the progression of RA using an experimental mouse model, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Clinical and histological severity of CIA was attenuated by daily oral administration of PG. In the joints of PG-administered mice, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils and also osteoclast accumulation were limited. In comparison to nonadministered mice, anti-collagen antibodies in the sera of PG-administered mice did not alter. On the other hand, local expression of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-6, IL-1 β, interferon- γ (IFN- γ), C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), C-X-C chemokine ligand 1 (CXCL1), and CXCL2 in the joints of PG-administered mice decreased. Moreover, in the response of type II collagen- (CII-) restimulation ex vivo, IL-17A and IFN- γ production by splenocytes from PG-administered mice was less than that of control mice. These data suggested that daily ingested PG attenuated CIA pathogenesis by modulating immune response of splenocytes to CII stimulation and local production inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the joints.

  2. Transforming growth factor alpha induces collagen degradation and cell migration in differentiating human epidermal raft cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Turksen, K; Choi, Y; Fuchs, E

    1991-01-01

    When cultured on plastic and treated with transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha), human keratinocytes exhibit an increase in proliferation at the colony periphery, apparently as a consequence of enhanced cell migration (Barrandon and Green, 1987). To investigate the effects of TGF alpha on a differentiating stratified squamous epithelium and to begin to examine the molecular basis mediating this influence, we cultured human epidermal cells on a gelled lattice of collagen and fibroblasts, floating on the air-liquid interface. Under these conditions, raft cultures differentiate and exhibit morphological and biochemical features of human skin in vivo (Asselineau et al., 1986; Kopan et al., 1987). When 3-wk-old raft cultures were treated with TGF alpha, basal cells showed a marked increase in cell proliferation. At elevated concentrations of TGF alpha, the organization of cells within the artificial tissue changed and islands of basal cells entered the collagen matrix. Biochemical analysis of the response revealed that type I collagenase and gelatinase were induced by keratinocytes within 12 h after TGF alpha treatment. In contrast, invasion of basal cells into the collagen matrix was not significant until 48-72 h post-treatment, suggesting that collagenase and gelatinase production may be a prerequisite to this phenomenon. These results have important implications for the possible role of TGF alpha in squamous cell carcinoma and tumor invasion. Images PMID:1663788

  3. Three-dimensional collagen matrix induces a mechanosensitive invasive epithelial phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Shawn P.; Martin, Karen E.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2017-01-01

    A critical step in breast cancer progression is local tissue invasion, during which cells pass from the epithelial compartment to the stromal compartment. We recently showed that malignant leader cells can promote the invasion of otherwise non-invasive epithelial follower cells, but the effects of this induced-invasion phenomenon on follower cell phenotype remain unclear. Notably, this process can expose epithelial cells to the stromal extracellular matrix (ECM), which is distinct from the ECM within the normal epithelial microenvironment. Here, we used a 3D epithelial morphogenesis model in which cells were cultured in biochemically and mechanically defined matrices to examine matrix-mediated gene expression and the associated phenotypic response. We found that 3D collagen matrix promoted expression of mesenchymal genes including MT1-MMP, which was required for collagen-stimulated invasive behavior. Epithelial invasion required matrix anchorage as well as signaling through Src, PI3K, and Rac1, and increasingly stiff collagen promoted dispersive epithelial cell invasion. These results suggest that leader cell-facilitated access to the stromal ECM may trigger an invasive phenotype in follower epithelial cells that could enable them to actively participate in local tissue invasion. PMID:28186196

  4. Protein arginine deiminase 4 inhibition is sufficient for the amelioration of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Willis, V C; Banda, N K; Cordova, K N; Chandra, P E; Robinson, W H; Cooper, D C; Lugo, D; Mehta, G; Taylor, S; Tak, P P; Prinjha, R K; Lewis, H D; Holers, V M

    2017-01-27

    Citrullination of joint proteins by the protein arginine deiminase (PAD) family of enzymes is recognized increasingly as a key process in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This present study was undertaken to explore the efficacy of a novel PAD4-selective inhibitor, GSK199, in the murine collagen-induced arthritis model of rheumatoid arthritis. Mice were dosed daily from the time of collagen immunization with GSK199. Efficacy was assessed against a wide range of end-points, including clinical disease scores, joint histology and immunohistochemistry, serum and joint citrulline levels and quantification of synovial autoantibodies using a proteomic array containing joint peptides. Administration of GSK199 at 30 mg/kg led to significant effects on arthritis, assessed both by global clinical disease activity and by histological analyses of synovial inflammation, pannus formation and damage to cartilage and bone. In addition, significant decreases in complement C3 deposition in both synovium and cartilage were observed robustly with GSK199 at 10 mg/kg. Neither the total levels of citrulline measurable in joint and serum, nor levels of circulating collagen antibodies, were affected significantly by treatment with GSK199 at any dose level. In contrast, a subset of serum antibodies reactive against citrullinated and non-citrullinated joint peptides were reduced with GSK199 treatment. These data extend our previous demonstration of efficacy with the pan-PAD inhibitor Cl-amidine and demonstrate robustly that PAD4 inhibition alone is sufficient to block murine arthritis clinical and histopathological end-points.

  5. β-Aminopropionitrile-Induced Reduction in Enzymatic Crosslinking Causes In Vitro Changes in Collagen Morphology and Molecular Composition

    PubMed Central

    Canelón, Silvia P.

    2016-01-01

    Type I collagen morphology can be characterized using fibril D-spacing, a metric which describes the periodicity of repeating bands of gap and overlap regions of collagen molecules arranged into collagen fibrils. This fibrillar structure is stabilized by enzymatic crosslinks initiated by lysyl oxidase (LOX), a step which can be disrupted using β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN). Murine in vivo studies have confirmed effects of BAPN on collagen nanostructure and the objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanism of these effects in vitro by measuring D-spacing, evaluating the ratio of mature to immature crosslinks, and quantifying gene expression of type I collagen and LOX. Osteoblasts were cultured in complete media, and differentiated using ascorbic acid, in the presence or absence of 0.25mM BAPN-fumarate. The matrix produced was imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and 2D Fast Fourier transforms were performed to extract D-spacing from individual fibrils. The experiment was repeated for quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses. The D-spacing distribution of collagen produced in the presence of BAPN was shifted toward higher D-spacing values, indicating BAPN affects the morphology of collagen produced in vitro, supporting aforementioned in vivo experiments. In contrast, no difference in gene expression was found for any target gene, suggesting LOX inhibition does not upregulate the LOX gene to compensate for the reduction in aldehyde formation, or regulate expression of genes encoding type I collagen. Finally, the mature to immature crosslink ratio decreased with BAPN treatment and was linked to a reduction in peak percent area of mature crosslink hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP). In conclusion, in vitro treatment of osteoblasts with low levels of BAPN did not induce changes in genes encoding LOX or type I collagen, but led to an increase in collagen D-spacing as well as

  6. Recombinant Galectin-1 and Its Genetic Delivery Suppress Collagen-Induced Arthritis via T Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Daly, Gordon; Dreja, Hanna; Tailor, Hitakshi; Riera, Clelia M.; Hirabayashi, Jun; Chernajovsky, Yuti

    1999-01-01

    Galectin-1 (GAL-1), a member of a family of conserved β-galactoside–binding proteins, has been shown to induce in vitro apoptosis of activated T cells and immature thymocytes. We assessed the therapeutic effects and mechanisms of action of delivery of GAL-1 in a collagen-induced arthritis model. A single injection of syngeneic DBA/1 fibroblasts engineered to secrete GAL-1 at the day of disease onset was able to abrogate clinical and histopathological manifestations of arthritis. This effect was reproduced by daily administration of recombinant GAL-1. GAL-1 treatment resulted in reduction in anticollagen immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels. The cytokine profile in draining lymph node cells and the anticollagen IgG isotypes in mice sera at the end of the treatment clearly showed inhibition of the proinflammatory response and skewing towards a type 2–polarized immune reaction. Lymph node cells from mice engaged in the gene therapy protocol increased their susceptibility to antigen-induced apoptosis. Moreover, GAL-1–expressing fibroblasts and recombinant GAL-1 revealed a specific dose-dependent inhibitory effect in vitro in antigen-dependent interleukin 2 production to an Aq-restricted, collagen type 2–specific T cell hybridoma clone. Thus, a correlation between the apoptotic properties of GAL-1 in vitro and its immunomodulatory properties in vivo supports its therapeutic potential in the treatment of T helper cell type 1–mediated autoimmune disorders. PMID:10430627

  7. Lycium barbarum polysaccharide attenuates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Lv, Jun; Yang, Bo; Liu, Fang; Tian, Zhiqiang; Cai, Yongqing; Yang, Di; Ouyang, Jing; Sun, Fengjun; Shi, Ying; Xia, Peiyuan

    2015-01-01

    No curative treatment is yet available for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), wherein chronic synovitis progresses to cartilage and bone destruction. Considering the recently recognized anti-inflammatory properties of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP; a derivative of the goji berry), we established the collagen type II-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model to investigate the potential therapeutic effects and mechanisms of LBP. The CIA-induced changes and LBP-related effects were assessed by micro-computed tomography measurement of bone volume/tissue volume and by ELISA and western blotting detection of inflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The CIA mice showed substantial bone damage, bone loss, and increased concentrations of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17, PGE2, MIP-1, anti-type II collagen IgG, MMP-1, and MMP-3. LBP treatments produced significant dose-dependent improvements in CIA-induced bone damage and bone loss, and significantly reduced CIA-stimulated expression of the inflammatory mediators and MMPs. Thus, LBP therapy can preserve bone integrity in CIA mice, possibly through down-regulation of inflammatory mediators.

  8. STAT6-Dependent Collagen Synthesis in Human Fibroblasts Is Induced by Bovine Milk.

    PubMed

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Zöller, Nadja; Kleemann, Johannes; Müller, Jutta; Kaufmann, Roland; Hofmann, Matthias; Bernd, August; Meissner, Markus; Valesky, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Since the domestication of the urus, 10.000 years ago, mankind utilizes bovine milk for different purposes. Besides usage as a nutrient also the external application of milk on skin has a long tradition going back to at least the ancient Aegypt with Cleopatra VII as a great exponent. In order to test whether milk has impact on skin physiology, cultures of human skin fibroblasts were exposed to commercial bovine milk. Our data show significant induction of proliferation by milk (max. 2,3-fold, EC50: 2,5% milk) without toxic effects. Surprisingly, bovine milk was identified as strong inducer of collagen 1A1 synthesis at both, the protein (4-fold, EC50: 0,09% milk) and promoter level. Regarding the underlying molecular pathways, we show functional activation of STAT6 in a p44/42 and p38-dependent manner. More upstream, we identified IGF-1 and insulin as key factors responsible for milk-induced collagen synthesis. These findings show that bovine milk contains bioactive molecules that act on human skin cells. Therefore, it is tempting to test the herein introduced concept in treatment of atrophic skin conditions induced e.g. by UV light or corticosteroids.

  9. Ear Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... YesNoDo you have thick pus-filled or bloody drainage from the ear canal that started after a ... bone behind the ear, or from an ENLARGED LYMPH NODE.Self CareURGENTSEE YOUR DOCTOR RIGHT AWAY.Start ...

  10. Characterization of type I, II, III, IV, and V collagens by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Laura; Cohen, David; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    2000-04-01

    The relative proportions of genetically distinct collagen types in connective tissues vary with tissue type and change during disease progression, development, wound healing, aging. This study aims to 1) characterize the spectro- temporal fluorescence emission of fiber different types of collagen and 2) assess the ability of time-resolved laser- induced fluorescence spectroscopy to distinguish between collagen types. Fluorescence emission of commercially available purified samples was induced with nitrogen laser excitation pulses and detected with a MCP-PMT connected to a digital storage oscilloscope. The recorded time-resolved emission spectra displayed distinct fluorescence emission characteristics for each collagen type. The time domain information complemented the spectral domain intensity data for improved discrimination between different collagen types. Our results reveal that analysis of the fluorescence emission can be used to characterize different species of collagen. Also, the results suggest that time-resolved spectroscopy can be used for monitoring of connective tissue matrix composition changes due to various pathological and non-pathological conditions.

  11. Influence of Term of Exposure to High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity on Myocardial Collagen Type I and III

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Danielle Cristina Tomaz; Lima-Leopoldo, Ana Paula; Leopoldo, André Soares; de Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé; do Nascimento, André Ferreira; de Oliveira, Sílvio Assis; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is a risk factor for many medical complications; medical research has shown that hemodynamic, morphological and functional abnormalities are correlated with the duration and severity of obesity. Objective Present study determined the influence of term of exposure to high-fat diet-induced obesity on myocardial collagen type I and III. Methods Thirty-day-old male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into two groups: a control (C) group fed a standard rat chow and an obese (Ob) group alternately fed one of four palatable high-fat diets. Each diet was changed daily, and the rats were maintained on their respective diets for 15 (C15 and Ob15) and 30 (C30 and Ob30) consecutive weeks. Obesity was determined by adiposity index. Results The Ob15 group was similar to the C15 group regarding the expression of myocardial collagen type I; however, expression in the Ob30 group was less than C30 group. The time of exposure to obesity was associated with a reduction in collagen type I in Ob30 when compared with Ob15. Obesity did not affect collagen type III expression. Conclusion This study showed that the time of exposure to obesity for 30 weeks induced by unsaturated high-fat diet caused a reduction in myocardial collagen type I expression in the obese rats. However, no effect was seen on myocardial collagen type III expression. PMID:24676371

  12. Collagen-Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds Induce Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells Osteogenic Differentiation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fabbi, Claudia; Figallo, Elisa; Lo Furno, Debora; Gulino, Rosario; Colarossi, Cristina; Fullone, Francesco; Giuffrida, Rosario; Parenti, Rosalba; Memeo, Lorenzo; Forte, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play a crucial role in regulating normal skeletal homeostasis and, in case of injury, in bone healing and reestablishment of skeletal integrity. Recent scientific literature is focused on the development of bone regeneration models where MSCs are combined with biomimetic three-dimensional scaffolds able to direct MSC osteogenesis. In this work the osteogenic potential of human MSCs isolated from adipose tissue (hADSCs) has been evaluated in vitro in combination with collagen/Mg doped hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Results demonstrate the high osteogenic potential of hADSCs when cultured in specific differentiation induction medium, as revealed by the Alizarin Red S staining and gene expression profile analysis. In combination with collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffold, hADSCs differentiate into mature osteoblasts even in the absence of specific inducing factors; nevertheless, the supplement of the factors markedly accelerates the osteogenic process, as confirmed by the expression of specific markers of pre-osteoblast and mature osteoblast stages, such as osterix, osteopontin (also known as bone sialoprotein I), osteocalcin and specific markers of extracellular matrix maturation and mineralization stages, such as ALPL and osteonectin. Hence, the present work demonstrates that the scaffold per se is able to induce hADSCs differentiation, while the addition of osteo-inductive factors produces a significant acceleration of the osteogenic process. This observation makes the use of our model potentially interesting in the field of regenerative medicine for the treatment of bone defects. PMID:26982592

  13. Collagen-Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds Induce Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells Osteogenic Differentiation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Giovanna; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Fabbi, Claudia; Figallo, Elisa; Lo Furno, Debora; Gulino, Rosario; Colarossi, Cristina; Fullone, Francesco; Giuffrida, Rosario; Parenti, Rosalba; Memeo, Lorenzo; Forte, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play a crucial role in regulating normal skeletal homeostasis and, in case of injury, in bone healing and reestablishment of skeletal integrity. Recent scientific literature is focused on the development of bone regeneration models where MSCs are combined with biomimetic three-dimensional scaffolds able to direct MSC osteogenesis. In this work the osteogenic potential of human MSCs isolated from adipose tissue (hADSCs) has been evaluated in vitro in combination with collagen/Mg doped hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Results demonstrate the high osteogenic potential of hADSCs when cultured in specific differentiation induction medium, as revealed by the Alizarin Red S staining and gene expression profile analysis. In combination with collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffold, hADSCs differentiate into mature osteoblasts even in the absence of specific inducing factors; nevertheless, the supplement of the factors markedly accelerates the osteogenic process, as confirmed by the expression of specific markers of pre-osteoblast and mature osteoblast stages, such as osterix, osteopontin (also known as bone sialoprotein I), osteocalcin and specific markers of extracellular matrix maturation and mineralization stages, such as ALPL and osteonectin. Hence, the present work demonstrates that the scaffold per se is able to induce hADSCs differentiation, while the addition of osteo-inductive factors produces a significant acceleration of the osteogenic process. This observation makes the use of our model potentially interesting in the field of regenerative medicine for the treatment of bone defects.

  14. Dynamics of Early Synovial Cytokine Expression in Rodent Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Palmblad, Karin; Erlandsson-Harris, Helena; Tracey, Kevin J.; Andersson, Ulf

    2001-01-01

    This study was performed to elucidate pathophysiological events before and during the course of collagen-induced arthritis in Dark Agouti rats, a model for rheumatoid arthritis. Kinetic studies of local cytokine responses were determined using immunohistochemical techniques, quantified by computer-assisted image analysis. We recently reported that the macrophage-pacifying agent CNI-1493 successfully ameliorated collagen-induced arthritis. In the present trial, we investigated the potential of CNI-1493 to down-regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines. Synovial cryosections were analyzed at various time points for the presence of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Unexpectedly, an early simultaneous TNF and IL-1β expression was detected in resident cells in the lining layer, preceding disease onset and inflammatory cell infiltration by >1 week. The predominant cytokine synthesis by synovial (ED1+) macrophages coincided with clinical disease. TNF production greatly exceeded that of IL-1β. CNI-1493 treatment did not affect the early disease-preceding TNF and IL-1β synthesis in the lining layer. However, after disease onset, CNI-1493 intervention resulted in a pronounced reduced IL-1β and in particular TNF expression. Furthermore, CNI-1493 significantly up-regulated synthesis of the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β and thereby shifted the balance of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the arthritic joint in a beneficial way. PMID:11159186

  15. Personal listening devices and the prevention of noise induced hearing loss in children: the Cheers for Ears Pilot Program.

    PubMed

    Taljaard, Dunay Schmulian; Leishman, Natalie F; Eikelboom, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether the Cheers for Ears Program on noise induced hearing loss prevention was effective in improving current knowledge of noise impact of personal listening devices on hearing, and in changing self-reported listening behavior of primary school students aged between 9 years and 13 years. A survey study was implemented at participating primary schools. Schools represented various levels of socio-economic status. Informed consent (parents and teachers) and informed assent (pupils) were obtained. All pupils participated in two interactive sessions (the second 6 weeks after first) and only those who provided assent and consent were surveyed at three points during the study: Prior to the first session (baseline), directly post-session and at 3 months post-session. A total of 318 pupils were surveyed. The median age of the participants was 11 years (nearly 50% of the total cohort). Significant changes are reported in their knowledge about hearing and in listening behavior of the participants as measured by pre- and post-measurement. The changes in behaviors were stable and sustained at 3 months post-intervention survey point and the success of the program can be attributed to the multimodal interactive nature of the sessions, the spacing of the sessions and the survey points. Wide-ranging support from schools and departments also played a role. The pilot Cheers for Ears Program is effective in increasing knowledge on the harmful effects of noise and therefore, it may prevent future noise-induced hearing loss.

  16. The Preventive Effects of Nanopowdered Peanut Sprout-added Caciocavallo Cheese on Collagen-induced Arthritic Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hwi; Chang, Yoon Hyuk; Kwak, Hae-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (NPCC) on the prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in DBA/IJ mice immunized with type II collagen. After the induction of arthritis, the mice were being divided into five groups: (1) normal, no immunization; (2) CIA, collagen-induced arthritis; (3) MTX, collagen-induced arthritis treated with methotrexate (0.3 mg/kg body weight); (4) CC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d); (5) NPCC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d). Nanopowdered peanut sprout was ranged from 300 to 350 nm, while regular powdered peanut sprouts were ranged from 50 to 150 μm. The NPCC group had considerable reductions of clinical scores and paw thicknesses at the end of experiment as compared to the CIA group. In the serum analysis, the TNF-α, IL-1β, IL- 6 and IgG1 levels in the NPCC group have decreased by 69.4, 75.9, 66.6, and 61.9%, respectively, when compared to the CIA group. The histological score and spleen index of the NPCC group were significantly lower than the CIA group. In conclusion, the feeding NPCC method could delay and/or prevent the rheumatoid arthritis in the collagen-induced arthritis mouse model. Based on this study, nanopowdered peanut sprouts could be applied to various functional cheeses.

  17. The Preventive Effects of Nanopowdered Peanut Sprout-added Caciocavallo Cheese on Collagen-induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoon Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (NPCC) on the prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in DBA/IJ mice immunized with type II collagen. After the induction of arthritis, the mice were being divided into five groups: (1) normal, no immunization; (2) CIA, collagen-induced arthritis; (3) MTX, collagen-induced arthritis treated with methotrexate (0.3 mg/kg body weight); (4) CC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d); (5) NPCC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d). Nanopowdered peanut sprout was ranged from 300 to 350 nm, while regular powdered peanut sprouts were ranged from 50 to 150 μm. The NPCC group had considerable reductions of clinical scores and paw thicknesses at the end of experiment as compared to the CIA group. In the serum analysis, the TNF-α, IL-1β, IL- 6 and IgG1 levels in the NPCC group have decreased by 69.4, 75.9, 66.6, and 61.9%, respectively, when compared to the CIA group. The histological score and spleen index of the NPCC group were significantly lower than the CIA group. In conclusion, the feeding NPCC method could delay and/or prevent the rheumatoid arthritis in the collagen-induced arthritis mouse model. Based on this study, nanopowdered peanut sprouts could be applied to various functional cheeses. PMID:26760745

  18. Potent Antiarthritic Properties of Phloretin in Murine Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shun-Ping; Li, Shiming; Chao, Ya-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    In the exploration of potential therapeutic agents for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), DBA/1J mice are used as the RA model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Phloretin, a flavonoid compound extracted from Prunus mandshurica, has been found to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity, making it a potential candidate for treatment of RA. The objective of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effects of phloretin on CIA mice. CIA mice were dosed daily with phloretin at either 50 or 100 mg/kg among two treatment groups. CIA treated mice showed mitigation of clinical symptoms of RA in addition to reduced inflammation of hind-limbs compared to mice who did not receive phloretin. Histological analysis showed that phloretin suppressed the severity of RA and effectively mitigated joint inflammation and cartilage- and bone-destruction via reducing proinflammatory cytokine productions (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-17). This was at least partially mediated by causing inadequate splenocyte activation and proliferation. Moreover, phloretin-treated CIA mice showed decreased oxidative stress and diminished levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in paw tissues as well as reduced productivity of anti-collagen antibodies in serum. We have concluded that phloretin could be a potent and effective antiarthritis agent, demonstrating anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and immunomodulatory effects in CIA mice. PMID:28044086

  19. Mice Deficient in CD38 Develop an Attenuated Form of Collagen Type II-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Postigo, Jorge; Iglesias, Marcos; Cerezo-Wallis, Daniela; Rosal-Vela, Antonio; García-Rodríguez, Sonia; Zubiaur, Mercedes; Sancho, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    CD38, a type II transmembrane glycoprotein expressed in many cells of the immune system, is involved in cell signaling, migration and differentiation. Studies in CD38 deficient mice (CD38 KO mice) indicate that this molecule controls inflammatory immune responses, although its involvement in these responses depends on the disease model analyzed. Here, we explored the role of CD38 in the control of autoimmune responses using chicken collagen type II (col II) immunized C57BL/6-CD38 KO mice as a model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We demonstrate that CD38 KO mice develop an attenuated CIA that is accompanied by a limited joint induction of IL-1β and IL-6 expression, by the lack of induction of IFNγ expression in the joints and by a reduction in the percentages of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells in the spleen. Immunized CD38 KO mice produce high levels of circulating IgG1 and low of IgG2a anti-col II antibodies in association with reduced percentages of Th1 cells in the draining lymph nodes. Altogether, our results show that CD38 participates in the pathogenesis of CIA controlling the number of iNKT cells and promoting Th1 inflammatory responses. PMID:22438945

  20. Suppression of collagen-induced arthritis with a serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) derived from myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Brahn, Ernest; Lee, Sarah; Lucas, Alexandra; McFadden, Grant; Macaulay, Colin

    2014-08-01

    Many viruses encode virulence factors to facilitate their own survival by modulating a host's inflammatory response. One of these factors, secreted from cells infected with myxoma virus, is the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) Serp-1. Because Serp-1 had demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in arterial injury models and viral infections, it was cloned and evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Clinical severity was significantly lower in the Serp-1 protocols (p<0.0001) and blinded radiographs indicated that the Serp-1 group had significantly less erosions than the controls (p<0.01). Delayed-type hypersensitivity was lower in the Serp-1 group but antibody titers to type II collagen were not significantly altered. Recipients had minimal histopathologic synovial changes and did not develop neutralizing antibodies to Serp-1. These results indicate that Serp-1 impedes the pathogenesis of CIA and suggests that the therapeutic potential of serine proteinase inhibitors in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, should be investigated further.

  1. Anti-inflammatory effect of Ulmus davidiana Planch (Ulmaceae) on collagen-induced inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Song, In-Kwang; Kim, Kap-Sung; Suh, Seok-Jong; Kim, Myung-Sunny; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Sun-Lim; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2007-01-01

    Ulmus davidiana Planch (Ulmaceae) extract (UD) has long been known to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. UD has been also known to have protective effects on damaged tissue, inflammation and bone among other functions. Effects of UD on inflammatory and immune responses and its mechanisms in collagen-induced inflammation (CII) rat were studied. Hind paw volumes of rats were measured by volume meter; lymphocyte proliferation, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α level was determined by 3-(4,5-2dimethylthiazal-2yl)2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide assay. Antibodies to collagen type II (BC-II) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There was a marked secondary inflammatory response in CII model, which accompanied with the decrease of body weight and the weight of immune organs simultaneously. The administration of UD (20, 80, 150mg/kg, intragastrically×10 days) inhibited the inflammatory response and restored body weight and the weight of immune organs of CII rats. Lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 production of CII rats increases, together with IL-1 and TNF-α in peritoneal macrophages and synoviocytes. The administration of UD (20, 80, 150mg/kg, 10 days) reduced above changes significantly. UD had no effect on the concentration of antibodies to BC-II. From the results, it was concluded that UD possesses anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory activities and has a therapeutic effect on CII rats.

  2. Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Ameliorates Joint Disease in Murine Collagen- Induced Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard O.; Feldmann, Marc; Maini, Ravinder N.

    1992-10-01

    There is considerable evidence implicating tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This evidence is based not only on the universal presence of TNF-α in arthritic joints accompanied by the upregulation of TNF-α receptors but also on the effects of neutralizing TNF-α in joint cell cultures. Thus, neutralization of TNF-α in vitro results in inhibition of the production of interleukin 1, which like TNF-α, is believed to contribute to joint inflammation and erosion. To determine the validity of this concept in vivo, the effect of administering TNF-neutralizing antibodies to mice with collagen-induced arthritis has been studied. This disease model was chosen because of its many immunological and pathological similarities to human rheumatoid arthritis. TN3-19.12, a hamster IgG1 monoclonal antibody to murine TNF-α/β, was injected i.p. into mice either before the onset of arthritis or after the establishment of clinical disease. Anti-TNF administered prior to disease onset significantly reduced paw swelling and histological severity of arthritis without reducing the incidence of arthritis or the level of circulating anti-type II collagen IgG. More relevant to human disease was the capacity of the antibody to reduce the clinical score, paw swelling, and the histological severity of disease even when injected after the onset of clinical arthritis. These results have implications for possible modes of therapy of human arthritis.

  3. Inhibition of arthritis by systemic administration of endostatin in passive murine collagen induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, D; Yoshida, K; Yasuda, J; Yokoyama, T; Kingetsu, I; Yamaguchi, N; Joh, K; Matsushima, M; Saito, S; Yamada, A

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Four kinds of monoclonal anti-type II collagen antibody followed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) three days later were given to 6 week old, female Balb/c mice to induce arthritis. Three groups of mice received 0.2 mg/kg/day, 2 mg/kg/day, and 10 mg/kg/day of endostatin, respectively, whereas a control group received phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Endostatin or PBS was given for 13 days, starting before the development of arthritis. Arthritis was evaluated by arthritis scores and hind paw thicknesses. Mice were killed for histological examination on the 22nd day after the administration of monoclonal anti-type II collagen antibody. Results: Arthritis developed within three days after LPS administration in both the control and endostatin treatment groups. No difference in the development rate of arthritis was noted between the control and endostatin treatment groups. Arthritis scores remained significantly lower in the endostatin 10 mg/kg/day group than in the control group. Hind paw thicknesses also remained significantly smaller in the endostatin 10 mg/kg/day group than in the control group. Histopathological examination showed that synovial thickening and subchondral bone erosion improved more in the endostatin treatment groups than in the control group. Conclusion: The systemic administration of endostatin had an arthritis inhibiting effect in RA animal models. Endostatin inhibited, in particular, pannus formation and bone destruction. PMID:12810435

  4. Contraction-induced Mmp13 and -14 expression by goat articular chondrocytes in collagen type I but not type II gels.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Agnes D; Vonk, Lucienne A; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A

    2012-10-01

    Collagen gels are promising scaffolds to prepare an implant for cartilage repair but several parameters, such as collagen concentration and composition as well as cell density, should be carefully considered, as they are reported to affect phenotypic aspects of chondrocytes. In this study we investigated whether the presence of collagen type I or II in gel lattices affects matrix contraction and relative gene expression levels of matrix proteins, MMPs and the subsequent degradation of collagen by goat articular chondrocytes. Only floating collagen I gels, and not those attached or composed of type II collagen, contracted during a culture period of 12 days. This coincided with an upregulation of both Mmp13 and -14 gene expression, whereas Mmp1 expression was not affected. The release of hydroxyproline in the culture medium, indicating matrix degradation, was increased five-fold in contracted collagen I gels compared to collagen II gels without contraction. Furthermore, blocking contraction of collagen I gels by cytochalasin B inhibited Mmp13 and -14 expression and the release of hydroxyproline. The expression of cartilage-specific ECM genes was decreased in contracted collagen I gels, with increased numbers of cells with an elongated morphology, suggesting that matrix contraction induces dedifferentiation of chondrocytes into fibroblast-like cells. We conclude that the collagen composition of the gels affects matrix contraction by articular chondrocytes and that matrix contraction induces an increased Mmp13 and -14 expression as well as matrix degradation.

  5. Swimmer's ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... or a respiratory infection such as a cold. Swimming in unclean water can lead to swimmer's ear. ... very well after it has gotten wet. Avoid swimming in polluted water. Use earplugs when swimming. Try ...

  6. Pierced Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... you run the risk of getting infected ears. Metal Matters Your first earrings should have gold posts ( ... infection and swelling. Later, you may find some metals cause an allergic reaction. You're probably wondering ...

  7. Boswellia serrata extract attenuates inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Umar, Sadiq; Umar, Khalid; Sarwar, Abu Hasnath Md Golam; Khan, Altaf; Ahmad, Niyaz; Ahmad, Sayeed; Katiyar, Chandra Kant; Husain, Syed Akhtar; Khan, Haider A

    2014-05-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease which leads to destruction of joints. Current treatment modalities for RA either produce symptomatic relief (NSAIDs) or modify the disease process (DMARDs). Though effective, their use is also limited by their side effects. As a result, the interest in alternative, well tolerated anti-inflammatory remedies has re-emerged. Our aim was to evaluate the antioxidant and antiarthritic activity of Boswellia serrata gum resin extract (BSE) in collagen induced arthritis. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by collagen induced arthritis (CIA) method. BSE was administered at doses of 100 and 200mg/kg body weight once daily for 21 days. The effects of treatment in the rats were assessed by biochemical (articular elastase, MPO, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD and NO), inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10, IFN-γ and PGE2), and histological studies in joints. BSE was effective in bringing significant changes on all the parameters (articular elastase, MPO, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD and NO) studied. Oral administration of BSE resulted in significantly reduced levels of inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and PGE2), and increased level of IL-10. The protective effects of BSE against RA were also evident from the decrease in arthritis scoring and bone histology. The abilities to inhibit proinflammatory cytokines and modulation of antioxidant status suggest that the protective effect of Boswellia serrata extract on arthritis in rats might be mediated via the modulation of immune system.

  8. The role of lipopolysaccharide injected systemically in the reactivation of collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Shin; Ohsawa, Motoyasu

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the role of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the reactivation of autoimmune disease by using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice in which autoimmunity to the joint cartilage component type II collagen (CII) was involved.CIA was induced by immunization with CII emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant at the base of the tail (day 0) followed by a booster injection on day 21. Varying doses of LPS from E. coli were i.p. injected on day 50.Arthritis began to develop on day 25 after immunization with CII and reached a peak on day 35. Thereafter, arthritis subsided gradually but moderate joint inflammation was still observed on day 50. An i.p. injection of LPS on day 50 markedly reactivated arthritis on a dose-related fashion. Histologically, on day 55, there were marked oedema of synovium which had proliferated by the day of LPS injection, new formation of fibrin, and intense infiltration of neutrophils accompanied with a large number of mononuclear cells. The reactivation of CIA by LPS was associated with increases in anti-CII IgG and IgG2a antibodies as well as various cytokines including IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α. LPS from S. enteritidis, S. typhimurium, and K. neumoniae and its component, lipid A from E. coli also reactivated the disease. Polymyxin B sulphate suppressed LPS- or lipid A-induced reactivation of CIA.These results suggest that LPS may play an important role in the reactivation of autoimmune joint inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:10742285

  9. Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Effects of Repeated Exposure to Cruciferous Allyl Nitrile in Sensitizer-Induced Ear Edema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tanii, Hideji; Sugitani, Kayo; Saijoh, Kiyofumi

    2016-01-01

    Background Skin sensitizers induce allergic reactions through the induction of reactive oxygen species. Allyl nitrile from cruciferous vegetables has been reported to induce antioxidants and phase II detoxification enzymes in various tissues. We assessed the effects of repeated exposure to allyl nitrile on sensitizer-induced allergic reactions. Material/Methods Mice were dosed with allyl nitrile (0–200 μmol/kg), and then received a dermal application of 1 of 3 sensitizers on the left ear or 1 of 2 vehicles on the right ear. Quantitative assessment of edema was carried out by measuring the difference in weight between the portions taken from the right and left ears. We tested enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in ears. Results Repeated exposure to allyl nitrile reduced edemas induced by glutaraldehyde and by 2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), but not by formaldehyde. The repeated exposure decreased levels of TBARS, a marker of oxidative stress, induced by glutaraldehyde and by DNCB, but not by formaldehyde. Allyl nitrile elevated SOD levels for the 3 sensitizers, and CAT levels for formaldehyde and DNCB. Allyl nitrile also increased GPx levels for formaldehyde and DNCB, but not for glutaraldehyde. The reduced edemas were associated with changes in oxidative stress levels and antioxidant enzymes. Conclusions Repeated exposure to allyl nitrile reduced allergic reactions induced by glutaraldehyde and by DNCB, but not by formaldehyde. This reduction was associated with changes in ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:26932717

  10. Keratocytes are induced to produce collagen type II: A new strategy for in vivo corneal matrix regeneration.

    PubMed

    Greene, Carol Ann; Green, Colin R; Dickinson, Michelle E; Johnson, Virginia; Sherwin, Trevor

    2016-09-10

    The stroma, the middle layer of the cornea, is a connective tissue making up most of the corneal thickness. The stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of highly organised lamellae which are made up of tightly packed fibrils primarily composed of collagens type I and V. This layer is interspersed with keratocytes, mesenchymal cells of neural crest origin. We have previously shown that adult corneal keratocytes exhibit phenotypic plasticity and can be induced into a neuronal phenotype. In the current study we evaluated the potential of keratocytes to produce collagen type II via phenotypic reprogramming with exogenous chondrogenic factors. The cornea presents a challenge to tissue engineers owing to its high level of organisation and the phenotypic instability of keratocytes. Traditional approaches based on a scar model do not support the engineering of functional stromal tissue. Type II collagen is not found in the adult cornea but is reported to be expressed during corneal development, raising the possibility of using such an approach to regenerate the corneal ECM. Keratocytes in culture and within intact normal and diseased tissue were induced to produce collagen type II upon treatment with transforming growth factor Beta3 (TGFβ3) and dexamethasone. In vivo treatment of rat corneas also resulted in collagen type II deposition and a threefold increase in corneal hardness and elasticity. Furthermore, the treatment of corneas and subsequent deposition of collagen type II did not cause opacity, fibrosis or scarring. The induction of keratocytes with specific exogenous factors and resulting deposition of type II collagen in the stroma can potentially be controlled by withdrawal of the factors. This might be a promising new approach for in vivo corneal regeneration strategies aimed at increasing corneal integrity in diseases associated with weakened ectatic corneal tissue such as keratoconus.

  11. Kaempferol suppresses collagen-induced platelet activation by inhibiting NADPH oxidase and protecting SHP-2 from oxidative inactivation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Su Bin; Jang, Ji Yong; Chae, Yun Hee; Min, Ji Hyun; Baek, Jin Young; Kim, Myunghee; Park, Yunjeong; Hwang, Gwi Seo; Ryu, Jae-Sang; Chang, Tong-Shin

    2015-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated upon collagen stimulation act as second messengers to propagate various platelet-activating events. Among the ROS-generating enzymes, NADPH oxidase (NOX) plays a prominent role in platelet activation. Thus, NOX has been suggested as a novel target for anti-platelet drug development. Although kaempferol has been identified as a NOX inhibitor, the influence of kaempferol on the activation of platelets and the underlying mechanism have never been investigated. Here, we studied the effects of kaempferol on NOX activation, ROS-dependent signaling pathways, and functional responses in collagen-stimulated platelets. Superoxide anion generation stimulated by collagen was significantly inhibited by kaempferol in a concentration-dependent manner. More importantly, kaempferol directly bound p47(phox), a major regulatory subunit of NOX, and significantly inhibited collagen-induced phosphorylation of p47(phox) and NOX activation. In accordance with the inhibition of NOX, ROS-dependent inactivation of SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) was potently protected by kaempferol. Subsequently, the specific tyrosine phosphorylation of key components (Syk, Vav1, Btk, and PLCγ2) of collagen receptor signaling pathways was suppressed by kaempferol. Kaempferol also attenuated downstream responses, including cytosolic calcium elevation, P-selectin surface exposure, and integrin-αIIbβ3 activation. Ultimately, kaempferol inhibited platelet aggregation and adhesion in response to collagen in vitro and prolonged in vivo thrombotic response in carotid arteries of mice. This study shows that kaempferol impairs collagen-induced platelet activation through inhibition of NOX-derived ROS production and subsequent oxidative inactivation of SHP-2. This effect suggests that kaempferol has therapeutic potential for the prevention and treatment of thrombovascular diseases.

  12. Epithelial derived CTGF promotes breast tumor progression via inducing EMT and collagen I fibers deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Sheng, Jianting; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Jiyong; Cui, Kemi; Chang, Jenny; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Interactions among tumor cells, stromal cells, and extracellular matrix compositions are mediated through cytokines during tumor progression. Our analysis of 132 known cytokines and growth factors in published clinical breast cohorts and our 84 patient-derived xenograft models revealed that the elevated connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in tumor epithelial cells significantly correlated with poor clinical prognosis and outcomes. CTGF was able to induce tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and promote stroma deposition of collagen I fibers to stimulate tumor growth and metastasis. This process was mediated through CTGF-tumor necrosis factor receptor I (TNFR1)-IκB autocrine signaling. Drug treatments targeting CTGF, TNFR1, and IκB signaling each prohibited the EMT and tumor progression. PMID:26318291

  13. Collagen-induced binding to human platelets of platelet-derived growth factor leading to inhibition of P43 and P20 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Bryckaert, M.C.; Rendu, F.; Tobelem, G.; Wasteson, A.

    1989-03-15

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is known to inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Collagen-induced binding of /sup 125/I-PDGF to human washed platelets was therefore investigated. It was found to be time-dependent, reaching a plateau at 20 degrees C after 30 min, collagen concentration-dependent, specifically inhibited by unlabeled PDGF, and saturable. Scatchard plot analysis showed a single class of sites with 3000 +/- 450 molecules bound/cell and an apparent KD of 1.2 +/- 0.2 10(-8) M. The effects of PDGF on collagen-induced phosphoinositide breakdown and protein phosphorylation were also investigated. At 50 ng/ml PDGF, a concentration which completely inhibited collagen-induced aggregation, the breakdown of (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) and (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) was observed, but the subsequent replenishment of (/sup 32/P)PIP2 was inhibited. The same PDGF concentration totally inhibited collagen-induced phosphatidic acid formation. PDGF also completely prevented phosphorylation of P43 and P20, as a result of protein kinase C activation consecutive to phosphoinositide metabolism. These results suggest that a specific PDGF receptor can be induced by collagen, and PDGF can effect the early events of collagen-induced platelet activation by inhibiting PIP2 resynthesis and P43 and P20 phosphorylation. It is concluded that PDGF might be involved in a negative feed-back control of platelet activation.

  14. Amelioration of collagen-induced arthritis by CD95 (Apo-1/Fas)-ligand gene transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H; Yang, Y; Horton, J L; Samoilova, E B; Judge, T A; Turka, L A; Wilson, J M; Chen, Y

    1997-01-01

    Both rheumatoid arthritis and animal models of autoimmune arthritis are characterized by hyperactivation of synovial cells and hyperplasia of the synovial membrane. The activated synovial cells produce inflammatory cytokines and degradative enzymes that lead to destruction of cartilage and bones. Effective treatment of arthritis may require elimination of most or all activated synovial cells. The death factor Fas/Apo-1 and its ligand (FasL) play pivotal roles in maintaining self-tolerance and immune privilege. Fas is expressed constitutively in most tissues, and is dramatically upregulated at the site of inflammation. In both rheumatoid arthritis and animal models of autoimmune arthritis, high levels of Fas are expressed on activated synovial cells and infiltrating leukocytes in the inflamed joints. Unlike Fas, however, the levels of FasL expressed in the arthritic joints are extremely low, and most activated synovial cells survive despite high levels of Fas expression. To upregulate FasL expression in the arthritic joints, we have generated a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus carrying FasL gene; injection of the FasL virus into inflamed joints conferred high levels of FasL expression, induced apoptosis of synovial cells, and ameliorated collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice. The Fas-ligand virus also inhibited production of interferon-gamma by collagen-specific T cells. Coadministration of Fas-immunoglobulin fusion protein with the Fas-ligand virus prevented these effects, demonstrating the specificity of the Fas-ligand virus. Thus, FasL gene transfer at the site of inflammation effectively ameliorates autoimmune disease. PMID:9329958

  15. Age-Related Differences in Collagen-Induced Arthritis: Clinical and Imaging Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Gerwing, Tracy D; Pratt, Isaac V; Cooper, David M L; Silver, Tawni I; Rosenberg, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Arthritis is among the most common chronic diseases in both children and adults. Although intraarticular inflammation is the feature common among all patients with chronic arthritis there are, in addition to age at onset, clinical characteristics that further distinguish the disease in pediatric and adult populations. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the utility of microCT (µCT) and ultrasonography in characterizing pathologic age-related differences in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Juvenile (35 d old) and young adult (91 d old) male Wistar rats were immunized with bovine type II collagen and incomplete Freund adjuvant to induce polyarthritis. Naïve male Wistar rats served as controls. All paws were scored on a scale of 0 (normal paw) to 4 (disuse of paw). Rats were euthanized at 14 d after the onset of arthritis and the hindpaws imaged by µCT and ultrasonography. Young adult rats had more severe signs of arthritis than did their juvenile counterparts. Imaging demonstrated that young adult CIA rats exhibited more widespread and severe skeletal lesions of the phalanges, metatarsals, and tarsal bones, whereas juvenile CIA rats had more localized and less proliferative and osteolytic damage that was confined predominantly to the phalanges and metatarsals. This report demonstrates the utility of imaging modalities to compare juvenile and young adult rats with CIA and provides evidence that disease characteristics and progression differ between the 2 age groups. Our observations indicate that the CIA model could help discern age-related pathologic processes in inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:24326225

  16. Betahistine attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis by suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 cell responses.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kuo-Tung; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Der-Yuan; Lim, Yun-Ping; Chen, Yi-Ming; Li, Yi-Rong; Yang, Deng-Ho; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic effects of betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. CIA was induced in DBA/1 male mice by primary immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml chicken type II collagen (CII) mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in an 1:1 ratio, and booster immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml CII mixed with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) in an 1:1 ratio. Immunization was performed subcutaneously at the base of the tail. After being boosted on day 21, betahistine (1 and 5mg/kg) was orally administered daily for 2weeks. The severity of CIA was determined by arthritic scores and assessment of histopathological joint destruction. Expression of cytokines in the paw and anti-CII antibodies in the serum was evaluated by ELISA. The proliferative response against CII in the lymph node cells was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. The frequencies of different CII specific CD4(+) T cell subsets in the lymph node were determined by flow-cytometric analysis. Betahistine treatment attenuated the severity of arthritis and reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-23 and IL-17A, in the paw tissues of CIA mice. Lymph node cells from betahistine-treated mice showed a decrease in proliferation, as well as a lower frequency of Th17 cells. In vitro, betahistine suppressed CD4(+) T cell differentiation into Th17 cells. These results indicate that betahistine is effective in suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 responses in mouse CIA and that it may have therapeutic value as an adjunct treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Suppression of collagen-induced arthritis by oral administration of transgenic rice seeds expressing altered peptide ligands of type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Mana; Wakasa, Yuhya; Tsuboi, Hiroto; Asashima, Hiromitsu; Hirota, Tomoya; Kondo, Yuya; Matsumoto, Isao; Takaiwa, Fumio; Sumida, Takayuki

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease associated with the recognition of self proteins secluded in arthritic joints. We previously reported that altered peptide ligands (APLs) of type II collagen (CII256-271) suppress the development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). In this study, we generated transgenic rice expressing CII256-271 and APL6 contained in fusion proteins with the rice storage protein glutelin in the seed endosperm. These transgene products successfully and stably accumulated at high levels (7-24 mg/g seeds) in protein storage vacuoles (PB-II) of mature seeds. We examined the efficacy of these transgenic rice seeds by performing oral administration of the seeds to CIA model mice that had been immunized with CII. Treatment with APL6 transgenic rice for 14 days significantly inhibited the development of arthritis (based on clinical score) and delayed disease onset during the early phase of arthritis. These effects were mediated by the induction of IL-10 from CD4(+ ) CD25(-) T cells against CII antigen in splenocytes and inguinal lymph nodes (iLNs), and treatment of APL had no effect on the production of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-2 or Foxp3(+) Treg cells. These findings suggest that abnormal immune suppressive mechanisms are involved in the therapeutic effect of rice-based oral vaccine expressing high levels of APLs of type II collagen on the autoimmune disease CIA, suggesting that the seed-based mucosal vaccine against CIA functions via a unique mechanism.

  18. Chemically Modified Interleukin-6 Aptamer Inhibits Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Ikuo; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Tomoki; Sumida, Shun-ichiro; Ibaragi, Shigeru; Kasai, Hayato; Horai, Naoto; Drolet, Daniel W.; Gupta, Shashi; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a potent mediator of inflammatory and immune responses, and a validated target for therapeutic intervention of inflammatory diseases. Previous studies have shown that SL1026, a slow off-rate modified aptamer (SOMAmer) antagonist of IL-6, neutralizes IL-6 signaling in vitro. In the present study, we show that SL1026 delays the onset and reduces the severity of rheumatoid symptoms in a collagen-induced arthritis model in cynomolgus monkeys. SL1026 (1 and 10 mg/kg), administered q.i.d., delayed the progression of arthritis and the concomitant increase in serum IL-6 levels compared to the untreated control group. Furthermore, SL1026 inhibited IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation ex vivo in T lymphocytes from human blood and IL-6-induced C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A production in human primary hepatocytes. Importantly, SOMAmer treatment did not elicit an immune response, as evidenced by the absence of anti-SOMAmer antibodies in plasma of treated monkeys. These results demonstrate that SOMAmer antagonists of IL-6 may be attractive agents for the treatment of IL-6-mediated diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26579954

  19. Inhibition of "spontaneous," notochord-induced, and collagen-induced in vitro somite chondrogenesis by the calcium lonophore, A23187.

    PubMed

    Kosher, R A

    1978-02-01

    The present study represents a first step in investigating the possible involvement of calcium (Ca2+) in the stimulation of somite chondrogenesis elicited by extracellular matrix components produced by the embryonic notochord. The ionophore, A23187, a drug that facilitates Ca2+ uptake leading to elevation of cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels, at concentrations of 0.25-1.0 microgram/ml severely impairs "spontaneous" somite chondrogenesis, i.e., inhibits the formation of the small amount of cartilaginous matrix normally formed by embryonic somites in vitro in the absence of inducing tissues. This inhibition is reflected in a considerable reduction in sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation by A23187-treated somite explants. Furthermore, A23187 inhibits the striking stimulation of cartilaginous matrix formation and sulfated GAG accumulation normally elicited by the embryonic notochord and collagen substrates. In fact, 1.0 microgram/ml of A23187 reduces sulfated GAG accumulation by somites cultured in association with notochord or on collagen to a level even below that accumulated by somites cultured in the absence of these inductive agents. Although these results must be interpreted with caution, they provide incentive for considering a possible regulatory role for Ca2+ in the chondrogenic response of somites to extracellular matrix components produced by the embryonic notochord.

  20. Porphyromonas gingivalis oral infection exacerbates the development and severity of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Clinical studies suggest a direct influence of periodontal disease (PD) on serum inflammatory markers and disease assessment of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the influence of PD on arthritis development remains unclear. This investigation was undertaken to determine the contribution of chronic PD to immune activation and development of joint inflammation using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Methods DBA1/J mice orally infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis were administered with collagen II (CII) emulsified in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) or incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) to induce arthritis. Arthritis development was assessed by visual scoring of paw swelling, caliper measurement of the paws, mRNA expression, paw micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis, histology, and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase for osteoclast detection (TRAP)-positive immunohistochemistry. Serum and reactivated splenocytes were evaluated for cytokine expression. Results Mice induced for PD and/or arthritis developed periodontal disease, shown by decreased alveolar bone and alteration of mRNA expression in gingival tissues and submandibular lymph nodes compared to vehicle. P. gingivalis oral infection increased paw swelling and osteoclast numbers in mice immunized with CFA/CII. Arthritis incidence and severity were increased by P. gingivalis in mice that received IFA/CII immunizations. Increased synovitis, bone erosions, and osteoclast numbers in the paws were observed following IFA/CII immunizations in mice infected with P gingivalis. Furthermore, cytokine analysis showed a trend toward increased serum Th17/Th1 ratios when P. gingivalis infection was present in mice receiving either CFA/CII or IFA/CII immunizations. Significant cytokine increases induced by P. gingivalis oral infection were mostly associated to Th17-related cytokines of reactivated splenic cells, including IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-22 in the CFA

  1. Novel therapeutic compound tuftsin-phosphorylcholine attenuates collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bashi, T; Shovman, O; Fridkin, M; Volkov, A; Barshack, I; Blank, M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2016-04-01

    Treatment with helminthes and helminthes ova improved the clinical symptoms of several autoimmune diseases in patients and in animal models. Phosphorylcholine (PC) proved to be the immunomodulatory molecule. We aimed to decipher the tolerogenic potential of tuftsin-PC (TPC), a novel helminth-based compound in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CIA DBA/1 mice were treated with TPC subcutaneously (5 µg/0.1 ml) or orally (250 µg/0.1 ml), starting prior to disease induction. The control groups were treated with PBS. Collagen antibodies were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), cytokine protein levels by ELISA kits and regulatory T (Treg ) and regulatory B (Breg ) cell phenotypes by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). TPC-treated mice had a significantly lower arthritis score of 1.5 in comparison with control mice 11.8 (P < 0.0001) in both subcutaneous and orally treated groups at day 31. Moreover, histology analysis demonstrated highly inflamed joints in control mice, whereas TPC-treated mice maintained normal joint structure. Furthermore, TPC decreased the titres of circulating collagen II antibodies in mice sera (P < 0.0001), enhanced expression of IL-10 (P < 0.0001) and inhibited production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-1β (P < 0.0001). TPC significantly expanded the CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) Treg cells and CD19(+) IL-10(+) CD5(high) CD1d(high) T cell immunoglobulin mucin-1 (TIM-1(+) ) Breg cell phenotypes (P < 0.0001) in treated mice. Our data indicate that treatment with TPC attenuates CIA in mice demonstrated by low arthritic score and normal joints histology. TPC treatment reduced proinflammatory cytokines and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine expression, as well as expansion of Treg and Breg cells. Our results may lead to a new approach for a natural therapy for early rheumatoid arthritis onset.

  2. Effects of low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, So Yean; Sim, Joon-Soo; Jeong, Choon Sik; Chang, Seung Yeup; Choi, Don Woong; Toida, Toshihiko; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2004-01-01

    In order to evaluate the improvement in the treatment of chronic arthritis, we investigated chondroitin sulfate depolymerization product (low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate, LMWCS) and intact chondroitin sulfate (CS) in vitro and in vivo. LMWCS was prepared by a chemical depolymerization process induced by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of copper salts. LMWCS (300 mg/kg) and CS (1200 mg/kg) were orally administered to DBA/1J mice once daily for 14 d prior to initial immunization with type II collagen. Their elastase activities and the production of cytokines in sera were examined on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice. We also compared the paracellular transport of LMWCS and CS across Caco-2 cell monolayers and examined the inhibitory effects on elastase activities. LMWCS inhibited elastase activity slightly, but CS did not show inhibition. Hind paw edema was significantly decreased by LMWCS treatment. Levels of anti-type II collagen antibody and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in sera were also reduced by LMWCS treatment but not in case of CS, although no significant difference was observed between LMWCS and CS on interleukin-6 (IL-6) induction. The LMWCS preparation showed preventive effects on the type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and better permeability through Caco-2 cells.

  3. Decreased collagen-induced arthritis severity and adaptive immunity in mitogen activated protein kinase kinase 6 -deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Hammaker, Deepa; Topolewski, Katharyn; Edgar, Meghan; Yoshizawa, Toshio; Fukushima, Akihisa; Boyle, David L.; Firestein, Gary S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective MAPK kinases MKK3 and MKK6 regulate p38 MAPK activation in inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Previous studies demonstrated that MKK3- or MKK6-deficiency inhibits K/BxN serum-induced arthritis. However, the role of these kinases in adaptive immunity-dependent models of chronic arthritis is not known. The goal of this study was to evaluate MKK3- and MKK6-deficiency in the collagen induced arthritis model. Methods Wildtype, MKK3−/−, and MKK6−/− mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (CII). Disease activity was evaluated by semiquantitative scoring, histology, and microcomputed tomography. Serum anti-collagen antibody levels were quantified by ELISA. In-vitro T cell cytokine response was measured by flow cytometry and multiplex analysis. Expression of joint cytokines and matrix metalloproteinase was determined by qPCR. Results MKK6-deficiency markedly reduced arthritis severity compared with WT mice, while absence of MKK3 had an intermediate effect. Joint damage was minimal in arthritic MKK6−/− mice and intermediate in MKK3−/− mice compared with wild type mice. MKK6−/− mice had modestly lower levels of pathogenic anti-collagen antibodies than WT or MKK3−/− mice. In vitro T cell assays showed reduced proliferation and IL-17 production by MKK6−/− cells in response to type II collagen. Gene expression of synovial IL-6, matrix metalloproteinases MMP3, and MMP13 was significantly inhibited in MKK6-deficient mice. Conclusion Reduced disease severity in MKK6−/− mice correlated with decreased anti-collagen responses indicating that MKK6 is a crucial regulator of inflammation joint destruction in CIA. MKK6 is a potential therapeutic target in complex diseases involving adaptive immune responses like rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:21953132

  4. Parathyroid hormone attenuates radiation-induced increases in collagen crosslink ratio at periosteal surfaces of mouse tibia.

    PubMed

    Oest, Megan E; Gong, Bo; Esmonde-White, Karen; Mann, Kenneth A; Zimmerman, Nicholas D; Damron, Timothy A; Morris, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    As part of our ongoing efforts to understand underlying mechanisms contributing to radiation-associated bone fragility and to identify possible treatments, we evaluated the longitudinal effects of parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment on bone quality in a murine model of limited field irradiation. We hypothesized PTH would mitigate radiation-induced changes in the chemical composition and structure of bone, as measured by microscope-based Raman spectroscopy. We further hypothesized that collagen crosslinking would be especially responsive to PTH treatment. Raman spectroscopy was performed on retrieved tibiae (6-7/group/time point) to quantify metrics associated with bone quality, including: mineral-to-matrix ratio, carbonate-to-phosphate ratio, mineral crystallinity, collagen crosslink (trivalent:divalent) ratio, and the mineral and matrix depolarization ratios. Irradiation disrupted the molecular structure and orientation of bone collagen, as evidenced by a higher collagen crosslink ratio and lower matrix depolarization ratio (vs. non-irradiated control bones), persisting until 12weeks post-irradiation. Radiation transiently affected the mineral phase, as evidenced by increased mineral crystallinity and mineral-to-matrix ratio at 4weeks compared to controls. Radiation decreased bone mineral depolarization ratios through 12weeks, indicating increased mineral alignment. PTH treatment partially attenuated radiation-induced increases in collagen crosslink ratio, but did not restore collagen or mineral alignment. These post-radiation matrix changes are consistent with our previous studies of radiation damage to bone, and suggest that the initial radiation damage to bone matrix has extensive effects on the quality of tissue deposited thereafter. In addition to maintaining bone quality, preventing initial radiation damage to the bone matrix (i.e. crosslink ratio, matrix orientation) may be critical to preventing late-onset fragility fractures.

  5. Phenotypic characterization of type II collagen-induced arthritis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Hou-Pan; Li, Xin; Yu, Rong; Zeng, Guang; Yuan, Zhen-Yi; Wang, Wei; Huang, Hui-Yong; Cai, Xiong

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine a more specific, efficient and simple method for the induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Different strains of rats were injected at the base of the tail with bovine type II collagen (CII) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The onset and severity of arthritis were evaluated by clinical assessment. The established CIA model was analyzed using a comprehensive examination of clinical, hematological, histological and radiological parameters. The results demonstrated that Wistar rats were the most susceptible strain to CIA followed by Wistar Furth rats, with Sprague Dawley rats being the least susceptible. Following primary and booster immunization, female Wistar rats developed severe arthritis, with an incidence of >83% and low variability in clinical signs. The development of arthritis was accompanied by a significantly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate compared with that in the control rats. The radiographic examination revealed bone matrix resorption, considerable soft tissue swelling, periosteal new bone formation and bone erosion in the arthritic joints of the CIA rats. Histopathologically, the synovial joints of CIA rats were characterized by synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation, marked cellular infiltration, bone and cartilage erosion and narrowing of the joint space. The administration of an intradermal injection of only 200 µg bovine CII emulsified in IFA at the base of the tail therefore leads to the successful development of a CIA rat model. This well-characterized CIA rat model could be specifically used to study the pathophysiology of human rheumatoid arthritis as well as to test and develop anti-arthritic agents for humans.

  6. Madecassoside ameliorates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice by downregulating collagen deposition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guo-Xun; Bian, Di-Fei; Ji, Yu; Guo, Jiao-Mei; Wei, Zhi-Feng; Jiang, Si-De; Xia, Yu-Feng; Dai, Yue

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to explore the protective effects of madecassoside (Mad), a triterpenoid saponin isolated from Centella asiatica herbs, on experimental pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and underlying mechanisms. PF model was established in mice by endotracheal instillation with bleomycin (5 mg/kg). Mice were orally administered with Mad (10, 20, 40 mg/kg) and prednisone (5 mg/kg) for 7 or 21 days. Mad (20, 40 mg/kg) significantly improved lung pathological changes and reduced collagen deposition. In the aspect of collagen synthesis, Mad (20, 40 mg/kg) reduced the expressions of α-smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and inhibited the phosphorylations of Smad2 and Smad3 in the lung tissues. However, in vitro, Mad showed little effect on TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of either Smad2 or Smad3 in primary mouse lung fibroblasts. Moreover, Mad (20, 40 mg/kg) attenuated oxidative damage and inflammation presented at the early stage of PF, evidenced by reduced total leukocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, decreased myeloperoxidase activity and malondialdehyde level, and increased super-oxide dismutase activity and glutathione level in lung tissues. On the other hand, Mad (40 mg/kg) elevated the matrix metalloproteinase 1/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 ratio in lung tissues of PF mice mainly by downregulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 expression. The present study demonstrated that Mad can ameliorate PF by preventing the deposition of extracellular matrix, which might be achieved mainly through attenuating inflammation and oxidative stress and consequent TGF-β1 overexpression.

  7. The soy isoflavonegenistein inhibits the reduction in Achilles tendon collagen content induced byovariectomy in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Jahir E.; Al-Nakkash, Layla; Peterson, Amity; Gump, Brian S.; Janjulia, Tea; Moore, M. Scott; Broderick, Tom L.; Carroll, Chad C.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of genistein and moderate intensity exercise on Achilles tendon collagen and cross-linking in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were separated into eight groups (n=9 per group): intact or OVX, treadmill exercised or sedentary, genistein-treated (300 mg•kg−1•day−1) or vehicle. After 6-weeks, tendons were assayed for the collagen-specific amino acid hydroxyproline and hydroxylyslpyridinoline (HP). Collagen content was not influenced by exercise (p=0.40) but was lower (p<0.001) in OVX vehicle rats compared to intact vehicle rats (OVX: 894±35 µg collagen/mg dry weight, intact: 1185±72 µg collagen/mg dry weight). In contrast, collagen content in OVX rats treated with genistein was greater (p=0.010, 1198±121 µg collagen/mg dry weight) when compared to untreated rats and not different from intact rats (p=0.89). HP content was lower in OVX genistein-treated when compared to intact genistein-treated rats, but only within the sedentary animals (p=0.05, intact-treated: 232±39mmol/mol collagen, OVX-treated: 144±21mmol/mol collagen). Our findings suggest that ovariectomy leads to a reduction in tendon collagen, which is prevented by genistein. HP content, however, may not have increased in proportion to the addition of collagen. Genistein may be useful for improving tendon collagen content in conditions of estrogen deficiency. PMID:22852581

  8. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Systemic Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Manasa G.; Kour, Supinder; Piprode, Vikrant; Mittal, Monika; Kumar, Anil; Rani, Lekha; Pote, Satish T.; Mishra, Gyan C.; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammatory synovitis leading to joint destruction and systemic bone loss. The inflammation-induced bone loss is mediated by increased osteoclast formation and function. Current antirheumatic therapies primarily target suppression of inflammatory cascade with limited or no success in controlling progression of bone destruction. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by virtue of their tissue repair and immunomodulatory properties have shown promising results in various autoimmune and degenerative diseases. However, the role of MSCs in prevention of bone destruction in RA is not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) on in vitro formation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and pathological bone loss in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA. We observed that ASCs significantly inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)–induced osteoclastogenesis in both a contact-dependent and -independent manner. Additionally, ASCs inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-17, and IL-1β. Furthermore, treatment with ASCs at the onset of CIA significantly reduced clinical symptoms and joint pathology. Interestingly, ASCs protected periarticular and systemic bone loss in CIA mice by maintaining trabecular bone structure. We further observed that treatment with ASCs reduced osteoclast precursors in bone marrow, resulting in decreased osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, ASCs suppressed autoimmune T cell responses and increased the percentages of peripheral regulatory T and B cells. Thus, we provide strong evidence that ASCs ameliorate inflammation-induced systemic bone loss in CIA mice by reducing osteoclast precursors and promoting immune tolerance. PMID:26538398

  9. Aqueous and methanolic extracts of Caulerpa mexicana suppress cell migration and ear edema induced by inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Bitencourt, Mariana Angelica Oliveira; Dantas, Gracielle Rodrigues; Lira, Daysianne Pereira; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; de Miranda, George Emmanuel Cavalcanti; Santos, Barbara Viviana de Oliveira; Souto, Janeusa Trindade

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of the inflammatory response is essential to maintaining homeostasis. Several studies have investigated new drugs that may contribute to avoiding or minimizing excessive inflammatory process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of extracts of green algae Caulerpa mexicana on models inflammation. In mice, the inflammatory peritonitis model is induced by zymosan. Previous treatment of mice with aqueous and methanolic extracts of C. mexicana was able to suppress the cell migration to the peritoneal cavity, in a time-dependent but not in a dose-dependent manner. The treatment of mice with C. mexicana extracts also decreased the xylene-induced ear edema, exerting strong inhibitory leukocyte migration elicited by zymosan into the air pouch. We concluded that administration of the extracts resulted in a reduction of cell migration to different sites as well as a decrease in edema formation induced by chemical irritants. This study demonstrates for the first time the anti-inflammatory effect of aqueous and methanolic extracts from the green marine algae Caulerpa mexicana.

  10. Effects of chebulic acid on advanced glycation endproducts-induced collagen cross-links.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Young; Oh, Jun-Gu; Kim, Jin Sook; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) have been implicated in the development of diabetic complications. We report the antiglycating activity of chebulic acid (CA), isolated from Terminalia chebula on breaking the cross-links of proteins induced by AGEs and inhibiting the formation of AGEs. Aminoguanidine (AG) reduced 50% of glycated bovine serum albumin (BSA) with glycolaldehyde (glycol-BSA)-induced cross-links of collagen at a concentration of 67.8 ± 2.5 mM, the level of CA required for exerting a similar antiglycating activity was 38.8 ± 0.5 µM. Also, the breaking activity on collagen cross-links induced by glycol-BSA was potent with CA (IC50=1.46 ± 0.05 mM), exhibiting 50-fold stronger breaking activity than with ALT-711, a well-known cross-link breaker (IC50=72.2 ± 2.4 mM). IC50 values of DPPH· scavenging activity for CA and ascorbic acid (AA) were 39.2 ± 4.9 and 19.0 ± 1.2 µg dry matter (DM) mL(-1), respectively, and ferric reducing and antioxidant power (FRAP) activities for CA and AA were 4.70 ± 0.06 and 11.4 ± 0.1 mmol/FeSO4·7H2O/g DM, respectively. The chelating activities of CA, AG and ALT711 on copper-catalyzed oxidation of AA were compared, and in increasing order, ALT-711 (IC50 of 1.92 ± 0.20 mM)

  11. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss].

    PubMed

    Hesse, G

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most dominant handicaps in modern societies, which additionally very often is not realized or not admitted. About one quarter of the general population suffers from inner ear hearing loss and is therefore restricted in communicational skills. Demographic factors like increasing age play an important role as well as environmental influences and an increasing sound and noise exposure especially in leisure activities. Thus borders between a "classical" presbyacusis - if it ever existed - and envirionmentally induced hearing loss disappear. Today restrictions in hearing ability develop earlier in age but at the same time they are detected and diagnosed earlier. This paper can eventually enlighten the wide field of inner ear hearing loss only fragmentarily; therefore mainly new research, findings and developments are reviewed. The first part discusses new aspects of diagnostics of inner ear hearing loss and different etiologies.

  12. Resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in SHPS-1 mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzawa, Chie; Kaneko, Yoriaki; Murata, Yoji; Miyake, Astuko; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okajo, Jun; Tomizawa, Takeshi; Kaneko, Yuka; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Matozaki, Takashi Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2008-07-04

    SHPS-1 is a transmembrane protein that binds the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 through its cytoplasmic region and is abundantly expressed on dendritic cells and macrophages. Here we show that mice expressing a mutant form of SHPS-1 fail to develop type-II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA), a model for rheumatoid arthritis in humans. Histological examinations of the arthritic paws from immunized wild-type mice revealed that cartilage was destroyed in association with marked mononuclear cell infiltration, while only mild cell infiltration was observed in immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice. Consistently, the serum levels of both IgG and IgG2a specific to CII and of IL-1{beta} in immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice were markedly reduced compared with those apparent for wild-type mice. The CII-induced proliferation of, and production of cytokines by, T cells from immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice were reduced compared to wild-type cells. These results suggest that SHPS-1 is essential for development of CIA.

  13. Paroxetine alleviates T lymphocyte activation and infiltration to joints of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingtong; Wang, Longsheng; Wu, Li; Zhang, Mei; Hu, Shanshan; Wang, Rui; Han, Yongsheng; Wu, Yujing; Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Xinming; Sun, Wuyi; Wei, Wei

    2017-01-01

    T cell infiltration to synovial tissue is an early pathogenic mechanism of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the present work, we reveal that G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is abundantly expressed in T cells of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). A GRK2 inhibitor, paroxetine protects the joints from inflammation and destruction, primarily through inhibition of both CD4+ helper T (Th) cell and CD8+ cytotoxic T (Tc) cell migration to synovial tissue. Meanwhile, paroxetine restores the balance of Th/Tc, effector Th (Theff)/ naïve Th (Thnaive) and effector Tc (Tceff)/ naïve Tc (Tcnaive) to equilibrium by elevating the frequency of Thnaive, Tcnaive and regulatory Th cells; reducing the increased Theff, activated Th and Tceff, having a similar effect as methotrexate (MTX). In addition, both serum and synovial IL-1β, TNF-α and CX3CL1 expression was effectively inhibited in treated rats. In vitro assay confirmed that paroxetine inhibits CX3CL1-induced T cell migration through blocking the activity of GRK2. Among three MAPK families, paroxetine was found to be able to decrease the phosphorylation of ERK. This study elucidates that paroxetine attenuates the symptoms of CIA rats due to its inhibitory effect on T cell activation and infiltration to synovial tissue via suppression of ERK pathway. PMID:28349925

  14. Changes and significance of IL-25 in chicken collagen II-induced experimental arthritis (CIA).

    PubMed

    Kaiwen, Wang; Zhaoliang, Su; Yinxia, Zhao; Siamak, Sandoghchian Shotorbani; Zhijun, Jiao; Yuan, Xue; Heng, Yang; Dong, Zheng; Yanfang, Liu; Pei, Shen; Shengjun, Wang; Qixiang, Shao; Xinxiang, Huang; Liwei, Lu; Huaxi, Xu

    2012-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease. It is a systemic inflammatory disease, characterized by chronic, symmetrical, multi-articular synovial arthritis. IL-25 (IL-17E) is a member of the recently emerged cytokine family (IL-17s), which is expressed in Th2 cells and bone marrow-derived mast cells. Unlike the other members of this family, IL-25 is capable of inducing Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and also promotes the release of some pro-immune factors (IL-6 and IL-8). IL-25 is also a pleiotropic factor, which constitutes a tissue-specific pathological injury and chronic inflammation. In this study, we used chicken collagen II-induced experimental arthritis (CIA) model in DBA/1 mice to investigate the relationship between IL-25 and other inflammatory factors, revealing the possible mechanism in CIA. Our results showed that the expression level of IL-25 was enhanced in the late stage of CIA, and IL-17 was increased in the early stage of the disease. It is well known that IL-17 has a crucial role in the development of RA pathogenesis, and IL-25 plays a significant role in humoral immune. For reasons given above, we suggested that the IL-25 inhibited IL-17 expression to some extent, while enhancing the production of IL-4. It was confirmed that IL-25 not only regulated the cellular immune, but also involved the humoral immune in rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Sympathetic Neurotransmitters Modulate Osteoclastogenesis and Osteoclast Activity in the Context of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Muschter, Dominique; Schäfer, Nicole; Stangl, Hubert; Straub, Rainer H.; Grässel, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Excessive synovial osteoclastogenesis is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Concomitantly, local synovial changes comprise neuronal components of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. Here, we wanted to analyze if collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) alters bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMM) osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity, and how sympathetic neurotransmitters participate in this process. Therefore, BMMs from Dark Agouti rats at different CIA stages were differentiated into osteoclasts in vitro and osteoclast number, cathepsin K activity, matrix resorption and apoptosis were analyzed in the presence of acetylcholine (ACh), noradrenaline (NA) vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and assay-dependent, adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477. We observed modulation of neurotransmitter receptor mRNA expression in CIA osteoclasts without affecting protein level. CIA stage-dependently altered marker gene expression associated with osteoclast differentiation and activity without affecting osteoclast number or activity. Neurotransmitter stimulation modulated osteoclast differentiation, apoptosis and activity. VIP, NA and adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477 inhibited cathepsin K activity and osteoclastogenesis (NKH477, 10-6M NA) whereas ACh mostly acted pro-osteoclastogenic. We conclude that CIA alone does not affect metabolism of in vitro generated osteoclasts whereas stimulation with NA, VIP plus specific activation of adenylyl cyclase induced anti-resorptive effects probably mediated via cAMP signaling. Contrary, we suggest pro-osteoclastogenic and pro-resorptive properties of ACh mediated via muscarinic receptors. PMID:26431344

  16. Mucosal Administration of Collagen V Ameliorates the Atherosclerotic Plaque Burden by Inducing Interleukin 35-dependent Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Park, Arick C; Huang, Guorui; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Massoudi, Dawiyat; Kernien, John F; Vignali, Dario A; Sullivan, Jeremy A; Wilkes, David S; Burlingham, William J; Greenspan, Daniel S

    2016-02-12

    We have shown previously that collagen V (col(V)) autoimmunity is a consistent feature of atherosclerosis in human coronary artery disease and in the Apoe(-/-) mouse model. We have also shown sensitization of Apoe(-/-) mice with col(V) to markedly increase the atherosclerotic burden, providing evidence of a causative role for col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerotic pathogenesis. Here we sought to determine whether induction of immune tolerance to col(V) might ameliorate atherosclerosis, providing further evidence for a causal role for col(V) autoimmunity in atherogenesis and providing insights into the potential for immunomodulatory therapeutic interventions. Mucosal inoculation successfully induced immune tolerance to col(V) with an accompanying reduction in plaque burden in Ldlr(-/-) mice on a high-cholesterol diet. The results therefore demonstrate that inoculation with col(V) can successfully ameliorate the atherosclerotic burden, suggesting novel approaches for therapeutic interventions. Surprisingly, tolerance and reduced atherosclerotic burden were both dependent on the recently described IL-35 and not on IL-10, the immunosuppressive cytokine usually studied in the context of induced tolerance and amelioration of atherosclerotic symptoms. In addition to the above, using recombinant protein fragments, we were able to localize two epitopes of the α1(V) chain involved in col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerotic Ldlr(-/-) mice, suggesting future courses of experimentation for the characterization of such epitopes.

  17. Reversibility of D-penicillamine induced collagen alterations in rat skin and granulation tissue.

    PubMed

    Junker, P; Lorenzen, I

    1983-06-01

    Granulation tissue was produced in rats by subcutaneous implantation of Visella sponges. D-penicillamine (D-pen) 100 or 500 mg/kg was administered daily for 42 days by gastric tubing. Pairfed, placebo treated animals were included as controls. Half of the groups were kept for additionally 28 days without medication. The inhibitory effect of D-pen on cross-link formation in newly synthesized collagen was readily reversible. By contrast, cross-link deficiency lasting beyond the observation period was observed in the higher polymeric collagen variants released by dilute acid, heat exposure or limited pepsin proteolysis as estimated by solubility, alpha/beta chain ratio and/or aldehyde content. By SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis on gels containing 3.6 M urea it was shown that purified dermal acid soluble collagen from treated animals consisted of a mixture of type I and III collagen, whereas only type I collagen was detected in controls. The band pattern was identical in reduced and unreduced collagen samples. Four weeks after D-pen discontinuance type III collagen had disappeared from the acid extract. Moreover, the ratio of type III to type I collagen in the pepsin digest from both granulation tissue and skin showed a persistent rise with D-pen. These observations indicate that D-pen destabilized type III collagen in particular by interference with its disulfide linkages. The amount of granulation tissue remained unaffected throughout the experiment, whereas the skin collagen content decreased at the higher dose level. The regeneration was not completed by the end of the observation period. Modulation of the molecular stability of granuloma collagens may be of relevance for the antirheumatoid effect of D-pen, but the sustained effect on normal tissues may imply a long standing impairment of their supportive capacity.

  18. Protective effects of a blueberry extract in acute inflammation and collagen-induced arthritis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Maria-Eduardo; Oliveira, Mónica; Direito, Rosa; Rocha, João; Alves, Paula; Serra, Ana-Teresa; Duarte, Catarina; Bronze, Rosário; Fernandes, Adelaide; Brites, Dora; Freitas, Marisa; Fernandes, Eduarda; Sepodes, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    Here we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of a blueberry extract in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model and collagen-induced arthritis model, both in rats. Along with the chemical characterization of the phenolic content of the fruits and extract, the antioxidant potential of the extract, the cellular antioxidant activity and the effects over neutrophils' oxidative burst, were studied in order to provide a mechanistic insight for the anti-inflammatory effects observed. The extract significantly inhibited paw edema formation in an acute model the rat. Our results also demonstrate that the standardized extract had pharmacological activity when administered orally in the collagen-induced arthritis model in the rat and was able to significantly reduce the development of clinical signs of arthritis and the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, consequently improving articular function in treated animals.

  19. Cosmetic ear surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  20. Multiphoton microscopy of engineered dermal substitutes: assessment of 3-D collagen matrix remodeling induced by fibroblast contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Fagot, Dominique; Olive, Christian; Michelet, Jean-François; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Leroy, Frédéric; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Martin, Jean-Louis; Colonna, Anne; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2010-09-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are responsible for the generation of mechanical forces within their surrounding extracellular matrix and can be potentially targeted by anti-aging ingredients. Investigation of the modulation of fibroblast contraction by these ingredients requires the implementation of three-dimensional in situ imaging methodologies. We use multiphoton microscopy to visualize unstained engineered dermal tissue by combining second-harmonic generation that reveals specifically fibrillar collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence from endogenous cellular chromophores. We study the fibroblast-induced reorganization of the collagen matrix and quantitatively evaluate the effect of Y-27632, a RhoA-kinase inhibitor, on dermal substitute contraction. We observe that collagen fibrils rearrange around fibroblasts with increasing density in control samples, whereas collagen fibrils show no remodeling in the samples containing the RhoA-kinase inhibitor. Moreover, we show that the inhibitory effects are reversible. Our study demonstrates the relevance of multiphoton microscopy to visualize three-dimensional remodeling of the extracellular matrix induced by fibroblast contraction or other processes.

  1. Effect of γ-tocotrienol in counteracting oxidative stress and joint damage in collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Ammu; Tudawe, Dulanthi; Chakravarthi, Srikumar; Chiew, Gan Seng; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja

    2014-05-01

    Tocotrienols exhibit a significant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect in numerous human diseases. However, the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of tocotrienols in arthritic conditions are not well documented. Therefore, the effect of γ-tocotrienol supplementation against oxidative stress and joint pathology in collagen-induced arthritis in rats was investigated in the present study. Adult female Dark Agouti rats were randomly divided into groups: Control, γ-tocotrienol alone, arthritis alone and arthritis with γ-tocotrienol. Arthritis was induced using 4 mg/kg body weight collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant. The rats were treated orally with 5 mg/kg body weight of γ-tocotrienol between day 21 and day 45. After 45 days, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total glutathione (GSH) assays were conducted. γ-tocotrienol significantly reduced the arthritis-induced changes in body weight, CRP, TNF-α, SOD and the total GSH levels. There was a significant reduction in the arthritis-induced histopathological changes in the γ-tocotrienol treatment group. The data indicated that administration of γ-tocotrienol resulted in a significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect on collagen-induced arthritis; therefore, γ-tocotrienol may have therapeutic potential as a long-term anti-arthritic agent in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

  2. Effect of γ-tocotrienol in counteracting oxidative stress and joint damage in collagen-induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    RADHAKRISHNAN, AMMU; TUDAWE, DULANTHI; CHAKRAVARTHI, SRIKUMAR; CHIEW, GAN SENG; HALEAGRAHARA, NAGARAJA

    2014-01-01

    Tocotrienols exhibit a significant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect in numerous human diseases. However, the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of tocotrienols in arthritic conditions are not well documented. Therefore, the effect of γ-tocotrienol supplementation against oxidative stress and joint pathology in collagen-induced arthritis in rats was investigated in the present study. Adult female Dark Agouti rats were randomly divided into groups: Control, γ-tocotrienol alone, arthritis alone and arthritis with γ-tocotrienol. Arthritis was induced using 4 mg/kg body weight collagen in complete Freund’s adjuvant. The rats were treated orally with 5 mg/kg body weight of γ-tocotrienol between day 21 and day 45. After 45 days, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total glutathione (GSH) assays were conducted. γ-tocotrienol significantly reduced the arthritis-induced changes in body weight, CRP, TNF-α, SOD and the total GSH levels. There was a significant reduction in the arthritis-induced histopathological changes in the γ-tocotrienol treatment group. The data indicated that administration of γ-tocotrienol resulted in a significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect on collagen-induced arthritis; therefore, γ-tocotrienol may have therapeutic potential as a long-term anti-arthritic agent in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. PMID:24940448

  3. Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.; Bourguignon, L.Y. )

    1990-08-01

    Initially we established that the binding of collagen to human blood platelets stimulates both the rapid loss of PIP2 and the generation of inositol-4,5-bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). These results indicate that the binding of collagen stimulates inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C during platelet activation. The fact that GTP or GTP-gamma-S augments, and pertussis toxin inhibits, collagen-induced IP3 formation suggests that a GTP-binding protein or (or proteins) may be directly involved in the regulation of phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets. We have used several complementary techniques to isolate and characterize a platelet 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) that has a number of structural and functional similarities to the regulatory alpha i subunit of the GTP-binding proteins isolated from bovine brain. This 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) is found to be closely associated with at least four membrane glycoproteins (e.g., gp180, gp110, gp95, and gp75) in a 330-kDa complex that can be dissociated by treatment with high salt plus urea. Most important, we have demonstrated that antilymphoma 41-kDa (alpha i subunit of GTP-binding proteins) antibody cross-reacts with the platelet 41-kDa protein (or proteins) and the alpha i subunit of bovine brain Gi alpha proteins, and blocks GTP/collagen-induced IP3 formation. These data provide strong evidence that the 41-kDa platelet GTP-binding protein (or proteins) is directly involved in collagen-induced signal transduction during platelet activation.

  4. Resveratrol inhibits high glucose induced collagen upregulation in cardiac fibroblasts through regulating TGF-β1-Smad3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junhui; Zhuo, Xiaozhen; Liu, Weimin; Wan, Zhaofei; Liang, Xiao; Gao, Shanshan; Yuan, Zuyi; Wu, Yue

    2015-02-05

    Cardiac fibrosis is a common pathological process presented in a variety of diseases, including hypertension and diabetes. Cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) have been identified as the most important participants in the development of cardiac fibrosis. Exposure of cultured CFs to high glucose (HG) or angiotensin II (Ang II) resulted in increased collagen synthesis. Resveratrol (Res) is a natural polyphenol exhibiting anti-fibrosis effects in a number of different organs fibrosis process, whether Res can prevent HG and Ang II induced fibrosis response in CFs remains unclear. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of Res in HG and Ang II induced fibrosis response in CFs. We cultured rat CFs in either normal glucose (5.6 mM) or HG (25 mM) media in the presence of Res or not and the changes in collagens synthesis and TGF-β1 production were assessed by Real-time PCR, Western blotting, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore, normal and diabetic mice (induced by single dose of streptozotocin (100 mg/kg) via tail vein) receiving Res (10 mg/kg) were used to explore the effects of Res on cardiac fibrosis in vivo. Masson staining and immunohistochemistry were performed to visualize cardiac collagen deposition. Results indicate that CFs exposed to HG condition shows enhanced proliferation rate. Furthermore, in the presence of HG or Ang II, CFs exhibited increased collagens synthesis and TGF-β1 production. And these effects were abolished by Res intervention. In vivo results show that diabetic mice exhibit increased collagen deposition in the cardiac compared with the normal mice. And this change was prevented by the treatment of Res. These results suggest that Res possesses a potential antifibrogenic effect in hypertension and diabetes-related cardiac fibrosis. Moreover, the action mechanism is probably associated with its ability to reduce TGF-β1 content in CFs.

  5. Effect of green tea extract on advanced glycation and cross-linking of tail tendon collagen in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Sabitha, Kuruvimalai Ekambaram; Shyamaladevi, Chennam Srinivasulu

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes leads to modification of collagen such as advanced glycation and cross-linking which play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. We have investigated the effect of green tea on modification of collagen in streptozotocin (60 mg/kg body weight) induced diabetic rats. To investigate the therapeutic effect of green tea, treatment was begun six weeks after the onset of diabetes and green tea extract (300 mg/kg body weight) was given orally for 4 weeks. The collagen content, extent of advanced glycation, advanced glycation end products (AGE) and cross-linking of tail tendon collagen were investigated. Green tea reduced the tail tendon collagen content which increased in diabetic rats. Accelerated advanced glycation and AGE in diabetic animals, as detected by Ehrlich's-positive material and collagen linked fluorescence respectively were reduced significantly by green tea. The solubility of tail tendon collagen decreased significantly in diabetic rats indicating a remarkable increase in the cross-linking, whereas green tea increases the solubility of collagen in diabetic rats. The present study reveals that green tea is effective in reducing the modification of tail tendon collagen in diabetic rats. Thus green tea may have a therapeutic effect in the treatment of glycation induced complications of diabetes.

  6. Fucoidan as an inhibitor of thermally induced collagen glycation examined by acetate electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Pielesz, Anna; Paluch, Jadwiga

    2014-08-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation (Maillard reaction) in vitro could be a simple method to obtain glycoconjugates for studying their biological properties. Hence, fucoidan was retained by acetate electrophoresis indicating a strong interaction with the protein. A loss of colour in fucoidan bands was found for samples incubated with collagen as compared with samples of free fucoidan. Also under in vitro conditions at 100°C - simulating a sudden burn incident - fucoidan binds with collagen as a result of the Maillard reaction. In contrast, the colour of the fucoidan bands intensified for samples incubated with collagen, with the addition of glucose. Electrophoretic analyses were carried out after heating the samples to a temperature simulating a burn incident. The bands were found to intensify for samples incubated with collagen during a 30-day-long incubation. Thus, spontaneous in vitro glycation - i.e. without the addition of glucose - was confirmed. This process is highly intensified both by the temperature and time of incubation. For a sample incubated in vitro in a fucoidan solution containing glucose, glycation was confirmed in a preliminary FTIR and acetate electrophoresis examinations, occurring in collagen obtained from chicken skins. In particular, a new band emerging around 1746 cm(-1) was observed for above samples, as was its increasing intensity, as compared with samples without the addition of glucose. In the collagen glycation assay, while glucose reacts with collagen and forms cross-linked aggregates, fucoidan decreases the process of aggregation and recovery of native collagen.

  7. Oxaliplatin retains HMGB1 intranuclearly and ameliorates collagen type II-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Östberg, Therese; Wähämaa, Heidi; Palmblad, Karin; Ito, Norimasa; Stridh, Pernilla; Shoshan, Maria; Lotze, Michael T; Harris, Helena Erlandsson; Andersson, Ulf

    2008-01-01

    Introduction High mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein that acts as a pro-inflammatory mediator following extracellular release. The protein is aberrantly expressed extracellularly in the settings of clinical and experimental synovitis. Therapy based on HMGB1 antagonists has shown encouraging results in experimental arthritis and warrants further scientific exploration using independent methods. In the present study we asked whether nuclear sequestration of HMGB1 preventing HMGB1 release would be beneficial for synovitis treatment. Methods Oxaliplatin-based therapy was evaluated in collagen type II-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice by clinical scoring and immunostaining of articular tissue. Oxaliplatin is an antineoplastic platinum-based compound that generates DNA adducts which tightly bind HMGB1. Secretion and intracellular location of HMGB1 were assessed by a novel HMGB1-specific ELISPOT assay and immunofluorescent staining. Results Intraperitoneal injections of oxaliplatin in early collagen type II-induced arthritis trapped HMGB1 with a distinct biphasic response pattern. Oxaliplatin therapy showed beneficial results for approximately 1 week. Microscopic evaluation of synovitis during this period showed strong nuclear HMGB1 staining in the oxaliplatin treated animals with much lower quantities of extracellular HMGB1 when compared to control treated animals. Furthermore, cellular infiltration, as well as cartilage and bone damage, were all reduced in the oxaliplatin treated group. A dramatic and as yet unexplained clinical relapse occurred later in the oxaliplatin exposed animals, which coincided with a massive synovial tissue expression of extracellular HMGB1 in all treated animals. This rebound-like reaction was also accompanied by a significantly increased incidence of arthritis in the oxaliplatin treated group. These results indicate a distinct temporal and spatial relationship between the clinical course of disease and the

  8. Effects of adrenergic and nitrergic blockade on theophylline-induced increase in peripheral blood flow in rat ear.

    PubMed

    Sanae, F; Hayashi, H

    1998-11-01

    A bolus injection of theophylline produced a significant increase in peripheral blood flow in anesthetized rat ear, monitored by laser-Doppler flowmetry, with increases in arterial blood pressure and heart rate. These effects were attenuated by previous treatment with reserpine, but reserpine had no effect on the blood flow increase produced by acetylcholine. A dose of propranolol, which caused attenuation of the theophylline-induced increase in heart rate, did not change the peripheral blood flow. The higher dose of propranolol, which nearly canceled the increases in blood pressure and heart rate, caused attenuation of the blood flow increase but did not cancel it. However, the theophylline-induced flow increase was completely reversed by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, which alone had no effect, without any change in arterial blood pressure and heart rate. Treatment of the rats with the dose of inhibitor slightly and significantly reduced the response of peripheral blood flow to acetylcholine. The other isomer, NG-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester, and the other inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, did not have such an effect. These results suggest that the flow increase is due to an independent effect on the heart with modification by autonomic reflexes and involves the adrenergic and nitrergic pathways.

  9. How can the auditory efferent system protect our ears from noise-induced hearing loss? Let us count the ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Lynne; Miller, Judi A. Lapsley

    2015-12-01

    It is a cause for some debate as to how the auditory olivocochlear (OC) efferent system could protect hearing from noise trauma. In this review, we examined physiological research to find mechanisms that could effectively attenuate the response to sound. For each purported mechanism, we indicate which part of the OC-efferent system is responsible for the function and the site of action. These mechanisms include basilar-membrane phase shifts at high stimulus levels; changes in outer-hair-cell stiffness and phase lag associated with efferent slow effects; small decreases in endocochlear potentials causing small decreases in outer- and inner-hair-cell output; low-spontaneous-rate and medium-spontaneous-rate fibers showing OC-induced decrements at high levels; auditory-nerve initial-peak reduction; OC effect increasing over minutes; cholinergic activation of anti-apoptotic pathways; and anti-excitotoxicity. There are clearly multiple opportunities for the OC-efferent system to protect the inner ear from noise trauma. From further exploration into the mechanisms outlined here, as well as to-be-discovered mechanisms, we will gain a greater understanding of the protective nature of the OC-efferent system. These findings could aid our ability to design better predictive tests for people at risk for noise-induced hearing loss.

  10. Garcinia Cambogia attenuates diet-induced adiposity but exacerbates hepatic collagen accumulation and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Je; Choi, Myung-Sook; Park, Yong Bok; Kim, Sang Ryong; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Jung, Un Ju

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate long-term effects of Garcinia Cambogia (GC), weight-loss supplement, on adiposity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese mice. METHODS: Obesity-prone C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD, 45 kcal% fat) with or without GC (1%, w/w) for 16 wk. The HFD contained 45 kcal% fat, 20 kcal% protein and 35 kcal% carbohydrate. They were given free access to food and distilled water, and food consumption and body weight were measured daily and weekly, respectively. Data were expressed as the mean ± SE. Statistical analyses were performed using the statistical package for the social science software program. Student’s t test was used to assess the differences between the groups. Statistical significance was considered at P < 0.05. RESULTS: There were no significant changes in body weight and food intake between the groups. However, the supplementation of GC significantly lowered visceral fat accumulation and adipocyte size via inhibition of fatty acid synthase activity and its mRNA expression in visceral adipose tissue, along with enhanced enzymatic activity and gene expression involved in adipose fatty acid β-oxidation. Moreover, GC supplementation resulted in significant reductions in glucose intolerance and the plasma resistin level in the HFD-fed mice. However, we first demonstrated that it increased hepatic collagen accumulation, lipid peroxidation and mRNA levels of genes related to oxidative stress (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) and inflammatory responses (tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) as well as plasma alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase levels, although HFD-induced hepatic steatosis was not altered. CONCLUSION: GC protects against HFD-induced obesity by modulating adipose fatty acid synthesis and β-oxidation but induces hepatic fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:23922466

  11. Radiation-Induced Middle Ear and Mastoid Opacification in Skull Base Tumors Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Gary V.; Ahmed, Salmaan; Allen, Pamela; Gidley, Paul W.; Woo, Shiao Y.; DeMonte, Franco; Chang, Eric L.; Mahajan, Anita

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of middle ear (ME) pathology in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) for skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 61 patients treated with RT between 2003 and 2008 for skull base tumors was conducted. Clinical outcomes and demographics were reviewed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was performed on the eustachian canal (EC), ME, mastoid air cells, vestibular apparatus, cochlea, internal auditory canal, lateral and posterior nasopharynx, and temporal lobes to relate doses to symptoms and radiographic change. Otomastoid opacification was rated 0 (none), 1 (mild), 2 (moderate), and 3 (severe) by a neuroradiologist blinded to clinical outcomes and doses. Results: The median prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 14-74 Gy). The ME mean dose was 14 Gy and 34 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3 opacification, respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean mastoid dose was 10 Gy and 26 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3, respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean EC dose was 17 Gy and 32 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3, respectively (p = 0.0001). Otomastoid opacification resolved in 17 of 40 patients (42.5%), at a mean of 17 months after RT (range, 2-45 months). Otomastoid opacification persisted in 23 of 40 patients (57.5%), with a mean follow-up of 23 months (range, 2-55 months). Multivariate analysis showed that mastoid dose >30 Gy (odds ratio = 28.0, p < 0.001) and posterior nasopharynx dose of >30 Gy (odds ratio = 4.9, p = 0.009) were associated with Grade 2-3 effusions, whereas other factors including dose to EC and ME were not significant. Conclusions: A mean RT dose >30 Gy to the mastoid air cells or posterior nasopharynx is associated with increased risk of moderate to severe otomastoid opacification, which persisted in more than half of patients at 2-year follow-up.

  12. Resveratrol inhibits collagen-induced platelet stimulation through suppressing NADPH oxidase and oxidative inactivation of SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji Yong; Min, Ji Hyun; Wang, Su Bin; Chae, Yun Hee; Baek, Jin Young; Kim, Myunghee; Ryu, Jae-Sang; Chang, Tong-Shin

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced upon collagen stimulation are implicated in propagating various platelet-activating pathways. Among ROS-producing enzymes, NADPH oxidase (NOX) is largely responsible for collagen receptor-dependent ROS production. Therefore, NOX has been proposed as a novel target for the development of antiplatelet agent. We here investigate whether resveratrol inhibits collagen-induced NOX activation and further examine the effects of resveratrol on ROS-dependent signaling pathways in collagen-stimulated platelets. Collagen-induced superoxide anion production in platelets was inhibited by resveratrol. Resveratrol suppressed collagen-induced phosphorylation of p47(phox), a major regulatory subunit of NOX. Correlated with the inhibitory effects on NOX, resveratrol protected SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) from ROS-mediated inactivation and subsequently attenuated the specific tyrosine phosphorylation of key components (spleen tyrosine kinase, Vav1, Bruton's tyrosine kinase, and phospholipase Cγ2) for collagen receptor signaling cascades. Resveratrol also inhibited downstream responses such as cytosolic calcium elevation, P-selectin surface exposure, and integrin-αIIbβ3 activation. Furthermore, resveratrol inhibited platelet aggregation and adhesion in response to collagen. The antiplatelet effects of resveratrol through the inhibition of NOX-derived ROS production and subsequent oxidative inactivation of SHP-2 suggest that resveratrol is a potential compound for prevention and treatment of thrombovascular diseases.

  13. Full-Length Fibronectin Drives Fibroblast Accumulation at the Surface of Collagen Microtissues during Cell-Induced Tissue Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Foolen, Jasper; Shiu, Jau-Ye; Mitsi, Maria; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Christopher S.; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Generating and maintaining gradients of cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a prerequisite for the development of functionality of healthy tissue. Therefore, gaining insights into the drivers of spatial organization of cells and the role of ECM during tissue morphogenesis is vital. In a 3D model system of tissue morphogenesis, a fibronectin-FRET sensor recently revealed the existence of two separate fibronectin populations with different conformations in microtissues, i.e. ‘compact and adsorbed to collagen’ versus ‘extended and fibrillar’ fibronectin that does not colocalize with the collagen scaffold. Here we asked how the presence of fibronectin might drive this cell-induced tissue morphogenesis, more specifically the formation of gradients in cell density and ECM composition. Microtissues were engineered in a high-throughput model system containing rectangular microarrays of 12 posts, which constrained fibroblast-populated collagen gels, remodeled by the contractile cells into trampoline-shaped microtissues. Fibronectin’s contribution during the tissue maturation process was assessed using fibronectin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (Fn-/- MEFs) and floxed equivalents (Fnf/f MEFs), in fibronectin-depleted growth medium with and without exogenously added plasma fibronectin (full-length, or various fragments). In the absence of full-length fibronectin, Fn-/- MEFs remained homogenously distributed throughout the cell-contracted collagen gels. In contrast, in the presence of full-length fibronectin, both cell types produced shell-like tissues with a predominantly cell-free compacted collagen core and a peripheral surface layer rich in cells. Single cell assays then revealed that Fn-/- MEFs applied lower total strain energy on nanopillar arrays coated with either fibronectin or vitronectin when compared to Fnf/f MEFs, but that the presence of exogenously added plasma fibronectin rescued their contractility. While collagen

  14. Polymorphism of the MHC class II Eb gene determines the protection against collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Zanelli, E.; Krco, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an animal model of auto immune polyarthritis, sharing similarities with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Paradoxally, susceptibility to mouse CIA is controlled by the H2A loci (DQ homologous) while RA is linked to HLA.DR genes (H2E homologous). We recently showed that the E{beta}{sup d} molecule prevents CIA development in susceptible H2{sup q} mice. We addressed the question of whether H2Eb polymorphism will influence CIA incidence as HLA.DRB1 polymorphism does in RA. In F{sub 1} mice, only H2Eb{sup d} and H2Eb{sup s} molecules showed protection. Using recombinant B10.RDD (Eb{sup d/b}) mice, we found that CIA protection was mediated by the first domain of the E{beta}{sup d} molecule. Using peptides covering the third hypervariable region of the E{beta} chain, we found a perfect correlation between presentation of E{beta} peptides by the H2A{sup q} molecule and protection on CIA. Therefore, the mechanism by which H2Eb protects against CIA seems to rely on the affinity of E{beta} peptides for the H2A{sup q} molecule. 35 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. The Extract of Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum Ameliorates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Do Kyun; Lee, Jun Ho; Yoo, Young Hyo; Park, Sun Kyu; Nam, Seung Taek; Kim, Hyun Woo; Park, Young Hwan; Lee, Dajeong; Lee, Min Beom

    2016-01-01

    Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum (CZ) has been used for beverage or tea and also as folk medicine for the remedy of diverse inflammatory diseases. Nevertheless, the therapeutic effect of CZ on arthritis remains to be unknown. In this paper we aim to investigate the CZ's antiarthritic effect and mechanism of action both in vitro and in vivo. To assess CZ's antiarthritic effect, mouse models of type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were used. Mice were used to gauge clinical arthritis index and histopathological changes. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blotting, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), and other biological methods were adopted to measure CZ's effect on arthritis and to understand the veiled mechanism of action. CZ greatly suppressed CIA, histopathological score, bone erosion, and osteoclast differentiation. Mechanistically, CZ inhibited the production of various inflammatory and arthritic mediators like inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and chemokines. Of note, CZ significantly suppressed the activation of the NF-κB pathway in vivo. CZ exerted an antiarthritic effect in CIA mice by curbing the production of crucial inflammatory and arthritis mediators. This study warrants further investigation of CZ for the use in human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:27840652

  16. Etanercept-Synthesising Mesenchymal Stem Cells Efficiently Ameliorate Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Narae; Rim, Yeri Alice; Jung, Hyerin; Kim, Juryun; Yi, Hyoju; Kim, Youngkyun; Jang, Yeonsue; Jung, Seung Min; Lee, Jennifer; Kwok, Seung-Ki; Park, Sung-Hwan; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have multiple properties including anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects in various disease models and clinical treatments. These beneficial effects, however, are sometimes inconsistent and unpredictable. For wider and proper application, scientists sought to improve MSC functions by engineering. We aimed to invent a novel method to produce synthetic biological drugs from engineered MSCs. We investigated the anti-arthritic effect of engineered MSCs in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Biologics such as etanercept are the most successful drugs used in anti-cytokine therapy. Biologics are made of protein components, and thus can be theoretically produced from cells including MSCs. MSCs were transfected with recombinant minicircles encoding etanercept (trade name, Enbrel), which is a tumour necrosis factor α blocker currently used to treat rheumatoid arthritis. We confirmed minicircle expression in MSCs in vitro based on GFP. Etanercept production was verified from the conditioned media. We confirmed that self-reproduced etanercept was biologically active in vitro. Arthritis subsided more efficiently in CIA mice injected with mcTNFR2MSCs than in those injected with conventional MSCs or etanercept only. Although this novel strategy is in a very early conceptual stage, it seems to represent a potential alternative method for the delivery of biologics and engineering MSCs. PMID:28084468

  17. Treatment with recombinant Hsp72 suppresses collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xinjing; Zuo, Xiaoxia; Mo, Xuanrong; Zhou, Yaou; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2011-10-01

    Although the level of heat shock protein (Hsp72) has been shown to be enhanced in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial tissues and RA synovial fluid, it remains unclear what role extracellular Hsp72 plays in the pathogenesis of RA. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of recombinant human Hsp72 on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) when administered therapeutically and elucidate its underlying mechanism. We demonstrated that recombinant Hsp72 significantly reduced disease severity. Hsp72-treated animals displayed significantly less cartilage and bone destruction than that in the controls. Hsp72 treatment also reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6 in the sera. Furthermore, Hsp72 treatment significantly inhibited activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in synovial tissues of CIA mice. These findings suggest that recombinant Hsp72 effectively suppressed synovial inflammation and the development and progress of CIA, which is mediated through the reduction of production of proinflammatory cytokines and the suppression of activation of NF-κB pathway.

  18. Ascidian tunicate extracts attenuate rheumatoid arthritis in a collagen-induced murine model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Kwone, Jung-Taek; Lee, Jae-Ho; Lee, Somin; Lee, Ah Young; Cho, Won-Young; Bat-Erdene, Munkhjargal; Choi, Byeong-Dae; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2014-06-01

    Murine rheumatoid arthritis models are often used to investigate the potential therapeutic effects of candidate drugs. The present study has been conducted in order to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of ascidian tunicate extracts in a collagen-induced arthritis DBA1/J mice model. Four types of formulas, ascidian tunicate extracts (ATE), crude ascidian tunicate glycans (ATEC), ascidian tunicate extracts with licorice extracts (ATEL), and crude ascidian tunicate glycans with licorice extracts (ATECL) were orally administered into DBA/1J mice for 3 weeks and paw edema and thickness were evaluated. Changes in inflammatory proteins and cytokines levels were monitored in hind leg tissues by Western blot and quantitative PCR analysis. The oral administration of ascidian tunicate extracts alleviated paw edema and improved the histological hind leg cartilage status. The extracts also reduced the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) protein and prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) levels. In addition, the extracts-treated groups showed increased interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels compared with the non-treated group. These findings suggest that orally administered ascidian tunicate extracts might have potential therapeutic effects for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Protective effects of Fructus sophorae extract on collagen-induced arthritis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyoung-Min; Hong, Su-Hyun; Park, Heung-Sik; Jung, Jae-Chul; Kim, Jong-Sik; Lee, Yong-Tae; Lee, Eun-Woo; Choi, Yung-Hyun; Kim, Byung-Woo; Kim, Cheol-Min; Kang, Kyung-Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Styphnolobium japonicum (L.) is utilized in Korean medicine for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of Fructus sophorae extract (FSE) isolated from the dried ripe fruit of S. japonicum (L.) on the development of type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in BALB/c mice. The CIA mice were orally administered FSE or saline daily for 2 weeks. The incidence and severity of disease and the inflammatory response in the serum and the joint tissues were assessed. Macroscopic and histological investigation indicated that FSE protected against CIA development. FSE was associated with a significant reduction in the levels of total immunoglobulin G2a and proinflammatory cytokines and mediators in the serum. In addition, FSE suppressed the gene expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines and mediators, the mediator of osteoclastic bone remodeling, the receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand and matrix metalloproteinases in the joint tissues. The present results suggest that FSE may protect against inflammation and bone damage, and would be a valuable candidate for further investigation as a novel anti-arthritic agent. PMID:28123483

  20. Activity of physalin F in a collagen-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Brustolim, Daniele; Vasconcelos, Juliana F; Freitas, Luiz Antônio R; Teixeira, Mauro M; Farias, Marcel T; Ribeiro, Yvone M; Tomassini, Therezinha C B; Oliveira, Geraldo G S; Pontes-de-Carvalho, Lain C; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ricardo; Soares, Milena B P

    2010-08-27

    The effects of physalin F (1), a steroid derivative purified from Physalis angulata, were investigated in models of collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice and allergic airway inflammation in BALB/c mice. Oral treatment with 1 or dexamethasone caused a marked decrease in paw edema and joint inflammation when compared to vehicle-treated arthritic mice. In contrast, treatment with 1 had no effect in mice with allergic airway inflammation caused by ovalbumin immunization, whereas dexamethasone significantly reduced the number of inflammatory cells and eosinophils in the broncoalveolar lavage fluid and in lung sections of challenged mice. To further demonstrate that 1 acts through a mechanism different from that of glucocorticoids, a nuclear translocation assay was performed of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) using COS-7 cells transfected with a plasmid encoding for a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-GR fusion protein. Untreated or treated cells with 1 had YFP staining mainly in the cytoplasm, whereas in dexamethasone-treated cells the YFP staining was concentrated in the nuclei. It is concluded that the mechanism of the immunosuppressive activity of physalin F is distinct from that of the glucocorticoids.

  1. A Metabolically-Stabilized Phosphonate Analog of Lysophosphatidic Acid Attenuates Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sevastou, Ioanna; Sirioti, Ivi; Samiotaki, Martina; Madan, Damian; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Aidinis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a destructive arthropathy with systemic manifestations, characterized by chronic synovial inflammation. Under the influence of the pro-inflammatory milieu synovial fibroblasts (SFs), the main effector cells in disease pathogenesis become activated and hyperplastic while releasing a number of signals that include pro-inflammatory factors and tissue remodeling enzymes. Activated RA SFs in mouse or human arthritic joints express significant quantities of autotaxin (ATX), a lysophospholipase D responsible for the majority of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) production in the serum and inflamed sites. Conditional genetic ablation of ATX from SFs resulted in attenuation of disease symptoms in animal models, an effect attributed to diminished LPA signaling in the synovium, shown to activate SF effector functions. Here we show that administration of 1-bromo-3(S)-hydroxy-4-(palmitoyloxy)butyl-phosphonate (BrP-LPA), a metabolically stabilized analog of LPA and a dual function inhibitor of ATX and pan-antagonist of LPA receptors, attenuates collagen induced arthritis (CIA) development, thus validating the ATX/LPA axis as a novel therapeutic target in RA. PMID:23923032

  2. Retrovirus-induced insertional mutagenesis: mechanism of collagen mutation in Mov13 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, D D; Wu, H; Hartung, S; Breindl, M; Jaenisch, R

    1991-01-01

    The Mov13 mouse strain carries a mutation in the alpha 1(I) procollagen gene which is due to the insertion of a Moloney murine leukemia provirus into the first intron. This insertion results in the de novo methylation of the provirus and flanking DNA, the alteration of chromatin structure, and the transcriptional inactivity of the collagen promoter. To address the mechanism of mutagenesis, we reintroduced a cloned and therefore demethylated version of the Mov13 mutant allele into mouse fibroblasts. The transfected gene was not transcribed, indicating that the transcriptional defect was not due to the hypermethylation. Rather, this result strongly suggests that the mutation is due to the displacement or disruption of cis-acting regulatory DNA sequences within the first intron. We also constructed a Mov13 variant allele containing a single long terminal repeat instead of the whole provirus. This construct also failed to express mRNA, indicating that the Mov13 mutation does not revert by provirus excision as has been observed for other retrovirus-induced mutations. Images PMID:1922037

  3. Directional conductivity in SWNT-collagen-fibrin composite biomaterials through strain-induced matrix alignment.

    PubMed

    Voge, Christopher M; Kariolis, Mihalis; MacDonald, Rebecca A; Stegemann, Jan P

    2008-07-01

    Composite biomaterials incorporating fibroblast cells, collagen Type I, fibrin, and 2 wt % carboxylated SWNT were created, and their properties were compared with similar control constructs without SWNT. Alignment of the matrix was stimulated by application of 8% cyclic strain for three 12-h periods over three days. All constructs underwent cell-mediated gel compaction to 15-20% of their initial volume, which was not affected by SWNT loading. Mechanical strain increased the rate of compaction, and strained constructs were significantly more compacted than unstrained controls by day 3. Cell viability and morphology were similar in both control and SWNT-loaded constructs, but unstrained samples exhibited a more stellate appearance with more numerous cellular projections. Application of mechanical strain caused clear alignment of both the cells and matrix in the direction of the applied strain. Bioimpedance measurements showed that SWNT loading increased the electrical conductivity of composite constructs, and that mechanically-induced alignment of the matrix/SWNT caused a further increase in conductivity. These results demonstrate that SWNT can be used to augment the electrical properties of 3D protein hydrogels, and that anisotropy in the matrix further enhances these properties. Such electrically conductive biopolymers may have a variety of applications in tissue engineering and biosensor development.

  4. Prophylactic and Therapeutic Effects of Acanthopanax senticosus Harms Extract on Murine Collagen-induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Tanaka, Maki; Murai, Ryosei; Kuribayashi, Kageaki; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yanagihara, Nozomi; Watanabe, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Evidences are accumulating that extract of Acanthopanax senticosus Harms (ASH; syn Eleutherococcus senticosus [Rupr. & Maxim.] Maxim), a shrub native to Northeastern Asia, has antiinflammatory effects. In this study, we examined prophylactic and therapeutic effects of ASH extract (ASHE) on rheumatoid arthritis using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. Acanthopanax senticosus Harms extract was administered before the onset of arthritis in the prophylaxis model. In the therapeutic model, ASHE was administered after the onset of arthritis with or without anti-TNF-α antibody. The ASHE treatment showed efficacy before onset of CIA but there was no effect after CIA was established. The ASHE treatment delayed the onset and decreased severity of CIA. In vitro examinations showed that ASHE is an antioxidant and that ASHE suppresses TNF-α and interleukin-6 production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The combination therapy with ASHE and anti-TNF-α antibody reduced the severity of arthritis compared with anti-TNF-α antibody alone. The present study shows that ASHE has prophylactic effect against CIA and support therapeutic effect of anti-TNF-α antibody. © 2014 The Authors. Phytotherapy Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:24797499

  5. Prophylactic and therapeutic effects of Acanthopanax senticosus Harms extract on murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Tanaka, Maki; Murai, Ryosei; Kuribayashi, Kageaki; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yanagihara, Nozomi; Watanabe, Naoki

    2014-10-01

    Evidences are accumulating that extract of Acanthopanax senticosus Harms (ASH; syn Eleutherococcus senticosus [Rupr. & Maxim.] Maxim), a shrub native to Northeastern Asia, has antiinflammatory effects. In this study, we examined prophylactic and therapeutic effects of ASH extract (ASHE) on rheumatoid arthritis using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. Acanthopanax senticosus Harms extract was administered before the onset of arthritis in the prophylaxis model. In the therapeutic model, ASHE was administered after the onset of arthritis with or without anti-TNF-α antibody. The ASHE treatment showed efficacy before onset of CIA but there was no effect after CIA was established. The ASHE treatment delayed the onset and decreased severity of CIA. In vitro examinations showed that ASHE is an antioxidant and that ASHE suppresses TNF-α and interleukin-6 production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The combination therapy with ASHE and anti-TNF-α antibody reduced the severity of arthritis compared with anti-TNF-α antibody alone. The present study shows that ASHE has prophylactic effect against CIA and support therapeutic effect of anti-TNF-α antibody.

  6. The anti-spasticity drug baclofen alleviates collagen-induced arthritis and regulates dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shichao; Mao, Jianxin; Wei, Bin; Pei, Gang

    2015-07-01

    Baclofen is used clinically as a drug that treats spasticity, which is a syndrome characterized by excessive contraction of the muscles and hyperflexia in the central nervous system (CNS), by activating GABA(B) receptors (GABA(B)Rs). Baclofen was recently reported to desensitize chemokine receptors and to suppress inflammation through the activation of GABA(B)Rs. GABA(B)Rs are expressed in various immune cells, but the functions of these receptors in autoimmune diseases remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of baclofen in murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Oral administration of baclofen alleviated the clinical development of CIA, with a reduced number of IL-17-producing T helper 17 (T(H)17) cells. In addition, baclofen treatment suppressed dendritic cell (DC)-primed T(H)17 cell differentiation by reducing the production of IL-6 by DCs in vitro. Furthermore, the pharmacological and genetic blockade of GABA(B)Rs in DCs weakened the effects of baclofen, indicating that GABA(B)Rs are the molecular targets of baclofen on DCs. Thus, our findings revealed a potential role for baclofen in the treatment of CIA, as well as a previously unknown signaling pathway that regulates DC function.

  7. Effect of Brand's glucosamine with essence of chicken on collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsi, Daniel; Khow, Agatha; Iino, Taeko; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2003-10-24

    The anti-arthritic effects of glucosamine incorporated in a chicken-meat extract known as Brand's Glucosamine with Essence of Chicken versus glucosamine or Essence of Chicken (EOC) alone were investigated on collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in dark agouti (DA) rats. Four groups of rats received basic food (control), 1.2% glucosamine (GLU), 0.8% EOC and 1.2% GLU + 0.8% EOC (GLU + EOC) admixed with basic food for 25 days following CIA. Foot pads were isolated on day 25 for histopathological evaluation. Clinical assessment of hind paw swelling as measured by foot pad volumes and histopathological scoring based on the degree of edema, periosteal new bone formation, periostitis and inflammatory cell infiltration of the isolated foot pad were performed. Arthritic rats given GLU + EOC showed significant reduction in left hind paw swelling following onset of arthritis. Correspondingly, a lesser degree of edema, periosteal new bone formation, periostitis and inflammatory cell infiltration was seen in histological sections of the left hind foot pads of these rats. A similar trend of reduced hind paw swelling was observed in the right hind paws of the same rats and those fed with EOC. Rats fed with GLU alone did not demonstrate these beneficial effects. The present findings demonstrate that a combination of glucosamine and EOC is effective in reducing the histopathological severity of arthritis, probably due to its ability to reduce the inflammatory conditions in CIA.

  8. Lysyl hydroxylase 2 induces a collagen cross-link switch in tumor stroma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulong; Terajima, Masahiko; Yang, Yanan; Sun, Li; Ahn, Young-Ho; Pankova, Daniela; Puperi, Daniel S.; Watanabe, Takeshi; Kim, Min P.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Rodriguez, Jaime; Liu, Hui; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Minelli, Rosalba; Scott, Kenneth L.; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Guilak, Farshid; Pati, Debananda; Thilaganathan, Nishan; Burns, Alan R.; Creighton, Chad J.; Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Zal, Tomasz; Grande-Allen, K. Jane; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tumor metastasis is preceded by an accumulation of collagen cross-links that heighten stromal stiffness and stimulate the invasive properties of tumor cells. However, the biochemical nature of collagen cross-links in cancer is still unclear. Here, we postulated that epithelial tumorigenesis is accompanied by changes in the biochemical type of collagen cross-links. Utilizing resected human lung cancer tissues and a p21CIP1/WAF1-deficient, K-rasG12D-expressing murine metastatic lung cancer model, we showed that, relative to normal lung tissues, tumor stroma contains higher levels of hydroxylysine aldehyde–derived collagen cross-links (HLCCs) and lower levels of lysine aldehyde–derived cross-links (LCCs), which are the predominant types of collagen cross-links in skeletal tissues and soft tissues, respectively. Gain- and loss-of-function studies in tumor cells showed that lysyl hydroxylase 2 (LH2), which hydroxylates telopeptidyl lysine residues on collagen, shifted the tumor stroma toward a high-HLCC, low-LCC state, increased tumor stiffness, and enhanced tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Together, our data indicate that LH2 enhances the metastatic properties of tumor cells and functions as a regulatory switch that controls the relative abundance of biochemically distinct types of collagen cross-links in the tumor stroma. PMID:25664850

  9. Estrogen-induced collagen reorientation correlates with sympathetic denervation of the rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Martínez, G F; Bianchimano, P; Brauer, M M

    2016-12-01

    Estrogen inhibits the growth and causes the degeneration (pruning) of sympathetic nerves supplying the rat myometrium. Previous cryoculture studies evidenced that substrate-bound signals contribute to diminish the ability of the estrogenized myometrium to support sympathetic nerve growth. Using electron microscopy, here we examined neurite-substrate interactions in myometrial cryocultures, observing that neurites grew associated to collagen fibrils present in the surface of the underlying cryosection. In addition, we assessed quantitatively the effects of estrogen on myometrial collagen organization in situ, using ovariectomized rats treated with estrogen and immature females undergoing puberty. Under low estrogen levels, most collagen fibrils were oriented in parallel to the muscle long axis (83% and 85%, respectively). Following estrogen treatment, 89% of fibrils was oriented perpendicularly to the muscle main axis; while after puberty, 57% of fibrils acquired this orientation. Immunohistochemistry combined with histology revealed that the vast majority of fine sympathetic nerve fibers supplying the myometrium courses within the areas where collagen realignment was observed. Finally, to assess whether depending on their orientation collagen fibrils can promote or inhibit neurite outgrowth, we employed cryocultures, now using as substrate tissue sections of rat-tail tendon. We observed that neurites grew extensively in the direction of the parallel-aligned collagen fibrils in the tendon main axis but were inhibited to grow perpendicularly to this axis. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that collagen reorientation may be one of the factors contributing to diminish the neuritogenic capacity of the estrogen-primed myometrial substrate.

  10. Anti-rheumatoid arthritic effects of Saussurea involucrata on type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meihong; Guo, Qianying; Wang, Shuangjia; Wang, Na; Wei, Liren; Wang, Junbo

    2016-02-01

    Saussurea involucrata (SI) has long been used under the herbal name "snow lotus" for treatment of inflammation and pain-related diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. The present study aimed to evaluate the pharmacological effects of SI on collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis in rats. Rats with collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis were orally administered SI (420 mg kg(-1)) for 40 consecutive days. Histopathological examination indicated that SI alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells and synovial hyperplasia and slows joint destruction. SI intervention reduced the serum levels of RF, COMP, CRP and anti-CII IgG. Results also showed that SI is a potential therapeutic agent for alleviating the severity of the disease based on the reduced arthritic index. It was concluded that SI can ameliorate inflammation and joint destruction in CIA rats.

  11. Somatic Antigens of Tropical Liver Flukes Ameliorate Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Yasir Akhtar; Umar, Sadiq; Abidi, Syed M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic helminths polarize immune response of their vertebrate hosts towards anti-inflammatory Th2 type and therefore it is hypothesized that they may suppress the inflammatory conditions in autoimmune disorders. The present study was undertaken to investigate in vivo immunomodulatory and therapeutic potential of somatic antigens (Ag) of liver infecting digenetic trematodes [Fasciola gigantica (Fg) and Gigantocotyle explanatum (Ge)] in collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) Wistar rats. The CIA rats were administered subcutaneously with different doses (50 μg, 100 μg and 150 μg) of somatic antigens of Fg and Ge, daily for 21 days, the time period required to establish infection in natural host (Bubalus bubalis). Thereafter, the control, diseased and treated rats were compared for different parameters viz. hind paw thickness; serum interleukins, IL-4 and IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ); expression level of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2, -9, -13 and nitric oxide (NO) in knee joints and patellar morphology. The CIA rats treated with different antigens, Fg-Ag and Ge-Ag, show significant amelioration of the disease by down regulation of serum TNF-α and IFN-γ (p< 0.05) and upregulation of IL-4 and IL-10 cytokines (p< 0.05); inhibition (p< 0.05) of MMPs (-2,-9,-13) and NO in knee joints and improved patellar morphology with decreased synovial hypertrophy and reduced infiltration of ploymorphonuclear cells. The activity of pro as well as active MMPs (-2 and -9) and active MMP-13 in knee joints of CIA rats was very high compared to the control and treatment groups, suggesting the extent of collagen degradation in CIA rats. Interestingly, the highest dose (150 μg) of Ge-Ag almost wiped out MMP-13 expression. The overall findings suggest that the somatic proteins of Ge-Ag appeared to be therapeutically more effective than Fg-Ag, reflecting interspecific molecular differences which could contribute to the ability of these worms to

  12. Efficacy of Annona squamosa L in the synthesis of glycosaminoglycans and collagen during wound repair in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ponrasu, Thangavel; Suguna, Lonchin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to find out the effects of Annona squamosa on the formation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen during wound healing in normal and diabetic rats. Diabetes induced rats were segregated into 4 groups, each containing six animals. Groups I and III served as the normal and diabetic control while groups II and IV served as normal and diabetic treated. The animals were treated with 200 μL of Annona squamosa extract topically. The granulation tissues formed were removed on the 8th day and the amount of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen formed was evaluated by sequential extraction and SDSPAGE, respectively. Histological evaluation was also carried out using Masson's trichrome stain. In vitro wound healing efficacy of A. squamosa in human dermal fibroblast culture (HDF) was also carried out. The fibroblasts treated with varying concentrations of A. squamosa were examined for proliferation and closure of the wound area and photographed. A. squamosa increased cellular proliferation in HDF culture. The granulation tissues of treated wounds showed increased levels of glycosaminoglycans (P < 0.05) and collagen which were also confirmed by histopathology. The results strongly substantiate the beneficial effects of A. squamosa on the formation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen during wound healing.

  13. Post implantation fate of adipogenic induced mesenchymal stem cells on Type I collagen scaffold in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Balu; Fernandez, Francis B; Harikrishnan, V S; John, Annie

    2017-02-01

    Regenerative medicine via its application in soft tissue reconstruction through novel methods in adipose tissue engineering (ATE) has gained remarkable attention and investment despite simultaneous reports on clinical incidence of graft resorption and impaired vascularization. The underlying malaise here once identified may play a critical role in optimizing implant function. Our work attempts to determine the fate of donor cells and the implant in recipient micro environment using adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) on a type I collagen sponge, an established scaffold for ATE. Cell components within the construct were identified 21 days post implantation to delineate cell survival, proliferation & terminal roles in vivo. ASC's are multipotent, while collagen type I is a natural extra cellular matrix component. Commercially available bovine type I collagen was characterized for its physiochemical properties and cyto-compatibility. Nile red staining of induced ASCs identified red globular structures in cell cytoplasm indicating oil droplet accumulation. Similarly, in vivo implantation of the cell seeded collagen construct in rat model for 21 days in the dorsal muscle, showed genesis of chicken wire network of fat-like cells, which was demonstrated histologically using a variety of staining techniques. Furthermore, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique established the efficiency of transplantation wherein the male donor cells with labeled Y chromosome was identified 21 days post implantation from female rat model. Retrieved samples at 21 days indicated adipogenesis in situ, with donor cells highlighted via FISH. The study provides an insight to stem cells in ATE from genesis to functionalization.

  14. Efficacy of Annona squamosa L in the Synthesis of Glycosaminoglycans and Collagen during Wound Repair in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ponrasu, Thangavel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to find out the effects of Annona squamosa on the formation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen during wound healing in normal and diabetic rats. Diabetes induced rats were segregated into 4 groups, each containing six animals. Groups I and III served as the normal and diabetic control while groups II and IV served as normal and diabetic treated. The animals were treated with 200 μL of Annona squamosa extract topically. The granulation tissues formed were removed on the 8th day and the amount of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen formed was evaluated by sequential extraction and SDSPAGE, respectively. Histological evaluation was also carried out using Masson's trichrome stain. In vitro wound healing efficacy of A. squamosa in human dermal fibroblast culture (HDF) was also carried out. The fibroblasts treated with varying concentrations of A. squamosa were examined for proliferation and closure of the wound area and photographed. A. squamosa increased cellular proliferation in HDF culture. The granulation tissues of treated wounds showed increased levels of glycosaminoglycans (P < 0.05) and collagen which were also confirmed by histopathology. The results strongly substantiate the beneficial effects of A. squamosa on the formation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen during wound healing. PMID:25003104

  15. Imatinib mesylate inhibits osteoclastogenesis and joint destruction in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA).

    PubMed

    Ando, Wataru; Hashimoto, Jun; Nampei, Akihide; Tsuboi, Hideki; Tateishi, Kosuke; Ono, Takeshi; Nakamura, Norimasa; Ochi, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a key factor for osteoclastogenesis at the bone-pannus interface in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as a receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Imatinib mesylate inhibits the phosphorylation of c-fms, a receptor for M-CSF. The present study investigates the effect of imatinib mesylate on joint destruction in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and on osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Imatinib mesylate (50 or 150 mg/kg), dexamethasone, or vehicle was administered daily to CIA rats for 4 weeks from the onset of arthritis. Hind-paw swelling and body weight were measured weekly. At weeks 2 and 4, the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints and the ankle and subtalar joints were radiographically and histologically assessed. The effect of imatinib mesylate on osteoclast formation from rat bone marrow cells with M-CSF and soluble RANKL (sRANKL) in vitro was also examined. Radiographic assessment showed that 150 mg/kg imatinib mesylate suppressed the destruction of the MTP and the ankle and subtalar joints at week 2, and MTP joint destruction at week 4 in CIA rats, although hind-paw swelling was not suppressed. The number of TRAP-positive cells at the bone-pannus interface was significantly reduced in the group administered with 150 mg/kg imatinib mesylate compared with that given vehicle at week 4. Imatinib mesylate dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of M-CSF-dependent osteoclast precursor cells in vitro as well as osteoclast formation induced by M-CSF and sRANKL. These findings suggest that imatinib mesylate could prevent joint destruction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Autoantibody profile in the experimental model of scleroderma induced by type V human collagen

    PubMed Central

    Callado, Maria R M; Viana, Vilma S T; Vendramini, Margarete B G; Leon, Elaine P; Bueno, Cleonice; Velosa, Ana P P; Teodoro, Walcy R; Yoshinari, Natalino H

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the humoral autoimmune response in the experimental model of systemic sclerosis (SSc) induced by human type V collagen (huCol V). New Zealand rabbits were immunized with huCol V in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) and boosted twice with 15 days intervals with huCol V in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Control groups included animals injected only with FCA or bovine serum albumin. Bleeding was done at days 0, 30, 75 and 120. Tissue specimens were obtained for histopathological investigation. Serological analysis included detection of antibodies against huCol V and anti-topoisomerase I (Anti-Scl70) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by indirect immunofluorescence, and rheumatoid factor (RF) by a latex agglutination test. Target antigens were characterized by immunoblot. Histological analysis revealed extracellular matrix remodeling with fibrosis and vasculitis. Anti-Scl70 and ANA were detected as early as 30 days in all huCol V animals. The universal ANA staining pattern was Golgi-like. This serum reactivity was not abolished by previous absorption with huCol V. Characterization of the target antigen by immunoblot revealed two major protein fractions of 175 000 and 220 000 MW. Similarly to ANA, there was a gradual increase of reactivity throughout the immunization and also it was not abolished by preincubation of serum samples with huCol V. RF testing was negative in hyperimmune sera. Conclusion: The production of autoantibodies, including anti-Scl70, a serological marker for SSc associated with histopathological alterations, validates huCol V induced-experimental model and brings out its potential for understanding the pathophysiology of SSc. PMID:17442023

  17. Neferine inhibits proliferation and collagen synthesis induced by high glucose in cardiac fibroblasts and reduces cardiac fibrosis in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue; Song, Xiuhui; Lu, Jianjun; Chen, Xueying; Liang, Ershun; Liu, Xiaoqiong; Zhang, Mingxiang; Zhang, Yun; Du, Zhanhui; Zhao, Yuxia

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is a common pathological process accompanying diabetes mellitus. In this report, we studied the effects of neferine (a major bisbenzylisoquinline alkaloid derived from lotus embryos) on cardiac fibrosis induced by diabetes mellitus, as well as the underlying molecular pathways. In vivo, type 1 diabetes mellitus was induced in mice by administering streptozotocin. Diabetic mice were treated with neferine through oral gavage, and cardiac function was assessed using echocardiography. Total collagen deposition was assessed by Masson's trichrome and Picrosirius staining. In vitro, cardiac fibroblasts were cultured in normal or high-glucose medium with or without neferine. Neferine attenuated left ventricular dysfunction and remodeling and reduced collagen deposition in diabetic mice. In vitro, neferine inhibited cardiac fibroblast proliferation, migration, and differentiation into myofibroblasts. In addition, neferine reduced high-glucose-induced collagen production and inhibited TGF-β1-Smad, ERK and p38 MAPK signaling activation in cardiac fibroblasts. These results suggest that neferine may have antifibrogenic effects in diabetes-related cardiac fibrosis. PMID:27533252

  18. Inhibition of UV-induced ROS and collagen damage by Phyllanthus emblica extract in normal human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Muhammed; Bhat, Beena; Anand, Susmitha; Sivakumar, A; Paliwal, Pritee; Geetha, K G

    2011-01-01

    As a part of ongoing research for novel natural cosmeceutical actives from plant extracts, this study demonstrates that Phyllanthus emblica fruit extract has shown its efficacy in protection against ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and collagen damage in normal human dermal fibroblasts. At a concentration of 0.5 mg/ml, emblica extract showed a significant response of 9.5 ± 0.28-fold protection from UVB induced-collagen damage as compared to untreated cells. A known active, ascorbic acid, at a concentration of 0.5 mg/ml, showed 3.7 ± 0.07-fold protection from UVB-induced collagen damage. While the untreated cells showed 84 ± 1.4% induction in ROS on UVB irradiation as compared to the non-irradiated cells, emblica extract treatment inhibited the induction of ROS to 15 ± 4% at a concentration of 0.5 mg/ml. Ascorbic acid inhibited the induction in ROS to 64 ± 2% at a concentration of 0.5 mg/ml. Emblica extract is a significantly better natural active, with promising cosmeceutical benefits against photoaging.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Middle Ear Inflammation Disrupts the cochlear Intra-Strial Fluid–Blood Barrier through Down-Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Hou, Zhiqiang; Cai, Jing; Dong, Mingmin; Shi, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    Middle ear infection (or inflammation) is the most common pathological condition that causes fluid to accumulate in the middle ear, disrupting cochlear homeostasis. Lipopolysaccharide, a product of bacteriolysis, activates macrophages and causes release of inflammatory cytokines. Many studies have shown that lipopolysaccharides cause functional and structural changes in the inner ear similar to that of inflammation. However, it is specifically not known how lipopolysaccharides affect the blood-labyrinth barrier in the stria vascularis (intra-strial fluid–blood barrier), nor what the underlying mechanisms are. In this study, we used a cell culture-based in vitro model and animal-based in vivo model, combined with immunohistochemistry and a vascular leakage assay, to investigate lipopolysaccharide effects on the integrity of the mouse intra-strial fluid–blood barrier. Our results show lipopolysaccharide-induced local infection significantly affects intra-strial fluid–blood barrier component cells. Pericytes and perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes are particularly affected, and the morphological and functional changes in these cells are accompanied by substantial changes in barrier integrity. Significant vascular leakage is found in the lipopolysaccharide treated-animals. Consistent with the findings from the in vivo animal model, the permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer to FITC-albumin was significantly higher in the lipopolysaccharide-treated monolayer than in an untreated endothelial cell monolayer. Further study has shown the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation to have a major effect on the expression of tight junctions in the blood barrier. Lipopolysaccharide was also shown to cause high frequency hearing loss, corroborated by previous reports from other laboratories. Our findings show lipopolysaccharide-evoked middle ear infection disrupts inner ear fluid balance, and its particular effects on the intra-strial fluid

  20. Lipopolysaccharide-induced middle ear inflammation disrupts the cochlear intra-strial fluid-blood barrier through down-regulation of tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Hou, Zhiqiang; Cai, Jing; Dong, Mingmin; Shi, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    Middle ear infection (or inflammation) is the most common pathological condition that causes fluid to accumulate in the middle ear, disrupting cochlear homeostasis. Lipopolysaccharide, a product of bacteriolysis, activates macrophages and causes release of inflammatory cytokines. Many studies have shown that lipopolysaccharides cause functional and structural changes in the inner ear similar to that of inflammation. However, it is specifically not known how lipopolysaccharides affect the blood-labyrinth barrier in the stria vascularis (intra-strial fluid-blood barrier), nor what the underlying mechanisms are. In this study, we used a cell culture-based in vitro model and animal-based in vivo model, combined with immunohistochemistry and a vascular leakage assay, to investigate lipopolysaccharide effects on the integrity of the mouse intra-strial fluid-blood barrier. Our results show lipopolysaccharide-induced local infection significantly affects intra-strial fluid-blood barrier component cells. Pericytes and perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes are particularly affected, and the morphological and functional changes in these cells are accompanied by substantial changes in barrier integrity. Significant vascular leakage is found in the lipopolysaccharide treated-animals. Consistent with the findings from the in vivo animal model, the permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer to FITC-albumin was significantly higher in the lipopolysaccharide-treated monolayer than in an untreated endothelial cell monolayer. Further study has shown the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation to have a major effect on the expression of tight junctions in the blood barrier. Lipopolysaccharide was also shown to cause high frequency hearing loss, corroborated by previous reports from other laboratories. Our findings show lipopolysaccharide-evoked middle ear infection disrupts inner ear fluid balance, and its particular effects on the intra-strial fluid-blood barrier

  1. A novel CC chemokine receptor 4 antagonist RS-1269 inhibits ovalbumin-induced ear swelling and lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Yasuhiro; Kawashima, Kayo; Etori, Maki; Yonekubo, Kazuki; Suzuki, Chie; Jojima, Takaaki; Kuribayashi, Takeshi; Nara, Futoshi; Yamashita, Makoto

    2010-10-01

    There is growing evidence that chemokines recruit leukocytes in allergic, inflammatory and immune responses. CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) is implicated as a preferential marker for T helper 2 cells, and the cells selectively respond to CC chemokine ligand 17 (CCL17) and CCL22. We searched for compounds having a profile as a CCR4 antagonist from an in-house library and have previously reported that 3-{2-[(2R)-2-phenyl-4-(4-pyridin-4-ylbenzyl)morpholin-2-yl]ethyl}quinazoline-2,4(1H,3H)-dione (named RS-1154) was capable of significantly inhibiting the binding of [(125) I]CCL17 to human CCR4-expressing CHO cells. From further synthesis of its derivatives, we newly focused on 3-(isobutyrylamino)-N-{2-[(2R)-2-phenyl-4-(4-pyridin-4-ylbenzyl)morpholin-2-yl]ethyl}benzamide (RS-1269), which showed potency comparable to RS-1154 in inhibiting CCL17-induced migration of DO11.10 mice-derived T helper 2 cells with an IC(50) value of 5.5 nM in vitro. We then investigated the pharmacological effects of RS-1269 on ovalbumin-induced ear swelling and lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock in mice. The ear thickness was significantly decreased by oral administration of RS-1269 at the dose of 30 mg/kg. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide significantly increased the serum level of tumour necrosis factor-α. Compared with an anti-CCL17 antibody, RS-1269 significantly inhibited the production at the dose of 100 mg/kg. These results raise the possibility that RS-1269 or one of its derivatives has potential to serve as a prototype compound to develop therapeutic agents for atopic dermatitis and inflammatory diseases.

  2. Collagen I-induced dendritic cells activation is regulated by TNF-alpha production through down-regulation of IRF4.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Barun; Ki, Hyeon-Hui; Lee, Young-Mi; Kim, Dae-Ki

    2015-03-01

    Previously we have shown that collagen I enhances the maturation and function of dendritic cells (DCs). Inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)- alpha, interleukin (IL)-1 beta and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are also known to activate DCs. Here we investigated the involvement of TNF-alpha on the collagen I-induced DCs activation. TNF-a neutralization inhibited collagen I-induced IL-12 secretions by DCs. Additionally, we observed suppression of collagen I-induced costimulatory molecules expression along with down-regulation of genes involved in DCs activation pathway. Furthermore, TNF- alpha inhibition upon collagen Istimulation up-regulated the expression of interferon regulatory transcription factor IRF4, when compared to collagen I only treated cells. Collectively, our data demonstrate that collagen I induce TNF- alpha production, which is crucial for the activation and function of DCs, through down-regulation of IRF4, and implicates the importance in development of anti- TNF-alpha therapeutics for several inflammatory diseases.

  3. Methacrylation induces rapid, temperature-dependent, reversible self-assembly of type-I collagen.

    PubMed

    Drzewiecki, Kathryn E; Parmar, Avanish S; Gaudet, Ian D; Branch, Jonathan R; Pike, Douglas H; Nanda, Vikas; Shreiber, David I

    2014-09-23

    Type-I collagen self-assembles into a fibrillar gel at physiological temperature and pH to provide a cell-adhesive, supportive, structural network. As such, it is an attractive, popular scaffold for in vitro evaluations of cellular behavior and for tissue engineering applications. In this study, type-I collagen is modified to introduce methacrylate groups on the free amines of the lysine residues to create collagen methacrylamide (CMA). CMA retains the properties of collagen such as self-assembly, biodegradability, and natural bioactivity but is also photoactive and can be rapidly cross-linked or functionalized with acrylated molecules when irradiated with ultraviolet light in the presence of a photoinitiator. CMA also demonstrates unique temperature-dependent behavior. For natural type-I collagen, the overall structure of the fiber network remains largely static over time scales of a few hours upon heating and cooling at temperatures below its denaturation point. CMA, however, is rapidly thermoreversible and will oscillate between a liquid macromer suspension and a semisolid fibrillar hydrogel when the temperature is modulated between 10 and 37 °C. Using a series of mechanical, scattering, and spectroscopic methods, we demonstrate that structural reversibility is manifest across multiple scales from the protein topology of the triple helix up through the rheological properties of the CMA hydrogel. Electron microscopy imaging of CMA after various stages of heating and cooling shows that the canonical collagen-like D-periodic banding ultrastructure of the fibers is preserved. A rapidly thermoreversible collagen-based hydrogel is expected to have wide utility in tissue engineering and drug delivery applications as a biofunctional, biocompatible material. Thermal reversibility also makes CMA a powerful model for studying the complex process of hierarchical collagen self-assembly.

  4. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo; Kim, So Young; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Taehoon G

    2012-11-23

    The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the β1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate peptide for the treatment of skin aging and wrinkles.

  5. Molecular mechanism of force induced stabilization of collagen against enzymatic breakdown.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Wei; Flynn, Brendan P; Ruberti, Jeffrey W; Buehler, Markus J

    2012-05-01

    Collagen cleavage, facilitated by collagenases of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family, is crucial for many physiological and pathological processes such as wound healing, tissue remodeling, cancer invasion and organ morphogenesis. Earlier work has shown that mechanical force alters the cleavage rate of collagen. However, experimental results yielded conflicting data on whether applying force accelerates or slows down the degradation rate. Here we explain these discrepancies and propose a molecular mechanism by which mechanical force might change the rate of collagen cleavage. We find that a type I collagen heterotrimer is unfolded in its equilibrium state and loses its triple helical structure at the cleavage site without applied force, possibly enhancing enzymatic breakdown as each chain is exposed and can directly undergo hydrolysis. Under application of force, the naturally unfolded region refolds into a triple helical structure, potentially protecting the molecule against enzymatic breakdown. In contrast, a type I collagen homotrimer retains a triple helical structure even without applied force, making it more resistant to enzyme cleavage. In the case of the homotrimer, the application of force may directly lead to molecular unwinding, resulting in a destabilization of the molecule under increased mechanical loading. Our study explains the molecular mechanism by which force may regulate the formation and breakdown of collagenous tissue.

  6. An essential role for mast cells as modulators of neutrophils influx in collagen-induced arthritis in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Tatiana Aparecida; Sampaio, Andrxsé Luiz Franco; D’Acquisto, Fulvio; Perretti, Mauro; Oliani, Sonia Maria

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are involved in immune disorders so that many of the proinflammatory and tissue destructive mediators produced by these cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This scenario prompted us to investigate the correlation between mast cell degranulation and neutrophil influx within the digits and knees joints of arthritic mice assessing what could be the functional role(s) of joint mast cells in the response to collagen immunization. DBA/1J mice were submitted to collagen-induced arthritis and disease was assessed on day 21, 32 and 42 post-immunization. Pharmacological treatment with the glucocorticoid prednisolone, commonly used in the clinic, and nedocromil, a mast cell stabilizer, was performed from day 21 to 30. Arthritis developing after immunization gradually increased up to day 42. Neutrophil infiltration peaked on day 32 and 21, in the digits and knees, respectively, showing an unequal pattern of recruitment between these tissues. This difference emerged for mast cell they peaked in the digits on day 21, but a higher degree of degranulation could be measured in the knee joints. Uneven modulation of arthritis occurred after treatment of mice with prednisolone or nedocromil. Neutrophils migration to the tissue was reduced after both therapies, but only prednisolone augmented mast cell migration to the joints. Nedocromil exerted inhibitory properties both on mast cell proliferation and migration, more effectively on the digit joints. Thus, collagen induced an inflammatory process characterized by tissue mast cells activation and degranulation, suggesting a potential driving force in propagating inflammatory circuits yielding recruitment of neutrophils. However, the different degree of affected joint involvement suggests a time-related implication of digits and knees during collagen-induced arthritis development. These results provide evidence for local alterations whereby mast cells contribute to the initiation of

  7. Puerarin attenuates inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody-induced arthritis via TLR4/NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changxing; Wang, Weidong; Jin, Xiaping; Shen, Jianguo; Hu, Weifeng; Jiang, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Puerarin is an important active ingredient in the root of kudzu vine due to its pharmacological properties. The aim of the present study is to contribute to the existing knowledge of the effect of puerarin in the attenuation of inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody-induced arthritis via toll‑like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling. Arthritis was induced using injection of anti‑type II collagen antibodies. Treatment with puerarin was observed to significantly decrease clinical scoring of the collagen antibody‑induced arthritis and suppress oxidative stress and the inflammatory response in mice. Furthermore, puerarin was demonstrated to inhibit mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase‑9 and protein expression of TLR4 following collagen antibody-induced arthritis in mice. The effect of puerarin may be associated with the suppression of NF‑κB activity in collagen antibody‑induced arthritis mice. Furthermore, upregulation of phosphorylated (p)‑Janus kinase 2 and p‑signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 protein expression was suppressed by puerarin. The results of the present study indicate, for the first time, the effect of puerarin to attenuate inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody‑induced arthritis via TLR4/NF-κB signaling.

  8. BMP4 Inhibits PDGF-Induced Proliferation and Collagen Synthesis via PKA-Mediated Inhibition of Calpain-2 in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, PengCheng; Kovacs, Laszlo; Dong, Sam; Wu, Guangyu; Su, Yunchao

    2017-02-24

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) on PDGF-induced proliferation and collagen synthesis in PASMCs. Normal human PASMCs were incubated with and without PDGF-BB in the absence and presence of BMP4 for 0.5 to 24 h. Then the protein levels of collagen-I, p-Smad2/3, p-Smad1/5, and intracellular active TGFβ1, calpain activity and cell proliferation were measured. The results showed that BMP4 induced an increase in p-Smad1/5 but had no effect on the protein levels of collagen-I, p-Smad2/3, and intracellular active TGFβ1, and calpain activity in PASMCs. Nevertheless, BMP4 attenuated increases in proliferation and protein levels of collagen-I, p-Smad2/3, and intracellular active TGFβ1, and calpain activity in PDGF-BB-treated PASMCs. Moreover, BMP4 increased PKA activity and inhibition of PKA prevented the inhibitory effects of BMP4 on PDGF-BB-induced calpain activation in normal PASMCs. PKA activator forskolin recapitulated the suppressive effect of BMP4 on PDGF-induced calpain activation. Further, BMP4 prevented PDGF-induced decrease in calpain-2 phosphorylation at serine 369 in normal PASMCs. Finally, BMP4 did not attenuate PDGF-induced increases in proliferation, collagen-I protein levels, and calpain activation, and did not induce PKA activation and did not prevent PDGF-induced decrease in calpain-2 phosphorylation at serine 369 in PASMCs from IPAH patients. These data demonstrate that BMP4 inhibits PDGF-induced proliferation and collagen synthesis via PKA-mediated inhibition of calpain-2 in normal PASMCs. The inhibitory effects of BMP4 on PDGF-induced proliferation, collagen synthesis and calpain-2 activation are impaired in PASMCs from PAH patients, which may contribute to pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH.

  9. Multiphoton microscopy of engineered dermal substitutes: assessment of 3D collagen matrix remodeling induced by fibroblasts contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, A.-M.; Olive, C.; Michelet, J.-F.; Galey, J.-B.; Fagot, D.; Leroy, F.; Martin, J.-L.; Colonna, A.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2010-02-01

    One of the main functions of dermal fibroblasts is the generation of mechanical forces within their surrounding extracellular matrix. Investigating molecules that could modulate fibroblast contraction and act as potent anti aging ingredients requires the development of three-dimensional in situ imaging methodologies for dermal substitute analysis. Here we use multiphoton microscopy in order to investigate the fibroblast-induced collagen matrix reorganization in engineered dermal tissue and to evaluate the effect of Y27632, a RhoA kinase inhibitor on dermal substitutes contraction. We observe that collagen fibrils rearrange around fibroblast with increasing density in control samples, whereas collagen fibrils show no remodeling in the samples containing the RhoA kinase inhibitor. Moreover, when the culture medium containing the inhibitor was replaced with a control medium, the dermal substitutes presented the same 3D reorganization as the control samples, which indicates that the inhibitory effects are reversible. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the relevance of multiphoton microscopy to visualize three-dimensional remodeling of the matrix induced by fibroblast contraction.

  10. Increased Inner Ear Susceptibility to Noise Injury in Mice With Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Takeshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Katsunuma, Sayaka; Hasegawa, Shingo; Tanimoto, Hitoshi; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the pathophysiology of diabetes-associated hearing impairment in type 1 diabetes using mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes (C57BL/6J; male). Hearing function was evaluated 1, 3, and 5 months after induction of diabetes (five diabetic and five control animals per time point) using auditory-evoked brain stem responses (ABRs). Mice (four diabetic and four control) were exposed to loud noise (105 dB) 5 months after induction of diabetes. ABRs were measured before and after noise exposure. Cochlear blood flows were measured by laser-Doppler flowmeter. Spiral ganglion cells (SGCs) were counted. Vessel endothelial cells were observed by CD31 immunostaining. Chronologic changes in the ABR threshold shift were not significantly different between the diabetic and control groups. However, vessel walls in the modiolus of the cochleae were significantly thicker in the diabetic group than the control group. Additionally, recovery from noise-induced injury was significantly impaired in diabetic mice. Reduced cochlea blood flows and SGC loss were observed in diabetic mice cochleae after noise exposure. Our data suggest that diabetic cochleae are more susceptible than controls to loud noise exposure, and decreased cochlear blood flow due to sclerosis of the vessels and consequent loss of SGCs are possible mechanisms of hearing impairment in diabetic patients. PMID:22851574

  11. Effect of Ultraviolet A-induced Crosslinking on Dentin Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Seseogullari-Dirihan, Roda; Tjäderhane, Leo; Pashley, David H; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of using UVA-induced crosslinking with or without riboflavin as photosensitizers on degradation of dentin matrix by dentin proteases. Methods Demineralized dentin specimens (0.4×3×6mm, n=10/group) were subjected to: (RP1), 0.1% riboflavin-5 phosphate/UVA for 1 min; (RP5), 0.1% riboflavin-5 phosphate/UVA for 5 min; (R1), 0.1% riboflavin/UVA for 1 min; (R5), 0.1% riboflavin-UVA for 5 min; (UV1), UVA for 1 min; (UV5), UVA for 5 min. Specimens were incubated in 1 mL zinc and calcium containing media for 1 day and 1 week. An untreated group served as control (CM). After incubation, the loss of dry mass of samples was measured and aliquots of media were analyzed for the release of C-terminal fragment telopeptide (ICTP vs CTX) of collagen to evaluate for cathepsin K (CA-K) and total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated degradation. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA at α=0.05. Results Although UVA radiation alone reduced dentin degradation, UVA-activated riboflavin or riboflavin-5 phosphate inhibited MMP and CA-K activities more than UVA alone. The effects of crosslinking were more pronounced in 7-day samples; only with CA-K were the effects of crosslinking with or without photosensitizer significantly different from controls in 1-day samples. Significance The use of bioactive forms (RP) or longer treatment time did not result with better effect. The use of UVA crosslinking reduces dentin matrix degradation, especially with photosensitizers. PMID:26314255

  12. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and toxicities of methotrexate in healthy and collagen-induced arthritic rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong-Yang; Lon, Hoi-Kei; Wang, Yan-Lin; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.; Jusko, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an anchor drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but responsiveness is variable in effectiveness and toxicity. Methotrexate and its polyglutamate conjugates (MTXPGn) in red blood cells (RBC) have been associated with patient response. In the current study, 13 collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) rats and 12 healthy rats were given subcutaneous doses of either saline or 0.3 or 1.5 mg/kg per 2 days of MTX from day 21 to 43 post-induction. Blood samples were obtained at various times to measure MTX in plasma, and MTX and MTXPGn in RBC. Effects on disease progression were indicated by body weight and paw size. After multiple-doses, RBC MTX reached steady-state (82.4 nM) within 4 days. The MTXPG2 and MTXPG3 in RBC kept increasing until the end of the study attaining 12.5 and 17.7 nM. Significant weight loss was observed after dosing of 1.5 mg/kg/2 days, whereas moderate effectiveness was observed after dosing of 0.3 mg/kg/2 days. A pharmacokinetic/ pharmacodynamic/disease (PK/PD/DIS) model with indirect mechanisms and transduction components incorporating plasma MTX, RBC MTX, and RBC MTXPGn concentrations, and paw size was developed using naïve data pooling and ADAPT 5. The PK/PD in CIA rats dosed at 0.3 mg/kg/2 days were captured well by our proposed model. MTX showed modest (Imaxd = 0.16) but sensitive (IC50d = 0.712 nM) effectiveness on paw edema. The higher dose produced toxicity. The proposed model offers improved understanding of MTX effects on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:23456770

  13. Effects of cichoric acid extract from Echinacea purpurea on collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling; Li, Weizu; Wang, Yuchan; Zhang, Xiaosu; Yu, Deqiang; Yin, Yanyan; Xie, Zhongwen; Yuan, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Cichoric acid extract (CAE) from Echinacea purpurea L. was used to investigate the anti-arthritic effect by using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. The hind paw swelling volume and the body weight were measured and recorded. All the drug solutions were administered orally to rats for a total of 28 days. On day 28, the rats were anaesthetized and decapitated. The thymus and spleen were weighed for the determination of the organ index. The concentration of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) in the serum was measured using commercially available ELISA kits. Total and phosphor-NF-κB and Cox-2 protein expression in synovial tissues were determined by histological slides quantification and western blot analysis. Our data showed that administration of all doses of CAE (8, 16, and 32 mg/kg) significantly decreased the paw swelling, restored body weight gain and decreased the organ index of the thymus and spleen compared with that of the CIA group. CAE (8, 16, and 32 mg/kg) treatment significantly reduced the levels of TNFα, IL-1β and PGE-2 in serum compared with the CIA group. Histopathological analysis demonstrated that CAE has obvious anti-arthritic activity. In addition, CAE (32 mg/kg) significantly decreased the levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), TNFα and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) in synovium tissues of the ankle joint compared with the CIA group. Furthermore, CAE administration significantly decreased the protein expression of phosphor-NF-κB and Cox-2 in synovium tissues of the knee joint compared with the CIA group. The results suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of CAE may account for its anti-arthritic effect, and CAE could be a potential therapeutic drug for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

  14. Fps/Fes and Fer non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinases regulate collagen- and ADP-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Senis, Y A; Sangrar, W; Zirngibl, R A; Craig, A W B; Lee, D H; Greer, P A

    2003-05-01

    Fps/Fes and Fer proto-oncoproteins are structurally related non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinases implicated in signaling downstream from cytokines, growth factors and immune receptors. We show that Fps/Fes and Fer are expressed in human and mouse platelets, and are activated following stimulation with collagen and collagen-related peptide (CRP), suggesting a role in GPVI receptor signaling. Fer was also activated following stimulation with thrombin and a protease-activated receptor4 (PAR4)-activating peptide, suggesting a role in signaling downstream from the G protein-coupled PAR4. There were no detectable perturbations in CRP-induced activation of Syk, PLCgamma2, cortactin, Erk, Jnk, Akt or p38 in platelets from mice lacking Fps/Fes, Fer, or both kinases. Platelets lacking Fps/Fes, from a targeted fps/fes null strain of mice, showed increased rates and amplitudes of collagen-induced aggregation, relative to wild-type platelets. P-Selectin expression was also elevated on the surface of Fps/Fes-null platelets in response to CRP. Fer-deficient platelets, from mice targeted with a kinase-inactivating mutation, disaggregated more rapidly than wild-type platelets in response to ADP. This report provides the first evidence that Fps/Fes and Fer are expressed in platelets and become activated downstream from the GPVI collagen receptor, and that Fer is activated downstream from a G-protein coupled receptor. Furthermore, using targeted mouse models we show that deficiency in Fps/Fes or Fer resulted in disregulated platelet aggregation and disaggregation, demonstrating a role for these kinases in regulating platelet functions.

  15. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H.; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation. PMID:27598131

  16. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-09-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation.

  17. An in vitro mouse model of congenital cytomegalovirus-induced pathogenesis of the inner ear cochlea.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Michael; Jaskoll, Tina

    2013-02-01

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the leading nongenetic etiology of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) at birth and prelingual SNHL not expressed at birth. The paucity of temporal bone autopsy specimens from infants with congenital CMV infection has hindered the critical correlation of histopathology with pathogenesis. Here, we present an in vitro embryonic mouse model of CMV-infected cochleas that mimics the human sites of viral infection and associated pathology. There is a striking dysplasia/hyperplasia in mouse CMV-infected cochlear epithelium and mesenchyme, including organ of Corti hair and supporting cells and stria vascularis. This is concomitant with significant dysregulation of p19, p21, p27, and Pcna gene expression, as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein expression. Other pathologies similar to those arising from known deafness gene mutations include downregulation of KCNQ1 protein expression in the stria vascularis, as well as hypoplastic and dysmorphic melanocytes. Thus, this model provides a relevant and reliable platform within which the detailed cell and molecular biology of CMV-induced deafness may be studied.

  18. Fabrication of Compositionally and Topographically Complex Robust Tissue Forms by 3D-Electrochemical Compaction of Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Younesi, Mousa; Islam, Anowarul; Kishore, Vipuil; Panit, Stefi; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Collagen solutions are phase-transformed to mechanically robust shell structures with curviplanar topographies using electrochemically induced pH gradients. The process enables rapid layer-by-layer deposition of collagen-rich mixtures over the entire field simultaneously to obtain compositionally diverse multilayered structures. In-plane tensile strength and modulus of the electrocompacted collagen sheet samples were 5200 -fold and 2300 -fold greater than that of uncompacted collagen samples. Out of plane compression tests showed 27 -fold and fold increase in compressive stress and 46 -fold increase in compressive modulus compared to uncompacted collagen sheets. Cells proliferated 4.9 times faster, and cellular area spread was 2.7 times greater on compacted collagen sheets. Electrocompaction also resulted in 2.9 times greater focal adhesion area than on regular collagen hydrogel. The reported improvements in the cell-matrix interactions with electrocompaction would serve to expedite the population of electrocompacted collagen scaffolds by cells. The capacity of the method to fabricate nonlinear curved topographies with compositional heterogeneous layers is demonstrated by sequential deposition of collagenhydroxyapatite layer over a collagen layer. The complex curved topography of the nasal structure is replicated by the electrochemical compaction method. The presented electrochemical compaction process is an enabling modality which holds significant promise for reconstruction of a wide spectrum of topographically complex systems such as joint surfaces, craniofacial defects, ears, nose or urogenital forms. PMID:26069162

  19. The exercise-induced biochemical milieu enhances collagen content and tensile strength of engineered ligaments.

    PubMed

    West, Daniel W D; Lee-Barthel, Ann; McIntyre, Todd; Shamim, Baubak; Lee, Cassandra A; Baar, Keith

    2015-10-15

    Exercise stimulates a dramatic change in the concentration of circulating hormones, such as growth hormone (GH), but the biological functions of this response are unclear. Pharmacological GH administration stimulates collagen synthesis; however, whether the post-exercise systemic milieu has a similar action is unknown. We aimed to determine whether the collagen content and tensile strength of tissue-engineered ligaments is enhanced by serum obtained post-exercise. Primary cells from a human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were used to engineer ligament constructs in vitro. Blood obtained from 12 healthy young men 15 min after resistance exercise contained GH concentrations that were ∼7-fold greater than resting serum (P < 0.001), whereas IGF-1 was not elevated at this time point (P = 0.21 vs. rest). Ligament constructs were treated for 7 days with medium supplemented with serum obtained at rest (RestTx) or 15 min post-exercise (ExTx), before tensile testing and collagen content analysis. Compared with RestTx, ExTx enhanced collagen content (+19%; 181 ± 33 vs. 215 ± 40 μg per construct P = 0.001) and ligament mechanical properties - maximal tensile load (+17%, P = 0.03 vs. RestTx) and ultimate tensile strength (+10%, P = 0.15 vs. RestTx). In a separate set of engineered ligaments, recombinant IGF-1, but not GH, enhanced collagen content and mechanics. Bioassays in 2D culture revealed that acute treatment with post-exercise serum activated mTORC1 and ERK1/2. In conclusion, the post-exercise biochemical milieu, but not recombinant GH, enhances collagen content and tensile strength of engineered ligaments, in association with mTORC1 and ERK1/2 activation.

  20. Ear tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100045.htm Ear tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 4 Overview The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Review Date 8/ ...

  1. Arginase inhibition prevents bleomycin-induced pulmonary hypertension, vascular remodeling, and collagen deposition in neonatal rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, Hartmut; Dhaliwal, Rupinder; Ivanovska, Julijana; Kantores, Crystal; McNamara, Patrick J; Scott, Jeremy A; Belik, Jaques; Jankov, Robert P

    2015-03-15

    Arginase is an enzyme that limits substrate L-arginine bioavailability for the production of nitric oxide by the nitric oxide synthases and produces L-ornithine, which is a precursor for collagen formation and tissue remodeling. We studied the pulmonary vascular effects of arginase inhibition in an established model of repeated systemic bleomycin sulfate administration in neonatal rats that results in pulmonary hypertension and lung injury mimicking the characteristics typical of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. We report that arginase expression is increased in the lungs of bleomycin-exposed neonatal rats and that treatment with the arginase inhibitor amino-2-borono-6-hexanoic acid prevented the bleomycin-induced development of pulmonary hypertension and deposition of collagen. Arginase inhibition resulted in increased L-arginine and L-arginine bioavailability and increased pulmonary nitric oxide production. Arginase inhibition also normalized the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and reduced bleomycin-induced nitrative stress while having no effect on bleomycin-induced inflammation. Our data suggest that arginase is a promising target for therapeutic interventions in neonates aimed at preventing lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension.

  2. Insoluble elastin reduces collagen scaffold stiffness, improves viscoelastic properties, and induces a contractile phenotype in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Alan J; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-12-01

    Biomaterials with the capacity to innately guide cell behaviour while also displaying suitable mechanical properties remain a challenge in tissue engineering. Our approach to this has been to utilise insoluble elastin in combination with collagen as the basis of a biomimetic scaffold for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Elastin was found to markedly alter the mechanical and biological response of these collagen-based scaffolds. Specifically, during extensive mechanical assessment elastin was found to reduce the specific tensile and compressive moduli of the scaffolds in a concentration dependant manner while having minimal effect on scaffold microarchitecture with both scaffold porosity and pore size still within the ideal ranges for tissue engineering applications. However, the viscoelastic properties were significantly improved with elastin addition with a 3.5-fold decrease in induced creep strain, a 6-fold increase in cyclical strain recovery, and with a four-parameter viscoelastic model confirming the ability of elastin to confer resistance to long term deformation/creep. Furthermore, elastin was found to result in the modulation of SMC phenotype towards a contractile state which was determined via reduced proliferation and significantly enhanced expression of early (α-SMA), mid (calponin), and late stage (SM-MHC) contractile proteins. This allows the ability to utilise extracellular matrix proteins alone to modulate SMC phenotype without any exogenous factors added. Taken together, the ability of elastin to alter the mechanical and biological response of collagen scaffolds has led to the development of a biomimetic biomaterial highly suitable for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

  3. UV-Induced Triggering of a Biomechanical Initiation Switch within Collagen Promotes Development of a Melanoma-Permissive Microenvironment in the Skin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    MatrigelTM has on inflammatory cell, dermal fibroblast, and melanoma cell adhesion, migration, invasion and proliferation as compared to control ECM...indicated that UVA and UVB irradiation can dose dependently induce conformational changes in both collagen type-I and collagen type-IV resulting in the...expressed αSMA, a known marker of an activated phenotype. As shown in figure 1A the in vitro cultured human dermal fibroblast used in our studies

  4. Stretch-induced network reconfiguration of collagen fibres in the human facet capsular ligament.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sijia; Bassett, Danielle S; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials can display complex spatial patterns of cellular responses to external forces. Revealing and predicting the role of these patterns in material failure require an understanding of the statistical dependencies between spatially distributed changes in a cell's local biomechanical environment, including altered collagen fibre kinematics in the extracellular matrix. Here, we develop and apply a novel extension of network science methods to investigate how excessive tensile stretch of the human cervical facet capsular ligament (FCL), a common source of chronic neck pain, affects the local reorganization of collagen fibres. We define collagen alignment networks based on similarity in fibre alignment angles measured by quantitative polarized light imaging. We quantify the reorganization of these networks following macroscopic loading by describing the dynamic reconfiguration of network communities, regions of the material that display similar fibre alignment angles. Alterations in community structure occur smoothly over time, indicating coordinated adaptation of fibres to loading. Moreover, flexibility, a measure of network reconfiguration, tracks the loss of FCL's mechanical integrity at the onset of anomalous realignment (AR) and regions of AR display altered community structure. These findings use novel network-based techniques to explain abnormal collagen fibre reorganization, a dynamic and coordinated multivariate process underlying tissue failure.

  5. Osteoprotegerin Reduces Osteoclast Numbers and Prevents Bone Erosion in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Romas, Evan; Sims, Natalie A.; Hards, Daphne K.; Lindsay, Mandy; Quinn, Julian W.M.; Ryan, Peter F.J.; Dunstan, Colin R.; Martin, T. John; Gillespie, Matthew T.

    2002-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by progressive synovial inflammation and joint destruction. While matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are implicated in the erosion of unmineralized cartilage, bone destruction involves osteoclasts, the specialized cells that resorb calcified bone matrix. RANK ligand (RANKL) expressed by stromal cells and T cells, and its cognate receptor, RANK, were identified as a critical ligand-receptor pair for osteoclast differentiation and survival. A decoy receptor for RANKL, osteoprotegerin, (OPG) impinges on this system and regulates osteoclast numbers and activity. RANKL is also expressed in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in which focal collections of osteoclasts are prominent at sites of bone destruction. To determine the role of RANK signaling events in the effector phase of CIA, we investigated effects of Fc-osteoprotegerin fusion protein (Fc-OPG) in CIA. After induction of CIA in Dark Agouti rats, test animals were treated with or without Fc-OPG (3 mg/kg/day) subcutaneously for 5 days, beginning at the onset of disease. Paraffin-embedded joints were then analyzed histologically and the adjacent bone assessed by histomorphometry. Osteoclasts were identified using TRAP staining and expression of the mRNA for OPG and RANKL was identified by in situ hybridization. The results indicated that short-term Fc-OPG effectively prevented joint destruction, even though it had no impact on the inflammatory aspects of CIA. In arthritic joints, Fc-OPG depleted osteoclast numbers by over 75% and diminished bone erosion scores by over 60%. Although cartilage loss was also reduced by Fc-OPG, the effects on cartilage were less striking than those on bone. In arthritic joints OPG mRNA was highly expressed and co-localized with RANK ligand, and treatment with Fc-OPG did not affect the expression of endogenous RANKL or OPG mRNA. These data demonstrate that short term Fc-OPG treatment has powerful anti-erosive effects, principally on bone, even though

  6. Flow-Induced Crystallization of Collagen: A Potentially Critical Mechanism in Early Tissue Formation.

    PubMed

    Paten, Jeffrey A; Siadat, Seyed Mohammad; Susilo, Monica E; Ismail, Ebraheim N; Stoner, Jayson L; Rothstein, Jonathan P; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2016-05-24

    The type I collagen monomer is one of nature's most exquisite and prevalent structural tools. Its 300 nm triple-helical motifs assemble into tough extracellular fibers that transition seamlessly across tissue boundaries and exceed cell dimensions by up to 4 orders of magnitude. In spite of extensive investigation, no existing model satisfactorily explains how such continuous structures are generated and grown precisely where they are needed (aligned in the path of force) by discrete, microscale cells using materials with nanoscale dimensions. We present a simple fiber drawing experiment, which demonstrates that slightly concentrated type I collagen monomers can be "flow-crystallized" to form highly oriented, continuous, hierarchical fibers at cell-achievable strain rates (<1 s(-1)) and physiologically relevant concentrations (∼50 μM). We also show that application of tension following the drawing process maintains the structural integrity of the fibers. While mechanical tension has been shown to be a critical factor driving collagen fibril formation during tissue morphogenesis in developing animals, the precise role of force in the process of building tissue is not well understood. Our data directly couple mechanical tension, specifically the extensional strain rate, to collagen fibril assembly. We further derive a "growth equation" which predicts that application of extensional strains, either globally by developing muscles or locally by fibroblasts, can rapidly drive the fusion of already formed short fibrils to produce long-range, continuous fibers. The results provide a pathway to scalable connective tissue manufacturing and support a mechano-biological model of collagen fibril deposition and growth in vivo.

  7. Autologous collagen induced chondrogenesis (ACIC: Shetty-Kim technique) - A matrix based acellular single stage arthroscopic cartilage repair technique.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Asode Ananthram; Kim, Seok Jung; Shetty, Vishvas; Jang, Jae Deog; Huh, Sung Woo; Lee, Dong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The defects of articular cartilage in the knee joint are a common degenerative disease and currently there are several established techniques to treat this problem, each with their own advantages and shortcomings. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is the current gold standard but the technique is expensive, time-consuming and most versions require two stage procedures and an arthrotomy. Autologous collagen induced chondrogenesis (ACIC) is a single-stage arthroscopic procedure and we developed. This method uses microfracture technique with atelocollagen mixed with fibrin gel to treat articular cartilage defects. We introduce this ACIC techniques and its scientific background.

  8. What Is an Ear Infection?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the germs bother your outer ear, it's called swimmer's ear. The middle ear is a small pocket ... What's Hearing Loss? Taking Care of Your Ears Swimmer's Ear Perforated Eardrum What's Earwax? Contact Us Print ...

  9. Synergistic effect of interleukin 1 alpha on nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-induced up-regulation of human beta-defensin 2 in middle ear epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung-Kyun; Lee, Haa-Yung; Pan, Huiqi; Takeshita, Tamotsu; Park, Raekil; Cha, Kiweon; Andalibi, Ali; Lim, David J

    2006-01-01

    Background We recently showed that beta-defensins have antimicrobial activity against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and that interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) up-regulates the transcription of beta-defensin 2 (DEFB4 according to new nomenclature of the Human Genome Organization) in human middle ear epithelial cells via a Src-dependent Raf-MEK1/2-ERK signaling pathway. Based on these observations, we investigated if human middle ear epithelial cells could release IL-1 alpha upon exposure to a lysate of NTHi and if this cytokine could have a synergistic effect on beta-defensin 2 up-regulation by the bacterial components. Methods The studies described herein were carried out using epithelial cell lines as well as a murine model of acute otitis media (OM). Human cytokine macroarray analysis was performed to detect the released cytokines in response to NTHi exposure. Real time quantitative PCR was done to compare the induction of IL-1 alpha or beta-defensin 2 mRNAs and to identify the signaling pathways involved. Direct activation of the beta-defensin 2 promoter was monitored using a beta-defensin 2 promoter-Luciferase construct. An IL-1 alpha blocking antibody was used to demonstrate the direct involvement of this cytokine on DEFB4 induction. Results Middle ear epithelial cells released IL-1 alpha when stimulated by NTHi components and this cytokine acted in an autocrine/paracrine synergistic manner with NTHi to up-regulate beta-defensin 2. This synergistic effect of IL-1 alpha on NTHi-induced beta-defensin 2 up-regulation appeared to be mediated by the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Conclusion We demonstrate that IL-1 alpha is secreted by middle ear epithelial cells upon exposure to NTHi components and that it can synergistically act with certain of these molecules to up-regulate beta-defensin 2 via the p38 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:16433908

  10. Treatment for chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice using parathyroid hormone agonists and antagonists linked to a collagen binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Suda, Hirofumi; Miyata, Shigeru; Sakon, Joshua; Matsushita, Osamu; Gensure, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) agonists and antagonists have been shown to improve hair growth after chemotherapy; however, rapid clearance and systemic side-effects complicate their usage. To facilitate delivery and retention to skin, we fused PTH agonists and antagonists to the collagen binding domain (CBD) of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase. in-vitro studies showed that the agonist fusion protein, PTH-CBD, bound collagen and activated the PTH/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor in SaOS-2 cells. The antagonist fusion proteins, PTH(7–33)-CBD and PTH([−1]–33)-CBD, also bound collagen and antagonized PTH(1–34) effect in SaOS-2 cells; however, PTH(7–33)-CBD had lower intrinsic activity. Distribution studies confirmed uptake of PTH-CBD to the skin at 1 and 12 hr after subcutaneous injection. We assessed in vivo efficacy of PTH-CBD and PTH(7–33)-CBD in C57BL/6J mice. Animals were depilated to synchronize the hair follicles; treated on Day 7 with agonist, antagonist, or vehicle; treated on Day 9 with cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg i.p.) or vehicle; and sacrificed on Day 39. Normal mice (no chemo and no treatment) showed rapid regrowth of hair and normal histology. Chemo + Vehicle mice showed reduced hair regrowth and decreased pigmentation; histology revealed reduced number and dystrophic anagen/catagen follicles. Chemo + Antagonist mice were grossly and histologically indistinguishable from Chemo + Vehicle mice. Chemo + Agonist mice showed more rapid regrowth and repigmentation of hair; histologically, there was a normal number of hair follicles, most of which were in the anagen phase. Overall, the agonist PTH-CBD had prominent effects in reducing chemotherapy-induced damage of hair follicles and may show promise as a therapy for chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:22130912

  11. Swimmer's Ear (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Swimmer's Ear (Otitis Externa) KidsHealth > For Parents > Swimmer's Ear (Otitis ... español Otitis del nadador (otitis externa) About Swimmer's Ear Otitis externa (OE) — commonly known as swimmer's ear — ...

  12. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2016-01-01

    Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs) with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1) after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1) overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder) at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue under

  13. Preliminary evaluation of collagen as a component in the thermally induced 'weld'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemole, G. M., Jr.; Anderson, R. Rox; DeCoste, Sue

    1991-06-01

    A simple thermodynamic approach to tissue 'welding' was studied. Fresh bovine tendon (67% type I collagen) was sectioned into disk shaped pieces, pairs of which were inserted between bowed glass coverslips and wrapped in aluminum foil. The packets were heated in a waterbath according to two protocols. In group I, packets were tested for four minutes at temperatures between 55-65 degree(s)C, in 1 degree(s)C intervals. In group II, the packets were kept at 62 degree(s)C for 4 minutes while the rate of cooling was altered. The force necessary to separate the tendon disks was then measured. The optimal temperature for tissue bonding (group I) was 62 degree(s)C (598 gm/in2). Stress values below 250 gm/in2 could be achieved without heat application and were considered non-welds. Group II showed that the faster the sample cools, the stronger the bond. Several conclusions can be postulated. The narrow temperature region necessary for tissue 'welding' strongly suggests that melting of type I collagen fibrils is involved. Bonding presumably occurs at 62 degree(s)C by allowing (alpha) -strands from the collagen super-helix molecule to form new, random connections. Group II results suggest that trans-incisional reannealing of unraveled helices does not play a role in tissue bonding. Rapid cooling allows less time for extended helix reformation; same-side a-helix reannealing may inhibit effective welds by reducing sites for trans-incisional visco-elastic bonding. Although the exact nature and optimization of thermal tissue 'welds' remains unclear, the behavior of collagen appears to play a central role.

  14. Interference-based linear birefringence measurements of thermally induced changes in collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitland, Duncan J.; Walsh, Joseph T.

    1994-08-01

    Linear birefringence (LB) is a polarization-specific property of many semi-crystalline structures in tissue. Specifically, collagen, with its triple helix conformation, exhibits LB in its native state. Rat tail tendon (RTT) was chosen for the LB experiments because it is > 90% collagen and the collagen fiber alignment is nearly parallel with the RTT length. This alignment results in RTT exhibiting uniaxial characteristics such that two properly chosen optical axes display differing refractive indices ((Delta) n equals nslow - nfast). RTT, which has an elliptical cross section, has its slow axis parallel to the tendon's length and a fast axes along the tendon's cross section. Native RTT has a refractive index difference of (Delta) n equals 1.5 X 10-3. For a typical tendon thickness of 200 micrometers , the phase shift, (delta) equals n*d (d, diameter), is approximately equal to 300 nm (transmission measurement). Heating of RTT results in a repeatable loss of (delta) . If monochromatic light is used the sample's output intensity is proportional to sin2((delta) (pi) /(lambda) ) where (lambda) is the wavelength of the light. Thus, given the native phase shift, the incident light's wavelength may be chosen such that the sample's loss of LB with heating is intensity- mapped on the sample's image.

  15. Mechanism for adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR56-mediated RhoA activation induced by collagen III stimulation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rong; Jeong, Sung-Jin; Yang, Annie; Wen, Miaoyun; Saslowsky, David E; Lencer, Wayne I; Araç, Demet; Piao, Xianhua

    2014-01-01

    GPR56 is a member of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Despite the importance of GPR56 in brain development, where mutations cause a devastating human brain malformation called bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria (BFPP), the signaling mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. Like many other adhesion GPCRs, GPR56 is cleaved via a GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain into N- and C-terminal fragments (GPR56N and GPR56C); however, the biological significance of this cleavage is elusive. Taking advantage of the recent identification of a GPR56 ligand and the presence of BFPP-associated mutations, we investigated the molecular mechanism of GPR56 signaling. We demonstrate that ligand binding releases GPR56N from the membrane-bound GPR56C and triggers the association of GPR56C with lipid rafts and RhoA activation. Furthermore, one of the BFPP-associated mutations, L640R, does not affect collagen III-induced lipid raft association of GPR56. Instead, it specifically abolishes collagen III-mediated RhoA activation. Together, these findings reveal a novel signaling mechanism that may apply to other members of the adhesion GPCR family.

  16. Deficiency of β-arrestin1 ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis with impaired TH17 cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Wei, Bin; Guo, Ao; Liu, Chang; Huang, Shichao; Du, Fang; Fan, Wei; Bao, Chunde; Pei, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease in which interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing T helper 17 (TH17) cells have been critically involved. We show that in patients with RA, the expression of a multifunctional regulator β-arrestin1 was significantly up-regulated in peripheral and synovial CD4+ T cells, which correlated well with active phases of RA. In collagen-induced arthritis, deficiency of β-arrestin1 ameliorated disease with decreased TH17 cell differentiation, proinflammatory cytokine production, synovitis, and cartilage and bone destruction. Further mechanistic study reveals that β-arrestin1 promoted signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation required for TH17 cell differentiation through scaffolding the interaction of Janus kinase 1 and STAT3. These findings indicate a critical role for β-arrestin1 in the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis and TH17 cell differentiation and suggest β-arrestin1 as a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target for RA. PMID:23589893

  17. Nimesulide improves the disease modifying anti-rheumatic profile of methotrexate in mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Inglis, Julia J; Nofal, Salwa M; Khalifa, Amani E; Williams, Richard O; El-Eraky, Wafaa I; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2010-10-10

    Methotrexate is a disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug that is widely used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Nimesulide is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which is frequently used as adjuvant therapy for symptomatic alleviation of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we have evaluated the potential influence of nimesulide on the disease modifying anti-rheumatic properties of methotrexate using the collagen-induced arthritis model. Mice were immunized with collagen type II for the induction of arthritis and treated with methotrexate (2.5mg/kg) twice a week, nimesulide (20mg/kg) every other day or a combination of both drugs. Treatment started one week after the onset of arthritis until day 40. An arthritic index was used to compare the severity of arthritis between different treatments. In addition, articular hyperalgesia, joint stiffness, radiological deterioration and intra-articular leucocytic infiltration were evaluated. Methotrexate alone showed modest but significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, and the effects of nimesulide were comparable. On the other hand, nimesulide significantly improved the disease modifying anti-rheumatic profile of methotrexate in terms of arthritic index and joint mobility. Furthermore, although nimesulide failed to show any radiological evidence of articular protection, it significantly improved methotrexate-induced joint protection as judged by X-ray analysis.

  18. Cholecystokinin octapeptide exerts its therapeutic effects on collagen-induced arthritis by suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaoxia; Cong, Bin; Shan, Baoen; Zhang, Jingge; Chen, Haiying; Wang, Tao; Ma, Chunling; Qin, Jin; Wen, Di; Yu, Feng

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an accepted murine experimental disease model with diverse histopathological features similar to human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CIA was induced in DBA/1J mice by immunization with chicken collagen type II (CII). CCK-8 at different doses was intraperitoneally administered daily for 1 week. Mice treated with CCK-8 at doses of 5 and 10 nmol but not 1 nmol displayed much delayed onset of CIA and significantly lower incidence and decreased severity of arthritis. CCK-8 treatment significantly reduced the production of cytokines (IL-17, IL-23, IL-6 and TNF-α) and chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in the joints of arthritic mice or in synovial cell culture supernatant, and increased the levels of IFN-γ and TGF-β. T cells from CCK-8 treated mice proliferated much less, produced low level of IL-17 and high levels of IFN-γ and TGF-β. Moreover, CCK-8 treated mice showed lower levels of CII-specific IgG, particularly that of IgG2a, in sera than those from control mice. These results indicate that CCK-8 is effective in suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 responses in CIA. CCK-8 may represent a new therapeutic modality for rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. The nonpsychoactive cannabis constituent cannabidiol is an oral anti-arthritic therapeutic in murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Malfait, A M; Gallily, R; Sumariwalla, P F; Malik, A S; Andreakos, E; Mechoulam, R; Feldmann, M

    2000-08-15

    The therapeutic potential of cannabidiol (CBD), the major nonpsychoactive component of cannabis, was explored in murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was elicited by immunizing DBA/1 mice with type II collagen (CII) in complete Freund's adjuvant. The CII used was either bovine or murine, resulting in classical acute CIA or in chronic relapsing CIA, respectively. CBD was administered after onset of clinical symptoms, and in both models of arthritis the treatment effectively blocked progression of arthritis. CBD was equally effective when administered i.p. or orally. The dose dependency showed a bell-shaped curve, with an optimal effect at 5 mg/kg per day i.p. or 25 mg/kg per day orally. Clinical improvement was associated with protection of the joints against severe damage. Ex vivo, draining lymph node cells from CBD-treated mice showed a diminished CII-specific proliferation and IFN-gamma production, as well as a decreased release of tumor necrosis factor by knee synovial cells. In vitro effects of CBD included a dose-dependent suppression of lymphocyte proliferation, both mitogen-stimulated and antigen-specific, and the blockade of the Zymosan-triggered reactive oxygen burst by peritoneal granulocytes. It also was found that CBD administration was capable of blocking the lipopolysaccharide-induced rise in serum tumor necrosis factor in C57/BL mice. Taken together, these data show that CBD, through its combined immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory actions, has a potent anti-arthritic effect in CIA.

  20. Artemisinin analogue SM934 attenuate collagen-induced arthritis by suppressing T follicular helper cells and T helper 17 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ze-Min; Yang, Xiao-Qian; Zhu, Feng-Hua; He, Shi-Jun; Tang, Wei; Zuo, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    SM934 is an artemisinin analogue with immunosuppressive properties and potent therapeutic activity against lupus-like diseases in autoimmune mice. In this report, the therapeutic efficacy and underlying mechanisms of SM934 on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was investigated using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1J mice. We demonstrated that SM934 treatment alleviate the severity of arthritis in CIA mice with established manifestations. The therapeutic benefits were associated with ameliorated joint swelling and reduced extent of bone erosion and destruction. Further, administration of SM934 diminished the development of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells and Th17 cells and suppressed the production of pathogenic antibodies, without altering the proportion of germinal center B cells. Ex vivo, SM934 treatment inhibited the bovine type II collagen (CII) induced proliferation and inflammatory cytokines secretion of CII -reactive T cells. In vitro, SM934 impeded the polarization of naïve CD4+ T cells into Tfh cells and the expression of its transcript factor Bcl-6. Moreover, SM934 decreased the IL-21-producing CD4+ T cells and dampened the IL-21 downstream signaling through STAT3. These finding offered the convincing evidence that artemisinin derivative might attenuate RA by simultaneously interfering with the generation of Tfh cells and Th17 cells as well as the subsequent antibody-mediated immune responses. PMID:27897259

  1. Fasudil inhibits proliferation and collagen synthesis and induces apoptosis of human fibroblasts derived from urethral scar via the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ning; Chen, Shao-Hao; Qu, Gen-Yi; Li, Xiao-Dong; Lin, Wen; Xue, Xue-Yi; Lin, Yun-Zhi; Zheng, Qing-Shui; Wei, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Fasudil has shown antifibrotic effects in various fibrotic diseases. However, its effects on human urethral fibroblasts are unknown. This study evaluated the effects of fasudil on cellular proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and collagen synthesis in human fibroblasts derived from urethral scar tissues. Human urethral scar fibroblasts were cultured by explant and incubated for 24 h or 48 h with fasudil (12.5, 25, 50 µmol/L) with or without transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1, 10 ng/mL), or left untreated (control). Cell proliferation and migration was determined by MTT assay and Transwell chambers, respectively. Apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. Levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP), LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1), phospho-cofilin (p-cofilin), collagen I, and collagen III were determined by Western blot. Compared with the control group, TGF-β1 was associated with a significant increase in urethral fibroblast proliferation and migration, and α-SMA, MLCP, LIMK1, p-cofilin, collagen I, and collagen III levels. Compared with the control group, fasudil (with or without TGF-β1), significantly and negatively correlated, in a dose-dependent manner, with the proliferation and migration of urethral fibroblasts, as well as α-SMA, MLCP, LIMK1, p-cofilin, collagen I, and collagen III levels. Moreover, fasudil significantly induced apoptosis of fibroblasts induced by TGF-β1. Higher concentrations of fasudil (50 μmol/L) were associated with greater cell apoptosis without TGF-β1 stimulation compared with the normal control group. Fasudil, with or without TGF-β1 stimulation, may inhibit human urethral fibroblasts proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and collagen synthesis via the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway. PMID:28386357

  2. Protection of chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia against collagen-induced arthritis in rat through increasing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Cui, Fang; Liu, Ai-Jing; Li, Jiao; Ma, Hui-Juan; Cheng, Ming; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2011-04-25

    The aim of present study was to investigate the effect of chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (CIHH) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rat. Fifty male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: CIHH pre-treatment group (Pre-T), pre-control group (Pre-C), CIHH post-treatment group (Post-T), post-control group (Post-C) and blank control group (Con). The rats in Pre-T and Post-T groups were exposed to 28 d of hypobaric hypoxia (simulated 3 000 m altitude, 5 h per day, pO2 = 108.8 mmHg, 14% O2) in a hypobaric chamber before and 12 days after CIA induction, respectively. The rats in Pre-C and Post-C groups were only experienced CIA induction, being control groups for Pre-T and Post-T groups, respectively. The rats in Con group were not given any treatment. The thickness of two-hind paw of rat was measured with spiral micrometer and the degree of arthritis was evaluated by arthritis index (AI). Morphological changes of ankle joint were observed through HE staining. The apoptotic rate in synovial tissue was measured by terminal dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and the apoptotic rate of CD3(+) T lymphocyte in spleen was measured by flow cytometry technique. The protein expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax were measured using immunohistochemistry SP method. The results showed that incidence rate of CIA in Pre-T rats was lower than that in Pre-C rats (P < 0.05). AI in Pre-T and Post-T rats were smaller than those in Pre-C and Post-C, respectively (P < 0.05). In Pre-C and Post-C rats, there were hyperplasia of synovial cell, pannus forming, infiltration with inflammatory cell, and destroyed cartilage and bone in ankle joint. On the contrary, pathological changes of ankle joint were alleviated significantly in Pre-T and Post-T rats. Compared with Pre-C and Post-C rats, apoptotic rates of synovial cell and T lymphocyte in Pre-T and Post-T rats were increased (P < 0.05). As to the possible anti-apoptosis mechanism, CIHH, no matter before and after CIA induction

  3. Role of CD14 and TLR4 in type I, type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced normal human skin fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongming; Li, Juncong; Wang, Yihe; Hu, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to investigate the role of CD14 and TLR4 in type I, type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced normal human skin fibroblasts. The secondary aim was to provide theoretical basis for the molecular mechanisms of scar formation induced by LPS. Methods: The normal skin fibroblasts cultured in vitro were randomly divided into four groups: 0.1 μg/mL LPS reference group, CD14 pretreatment + LPS, TLR4 pretreatment + LPS, CD14 and TLR4 pretreatment + LPS. The collagen DNA synthesis was assessed by 3H-proline incorporation method. Real-time Quantitative PCR was used to detect type I, type III collagen mRNA expression. Results: Similar results were revealed for mRNA expression levels. The immunofluorescence staining suggested that type I and type III collagen were expressed in all investigated groups and that the expression was differentially downregulated in groups B, C, D. ELISA demonstrated markedly decreased levels in secreting type I, type III collagens and hydroxyproline in groups B, C, D (P<0.05), and the lowest level was detected in group D (P<0.01). Conclusion: Pretreatment with CD14 or TLR4 alone or their combination can significantly reduce the levels of type I and type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion, with the most notable reduction detected in case of CD14 and TLR4 combined. We could thus conclude that both CD14 and TLR4 are involved in type I and type III collagen expression, synthesis and secretion in LPS-induced skin fibroblasts. PMID:25932184

  4. Oxidant exposure induces cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1) via c-Jun/AP-1 to reduce collagen expression in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhaoping; Robichaud, Patrick; He, Tianyuan; Fisher, Gary J; Voorhees, John J; Quan, Taihao

    2014-01-01

    Human skin is a primary target of oxidative stress from reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated from both extrinsic and intrinsic sources. Oxidative stress inhibits the production of collagen, the most abundant protein in skin, and thus contributes to connective tissue aging. Here we report that cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1), a negative regulator of collagen production, is markedly induced by ROS and mediates loss of type I collagen in human dermal fibroblasts. Conversely, antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine significantly reduced CCN1 expression and prevented ROS-induced loss of type I collagen in both human dermal fibroblasts and human skin in vivo. ROS increased c-Jun, a critical member of transcription factor AP-1 complex, and increased c-Jun binding to the AP-1 site of the CCN1 promoter. Functional blocking of c-Jun significantly reduced CCN1 promoter and gene expression and thus prevented ROS-induced loss of type I collagen. Targeting the c-Jun/CCN1 axis may provide clinical benefit for connective tissue aging in human skin.

  5. Oxidant Exposure Induces Cysteine-Rich Protein 61 (CCN1) via c-Jun/AP-1 to Reduce Collagen Expression in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhaoping; Robichaud, Patrick; He, Tianyuan; Fisher, Gary J.; Voorhees, John J.; Quan, Taihao

    2014-01-01

    Human skin is a primary target of oxidative stress from reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated from both extrinsic and intrinsic sources. Oxidative stress inhibits the production of collagen, the most abundant protein in skin, and thus contributes to connective tissue aging. Here we report that cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1), a negative regulator of collagen production, is markedly induced by ROS and mediates loss of type I collagen in human dermal fibroblasts. Conversely, antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine significantly reduced CCN1 expression and prevented ROS-induced loss of type I collagen in both human dermal fibroblasts and human skin in vivo. ROS increased c-Jun, a critical member of transcription factor AP-1 complex, and increased c-Jun binding to the AP-1 site of the CCN1 promoter. Functional blocking of c-Jun significantly reduced CCN1 promoter and gene expression and thus prevented ROS-induced loss of type I collagen. Targeting the c-Jun/CCN1 axis may provide clinical benefit for connective tissue aging in human skin. PMID:25536346

  6. Inflammasome-independent role of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) in T cell priming is critical for collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ippagunta, Sirish K; Brand, David D; Luo, Jiwen; Boyd, Kelli L; Calabrese, Christopher; Stienstra, Rinke; Van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B; Lamkanfi, Mohamed; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2010-04-16

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease with 1% prevalence in the industrialized world. The contributions of the inflammasome components Nlrp3, ASC, and caspase-1 in the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis have not been characterized. Here, we show that ASC(-/-) mice were protected from arthritis, whereas Nlrp3(-/-) and caspase-1(-/-) mice were susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis. Unlike Nlrp3(-/-) and caspase-1(-/-) mice, the production of collagen-specific antibodies was abolished in ASC(-/-) mice. This was due to a significantly reduced antigen-specific activation of lymphocytes by ASC(-/-) dendritic cells. Antigen-induced proliferation of purified ASC(-/-) T cells was restored upon incubation with wild type dendritic cells, but not when cultured with ASC(-/-) dendritic cells. Moreover, direct T cell receptor ligation with CD3 and CD28 antibodies induced a potent proliferation of ASC(-/-) T cells, indicating that ASC is specifically required in dendritic cells for antigen-induced T cell activation. Therefore, ASC fulfills a hitherto unrecognized inflammasome-independent role in dendritic cells that is crucial for T cell priming and the induction of antigen-specific cellular and humoral immunity and the onset of collagen-induced arthritis.

  7. Influence of tetrahydrocurcumin on tail tendon collagen contents and its properties in rats with streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pari, Leelavinothan; Murugan, Pidaran

    2007-12-01

    Changes in the structural and functional properties of collagen caused by advanced glycation might be of importance for the etiology of late-stage complications in diabetics. Curcumin is the most active component of turmeric. It is believed that curcumin is a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) is one of the major metabolites of curcumin, exhibiting many of the same physiological and pharmacological activities of curcumin and in some systems may exert greater antioxidant activity than curcumin. In diabetic rats, hydroxyproline and collagen content as well as its degree of cross-linking were increased, as shown by increased extent of glycation, collagen-linked fluorescence, neutral salt collagen, and decreased acid and pepsin solubility. Administration of THC for 45 days to diabetic rats significantly reduced the accumulation and cross-linking of collagen. The effects of THC were comparable with those of curcumin. In conclusion, administration of THC had a positive influence on the content of collagen and its properties in streptozotocin- and nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats. THC was found to be more effective than curcumin.

  8. Effects of Wutou Decoction on DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications in Rats with Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying; Hu, Yong-Hong; Tu, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wutou decoction (WTD) has been wildly applied in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and experimental arthritis in rats for many years. Epigenetic deregulation is associated with the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the effects of WTD on epigenetic changes are unclear. This study is set to explore the effects of WTD on DNA methylation and histone modifications in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The CIA model was established by the stimulation of collagen and adjuvant. The knee synovium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methylated CpG binding domain 2 (MBD2) expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by Real-Time PCR. The global DNA histone H3-K4/H3-K27 methylation and total histones H3 and H4 acetylation of PBMCs were detected. Results. Our data demonstrated that the DNMT1 mRNA expression was significantly lowered in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). The DNA methylation level was significantly reduced in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). Moreover, H3 acetylation of PBMCs was overexpressed in WTD compared with CIA (P < 0.05). Conclusions. WTD may modulate DNA methylation and histone modifications, functioning as anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:27042192

  9. Release of biologically active TGF-beta from airway smooth muscle cells induces autocrine synthesis of collagen.

    PubMed

    Coutts, A; Chen, G; Stephens, N; Hirst, S; Douglas, D; Eichholtz, T; Khalil, N

    2001-05-01

    In severe or chronic asthma, there is an increase in airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) mass as well as an increase in connective tissue proteins in the smooth muscle layer of airways. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) exists in three isoforms in mammals and is a potent regulator of connective tissue protein synthesis. Using immunohistochemistry, we had previously demonstrated that ASMCs contain large quantities of TGF-beta1-3. In this study, we demonstrate that bovine ASMC-derived TGF-beta associates with the TGF-beta latency binding protein-1 (LTBP-1) expressed by the same cells. The TGF-beta associated with LTBP-1 localizes TGF-beta extracellularly. Furthermore, plasmin, a serine protease, regulates the secretion of a biologically active form of TGF-beta by ASMCs as well as the release of extracellular TGF-beta. The biologically active TGF-beta released by plasmin induces ASMCs to synthesize collagen I in an autocrine manner. The autocrine induction of collagen expression by ASMCs may contribute to the irreversible fibrosis and remodeling seen in the airways of some asthmatics.

  10. Moxibustion at mingmen reduces inflammation and decreases IL-6 in a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Morihiro; Mimura, Naomi; Ikemoto, Hideshi; Ishikawa, Shintaro; Nakanishi-Ueda, Takako; Sunagawa, Masataka; Hisamitsu, Tadashi

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of moxibustion (MOX) treatment at the GV4 and CV12 acupoints, and to determine the correlations between MOX treatment and interleukin (IL)-6 and corticosterone levels in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. CIA mice were immunized twice intradermally over a 3-week interval with bovine type II collagen. After the second immunization (day 21), MOX was applied to the mouse equivalent of the GV4 and CV12 acupoints with a 1mg moxa cone five times/day. Clinical symptoms of CIA were observed three times/week until day 35. The concentrations of IL-6 and corticosterone in the blood samples were measured by immunoassay kits. At day 35, the incidence of CIA was significantly decreased in mice treated with MOX at the GV4 acupoint (78%, n=23, p<0.05), compared to untreated CIA mice (100%) and mice treated with MOX at the CV12 acupoint (100%). IL-6 and corticosterone levels were significantly increased by immunization. IL-6 levels significantly decreased in mice treated with MOX at the GV4 acupoint. These results suggest that MOX treatment suppressed CIA at the GV4 acupoint, not at the CV12 acupoint, possibly through inhibition of IL-6 production.

  11. Therapeutic effect of erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1) on collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Eun; Kim, Sungryung; Park, Sunyoung; Houh, Younkyung; Yang, Yoolhee; Park, Seung Beom; Kim, Sangyoon; Kim, Daejin; Hur, Dae Young; Kim, Seonghan

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease, and multiple inflammatory cytokines are involved in RA pathogenesis. Interleukin (IL)-18, in particular, has a significant positive correlation with RA. In this study, we investigated the effect of erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1), which is negatively regulated by IL-18, in an animal model of inflammatory arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1J mice. Treatment of mice with recombinant (r)Erdr1 significantly suppressed the severity of arthritis, histologic features of arthritic tissue, and serum levels of anti-collagen autoantibodies (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a and IgM) in CIA. In addition, IL-18 expression was reduced in the affected synovium of rErdr1-treated mice. Interestingly, Erdr1 treatment suppressed migration in contrast to the pro-migratory effect of IL-18, indicating the therapeutic effects of Erdr1 on CIA through inhibiting synovial fibroblast migration. In addition, Erdr1 inhibited activation of ERK1/2, a key signaling pathway in migration of various cell types. Taken together, these data show that rErdr1 exerts therapeutic effects on RA by inhibiting synovial fibroblast migration, suggesting that rErdr1 treatment might be an effective therapeutic approach for RA. PMID:27823968

  12. Cadmium induces alpha(1)collagen (I) and metallothionein II gene and alters the antioxidant system in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    del Carmen, Escobar Ma; Souza, Verónica; Bucio, Leticia; Hernández, Elizabeth; Damián-Matsumura, Pablo; Zaga, Verónica; Gutiérrez-Ruiz, Ma Concepción

    2002-01-15

    The mechanism of cadmium-mediated hepatotoxicity has been the subject of numerous investigations, principally in hepatocytes. Although, some uncertainties persist, sufficient evidence has emerged to provide a reasonable account of the toxic process in parenchymal cells. However, there is no information about the effect of cadmium in other hepatic cell types, such as stellate cells (fat storing cells, Ito cells, perisinusoidal cells, parasinusoidal cells, lipocytes). Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) express a quiescent phenotype in a healthy liver and acquire an activated phenotype in liver injury. These cells play an important role in the fibrogenic process. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a 24 h treatment of low Cd concentrations in glutathione content, lipid peroxidation damage, cytosolic free Ca, antioxidant enzyme activities: glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase and catalase along with the capacity of this heavy metal to induce metallothionein II and alpha(1)collagen (I) in an hepatic stellate cell line (CFSC-2G). Cd-treated cells increased lipid peroxidation and the content of cytosolic free calcium, decreased glutathione content and superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity. Cd was able to induce the expression of the metallothionein II and alpha(1)collagen (I) gene, that was not described in this cell type. Cadmium may act as a pro-fibrogenic agent in the liver probably by inducing oxidative damage by enhancing lipid peroxidation and altering the antioxidant system of the cells. Although, the exact role metallothionein induction plays in this process is unknown, it probably, provides a cytosolic pool of potential binding sites to sequester ionic Cd, thereby decreasing its toxicity.

  13. Simvastatin inhibits transforming growth factor-β1-induced expression of type I collagen, CTGF, and α-SMA in keloid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mun, Je-Ho; Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Jae-Ho; Kim, Moon-Bum; Ko, Hyun-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Simvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase inhibitor, is used to reduce cholesterol levels. Accumulating evidence has revealed the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of simvastatin that prevent cardiovascular diseases. In addition, the beneficial effects of statins on fibrosis of various organs have been reported. However, the functional effect of statins on dermal fibrosis of keloids has not yet been explored. The objective of this study was to determine whether simvastatin could affect dermal fibrosis associated with keloids. We examined the effect of simvastatin on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced production of type I collagen, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF or CCN2), and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Keloid fibroblasts were cultured and exposed to different concentrations of simvastatin in the presence of TGF-β1, and the effects of simvastatin on TGF-β1-induced collagen and CTGF production in keloid fibroblasts were determined. The type I collagen, CTGF, and α-SMA expression levels and the Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation levels were assessed by Western blotting. The effect of simvastatin on cell viability was evaluated by assessing the colorimetric conversion of 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. Simvastatin suppressed TGF-β1-induced type I collagen, CTGF, and α-SMA production in a concentration-dependent manner. The TGF-β1-induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation levels were abrogated by simvastatin pretreatment. The inhibition of type I collagen, CTGF, and α-SMA expression by simvastatin was reversed by geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, suggesting that the simvastatin-induced cellular responses were due to inhibition of small GTPase Rho involvement. A RhoA activation assay showed that preincubation with simvastatin significantly blocked TGF-β1-induced RhoA activation. The Rho-associated coiled kinase inhibitor Y27632 abrogated TGF-β1-induced production of type I collagen

  14. Engineering fibrin-based tissue constructs from myofibroblasts and application of constraints and strain to induce cell and collagen reorganization.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Nicky; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2013-10-28

    Collagen content and organization in developing collagenous tissues can be influenced by local tissue strains and tissue constraint. Tissue engineers aim to use these principles to create tissues with predefined collagen architectures. A full understanding of the exact underlying processes of collagen remodeling to control the final tissue architecture, however, is lacking. In particular, little is known about the (re)orientation of collagen fibers in response to changes in tissue mechanical loading conditions. We developed an in vitro model system, consisting of biaxially-constrained myofibroblast-seeded fibrin constructs, to further elucidate collagen (re)orientation in response to i) reverting biaxial to uniaxial static loading conditions and ii) cyclic uniaxial loading of the biaxially-constrained constructs before and after a change in loading direction, with use of the Flexcell FX4000T loading device. Time-lapse confocal imaging is used to visualize collagen (re)orientation in a nondestructive manner. Cell and collagen organization in the constructs can be visualized in real-time, and an internal reference system allows us to relocate cells and collagen structures for time-lapse analysis. Various aspects of the model system can be adjusted, like cell source or use of healthy and diseased cells. Additives can be used to further elucidate mechanisms underlying collagen remodeling, by for example adding MMPs or blocking integrins. Shape and size of the construct can be easily adapted to specific needs, resulting in a highly tunable model system to study cell and collagen (re)organization.

  15. Definition of MHC and T cell receptor contacts in the HLA-DR4restricted immunodominant epitope in type II collagen and characterization of collagen-induced arthritis in HLA-DR4 and human CD4 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ellen Christina; Hansen, Bjarke Endel; Jacobsen, Helle; Madsen, Lars S.; Andersen, Claus B.; Engberg, Jan; Rothbard, Jonathan B.; McDevitt, Grete Sønderstrup; Malmström, Vivianne; Holmdahl, Rikard; Svejgaard, Arne; Fugger, Lars

    1998-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease associated with the HLA-DR4 and DR1 alleles. The target autoantigen(s) in RA is unknown, but type II collagen (CII) is a candidate, and the DR4- and DR1-restricted immunodominant T cell epitope in this protein corresponds to amino acids 261–273 (CII 261–273). We have defined MHC and T cell receptor contacts in CII 261–273 and provide strong evidence that this peptide corresponds to the peptide binding specificity previously found for RA-associated DR molecules. Moreover, we demonstrate that HLA-DR4 and human CD4 transgenic mice homozygous for the I-Abβ0 mutation are highly susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis and describe the clinical course and histopathological changes in the affected joints. PMID:9636191

  16. Hypoxic culture conditions induce increased metabolic rate and collagen gene expression in ACL-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Tomasz J; Leong, Natalie L; Dar, Ayelet; Wu, Ling; Kabir, Nima; Khan, Adam Z; Eliasberg, Claire D; Pedron, Andrew; Karayan, Ashant; Lee, Siyoung; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theodor; Jiacheng, Jin; Wu, Ben M; Evseenko, Denis; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    There has been substantial effort directed toward the application of bone marrow and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissue. Recently, resident tissue-specific stem cells have been described in a variety of mesenchymal structures including ligament, tendon, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In the current study, we systematically characterize three novel anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-derived cell populations with the potential for ligament regeneration: ligament-forming fibroblasts (LFF: CD146(neg) , CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ), ligament perivascular cells (LPC: CD146(pos) CD34(neg) CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) ) and ligament interstitial cells (LIC: CD34(pos) CD146(neg) , CD44(pos) , CD31(neg) , CD45(neg) )-and describe their proliferative and differentiation potential, collagen gene expression and metabolism in both normoxic and hypoxic environments, and their trophic potential in vitro. All three groups of cells (LIC, LPC, and LFF) isolated from adult human ACL exhibited progenitor cell characteristics with regard to proliferation and differentiation potential in vitro. Culture in low oxygen tension enhanced the collagen I and III gene expression in LICs (by 2.8- and 3.3-fold, respectively) and LFFs (by 3- and 3.5-fold, respectively) and increased oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate in LICs (by 4- and 3.5-fold, respectively), LFFs (by 5.5- and 3-fold, respectively), LPCs (by 10- and 4.5-fold, respectively) as compared to normal oxygen concentration. In summary, this study demonstrates for the first time the presence of three novel progenitor cell populations in the adult ACL that demonstrate robust proliferative and matrix synthetic capacity; these cells may play a role in local ligament regeneration, and consequently represent a potential cell source for ligament engineering applications. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  17. Oncostatin M stimulates proliferation, induces collagen production and inhibits apoptosis of human lung fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Scaffidi, Amelia K; Mutsaers, Steven E; Moodley, Yuben P; McAnulty, Robin J; Laurent, Geoffrey J; Thompson, Philip J; Knight, Darryl A

    2002-01-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM), a member of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) cytokine family, acts on a variety of cells and elicits diversified biological responses, suggesting potential roles in the regulation of cell survival, differentiation and proliferation.We have examined the effect of OSM on the regulation of human lung fibroblast proliferation, collagen production and spontaneous apoptosis. The proliferative effects of OSM (0.5 – 100 ng ml−1) were assessed using a MTS assay as well as [3H]-thymidine incorporation and cell counts at 24 and 48 h. Hydroxyproline was measured as an index of procollagen production by high pressure liquid chromotography (HPLC). Apoptosis was determined by annexin staining.OSM enhanced the mitotic activity of lung fibroblasts in a time and dose dependent manner. Maximum proliferation of 57% above control was observed after incubation for 48 h with 2 ng ml−1 OSM (P<0.05).Incubation with the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase inhibitor, PD98059 or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genestein both significantly reduced the mitogenic effect of OSM (P<0.05).In contrast, proliferation in response to OSM was not regulated by induction of cyclo-oxygenase and subsequent prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release or by IL-6.OSM also stimulated fibroblasts to synthesize pro-collagen by a maximum of 35% above control levels after 48 h (P<0.05).OSM significantly inhibited the spontaneous apoptosis of fibroblasts at 24 and 48 h.These results provide evidence that OSM has pro-fibrotic properties and suggest that it may play a role in normal lung wound repair and fibrosis. PMID:12086989

  18. Morphological characterization of intra-articular HMGB1 expression during the course of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Palmblad, Karin; Sundberg, Erik; Diez, Margarita; Söderling, Riikka; Aveberger, Ann-Charlotte; Andersson, Ulf; Harris, Helena Erlandsson

    2007-01-01

    High-mobility group chromosomal box protein 1 (HMGB1) is a structural nuclear protein that promotes inflammation when present extracellularly. Aberrant, extracellular HMGB1 expression has been demonstrated in human and experimental synovitis. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the temporal and spatial expression of HMGB1 compared to that of the central mediators tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β) during the course of collagen-induced arthritis. Thus, Dark Agouti rats were immunized with homologous type II collagen and synovial tissue specimens were obtained at various time points prior to and during the course of clinical arthritis. Local cytokine responses were assessed by immunohistochemistry and by in situ hybridization. We demonstrate a distinct nuclear expression of HMGB1 at early disease-preceding time points. Preceding clinical onset by a few days, cytoplasmic HMGB1 expression was evident in synoviocytes within the non-proliferative lining layer. Pronounced cytoplasmic and additional extracellular HMGB1 expression coincided with the progression of clinical disease. In advanced arthritis, the number of cells with cytoplasmic HMGB1 expression was quantitatively comparable to that of cells expressing TNF and IL-1β. Interestingly, although HMGB1 was abundantly expressed throughout the inflamed synovium at a protein level, upregulation of HMGB1 mRNA was restricted mainly to areas of cartilage and bone destruction. In conclusion, these new findings implicate a role for HMGB1 in both inducing and perpetuating inflammatory events of significant importance in the destructive processes in chronic arthritis. PMID:17397533

  19. Combination of Collagen-Based Scaffold and Bioactive Factors Induces Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Chondrogenic Differentiation In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Giovanna; Forte, Stefano; Gulino, Rosario; Cefalì, Francesco; Figallo, Elisa; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Maniscalchi, Eugenia T.; Angelico, Giuseppe; Parenti, Rosalba; Gulisano, Massimo; Memeo, Lorenzo; Giuffrida, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    Recently, multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted much attention in the field of regenerative medicine due to their ability to give rise to different cell types, including chondrocytes. Damaged articular cartilage repair is one of the most challenging issues for regenerative medicine, due to the intrinsic limited capability of cartilage to heal because of its avascular nature. While surgical approaches like chondral autografts and allografts provide symptoms and function improvement only for a short period, MSC based stimulation therapies, like microfracture surgery or autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis demonstrate to be more effective. The use of adult chondrocytes, which are the main cellular constituent of cartilage, in medical practice, is indeed limited due to their instability in monolayer culture and difficulty to collect donor tissue (articular and nasal cartilage). The most recent cartilage engineering approaches combine cells, biomaterial scaffold and bioactive factors to promote functional tissue replacements. Many recent evidences demonstrate that scaffolds providing specific microenvironmental conditions can promote MSCs differentiation toward a functional phenotype. In the present work, the chondrogenic potential of a new Collagen I based 3D scaffold has been assessed in vitro, in combination with human adipose-derived MSCs which possess a higher chondrogenic potential compared to MSCs isolated from other tissues. Our data indicate that the scaffold was able to promote the early stages of chondrogenic commitment and that supplementation of specific soluble factors was able to induce the complete differentiation of MSCs in chondrocytes as demonstrated by the appearance of cartilage distinctive markers (Sox 9, Aggrecan, Matrilin-1, and Collagen II), as well as by the cartilage-specific Alcian Blue staining and by the acquisition of typical cellular morphology. Such evidences suggest that the investigated scaffold formulation could

  20. Individual isomers of conjugated linoleic acid reduce inflammation associated with established collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Shane M; Campbell, James P; Butz, Daniel E; Fulmer, Tyler G; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette; Cook, Mark E

    2010-08-01

    Previously, dietary conjugated linoleic acid [(CLA), an equal mixture of cis-9, trans-11 (c9t11) and trans-10, cis-12 (t10c12) CLA isomers], was found to reduce inflammation in the murine collagen antibody-induced arthritis model, but less so in the murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, an arthritic model dependent upon acquired immunity. Because CLA is known to alter the acquired immune response, it was hypothesized that feeding CLA after the establishment of arthritis would reduce paw swelling in the CIA model. In this study, upon the establishment of arthritic symptoms, mice were randomized to the following dietary treatments: corn oil (CO) control (n = 6), 0.5% c9t11-CLA (n = 8), 0.5% t10c12-CLA (n = 6), or 1% combined CLA (1:1 c9t11:t10c12-CLA, n = 6). Paws were scored for severity of arthritis and measured for changes in thickness during an 84-d study period. Dietary c9t11- and combined-CLA similarly decreased the arthritic score (29%, P = 0.036, P = 0.049, respectively, when normalized to initial score) and paw thickness (0.11 mm, P = 0.027, P = 0.035, respectively) compared with CO. Dietary t10c12-CLA reduced the arthritic score (41%, P = 0.007 when normalized) and paw thickness (0.12 mm, P = 0.013) relative to CO. Reduced interleukin-1beta on d 7 and 21 for all CLA treatments (n = 3) relative to CO suggested that antiinflammatory effects of CLA isomers might work by common mechanisms of known pathways involved in chronic inflammation. In conclusion, dietary CLA reduced inflammation associated with CIA, and both c9t11-CLA and t10c12-CLA exhibited antiinflammatory effects.

  1. Anti-inflammatory activities of light emitting diode irradiation on collagen-induced arthritis in mice (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Yusuke; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an auto-immune disease afflicting multiple joints of the body, where as a result of the increase in inflammatory cytokines and tissue destructive factors such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, deterioration of the bones and cartilages of the joints occurs. The present investigation was carried out to study the anti-inflammatory activities of light emitting diode (LED) irradiation on hind paw inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice models. Materials and method: RA in the CIA mouse model was induced by immunization of DBA/1J mice with intradermal injections of an emulsion of bovine type II collagen and complete Freund's adjuvant. A total of 20 CIA mice were subdivided into the following groups: control group, CIA group and 2 groups of LED irradiated CIA mice (LED groups) (n=5 per group). The mouse knee joint area in the LED groups (the 570 nm and 940 nm groups) was irradiated with LED energy, three times a week for 500 s per session over 8 weeks at a dose of 5 J/cm2. The hind paw swelling was assessed by the increase in hind paw thickness. The serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines and arthritic factor MMP-3 were determined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In the LED-570 and LED-940 groups at 4 weeks after arthritis induction, the swelling inhibition index was 18.1±4.9 and 29.3±4.0 respectively. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and MMP-3 serum levels were significantly lower in the LED-940 group. Conclusions: LED irradiation, particularly in the near-infrared was effective for inhibition of the inflammatory reactions caused by RA. PMID:25368445

  2. Otoplasty (Cosmetic Ear Surgery)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is typically done on both ears to optimize symmetry. Otoplasty can be done at any age after ... your ears — including their placement, size, shape and symmetry. The doctor might also take pictures of your ...

  3. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  4. Ear drainage culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... needed. Your health care provider will use a cotton swab to collect the sample from inside the ... Using a cotton swab to take a sample of drainage from the outer ear is not painful. However, ear pain may ...

  5. Swimmer's Ear (External Otitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ears. This is especially true if they use cotton swabs or dangerously sharp small objects, like hair ... all objects out of your ear canals — including cotton swabs — unless your doctor has told you it's ...

  6. Middle ear infection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A middle ear infection is also known as otitis media. It is one of the most common of childhood infections. With this illness, the middle ear becomes red, swollen, and inflamed because of bacteria ...

  7. Swimmer's Ear (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inserting foreign objects like bobby pins or paper clips into the ear can all increase the ... discharge from the ear to help identify which bacteria or fungi are causing the infection. Over-the- ...

  8. Ear surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100016.htm Ear surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Overview This image demonstrates normal appearance of the ears in relation to the face. Review Date 10/ ...

  9. Accumulation of Regulatory T Cells and Chronic Inflammation in the Middle Ear in a Mouse Model of Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion Induced by Combined Eustachian Tube Blockage and Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Satoru; Kawano, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is associated with chronic otitis media (COM). In this study, we generated a murine model of COM by using eustachian tube (ET) obstruction and NTHi (107 CFU) inoculation into the tympanic bulla, and we investigated the relationship between regulatory T cells (Treg) and chronic inflammation in the middle ear. Middle ear effusions (MEEs) and middle ear mucosae (MEM) were collected at days 3 and 14 and at 1 and 2 months after inoculation. Untreated mice served as controls. MEEs were used for bacterial counts and to measure the concentrations of cytokines. MEM were collected for histological evaluation and flow cytometric analysis. Inflammation of the MEM was prolonged throughout this study, and the incidence of NTHi culture-positive MEE was 38% at 2 months after inoculation. The levels of interleukin-1β (IL-β), tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-10, and transforming growth factor β were increased in the middle ear for up to 2 months after inoculation. CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg accumulated in the middle ear, and the percentage of Treg in the MEM increased for up to 2 months after inoculation. Treg depletion induced a 99.9% reduction of bacterial counts in MEEs and also significantly reduced the ratio of NTHi culture-positive MEE. The levels of these cytokines were also reduced in MEEs. In summary, we developed a murine model of COM, and our findings indicate that Treg confer infectious tolerance to NTHi in the middle ear. PMID:26553466

  10. PEP-1-SIRT2-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -13 modulates type II collagen expression via ERK signaling in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are critical for the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which includes cartilage-specific collagen types I, II and XI. We previously found that PEP-1-sirtuin (SIRT)2 could induce dedifferentiation of articular chondrocytes; however, the underlying mechanisms remains unclear. We addressed this in the present study by examining the association between PEP-1-SIRT2 and the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-13 and type II collagen in rabbit articular chondrocytes. We found that PEP-1-SIRT2 increased MMP-1 and -13 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as determined by western blotting. A similar trend in MMP-1 and -13 levels was observed in cultures during expansion to four passages. Pharmacological inhibition of MMP-1 and -13 blocked the PEP-1-SIRT2-induced decrease in type II collagen level. Phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) was increased by PEP-1-SIRT2; however, treatment with the mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor PD98059 suppressed PEP-1-SIRT2-induced MMP-1 and -13 expression and dedifferentiation while restoring type II collagen expression in passage 2 cells. These results suggest that PEP-1-SIRT2 promotes MMP-induced dedifferentiation via ERK signaling in articular chondrocytes.

  11. A Membrane-Type-1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) – Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Axis Regulates Collagen-Induced Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Assent, Delphine; Bourgot, Isabelle; Hennuy, Benoît; Geurts, Pierre; Noël, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Maquoi, Erik

    2015-01-01

    During tumour dissemination, invading breast carcinoma cells become confronted with a reactive stroma, a type I collagen-rich environment endowed with anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. To develop metastatic capabilities, tumour cells must acquire the capacity to cope with this novel microenvironment. How cells interact with and respond to their microenvironment during cancer dissemination remains poorly understood. To address the impact of type I collagen on the fate of tumour cells, human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were cultured within three-dimensional type I collagen gels (3D COL1). Using this experimental model, we have previously demonstrated that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), a proteinase overexpressed in many aggressive tumours, promotes tumour progression by circumventing the collagen-induced up-regulation of BIK, a pro-apoptotic tumour suppressor, and hence apoptosis. Here we performed a transcriptomic analysis to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating 3D COL1-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Control and MT1-MMP expressing MCF-7 cells were cultured on two-dimensional plastic plates or within 3D COL1 and a global transcriptional time-course analysis was performed. Shifting the cells from plastic plates to 3D COL1 activated a complex reprogramming of genes implicated in various biological processes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a 3D COL1-mediated alteration of key cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, RNA processing and cytoskeleton remodelling. By using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors, we identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase specifically activated by collagen, as the initiator of 3D COL1-induced apoptosis. Our data support the concept that MT1-MMP contributes to the inactivation of the DDR1-BIK signalling axis through the cleavage of collagen fibres and/or the alteration of DDR1 receptor signalling unit, without triggering a

  12. Central auditory plasticity after carboplatin-induced unilateral inner ear damage in the chinchilla: up-regulation of GAP-43 in the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kraus, K S; Ding, D; Zhou, Y; Salvi, R J

    2009-09-01

    Inner ear damage may lead to structural changes in the central auditory system. In rat and chinchilla, cochlear ablation and noise trauma result in fiber growth and synaptogenesis in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN). In this study, we documented the relationship between carboplatin-induced hair cell degeneration and VCN plasticity in the chinchilla. Unilateral application of carboplatin (5mg/ml) on the round window membrane resulted in massive hair cell loss. Outer hair cell degeneration showed a pronounced basal-to-apical gradient while inner hair cell loss was more equally distributed throughout the cochlea. Expression of the growth associated protein GAP-43, a well-established marker for synaptic plasticity, was up-regulated in the ipsilateral VCN at 15 and 31 days post-carboplatin, but not at 3 and 7 days. In contrast, the dorsal cochlear nucleus showed only little change. In VCN, the high-frequency area dorsally showed slightly yet significantly stronger GAP-43 up-regulation than the low-frequency area ventrally, possibly reflecting the high-to-low frequency gradient of hair cell degeneration. Synaptic modification or formation of new synapses may be a homeostatic process to re-adjust mismatched inputs from two ears. Alternatively, massive fiber growth may represent a deleterious process causing central hyperactivity that leads to loudness recruitment or tinnitus.

  13. Swimmer's Ear (External Otitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be caused by many different types of bacteria or fungi. It usually develops in ears that are exposed to moisture. People who get OE often have been diving or swimming for long periods of time. This can bring infectious bacteria directly into the ear canal. Swimmer's ear occurs ...

  14. Bioengineered collagens

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  15. Protective Effect of Cod (Gadus macrocephalus) Skin Collagen Peptides on Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huina; Wang, Zhicong; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Bafang

    2016-07-01

    This research was performed to explore the protective effect of cod skin collagen peptides (CCP) on gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid. The CCP were fractionated into low molecular CCP (LMCCP, Mw < 3 kDa) and high molecular CCP (HMCCP, Mw > 3 kDa). In HMCCP and LMCCP, glycine of accounted for about one-third of the total amino acids without cysteine and tryptophan, and hydrophobic amino acids accounted for about 50%. After 21 d CCP treatment (60 or 300 mg/kg, p.o./daily), the healing effects on acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers were evaluated by macroscopic measure, microscopic measure, and immune histochemistry. Moreover, the expression levels of the growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was detected. The results showed that both LMCCP and HMCCP could significantly decrease the ulcer areas and promote the healing of the lesions. They also could improve the levels of hexosamine, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, and reduce the content of malondialdehyde and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, the expression level of TGFβ1 gene and HSP70 mRNA was significantly improved by the treatment. It suggested that CCP could be able to improve symptoms of gastric ulcer and probably be used in the treatment of gastric ulcer.

  16. Immunohistochemical distribution of laminin-332 and collagen type IV in the basement membrane of normal horses and horses with induced laminitis.

    PubMed

    Visser, M B; Pollitt, C C

    2011-07-01

    The basement membrane (BM) is a thin layer of extracellular matrix that regulates cell functions as well as providing support to tissues of the body. Primary components of the BM of epithelial tissues are laminin-332 (Ln-332) and collagen type IV. Equine laminitis is a disease characterized by destruction and dislocation of the hoof lamellar BM. Immunohistochemistry was used to characterize the distribution of Ln-332 and collagen type IV in the organs of normal horses and these proteins were found to be widespread. Analysis of a panel of tissue samples from horses with experimentally-induced laminitis revealed that Ln-332 and collagen type IV degradation occurs in the skin and stomach in addition to the hoof lamellae. These findings suggest that BM degradation is common to many epithelial tissues during equine laminitis and suggests a role for systemic trigger factors in this disease.

  17. Mesothelial Cell Autoantibodies Induce Collagen Deposition in vitro & Using a Case Study to Introduce Undergraduates to Bioinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serve, Kinta M.

    Part I. Pleural fibrosis, a non-malignant, asbestos-related respiratory disease characterized by excessive collagen deposition, is progressive, debilitating, and potentially fatal. Disease severity may be influenced by the type of asbestos fiber inhaled, with Libby amphibole (LA) a seemingly more potent mediator of pleural fibrosis than chrysotile (CH) asbestos. This difference in severity may be due to the reported immunological component associated with LA but not CH related diseases. Here, we report the potential mechanisms by which asbestos-associated mesothelial cell autoantibodies (MCAAs) contribute to pleural fibrosis development. MCAAs are shown to bind cultured human pleural mesothelial cells and induce the deposition of type I collagen proteins in the absence of phenotypic changes typically associated with fibrosis development. However, additional extracellular proteins seem to differentially contribute to LA and CH MCAA-associated collagen deposition. Our data also suggest that IgG subclass distributions differ between LA and CH MCAAs, potentially altering the antibody effector functions. Differences in MCAA mechanisms of action and effector functions may help explain the disparate clinical disease phenotypes noted between LA and CH-exposed populations and may provide insights for development of novel therapeutic strategies. Part II. As scientific research becomes increasingly reliant on computational tools, it is more important than ever before to train students to use these tools. While educators agree that biology students should gain experience with bioinformatics, there exists no consensus as to how to integrate these concepts into the already demanding undergraduate curriculum. The Portal-21 project offers a solution by utilizing on-line learning case studies to allow flexibility for classroom integration. Presented here are the results from two field tests of a case study developed to introduce the common bioinformatics tools pBLAST and PubMed to

  18. Hybrid Gel Composed of Native Heart Matrix and Collagen Induces Cardiac Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells without Supplemental Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yi; Liu, Zen; O'Neill, John; Wan, Leo Q.; Freytes, Donald O.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to assess the ability of native heart extracellular matrix (ECM) to direct cardiac differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in vitro. In order to probe the effects of cardiac matrix on hESC differentiation, a series of hydrogels was prepared from decellularized ECM from porcine hearts by mixing ECM and collagen type I at varying ratios. Maturation of cardiac function in embryoid bodies formed from hESCs was documented in terms of spontaneous contractile behavior and the mRNA and protein expression of cardiac markers. Hydrogel with high ECM content (75% ECM, 25% collagen, no supplemental soluble factors) increased the fraction of cells expressing cardiac marker troponin T, when compared with either hydrogel with low ECM content (25% ECM, 75% collagen, no supplemental soluble factors) or collagen hydrogel (100% collagen, with supplemental soluble factors). Furthermore, cardiac maturation was promoted in high-ECM content hydrogels, as evidenced by the striation patterns of cardiac troponin I and by upregulation of Cx43 gene. Consistently, high-ECM content hydrogels improved the contractile function of cardiac cells, as evidenced by increased numbers of contracting cells and increased contraction amplitudes. The ability of native ECM hydrogel to induce cardiac differentiation of hESCs without the addition of soluble factors makes it an attractive biomaterial system for basic studies of cardiac development and potentially for the delivery of therapeutic cells into the heart. PMID:21744185

  19. The natural flavonoid galangin inhibits osteoclastic bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis by suppressing NF-κB in collagen-induced arthritis and bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jeong-Eun; Jung, In-Tae; Choi, Junyoung; Baek, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Dong; Park, Dong-Suk; Choi, Do-Young

    2013-01-05

    We investigated the effect of galangin, a natural flavonoid, on osteoclastic bone destruction in collagen-induced arthritis and examined the molecular mechanisms by which galangin affects osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow derived macrophages. In mice with collagen-induced arthritis, administration of galangin significantly reduced the arthritis clinical score, edema and severity of disease without toxicity. Interestingly, galangin treatment during a later stage of collagen-induced arthritis, using mice with a higher clinical arthritis score, still significantly slowed the progression of the disease. Extensive cartilage and bone erosive changes as well as synovial inflammation, synovial hyperplasia and pannus formation were dramatically inhibited in arthritic mice treated with galangin. Furthermore, galangin-treated arthritic mice showed a significant reduction in the concentrations of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-17. We found that galangin inhibited osteoclastogenic factors and osteoclast formation in bone marrow-derived macrophages and osteoblast co-cultured cells, and increased osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels in osteoblasts. Galangin and NF-κB siRNA suppressed RANKL-induced phosphorylation of the c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), but not AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Also, the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and p38 inhibitor SB203580 reduced RANKL-induced expressions of phospho-c-Jun, c-fos and NFATc1 genes during osteoclast development. In addition, galangin suppressed RANKL-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB, phospho-IκBα, inflammatory cytokines and osteoclast formation in bone marrow-derived macrophages. Our data suggest that galangin prevented osteoclastic bone destruction and osteoclastogenesis in osteoclast precursors as well as in collagen-induced arthritis mice without toxicity via attenuation of RANKL-induced activation of JNK, p38 and NF-κB pathways.

  20. Ultraviolet irradiation induces CYR61/CCN1, a mediator of collagen homeostasis, through activation of transcription factor AP-1 in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; Qin, Zhaoping; Xu, Yiru; He, Tianyuan; Kang, Sewon; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2010-06-01

    UV irradiation from the sun elevates the production of collagen-degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and reduces the production of new collagen. This imbalance of collagen homeostasis impairs the structure and function of the dermal collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM), thereby promoting premature skin aging (photoaging). We report here that aberrant dermal collagen homeostasis in UV-irradiated human skin is mediated in part by a CCN-family member, cysteine-rich protein-61 (CYR61/CCN1). CYR61 is significantly elevated in acutely UV-irradiated human skin in vivo, and UV-irradiated human skin fibroblasts. Knockdown of CYR61 significantly attenuates UV irradiation-induced inhibition of type-I procollagen and upregulation of MMP-1. Determination of CYR61 mRNA and protein indicates that the primary mechanism of CYR61 induction by UV irradiation is transcriptional. Analysis of CYR61 proximal promoter showed that a sequence conforming to the consensus binding site for transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) is required for promoter activity. UV irradiation increased the binding of AP-1-family members c-Jun and c-Fos to this AP-1 site. Furthermore, functional blockade of c-Jun or knockdown of c-Jun significantly reduced the UV irradiation-induced activation of CYR61 promoter and CYR61 gene expression. These data show that CYR61 is transcriptionally regulated by UV irradiation through transcription factor AP-1, and mediates altered collagen homeostasis that occurs in response to UV irradiation in human skin fibroblasts.

  1. Modeling Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics of Abatacept and Disease Progression in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Rats - A Population Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lon, Hoi-Kei; Liu, Dongyang; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    The PK / PD of abatacept, a selective T-cell co-stimulation modulator, was examined in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using a nonlinear mixed effect modeling approach. Male Lewis rats underwent collagen induction to produce rheumatoid arthritis. Two single-dose groups received either 10 mg/kg intravenous (IV) or 20 mg/kg subcutaneous (SC) abatacept, and one multiple-dose group received one 20 mg/kg SC abatacept dose and four additional 10 mg/kg SC doses. Effects on disease progression (DIS) were measured by paw swelling. Plasma concentrations of abatacept were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The PK / PD data were sequentially fitted using NONMEM VI. Goodness-of-fit was assessed by objective functions and visual inspection of diagnostic plots. The PK of abatacept followed a two-compartment model with linear elimination. For SC doses, short-term zero-order absorption was assumed with F = 59.2 %. The disease progression component was an indirect response model with a time-dependent change in paw edema production rate constant (kin) that was inhibited by abatacept. Variation in the PK data could be explained by inter-individual variability in clearance (CL) and central compartment volume (V1), while the large variability of the PD data may be the result of paw edema production (kin0) and loss rate constant (kout). Abatacept has modest effects on paw swelling in CIA rats. The PK / PD profiles were well described by the proposed model and allowed evaluation of inter-individual variability on drug- and DIS-related parameters. PMID:24233383

  2. The soy isoflavone genistein inhibits the reduction in Achilles tendon collagen content induced by ovariectomy in rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, J E; Al-Nakkash, L; Peterson, A; Gump, B S; Janjulia, T; Moore, M S; Broderick, T L; Carroll, C C

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of genistein and moderate intensity exercise on Achilles tendon collagen and cross-linking in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were separated into eight groups (n = 9/group): intact or OVX, treadmill exercised or sedentary, genistein-treated (300 mg/kg/day) or vehicle. After 6 weeks, tendons were assayed for the collagen-specific amino acid hydroxyproline and hydroxylyslpyridinoline (HP). Collagen content was not influenced by exercise (P = 0.40) but was lower (P < 0.001) in OVX-vehicle rats compared with intact vehicle rats (OVX: 894 ± 35 μg collagen/mg dry weight; intact: 1185 ± 72 μg collagen/mg dry weight). In contrast, collagen content in OVX rats treated with genistein was greater (P = 0.010, 1198 ± 121 μg collagen/mg dry weight) when compared with untreated rats and was not different from intact rats (P = 0.89). HP content was lower in OVX genistein-treated rats when compared with intact genistein-treated rats, but only within the sedentary animals (P = 0.05, intact-treated: 232 ± 39 mmol/mol collagen; OVX-treated: 144 ± 21 mmol/mol collagen). Our findings suggest that ovariectomy leads to a reduction in tendon collagen, which is prevented by genistein. HP content, however, may not have increased in proportion to the addition of collagen. Genistein may be useful for improving tendon collagen content in conditions of estrogen deficiency.

  3. [Middle ear physiology].

    PubMed

    Ayerbe, I; Négrevergne, M; Ucelay, R; Sanchez Fernandez, J M

    1999-01-01

    The middle ear forms part of the sound transformer mechanism, together with the outer ear and the conducting system of the inner ear. An intermediate sensory organ, sensitive to acoustic vibration, and linked to the inner ear, the middle ear made its appearance during the period of adaptation of marine creatures to a terrestrial habitat; its presence is therefore a phylogenetic requirement. It is classical to ascribe three functions to the middle ear: the transmission of acoustic vibrations from the tympanic membrane to the cochlea, impedance matching between the air in the external auditary meatus and the labyrinthine fluids, and protection of the inner ear by means of the acoustic reflex. If the classical mechanical explanation has been able to explain its function, the conceptualization of its physiology in terms of energy allows an even better understanding, as well as providing and explanation for the paradoxes which arise in clinical practice when the classical model is used.

  4. Analysis of gene polymorphisms associated with K ion circulation in the inner ear of patients susceptible and resistant to noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Pawelczyk, Malgorzata; Van Laer, Lut; Fransen, Erik; Rajkowska, Elzbieta; Konings, Annelies; Carlsson, Per-Inge; Borg, Erik; Van Camp, Guy; Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2009-07-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the leading occupational health risks in industrialized countries. It results from an interaction between environmental and genetic factors, however the nature of the genetic factors contributing to NIHL has not yet been clarified. Here, we investigated whether genetic variations in 10 genes putatively involved in the potassium recycling pathway in the inner ear may influence susceptibility to noise. 99 SNPs were genotyped in Polish noise-exposed workers, categorized into susceptible and resistant subjects. The most interesting results were obtained for KCNE1 and KCNQ4 as we replicated associations that were previously reported in a Swedish sample set, hence confirming that they are NIHL susceptibility genes. Additionally we report significant associations in GJB1, GJB2, GJB4, KCNJ10 and KCNQ1, however due to the lack of replication in the Swedish sample set, these results should be seen as suggestive.

  5. Modeling of sound transmission from ear canal to cochlea.

    PubMed

    Gan, Rong Z; Reeves, Brian P; Wang, Xuelin

    2007-12-01

    A 3-D finite element (FE) model of the human ear consisting of the external ear canal, middle ear, and cochlea is reported in this paper. The acoustic-structure-fluid coupled FE analysis was conducted on the model which included the air in the ear canal and middle ear cavity, the fluid in the cochlea, and the middle ear and cochlea structures (i.e., bones and soft tissues). The middle ear transfer function such as the movements of tympanic membrane, stapes footplate, and round window, the sound pressure gain across the middle ear, and the cochlear input impedance in response to sound stimulus applied in the ear canal were derived and compared with the published experimental measurements in human temporal bones. The frequency sensitivity of the basilar membrane motion and intracochlear pressure induced by sound pressure in the ear canal was predicted along the length of the basilar membrane from the basal turn to the apex. The satisfactory agreements between the model and experimental data in the literature indicate that the middle ear function was well simulated by the model and the simplified cochlea was able to correlate sound stimulus in the ear canal with vibration of the basilar membrane and pressure variation of the cochlear fluid. This study is the first step toward the development of a comprehensive FE model of the entire human ear for acoustic-mechanical analysis.

  6. Stem Cell Therapy for the Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, perception of sound, motion, and balance is mediated through mechanosensory hair cells located within the inner ear. In mammals, hair cells are only generated during a short period of embryonic development. As a result, loss of hair cells as a consequence of injury, disease, or genetic mutation, leads to permanent sensory deficits. At present, cochlear implantation is the only option for profound hearing loss. However, outcomes are still variable and even the best implant cannot provide the acuity of a biological ear. The recent emergence of stem cell technology has the potential to open new approaches for hair cell regeneration. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of inner ear stem cell research from a viewpoint of its clinical application for inner ear disorders to illustrate how complementary studies have the potential to promote and refine stem cell therapies for inner ear diseases. The review initially discusses our current understanding of the genetic pathways that regulate hair cell formation from inner ear progenitors during normal development. Subsequent sections discuss the possible use of endogenous inner ear stem cells to induce repair as well as the initial studies aimed at transplanting stem cells into the ear. PMID:22514095

  7. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of triptolide-loaded liposome hydrogel patch under microneedles on rats with collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gui; Hao, Baohua; Ju, Dahong; Liu, Meijie; Zhao, Hongyan; Du, Zhongping; Xia, Jizi

    2015-01-01

    Triptolide (TP), a major active component of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook.F. (TWHF), is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it has a narrow therapeutic window due to its serious toxicities. To increase the therapeutic index, a new triptolide-loaded transdermal delivery system, named triptolide-loaded liposome hydrogel patch (TP-LHP), has been developed. In this paper, we used a micro-needle array to deliver TP-LHP to promote transdermal absorption and evaluated this treatment on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of TP-LHP in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The pharmacokinetic results showed that transdermal delivery of microneedle TP-LHP yielded plasma drug levels which fit a one-compartment open model. The relationship equation between plasma concentration and time was C=303.59×(e−0.064t−e−0.287t). The results of pharmacodynamic study demonstrated that TP-LHP treatment mitigated the degree of joint swelling and suppressed the expressions of fetal liver kinase-1, fetal liver tyrosine kinase-4 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in synovium. Other indicators were also reduced by TP-LHP, including hyperfunction of immune, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 levels in serum. The therapeutic mechanism of TP-LHP might be regulation of the balance between Th1 and Th2, as well as inhibition of the expression and biological effects of vascular endothelial growth factor. PMID:26713272

  8. Decreased severity of collagen antibody and lipopolysaccharide-induced arthritis in human IL-32β overexpressed transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Hee; Yoon, Do-Young; Ban, Jung Ok; Kim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Dong Hun; Song, Sukgil; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Hee Pom; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-11-17

    Interleukin (IL)-32, mainly produced by T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells, epithelial cells, and blood monocytes, is dominantly known as a pro-inflammatory cytokine. However, the role of IL-32 on inflammatory disease has been doubtful according to diverse conflicting results. This study was designed to examine the role of IL-32β on the development of collagen antibody (CAIA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory arthritis. Our data showed that the paw swelling volume and clinical score were significantly reduced in the CAIA and LPS-treated IL-32β transgenic mice compared with non-transgenic mice. The populations of cytotoxic T, NK and dendritic cells was inhibited and NF-κB and STAT3 activities were significantly lowered in the CAIA and LPS-treated IL-32β transgenic mice. The expression of pro-inflammatory proteins was prevented in the paw tissues of CAIA and LPS-treated IL-32β transgenic mice. In addition, IL-32β altered several cytokine levels in the blood, spleen and paw joint. Our data indicates that IL-32β comprehensively inhibits the inflammation responses in the CAIA and LPS-induced inflammatory arthritis model.

  9. Designation of a novel DKK1 multiepitope DNA vaccine and inhibition of bone loss in collagen-induced arthritic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Sibo; Li, Shentao; Du, Yuxuan; Dou, Yunpeng; Li, Zhanguo; Yuan, Huihui; Zhao, Wenming

    2015-01-01

    Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), a secretory inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling, plays a critical role in certain bone loss diseases. Studies have shown that serum levels of DKK1 are significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and are correlated with the severity of the disease, which indicates the possibility that bone erosion in RA may be inhibited by neutralizing the biological activity of DKK1. In this study, we selected a panel of twelve peptides using the software DNASTAR 7.1 and screened high affinity and immunogenicity epitopes in vitro and in vivo assays. Furthermore, we optimized four B cell epitopes to design a novel DKK1 multiepitope DNA vaccine and evaluated its bone protective effects in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of RA. High level expression of the designed vaccine was measured in supernatant of COS7 cells. In addition, intramuscular immunization of BALB/c mice with this vaccine was also highly expressed and sufficient to induce the production of long-term IgG, which neutralized natural DKK1 in vivo. Importantly, this vaccine significantly attenuated bone erosion in CIA mice compared with positive control mice. These results provide evidence for the development of a DNA vaccine targeted against DKK1 to attenuate bone erosion.

  10. Designation of a Novel DKK1 Multiepitope DNA Vaccine and Inhibition of Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Sibo; Li, Shentao; Du, Yuxuan; Dou, Yunpeng; Li, Zhanguo; Yuan, Huihui; Zhao, Wenming

    2015-01-01

    Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), a secretory inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling, plays a critical role in certain bone loss diseases. Studies have shown that serum levels of DKK1 are significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and are correlated with the severity of the disease, which indicates the possibility that bone erosion in RA may be inhibited by neutralizing the biological activity of DKK1. In this study, we selected a panel of twelve peptides using the software DNASTAR 7.1 and screened high affinity and immunogenicity epitopes in vitro and in vivo assays. Furthermore, we optimized four B cell epitopes to design a novel DKK1 multiepitope DNA vaccine and evaluated its bone protective effects in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of RA. High level expression of the designed vaccine was measured in supernatant of COS7 cells. In addition, intramuscular immunization of BALB/c mice with this vaccine was also highly expressed and sufficient to induce the production of long-term IgG, which neutralized natural DKK1 in vivo. Importantly, this vaccine significantly attenuated bone erosion in CIA mice compared with positive control mice. These results provide evidence for the development of a DNA vaccine targeted against DKK1 to attenuate bone erosion. PMID:26075259

  11. Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus acidophilus regulate inflammatory pathway and improve antioxidant status in collagen-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Amdekar, Sarika; Singh, Vinod; Kumar, Avnish; Sharma, Poonam; Singh, Rambir

    2013-01-01

    In view of well-established immunomodulatory properties of Lactobacillus, present investigation was carried out to evaluate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus acidophilus, against inflammatory pathway and oxidative stress developed in an experimental model of arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model was used. Oral administration of L. casei, L. acidophilus, standard antiarthritic drug indomethacin, and vehicle were started after induced arthritis and continued up to day 28. Interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1β, IL-17, IL-4, and IL-10 levels were estimated in serum. In parallel, oxidative stress parameters were also measured from synovial effsuate. All rats were graded for arthritis score at the end of each week. L. casei, L. acidophilus, and indomethacin treatment significantly downregulated proinflammatory and upregulated anti-inflammatory cytokines at P<0.0001. They have significantly decreased oxidative stress in synovial effsuate (P<0.0001) and also arthritis score (P<0.05). Protection provided by L. casei and L. acidophilus was more pronounced than that of indomethacin. These lines of evidence suggest that L. casei and L. acidophilus exert potent protective effect against CIA. It further establishes effective anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of Lactobacillus. However, additional clinical investigations are needed to prove the efficacy of Lactobacillus in treatment/management of rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Anti-arthritogenic and cardioprotective action of hesperidin and daidzein in collagen-induced rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shafeeque; Alam, Khursheed; Hossain, M Mobarak; Fatima, Mahino; Firdaus, Fakiha; Zafeer, Mohammad Faraz; Arif, Zarina; Ahmed, Murad; Nafees, K A

    2016-12-01

    Atherosclerosis has been linked to chronic inflammatory processes. Changes in the levels of lipoproteins, especially low-density lipoprotein or its variants, as well as inflammatory markers are risk factors for the atherosclerosis. In the present study, an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis was developed by administrating collagen suspension intradermally in the tail region of Wistar albino rats. At the same time, a suspension of hesperidin (50 mg/kg body weight) and daidzein (20 mg/kg body weight) was orally administrated. The compounds were given in the morning and evening for 21 days. Levels of inflammatory markers in the homogenate of knee joints of experimental rats as well as plasma lipoproteins were investigated. The administration of hesperidin and daidzein caused significant (p < 0.001) decrease in articular elastase activity, TNF-α, and malondialdehyde levels. Further, arthritis scoring and histological findings supported the anti-inflammatory actions of the test compounds. Interestingly, the test compounds also lowered the plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride but increased the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The test compounds thus ameliorated the risk factors of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, antioxidant roles of hesperidin as well as daidzein were evident from decrease in free radical load demonstrated as increase in total antioxidant level in plasma of arthritic animals treated with hesperidin and daidzein. In a separate in vitro experiment, enhanced free radical scavenging activity of hesperidin was demonstrated against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid. The anti-inflammatory, hypolipidemic, and antioxidant actions of the naturally occurring test compounds, particularly hesperidin, seem to be quite effective against rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis. Thus, their consumption may be helpful in

  13. Engineering Fibrin-based Tissue Constructs from Myofibroblasts and Application of Constraints and Strain to Induce Cell and Collagen Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Nicky; Baaijens, Frank P. T.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen content and organization in developing collagenous tissues can be influenced by local tissue strains and tissue constraint. Tissue engineers aim to use these principles to create tissues with predefined collagen architectures. A full understanding of the exact underlying processes of collagen remodeling to control the final tissue architecture, however, is lacking. In particular, little is known about the (re)orientation of collagen fibers in response to changes in tissue mechanical loading conditions. We developed an in vitro model system, consisting of biaxially-constrained myofibroblast-seeded fibrin constructs, to further elucidate collagen (re)orientation in response to i) reverting biaxial to uniaxial static loading conditions and ii) cyclic uniaxial loading of the biaxially-constrained constructs before and after a change in loading direction, with use of the Flexcell FX4000T loading device. Time-lapse confocal imaging is used to visualize collagen (re)orientation in a nondestructive manner. Cell and collagen organization in the constructs can be visualized in real-time, and an internal reference system allows us to relocate cells and collagen structures for time-lapse analysis. Various aspects of the model system can be adjusted, like cell source or use of healthy and diseased cells. Additives can be used to further elucidate mechanisms underlying collagen remodeling, by for example adding MMPs or blocking integrins. Shape and size of the construct can be easily adapted to specific needs, resulting in a highly tunable model system to study cell and collagen (re)organization. PMID:24192534

  14. Phenotypic changes in dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord in the collagen antibody-induced arthritis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Su, Jie; Gao, Tianle; Shi, Tiejun; Xiang, Qiong; Xu, Xiaojun; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Hökfelt, Tomas; Svensson, Camilla I

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-induced pain are still not fully elucidated, and accumulating data indicate that peripheral inflammation is not the only factor driving pain in these patients. The focus of our work is to investigate the molecular basis for long-term alterations in nociceptive pathways induced by polyarthritis using the collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) mouse model. In this model, mechanical hypersensitivity outlasts the joint inflammation by weeks. Here we examined expression levels of neuropeptides, ion channels, and nerve injury markers associated with neuropathic and/or inflammatory pain in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and spinal cord both during the peak of inflammation (day 15) and when the inflammation has resolved but the hypersensitivity persists (days 45-47). No apparent differences were observed in substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, or neuropeptide Y protein expression in DRGs and spinal cord of CAIA mice. However, the neuropeptide galanin, the ATP-gated ion channel P2X3, and calcium channel subunit α2δ1 were significantly increased in the CAIA DRGs as compared to controls, both 15 and 47 days after induction of arthritis. On day 15 there was an increase in expression of two factors associated with nerve injury and cell stress, activating transcription factor 3 and growth-associated protein 43 in DRGs, whereby the latter was still dramatically upregulated after 47 days. In conclusion, this study suggests that long-term joint inflammation has an impact on DRG neurons that resembles both inflammation and nerve injury-induced pain states. Thus, antibody-driven inflammation generates a pain state with a unique neurochemical profile.

  15. Cigarette smoke-induced lung emphysema in mice is associated with prolyl endopeptidase, an enzyme involved in collagen breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Koelink, Pim J.; Henricks, Paul A. J.; Jackson, Patricia L.; Nijkamp, Frans P.; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D.; Blalock, J. Edwin; Folkerts, Gert

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the neutrophil chemoattractant proline-glycine-proline (PGP), derived from the breakdown of the extracellular matrix, plays an important role in neutrophil recruitment to the lung. PGP formation is a multistep process involving neutrophils, metalloproteinases (MMPs), and prolyl endopeptidase (PE). This cascade of events is now investigated in the development of lung emphysema. A/J mice were whole body exposed to cigarette smoke for 20 wk. After 20 wk or 8 wk after smoking cessation, animals were killed, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were collected to analyze the neutrophilic airway inflammation, the MMP-8 and MMP-9 levels, the PE activity, and the PGP levels. Lung tissue degradation was assessed by measuring the mean linear intercept. Additionally, we investigated the effect of the peptide l-arginine-threonine-arginine (RTR), which binds to PGP sequences, on the smoke-induced neutrophil influx in the lung after 5 days of smoke exposure. Neutrophilic airway inflammation was induced by cigarette smoke exposure. MMP-8 and MMP-9 levels, PE activity, and PGP levels were elevated in the lungs of cigarette smoke-exposed mice. PE was highly expressed in epithelial and inflammatory cells (macrophages and neutrophils) in lung tissue of cigarette smoke-exposed mice. After smoking cessation, the neutrophil influx, the MMP-8 and MMP-9 levels, the PE activity, and the PGP levels were decreased or reduced to normal levels. Moreover, RTR inhibited the smoke-induced neutrophil influx in the lung after 5 days' smoke exposure. In the present murine model of cigarette smoke-induced lung emphysema, it is demonstrated for the first time that all relevant components (neutrophils, MMP-8, MMP-9, PE) involved in PGP formation from collagen are upregulated in the airways. Together with MMPs, PE may play an important role in the formation of PGP and thus in the pathophysiology of lung emphysema. PMID:21112944

  16. Enriched Astaxanthin Extract from Haematococcus pluvialis Augments Growth Factor Secretions to Increase Cell Proliferation and Induces MMP1 Degradation to Enhance Collagen Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-Yu; Lee, Chelsea; Pan, Jian-Liang; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shu-Hung; Lan, Chi-Wei John; Liu, Wang-Ta; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Hseu, You-Cheng; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hui-Min David

    2016-06-16

    Among many antioxidants that are used for the repairing of oxidative stress induced skin damages, we identified the enriched astaxanthin extract (EAE) from Haematococcus pluvialis as a viable ingredient. EAE was extracted from the red microalgae through supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction. To compare the effectiveness, EAE wastreated on human dermal fibroblasts with other components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and doxycycline. With sirius red staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we found that PMA decreased the collagen concentration and production while overall the addition of doxycycline and EAE increased the collagen concentration in a trial experiments. EAE increased collagen contents through inhibited MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA expression and induced TIMP1, the antagonists of MMPs protein, gene expression. As for when tested for various proteins through western blotting, it was seen that the addition of EAE increased the expression of certain proteins that promote cell proliferation. Testing those previous solutions using growth factor assay, it was noticeable that EAE had a positive impact on cell proliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) than doxycycline, indicating that it was a better alternative treatment for collagen production. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agentsand food supplements.

  17. Enriched Astaxanthin Extract from Haematococcus pluvialis Augments Growth Factor Secretions to Increase Cell Proliferation and Induces MMP1 Degradation to Enhance Collagen Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsin-Yu; Lee, Chelsea; Pan, Jian-Liang; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shu-Hung; Lan, Chi-Wei John; Liu, Wang-Ta; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Hseu, You-Cheng; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hui-Min David

    2016-01-01

    Among many antioxidants that are used for the repairing of oxidative stress induced skin damages, we identified the enriched astaxanthin extract (EAE) from Haematococcus pluvialis as a viable ingredient. EAE was extracted from the red microalgae through supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction. To compare the effectiveness, EAE wastreated on human dermal fibroblasts with other components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and doxycycline. With sirius red staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we found that PMA decreased the collagen concentration and production while overall the addition of doxycycline and EAE increased the collagen concentration in a trial experiments. EAE increased collagen contents through inhibited MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA expression and induced TIMP1, the antagonists of MMPs protein, gene expression. As for when tested for various proteins through western blotting, it was seen that the addition of EAE increased the expression of certain proteins that promote cell proliferation. Testing those previous solutions using growth factor assay, it was noticeable that EAE had a positive impact on cell proliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) than doxycycline, indicating that it was a better alternative treatment for collagen production. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agentsand food supplements. PMID:27322248

  18. Recombinant growth factor mixtures induce cell cycle progression and the upregulation of type I collagen in human skin fibroblasts, resulting in the acceleration of wound healing processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Hyun; Choi, Kyung-Ha; Cho, Jae-We; Kim, So Young; Kwon, Tae Rin; Choi, Sun Young; Choi, Yoo Mi; Lee, Jay; Yoon, Ho Sang; Kim, Beom Joon

    2014-05-01

    Application of growth factor mixtures has been used for wound healing and anti-wrinkles agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant growth factor mixtures (RGFM) on the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, type I collagen, and wound healing processes of acute animal wound models. The results showed that RGFM induced increased rates of cell proliferation and cell migration of human skin fibroblasts (HSF). In addition, expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)4, and Cdk2 proteins was markedly increased with a growth factor mixtures treatment in fibroblasts. Expression of type I collagen was also increased in growth factor mixtures-treated HSF. Moreover, growth factor mixtures-induced the upregulation of type I collagen was associated with the activation of Smad2/3. In the animal model, RGFM-treated mice showed accelerated wound closure, with the closure rate increasing as early as on day 7, as well as re-epithelization and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration than phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated mice. In conclusion, the results indicated that RGFM has the potential to accelerate wound healing through the upregulation of type I collagen, which is partly mediated by activation of Smad2/3-dependent signaling pathway as well as cell cycle progression in HSF. The topical application of growth factor mixtures to acute and chronic skin wound may accelerate the epithelization process through these molecular mechanisms.

  19. Effects of Sandimmune Neoral on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DA Rats: Characterization by High Resolution Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and by Histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Nicolau; Bruttel, Konrad; Schuurman, Henk; Mir, Anis

    1998-03-01

    In the present work the time course of collagen-induced arthritis and the effect of Sandimmune Neoral in this model of arthritis were followed in the rat over an extended period of time (70 days) using high resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High resolution 3D gradient-echo (TR = 100 ms; TE = 3.8 ms) images with a voxel size of 94 × 81 × 60 μm3were acquired from the hind paw of DA rats (n= 21) at various time points after injection of type II bovine collagen into the tail. Eleven rats were treated with Neoral (15 mg/kg/day p.o. together with vehicle) for 42 days starting at day 14 after collagen injection. The remaining controls received vehicle. Pathomorphological changes associated with the collagen-induced arthritic process, e.g., increase of joint space and cartilage and bone erosion, could be observedin vivoin the control group. In contrast, no changes in the joint architecture were detected in Neoral-treated animals. Indeed, Neoral showed strong anti-inflammatory effects and marked protection against cartilage and bone destruction in this model. Qualitative information derived from the MR images correlated significantly with histological findings.

  20. Matrine induces the apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes derived from rats with collagen-induced arthritis by suppressing the activation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongsheng; Dong, Qiumei; Li, Rongheng

    2017-01-01

    The induction of apoptosis-resistant rheumatoid synovial tissue cells has been related to constitutively active Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The excessive proliferation and inherent resistance to apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) is an important mechanism by which RA originates. However, the effects of matrine on FLS in RA is unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of action of matrine in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The CIA model was established using bovine type II collagen. FLS were isolated from control and CIA rats, cultured in vitro, and confirmed to harbor fibroblast-like characteristics. After treatment of FLS with varying concentrations of matrine, the JAK2 inhibitor AG490, or a combination of both drugs, cell proliferation, apoptosis rate, expression of apoptotic markers and the activation of the JAK/STAT pathway were assessed. Additionally, CIA rats were administered either matrine or methotrexate by oral gavage to examine the effects of therapeutic intervention on arthritis pathogenesis. The arthritis index (AI) was measured and ankle joint structure was analyzed histologically to determine the severity of CIA. Furthermore, expression levels of apoptotic markers and members of the JAK/STAT family were also examined in vivo. Compared with the CIA group, matrine reduced AI and improved ankle pathology. Matrine also inhibited FLS proliferation, induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, and increased the rate of apoptosis in vitro. The effects of matrine on apoptosis induction were further confirmed by observations that Bcl-2 levels were decreased, whereas Bax and caspase-3 levels were increased in the matrine-treated synovial tissues and FLS. Finally, matrine treatment also diminished the phosphorylation, and hence activation of JAK2, STAT1 and STAT3. Our results suggest that matrine induces the apop-tosis of FLS from rats

  1. Collagen I induces discoidin domain receptor (DDR) 1 expression through DDR2 and a JAK2-ERK1/2-mediated mechanism in primary human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pedro A; Jarai, Gabor

    2011-04-15

    Discoidin domain receptors (DDRs) DDR1 and DDR2 are receptor tyrosine kinases with the unique ability among receptor tyrosine kinases to respond to collagen. Several signaling molecules have been implicated in DDR signaling, including Shp-2, Src, and MAPK pathways, but a detailed understanding of these pathways and their transcriptional targets is still lacking. Similarly, the regulation of the expression of DDRs is poorly characterized with only a few inflammatory mediators, such as lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1β identified as playing a role in DDR1 expression. DDRs have been reported to induce the expression of various genes including matrix metalloproteinases and bone morphogenetic proteins, but the regulatory mechanisms underlying DDR-induced gene expression remain to be determined. The aim of the present work was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms implicated in the expression of DDRs and to identify DDR-induced signaling pathways and target genes. Our data show that collagen I induces the expression of DDR1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner in primary human lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, activation of DDR2, JAK2, and ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathways was essential for collagen I-induced DDR1 and matrix metalloproteinase 10 expression. Finally, inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway abrogated DDR1 expression by blocking the recruitment of the transcription factor polyoma enhancer A-binding protein 3 to the DDR1 promoter. Our data provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of collagen I-induced DDR1 expression and demonstrate an important role for ERK1/2 activation and the recruitment of polyoma enhancer-A binding protein 3 to the DDR1 promoter.

  2. Thermal and substrate color-induced melanization in laboratory reared red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    PubMed

    Rowe, John W; Clark, David L; Mortensen, Rebecca A; Commissaris, Carolyn V; Wittle, Lawrence W; Tucker, John K

    2016-10-01

    Color and pigmentation patterns of the integument can facilitate crypsis, thermoregulation, and social signaling. According to the "thermal melanism hypothesis", cold environmental temperature should increase the quantity of melanin that is deposited in the integument thereby facilitating radiative warming. We studied the influences of water temperature (26°C or 31°C) and substrate color (black or white) on the degree of melanization in the red-eared slider, Trachemys scripta elegans, under laboratory conditions. Turtles reared on a black substrate, or in 26°C water, for 120 days were darker than those reared on a white substrate or in 31°C water. A potential tradeoff between the fitness benefits of crypsis and the benefits of radiative warming through melanism was detected because turtles reared in 26°C water and on a white substrate were darker than those reared on a white substrate and in 31°C water. Low temperatures limited metabolic processes because turtles reared in 26°C water grew more slowly than those reared in 31°C water. However, histological analyses revealed that melanization was a dynamic process in all treatments confirming that the degree of melanization in the cool water treatment was not influenced by the initial and relatively dark hatchling coloration in individuals that grew relatively slowly.

  3. Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Year-Old Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery KidsHealth > For Parents > Middle Ear Infections and Ear ... medio y colocación de tubos de ventilación Why Surgery? Many kids get middle ear infections (known as ...

  4. Anti-edema effects of brown seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida) extract on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced mouse ear inflammation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammed Nurul Absar; Yoon, Seung-Je; Choi, Jae-Suk; Park, Nam Gyu; Lee, Hyung-Ho; Cho, Ji-Young; Hong, Yong-Ki

    2009-01-01

    The brown seaweed Undaria pinnatifida (Harvey) Suringar is used in traditional medicine to treat fever, urination problems, lumps and swelling, and as a dietary supplement for post-childbirth women. We examined the anti-inflammatory activities of the seaweed. The methanol extract of the seaweed was active against mouse ear edema induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), with an IC(50) of 10.3 mg/ml. The extract reduced the edema to a half-maximal level when applied at the concentration of 40 mg/ml within 3 hours before or 2 hours after application of PMA. Extract taken from the blade section of the seaweed demonstrated the highest activity. The Northern form of U. pinnatifida was more active than the Southern form. In the analgesic test, the methanol extract suppressed the acetic acid-induced writhing response, with an IC(50) of 0.48 g/kg body weight. The extract also demonstrated antipyretic activity in yeast-induced hyperthermic mice. Activity-related constituents were arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, and stearidonic acids.

  5. Long-term electrical stimulation at ear and electro-acupuncture at ST36-ST37 attenuated COX-2 in the CA1 of hippocampus in kainic acid-induced epileptic seizure rats.

    PubMed

    Liao, En-Tzu; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lin, Yi-Wen; Liang Hsieh, Ching

    2017-03-28

    Seizures produce brain inflammation, which in turn enhances neuronal excitability. Therefore, anti-inflammation has become a therapeutic strategy for antiepileptic treatment. Cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays a critical role in postseizure brain inflammation and neuronal hyperexcitability. Our previous studies have shown that both electrical stimulation (ES) at the ear and electro-acupuncture (EA) at the Zusanli and Shangjuxu acupoints (ST36-ST37) for 6 weeks can reduce mossy fiber sprouting, spike population, and high-frequency hippocampal oscillations in kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptic seizure rats. This study further investigated the effect of long-term ear ES and EA at ST36-ST37 on the inflammatory response in KA-induced epileptic seizure rats. Both the COX-2 levels in the hippocampus and the number of COX-2 immunoreactive cells in the hippocampal CA1 region were increased after KA-induced epileptic seizures, and these were reduced through the 6-week application of ear ES or EA at ST36-ST37. Thus, long-term ear ES or long-term EA at ST36-ST37 have an anti-inflammatory effect, suggesting that they are beneficial for the treatment of epileptic seizures.

  6. Synthesis of huaicarbon A/B and their activating effects on platelet glycoprotein VI receptor to mediate collagen-induced platelet aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongli; Chen, Yeqing; Wu, Hao; Wang, Kuilong; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Xingde

    2017-01-01

    Quercetin and rhamnose were efficiently converted into huaicarbon A/B by heating at 250°C for 10-15 min or at 200°C for 25-30 min. With the optimum molar ratio of quercetin/rhamnose (1:3), huaicarbon A and B yields reached 25% and 16% respectively after heating at 250°C, with 55% quercetin conversion. Huaicarbon A/B both promoted washed platelet aggregation dose-dependently, which was antagonized by an inhibitor of glycoprotein VI (GPVI) receptor. Similarly, they both promoted collagen-induced platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma in dose-dependent manners. According to the S type dose-response model, EC50 values of huaicarbon A and huaicarbon B were calculated as 33.48 μM and 48.73 μM respectively. They induced intracellular Ca2+ accumulation that was specifically blocked by GPVI antagonist. Huaicarbon A/B enhanced intracellular Ca2+ accumulation and facilitated collagen-induced platelet aggregation, which were blocked by GPVI antagonist. They were conducive to collagen-induced platelet aggregation by activating platelet GPVI receptor. PMID:28337278

  7. Pathology of the Ear

    PubMed Central

    Orengo, Ida; Robbins, Kerri; Marsch, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    The external ear is exposed to weathering and trauma; it also has sparse vascularity, making it prone to infection and disease. The external location of the cutaneous ear makes it easily visible for diagnosis and accessible for treatment. In this article, the authors focus on diseases of the ear that are most commonly encountered and may be subject to surgical and medical evaluation and/or treatment. Epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical course, and treatment for each disease entity are discussed. PMID:23115534

  8. Effects of linagliptin and liraglutide on glucose- and angiotensin II-induced collagen formation and cytoskeleton degradation in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-wei; Zhang, Fen-xi; Yang, Fen; Ding, Zu-feng; Agarwal, Nidhi; Guo, Zhi-kun; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors can not only lower blood glucose levels, but also alleviate cardiac remodeling after myocardial ischemia and hypertension. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor (linagliptin) and a GLP-1 activator (liraglutide) on glucose- and angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced collagen formation and cytoskeleton reorganization in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro, and elucidated the related mechanisms. Methods: Cardiac fibroblasts were isolated from the hearts of 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice, and then exposed to different concentrations of glucose or Ang II for 24 h. The expression of fibrotic signals (fibronectin, collagen-1, -3 and -4), as well as ERK1/2 and NF-κB-p65 in the fibroblasts was examined using Western blotting assays. F-actin degradation was detected under inverted laser confocal microscope in fibroblasts stained with Rhodamine phalloidin. Results: Glucose (1–40 mmol/L) and Ang II (10−8–10−5 mol/L) dose-dependently increased the expression of fibronectin, collagens, phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-NF-κB-p65 in cardiac fibroblasts. High concentrations of glucose (≥40 mmol/L) and Ang II (≥10−6 mol/L) caused a significant degradation of F-actin (less assembly F-actin fibers and more disassembly fibers). ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 (10 μmol/L) and NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23 (10 μmol/L) both markedly suppressed glucose- and angiotensin II-induced fibronectin and collagen expressions in cardiac fibroblasts. Furthermore, pretreatment with liraglutide (10–100 nmol/L) or linagliptin (3 and 30 nmol/L) significantly decreased glucose- and Ang II-induced expression of fibrotic signals, phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-NF-κB-p65 in cardiac fibroblasts. Moreover, pretreatment with liraglutide (30 nmol/L) or liraglutide (100 nmol/L) markedly inhibited glucose-induced F-actin degradation, however, only liraglutide inhibited Ang II-induced F-actin degradation. Conclusion

  9. Extracts of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. attenuate the inflammatory response in a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    XU, WEI; HUANG, MINGQING; ZHANG, YUQIN; LI, HUANG; ZHENG, HAIYIN; YU, LISHUANG; CHU, KEDAN; LIN, YU; CHEN, LIDIAN

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is considered a serious public health problem, which is commonly treated with traditional Chinese or herbal medicine. The present study evaluated the effects of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. extraction (BCBE) on a type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Wistar rats with CIA received either 125 or 500 mg/kg BCBE, after which, paw swelling was markedly suppressed compared with in the model group. In addition, BCBE significantly ameliorated pathological joint alterations, including synovial hyperplasia, and cartilage and bone destruction. The protein and mRNA expression levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α and nuclear factor-κB in synovial tissue were determined by immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that the expression levels of these factors were significantly downregulated in the BCBE-treated group compared with in the model group. These results indicated that BCBE may exert an inhibitory effect on the CIA rat model, and its therapeutic potential is associated with its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:27035125

  10. Evaluation of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody therapy using murine type II collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bailin; Song, Zheng; Wu, Bin; Gardner, Debra; Shealy, David; Song, Xiao-Yu; Wooley, Paul H

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that is critical for T/B-cell differentiation and maturation, immunoglobulin secretion, acute-phase protein production, and macrophage/monocyte functions. Extensive research into the biology of IL-6 has implicated IL-6 in the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of RA. An anti-murine IL-6 mAb that neutralizes mouse IL-6 activities was tested in animal model of collagen-induced arthritis. Prophylactic treatment with anti-IL-6 mAb significantly reduced the incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control mAb treated mice. The mitogenic response of B and T cells isolated from the lymph nodes of anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced compared to cells isolated from control mAb treated mice. The overall histopathology score for paws from the anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced when compared to paws from mice treated with control mAb, including both inflammatory (synovitis and pannus) and erosive (erosions and architecture) parameters. Reduced loss of cartilage matrix components was also observed in the anti-IL-6 treated mice. Collectively, these data suggest that IL-6 plays a major role in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus support the potential benefit of anti-IL-6 mAb treatment in rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:19368720

  11. Spatiotemporal expression of endogenous TLR4 ligands leads to inflammation and bone erosion in mouse collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kiyeko, Gaëlle Wambiekele; Hatterer, Eric; Herren, Suzanne; Di Ceglie, Irene; van Lent, Peter L; Reith, Walter; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Ferlin, Walter; Shang, Limin

    2016-11-01

    Increased expression of endogenous Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) ligands (e.g., Tenascin-C, S100A8/A9, citrullinated fibrinogen (cFb) immune complexes) has been observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, their roles in RA pathogenesis are not well understood. Here, we investigated the expression kinetics and role of endogenous TLR4 ligands in the murine model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Tenascin-C was upregulated in blood early in CIA, and correlated positively with the clinical score at day 56. Levels of S100A8/A9 increased starting from day 28, peaking at day 42, and correlated positively with joint inflammation. Levels of anti-cFb antibodies increased during the late phase of CIA and correlated positively with both joint inflammation and cartilage damage. Blockade of TLR4 activation at the time of the first TLR4 ligand upregulation prevented clinical and histological signs of arthritis. A TLR4-dependent role was also observed for Tenascin-C and cFb immune complexes in osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Taken together, our data suggests that the pathogenic contribution of TLR4 in promoting joint inflammation and bone erosion during CIA occurs via various TLR4 ligands arising at different stages of disease. The data also suggests that Blockade of TLR4 with monoclonal antibodies is a promising strategy in RA treatment.

  12. OPLA scaffold, collagen I, and horse serum induce an higher degree of myogenic differentiation of adult rat cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Di Felice, Valentina; Ardizzone, Nella Maria; De Luca, Angela; Marcianò, Vito; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Macaluso, Filippo; Manente, Lucrezia; Cappello, Francesco; De Luca, Antonio; Zummo, Giovanni

    2009-12-01

    In the last few years, a major goal of cardiac research has been to drive stem cell differentiation to replace damaged myocardium. Several research groups have attempted to differentiate potential cardiac stem cells (CSCs) using bi- or three-dimensional systems supplemented with growth factors or molecules acting as differentiating substances. We hypothesize that these systems failed to induce a complete differentiation because they lacked an architectural space. In the present study, we isolated a pool of small proliferating and fibroblast-like cells from adult rat myocardium. The phenotype of these cells was assessed and the characterized cells were cultured in a collagen I/OPLA scaffold with horse serum to obtain fine myocardial differentiation. C-Kit(POS)/Sca-1(POS) CSCs fully differentiated in vitro when an environment more similar to the CSC niche was created. These experiments demonstrated an important model for the study of the biology of CSCs and the biochemical pathways that lead to myocardial differentiation. The results pave the way for a new surgical approach.

  13. Cystamine immobilization on TiO 2 film surfaces and the influence on inhibition of collagen-induced platelet activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yujuan; Weng, Yajun; Zhang, Liping; Jing, Fengjuan; Huang, Nan; Chen, Junying

    2011-12-01

    Poor haemocompatibility is a main issue of artificial cardiovascular materials in clinical application. Nitric oxide (NO), produced by vascular endothelial cells, is a well known inhibitor of platelet adhesion and activation. Thus, NO-releasing biomaterials are beneficial for improving haemocompatibility of blood-contacting biomedical devices. In this paper, a novel method was developed for enhancement of haemocompatibility by exploiting endogenous NO donors. TiO 2 films were firstly synthesized on Si (1 0 0) wafers via unbalanced magnetron sputtering technology, and then polydopamine was grafted on TiO 2 films and used as a linker for further immobilization of cystamine. The obtained surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. NO generation is evaluated by saville-griess reagents, and it shows that cystamine immobilized samples are able to catalytically generate NO by decomposing endogenous S-nitrosothiols (RSNO). In vitro platelet adhesion results reveal that cystamine modified surfaces can inhibit collagen-induced platelet activation. ELISA analysis reveals that cGMP in platelets obviously increases on cystamine immobilized surface, which suggests the reducing of platelet activation is through NO/cGMP signal channel. It can be concluded that cystamine immobilized surface shows better blood compatibility by catalyzing NO release from the endogenous NO donor. It may be a promising method for improvement of haemocompatibility of blood-contacting implants.

  14. Population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic-disease progression model for effects of anakinra in Lewis rats with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongyang; Lon, Hoi-Kei; Dubois, Debra C; Almon, Richard R; Jusko, William J

    2011-12-01

    A population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic-disease progression (PK/PD/DIS) model was developed to characterize the effects of anakinra in collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) rats and explore the role of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in rheumatoid arthritis. The CIA rats received either vehicle, or anakinra at 100 mg/kg for about 33 h, 100 mg/kg for about 188 h, or 10 mg/kg for about 188 h by subcutaneous infusion. Plasma concentrations of anakinra were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Swelling of rat hind paws was measured. Population PK/PD/DIS parameters were computed for the various groups using non-linear mixed-effects modeling software (NONMEM® Version VI). The final model was assessed using visual predictive checks and nonparameter stratified bootstrapping. A two-compartment PK model with two sequential absorption processes and linear elimination was used to capture PK profiles of anakinra. A transduction-based feedback model incorporating logistic growth rate captured disease progression and indirect response model I captured drug effects. The PK and paw swelling versus time profiles in CIA rats were fitted well. Anakinra has modest effects (I ( max ) = 0.28) on paw edema in CIA rats. The profiles are well-described by our PK/PD/DIS model which provides a basis for future mechanism-based assessment of anakinra dynamics in rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. The Predicted Proteomic Network Associated with the Antiarthritic Action of Qingfu Guanjieshu in Collagen-II-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting Yu; Zhou, Hua; Wong, Yuen Fan; Wu, Pui Kei; Hsiao, Wen-Luan Wendy; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Liu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Qingfu Guanjieshu (QFGJS) is an herbal preparation for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Previous studies revealed that QFGJS significantly inhibited experimental arthritis and acute inflammation, accompanied by reduction of proinflammatory cytokines and elevation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. This study aims to identify the targeted proteins and predict the proteomic network associated with the drug action of QFGJS by using 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques. Thirty female Wistar rats were evenly grouped as normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats. The antiarthritic effect of QFGJS was examined with a 19-day treatment course, and the knee synovial tissues of animals from each group were obtained for 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis. Results showed that QFGJS significantly ameliorated collagen II-induced arthritis when administrated at 2.8 g/kg body weight for 19 days. 2D gel image analysis revealed 89 differentially expressed proteins in the synovial tissues among the normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats from over 1000 proteins of which 63 proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis, and 32 proteins were included for classification of functions using Gene Ontology (GO) method. Finally, 14 proteins were analyzed using bioinformatics, and a predicted proteomic network related to the anti-arthritic effect of QFGJS was established, and Pgk1 plays a central role. PMID:23781264

  16. H2-M polymorphism in mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis involves the peptide binding groove

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W.; Loos, M.; Maeurer, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    The ability to develop type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is associated with the major histocompatibility I-A gene and with as yet poorly defined regulatory molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen processing and presentation pathway. H2-M molecules are thought to be involved in the loading of antigenic peptides into the MHC class II binding cleft. We sequenced H2-Ma, H2-Mb1, and H2-Mb2 genes from CIA-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains and identified four different Ma and Mb2 alleles, and three different Mb1 alleles defined by polymorphic residues within the predicted peptide binding groove. Most CIA-resistant mouse strains share common Ma, Mb1, and Mb2 alleles. In contrast, H2-M alleles designated Ma-III, Ma-IV, Mb1-III, and Mb2-IV could be exclusively identified in the CIA-susceptible H2{sup r} and H2{sup q} haplotypes, suggesting that allelic H2-M molecules may modulate the composition of different CII peptides loaded onto MHC class II molecules, presumably presenting {open_quotes}arthritogenic{close_quotes} epitopes to T lymphocytes. 42 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Impact of repeated intravenous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells infusion on myocardial collagen network remodeling in a rat model of doxorubicin-induced dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Li, Qianxiao; Na, Rongmei; Li, Xiaofei; Liu, Baiting; Meng, Lili; Liutong, Hanyu; Fang, Weiyi; Zhu, Ning; Zheng, Xiaoqun

    2014-02-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation improved cardiac function and reduced myocardial fibrosis in both ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. We evaluated the effects of repeated peripheral vein injection of MSCs on collagen network remodeling and myocardial TGF-β1, AT1, CYP11B2 (aldosterone synthase) gene expressions in a rat model of doxorubicin (DOX)-induced dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Thirty-eight out of 53 SD rats survived at 10 weeks post-DOX injection (2.5 mg/kg/week for 6 weeks, i.p.) were divided into DCM blank (without treatment, n = 12), DCM placebo (intravenous tail injection of 0.5 mL serum-free culture medium every other day for ten times, n = 13), and DCM plus MSCs group (intravenous tail injection of 5 × 10(6) MSCs dissolved in 0.5 mL serum-free culture medium every other day for 10 times, n = 13). Ten untreated rats served as normal controls. At 20 weeks after DOX injection, echocardiography, myocardial collagen content, myocardial expressions of types I and III collagen, TGF-β1, AT1, and CYP11B2 were compared among groups. At 20 weeks post-DOX injection, 8 rats (67%) survived in DCM blank group, 9 rats (69%) survived in DCM placebo group while 13 rats (100 %) survived in DCM plus MSCs group. Left ventricular end-diastolic diameter was significantly higher and ejection fraction was significantly lower in DCM blank and DCM placebo groups compared to normal control rats, which were significantly improved in DCM plus MSCs group (all p < 0.05 vs. DCM blank and DCM placebo groups). Moreover, myocardial collagen volume fraction, types I and III collagen, myocardial mRNA expressions of TGF-β1, AT1, CYP11B2, and collagen I/III ratio were all significantly lower in DCM plus MSCs group compared to DCM blank and DCM placebo groups (all p < 0.05). Repeated intravenous MSCs transplantation could improve cardiac function by attenuating myocardial collagen network remodeling possibly through downregulating renin

  18. Relationship among follicular apoptosis, integrin beta1 and collagen type IV during early ovarian regression in the teleost Prochilodus argenteus after induced spawning.

    PubMed

    Santos, H B; Sato, Y; Moro, L; Bazzoli, N; Rizzo, E

    2008-04-01

    Early ovarian regression was analyzed in the neotropical freshwater teleost, curimatã-pacu (Prochilodus argenteus), in order to evaluate follicular apoptosis, basement membrane morphology, and integrin beta1 and collagen type IV immunostainning in postovulatory follicles. Mature females were induced to spawn by using carp pituitary extract for study of ovarian regression up to 5 days post-spawning. Morphometric analyses showed that the postovulatory follicle area decreased progressively after spawning and was coupled to the gonadosomatic index (r=0.92). During ovarian regression, follicular cells detached from the neighboring cells and basement membrane and then died by apoptosis. The follicular basement membrane became thicker and diffuse and was breached during regression of the postovulatory follicles. Follicular apoptosis was detected by TUNEL, histology, and electron microscopy. The ladder pattern of apoptotic DNA was revealed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The apoptotic index for the follicular cells increased until 3 days post-spawning and decreased thereafter. Immunohistochemistry reactions detected caspase 3, integrin beta1, and collagen type IV in the follicular layer of the postovulatory follicles. Labeling for integrin beta1 and collagen type IV decreased significantly, whereas a peak in cell death occurred 3 days post-spawning. At 4-5 days post-spawning, the connective theca was more thickened and vascularized. Simultaneously, granulocytes migrated toward the follicular lumen. Thus, follicular apoptosis contributes to early ovarian regression in P. argenteus. Additionally, our findings suggest integrin beta1 and collagen type IV as possible survival factors for follicular cells in teleost ovary.

  19. Prolidase-dependent mechanism of (Z)-8,9-epoxyheptadeca-1,11,14-triene-induced inhibition of collagen biosynthesis in cultured human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Szoka, Lukasz; Karna, Ewa; Nazaruk, Jolanta; Palka, Jerzy A

    2016-01-01

    The effects of polyolefinic compound from roots of Cirsium palustre, (Z)-8,9-epoxyheptadeca-1,11,14-triene (EHT) on collagen biosynthesis, prolidase activity, expression of insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR), β1 integrin, MAP kinases (pERK1/2), the transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were evaluated in human dermal fibroblasts treated with micromolar concentrations (40-200 μM) for 24 h. It was found that EHT-dependent inhibition of collagen biosynthesis was accompanied by parallel inhibition in prolidase activity. Since IGF-I is the most potent regulator of both processes and prolidase is regulated by β1 integrin signalling, the effect of EHT on IGF-IR and β1 integrin receptor expressions were evaluated. Exposure of the cells to EHT contributed to distinct increase in IGF-IR and slight increase in β1 integrin receptor expressions. It was accompanied by decrease in expression of pERK1/2, HIF-1α and NF-κB. EHT-dependent inhibition of collagen biosynthesis results from inhibition of prolidase activity, the enzyme involved in collagen biosynthesis.

  20. Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2-Year-Old Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery KidsHealth > For Parents > Middle Ear Infections and ... to 18 months or longer. previous continue Tympanostomy Tube Surgery If your child is old enough to ...

  1. Hepatoprotective effect of juglone on dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver fibrosis and its effect on hepatic antioxidant defence and the expression levels of α-SMA and collagen III.

    PubMed

    Zhou, De-Jiang; Mu, Dong; Jiang, Ming-De; Zheng, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Yong; He, Sheng; Weng, Min; Zeng, Wei-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the antifibrotic effects of juglone on dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)‑induced fibrosis in rats. Juglone, which is a quinone, significantly decreased DMN‑induced rat hepatic fibrosis, which was associated with increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, decreased oxidative stress and reduced levels of α‑smooth muscle actin (α‑SMA) and collagen (Col) III in the liver. Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, hyaluronic acid, laminin, type III precollagen and type IV collagen were significantly reduced by treatment with juglone. Liver fibrosis was induced in male Sprague‑Dawley rats by subcutaneous injections of DMN solution and hepatic fibrosis was assessed using Massons trichome staining. The expression levels of α‑SMA and Col III were determined using immunohistochemical techniques. The activities of SOD and malondialdehyde in liver homogenates were also determined. The results suggested that juglone augmented the antioxidative capability of the liver, possibly by stimulating the activity of SOD, which promoted the inactivation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and decreased the accumulation of extracellular matrix collagen in the liver, thereby alleviating hepatic fibrosis. Silymarin was used as a positive control for liver fibrosis protection. It was hypothesized that juglone alleviates or mitigates oxidative stress‑mediated hepatic fibrosis by upregulating the expression of peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor γ and inhibiting the activation of HSC.

  2. Investigation of the role of endosomal Toll-like receptors in murine collagen-induced arthritis reveals a potential role for TLR7 in disease maintenance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Endosomal toll-like receptors (TLRs) have recently emerged as potential contributors to the inflammation observed in human and rodent models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study aims to evaluate the role of endosomal TLRs and in particular TLR7 in the murine collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model. Methods CIA was induced by injection of collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant. To investigate the effect of endosomal TLRs in the CIA model, mianserin was administered daily from the day of disease onset. The specific role of TLR7 was examined by inducing CIA in TLR7-deficient mice. Disease progression was assessed by measuring clinical score, paw swelling, serum anti-collagen antibodies histological parameters, cytokine production and the percentage of T regulatory (Treg) cells. Results Therapeutic administration of mianserin to arthritic animals demonstrated a highly protective effect on paw swelling and joint destruction. TLR7-/- mice developed a mild arthritis, where the clinical score and paw swelling were significantly compromised in comparison to the control group. The amelioration of arthritis by mianserin and TLR7 deficiency both corresponded with a reduction in IL-17 responses, histological and clinical scores, and paw swelling. Conclusions These data highlight the potential role for endosomal TLRs in the maintenance of inflammation in RA and support the concept of a role for TLR7 in experimental arthritis models. This study also illustrates the potential benefit that may be afforded by therapeutically inhibiting the endosomal TLRs in RA. PMID:22691272

  3. The conductive hearing loss due to an experimentally induced middle ear effusion alters the interaural level and time difference cues to sound location.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Jennifer L; Chevallier, Keely M; Koka, Kanthaiah; Lupo, J Eric; Tollin, Daniel J

    2012-10-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a pathologic condition of the middle ear that leads to a mild to moderate conductive hearing loss as a result of fluid in the middle ear. Recurring OME in children during the first few years of life has been shown to be associated with poor detection and recognition of sounds in noisy environments, hypothesized to result due to altered sound localization cues. To explore this hypothesis, we simulated a middle ear effusion by filling the middle ear space of chinchillas with different viscosities and volumes of silicone oil to simulate varying degrees of OME. While the effects of middle ear effusions on the interaural level difference (ILD) cue to location are known, little is known about whether and how middle ear effusions affect interaural time differences (ITDs). Cochlear microphonic amplitudes and phases were measured in response to sounds delivered from several locations in azimuth before and after filling the middle ear with fluid. Significant attenuations (20-40 dB) of sound were observed when the middle ear was filled with at least 1.0 ml of fluid with a viscosity of 3.5 Poise (P) or greater. As expected, ILDs were altered by ~30 dB. Additionally, ITDs were shifted by ~600 μs for low frequency stimuli (<4 kHz) due to a delay in the transmission of sound to the inner ear. The data show that in an experimental model of OME, ILDs and ITDs are shifted in the spatial direction of the ear without the experimental effusion.

  4. Caring for Pierced Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... close. Regularly wash your ears with soap and water. Carefully do this at least once a day to avoid infection. Twist the earrings a few times daily. This will help keep the pierced holes open. Put rubbing alcohol on your ears. Using ...

  5. Avoiding Infection After Ear Piercing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Avoiding Infection After Ear Piercing Page Content Article Body What is the best way to avoid infection after ear piercing? Ears may be pierced for cosmetic reasons ...

  6. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    ... and blocked ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... The eustachian tube is a connection between the middle ear (the space deep to the eardrum) and the back of the ...

  7. The role of collagen in extralobar pulmonary artery stiffening in response to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Chen Yen; Wang, Zhijie; Tabima, Diana M.; Eickhoff, Jens C.

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) causes extralobar pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening, which potentially impairs right ventricular systolic function. Changes in the extracellular matrix proteins collagen and elastin have been suggested to contribute to this arterial stiffening. We hypothesized that vascular collagen accumulation is a major cause of extralobar PA stiffening in HPH and tested our hypothesis with transgenic mice that synthesize collagen type I resistant to collagenase degradation (Col1a1R/R). These mice and littermate controls that have normal collagen degradation (Col1a1+/+) were exposed to hypoxia for 10 days; some were allowed to recover for 32 days. In vivo PA pressure and isolated PA mechanical properties and collagen and elastin content were measured for all groups. Vasoactive studies were also performed with U-46619, Y-27632, or calcium- and magnesium-free medium. Pulmonary hypertension occurred in both mouse strains due to chronic hypoxia and resolved with recovery. HPH caused significant PA mechanical changes in both mouse strains: circumferential stretch decreased, and mid-to-high-strain circumferential elastic modulus increased (P < 0.05 for both). Impaired collagen type I degradation prevented a return to baseline mechanical properties with recovery and, in fact, led to an increase in the low and mid-to-high-strain moduli compared with hypoxia (P < 0.05 for both). Significant changes in collagen content were found, which tended to follow changes in mid-to-high-strain elastic modulus. No significant changes in elastin content or vasoactivity were observed. Our results demonstrate that collagen content is important to extralobar PA stiffening caused by chronic hypoxia. PMID:20852040

  8. Effectiveness of Ear Splint Therapy for Ear Deformities

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To present our experience with ear splint therapy for babies with ear deformities, and thereby demonstrate that this therapy is an effective and safe intervention without significant complications. Methods This was a retrospective study of 54 babies (35 boys and 19 girls; 80 ears; age ≤3 months) with ear deformities who had received ear splint therapy at the Center for Torticollis, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ajou University Hospital between December 2014 and February 2016. Before the initiation of ear splint therapy, ear deformities were classified with reference to the standard terminology. We compared the severity of ear deformity before and after ear splint therapy by using the physician's ratings. We also compared the physician's ratings and the caregiver's ratings on completion of ear splint therapy. Results Among these 54 babies, 41 children (58 ears, 72.5%) completed the ear splint therapy. The mean age at initiation of therapy was 52.91±18.26 days and the treatment duration was 44.27±32.06 days. Satyr ear, forward-facing ear lobe, Darwinian notch, overfolded ear, and cupped ear were the five most common ear deformities. At the completion of therapy, the final physician's ratings of ear deformities were significantly improved compared to the initial ratings (8.28±1.44 vs. 2.51±0.92; p<0.001). There was no significant difference between the physician's ratings and the caregiver's ratings at the completion of ear splint therapy (8.28±1.44 vs. 8.0±1.61; p=0.297). Conclusion We demonstrated that ear splint therapy significantly improved ear deformities in babies, as measured by quantitative rating scales. Ear splint therapy is an effective and safe intervention for babies with ear deformities. PMID:28289646

  9. IL-17 promotes bone erosion in murine collagen-induced arthritis through loss of the receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand/osteoprotegerin balance.

    PubMed

    Lubberts, Erik; van den Bersselaar, Liduine; Oppers-Walgreen, Birgitte; Schwarzenberger, Paul; Coenen-de Roo, Christina J J; Kolls, Jay K; Joosten, Leo A B; van den Berg, Wim B

    2003-03-01

    IL-17 is a T cell-derived proinflammatory cytokine in experimental arthritis and is a stimulator of osteoclastogenesis in vitro. In this study, we report the effects of IL-17 overexpression (AdIL-17) in the knee joint of type II collagen-immunized mice on bone erosion and synovial receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL)/receptor activator of NF-kappa B/osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression. Local IL-17 promoted osteoclastic bone destruction, which was accompanied with marked tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity at sites of bone erosion in cortical, subchondral, and trabecular bone. Accelerated expression of RANKL and its receptor, receptor activator of NF-kappa B, was found in the synovial infiltrate and at sites of focal bone erosion, using specific immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, AdIL-17 not only enhanced RANKL expression but also strongly up-regulated the RANKL/OPG ratio in the synovium. Comparison of arthritic mice from the AdIL-17 collagen-induced arthritis group with full-blown collagen-arthritic mice having similar clinical scores for joint inflammation revealed lower RANKL/OPG ratio and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity in the latter group. Interestingly, systemic OPG treatment prevented joint damage induced by local AdIL-17 gene transfer in type II collagen-immunized mice. These findings suggest T cell IL-17 to be an important inducer of RANKL expression leading to loss of the RANKL/OPG balance, stimulating osteoclastogenesis and bone erosion in arthritis.

  10. MicroRNA-98 inhibits TGF-β1-induced differentiation and collagen production of cardiac fibroblasts by targeting TGFBR1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ranran; Dang, Ruiying; Zhou, Yan; Ding, Min; Hua, Huikun

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the effects of miR-98 on TGF-β1-induced cardiac fibrosis in human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs), and to establish the mechanism underlying these effects, HCFs were transfected with miR-98 inhibitor or mimic, and then treated with or without TGF-β1. The level of miR-98 was determined by qRT-PCR in TGF-β1-induced HCFs. Cell differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs were detected by qRT-PCR and Western blot assays, respectively. The mRNA and protein expressions of TGFBR1 were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. In this study, the outcomes showed that TGF-β1 could dramatically decrease the level of miR-98 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Upregulation of miR-98 dramatically improved TGF-β1-induced increases in cell differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis predicted that the TGFBR1 was a potential target gene of miR-98. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-98 could directly target TGFBR1. Inhibition of TGFBR1 had the similar effect as miR-98 overexpression. Downregulation of TGFBR1 in HCFs transfected with miR-98 inhibitor partially reversed the protective effect of miR-98 overexpression on TGF-β1-induced cardiac fibrosis in HCFs. Upregulation of miR-98 ameliorates TGF-β1-induced differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs by downregulation of TGFBR1. These results provide further evidence for protective effect of miR-98 overexpression on TGF-β1-induced cardiac fibrosis.

  11. Zinc l-pyrrolidone carboxylate inhibits the UVA-induced production of matrix metalloproteinase-1 by in vitro cultured skin fibroblasts, whereas it enhances their collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takino, Y; Okura, F; Kitazawa, M; Iwasaki, K; Tagami, H

    2012-02-01

    Reduced collagen matrix in the dermis constitutes one of the characteristic features of chronologically aged skin, which is further enhanced on the sun-exposed portions of the body by chronic ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, inducing the unique changes associated with skin photoageing. The zinc salt of l-pyrrolidone carboxylate (Zinc PCA) has long been used as a cosmetic ingredient, because of its astringent and anti-microbial properties. In the present study, by employing cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts, we found that Zinc PCA suppressed UVA-induced activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and reduced matrix metalloproteinase-1 production in these cells, which is thought to be involved in collagen degradation in photoaged skin. Moreover, Zinc PCA treatment of the cells increased the expression of an ascorbic acid transporter mRNA, SVCT2, but not SVCT1, resulting in the enhanced production of type I collagen. Based on these in vitro findings, we consider Zinc PCA to be a promising candidate for an anti-skin ageing agent.

  12. S100a8/NF-κB signal pathway is involved in the 800-nm diode laser-induced skin collagen remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaolin; Ge, Minggai; Qin, Xiaofeng; Xu, Peng; Zhu, Pingya; Dang, Yongyan; Gu, Jun; Ye, Xiyun

    2016-05-01

    The 800-nm diode laser is widely used for hair removal and also promotes collagen synthesis, but the molecular mechanism by which dermis responses to the thermal damage induced by the 800-nm diode laser is still unclear. Ten 2-month-old mice were irradiated with the 800-nm diode laser at 20, 40, and 60 J/cm(2), respectively. Skin samples were taken for PCR, Western blot analysis, and histological study at day 3 or 30 after laser irradiation. The expression of S100a8 and its two receptors (advanced glycosylation end product-specific receptor, RAGE and toll-like receptor 4, TRL4) was upregulated at day 3 after laser treatments. P-p65 levels were also elevated, causing the increase of cytokine (tumor necrosis factor, TNF-α and interleukin 6, IL-6) and MMPs (MMP1a, MMP9). At day 30, PCR and Western blot analysis showed significant increase of type I and III procollagen in the dermis treated with laser. Importantly, skin structure was markedly improved in the laser-irradiated skin compared with the control. Thus, it seemed that S100a8 upregulation triggered NF-κB signal pathway through RAGE and TLR4, responding to laser-induced dermis wound healing. The involvement of the NF-κB pathway in MMP gene transcription promoted the turnover of collagen in the skin, accelerating new collagen synthesis.

  13. High Residual Collagen-Induced Platelet Reactivity Predicts Development of Restenosis in the Superficial Femoral Artery After Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty in Claudicant Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, Thomas; Prüller, Florian Raggam, Reinhard; Mahla, Elisabeth; Eller, Philipp Hafner, Franz Brodmann, Marianne

    2016-02-15

    PurposeAlthough platelet reactivity is routinely inhibited with aspirin after percutaneous angioplasty (PTA) in peripheral arteries, the restenosis rate in the superficial femoral artery (SFA) is high. Interaction of activated platelets and the endothelium in the region of intervention could be one reason for this as collagen in the subendothelium activates platelets.Materials and MethodsA prospective study evaluating on-site platelet reactivity during PTA and its influence on the development of restenosis with a total of 30 patients scheduled for PTA of the SFA. Arterial blood was taken from the PTA site after SFA; platelet function was evaluated with light transmission aggregometry. After 3, 6, 12, and 24 months, duplex sonography was performed and the restenosis rate evaluated.ResultsEight out of 30 patients developed a hemodynamically relevant restenosis (>50 % lumen narrowing) in the PTA region during the 24-month follow-up period. High residual collagen-induced platelet reactivity defined as AUC >30 was a significant predictor for the development of restenosis [adjusted odds ratio 11.8 (9.4, 14.2); P = .04].ConclusionsHigh residual collagen-induced platelet reactivity at the interventional site predicts development of restenosis after PTA of the SFA. Platelet function testing may be useful for identifying patients at risk.

  14. Collagenous colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kingham, J G; Levison, D A; Morson, B C; Dawson, A M

    1986-01-01

    Clinical and pathological aspects of six patients with collagenous colitis are presented. These patients have been observed for between four and 15 years and the evolution of the condition is documented in three (cases 1, 3 and 5). Management and possible pathogenetic mechanisms of this enigmatic condition are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3699567

  15. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoyi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Takashi; Kondo, Yutaka; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Iijima, Katsunori; Imatani, Akira; Watanabe, Mika; Shirane, Akio; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we report a case of rare collagenous gastritis. The patient was a 25-year-old man who had experienced nausea, abdominal distention and epigastralgia since 2005. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) carried out at initial examination by the patient's local doctor revealed an extensively discolored depression from the upper gastric body to the lower gastric body, mainly including the greater curvature, accompanied by residual mucosa with multiple islands and nodularity with a cobblestone appearance. Initial biopsies sampled from the nodules and accompanying atrophic mucosa were diagnosed as chronic gastritis. In August, 2011, the patient was referred to Tohoku University Hospital for observation and treatment. EGD at our hospital showed the same findings as those by the patient's local doctor. Pathological findings included a membranous collagen band in the superficial layer area of the gastric mucosa, which led to a diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic findings to make a diagnosis.

  16. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Son, Youngsook

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • SP can increase IL-10 levels and reduce TNF-α and IL-17 levels in RA. • SP causes the increase in T{sub reg}, M2 macrophage, and MSCs in RA. • SP-induced immune suppression leads to the blockade of RA progression. • SP can be used as the therapeutics for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. - Abstract: Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T{sub reg} and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases.

  17. Detection of active matrix metalloproteinase-3 in serum and fibroblast-like synoviocytes of collagen-induced arthritis mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aeju; Choi, Sung-Jae; Park, Kyeongsoon; Park, Jong Woong; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Choi, Kuiwon; Yoon, Soo-Young; Youn, Inchan

    2013-06-19

    The activity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) correlates with the expression of proteases. Among several proteases, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) is one of the biological markers used to diagnose RA. The active form of MMP-3 is a key enzyme involved in RA-associated destruction of cartilage and bone. Thus, detection of active MMP-3 in serum or in vivo is very important for early diagnosis of RA. In this study, a soluble MMP-3 probe was prepared to monitor RA progression by detecting expression of active MMP-3 in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice in vivo in both serum and fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs). The MMP-3 probe exhibited strong sensitivity to MMP-3 and moderate sensitivity to MMP-7 at nanomolecular concentrations, but was not sensitive to other MMPs such as MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-13. In an optical imaging study, the MMP-3 probe produced early and strong NIR fluorescence signals prior to observation of erythema and swelling in CIA mice. The MMP-3 probe was able to rapidly and selectively detect and monitor active MMP-3 in diluted serum from CIA mice. Furthermore, histological data demonstrated that activated FLSs in arthritic knee joints expressed active MMP-3. Together, our results demonstrated that the MMP-3 probe may be useful for detecting active MMP-3 for diagnosis of RA. More importantly, the MMP-3 probe was able to detect active MMP-3 in diluted serum with high sensitivity. Therefore, the MMP-3 probe developed in this study may be a very promising probe, useful as a biomarker for early detection and diagnosis of RA.

  18. Anti-angiogenic effect of total saponins of Rhizoma Dioscorea nipponica on collagen induced-arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiu-Jun; Guo, Ya-Chun; Sun, Tong-You; Song, Hong-Ru; Gao, Ya-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic autoimmune and incurable disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effect and mechanism of the total saponins of Rhizoma Dioscorea nipponica (TSRDN) in RA. A collagen induced-arthritis (CIA) rat model was established. CIA rats were randomly divided into three groups and lavaged with an equal volume of solvent (CIA group), TSRDN (25 mg/kg/day, RDN group) and tripterygium (TP; 12 mg/kg/day, TP group) for 21 days, respectively. Normal rats served as a control group. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining was used to observe the histopathological injury of synovial tissues. The level of CD31, which used for marking and counting, micro vessel density (MVD) and the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) were detected by immunohistochemical analysis. Additionally, the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was determined using an ELISA kit. HE staining showed obvious synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration, pannus formation, cartilage and bone erosion in the CIA group rats. In addition, compared with control group, the level of MVD, the expression of VEGF and STAT3, and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB were all increased in CIA group rat synovial tissue (all P<0.01); however, TSRDN or tripterygium were able to inhibit these changes (all P<0.01). It was speculated that TSRDN may prevent angiogenesis by inhibiting the expression of STAT3 and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB p65, thereby potentially improving CIA. PMID:27698704

  19. Yohimbine hydrochloride ameliorates collagen type-II-induced arthritis targeting oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Neha; Ansari, Md Meraj; Khan, Haider A

    2017-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common type of chronic inflammatory disease which is triggered by dysfunction in the immune system which in turn affects synovial joints. Current treatment of RA with NSAIDs and DMRDs is limited by their side effect. As a result, the interest in alternative, well tolerated anti-inflammatory remedies has re-emerged. Our aim was to evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities underlying the anti-RA effect of Yohimbine hydrochloride (YCL) in collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in Wistar rats. The YCL was administered at doses of 5 and 10 mg kg(-1) body weight once daily for 28 days. The effects of treatment in the rats were assessed by biochemical parameter (articular elastase, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD), hematological parameter (ESR, WBC, C-reactive protein (CRP), immunohistochemical expression (COX2, TNF-α, and NF-κB), and histological changes in joints. YCL showed anti-RA efficacy as it significantly reduced articular elastase, LPO and catalase level and ameliorates histological changes. This is in addition to its antioxidant efficacy as YCL shown a significant increase in GSH and SOD level. Also, YCL showed effective anti-inflammatory activity as it significantly decreased the expression of COX-2, TNF-α, and NF-ĸB. The therapeutic effect of YCL against RA was also evident from lower arthritis scoring and reduced hematological parameter (ESR, WBC, and C-reactive protein level). The abilities to inhibit proinflammatory cytokines and modulation of antioxidant states that the protective effect of YCL on arthritis rats might be mediated via the modulation of the immune system. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 619-629, 2017.

  20. Differential display analysis of murine collagen-induced arthritis: cloning of the cDNA-encoding murine ATPase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, E; Ishiguro, N; Miyaishi, O; Takeuchi, A; Nakashima, I; Iwata, H; Isobe, K

    1997-01-01

    We used the differential display technique in order to detect a new gene involved in murine type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). In this study, we have identified a novel gene, IF1, whose expression level is increased during the natural course of CIA. Northern blot analyses suggest that IF1 is involved in the natural course of CIA but is not involved as a trigger of CIA. IF1 is considered to be the murine ATPase inhibitor gene for several reasons. First, IF1 shows an extremely high homology to the rat ATPase inhibitor; the highly conserved region between rat and bovine amino acid residues 22-45, which is the minimum sequence showing ATPase inhibitory activities, is also highly conserved in IF1. Second, IF1 possesses a histidine-rich region in the same area, which is thought to be important for regulation of mammalian inhibitors. Third, the tissue distribution of IF1 is very suggestive. The expression of IF1 was very strong in energetic organs such as the heart, brain and kidney, and the development of arthritis requires great amounts of ATP. As arthritis develops rapidly, the cellular ATP pool may be decreased. Before the ATP pool is exhausted, the ATPase inhibitor may serve as a brake for ATP hydrolysis. If the supply of free energy can be reduced, the inflammation of arthritis may in turn be restored. Our hypothesis is that the ATPase inhibitor is involved in regulating the inflammatory responses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9497501

  1. Collagen-induced arthritis and related animal models: how much of their pathogenesis is auto-immune, how much is auto-inflammatory?

    PubMed

    Billiau, Alfons; Matthys, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we discuss our studies on the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and related mouse models for rheumatoid arthritis. Of note, these models invariably rely on the use of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Our analysis has focused on explaining the dichotomous - either protective or disease-promoting - role of endogenous IFN-γ. Induction of a myelopoietic burst by CFA was identified as an important and underestimated factor in mediating the role of IFN-γ and other cytokines (IL-6, IL-17, GCP-2, RANK-L). Myelopoiesis provides an excess in precursors for joint-infiltrating neutrophils and osteoclasts. We postulate that classical CIA is primarily an auto-inflammatory disease, in part because of a strong innate immune response to the adjuvant. Superimposed on this, collagen-specific auto-immunity reinforces inflammatory reactivity in joints.

  2. Ear problems in swimmers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao-Che; Liu, Chia-Yu; Shiao, An-Suey; Wang, Tyrone

    2005-08-01

    Acute diffuse otitis externa (swimmer's ear), otomycosis, exostoses, traumatic eardrum perforation, middle ear infection, and barotraumas of the inner ear are common problems in swimmers and people engaged in aqua activities. The most common ear problem in swimmers is acute diffuse otitis externa, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most common pathogen. The symptoms are itching, otalgia, otorrhea, and conductive hearing loss. The treatment includes frequent cleansing of the ear canal, pain control, oral or topical medications, acidification of the ear canal, and control of predisposing factors. Swimming in polluted waters and ear-canal cleaning with cotton-tip applicators should be avoided. Exostoses are usually seen in people who swim in cold water and present with symptoms of accumulated debris, otorrhea and conductive hearing loss. The treatment for exostoses is transmeatal surgical removal of the tumors. Traumatic eardrum perforations may occur during water skiing or scuba diving and present with symptoms of hearing loss, otalgia, otorrhea, tinnitus and vertigo. Tympanoplasty might be needed if the perforations do not heal spontaneously. Patients with chronic otitis media with active drainage should avoid swimming, while patients who have undergone mastoidectomy and who have no cavity problems may swim. For children with ventilation tubes, surface swimming is safe in a clean, chlorinated swimming pool. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss and some degree of vertigo may occur after diving because of rupture of the round or oval window membrane.

  3. Bioassay-guided chemical study of the anti-inflammatory effect of Senna villosa (Miller) H.S. Irwin & Barneby (Leguminosae) in TPA-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Susunaga-Notario, Ana del Carmen; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Almanza-Pérez, Julio Cesar; Gutiérrez-Carrillo, Atilano; Arrieta-Báez, Daniel; López-López, Ana Laura; Román-Ramos, Rubén; Flores-Sáenz, José Luis Eduardo; Alarcón-Aguilar, Francisco Javier

    2014-07-15

    Senna villosa (Miller) is a plant that grows in México. In traditional Mexican medicine, it is used topically to treat skin infections, pustules and eruptions and to heal wounds by scar formation. However, studies of its potential anti-inflammatory effects have not been performed. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-inflammatory effect of extracts from the leaves of Senna villosa and to perform a bioassay-guided chemical study of the extract with major activity in a model of ear edema induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). The results reveal that the chloroform extract from Senna villosa leaves has anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties. Nine fractions were obtained from the bioassay-guided chemical study, including a white precipitate from fractions 2 and 3. Although none of the nine fractions presented anti-inflammatory activity, the white precipitate exhibited pharmacological activity. It was chemically characterized using mass spectrometry and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, resulting in a mixture of three aliphatic esters, which were identified as the principal constituents: hexyl tetradecanoate (C20H40O2), heptyl tetradecanoate (C21H42O2) and octyl tetradecanoate (C22H44O2). This research provides, for the first time, evidence of the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties of compounds isolated from Senna villosa.

  4. Asiatic Acid Isolated From Centella Asiatica Inhibits TGF-β1-induced Collagen Expression in Human Keloid Fibroblasts via PPAR-γ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Difei; Zhang, Jizhou; Wu, Xin; Dou, Yannong; Yang, Yan; Tan, Qian; Xia, Yufeng; Gong, Zhunan; Dai, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Keloids are fibroproliferative disorders characterized by exuberant extracellular matrix deposition and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/Smad pathway plays a pivotal role in keloid pathogenesis. Centella asiatica extract has been applied in scar management for ages. As one of its major components, asiatic acid (AA) has been recently reported to inhibit liver fibrosis by blocking TGF-β/Smad pathway. However, its effect on keloid remains unknown. In order to investigate the effects of AA on cell proliferation, invasion and collagen synthesis, normal and keloid fibroblasts were exposed to TGF-β1 with or without AA. Relevant experiments including 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assay, Transwell invasion assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and RNA interference assay were conducted. As a result, keloid fibroblasts showed higher responsiveness to TGF-β1 stimulation than normal fibroblasts in terms of invasion and collagen synthesis. AA could suppress TGF-β1-induced expression of collagen type I, inhibit Smad 2/3 phosphorylation and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression, while elevate Smad 7 protein level. Noteworthy, the effects of AA on keloid fibroblasts could be abrogated by PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 and by silencing of PPAR-γ. The present study demonstrated that AA inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen and PAI-1 expression in keloid fibroblasts through PPAR-γ activation, which suggested that AA was one of the active constituents of C. asiatica responsible for keloid management, and could be included in the arsenal for combating against keloid. PMID:24250248

  5. Mechanism of IFN-γ in regulating OPN/Th17 pathway during vascular collagen remodeling of hypertension induced by ANG II.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; He, Pengcheng; Liu, Yong; Chen, Jiyan; Wei, Xuebiao; Tan, Ning

    2015-01-01

    More and more researches show that hypertensive vascular remodeling is closely related to the imbalance of immune system in recent years. IFN-γ is natural protein with the function of immune regulation and has resistance effect on vascular remodeling. However, the mechanism of IFN-γ is to be defined. This paper is to explore the mechanism of IFN-γ in regulating OPN/Th17 pathway. In this research, animal models of vascular collagen remodeling were established by inducing hypertensive mice with ANG II. There was no statistical significance when the systolic blood pressures and the percentages of wall thickness/lumen diameter in both groups of WT + AngII + IFN-γ and WT + PBS were compared (P=0.219>0.05, P=0.118>0.05). The concentration of serum precollagen-type I and III and their ratio in WT + AngII + IFN-γ group were decreased after the IFN-γ being given (P<0.01). Expression of OPN within tissue in WT + Ang II group was relatively high, but lowered after treated by IFN-γ. Th17 cell ratio was decreased in WT + AngII + IFN-γ group (P<0.01). Expressions of RORα and RORγt mRNA within Th17 cell were decreased (P<0.01). The content of IL-23 in WT + AngII + IFN-γ group was increased, while IL-10 and TGF-β decreased. It has proved that IFN-γ can regulate the hypertensive vascular collagen remodeling induced by ANG II, lower the systolic pressure and reduce the pathological damage of vascular collagen remodeling and the collagen synthesis. The mechanism may that the differentiation of Th17 is inhibited by suppressing the OPN expression and regulating the secretion of inflammatory cytokines.

  6. MicroRNA-9 inhibits high glucose-induced proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation of cardiac fibroblasts by down-regulation of TGFBR2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiaxin; Dai, Yingnan; Su, Zhendong; Wei, Guoqian

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of miR-9 on high glucose (HG)-induced cardiac fibrosis in human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs), and to establish the mechanism underlying these effects. HCFs were transfected with miR-9 inhibitor or mimic, and then treated with normal or HG. Cell viability and proliferation were detected by using the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and Brdu-ELISA assay. Cell differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs were detected by qRT-PCR and Western blot assays respectively. The mRNA and protein expressions of transforming growth factor-β receptor type II (TGFBR2) were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Up-regulation of miR-9 dramatically improved HG-induced increases in cell proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis predicted that the TGFBR2 was a potential target gene of miR-9. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-9 could directly target TGFBR2. Inhibition of TGFBR2 had the similar effect as miR-9 overexpression. Down-regulation of TGFBR2 in HCFs transfected with miR-9 inhibitor partially reversed the protective effect of miR-9 overexpression on HG-induced cardiac fibrosis in HCFs. Up-regulation of miR-9 ameliorates HG-induced proliferation, differentiation and collagen accumulation of HCFs by down-regulation of TGFBR2. These results provide further evidence for protective effect of miR-9 overexpression on HG-induced cardiac fibrosis. PMID:27756824

  7. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Pyeongwisan on LPS-Stimulated Murine Macrophages and Mouse Models of Acetic Acid-Induced Writhing Response and Xylene-Induced Ear Edema

    PubMed Central

    Oh, You-Chang; Jeong, Yun Hee; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ha, Jeong-Ho; Gu, Min Jung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Pyeongwisan (PW) is an herbal medication used in traditional East Asian medicine to treat anorexia, abdominal distension, borborygmus and diarrhea caused by gastric catarrh, atony and dilatation. However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of PW on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in macrophages and on local inflammation in vivo. We investigated the biological effects of PW on the production of inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, we evaluated the analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response and the inhibitory activity on xylene-induced ear edema in mice. PW showed anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In addition, PW strongly suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a NO synthesis enzyme, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and inhibited NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Also, PW suppressed TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β cytokine production in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, PW showed an analgesic effect on the writhing response and an inhibitory effect on mice ear edema. We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time. Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance. PMID:25569097

  8. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of pyeongwisan on LPS-stimulated murine macrophages and mouse models of acetic acid-induced writhing response and xylene-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Oh, You-Chang; Jeong, Yun Hee; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ha, Jeong-Ho; Gu, Min Jung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-06

    Pyeongwisan (PW) is an herbal medication used in traditional East Asian medicine to treat anorexia, abdominal distension, borborygmus and diarrhea caused by gastric catarrh, atony and dilatation. However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of PW on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in macrophages and on local inflammation in vivo. We investigated the biological effects of PW on the production of inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, we evaluated the analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response and the inhibitory activity on xylene-induced ear edema in mice. PW showed anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In addition, PW strongly suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a NO synthesis enzyme, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and inhibited NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Also, PW suppressed TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β cytokine production in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, PW showed an analgesic effect on the writhing response and an inhibitory effect on mice ear edema. We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time. Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance.

  9. Dietary trans-10,cis-12 CLA reduces murine collagen-induced arthritis in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Shane M; Olson, Jake M; Campbell, James P; Bishop, Jeffrey W; Crump, Peter M; Cook, Mark E

    2014-02-01

    Dietary trans-10,cis-12 (t10c12) conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been shown to reduce inflammation in a murine collagen-induced arthritis (CA) model. To understand the anti-inflammatory potential of t10c12-CLA in the diet, the minimum dose of pure dietary t10c12-CLA capable of reducing CA was investigated. Because plasma inflammatory cytokines often do not reflect the progression of late-stage arthritis, inflamed tissue cytokine concentrations were also investigated in relation to increasing dietary t10c12-CLA amounts. Mice were randomly assigned to the following dietary treatments upon the establishment of arthritis: corn oil (CO) or 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.375%, or 0.5% t10c12-CLA (wt:wt) for 84 d. Sham mice (no arthritis) were fed CO and served as controls. Arthritic paw score, based on subjective assessment of arthritic severity, and paw thickness decreased linearly overall [16-65% (P < 0.001) and 0.5-12% (P < 0.001), respectively] as dietary t10c12-CLA increased (P < 0.001, R(2) < 0.81). Increasing dietary t10c12-CLA was associated with a decrease in plasma interleukin (IL)-1β at days 21 and 42 compared with CO-fed arthritic mice, such that mice fed ≥0.25% t10c12-CLA had IL-1β concentrations that were similar to sham mice. Plasma cytokines returned to sham mice concentrations by day 63 regardless of treatment; however, an arthritis-induced elevation in paw IL-1β decreased linearly as dietary t10c12-CLA concentrations increased at day 84 (P = 0.007, R(2) = 0.92). Similarly, increasing dietary t10c12-CLA linearly decreased paw tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (P = 0.05, R(2) = 0.70). In conclusion, ≥0.125% t10c12-CLA dose-dependently reduced inflammation in a murine CA model.

  10. Collagen induced arthritis increases secondary metastasis in MMTV-PyV MT mouse model of mammary cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have demonstrated that sites of chronic inflammation are often associated with the establishment and growth of various malignancies. A common inflammatory condition in humans is autoimmune arthritis (AA). Although AA and cancer are different diseases, many of the underlying processes that contribute to the disorders of the joints and connective tissue that characterize AA also affect cancer progression and metastasis. Systemically, AA can lead to cellular infiltration and inflammation of the lungs. Several studies have reported statistically significant risk ratios between AA and breast cancer. Despite this knowledge being available, there has been minimal research linking breast cancer, arthritis, and metastasis associated with breast cancer. Notably both diseases are extremely prevalent in older post-menopausal women. Methods To establish the novel link between arthritis induced inflammation and secondary metastasis associated with breast cancer, PyV MT mice that spontaneously develop mammary gland carcinoma were injected with Type II collagen (CII) to induce arthritis at 9 and 18 weeks of age for pre-metastatic and metastatic condition. The sites of secondary metastasis and the associated inflammatory microenvironment were evaluated. Results A significant increase in breast cancer-associated secondary metastasis to the lungs and bones was observed in the arthritic versus the non-arthritic PyV MT mice along with an increase in primary tumor burden. We report significant increases in the levels of interstitial cellular infiltrates and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Pro- Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (Pro-MMP9), insulin like growth factor-II (GF-II) and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the arthritic lung and bone milieu as well as in the circulation. These pro-inflammatory cytokines along with the inflammatory microenvironment may be the underlying factors facilitating tumor

  11. A combination of methotrexate and zoledronic acid prevents bone erosions and systemic bone mass loss in collagen induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Osteoclasts play a key role in the pathogenesis of bone erosion and systemic bone mass loss during rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of methotrexate (MTX) and zoledronic acid (ZA), used alone or in combination, on osteoclast-mediated bone erosions and systemic bone mass loss in a rat model of collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We hypothesized that MTX and ZA could have an additive effect to prevent both bone erosion and systemic bone loss. Methods Arthritis was induced in 64 female Sprague-Dawley rats. After the clinical onset of CIA, rats were assigned to treatment with MTX (1 mg/kg/week), ZA (100 μg/kg twice weekly), both treatments at the same regimens, or vehicle. Arthritis score and paw thickness were recorded twice weekly. The rats were sacrificed on D28 and hind paws were removed for radiographic, histological and immunohistochemical analysis. The effects of treatments on osteoclastogenesis were determined by Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. Micro-CT of the tibia was carried out for histomorphometric analysis. Bone mass density was evaluated by densitometry. Results MTX significantly decreased the severity of CIA, whereas ZA slightly exacerbated it. When these two drugs were used in combination, MTX prevented the pro-inflammatory effect of ZA. The combination of ZA with MTX was more effective than MTX alone for reducing structural joint damage with a dramatic decrease of osteoclasts' number in the eroded joints. However, MTX alone also significantly reduced the number of osteoclasts and the number of CD68+ mononuclear cells. ZA alone, or ZA with MTX, significantly increased the systemic bone mass density measured by densitometry and bone volume on histomorphometric analysis. Conclusions A combination of MTX and ZA prevented both bone erosion and systemic bone loss in a rat model of arthritis. Both treatments independently decreased the number of osteoclasts in the eroded joint. However

  12. Celastrol attenuates bone erosion in collagen-Induced arthritis mice and inhibits osteoclast differentiation and function in RANKL-induced RAW264.7.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ke; Xu, Lingxiao; Feng, Xiaoke; Zhang, Qiande; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng

    2015-02-01

    Recently, the traditional Chinese medicine Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f (TwHF) of the Celastraceae family has attracted increasing attention for its potential therapeutic application in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is well accepted that TwHF exerts the antirheumatic activity and mainly depends on its potent anti-inflammatory property. To further explore the therapeutic potential of the well-defined TwHF-derived single compound - celastrol in RA, we study the therapeutic efficacy of celastrol on bone erosion in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice and delineate its effects on osteoclast differentiation and functions in RANKL-induced osteoclast precursors RAW264.7 cell line. In CIA mice, daily injection of celastrol (beginning on day 28 after arthritis induction) markedly suppressed arthritis, and reduced bone damage in the joints as demonstrated by histology and bone micro-computed tomography (CT). The effects were accompanied by reductions of osteoclast cells in joints, serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) 5b, and expression of osteoclastic genes (Trap, Ctsk, Ctr, Mmp-9) and transcriptional factors (c-Fos, c-Jun and NFATc1). When RAW264.7 cells were treated with RANKL, celastrol inhibited the formation of TRAP+ multinucleated cells and the bone-resorbing activity in dose-dependent manners. Furthermore, celastrol reduced the RANKL-induced expression of osteoclastic genes and transcriptional factors, as well as phosphorylation of NF-kB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). These findings show that celastrol could directly inhibit osteoclast formation and function, suggesting a novel therapeutic strategy of celastrol for managing RA, especially in preventing bone destruction.

  13. Preeclampsia serum-induced collagen I expression and intracellular calcium levels in arterial smooth muscle cells are mediated by the PLC-γ1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rongzhen; Teng, Yincheng; Huang, Yajuan; Gu, Jinghong; Ma, Li; Li, Ming; Zhou, Yuedi

    2014-09-26

    In women with preeclampsia (PE), endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction can lead to altered secretion of paracrine factors that induce peripheral vasoconstriction and proteinuria. This study examined the hypothesis that PE sera may directly or indirectly, through human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs), stimulate phospholipase C-γ1-1,4,5-trisphosphate (PLC-γ1-IP3) signaling, thereby increasing protein kinase C-α (PKC-α) activity, collagen I expression and intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). HUASMCs and HUVECs were cocultured with normal or PE sera before PLC-γ1 silencing. Increased PLC-γ1 and IP3 receptor (IP3R) phosphorylation was observed in cocultured HUASMCs stimulated with PE sera (P<0.05). In addition, PE serum significantly increased HUASMC viability and reduced their apoptosis (P<0.05); these effects were abrogated with PLC-γ1 silencing. Compared with normal sera, PE sera increased [Ca(2+)]i in cocultured HUASMCs (P<0.05), which was inhibited by PLC-γ1 and IP3R silencing. Finally, PE sera-induced PKC-α activity and collagen I expression was inhibited by PLC-γ1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) (P<0.05). These results suggest that vasoactive substances in the PE serum may induce deposition in the extracellular matrix through the activation of PLC-γ1, which may in turn result in thickening and hardening of the placental vascular wall, placental blood supply shortage, fetal hypoxia-ischemia and intrauterine growth retardation or intrauterine fetal death. PE sera increased [Ca(2+)]i and induced PKC-α activation and collagen I expression in cocultured HUASMCs via the PLC-γ1 pathway.

  14. Cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) as a new chiral triacid scaffold capable of inducing triple helix formation of collagen peptides containing either a native sequence or Pro-Hyp-Gly repeats.

    PubMed

    Rump, Erik T; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Hilbers, Hans W; de Groot, Philip G; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2002-10-18

    A new triacid scaffold is described based on the cone-shaped cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) molecule that facilitates the triple helical folding of peptides containing either a unique blood platelet binding collagen sequence or collagen peptides composed of Pro-Hyp-Gly repeats. The latter were synthesized by segment condensation using Fmoc-Pro-Hyp-Gly-OH. Peptides were coupled to this CTV scaffold and also coupled to the Kemp's triacid (KTA) scaffold. After assembly of peptide H-Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Glu(OAll)-Arg-Gly-Val-Glu (OAll)-Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-NH2 (13) by an orthogonal synthesis strategy to both triacid scaffolds, followed by deprotection of the allyl groups, the molecular constructs spontaneously folded into a triple helical structure. In contrast, the non-assembled peptides did not. The melting temperature (Tm) of (+/-) CTV[CH2C(O)N(H)Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Glu-Arg-Gly-Val-Glu-Gly- [Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-NH2]3 (14) is 19 degrees C, whereas KTA[Gly-Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Glu-Arg-Gly-Val-Glu-Gly- [Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-NH2]3 (15) has a Tm of 20 degrees C. Thus, it was shown for the first time that scaffolds were also effective in stabilizing the triple helix of native collagen sequences. The different stabilizing properties of the two CTV enantiomers could be measured after coupling of racemic CTV triacid to the collagen peptide, and subsequent chromatographic separation of the diastereomers. After assembly of the two chiral CTV scaffolds to the model peptide H-Gly-Gly-(Pro-Hyp-Gly)5-NH2 (24), the (+)-enantiomer of CTV 28b was found to serve as a better triple helix-inducing scaffold than the (-)-enantiomer 28a. In addition to an effect of the chirality of the CTV scaffold, a certain degree of flexibility between the CTV cone and the folded peptide was also shown to be of importance. Restricting the flexibility from two to one glycine residues resulted in a significant difference between the two collagen mimics 20a and 20b, whereas the difference was

  15. Ear Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... head, sports injuries, and even listening to loud music can cause ear damage, which can affect hearing ... But for kids and teens, listening to loud music (at concerts, in the car, through headphones) is ...

  16. Ear infection - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Paralysis of the face Inflammation around the brain ( epidural abscess ) or in the brain Damage to the part ... pubmed/23818543 . Read More Cholesteatoma Ear infection - acute Epidural abscess Mastoiditis Otitis Review Date 4/21/2015 Updated ...

  17. Ear tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ear tube surgery - what to ask your doctor Review Date 8/5/2015 Updated by: Sumana Jothi ... Otolaryngology, NCHCS VA, SFVA, San Francisco, CA. Internal review and update on 09/01/2016 by David ...

  18. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... more than 6 children) Changes in altitude or climate Cold climate Exposure to smoke Family history of ear infections ... or fewer children. This can reduce your child's chances of getting a cold or other infection, and ...

  19. How to Use Ear Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... the dropper tip down. Tilt the affected ear up or lie on your side. Pull the ear backward and upward (or if giving ... into the ear canal. Keep your ear tilted up for a few minutes or insert a soft ... from the Michigan Pharmacists Association's Patient Education Program.

  20. APL-1, an altered peptide ligand derived from heat-shock protein, alone or combined with methotrexate attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Norailys; Altruda, Fiorella; Silengo, Lorenzo; Del Carmen Dominguez, Maria

    2016-05-09

    Induction of tolerance to autoantigens in vivo is a complex process that involves several mechanisms such as the induction of regulatory T cells and changes in the cytokine and chemokine profiles. This approach represents an attractive alternative for treatment of autoimmune diseases. APL-1 is an altered peptide ligand derived from a novel CD4 + T cell epitope of human heat-shock protein of 60 kDa (HSP60), an autoantigen involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We have shown previously that this peptide efficiently inhibited the course of adjuvant-induced arthritis in Lewis rats and induced regulatory T cell (Treg) in ex vivo assay with PBMC isolated from RA patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic effect of APL-1 and its combination with methotrexate (MTX) in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in male DBA/1 mice at 8 weeks of age by immunization with chicken collagen. APL, MTX or both were administrated beginning from arthritis onset. Therapeutic effect was evaluated by arthritis and joint pathologic scores. In addition, TNFα and IL-10 in sera were measured by ELISA. Treg induction was assessed by FACS analysis. APL-1 inhibits efficiently the course of arthritis in CIA, similar to MTX. In addition, therapy with APL-1 plus MTX reduced CIA in mice, associated with an increase in Treg. These facts reinforce the therapeutic possibilities of APL-1 as a candidate drug for treatment of RA.

  1. Acarbose Decreases the Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk of Diabetic Patients and Attenuates the Incidence and Severity of Collagen-induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Hua; Chen, Der-Yuan; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Ming; Wu, Chao-Liang; Lai, Kuo-Lung; Lin, Ching-Heng; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Acarbose has been found to decrease some inflammatory parameters in diabetic patients. This study aimed to examine the influence of acarbose on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) risk in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and on the incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. In a nationwide, matched case–control study, we identified 723 incident RA cases and selected 7,230 age-, sex- and RA diagnosis date–matched controls from all newly treated DM patients. We found that use of acarbose at > 16,950 mg per year was associated with a lower RA risk (odds ratio 0.60; 95% CI, 0.41–0.89). In the CIA mouse study, acarbose was orally administered from days -7 to 38 relative to type II collagen (CII) immunization. The results revealed that acarbose at the dose of 500 mg/kg/day attenuated the incidence and severity of arthritis and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-17 in the paw tissues. Acarbose further decreased the productions of anti-CII-IgG, IL-17 and IFN-γ by collagen-reactive lymph node cells. This work suggests that the use of acarbose decreased RA risk in DM patients and the incidence of CIA in mice. Acarbose also attenuated the severity of CIA via anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. PMID:26678745

  2. Altered expression of small proteoglycans, collagen, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 in developing bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Westergren-Thorsson, G; Hernnäs, J; Särnstrand, B; Oldberg, A; Heinegård, D; Malmström, A

    1993-01-01

    The development of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats was studied over a period of 21 d after an intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. The expression of three small proteoglycans (biglycan, decorin, and fibromodulin), collagen III and TGF-beta 1 was studied by RNA-transfer blot analysis. The proteoglycans were also studied by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blots. TGF-beta 1 mRNA increased threefold already on day 3 and remained elevated until day 10. After the increase of TGF-beta 1 mRNA the messages for biglycan and collagen III steadily increased to reach a maximum 10 d after bleomycin instillation. The mRNA for biglycan increased maximally fourfold and that of collagen III 2.5-fold. Decorin mRNA, in contrast to biglycan decreased and reached 20% of control on day 10. The message for fibromodulin remained constant throughout the study period. The amounts of biglycan and decorin in the tissue changed in accordance with the mRNA levels. The results corroborate and extend previous in vitro studies concerning the effect of TGF-beta 1 on the metabolism of small proteoglycans and show that these macromolecules are regulated differently also in vivo. The marked alterations of biglycan and decorin during the development of fibrosis suggests that these proteoglycans have a regulating role in this process. Images PMID:7688761

  3. Exposure to Mimivirus Collagen Promotes Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Hülsmeier, Andreas J.; Hochhold, Nina; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in animals, also occur in some recently described nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses such as Mimiviridae, which replicate in amoebae. To clarify the impact of viral collagens on the immune response of animals exposed to Mimiviridae, we have investigated the localization of collagens in Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus particles and the response of mice to immunization with mimivirus particles. Using protein biotinylation, we have first shown that viral collagen encoded by open reading frame L71 is present at the surface of mimivirus particles. Exposure to mimivirus collagens elicited the production of anti-collagen antibodies in DBA/1 mice immunized intradermally with mimivirus protein extracts. This antibody response also targeted mouse collagen type II and was accompanied by T-cell reactivity to collagen and joint inflammation, as observed in collagen-induced arthritis following immunization of mice with bovine collagen type II. The broad distribution of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses in the environment suggests that humans are constantly exposed to such large virus particles. A survey of blood sera from healthy human subjects and from rheumatoid arthritis patients indeed demonstrated that 30% of healthy-subject and 36% of rheumatoid arthritis sera recognized the major mimivirus capsid protein L425. Moreover, whereas 6% of healthy-subject sera recognized the mimivirus collagen protein L71, 22% of rheumatoid arthritis sera were positive for mimivirus L71. Accordingly, our study shows that environmental exposure to mimivirus represents a risk factor in triggering autoimmunity to collagens. PMID:24173233

  4. Mesothelial Cell Autoantibodies Induce Collagen Deposition in vitro & Using a Case Study to Introduce Undergraduates to Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serve, Kinta M.

    2013-01-01

    Part I. Pleural fibrosis, a non-malignant, asbestos-related respiratory disease characterized by excessive collagen deposition, is progressive, debilitating, and potentially fatal. Disease severity may be influenced by the type of asbestos fiber inhaled, with Libby amphibole (LA) a seemingly more potent mediator of pleural fibrosis than chrysotile…

  5. Type II collagen antibody response is enriched in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid joints and directed to the same major epitopes as in collagen induced arthritis in primates and mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Antibodies towards type II collagen (CII) are detected in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in non-human primates and rodents with collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We have previously shown that antibodies specific for several CII-epitopes are pathogenic using monoclonal antibodies from arthritic mice, although the role of different anti-CII epitopes has not been investigated in detail in other species. We therefore performed an inter-species comparative study of the autoantibody response to CII in patients with RA versus monkeys and mice with CIA. Methods Analysis of the full epitope repertoire along the disease course of CIA was performed using a library of CII triple-helical peptides. The antibody responses to the major CII epitopes were analyzed in sera and synovial fluid from RA patients, and in sera from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) and mice. Results Many CII epitopes including the major C1, U1, and J1 were associated with established CIA and arginine residues played an important role in the anti-CII antibody interactions. The major epitopes were also recognized in RA patients, both in sera and even more pronounced in synovial fluid: 77% of the patients had antibodies to the U1 epitope. The anti-CII immune response was not restricted to the anti-citrulline protein antibodies (ACPA) positive RA group. Conclusion CII conformational dependent antibody responses are common in RA and are likely to originate from rheumatoid joints but did not show a correlation with ACPA response. Importantly, the fine specificity of the anti-CII response is similar with CIA in monkeys and rodents where the recognized epitopes are conserved and have a major pathogenic role. Thus, anti-CII antibodies may both contribute to, as well as be the consequence of, local joint inflammation. PMID:25005029

  6. Deletion of IFT20 in early stage T lymphocyte differentiation inhibits the development of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann; Sarkar, Debanjan; Yang, Shuying

    2014-01-01

    IFT20 is the smallest member of the intraflagellar transport protein (IFT) complex B. It is involved in cilia formation. Studies of IFT20 have been confined to ciliated cells. Recently, IFT20 was found to be also expressed in non-ciliated T cells and have functions in immune synapse formation and signaling in vitro. However, how IFT20 regulates T-cell development and activation in vivo is still unknown. We deleted the IFT20 gene in early and later stages of T-cell development by crossing IFT20flox/flox (IFT20f/f) mice with Lck-Cre and CD4-Cre transgenic mice, and investigated the role of IFT20 in T-cell maturation and in the development of T cell-mediated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We found that both Lck-Cre/IFT20f/f and CD4-Cre/IFT20f/f mice were indistinguishable from their wild-type littermates in body size, as well as in the morphology and weight of the spleen and thymus. However, the number of CD4- and CD8-positive cells was significantly lower in thymus and spleen in Lck-Cre/IFT20f/f mice. Meanwhile, the incidence and severity of CIA symptoms were significantly decreased, and inflammation in the paw was significantly inhibited in Lck-Cre/IFT20f/f mice compared to Lck-Cre/IFT20+/+ littermates. Deletion IFT20 in more mature T cells of CD4-Cre/IFT20f/f mice had only mild effects on the development of T cells and CIA. The expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TGF-β1 were significantly downregulated in the paw of Lck-Cre/IFT20f/f mice, but just slight decreased in CD4-Cre/IFT20f/f mice. These results demonstrate that deletion of IFT20 in the early stage of T-cell development inhibited CIA development through regulating T-cell development and the expression of critical cytokines. PMID:26097753

  7. Differential effects of isoflurane and CO2 inhalation on plasma levels of inflammatory markers associated with collagen-induced arthritis in DBA mice.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Christopher C; Lucas, Edralin A; Clarke, Stephen L; Smith, Brenda J; Kuvibidila, Solo

    2009-07-01

    Inhalation of CO2 or isoflurane is a commonly used method of euthanasia with mice, but information related to their effects on serum inflammatory markers in chronic models of inflammation is limited. In the current study, nineteen-week old DBA female mice with (n = 53) or without (n = 51) collagen-induced arthritis were randomly assigned to euthanization with CO2 (n = 55) or isoflurane (n = 49. Plasma was collected for the measurement of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by ELISA. When mice without and with collagen-induced arthritis were pooled, compared to CO2, administration of isoflurane was associated with lower production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha (pg/ml, mean +/- SEM) (26.1 +/- 2.82 versus 48.1 +/- 7.99) and IL-6 (25.18 +/- 2.73 versus 48.1 +/- 6.82) (ANOVA, p < 0.05). In contrast to TNF-alpha and IL-6, administration of CO2 decreased the plasma sICAM-1 level (1170+/- 50 versus 758 +/- 24 for CO2) (p < 0.00001). When data were analyzed as a function of collagen-induced arthritis, the differences between CO2 and isoflurane persisted. Low plasma sICAM-1 levels found in CO2 euthanasia group may be due to degradation. Since mice are the most common animal model for studying inflammation, researchers should be aware of these iatrogenic experimental variables before interpreting their data.

  8. Diallylsulfide attenuates excessive collagen production and apoptosis in a rat model of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis through the involvement of protease activated receptor-2

    SciTech Connect

    Kalayarasan, Srinivasan Sriram, Narayanan; Soumyakrishnan, Syamala; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) can be a devastating lung disease. It is primarily caused by inflammation leading to severe damage of the alveolar epithelial cells. The pathophysiology of PF is not yet been clearly defined, but studying lung parenchymal injury by involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the activation of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) may provide promising results. PAR-2 is a G-protein coupled receptor is known to play an important role in the development of PF. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory role of diallylsulfide (DAS) against ROS mediated activation of PAR-2 and collagen production accompanied by epithelial cell apoptosis. Bleomycin induced ROS levels may prompt to induce the expression of PAR-2 as well as extracellular matrix proteins (ECM), such as MMP 2 and 9, collagen specific proteins HSP-47, α-SMA, and cytokines IL-6, and IL-8RA. Importantly DAS treatment effectively decreased the expression of all these proteins. The inhibitory effect of DAS on profibrotic molecules is mediated by blocking the ROS level. To identify apoptotic signaling as a mediator of PF induction, we performed apoptotic protein expression, DNA fragmentation analysis and ultrastructural details of the lung tissue were performed. DAS treatment restored all these changes to near normalcy. In conclusion, treatment of PF bearing rats with DAS results in amelioration of the ROS production, PAR-2 activation, ECM production, collagen synthesis and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis during bleomycin induction. We attained the first evidence that treatment of DAS decreases the ROS levels and may provide a potential therapeutic effect attenuating bleomycin induced PF. - Highlights: • DAS inhibits PAR-2 activity; bleomycin stimulates PAR-2 activity. • Increase in PAR-2 activity is correlated with pulmonary fibrosis • DAS reduces pro-inflammatory activity linked to facilitating pulmonary fibrosis. • DAS inhibits apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells.

  9. A Rationally Designed TNF-α Epitope-Scaffold Immunogen Induces Sustained Antibody Response and Alleviates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Jin; Xu, Aizhang; Zhong, Conghao; Lu, Wuguang; Deng, Li; Li, Rongxiu

    2016-01-01

    The TNF-α biological inhibitors have significantly improved the clinical outcomes of many autoimmune diseases, in particular rheumatoid arthritis. However, the practical uses are limited due to high costs and the risk of anti-drug antibody responses. Attempts to develop anti-TNF-α vaccines have generated encouraging data in animal models, however, data from clinical trials have not met expectations. In present study, we designed a TNF-α epitope-scaffold immunogen DTNF7 using the transmembrane domain of diphtheria toxin, named DTT as a scaffold. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that the grafted TNF-α epitope is entirely surface-exposed and presented in a native-like conformation while the rigid helical structure of DTT is minimally perturbed, thereby rendering the immunogen highly stable. Immunization of mice with alum formulated DTNF7 induced humoral responses against native TNF-α, and the antibody titer was sustained for more than 6 months, which supports a role of the universal CD4 T cell epitopes of DTT in breaking self-immune tolerance. In a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, DTNF7-alum vaccination markedly delayed the onset of collagen-induced arthritis, and reduced incidence as well as clinical score. DTT is presumed safe as an epitope carrier because a catalytic inactive mutant of diphtheria toxin, CRM197 has good clinical safety records as an active vaccine component. Taken all together, we show that DTT-based epitope vaccine is a promising strategy for prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27658047

  10. Protective effect of higenamine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis through heme oxygenase-1 and PI3K/Akt/Nrf-2 signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wenjiang; Chen, Jianmin; Wu, Yu; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Yuansheng

    2016-01-01

    Existing in Ranunculaceae Aconitum and tomato, with the chemical name 1-phydroxybenzyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahy-droisoquinoline, higenamine is widely distributed in China. Higenamine's anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects have been identified in previous studies. The present study attempted to determine the protective effect of higenamine against collagen-induced arthritis through heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and PI3K/Akt/Nrf-2 signaling pathways. A type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) model was established and clinical arthritis scores were used to appraise the curative effect of higenamine. Inflammatory reactions, oxidative damage and caspase-3/9 activation were detected using specific ELISA kits. In addition, western blotting was used to evaluate the expression of HO-1, Akt and Nrf-2 protein in CII-induced CIA mice. In CII-induced CIA mice, the clinical arthritis scores, inflammatory reactions, oxidation damage and caspase-3/9 activation were increased and activated. The results demonstrated that treatment with higenamine significantly reduced the elevation of clinical arthritis scores (P<0.01), and suppressed the promotion of inflammatory reactions, oxidation damage and caspase-3/9 activation. Furthermore, higenamine significantly increased HO-1 protein expression (P<0.01) and upregulated the PI3K/Akt/Nrf-2 signal pathway in CII-induced CIA mice. Collectively, it is concluded that higenamine protects against CII-induced CIA through the induction of HO-1 and the upregulation of the PI3K/Akt/Nrf-2 signaling pathway. In conclusion, higenamine may be a beneficial drug for protecting against CIA. PMID:27882125

  11. Photobiomodulation therapy on collagen type I and III, vascular endothelial growth factor, and metalloproteinase in experimentally induced tendinopathy in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Marques, Anna Cristina de Farias; Albertini, Regiane; Serra, Andrey Jorge; da Silva, Evela Aparecida Pereira; de Oliveira, Vanessa Lima Cavalcante; Silva, Luciana Miatto; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) on collagen type I and III, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in experimentally induced tendinopathy in female aged rats. Tendinopathy was induced by the Achilles tendoncollagenase peritendinous. Forty-two Wistar rats (Norvegicus albinus) were used; groups consisted of 36 aged animals (18 months old; mean body weight, 517.7 ± 27.54 g) and 6 adult animals (12 weeks old; mean body weight, 266± 19.30 g). The animals were divided into three groups: control, aged tendinopathy, and aged tendinopathy PBMT; the aged groups were subdivided based on time to euthanasia: 7, 14, and 21 days. PBMT involved a gallium-arsenide-aluminum laser (Theralaser, DMC®) with active medium operating at wavelength 830 ± 10 nm, 50 mW power, 0.028 cm(2) laser beam, 107 J/cm(2) energy density, 1.8 W/cm(2) power density, and an energy of 3 J per point. The laser was applied by direct contact with the left Achilles tendon during 60 s per point at a frequency of three times per week, until the euthanasia date (7, 14, and 21 days). VEGF, MMP-3, and MMP-9 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, and collagen type I and III by Sirius red. PBMT increased the deposition of collagen type I and III in a gradual manner, with significant differences relative to the group aged tendonitis (p < 0.001), and in relation to VEGF (p < 0.001); decreased expression of MMP-3 and 9 were observed in group aged tendinopathy (p < 0.001). PBMT, therefore, increased the production of collagen type I and III, downregulated the expression of MMP-3 and MMP-9, and upregulated that of VEGF, with age and age-induced hormonal deficiency.

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Joint Protection in Collagen-Induced Arthritis after Treatment with IQ-1S, a Selective c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Hammaker, Deepa; Kochetkova, Irina; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Lyakhov, Sergey A; Firestein, Gary S; Quinn, Mark T

    2015-06-01

    c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) participate in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including inflammatory diseases. We recently synthesized the sodium salt of IQ-1S (11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one oxime) and demonstrated that it is a high-affinity JNK inhibitor and inhibits murine delayed-type hypersensitivity. Here we show that IQ-1S is highly specific for JNK and that its neutral form is the most abundant species at physiologic pH. Molecular docking of the IQ-1S syn isomer into the JNK1 binding site gave the best pose, which corresponded to the position of cocrystallized JNK inhibitor SP600125 (1,9-pyrazoloanthrone). Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of IQ-1S showed that it inhibited matrix metalloproteinase 1 and 3 gene expression induced by interleukin-1β in human fibroblast-like synoviocytes and significantly attenuated development of murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Treatment with IQ-1S either before or after induction of CIA resulted in decreased clinical scores, and joint sections from IQ-1S-treated CIA mice exhibited only mild signs of inflammation and minimal cartilage loss compared with those from control mice. Collagen II-specific antibody responses were also reduced by IQ-1S treatment. By contrast, the inactive ketone derivative 11H-indeno[1,2-b]quinoxalin-11-one had no effect on CIA clinical scores or collagen II-specific antibody titers. IQ-1S treatment also suppressed proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in joints and lymph node cells. Finally, treatment with IQ-1S increased the number of Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in lymph nodes. Thus, IQ-1S can reduce inflammation and cartilage loss associated with CIA and can serve as a small-molecule modulator for mechanistic studies of JNK function in rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. Transient retinoic acid signaling confers anterior-posterior polarity to the inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Jinwoong; Raft, Steven; Kong, Kyoung-Ah; Koo, Soo Kyung; Dräger, Ursula C.; Wu, Doris K.

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrate hearing and balance are based in complex asymmetries of inner ear structure. Here, we identify retinoic acid (RA) as an extrinsic signal that acts directly on the ear rudiment to affect its compartmentalization along the anterior-posterior axis. A rostrocaudal wave of RA activity, generated by tissues surrounding the nascent ear, induces distinct responses from anterior and posterior halves of the inner ear rudiment. Prolonged response to RA by posterior otic tissue correlates with Tbx1 transcription and formation of mostly nonsensory inner ear structures. By contrast, anterior otic tissue displays only a brief response to RA and forms neuronal elements and most sensory structures of the inner ear. PMID:21173260

  14. Soluble complement receptor one (sCR1) inhibits the development and progression of rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, R M; Williams, A S; Levin, J L; Williams, B D; Morgan, B P

    2000-01-01

    We set out to determine whether inhibition of complement using sCR1 could influence the development and progression of collagen arthritis in the Lewis rat. Collagen arthritis was successfully established in the Lewis rat, using a novel immunization schedule. In separate experiments, cobra venom factor (CVF) and sCR1 were used to achieve systemic complement inhibition. Their respective effects on disease onset and on the progression of established disease compared with saline-treated control animals was explored. Arthritis was assessed by measurement of clinical score, paw diameter and paw volume. Complement inhibition using either CVF or sCR1, prior to the onset of clinical signs of inflammation, delayed the development of disease. CVF was ineffective in the treatment of established disease, whereas sCR1 delayed the progression of disease in affected joints and prevented the recruitment of further joints while the animals were complement-depleted. In the control saline-treated groups the disease continued to progress relentlessly. We conclude that complement activation is important in the initiation and maintenance of inflammation in collagen arthritis. The potent disease-modulating effect of sCR1 provides persuasive evidence that specific complement inhibiting agents may be an effective approach to the treatment of inflammatory joint diseases

  15. Protective effect of Withania somnifera root powder in relation to lipid peroxidation, antioxidant status, glycoproteins and bone collagen on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Rasool, M; Varalakshmi, P

    2007-04-01

    The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the protective effect of Withania somnifera Linn. Dunal (family-Solanaceae), commonly known as Ashwagandha, on adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. Results were compared with those for Indomethacin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (0.1 mL) into the right hind paw of Wistar albino rats. Withania somnifera root powder (1000 mg/kg/day) and Indomethacin (3 mg/kg/day) were orally administered for 8 days (from 11th to 18th day) after adjuvant injection. The anti-arthritic effect of W. somnifera root powder was assessed by measuring changes in lipid peroxidation, antioxidant status, and glycoprotein levels in plasma and spleen of arthritic animals. In addition, cartilage degradation was also assessed by estimating bone collagen, and urinary constituents in arthritic animals. Results of the present investigation showed significant increase in the level of lipid peroxides, glycoproteins, and urinary constituents with the depletion of antioxidant status and bone collagen in arthritic animals. These biochemical alterations observed were ameliorated significantly by oral administration of W. somnifera root powder (1000 mg/kg body weight) in arthritic animals. The results of this study clearly indicate that W. somnifera root powder is capable of rectifying the above biochemical changes in adjuvant arthritis.

  16. Alleviation of collagen-induced arthritis by the benzoxathiole derivative BOT-4-one in mice: Implication of the Th1- and Th17-cell-mediated immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Hak; Yoon, Bo Ruem; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Noh, Kum Hee; Kwon, Sun-Ho; Yi, Eun Hee; Lee, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Jung Sook; Kang, Seong Wook; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Won-Woo; Ye, Sang-Kyu

    2016-06-15

    Autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by chronic inflammation and hyperplasia in the synovial joints. Although the cause of rheumatoid arthritis is largely unknown, substantial evidence has supported the importance of immune cells and inflammatory cytokines in the initiation and progression of this disease. Herein, we demonstrated that the benzoxathiole derivative 2-cyclohexylimino-6-methyl-6,7-dihydro-5H-benzo[1,3]oxathiol-4-one (BOT-4-one) alleviated type II collagen-induced arthritis in a mouse model. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in both human patients with rheumatoid arthritis and mice with collagen-induced arthritis. BOT-4-one treatment reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice and endotoxin-stimulated macrophages. BOT-4-one treatment suppressed the polarization of Th1- and Th17-cell subsets by inhibiting the expression and production of their lineage-specific master transcription factors and cytokines, as well as activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins. In addition, BOT-4-one inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-kappaB signaling as well as the transcriptional activities and DNA-binding of transcription factors, including activator protein-1, cAMP response element-binding protein and NF-kappaB. Our results suggest that BOT-4-one may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of chronic inflammation associated with autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Listening to the Ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher Alan

    Otoacoustic emissions demonstrate that the ear creates sound while listening to sound, offering a promising acoustic window on the mechanics of hearing in awake, listening human beings. That window is clouded, however, by an incomplete knowledge of wave reflection and transmission, both forth and back within the cochlea and through the middle ear. This thesis "does windows," addressing wave propagation and scattering on both sides of the middle ear. A summary of highlights follows. Measurements of the cochlear input impedance in cat are used to identify a new symmetry in cochlear mechanics--termed "tapering symmetry" after its geometric interpretation in simple models--that guarantees that the wavelength of the traveling wave changes slowly with position near the stapes. Waves therefore propagate without reflection through the basal turns of the cochlea. Analytic methods for solving the cochlear wave equations using a perturbative scattering series are given and used to demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, conventional cochlear models exhibit negligible internal reflection whether or not they accurately represent the tapering symmetries of the inner ear. Frameworks for the systematic "deconstruction" of eardrum and middle-ear transduction characteristics are developed and applied to the analysis of noninvasive measurements of middle-ear and cochlear mechanics. A simple phenomenological model of inner-ear compressibility that correctly predicts hearing thresholds in patients with missing or disarticulated middle-ear ossicles is developed and used to establish an upper bound on cochlear compressibility several orders of magnitude smaller than that provided by direct measurements. Accurate measurements of stimulus -frequency evoked otoacoustic emissions are performed and used to determine the form and frequency variation of the cochlear traveling-wave ratio noninvasively. Those measurements are inverted to obtain the spatial distribution of mechanical

  18. Listening to the ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher A.

    Otoacoustic emissions demonstrate that the ear creates sound while listening to sound, offering a promising acoustic window on the mechanics of hearing in awake, listening human beings. That window is clouded, however, by an incomplete knowledge of wave reflection and transmission, both forth and back within the cochlea and through the middle ear. This thesis "does windows," addressing wave propagation and scattering on both sides of the middle ear. A summary of highlights follows. Measurements of the cochlear input impedance in cat are used to identify a new symmetry in cochlear mechanics-termed "tapering symmetry" after its geometric interpretation in simple models-that guarantees that the wavelength of the traveling wave changes slowly with position near the stapes. Waves therefore propagate without reflection through the basal turns of the cochlea. Analytic methods for solving the cochlear wave equations using a perturbative scattering series are given and used to demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, conventional cochlear models exhibit negligible internal reflection whether or not they accurately represent the tapering symmetries of the inner ear. Frameworks for the systematic "deconstruction" of eardrum and middle-ear transduction characteristics are developed and applied to the analysis of noninvasive measurements of middle-ear and cochlear mechanics. A simple phenomenological model of inner-ear compressibility that correctly predicts hearing thresholds in patients with missing or disarticulated middle-ear ossicles is developed and used to establish an upper bound on cochlear compressibility several orders of magnitude smaller than that provided by direct measurements. Accurate measurements of stimulus frequency evoked otoacoustic emissions are performed and used to determine the form and frequency variation of the cochlear traveling-wave ratio noninvasively. Those measurements are inverted to obtain the spatial distribution of mechanical

  19. Gfi1Cre mice have early onset progressive hearing loss and induce recombination in numerous inner ear non-hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Matern, Maggie; Vijayakumar, Sarath; Margulies, Zachary; Milon, Beatrice; Song, Yang; Elkon, Ran; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Jones, Sherri M.; Hertzano, Ronna

    2017-01-01

    Studies of developmental and functional biology largely rely on conditional expression of genes in a cell type-specific manner. Therefore, the importance of specificity and lack of inherent phenotypes for Cre-driver animals cannot be overemphasized. The Gfi1Cre mouse is commonly used for conditional hair cell-specific gene deletion/reporter gene activation in the inner ear. Here, using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, we show that the Gfi1Cre mice produce a pattern of recombination that is not strictly limited to hair cells within the inner ear. We observe a broad expression of Cre recombinase in the Gfi1Cre mouse neonatal inner ear, primarily in inner ear resident macrophages, which outnumber the hair cells. We further show that heterozygous Gfi1Cre mice exhibit an early onset progressive hearing loss as compared with their wild-type littermates. Importantly, vestibular function remains intact in heterozygotes up to 10 months, the latest time point tested. Finally, we detect minor, but statistically significant, changes in expression of hair cell-enriched transcripts in the Gfi1Cre heterozygous mice cochleae compared with their wild-type littermate controls. Given the broad use of the Gfi1Cre mice, both for gene deletion and reporter gene activation, these data are significant and necessary for proper planning and interpretation of experiments. PMID:28181545

  20. Limited efficacy of Fever Tag® temperature sensing ear tags in calves with naturally occurring bovine respiratory disease or induced bovine viral diarrhea virus infection

    PubMed Central

    McCorkell, Robert; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; Windeyer, Claire; Schaefer, Al

    2014-01-01

    Temperature sensing ear tags were tested in 1) auction-derived calves with 50% incidence of bovine respiratory disease, and 2) specific pathogen-free calves infected with bovine virus diarrhea virus. There were no false positives, but tag placement, probe displacement, and a high threshold for activation all contributed to failure to reliably detect sick calves. PMID:24982523

  1. Fusion of the ear bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Images Ear anatomy Medical findings based on ear anatomy References House JW, Cunningham CD. Otosclerosis. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  2. "Swimmer's Ear" (Otitis Externa) Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work: Healthy Swimming Policy & Recommendations Fast Facts Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ... painful. How is swimmer's ear spread at recreational water venues? Swimmer’s ear can occur when water stays ...

  3. Involvement of P2X7 receptor signaling on regulating the differentiation of Th17 cells and type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhi-Dan; Zhang, Ya-Yuan; Guo, Yi-Hong; Huang, Na; Ma, Hui-Hui; Huang, Hui; Yu, Hai-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17 producing T helper (Th17) cells are major effector cells in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has emerged as a potential site in the regulation of inflammation in RA but little is known of its functional role on the differentiation of Th17 cells. This study investigates the in vitro and in vivo effects of P2X7R on Th17 cell differentiation during type II collagen (CII) induced experimental arthritis model. In CII-treated dendritic cells (DCs) and DC/CD4+ T coculture system, pretreatment with pharmacological antagonists of P2X7R (Suramin and A-438079) caused strong inhibition of production of Th17-promoting cytokines (IL-1β, TGF-β1, IL-23p19 and IL-6). Exposure to CII induced the elevation of mRNAs encoding retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α and γt, which were abolished by pretreatment with P2X7R antagonists. Furthermore, blocking P2X7R signaling abolished the CII-mediated increase in IL-17A. Blockade of P2X7R remarkably inhibited hind paw swelling and ameliorated pathological changes in ankle joint of the collagen-induced arthritis mice. Thus, we demonstrated a novel function for P2X7R signaling in regulating CII-induced differentiation of Th17 cells. P2X7R signaling facilitates the development of the sophisticated network of DC-derived cytokines that favors a Th17 phenotype. PMID:27775097

  4. Therapeutic Effect of Ergotope Peptides on Collagen-Induced Arthritis by Downregulation of Inflammatory and Th1/Th17 Responses and Induction of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaoyin; Deng, Shaohua; Li, Shan; Xi, Yebin; Li, Chengzhen; Wang, Li; He, Dongyi; Wang, Zhaojun; Chen, Guangjie

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that results in a chronic and inflammatory disorder. Dynamic balance of helper T cells (Th) 1 and 17 and regulatory T cells (Treg) is broken in RA. Since there is no cure for RA at present, it is necessary to find a truly effective and convenient treatment. Several studies have intended to induce ergotopic regulation to treat autoimmune diseases. This study was undertaken to find potential ergotope peptides and investigate their effects in treating the animal model of RA and their underlying regulatory mechanisms. First, we selected functional ergotope peptides from 25 overlapping peptides derived from the interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) α chain, and then used these peptides to treat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We showed ergotope peptides as immunomodulatory factors with great benefits at the clinical and pathologic levels. This effect was associated with inhibition of type II collagen (CII)-specific proliferation and autoantibody production as well as induction of antiergotypic immune response, downregulation of both Th1 and Th17 cells and their related components, and emergence of Treg cells that had suppressive action on autoreactive T cells. We also proved that cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and IL-10 are two important mediators that are critical to Treg suppressive function. Inhibition of Th1 and Th17 in established CIA could be attributed to ergotope-induced Treg cells. Our findings reveal that ergotope peptides induce regulatory immune responses and restore immune tolerance, suggesting that treatment with ergotope peptides may be a novel approach to therapy for RA patients and has good application prospects, with cheap, effective, convenient, wide-spectrum features. PMID:27579476

  5. Ear Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or it can be bought separately). Wear ear protection at concerts, especially when sitting near the stage or speakers (they'll still be able to hear with earplugs — it just won't be as deafening), mowing the lawn or using machinery (like in metal or wood shop at school), or playing a loud instrument ( ...

  6. The red ear syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Red Ear Syndrome (RES) is a very rare disorder, with approximately 100 published cases in the medical literature. Red ear (RE) episodes are characterised by unilateral or bilateral attacks of paroxysmal burning sensations and reddening of the external ear. The duration of these episodes ranges from a few seconds to several hours. The attacks occur with a frequency ranging from several a day to a few per year. Episodes can occur spontaneously or be triggered, most frequently by rubbing or touching the ear, heat or cold, chewing, brushing of the hair, neck movements or exertion. Early-onset idiopathic RES seems to be associated with migraine, whereas late-onset idiopathic forms have been reported in association with trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). Secondary forms of RES occur with upper cervical spine disorders or temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction. RES is regarded refractory to medical treatments, although some migraine preventative treatments have shown moderate benefit mainly in patients with migraine-related attacks. The pathophysiology of RES is still unclear but several hypotheses involving peripheral or central nervous system mechanisms have been proposed. PMID:24093332

  7. From Ear to Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimura, Doreen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper Doreen Kimura gives a personal history of the "right-ear effect" in dichotic listening. The focus is on the early ground-breaking papers, describing how she did the first dichotic listening studies relating the effects to brain asymmetry. The paper also gives a description of the visual half-field technique for lateralized stimulus…

  8. Icariin attenuates high glucose-induced type IV collagen and fibronectin accumulation in glomerular mesangial cells by inhibiting transforming growth factor-β production and signalling through G protein-coupled oestrogen receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Chen; Ding, Xuan-Sheng; Li, Hui-Mei; Zhang, Cheng

    2013-09-01

    Icariin has been shown to attenuate diabetic nephropathy in rats by decreasing transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and type IV collagen expression, but its mode of action in glomerular mesangial cells is uncertain. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of icariin on excess mesangial type IV collagen and fibronectin accumulation induced by high glucose, and to determine the mechanism underlying its protective effects. Under high-glucose conditions, icariin diminished type IV collagen and fibronectin accumulation, as well as TGF-β production in human and rat mesangial cells. Mesangial cells treated with icariin after TGF-β1 exposure expressed less type IV collagen and fibronectin than those without icariin treatment, suggesting inhibition by icariin of TGF-β1 downstream pathways. On TGF-β1 stimulation, icariin inhibited TGF-β canonical Smad signalling and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 signalling by decreasing Smad2/3 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. U0126, which blocked the ERK1/2 pathway, exerted an additive effect on the icariin suppression of type IV collagen and fibronectin expression, enhancing the beneficial effects of icariin. The G protein-coupled oestrogen receptor 1 (GPER) antagonist, G-15, abolished the icariin-induced inhibition of type IV collagen, and fibronectin overproduction and TGF-β signalling. Treatment of cells with fulvestrant, a downregulator of the oestrogen receptor, enhanced the action of icariin. In conclusion, icariin decreased type IV collagen and fibronectin accumulation induced by high glucose in mesangial cells by inhibiting TGF-β production, as well as Smad and ERK signalling in a GPER-dependent manner.

  9. Taking Care of Your Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... it to get better by itself. Tips for Swimmers Sometimes, swimming can lead to a case of swimmer's ear . That's when your outer ear gets infected, ... cause an infection. If you think you have swimmer's ear, your mom or dad needs to call ...

  10. Ear Infections and Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Joanne E.; Zeisel, Susan A.

    Ear infections in infants and preschoolers can cause mild or moderate temporary hearing loss, which may in turn affect a child's ability to understand and learn language. Noting that providing children with proper medical treatment for ear infections or middle ear fluid is important in preventing possible problems with language development, this…

  11. Interleukin-35 (IL-35) inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes isolated from mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunxia; Wu, Suqin; Li, Yuxuan; Jiang, Shenyi; Lin, Tiantian; Xia, Liping; Shen, Hui; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disorder of the joints that affects 0.5-1 % of adults. Excessive growth of the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) promotes hyperplasia of synovial tissues and causes its invasion into the bone and cartilage, which eventually causes deformity and dysfunction of affected joints. Interleukin 35 (IL-35) was shown to suppress the inflammatory responses to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) via upregulation of T regulatory cells and suppression of T helper type 17 cells in a mouse model. To study the effects of IL-35 on the proliferation and apoptosis frequency of cultured FLS isolated from mice with CIA as well as to examine the effects of IL-35 on CIA in vivo. Thirty DBA/1 J mice, which are used as an animal model for RA, were divided randomly (ten mice per group) to a CIA group (collagen treatment), a CIA + IL-35 group (collagen and IL-35 treatments), and a control group (no treatment). Starting on the 24th day after collagen administration, IL-35 was injected intraperitoneally into mice of the CIA + IL-35 group once per day for 10 days. An arthritis index was calculated, and pathological analysis of synovial tissue was performed. FLS isolated from CIA mice were treated with various concentrations of IL-35 (12.5-100 ng/ml). The MTT assay was used to examine FLS proliferation, and apoptosis frequency of FLS was detected by flow cytometry. On day 24, the CIA mice began to exhibit arthritis symptoms, and the symptoms rapidly progressed with time. Treatment with IL-35 significantly alleviated arthritis symptoms and reduced the synovial tissue inflammation. In addition, IL-35 treatment inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis in cultured FLS from CIA mice in a dose-dependent manner. IL-35 could ameliorate the symptoms of arthritis in the CIA mouse model in vivo and inhibited FLS proliferation while promoting FLS apoptosis in vitro, thereby exhibited the potential in inhibiting the progression of RA.

  12. A Magneto-Microfluidic System for Investigating the Influence of an Externally Induced Force Gradient in a Collagen Type I ECM on HMVEC Sprouting.

    PubMed

    Herath, Sahan C B; Sharghi-Namini, Soheila; Du, Yue; Wang, Dongan; Ge, Ruowen; Wang, Qing-Guo; Asada, Harry; Chen, Peter C Y

    2016-11-01

    Advances in mechanobiology have suggested that physiological and pathological angiogenesis may be differentiated based on the ways in which the cells interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM) that exhibits partially different mechanical properties. This warrants investigating the regulation of ECM stiffness on cell behavior using angiogenesis assays. In this article, we report the application of the technique of active manipulation of ECM stiffness to study in vitro angiogenic sprouting of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) in a microfluidic device. Magnetic beads were embedded in the ECM through bioconjugation (between the streptavidin-coated beads and collagen fibers) in order to create a pretension in the ECM when under the influence of an external magnetic field. The advantage of using this magneto-microfluidic system is that the resulting change in the local deformability of the collagen fibers is only apparent to a cell at the pericellular level near the site of an embedded bead, while the global intrinsic material properties of the ECM remain unchanged. The results demonstrate that this system represents an effective tool for inducing noninvasively an external force on cells through the ECM, and suggest the possibility of creating desired stiffness gradients in the ECM for manipulating cell behavior in vitro.

  13. Tetrandrine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by restoring the balance between Th17 and Treg cells via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xusheng; Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Tetrandrine is an alkaloid constituent of the root of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. The long-term clinical uses of tetrandrine for treatments of rheumatalgia and arthralgia as well as the inhibition of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis imply that tetrandrine may have therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we explored its anti-RA mechanism in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in relation to the balance between T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type II collagen and were orally administered tetrandrine for 14 consecutive days. Then, the mice were sacrificed, their joints were removed for histological analysis, and spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were removed to examine the Th17 and Treg cells. Tetrandrine markedly alleviated the severity of arthritis, reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the Th17/Treg balance, as demonstrated by the serum levels of their related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-10) and the proportion of each cell type. Tetrandrine inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and induced Treg cell differentiation in vitro . Notably, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was proven to play a crucial role in tetrandrine-mediated T cell differentiation. The correlation between AhR activation, regulation of Th17/Treg and amelioration of arthritis by tetrandrine was verified in the CIA mice. Moreover, tetrandrine might be a ligand of AhR because it facilitated the expression of the AhR target gene cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and the activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Taken together, tetrandrine exerts its anti-arthritis efficacy by restoring Th17/Treg balance via AhR.

  14. The contralateral ear in cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Sady Selaimen; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro; Rosito, Letícia Petersen Schmidt

    2016-07-01

    Middle ear cholesteatoma has been extensively studied. Theories of cholesteatoma pathogenesis involving previous tympanic membrane retraction are the most widely accepted, but the contralateral ear in patients with cholesteatoma remains unstudied. This study aimed to investigate the contralateral ear in patients with cholesteatoma, and to determine whether the characteristics of it differ according to patient age and cholesteatoma growth patterns. This study was cross sectional. We evaluated 356 patients with middle ear cholesteatoma in at least one ear, and no history of surgery, between August 2000 and March 2013. Otoendoscopy was conducted on both the affected and the contralateral ear. They were classified as normal, tympanic membrane perforation, moderate to severe tympanic membrane retraction and cholesteatoma. The mean age of the patients was 32.77 years, and 53.1 % of the cohort were female. Only 34.8 % of the contralateral ears were normal. The most common abnormality was moderate to severe tympanic membrane retraction (41.6 %). Cholesteatoma was identified in 16 %. Children exhibited a greater frequency of tympanic membrane retractions, whereas adults exhibited a greater frequency of cholesteatoma. All of the contralateral ears in the anterior epitympanic group were normal, but otherwise there were no differences in the contralateral ear when we compared the cholesteatoma growth patterns. We conclude that patients diagnosed with acquired cholesteatoma of one ear are significantly more likely to exhibit abnormalities of the contralateral ear.

  15. Drug delivery to the ear.

    PubMed

    Hoskison, E; Daniel, M; Al-Zahid, S; Shakesheff, K M; Bayston, R; Birchall, J P

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery to the ear is used to treat conditions of the middle and inner ear such as acute and chronic otitis media, Ménière's disease, sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus. Drugs used include antibiotics, antifungals, steroids, local anesthetics and neuroprotective agents. A literature review was conducted searching Medline (1966-2012), Embase (1988-2012), the Cochrane Library and Ovid (1966-2012), using search terms 'drug delivery', 'middle ear', 'inner ear' and 'transtympanic'. There are numerous methods of drug delivery to the middle ear, which can be categorized as topical, systemic (intravenous), transtympanic and via the Eustachian tube. Localized treatments to the ear have the advantages of targeted drug delivery allowing higher therapeutic doses and minimizing systemic side effects. The ideal scenario would be a carrier system that could cross the intact tympanic membrane loaded with drugs or biochemical agents for the treatment of middle and inner ear conditions.

  16. Lactobacillus casei reduces the inflammatory joint damage associated with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) by reducing the pro-inflammatory cytokines: Lactobacillus casei: COX-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Amdekar, Sarika; Singh, Vinod; Singh, Rambir; Sharma, Poonam; Keshav, Poonam; Kumar, Avnish

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of Lactobacillus casei in treating rheumatoid arthritis using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) animal model. Healthy female Wistar rats (weight-180-200 g) were included in this study. Oral administration of L. casei was started on the same day. Indomethacin was used as standard reference drug. Serum level of IL-6, α-TNF, and IL-10 were observed. Four-point arthritis indexes were also assessed at the end of week for 28th day. L. casei-treated rats had shown normal histopathology without any synovial infiltration, pannus formation, cartilage, and bone destruction. Arthritis score was also lower for the group treated with L. casei. Oral administration of L. casei significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines. Present study suggests that L. casei has potent antiarthritic effect in CIA model. Inhibition of COX-2 via inhibiting the pro-inflammatory cytokines is an understanding of the complex interactions involved in these pathways.

  17. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins.

  18. Antisense targeting of TGF-{beta}1 augments BMP-induced upregulation of osteopontin, type I collagen and Cbfa1 in human Saos-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Zhong-Jian . E-mail: zshen2@wisc.edu; Kook Kim, Sang; Youn Jun, Do; Park, Wan; Ho Kim, Young; Malter, James S.; Jo Moon, Byung . E-mail: bjmoon@mail.knu.ac.kr

    2007-04-15

    Despite commonalities in signal transduction in osteoblasts from different species, the role of TGF-{beta}1 on bone formation remains elusive. In particular, the role of autocrine TGF-{beta}1 on human osteoblasts is largely unknown. Here we show the effect of TGF-{beta}1 knock-down on the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts induced by BMP2. Treatment with antisense TGF-{beta}1 moderately increased the rate of cell proliferation, which was completely reversed by the exogenous addition of TGF-{beta}1. Notably, TGF-{beta}1 blockade significantly enhanced BMP2-induced upregulation of mRNAs encoding osteopontin, type I collagen and Cbfa1, which was suppressed by exogenous TGF-{beta}1. Moreover, TGF-{beta}1 knock-down increased BMP2-induced phosphorylation of Smad1/5 as well as their nuclear import, which paralleled a reduction of inhibitory Smad6. These data suggest autocrine TGF-{beta}1 antagonizes BMP signaling through modulation of inducible Smad6 and the activity of BMP specific Smad1/5.

  19. Effects of gangliosides from deer bone extract on the gene expressions of matrix metalloproteinases and collagen type II in interleukin-1β-induced osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Hyung Joo; Lee, Hyunji; Min, Byung Jung; Jung, Sung Ug

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES We investigated the anti-osteoarthritic effects of deer bone extract on the gene expressions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and collagen type II (COL2) in interleukin-1β-induced osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes. MATERIALS/METHODS Primary rabbit chondrocytes were treated as follows: CON (PBS treatment), NC (IL-1β treatment), PC (IL-1β + 100 µg/mL glucosamine sulphate/chondroitin sulphate mixture), and DB (IL-1β + 100 µg/mL deer bone extract). RESULTS The results of the cell viability assay indicated that deer bone extract at doses ranging from 100 to 500 µg/mL inhibits cell death in chondrocytes induced by IL-1β. Deer bone extract was able to significantly recover the mRNA expression of COL2 that was down-regulated by IL-1β (NC: 0.79 vs. DB: 0.87, P < 0.05) and significantly decrease the mRNA expression of MMP-3 (NC: 2.24 vs. DB: 1.75) and -13 (NC: 1.28 vs. DB: 0.89) in OA chondrocytes (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS We concluded that deer bone extract induces accumulation of COL2 through the down-regulation of MMPs in IL-1β-induced OA chondrocytes. Our results suggest that deer bone extract, which contains various components related to OA, including chondroitin sulphate, may possess anti-osteoarthritic properties and be of value in inhibiting the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:27909553

  20. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients. PMID:27621603

  1. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients.

  2. Inner ear insult suppresses the respiratory response to carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Allen, T; Juric-Sekhar, G; Campbell, S; Mussar, K E; Seidel, K; Tan, J; Zyphur, M; Villagracia, L; Stephanian, D; Koch, H; Ramirez, J M; Rubens, D D

    2011-02-23

    Compensated respiratory acidosis has been observed in a significant number of patients with active vestibular disease. We therefore hypothesized that the inner ear may play an unrecognized integral role in respiratory control. To test this premise, we investigated whether mice with induced inner ear injury demonstrated any alteration in their respiratory response to inhaled carbon dioxide (CO(2)). Experimental mice and control mice were included in two separate experiments. Intra-tympanic gentamycin injections were administered to induce inner ear damage in experimental animals. Hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction were tested 1-week after injections to confirm presence of inner ear insult, following which the animal's respiratory response to inhalation of 8% CO(2) was examined. Mice with inner ear injury (n=60) displayed a significantly diminished hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR). This contrasted with the normal HCVR seen in control mice that had not undergone tympanic injections (n=30), controls that received tympanic injections with saline (n=5), and controls that had gentamicin administered systemically (n=5). In response to inspired CO(2), the mean respiratory frequency of control mice increased by an average of 50% over their baseline values for both parts of the experiment. In contrast, the ear-damaged experimental group mean values increased by only three breaths per minute (bpm) (2%) in the first experiment and by 28 bpm (11%) in the second experiment. Inner ear damage significantly reduces the respiratory response to CO(2) inhalation. In addition to the established role of the inner ear organ in hearing and balance, this alludes to an unidentified function of the inner ear and its interconnecting neuronal pathways in respiratory regulation. This finding may offer valuable new clues for disease states with abnormal respiratory control where inner ear dysfunction may be present.

  3. [Effect of allogenic mesenchymal stem cells transplantation on the expression of interleukin-22 and matrix metalloproteinase-3 in rats with collagen induced arthritis].

    PubMed

    Liu, G Y; Bian, S; Li, F; Li, X F; Fan, K; An, H Z; Jia, X X

    2017-03-07

    Objective: To study the effect of allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transplantation on the expression of interleukin -22 (IL-22), matrix metalloproteinase -3 (MMP-3) in serum and synovial of rats with collagen induced arthritis. Methods: Type Ⅱ collagen were injected twice to establish the collagen induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: control group, CIA control group, CIA experiment group. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured by bone marrow method combined with adherent culture method. After identify, the remaining cells were injected in the CIA experimental group. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression of IL-22 and MMP-3 in serum and anklebone joint's synovium of rats, respectively. Synovial cells were isolated and cultured, and were treated with different concentrations of IL-22. MMP-3 protein and mRNA were detected before and after stimulation by Western blot and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Results: After MSC transplantation, arthritis index, X-ray, HE staining of CIA rat showed that joint damage significantly reduced compared with the control group. The ELISA results showed that the expression of MMP-3 and IL-22 in CIA control group was higher than those in the control group (125.79±9.12 vs 102.00±7.63 ng/ml, P<0.05), (292.35±31.23 vs 257.27±13.99 ng/ml, P<0.05) and CIA experiment group (125.79±9.12 vs 97.94±9.50 ng/ml, P<0.05), (292.35±31.23 vs 262.16±22.02 ng/ml, P<0.05) with statistically significant difference (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the control group and CIA experimental group. Immunohistochemical showed similar results with ELISA. Western blotting and RT-qPCR showed that MMP-3 protein and mRNA expression was increased after IL-22 stimulation in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: IL-22 and MMP-3 play an important role in the pathogenesis of

  4. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in CD4(+) T cells contributes to alleviation of Th17/Treg imbalance in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Qin; Liu, Yan; Cai, Huan-Huan; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2016-12-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of catecholamines, is expressed in T lymphocytes. However, the role of T cell-expressed TH in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is less clear. Herein, we aimed to show the contribution of TH expression by CD4(+) T cells to alleviation of helper T (Th)17/regulatory T (Treg) imbalance in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of RA. CIA was prepared by intradermal injection of collagen type II (CII) at tail base of DBA1/J mice. Expression of TH in the spleen and the ankle joints was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Percentages of TH-expressing Th17 and Treg cells in splenic CD4(+) T cells were determined by flow cytometry. Overexpression and knockdown of TH gene in CD4(+) T cells were taken to evaluate effects of TH on Th17 and Treg cells in CIA. TH expression was upregulated in both the inflamed tissues (spleen and ankle joints) and the CD4(+) T cells of CIA mice. In splenic CD4(+) T cells, the cells expressing TH were increased during CIA. These cells that expressed more TH in CIA were mainly Th17 cells rather than Treg cells. TH gene overexpression in CD4(+) T cells from CIA mice reduced Th17 cell percentage as well as Th17-related transcription factor and cytokine expression and secretion, whereas TH gene knockdown enhanced the Th17 cell activity. In contrast, TH gene overexpression increased Treg-related cytokine expression and secretion in CD4(+) T cells of CIA mice, while TH gene knockdown decreased the Treg cell changes. Collectively, these findings show that CIA induces TH expression in CD4(+) T cells, particularly in Th17 cells, and suggest that the increased TH expression during CIA represents an anti-inflammatory mechanism.

  5. ETP-46321, a dual p110α/δ class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor modulates T lymphocyte activation and collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aragoneses-Fenoll, L; Montes-Casado, M; Ojeda, G; Acosta, Y Y; Herranz, J; Martínez, S; Blanco-Aparicio, C; Criado, G; Pastor, J; Dianzani, U; Portolés, P; Rojo, J M

    2016-04-15

    Class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are essential to function of normal and tumor cells, and to modulate immune responses. T lymphocytes express high levels of p110α and p110δ class IA PI3K. Whereas the functioning of PI3K p110δ in immune and autoimmune reactions is well established, the role of p110α is less well understood. Here, a novel dual p110α/δ inhibitor (ETP-46321) and highly specific p110α (A66) or p110δ (IC87114) inhibitors have been compared concerning T cell activation in vitro, as well as the effect on responses to protein antigen and collagen-induced arthritis in vivo. In vitro activation of naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 was inhibited more effectively by the p110δ inhibitor than by the p110α inhibitor as measured by cytokine secretion (IL-2, IL-10, and IFN-γ), T-bet expression and NFAT activation. In activated CD4(+) T cells re-stimulated through CD3 and ICOS, IC87114 inhibited Akt and Erk activation, and the secretion of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17A, and IFN-γ better than A66. The p110α/δ inhibitor ETP-46321, or p110α plus p110δ inhibitors also inhibited IL-21 secretion by differentiated CD4(+) T follicular (Tfh) or IL-17-producing (Th17) helper cells. In vivo, therapeutic administration of ETP-46321 significantly inhibited responses to protein antigen as well as collagen-induced arthritis, as measured by antigen-specific antibody responses, secretion of IL-10, IL-17A or IFN-γ, or clinical symptoms. Hence, p110α as well as p110δ Class IA PI3Ks are important to immune regulation; inhibition of both subunits may be an effective therapeutic approach in inflammatory autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. Intranasal Administration of Type V Collagen Reduces Lung Carcinogenesis through Increasing Endothelial and Epithelial Apoptosis in a Urethane-Induced Lung Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Parra, Edwin Roger; Alveno, Renata Antunes; Faustino, Carolina Brito; Corrêa, Paula Yume Sato Serzedello; Vargas, Camilla Mutai; de Morais, Jymenez; Rangel, Maristela Peres; Velosa, Ana Paula Pereira; Fabro, Alexandre Todorovic; Teodoro, Walcy Rosolia; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza

    2016-08-01

    Type V collagen (Col V) is a "minor" component of normal lung extracellular matrix, which is subjected to decreased and abnormal synthesis in human lung infiltrating adenocarcinoma. We previously reported that a direct link between low amounts of Col V and decreased cell apoptosis may favor cancer cell growth in the mouse lung after chemical carcinogenesis. Moreover, this collagen species was able to trigger DNA fragmentation and impair survival of neoplastic cells. In this study, we have extended our investigation with the aim to obtain further evidence that the death induced by Col V-treatment is of the caspase-9 apoptotic type. We used (1) optical and electron microscopy, (2) quantitation of TUNEL-labeled cells and (3) analysis of the expression levels of Col V and selected genes coding for apoptosis-linked factors, by conventional RT-PCR. BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with 1.5 g/kg body weight of urethane. After urethane injection, the animals received intranasal administration of 20 µg/20 µl of Col V every day during 2 months. We report here that Col V treatment was able to determine significant increase in Col V protein and gene expression and in the percentage of TUNEL-positive cells, to up-regulate caspase-9, resulting in low growth of tumor cells. Our data validate chemical carcinogenesis as a suitable "in vivo" model for further and more detailed studies on the molecular mechanisms of the death response induced by Col V in lung infiltrating adenocarcinoma opening new strategies for treatment.

  7. Periplocoside A ameliorated type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice via regulation of the balance of Th17/Treg cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Hu, Xudong; Cheng, Lei; Tang, Wei; Zhao, Weimin; Yang, Yifu; Zuo, Jianping

    2017-03-01

    Periplocoside A (PSA) has been extracted from the Chinese herbal medicine Periploca sepium Bge to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) via immune regulation. We previously found that PSA exhibits immunosuppressive activity both in vitro and in vivo. Balanced regulation of helper T 17 (Th17)/regulatory T (Treg) cells is the current therapeutic direction for the treatment of RA. The present study investigated the mechanism of PSA in treating collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The therapeutic effects and potential pharmacological mechanisms of PSA were specifically clarified by examining its effects on CIA in DBA/1 mice. PSA administration significantly relieved the severity of the arthritis, and preventive administration of PSA reduced the incidence of arthritis in the mice with CIA and relieved joint damage in terms of morphology. PSA was also able to reduce the levels of anti-collagen II (CII) antibodies and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the serum. As a result, the proportion of Th17 cells decreased, and the proportion of Treg cells increased. A follow-up study of the ex vivo immunological reactions induced by a specific antigen found that PSA suppressed lymphocyte proliferation, inhibited the differentiation and reactivity of Th17 cells, and promoted the proportion of Treg cells among helper T cells. PSA also exhibited pharmacological effect in regulating the balance between Th17 and Treg cells in CIA through relevant signalling pathways. Thus, PSA played a specific role in CIA treatment. In particular, our results suggest that the therapeutic effects of PSA on RA are partially realized via the regulation of the balance of Th17/Treg cells.

  8. Immunosuppression by fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in collagen arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Belli, J.A.; Trentham, D.E.

    1982-05-01

    Treatments with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and cyclophosphamide were evaluated for rats injected with type II collagen. Preadministration of TLI and repeated injections of cyclophosphamide suppressed the severity of arthritis and lowered antibody titers to collagen significantly. TLI initiated at the onset of collagen arthritis decreased humoral and cellular responses to collagen but did not affect the severity of arthritis. These data demonstrate that both TLi and cyclophosphamide are immunosuppressive in an experimentally inducible autoimmune disease.

  9. Expression of catalytically active Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 in dermal fibroblasts induces collagen fragmentation and functional alterations that resemble aged human skin

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wei; Hammerberg, Craig; Li, Yong; He, Tianyuan; Quan, Taihao; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Summary Increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and reduced production of type I collagen by dermal fibroblasts are prominent features of aged human skin. We have proposed that MMP-1-mediated collagen fibril fragmentation is a key driver of age-related decline of skin function. To investigate this hypothesis, we constructed, characterized, and expressed constitutively active MMP-1 mutant (MMP-1 V94G) in adult human skin in organ culture and fibroblasts in three dimensional collagen lattice cultures. Expression of MMP-1 V94G in young skin in organ culture caused fragmentation and ultrastructural alterations of collagen fibrils similar to those observed in aged human skin in vivo. Expression of MMP-1 V94G in dermal fibroblasts cultured in three-dimensional collagen lattices caused substantial collagen fragmentation, which was markedly reduced by MMP-1 siRNA-mediated knockdown or MMP inhibitor MMI270. Importantly, fibroblasts cultured in MMP-1 V94G-fragmented collagen lattices displayed many alterations observed in fibroblasts in aged human skin, including reduced cytoplasmic area, disassembled actin cytoskeleton, impaired TGF-β pathway, and reduced collagen production. These results support the concept that MMP-1-mediated fragmentation of dermal collagen fibrils alters the morphology and function of dermal fibroblasts, and provide a foundation for understanding specific mechanisms that link collagen fibril fragmentation to age-related decline of fibroblast function. PMID:23601157

  10. The Effector Protein BPE005 from Brucella abortus Induces Collagen Deposition and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Downmodulation via Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Rey Serantes, Diego; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Vanzulli, Silvia; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Comerci, Diego José

    2015-01-01

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. In the present study, we identified a virulence factor involved in the modulation of hepatic stellate cell function and consequent fibrosis during Brucella abortus infection. This study assessed the role of BPE005 protein from B. abortus in the fibrotic phenotype induced on hepatic stellate cells during B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the fibrotic phenotype induced by B. abortus on hepatic stellate (LX-2) cells was dependent on BPE005, a protein associated with the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB from B. abortus. Our results indicated that B. abortus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) secretion through the activity of the BPE005-secreted protein and induces concomitant collagen deposition by LX-2 cells. BPE005 is a small protein containing a cyclic nucleotide monophosphate binding domain (cNMP) that modulates the LX-2 cell phenotype through a mechanism that is dependent on the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that B. abortus tilts LX-2 cells to a profibrogenic phenotype employing a functional T4SS and the secreted BPE005 protein through a mechanism that involves the cAMP and PKA signaling pathway. PMID:26667834

  11. Glucose Kinetics in the Collagen-Induced Arthritis Model: An All-in-One Model to Assess Both Efficacy and Metabolic Side Effects of Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Theo H.; Bleeker, Aycha; Grefhorst, Aldo; Schouten, Annelies E.; Bastiaanssen, Ellen A. J.; Ballak, Dov B.; Koenders, Marije I.; van Doorn, Cindy; van der Vleuten, Monique A. J.; van Lierop, Marie-Jose C.; Groen, Albert K.; Dokter, Wim H. A.

    2014-01-01

    Prednisolone and other glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent anti-inflammatory drugs, but chronic use is hampered by metabolic side effects. Therefore, there is an urgent medical need for improved GCs that are as effective as classical GCs but have a better safety profile. A well-established model to assess anti-inflammatory efficacy is the chronic collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model in mice, a model with features resembling rheumatoid arthritis. Models to quantify undesired effects of glucocorticoids on glucose kinetics are less well-established. Recently, we have described a model to quantify basal blood glucose kinetics using stably-labeled glucose. In the present study, we have integrated this blood glucose kinetic model in the CIA model to enable quantification of both efficacy and adverse effects in one animal model. Arthritis scores were decreased after treatment with prednisolone, confirming the anti-inflammatory properties of GCs. Both inflammation and prednisolone induced insulin resistance as insulin secretion was strongly increased whereas blood glucose concentrations and hepatic glucose production were only slightly decreased. This insulin resistance did not directly resulted in hyperglycemia, indicating a highly adaptive compensatory mechanism in these mice. In conclusion, this ‘all-in-one’ model allows for studying effects of (novel) GC compounds on the development of arthritis and glucose kinetics in a single animal. This integrative model provides a valuable tool for investigating (drug-induced) metabolic dysregulation in an inflammatory setting. PMID:25181348

  12. Glucose kinetics in the collagen-induced arthritis model: an all-in-one model to assess both efficacy and metabolic side effects of glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Erik J M; Laskewitz, Anke J; van Dijk, Theo H; Bleeker, Aycha; Grefhorst, Aldo; Schouten, Annelies E; Bastiaanssen, Ellen A J; Ballak, Dov B; Koenders, Marije I; van Doorn, Cindy; van der Vleuten, Monique A J; van Lierop, Marie-Jose C; Groen, Albert K; Dokter, Wim H A

    2014-01-01

    Prednisolone and other glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent anti-inflammatory drugs, but chronic use is hampered by metabolic side effects. Therefore, there is an urgent medical need for improved GCs that are as effective as classical GCs but have a better safety profile. A well-established model to assess anti-inflammatory efficacy is the chronic collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model in mice, a model with features resembling rheumatoid arthritis. Models to quantify undesired effects of glucocorticoids on glucose kinetics are less well-established. Recently, we have described a model to quantify basal blood glucose kinetics using stably-labeled glucose. In the present study, we have integrated this blood glucose kinetic model in the CIA model to enable quantification of both efficacy and adverse effects in one animal model. Arthritis scores were decreased after treatment with prednisolone, confirming the anti-inflammatory properties of GCs. Both inflammation and prednisolone induced insulin resistance as insulin secretion was strongly increased whereas blood glucose concentrations and hepatic glucose production were only slightly decreased. This insulin resistance did not directly resulted in hyperglycemia, indicating a highly adaptive compensatory mechanism in these mice. In conclusion, this 'all-in-one' model allows for studying effects of (novel) GC compounds on the development of arthritis and glucose kinetics in a single animal. This integrative model provides a valuable tool for investigating (drug-induced) metabolic dysregulation in an inflammatory setting.

  13. The Effector Protein BPE005 from Brucella abortus Induces Collagen Deposition and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Downmodulation via Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Rey Serantes, Diego; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Vanzulli, Silvia; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Comerci, Diego José; Delpino, María Victoria

    2015-12-14

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. In the present study, we identified a virulence factor involved in the modulation of hepatic stellate cell function and consequent fibrosis during Brucella abortus infection. This study assessed the role of BPE005 protein from B. abortus in the fibrotic phenotype induced on hepatic stellate cells during B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the fibrotic phenotype induced by B. abortus on hepatic stellate (LX-2) cells was dependent on BPE005, a protein associated with the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB from B. abortus. Our results indicated that B. abortus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) secretion through the activity of the BPE005-secreted protein and induces concomitant collagen deposition by LX-2 cells. BPE005 is a small protein containing a cyclic nucleotide monophosphate binding domain (cNMP) that modulates the LX-2 cell phenotype through a mechanism that is dependent on the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that B. abortus tilts LX-2 cells to a profibrogenic phenotype employing a functional T4SS and the secreted BPE005 protein through a mechanism that involves the cAMP and PKA signaling pathway.

  14. Association of H2A{sup b} with resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in H2-recombinant mouse strains: An allele associated with reduction of several apparently unrelated responses

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, N.A.; Brunner, M.C.

    1995-02-01

    HLA class II alleles can protect against immunological diseases. Seeking an animal model for a naturally occurring protective allele, we screened a panel of H2-congenic and recombinant mouse strains for ability to protect against collagen-induced arthritis. The strains were crossed with the susceptible strain DBA/1, and the F{sub 1} hybrids immunized with cattle and chicken type II collagen. Hybrids having the H2A{sup b} allele displayed a reduced incidence and duration of the disease. They also had a reduced level of pre-disease inflammation, but not of anti-collagen antibodies. The allele is already known to be associated with reduction of other apparently unrelated immune responses, suggesting that some form of functional differentiation may operate that is not exclusively related to epitope-binding. It is suggested that this may reflect allelic variation in the class II major histocompatibility complex promoter region. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Ear syringing: minimising the risks.

    PubMed

    Bird, Sara

    2008-05-01

    The patient, 61 years of age, saw the general practitioner for a repeat prescription for her blood pressure medication. During the consultation, the patient mentioned that she had some discomfort in her left ear. The GP examined the patient's ears and noted that both external auditory canals were blocked by wax. He recommended that the patient have her ears syringed and arranged for the practice nurse to perform the procedure. The GP did not see the patient again.

  16. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) but not HIF-2 is essential for hypoxic induction of collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases in primary newborn mouse epiphyseal growth plate chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Aro, Ellinoora; Khatri, Richa; Gerard-O'Riley, Rita; Mangiavini, Laura; Myllyharju, Johanna; Schipani, Ernestina

    2012-10-26

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are the master regulators of hypoxia-responsive genes. They play a critical role in the survival, development, and differentiation of chondrocytes in the avascular hypoxic fetal growth plate, which is rich in extracellular matrix (ECM) and in its main component, collagens. Several genes involved in the synthesis, maintenance, and degradation of ECM are regulated by HIFs. Collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases (C-P4Hs) are key enzymes in collagen synthesis because the resulting 4-hydroxyprolines are necessary for the stability of all collagen molecules. The vertebrate C-P4Hs are α(2)β(2) tetramers with three isoforms of the catalytic α subunit, yielding C-P4Hs of types I-III. C-P4H-I is the main form in most cells, but C-P4H-II is the major form in chondrocytes. We postulated here that post-translational modification of collagens, particularly 4-hydroxylation of proline residues, could be one of the modalities by which HIF regulates the adaptive responses of chondrocytes in fetal growth plates. To address this hypothesis, we used primary epiphyseal growth plate chondrocytes isolated from newborn mice with conditionally inactivated genes for HIF-1α, HIF-2α, or the von Hippel-Lindau protein. The data obtained showed that C-P4H α(I) and α(II) mRNA levels were increased in hypoxic chondrocytes in a manner dependent on HIF-1 but not on HIF-2. Furthermore, the increases in the C-P4H mRNA levels were associated with both increased amounts of the C-P4H tetramers and augmented C-P4H activity in hypoxia. The hypoxia inducibility of the C-P4H isoenzymes is thus likely to ensure sufficient C-P4H activity for collagen synthesis occurring in chondrocytes in a hypoxic environment.

  17. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces type II collagen and aggrecan expression via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanhui; Tao, Hairong; Jin, Chen; Liu, Yonzhang; Lu, Xiongwei; Hu, Xiaopeng; Wang, Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β regulates the anabolic metabolism of articular cartilage and prevents cartilage degradation. TGF‑β1 influences cellular proliferation, differentiation and the extracellular matrix through activation of the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways. However, it has remained to be fully elucidated precisely how the ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways mediate anabolic processes of articular cartilage. The present study investigated how ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling mediate TGF‑β1‑stimulated type II collagen and aggrecan expression in rat chondrocytes. The results confirmed that TGF‑β1 stimulates type II collagen and aggrecan expression in rat chondrocytes, and furthermore, that the ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways were activated by TGF‑β1. Conversely, the TGF‑β receptor I (ALK5) kinase inhibitor SB525334 significantly impaired TGF‑β1‑induced type II collagen and aggrecan expression, coinciding with a reduction of ERK1/2 and Smad3 phosphorylation. In addition, TGF‑β1‑induced type II collagen and aggrecan expression were significantly suppressed by ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. Similarly, TGF‑β1‑stimulated type II collagen and aggrecan expression were decreased in the presence of a Smad3 phosphorylation inhibitor SIS3. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that the ERK1/2 and Smad2/3 signaling pathways regulate type II collagen and aggrecan expression in rat chondrocytes.

  18. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in mice features regulatory transcriptional network connecting major histocompatibility complex (MHC H2) with autoantigen genes in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Donate, Paula B; Fornari, Thaís A; Junta, Cristina M; Magalhães, Danielle A; Macedo, Cláudia; Cunha, Thiago M; Nguyen, Catherine; Cunha, Fernando Q; Passos, Geraldo A

    2011-05-01

    Considering that imbalance of central tolerance in the thymus contributes to aggressive autoimmunity, we compared the expression of peripheral tissue autoantigens (PTA) genes, which are involved in self-representation in the thymic stroma, of two mouse strains; DBA-1/J (MHC-H2(q)) susceptible and DBA-2/J (MHC-H2(d)) resistant to collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We evaluate whether these strains differ in their thymic gene expression, allowing identification of genes that might play a role in susceptibility/resistance to CIA. Microarray profiling showed that 1093 PTA genes were differentially modulated between collagen immunized DBA-1/J and DBA-2/J mice. These genes were assigned to 17 different tissues/organs, including joints/bone, characterizing the promiscuous gene expression (PGE), which is implicated in self-representation. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that Aire (autoimmune regulator), an important regulator of the PGE process, Aire-dependent (insulin), Aire-independent (Col2A1 and Gad67), and other 22 joint/bone autoantigen genes were down-regulated in DBA-1/J compared with DBA-2/J in the thymus. Considering the importance of MHC-H2 in peptide-self presentation and autoimmunity susceptibility, we reconstructed transcriptional networks of both strains based on actual microarray data. The networks clearly demonstrated different MHC-H2 transcriptional interactions with PTAs genes. DBA-1/J strain featured MHC-H2 as a node influencing downstream genes. Differently, in DBA-2/J strain network MHC-H2 was exclusively self-regulated and does not control other genes. These findings provide evidence that CIA susceptibility in mice may be a reflex of a cascade-like transcriptional control connecting different genes to MHC-H2 in the thymus.

  19. In situ observation of fluoride-ion-induced hydroxyapatite collagen detachment on bone fracture surfaces by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindt, J. H.; Thurner, P. J.; Lauer, M. E.; Bosma, B. L.; Schitter, G.; Fantner, G. E.; Izumi, M.; Weaver, J. C.; Morse, D. E.; Hansma, P. K.

    2007-04-01

    The topography of freshly fractured bovine and human bone surfaces was determined by the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Fracture surfaces from both kinds of samples exhibited complex landscapes formed by hydroxyapatite mineral platelets with lateral dimensions ranging from ~90 nm × 60 nm to ~20 nm × 20 nm. Novel AFM techniques were used to study these fracture surfaces during various chemical treatments. Significant topographical changes were observed following exposure to aqueous solutions of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or highly concentrated sodium fluoride (NaF). Both treatments resulted in the apparent loss of the hydroxyapatite mineral platelets on a timescale of a few seconds. Collagen fibrils situated beneath the overlying mineral platelets were clearly exposed and could be resolved with high spatial resolution in the acquired AFM images. Time-dependent mass loss experiments revealed that the applied agents (NaF or EDTA) had very different resulting effects. Despite the fact that the two treatments exhibited nearly identical results following examination by AFM, bulk bone samples treated with EDTA exhibited a ~70% mass loss after 72 h, whereas for the NaF-treated samples, the mass loss was only of the order of ~10%. These results support those obtained from previous mechanical testing experiments, suggesting that enhanced formation of superficial fluoroapatite dramatically weakens the protein-hydroxyapatite interfaces. Additionally, we discovered that treatment with aqueous solutions of NaF resulted in the effective extraction of noncollagenous proteins from bone powder.

  20. UV-Induced Triggering of a Biomechanical Initiation Switch Within Collagen Promotes Development of a Melanoma-Permissive Microenvironment in the Skin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Using similar experimental approaches we coated microtiter wells with UVA or UVB irradiated collagen type-I or type-IV and examined human dermal ...4). Human dermal fibroblast cell adhesion to collagen type-I was only minimally (20%-25%) enhanced following UVA or UVB irradiation, while high dose...findings suggest that UVA and UVB dose dependently and differentially trigger conformational changes in collagen type-I and IV resulting in the

  1. Local anesthesia for middle ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Caner, Gül; Olgun, Levent; Gültekin, Gürol; Aydar, Levent

    2005-08-01

    The adequacy of anesthesia and comfort during surgery was assessed for 100 consecutive patients undergoing middle ear surgery using local anesthesia, both by the patients themselves and by the surgeon. The possibility of inducing an iatrogenic facial weakness was also evaluated. Both the surgeon and the majority of patients were pleased with the quality of anesthesia and little adverse effects occurred as a consequence of local anesthesia itself.

  2. Effect of an aqueous extract of Phaseolus vulgaris on the properties of tail tendon collagen of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pari, L; Venkateswaran, S

    2003-07-01

    Changes in the structural and functional properties of collagen caused by advanced glycation might be of importance for the etiology of late complications in diabetes. The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of oral administration of aqueous pod extract (200 mg/kg body weight) of Phaseolus vulgaris, an indigenous plant used in Ayurvedic Medicine in India, on collagen content and characteristics in the tail tendon of streptozotocin-diabetic rats. In diabetic rats, collagen content (117.01 6.84 mg/100 mg tissue) as well as its degree of cross-linking was increased, as shown by increased extent of glycation (21.70 0.90 g glucose/mg collagen), collagen-linked fluorescence (52.8 3.0 AU/ mol hydroxyproline), shrinkage temperature (71.50 2.50 C) and decreased acid (1.878 0.062 mg hydroxyproline/100 mg tissue) and pepsin solubility (1.77 0.080 mg hydroxyproline/100 mg tissue). The alpha/ ratio of acid- (1.69) and pepsin-soluble (2.00) collagen was significantly decreased in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Administration of P. vulgaris for 45 days to streptozotocin-diabetic rats significantly reduced the accumulation and cross-linking of collagen. The effect of P. vulgaris was compared with that of glibenclamide, a reference drug administered to streptozotocin-diabetic rats at the dose of 600 g/kg body weight for 45 days by gavage. The effects of P. vulgaris (collagen content, 64.18 1.97; extent of glycation, 12.00 0.53; collagen-linked fluorescence, 33.6 1.9; shrinkage temperature, 57.0 1.0; extent of cross-linking - acid-soluble collagen, 2.572 0.080, and pepsin-soluble collagen, 2.28 0.112) were comparable with those of glibenclamide (collagen content, 71.5 2.04; extent of glycation, 13.00 0.60; collagen-linked fluorescence, 38.9 2.0; shrinkage temperature, 59.0 1.5; extent of cross-linking - acid-soluble collagen, 2.463 0.078, and pepsin-soluble collagen, 2.17 0.104). In conclusion, administration of P. vulgaris pods had a positive influence on the

  3. Collagen-mediated hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Manon-Jensen, T; Kjeld, N G; Karsdal, M A

    2016-03-01

    Collagens mediate essential hemostasis by maintaining the integrity and stability of the vascular wall. Imbalanced turnover of collagens by uncontrolled formation and/or degradation may result in pathologic conditions such as fibrosis. Thickening of the vessel wall because of accumulation of collagens may lead to arterial occlusion or thrombosis. Thinning of the wall because of collagen degradation or deficiency may lead to rupture of the vessel wall or aneurysm. Preventing excessive hemorrhage or thrombosis relies on collagen-mediated actions. Von Willebrand factor, integrins and glycoprotein VI, as well as clotting factors, can bind collagen to restore normal hemostasis after trauma. This review outlines the essential roles of collagens in mediating hemostasis, with a focus on collagens types I, III, IV, VI, XV, and XVIII.

  4. Biomedical applications of collagens.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, John A M

    2016-05-01

    Collagen-based biomedical materials have developed into important, clinically effective materials used in a range of devices that have gained wide acceptance. These devices come with collagen in various formats, including those based on stabilized natural tissues, those that are based on extracted and purified collagens, and designed composite, biosynthetic materials. Further knowledge on the structure and function of collagens has led to on-going developments and improvements. Among these developments has been the production of recombinant collagen materials that are well defined and are disease free. Most recently, a group of bacterial, non-animal collagens has emerged that may provide an excellent, novel source of collagen for use in biomaterials and other applications. These newer collagens are discussed in detail. They can be modified to direct their function, and they can be fabricated into various formats, including films and sponges, while solutions can also be adapted for use in surface coating technologies.

  5. Optimum management of the discharging ear.

    PubMed

    Ruddy, J; Bickerton, R C

    1992-02-01

    Discharge from the ear can be the result of many disease processes. The ear may discharge blood, pus, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or wax. Keratosis obturans, stenosis of the external meatus and benign tumours of the external meatus all lead to wax build-up, which may cause recurrent attacks of otitis externa. Malignant tumours, such as basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and tumours of ceruminous gland origin may also present with discharge. Tumours should be excluded by submitting all material removed from the external canal for histological examination. Single or multiple abscesses (known as furuncles) may occur in the hair follicles in the skin of the external acoustic meatus (EAM). Compulsive scratching, hearing aids and foreign bodies placed in the ear predispose to otitis externa, which is also often associated with infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and faecal organisms. Management may be with aluminium acetate 14%, topical antibiotic/steroid drops, a gauze wick soaked with icthammol 10% in glycerin or polymyxin B sulphate--neomycin sulphate--hydrocortisone acetate cream placed into the EAM and replaced every 24 to 48 hours, or systemic antibiotics according to severity. Malignant (necrotising) otitis externa causes progressive destruction of the temporal bone, and cranial nerve palsies (usually facial first). Treatment is limited debridement of infected bone, accompanied by intravenous aminoglycosides, and local antibiotic treatment and aural cleanout or oral ciprofloxacin. Middle ear conditions causing discharge include acute otitis media, infected grommets, traumatic perforations and chronic suppurative otitis media, as well as tumours of the ear canal skin and middle ear, radiation-induced otitis externa and osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone, tuberculosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, spontaneous or post-traumatic CSF leaks, Wegeners granulomatosis and immune deficiency states. Topical application of aminoglycoside

  6. Benign ear cyst or tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bony tumor of the ear canal Images Ear anatomy References Nicolai P, Castelnuovo P. Benign tumors of the sinonasal tract. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  7. Otoscopic exam of the ear (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... intrument which is used to look into the ear canal. The ear speculum (a cone-shaped viewing piece of the otoscope) is slowly inserted into the ear canal while looking into the otoscope. The speculum ...

  8. Wax blockage in the ear (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hair follicles and glands that produce a waxy oil called cerumen. Sometimes the glands produce more wax than can be easily excreted out the ear. This extra wax may harden within the ear canal and block the ear.

  9. Modeling Analysis of Biomechanical Changes of Middle Ear and Cochlea in Otitis Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Rong Z.; Zhang, Xiangming; Guan, Xiying

    2011-11-01

    A comprehensive finite element (FE) model of the human ear including the ear canal, middle ear, and spiral cochlea was developed using histological sections of human temporal bone. The cochlea was modeled with three chambers separated by the basilar membrane and Reissner's membrane and filled with perilymphatic fluid. The viscoelastic material behavior was applied to middle ear soft tissues based on dynamic measurements of tissues in our lab. The model was validated using the experimental data obtained in human temporal bones and then used to simulate various stages of otitis media (OM) including the changes of morphology, mechanical properties, pressure, and fluid level in the middle ear. Function alterations of the middle ear and cochlea in OM were derived from the model and compared with the measurements from temporal bones. This study indicates that OM can be simulated in the FE model to predict the hearing loss induced by biomechanical changes of the middle ear and cochlea.

  10. Anti-arthritic activity of Fu-Fang-Lu-Jiao-Shuang on collagen-induced arthritis in Balb/c mice and its underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyan; Sun, Weiguang; Chen, Laxia; Xu, Xin; Wu, Yunxia; Zhang, Jinwen; Zhang, Yonghui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, autoimmune disorder characterized by progressive multiple joint destruction, deformity, disability and premature death in most patients. Fu-Fang-Lu-Jiao-Shuang (FFLJS) is an effective traditional Chinese medicine, which has long been used clinically to treat RA patients. Objective: The objective of this study is aimed to evaluate the anti-rheumatic effects of FFLJS on collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model, as well as the underlying mechanisms, which have not previously been explored. Materials and Methods: CIA was induced by immunization with type II collagen (CII) in male Balb/c mice. The mice in the onset of arthritis were treated daily with FFLJS (125 or 500 mg/kg) or 1% carboxymethyl cellulose-Na for 28 days. Paw thickness and arthritic score were evaluated to confirm the anti-arthritic effect of FFLJS on CIA in mice. Levels of anti-CII antibody, proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1) β, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as well as prostaglandin E-2 (PGE-2) in serum and histological changes in the ankle joint were also analyzed. In addition, expressions of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3 and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases-1 (TIMP-1) in synovial tissue were also detected to further study the molecular mechanism of the anti-arthritic effects of FFLJS. Results: During therapeutic treatment, FFLJS significantly reduced paw thickness and arthritic score in CIA mice, decreased the amounts of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IL-17, PGE-2 and anti-CII antibody in serum. In addition, FFLJS treatment could prevent the bone destruction by reducing the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3, increasing the expression of TIMP-1 in synovial tissue of CIA mice. Conclusion: These findings offer the convincing evidence for the first time that the anti-rheumatic effects of FFLJS might be related to down-regulation of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IL-17 and PGE-2 levels for acute arthritis, and regulation of MMP-1, MMP-3

  11. Factors leading to chronic middle ear disease.

    PubMed

    Canty, A A; Prestwood, U; Dugdale, A E; Lewis, A N

    1975-05-10

    In an Australian Aboriginal community, 65% of all people examined had clinical evidence of pathology in the ear drum or middle ear, but active ear disease was found mainly in children. In most people, both ears showed similar clinical changes. Clinical nutritional status and hygienic factors did not correlate with the presence of ear disease. Some families had significantly more ear disease than did others, suggesting that there is some as yet unidentified familial factor.

  12. Parathyroid hormone linked to a collagen binding domain promotes hair growth in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Seymour, Andrew; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a major source of psychological stress in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy, and it can influence treatment decisions. Although there is currently no therapy for alopecia, a fusion protein of parathyroid hormone and collagen binding domain (PTH-CBD) has shown promise in animal models. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are dose-dependent effects of PTH-CBD on chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a mouse model. C57BL/6J mice were waxed to synchronize hair follicles; treated on day 7 with vehicle or PTH-CBD (100, 320, and 1000 mcg/kg subcutaneous injection); and treated on day 9 with vehicle or cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg intraperitoneally). Mice were photographed every 3-4 days and killed on day 63 for histological analysis. Photographs were quantified by gray scale analysis to assess hair content. Mice not receiving chemotherapy showed regrowth of hair 2 weeks after waxing and normal histology after 2 months. Mice receiving chemotherapy alone showed marked hair loss after chemotherapy, which was sustained for 10 days and was followed by rapid regrowth of a normal coat. Histological analysis revealed rapid cycling dystrophic anagen/catagen follicles. Animals receiving chemotherapy and PTH-CBD showed decreased hair loss and more rapid regrowth of hair than that seen with chemotherapy alone (increased hair growth by gray scale analysis, P<0.05), and the effects were dose dependent. Histologically, hair follicles in animals receiving the highest dose of PTH-CBD were in a quiescent phase, similar to that in mice that did not receive chemotherapy. Single-dose subcutaneous administration of PTH-CBD showed dose-dependent effects in minimizing hair loss and speeding up recovery from chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

  13. Silencing of Wnt5a prevents interleukin-1β-induced collagen type II degradation in rat chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shiping; Man, Zhentao; Li, Wei; Sun, Shui; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease, and few treatments to date have been able to delay OA progression. The degradation of collagen type II (COL2) in the cartilage matrix is an important initiating factor for OA progression; the upregulation of Wnt5a protein activates COL2 degradation. In the present study, small interfering RNA of Wnt-5a was delivered by a lentiviral vector (LV-Wnt5a-RNAi) to silence Wnt-5a mRNA and prevent COL2 degradation. To determine the function of LV-Wnt5a-RNAi, the OA chondrocyte model (OA-like chondrocytes) were constructed using interleukin (IL)-1β. Detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), Wnt-5a mRNA in the OA-like chondrocytes were upregulated in a time-dependent manner, indicating that OA-like chondrocytes were successfully constructed. The bioactivity of OA-like chondrocytes was determined using Live-Dead staining, and the result illustrated that the OA-like chondrocytes stimulated with IL-1β for 6 h remained viable, and these were used in Wnt5a silencing. The OA-like chondrocytes were divided into three groups: Group I, cultivated with common medium; group II, cultivated with common medium supplemented with empty lentiviral vector; group III, cultivated with common medium supplemented with LV-Wnt5a-RNAi. The efficiency of LV-Wnt5a-RNAi transfection was determined using fluorescence microscopy, the result of which indicated that LV-Wnt5a-RNAi could efficiently be transfected into the OA-like chondrocytes. The LV-Wnt5a-RNAi efficiency for the Wnt5a mRNA silencing was determined using RT-qPCR. The result illustrated that the mRNA of Wnt5a in group III was significantly lower in group I compared with that in group II (P<0.05), indicating that the LV-Wnt5a-RNAi could successfully silence Wnt5a mRNA. To further verify whether the silencing of Wnt5a mRNA could prevent COL2 degradation, western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses were performed. The results demonstrated that COL2 in

  14. Spontaneous ultra-weak photon emission in correlation to inflammatory metabolism and oxidative stress in a mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    He, Min; van Wijk, Eduard; van Wietmarschen, Herman; Wang, Mei; Sun, Mengmeng; Koval, Slavik; van Wijk, Roeland; Hankemeier, Thomas; van der Greef, Jan

    2017-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis has driven the development of new approaches and technologies for investigating the pathophysiology of this devastating, chronic disease. From the perspective of systems biology, combining comprehensive personal data such as metabolomics profiling with ultra-weak photon emission (UPE) data may provide key information regarding the complex pathophysiology underlying rheumatoid arthritis. In this article, we integrated UPE with metabolomics-based technologies in order to investigate collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, at the systems level, and we investigated the biological underpinnings of the complex dataset. Using correlation networks, we found that elevated inflammatory and ROS-mediated plasma metabolites are strongly correlated with a systematic reduction in amine metabolites, which is linked to muscle wasting in rheumatoid arthritis. We also found that increased UPE intensity is strongly linked to metabolic processes (with correlation co-efficiency |r| value >0.7), which may be associated with lipid oxidation that related to inflammatory and/or ROS-mediated processes. Together, these results indicate that UPE is correlated with metabolomics and may serve as a valuable tool for diagnosing chronic disease by integrating inflammatory signals at the systems level. Our correlation network analysis provides important and valuable information regarding the disease process from a system-wide perspective.

  15. Collagen-graft mixed cellulose esters membrane maintains undifferentiated morphology and markers of potential pluripotency in feeder-free culture of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lotfalah Moradi, Sadegh; Hajishafieeha, Zahra; Nojedehi, Shahrzad; Dinarvand, Vida; Hesami Tackallou, Saeed; Roy, Ram V; Ardeshirylajimi, Abdolreza; Soleimani, Masoud

    2016-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are unique and unlimited clinical sources of stem cell therapy for the regenerative medicine. Feeder layer preparation is an important step for iPSCs production, which is expensive, time-consuming and requires conversance. In the present study, we investigated the maintenance of pluripotency, and stemness of the iPSCs through feeder-free culture on a collagen-grafted Mixed Cellulose Esters membrane (MCE-COL) after three passages during twelve days. Results have demonstrated that the iPSCs cultured on MCE-COL membrane had a fine, typical undifferentiated morphology, increased proliferation rate and significant multi-lineage differentiation potential. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and pluripotency associated gene markers expression further confirmed that iPSCs cultured on the surface of MCE-COL had more ALP positive colonies and enhanced expression of Oct-4, Nanog, Sox-2 and ALP in comparison with MCE and control groups. Since MCE-COL membrane has three dimensional structure and bioactivity, it has the potential for usage in the feeder-free culture of iPSCs, and could be a suitable candidate to use as a feeder layer in stem cells preparation.

  16. Anti-inflammatory effects of a new tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitor (CNI-1493) in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats

    PubMed Central

    ÅKerlund, K; Erlandsson Harris, H; Tracey, K J; Wang, H; Fehniger, T; Klareskog, L; Andersson, J; Andersson, U

    1999-01-01

    A recently developed compound, a multivalent guanylhydrazone (CNI-1493) that inhibits TNF-α production by suppressing TNF-α translational efficiency, was administered in an experimental model of collagen type II-induced arthritis in DA rats. CNI-1493 was injected daily intraperitoneally either before the onset of arthritis or after the establishment of clinical disease. Prophylactic treatment with CNI-1493 significantly prevented or delayed the onset and suppressed the severity of arthritis in a dose-dependent manner. Therapeutic intervention with CNI-1493 in established joint disease also resulted in a significant reduction of clinical signs of arthritis in treated animals. No severe side-effects were noted when animals were treated with daily CNI-1493 doses up to 5 mg/kg. An immunohistochemical study was performed which demonstrated that CNI-1493 led to a reduced expression of TNF-α at the site of disease activity. Thus, CNI-1493 with documented inhibitory effects on TNF-α synthesis, has proven successful in ameliorating the course of arthritis in CIA. We believe that the use of a compound such as CNI-1493 with a defined mode of action provides a useful tool for dissecting and understanding important pathogenic mechanisms operating in the development of chronic arthritis. PMID:9933418

  17. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Bioactive Compound Ferulic Acid Contained in Oldenlandia diffusa on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hao; Liang, Qing-Hua; Xiong, Xin-Gui; Chen, Jiang; Wu, Dan; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to identify the active compounds in Oldenlandia diffusa (OD) decoction and the compounds absorbed into plasma, and to determine whether the absorbed compounds derived from OD exerted any anti-inflammatory effects in rats with collagen induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The UPLC-PDA (Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography Photo-Diode Array) method was applied to identify the active compounds both in the decoction and rat plasma. The absorbable compound was administered to the CIA rats, and the effects were dynamically observed. X-ray films of the joints and HE stain of synovial tissues were analyzed. The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in the rats from each group were measured by means of ELISA. The absorbed compound in the plasma of CIA rats was identified as ferulic acid (FA), following OD decoction administration. Two weeks after the administration of FA solution or OD decoction, the general conditions improved compared to the model group. The anti-inflammatory effect of FA was inferior to that of the OD decoction (P < 0.05), based on a comparison of IL-1β TNF-α levels. FA from the OD decoction was absorbed into the body of CIA rats, where it elicited anti-inflammatory responses in rats with CIA. Conclusions. These results suggest that FA is the bioactive compound in OD decoction, and FA exerts its effects through anti-inflammatory pathways. PMID:24883069

  18. Xianfanghuomingyin, a Chinese Compound Medicine, Modulates the Proliferation and Differentiation of T Lymphocyte in a Collagen-Induced Arthritis Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Wei, Yi; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Jingwei; Dong, Bin; Zhu, Lingqun

    2016-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), xianfanghuomingyin (XFHM) is used to treat autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we studied the mechanisms underlying its treatment effects, especially its anti-inflammatory effects in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. We found that cartilage destruction and pannus formation were alleviated by treatment with XFHM. The abnormal differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells was downregulated significantly by XFHM, and Th2 and Treg cells were upregulated. Moreover, the expression levels of specific cytokines and transcription factors related to Th1 cells (interferon γ [IFNγ], T-bet) and Th17 cells (interleukin- [IL-] 17) and the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-gamma (RORγ) were downregulated. Serum IL-4 and GATA-3, which contribute to Th2 cells differentiation, increased significantly after XFHM administration. These results indicate that XFHM can restore the balance of T lymphocytes and reestablish the immunological tolerance to inhibit autoinflammatory disorder of RA. Taken together, XFHM can be used as a complementary or alternative traditional medicine to treat RA. PMID:27656238

  19. Triptolide Prevents Bone Destruction in the Collagen-Induced Arthritis Model of Rheumatoid Arthritis by Targeting RANKL/RANK/OPG Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanqiong; Kong, Xiangying; Xu, Ying; Chen, Weiheng; Lu, Aiping; Lin, Na

    2013-01-01

    Focal bone destruction within inflamed joints is the most specific hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our previous study indicated that the therapeutic efficiency of triptolide in RA may be due partially to its chondroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. However, its roles in bone destruction are still unclear. In this study, our data firstly showed the therapeutic effects of triptolide on severity of arthritis and arthritis progression in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Then, by micro-CT quantification, triptolide treatment significantly increased bone mineral density, bone volume fraction, and trabecular thickness and decreased trabecular separation of inflamed joints. Interestingly, triptolide treatment could prevent the bone destruction by reducing the number of osteoclasts in inflamed joints, reducing the expression of receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL) and RANK, increasing the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG), at both mRNA and protein levels, and decreasing the ratio of RANKL to OPG in sera and inflamed joints of CIA mice, which were further confirmed in the coculture system of human fibroblast-like synovial and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These findings offer the convincing evidence for the first time that triptolide may attenuate RA partially by preventing the bone destruction and inhibit osteoclast formation by regulating RANKL/RANK/OPG signal pathway. PMID:23573139

  20. Sinomenine suppresses collagen-induced arthritis by reciprocal modulation of regulatory T cells and Th17 cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Tong, Bei; Yu, Juntao; Wang, Ting; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Kong, Lingyi; Dai, Yue; Xia, Yufeng

    2015-05-01

    Sinomenine (SIN) has long been used as a therapeutic agent of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in China. However, the discrepancy between low oral bioavailability and higher minimal effective concentration made its action mode mysterious. The present study aimed to gain insight into the mechanisms by which SIN suppressed collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats in view of Th17 and regulatory T (Treg) cell balance. SIN was orally administered, and the clinical symptoms of CIA rats were monitored; inflammatory cytokines levels in serum were measured by ELISA; pharmacokinetic studies were performed in normal and CIA rats; Th17 and Treg cell frequencies were analyzed by flow cytometry. The data showed that SIN treatment resulted in a dramatic decrease of arthritis scores and paw volume of CIA rats, which was accompanied by down-regulation of IL-17A and up-regulation of IL-10 in rat serum. The frequency of Treg cells was increased and the frequency of Th17 cells was decreased in the gut lymphoid tissues of SIN-treated rats. Immunohistochemistry assay demonstrated that more α4β7-positive cells were detained in joi