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Sample records for collagen induced ear

  1. Prostaglandins in the perilymph of guinea pig with type II collagen induced ear diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, T.; Chiang, T.; Kitano, H.; Sudo, N.; Kim, S.Y.; Ha, S.; Woo, V.; Wolf, B.; Floyd, R.; Yoo, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have studied the prostaglandins (PGs) in the perilymph from guinea pig with type II collagen induced autoimmune ear disease. Hartly guinea pigs were immunized with type II collagen in CFA and auditory brain stem responses (ABR) were measured at 2, 3, 4, and 6 months after initial immunization perilymph was obtained and the levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha.. were measured by radioimmunoassays. Temporal bones were examined for the histopathologic changes. Immunized guinea pigs showed the evidence of hearing loss by ABR. The temporal bones showed the following changes: spiral ganglia degeneration, mild to moderate degree of degeneration in organ of Corti, infrequent very mild endolymphatic hydrops and labrynthitis. The perilymph from immunized animals contained about 5 times more PGE2 and about 3 times more 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha.. than control animals. However, between these two groups, there was no difference in the CSF and sera levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha... Thus, this study suggests that these inflammatory mediators might be involved in the pathogenesis of collagen induced autoimmune inner ear disease.

  2. Autologous circulating angiogenic cells treated with osteopontin and delivered via a collagen scaffold enhance wound healing in the alloxan-induced diabetic rabbit ear ulcer model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic foot ulceration is the leading cause of amputation in people with diabetes mellitus. Peripheral vascular disease is present in the majority of patients with diabetic foot ulcers. Despite standard treatments there exists a high amputation rate. Circulating angiogenic cells previously known as early endothelial progenitor cells are derived from peripheral blood and support angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, providing a potential topical treatment for non-healing diabetic foot ulcers. Methods A scaffold fabricated from Type 1 collagen facilitates topical cell delivery to a diabetic wound. Osteopontin is a matricellular protein involved in wound healing and increases the angiogenic potential of circulating angiogenic cells. A collagen scaffold seeded with circulating angiogenic cells was developed. Subsequently the effect of autologous circulating angiogenic cells that were seeded in a collagen scaffold and topically delivered to a hyperglycemic cutaneous wound was assessed. The alloxan-induced diabetic rabbit ear ulcer model was used to determine healing in response to the following treatments: collagen seeded with autologous circulating angiogenic cells exposed to osteopontin, collagen seeded with autologous circulating angiogenic cells, collagen alone and untreated wound. Stereology was used to assess angiogenesis in wounds. Results The cells exposed to osteopontin and seeded on collagen increased percentage wound closure as compared to other groups. Increased angiogenesis was observed with the treatment of collagen and collagen seeded with circulating angiogenic cells. Conclusions These results demonstrate that topical treatment of full thickness cutaneous ulcers with autologous circulating angiogenic cells increases wound healing. Cells exposed to the matricellular protein osteopontin result in superior wound healing. The wound healing benefit is associated with a more efficient vascular network. This topical therapy provides a potential novel

  3. Detection of endogenous and food-derived collagen dipeptide prolylhydroxyproline (Pro-Hyp) in allergic contact dermatitis-affected mouse ear.

    PubMed

    Kusubata, Masashi; Koyama, Yoh-Ichi; Tometsuka, Chisa; Shigemura, Yasutaka; Sato, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Generation of collagen dipeptides and deposition of orally administered prolylhydroxyproline (Pro-Hyp) in local inflammatory sites were examined in mice with hapten (2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene)-induced dermatitis in the ear. Pro-Hyp content in the hapten-treated ear was significantly higher in the chronic phase of contact dermatitis than the vehicle control. In contrast, hydroxyprolylglycine contents remained at lower levels in all cases compared to Pro-Hyp. Four hours after the ingestion of [(13)C5,(15)N]Pro and [(13)C5,(15)N]Pro-Hyp, labeled-Pro-Hyp and Pro, respectively, appeared only in the ear with dermatitis. Thus, Pro-Hyp is generated and degraded as part of the rapid synthesis and degradation of collagen in the ear with dermatitis. In addition to the endogenously generated Pro-Hyp, the orally administered Pro-Hyp was deposited in the ears.

  4. Analysis of collagen types synthesized by rabbit ear cartilage chondrocytes in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, K; von der Mark, K; van Menxel, M; Friberg, U

    1984-01-01

    This study compares the collagen types present in rabbit ear cartilage with those synthesized by dissociated chondrocytes in cell culture. The cartilage was first extracted with 4M-guanidinium chloride to remove proteoglycans. This step also extracted type I collagen. After pepsin solubilization of the residue, three additional, genetically distinct collagen types could be separated by fractional salt precipitation. On SDS (sodium dodecyl sulphate)/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis they were identified as type II collagen, (1 alpha, 2 alpha, 3 alpha) collagen and M-collagen fragments, a collagen pattern identical with that found in hyaline cartilage. Types I, II, (1 alpha, 2 alpha, 3 alpha) and M-collagen fragments represent 20, 75, 3.5, and 1% respectively of the total collagen. In frozen sections of ear cartilage, type II collagen was located by immunofluorescence staining in the extracellular matrix, whereas type I collagen was closely associated with the chondrocytes. Within 24h after release from elastic cartilage by enzymic digestion, auricular chondrocytes began to synthesize type III collagen, in addition to the above-mentioned collagens. This was shown after labelling of freshly dissociated chondrocytes with [3H]proline 1 day after plating, fractionation of the pepsin-treated collagens from medium and cell layer by NaCl precipitation, and analysis of the fractions by CM(carboxymethyl)-cellulose chromatography and SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The 0.8 M-NaCl precipitate of cell-layer extracts consisted predominantly of type II collagen. The 0.8 M-NaCl precipitate obtained from the medium contained type I, II, and III collagen. In the supernatant of the 0.8 M-NaCl precipitation remained, both in the cell extract and medium, predominantly 1 alpha-, 2 alpha-, and 3 alpha-chains and M-collagen fragments. These results indicate that auricular chondrocytes are similar to chondrocytes from hyaline cartilage in that they produce, with the exception of

  5. Propranolol-induced elevation of pulmonary collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenschmidt, R.C.; Witschi, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    Current concepts of collagen metabolism suggest that fibroblasts tightly control collagen production. One of the possible mechanisms of control is via the cyclic nucleotides, cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP). Beta adrenergic agonists, by elevating intracellular cAMP levels, have been shown in vitro to suppress fibroblast collagen production; whereas beta adrenergic antagonists were effective in removing this suppression by blocking the rise in cAMP. In the present study with mice, the authors showed that administration of the beta adrenergic antagonists, propranolol, at a dose demonstrated to decrease the ratio of cAMP to cGMP, resulted in an elevation in total lung collagen in vivo. The increase in collagen was evident only when propranolol was administered before and during acute lung damage induced by either butylated hydroxytoluene, bleomycin or high concentrations of oxygen. There was no increase in lung collagen when propranolol administration was delayed after injury or when given to an undamaged lung. The authors propose that via beta adrenergic blockage by propranolol, fibroblasts involved in the normal reparative process may have lost a mechanism for regulatory control, resulting in excessive deposition of collagen. 38 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Protective effect of small molecule analogues of the Acanthocheilonema viteae secreted product ES-62 on oxazolone-induced ear inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Lamyaa; Rodgers, David T.; Rzepecka, Justyna; Pineda, Miguel A.; Suckling, Colin J.; Harnett, Margaret M.; Harnett, William

    2015-01-01

    ES-62 is the major secreted protein of the rodent filarial nematode Acanthocheilonema viteae. The molecule contains covalently attached phosphorylcholine (PC) residues, which confer anti-inflammatory properties on ES-62, underpinning the idea that drugs based on this active moiety may have therapeutic potential in human diseases associated with aberrant inflammation. Here we demonstrate that two synthetic small molecule analogues (SMAs) of ES-62 termed SMA 11a and SMA 12b are protective in the oxazolone-induced acute allergic contact dermatitis mouse model of skin inflammation, as measured by a significant reduction in ear inflammation following their administration before oxazolone sensitisation and before oxazolone challenge. Furthermore, it was found that when tested, 12b was effective at reducing ear swelling even when first administered before challenge. Histological analysis of the ears showed elevated cellular infiltration and collagen deposition in oxazolone-treated mice both of which were reduced by treatment with the two SMAs. Likewise, the oxazolone-induced increase in IFNγ mRNA in the ears was reduced but no effect on other cytokines investigated was observed. Finally, no influence on the mast cell populations in the ear was observed. PMID:25836375

  7. Lack of Collagen VI Promotes Wound-Induced Hair Growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peiwen; Cescon, Matilde; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix molecule that is abundantly expressed in the skin. However, the role of collagen VI in hair follicle growth is unknown. Here, we show that collagen VI is strongly deposited in hair follicles, and is markedly upregulated by skin wounding. Lack of collagen VI in Col6a1(-/-) mice delays hair cycling and growth under physiological conditions, but promotes wound-induced hair regrowth without affecting skin regeneration. Conversely, addition of purified collagen VI rescues the abnormal wound-induced hair regrowth in Col6a1(-/-) mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that the increased wound-induced hair regrowth of Col6a1(-/-) mice is triggered by activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and is abolished by inhibition of this pathway. These findings highlight the essential relationships between extracellular matrix (ECM) and hair follicle regeneration, and suggest that collagen VI could be a potential therapeutic target for hair loss and other skin-related diseases.

  8. Nature and specificity of the immune response to collagen in type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, J M; Townes, A S; Kang, A H

    1982-01-01

    To determine the role of collagen-immunity in the development of collagen-induced arthritis, DBA/1 mice were immunized with type II collagen and observed for the development of polyarthritis. 96% of the mice immunized with native type II collagen developed inflammatory arthritis between 4 and 5 wk after primary immunization. Immunization with denatured type II collagen in exactly the same manner was not effective in inducing arthritis. Cell-mediated immunity in arthritic mice was assessed by measuring [3H]thymidine incorporation by mononuclear cells cultured in the presence of collagen. The maximal proliferative response to collagen occurred at 2 wk after immunization. Equally good incorporation of label occurred when cells were cultured with native or denatured type II collagen or type I collagen. The cellular response of nonarthritic mice immunized with denatured collagen was indistinguishable from that seen in arthritic mice. Humoral immunity was assessed by an ELISA assay for antibodies to collagen. The immunoglobulin M (IgM) response peaked at 2 wk and the IgG response at 5 wk after immunization. Antisera from arthritic mice immunized with native type II collagen were relatively specific for conformational determinants on the native type II molecule although some reactivity with denatured collagen was noted. Antisera from nonarthritic mice immunized with denatured collagen primarily recognized covalent structural determinants. It was concluded that native type II collagen was essential for the induction of arthritis and that an antibody response specific for native type II collagen may be important for the development of arthritis. Images PMID:6174550

  9. Strain-Induced Alignment in Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    Vader, David; Kabla, Alexandre; Weitz, David; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayana

    2009-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant extracellular-network-forming protein in animal biology and is important in both natural and artificial tissues, where it serves as a material of great mechanical versatility. This versatility arises from its almost unique ability to remodel under applied loads into anisotropic and inhomogeneous structures. To explore the origins of this property, we develop a set of analysis tools and a novel experimental setup that probes the mechanical response of fibrous networks in a geometry that mimics a typical deformation profile imposed by cells in vivo. We observe strong fiber alignment and densification as a function of applied strain for both uncrosslinked and crosslinked collagenous networks. This alignment is found to be irreversibly imprinted in uncrosslinked collagen networks, suggesting a simple mechanism for tissue organization at the microscale. However, crosslinked networks display similar fiber alignment and the same geometrical properties as uncrosslinked gels, but with full reversibility. Plasticity is therefore not required to align fibers. On the contrary, our data show that this effect is part of the fundamental non-linear properties of fibrous biological networks. PMID:19529768

  10. Monitoring inner ear pressure changes in normal guinea pigs induced by the Meniett20.

    PubMed

    Feijen, R A; Segenhout, J M; Wit, H P; Albers, F W

    2000-10-01

    The inner ear fluid pressure of guinea pigs was measured during a series of complex oscillating middle ear pressure changes induced by the Meniett20 (Pascal Medical, Sweden), a possible therapeutic pressure generator to be used by patients with Meniere's disease. Middle ear pressure changes were transferred instantly to the inner ear, although inner ear pressure declined while middle ear pressure stayed relatively stable. An average undershoot of -1.0 cm H2O with respect to the steady-state pressure was seen after application of a pressure pulse, which was released in a few seconds. The results did not fully comply with a simple linear model in which a constant flow resistance between the inner ear and cerebrospinal space was assumed. PMID:11132711

  11. Hydrogen peroxide is involved in collagen-induced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, P; Pulcinelli, F M; Lenti, L; Gazzaniga, P P; Violi, F

    1998-01-15

    In this study, we investigated whether (1) collagen-induced platelet aggregation is associated with a burst of H2O2, (2) this oxidant species is involved in the activation of platelets, and (3) the pathways of platelet activation are stimulated by H2O2. Collagen-induced platelet aggregation was associated with production of H2O2, which was abolished by catalase, an enzyme that destroys H2O2. H2O2 production was not observed when ADP or thrombin were used as agonists. Catalase inhibited dose-dependently thromboxane A2 production, release of arachidonic acid from platelet membrane, and Inositol 1,4,5P3 (IP3) formation. In aspirin-treated platelets stimulated with high concentrations of collagen, catalase inhibited platelet aggregation, calcium mobilization, and IP3 production. This study suggests that collagen-induced platelet aggregation is associated with a burst of H2O2 that acts as a second messenger by stimulating the arachidonic acid metabolism and phospholipase C pathway.

  12. Characteristics of laser-induced shock wave injury to the inner ear of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Niwa, Katsuki; Tamura, Atsushi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Satoh, Yasushi; Sato, Shunichi; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the number of blast injuries of the inner ear has increased in the general population. In blast-induced inner ear injury, a shock wave (SW) component in the blast wave is considered to play an important role in sensorineural hearing loss. However, the mechanisms by which an SW affects inner ear tissue remain largely unknown. We aimed to establish a new animal model for SW-induced inner ear injury by using laser-induced SWs (LISWs) on rats. The LISWs were generated by irradiating an elastic laser target with 694-nm nanosecond pulses of a ruby laser. After LISW application to the cochlea through bone conduction, auditory measurements revealed the presence of inner ear dysfunction, the extent of which depended on LISW overpressure. A significantly lower survival rate of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons, as well as severe oxidative damage, were observed in the inner ear exposed to an LISW. Although considerable differences in the pressure characteristics exist between LISWs and SWs in real blast waves, the functional and morphological changes shown by the present LISW-based model were similar to those observed in real blast-induced injury. Thus, our animal model is expected to be useful for laboratory-based research of blast-induced inner ear injury.

  13. Characteristics of laser-induced shock wave injury to the inner ear of rats.

    PubMed

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Niwa, Katsuki; Tamura, Atsushi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Satoh, Yasushi; Sato, Shunichi; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the number of blast injuries of the inner ear has increased in the general population. In blast-induced inner ear injury, a shock wave (SW) component in the blast wave is considered to play an important role in sensorineural hearing loss. However, the mechanisms by which an SW affects inner ear tissue remain largely unknown. We aimed to establish a new animal model for SW-induced inner ear injury by using laser-induced SWs (LISWs) on rats. The LISWs were generated by irradiating an elastic laser target with 694-nm nanosecond pulses of a ruby laser. After LISW application to the cochlea through bone conduction, auditory measurements revealed the presence of inner ear dysfunction, the extent of which depended on LISW overpressure. A significantly lower survival rate of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons, as well as severe oxidative damage, were observed in the inner ear exposed to an LISW. Although considerable differences in the pressure characteristics exist between LISWs and SWs in real blast waves, the functional and morphological changes shown by the present LISW-based model were similar to those observed in real blast-induced injury. Thus, our animal model is expected to be useful for laboratory-based research of blast-induced inner ear injury. PMID:25467523

  14. Inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation by antibodies to distinct types of collagens.

    PubMed Central

    Balleisen, L; Nowack, H; Gay, S; Timpl, R

    1979-01-01

    Aggregation of platelets by fibrils formed from collagens type I, II and III could be inhibited by coating the fibrils with anti-collagen antibodies or Fab fragments. Similar results were obtained in a clot-retraction assay. Inhibition was achieved with stoichiometric amounts of antibodies and was specific for each type of collagen. Aggregation caused by a mixture of type-I and -III collagens could only be inhibited by a mixture of antibodies against both collagens. The data show that each interstitial collagen is capable of interacting with platelets and do not support the concept of an outstanding activity of type-III collagen. Images PLATE 1 PMID:395952

  15. Chemical Leucoderma Induced by Ear-ring Stoppers Made of Polyvinyl Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Reena; Singal, Archana; Verma, Prashant; Grover, Chander

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of chemical leucoderma (CL) in a 15-year-old girl, who developed patterned depigmentation at the back of both ear lobules after contact with plastic ear-ring stoppers made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) after continuous use for 6–7 months. Patch test with Indian standard series and cosmetic series was negative after 48 h, but she refused patch testing for extended duration as the possibility of induced depigmentation at the test site was unacceptable to her. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of plastic ear-ring stopper induced CL. PMID:23060712

  16. Schistosoma japonicum cystatin attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Cheng, Weisheng; Pappoe, Faustina; Hu, Xiaodong; Wen, Huiqin; Luo, Qingli; Wang, Shushu; Deng, Fang; Xie, Yuanyuan; Xu, Yuanhong; Shen, Jilong

    2016-10-01

    Recombinant SjCystatin (rSjCystatin), a recombinant protein of Schistosoma japonicum cystatin, has been reported to have an effect on immunoregulation mediated by IL-10 induction. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune inflammatory arthropathy, and recombinant immune-modulating drugs for RA treatment are under development. We aimed to study the putative immune regulation of rSjCystatin and its prophylactic/therapeutic effects on murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in DBA/1 mice by inoculation with bovine collagen II (CII). rSjCystatin was administered prior or post development of CIA. The severity of CIA was assessed using established clinical and histopathological scoring systems. The incidence was also determined. The CII-specific antibodies in sera and cytokines in splenocyte culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Th1/Th2/Th17 cells and Tregs development in splenocytes were monitored by flow cytometry. The inflammatory mediators in the diseased joint were semiquantitated by qPCR. Prophylactic injection of rSjCystatin attenuated paw clinical scores, incidence, and histopathology scores of joints in CIA mice. The arthritis-alleviative effects were closely associated with the augmentation of IL-4, IL-10, and collagen-specific IgG1, and with the distinct reduction of IFN-γ, collagen-specific IgG2a, and the marked decrease of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-17, and TNF-α and RANKL. The data indicate that rSjCystatin may prevent cartilage destruction and inflammation of joints in CIA mice. The effects are related to the inhibitory modulation of Th1 and Th17 and upregulation of Tregs and Th2 via a shift of cytokines profiling from Th1 to Th2 response. PMID:27393379

  17. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  18. Assessment of thermal treatment via irrigation of external ear to reduce cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Spankovich, Christopher; Lobarinas, Edward; Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard; Le Prell, Colleen G

    2016-02-01

    Systemic and local changes in body temperature can have a profound effect on traumatic injuries including those to the inner ear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of acutely increasing or decreasing the temperature of the external ear canal on cisplatin-induced hearing loss. The external auditory canals of male guinea pigs were acutely irrigated with warm (44 °C), euthermic (37 °C), or cool (30 °C) water and subsequently injected with cisplatin (12 mg/kg, i.p.). Hearing was assessed by the auditory brainstem response and cochleograms were prepared to determine loss of hair cells. Ear canal irrigation with warm water potentiated cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss whereas cool ear canal irrigation showed significant protection from cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss. These results suggest that non-invasive cool water ear canal irrigation may be highly effective clinical procedure for protecting against cisplatin-induced hearing loss. PMID:26639015

  19. Assessment of thermal treatment via irrigation of external ear to reduce cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Spankovich, Christopher; Lobarinas, Edward; Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard; Le Prell, Colleen G

    2016-02-01

    Systemic and local changes in body temperature can have a profound effect on traumatic injuries including those to the inner ear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of acutely increasing or decreasing the temperature of the external ear canal on cisplatin-induced hearing loss. The external auditory canals of male guinea pigs were acutely irrigated with warm (44 °C), euthermic (37 °C), or cool (30 °C) water and subsequently injected with cisplatin (12 mg/kg, i.p.). Hearing was assessed by the auditory brainstem response and cochleograms were prepared to determine loss of hair cells. Ear canal irrigation with warm water potentiated cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss whereas cool ear canal irrigation showed significant protection from cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss. These results suggest that non-invasive cool water ear canal irrigation may be highly effective clinical procedure for protecting against cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

  20. Development of biomimetic tilapia collagen nanofibers for skin regeneration through inducing keratinocytes differentiation and collagen synthesis of dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Nanping; Xue, Yang; Ding, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Mo, Xiumei; Sun, Jiao

    2015-02-11

    In this study, tilapia skin collagen sponge and electrospun nanofibers were developed for wound dressing. The collagen sponge was composed of at least two α-peptides, and its denaturation temperature was 44.99 °C. It did not change the number of spleen-derived lymphocytes in BALB/c mice, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytes, and the level of IgG or IgM in Sprague-Dawley rat. The contact angle, tensile strength, and weight loss temperature of collagen nanofibers were 21.2°, 6.72±0.44 MPa, and 300 °C, respectively. The nanofibers could promote the viabilities of human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), inducing epidermal differentiation through the gene expression of involucrin, filaggrin, and type I transglutaminase of HaCaTs, and they could also accelerate migration of HaCaTs with the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Besides, the nanofibers could upregulate the protien level of Col-I in HDFs both via a direct effect and TGF-β1 secreted from HaCaTs, thus facilitating the formation of collagen fibers. Furthermore, the collagen nanofibers stimulated the skin regeneration rapidly and effectively in vivo. These biological effects could be explained as the contributions from the biomimic extracellular cell matrix structure, hydrophilicity, and the multiple amino acids of the collagen nanofibers. PMID:25598076

  1. Development of biomimetic tilapia collagen nanofibers for skin regeneration through inducing keratinocytes differentiation and collagen synthesis of dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Nanping; Xue, Yang; Ding, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Mo, Xiumei; Sun, Jiao

    2015-02-11

    In this study, tilapia skin collagen sponge and electrospun nanofibers were developed for wound dressing. The collagen sponge was composed of at least two α-peptides, and its denaturation temperature was 44.99 °C. It did not change the number of spleen-derived lymphocytes in BALB/c mice, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytes, and the level of IgG or IgM in Sprague-Dawley rat. The contact angle, tensile strength, and weight loss temperature of collagen nanofibers were 21.2°, 6.72±0.44 MPa, and 300 °C, respectively. The nanofibers could promote the viabilities of human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), inducing epidermal differentiation through the gene expression of involucrin, filaggrin, and type I transglutaminase of HaCaTs, and they could also accelerate migration of HaCaTs with the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Besides, the nanofibers could upregulate the protien level of Col-I in HDFs both via a direct effect and TGF-β1 secreted from HaCaTs, thus facilitating the formation of collagen fibers. Furthermore, the collagen nanofibers stimulated the skin regeneration rapidly and effectively in vivo. These biological effects could be explained as the contributions from the biomimic extracellular cell matrix structure, hydrophilicity, and the multiple amino acids of the collagen nanofibers.

  2. Immune regulation and anti-inflammatory effects of isogarcinol extracted from Garcinia mangostana L. against collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanxia; Zhou, Hailing; Wang, Mengqi; Cen, Juren; Wei, Qun

    2014-05-01

    Isogarcinol is a natural compound that we extracted from Garcinia mangostana L., and we were the first to report that it is a new immunosuppressant. In the present study, we investigated the immune regulation and anti-inflammatory effects of isogarcinol on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and explored its potential mechanism in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The oral administration of isogarcinol significantly reduced clinical scores, alleviated cartilage and bone erosion, and reduced the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines in CIA mice. Isogarcinol inhibited xylene-induced mouse ear edema in vivo. In vitro, isogarcinol decreased iNOS and COX-2 mRNA expression and NO content by inhibiting NF-κB expression. Furthermore, isogarcinol decreased the activity of NFAT and inhibited IL-2 expression. The mechanism of action of isogarcinol is associated with down-regulation of both autoimmune and inflammatory reactions.

  3. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  4. Diabetes-induced alterations in tissue collagen and carboxymethyllysine in rat kidneys: Association with increased collagen-degrading proteinases and amelioration by Cu(II)-selective chelation.

    PubMed

    Brings, Sebastian; Zhang, Shaoping; Choong, Yee S; Hogl, Sebastian; Middleditch, Martin; Kamalov, Meder; Brimble, Margaret A; Gong, Deming; Cooper, Garth J S

    2015-08-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) comprise a group of non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of proteins and are elevated in diabetic tissues. AGE-modification impairs the digestibility of collagen in vitro but little is known about its relation to collagen-degrading proteinases in vivo. N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) is a stable AGE that forms on lysyl side-chains in the presence of glucose, probably via a transition metal-catalysed mechanism. Here, rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes and non-diabetic controls were treated for 8weeks with placebo or the Cu(II)-selective chelator, triethylenetetramine (TETA), commencing 8weeks after disease induction. Actions of diabetes and drug treatment were measured on collagen and collagen-degrading proteinases in kidney tissue. The digestibility and CML content of collagen, and corresponding levels of mRNAs and collagen, were related to changes in collagen-degrading-proteinases. Collagen-degrading proteinases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) were increased in diabetic rats. CTSL-levels correlated strongly and positively with increased collagen-CML levels and inversely with decreased collagen digestibility in diabetes. The collagen-rich mesangium displayed a strong increase of CTSL in diabetes. TETA treatment normalised kidney collagen content and partially normalised levels of CML and CTSL. These data provide evidence for an adaptive proteinase response in diabetic kidneys, affected by excessive collagen-CML formation and decreased collagen digestibility. The normalisation of collagen and partial normalisation of CML- and CTSL-levels by TETA treatment supports the involvement of Cu(II) in CML formation and altered collagen metabolism in diabetic kidneys. Cu(II)-chelation by TETA may represent a treatment option to rectify collagen metabolism in diabetes independent of alterations in blood glucose levels.

  5. Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Miki; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Real time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.

  6. Ossicular Bone Damage and Hearing Loss in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Correlated Functional and High Resolution Morphometric Study in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Mary F.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, a body of comparative case-control studies suggests that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are more prone to developing hearing loss (HL). However, experimental evidence that supports this hypothesis is still lacking because the human auditory organ is not readily accessible. The aim of this study was to determine the association between bone damage to the ossicles of the middle ear and HL, using a widely accepted murine model of collagen-induced arthritis (RA mice). Diarthrodial joints in the middle ear were examined with microcomputer tomography (microCT), and hearing function was assessed by auditory brainstem response (ABR). RA mice exhibited significantly decreased hearing sensitivity compared to age-matched controls. Additionally, a significant narrowing of the incudostapedial joint space and an increase in the porosity of the stapes were observed. The absolute latencies of all ABR waves were prolonged, but mean interpeak latencies were not statistically different. The observed bone defects in the middle ear that were accompanied by changes in ABR responses were consistent with conductive HL. This combination suggests that conductive impairment is at least part of the etiology of RA-induced HL in a murine model. Whether the inner ear sustains bone erosion or other pathology, and whether the cochlear nerve sustains pathology await subsequent studies. Considering the fact that certain anti-inflammatories are ototoxic in high doses, monitoring RA patients’ auditory function is advisable as part of the effort to ensure their well-being. PMID:27690307

  7. Pathophysiology of the inner ear after blast injury caused by laser-induced shock wave

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Katsuki; Mizutari, Kunio; Matsui, Toshiyasu; Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Satoh, Yasushi; Sato, Shunichi; Shiotani, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The ear is the organ that is most sensitive to blast overpressure, and ear damage is most frequently seen after blast exposure. Blast overpressure to the ear results in sensorineural hearing loss, which is untreatable and is often associated with a decline in the quality of life. In this study, we used a rat model to demonstrate the pathophysiological and structural changes in the inner ear that replicate pure sensorineural hearing loss associated with blast injury using laser-induced shock wave (LISW) without any conductive hearing loss. Our results indicate that threshold elevation of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) after blast exposure was primarily caused by outer hair cell dysfunction induced by stereociliary bundle disruption. The bundle disruption pattern was unique; disturbed stereocilia were mostly observed in the outermost row, whereas those in the inner and middle rows stereocilia remained intact. In addition, the ABR examination showed a reduction in wave I amplitude without elevation of the threshold in the lower energy exposure group. This phenomenon was caused by loss of the synaptic ribbon. This type of hearing dysfunction has recently been described as hidden hearing loss caused by cochlear neuropathy, which is associated with tinnitus or hyperacusis. PMID:27531021

  8. Pathophysiology of the inner ear after blast injury caused by laser-induced shock wave.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Katsuki; Mizutari, Kunio; Matsui, Toshiyasu; Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Satoh, Yasushi; Sato, Shunichi; Shiotani, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The ear is the organ that is most sensitive to blast overpressure, and ear damage is most frequently seen after blast exposure. Blast overpressure to the ear results in sensorineural hearing loss, which is untreatable and is often associated with a decline in the quality of life. In this study, we used a rat model to demonstrate the pathophysiological and structural changes in the inner ear that replicate pure sensorineural hearing loss associated with blast injury using laser-induced shock wave (LISW) without any conductive hearing loss. Our results indicate that threshold elevation of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) after blast exposure was primarily caused by outer hair cell dysfunction induced by stereociliary bundle disruption. The bundle disruption pattern was unique; disturbed stereocilia were mostly observed in the outermost row, whereas those in the inner and middle rows stereocilia remained intact. In addition, the ABR examination showed a reduction in wave I amplitude without elevation of the threshold in the lower energy exposure group. This phenomenon was caused by loss of the synaptic ribbon. This type of hearing dysfunction has recently been described as hidden hearing loss caused by cochlear neuropathy, which is associated with tinnitus or hyperacusis.

  9. Pathophysiology of the inner ear after blast injury caused by laser-induced shock wave.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Katsuki; Mizutari, Kunio; Matsui, Toshiyasu; Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Satoh, Yasushi; Sato, Shunichi; Shiotani, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The ear is the organ that is most sensitive to blast overpressure, and ear damage is most frequently seen after blast exposure. Blast overpressure to the ear results in sensorineural hearing loss, which is untreatable and is often associated with a decline in the quality of life. In this study, we used a rat model to demonstrate the pathophysiological and structural changes in the inner ear that replicate pure sensorineural hearing loss associated with blast injury using laser-induced shock wave (LISW) without any conductive hearing loss. Our results indicate that threshold elevation of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) after blast exposure was primarily caused by outer hair cell dysfunction induced by stereociliary bundle disruption. The bundle disruption pattern was unique; disturbed stereocilia were mostly observed in the outermost row, whereas those in the inner and middle rows stereocilia remained intact. In addition, the ABR examination showed a reduction in wave I amplitude without elevation of the threshold in the lower energy exposure group. This phenomenon was caused by loss of the synaptic ribbon. This type of hearing dysfunction has recently been described as hidden hearing loss caused by cochlear neuropathy, which is associated with tinnitus or hyperacusis. PMID:27531021

  10. Cell Alignment Driven by Mechanically Induced Collagen Fiber Alignment in Collagen/Alginate Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Chaubaroux, Christophe; Perrin-Schmitt, Fabienne; Senger, Bernard; Vidal, Loïc; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Schaaf, Pierre; Haikel, Youssef; Boulmedais, Fouzia; Lavalle, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    For many years it has been a major challenge to regenerate damaged tissues using synthetic or natural materials. To favor the healing processes after tendon, cornea, muscle, or brain injuries, aligned collagen-based architectures are of utmost interest. In this study, we define a novel aligned coating based on a collagen/alginate (COL/ALG) multilayer film. The coating exhibiting a nanofibrillar structure is cross-linked with genipin for stability in physiological conditions. By stretching COL/ALG-coated polydimethylsiloxane substrates, we developed a versatile method to align the collagen fibrils of the polymeric coating. Assays on cell morphology and alignment were performed to investigate the properties of these films. Microscopic assessments revealed that cells align with the stretched collagen fibrils of the coating. The degree of alignment is tuned by the stretching rate (i.e., the strain) of the COL/ALG-coated elastic substrate. Such coatings are of great interest for strategies that require aligned nanofibrillar biological material as a substrate for tissue engineering. PMID:25658028

  11. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  12. Heparin fragments modulate the collagen phenotype of fibroblasts from radiation-induced subcutaneous fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    el Nabout, R.; Martin, M.; Remy, J.; Robert, L.; Lafuma, C. )

    1989-10-01

    Acute local gamma irradiation of porcine skin induces, as in human skin, an extensive and mutilating sclerosis characterized by continuous expansion of the fibrosis invading the adjacent muscle and by accumulation of the macromolecular components of the extracellular matrix. Collagen synthesis, content, and types were studied in the presence of heparin fragments (100 micrograms/10(6) cells) in the culture medium, by measuring the incorporation of the radiolabeled precursor (3H)proline into confluent primary cultures of porcine fibroblasts obtained from normal and irradiated fibrotic dermis. Enhancement in collagen biosynthesis and deposition and preferential increase in collagen type III synthesis were observed in fibrotic fibroblast cultures when compared to those in normal dermis fibroblasts. The total collagen synthesis and the rate of collagen hydroxylation appear unmodified by heparin fragments both in normal and in fibrotic fibroblast cultures. But heparin fragments induce a 10- and 2-fold decrease, respectively, in collagen type III and type V syntheses by fibrosis fibroblasts. As only minor effects upon collagen type III and V are observed in cultures of normal dermis fibroblasts, these results highly suggest that heparin fragments are capable of specifically modulating the collagen phenotype of fibroblasts derived from radiation-induced dermis fibrosis and thus are able to regulate the fibrotic process.

  13. Riboflavin-induced photo-crosslinking of collagen hydrogel and its application in meniscus tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jiseung; Koh, Rachel H; Shim, Whuisu; Kim, Hwan D; Yim, Hyun-Gu; Hwang, Nathaniel S

    2016-04-01

    A meniscus tear is a common knee injury, but its regeneration remains a clinical challenge. Recently, collagen-based scaffolds have been applied in meniscus tissue engineering. Despite its prevalence, application of natural collagen scaffold in clinical setting is limited due to its extremely low stiffness and rapid degradation. The purpose of the present study was to increase the mechanical properties and delay degradation rate of a collagen-based scaffold by photo-crosslinking using riboflavin (RF) and UV exposure. RF is a biocompatible vitamin B2 that showed minimal cytotoxicity compared to conventionally utilized photo-initiator. Furthermore, collagen photo-crosslinking with RF improved mechanical properties and delayed enzyme-triggered degradation of collagen scaffolds. RF-induced photo-crosslinked collagen scaffolds encapsulated with fibrochondrocytes resulted in reduced scaffold contraction and enhanced gene expression levels for the collagen II and aggrecan. Additionally, hyaluronic acid (HA) incorporation into photo-crosslinked collagen scaffold showed an increase in its retention. Based on these results, we demonstrate that photo-crosslinked collagen-HA hydrogels can be potentially applied in the scaffold-based meniscus tissue engineering.

  14. Infection of corn ears by Fusarium spp. induces the emission of volatile sesquiterpenes.

    PubMed

    Becker, Eva-Maria; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Irmisch, Sandra; Köllner, Tobias G; Feussner, Ivo; Karlovsky, Petr; Splivallo, Richard

    2014-06-01

    Infection of corn (Zea mays L.) ears with fungal pathogens of the Fusarium genus might result in yield losses and in the accumulation of mycotoxins. The aim of this study was to investigate whether volatile profiles could be used to identify Fusarium-infected corn ears. The volatiles released by corn ears infected by Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium verticillioides, and Fusarium subglutinans were studied. Volatile emission was recorded at 24 days postinoculation (dpi) and in a time series (from 4 to 24 dpi). Twenty-two volatiles were differentially emitted from Fusarium-infected versus healthy corn ears. These included C6-C8 compounds and sesquiterpenoids. All volatiles indicative of Fusarium infection were detectable as early as 4-8 dpi and continued to be produced to the final sampling time (early milk maturity stage). The induced emission of β-macrocarpene and β-bisabolene correlated with an increased transcript accumulation of corn terpene synthase 6/11 (tps6/11). Additionally, the modification of volatile profiles after Fusarium infection was accompanied by the induction of plant defense compounds such as zealexins and oxylipins. Together, these results reveal a broad metabolic response of the plant to pathogen attack. Volatile biomarkers of Fusarium infection are promising indicators for the early detection of fungal infection before disease symptoms become visible.

  15. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen.

    PubMed

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone.

  16. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J.; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone.

  17. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J.; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone. PMID:25608644

  18. Isolation of inhibitors of TPA-induced mouse ear edema from Hoelen, Poria cocos.

    PubMed

    Nukaya, H; Yamashiro, H; Fukazawa, H; Ishida, H; Tsuji, K

    1996-04-01

    Triterpene carboxylic acids were isolated from the methanol extract of Hoelen, Poria cocos, and found to inhibit 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TAP)-induced mouse ear edema. Their chemical structures were identified as 3 beta,-16 alpha-dihydroxylanosta-7,9(11),24-trien-21-oic acid, 16 alpha-hydroxydehydropachymic acid, 16 alpha-hydroxytrametenolic acid and dehydrotumulosic acid. PMID:8681415

  19. Pierced Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Pierced Ears KidsHealth > For Kids > Pierced Ears Print A A ... cool, but infected ears do not! Getting Your Ears Pierced It's important to get your ears pierced ...

  20. A histological evaluation for guided bone regeneration induced by a collagenous membrane.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yuya; Amizuka, Norio; Nakadate, Masayoshi; Ohnishi, Hideo; Fujii, Noritaka; Oda, Kimimitsu; Nomura, Shuichi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2005-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the histological changes during ossification and cellular events including osteogenic differentiation responding to collagenous bioresorbable membranes utilized for GBR. Standardized artificial bony defects were prepared at rat maxillae, and covered with a collagenous bioresorbable membrane. These animals were sacrificed at 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after the GBR-operation. The paraffin sections were subject to tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) enzyme histochemistry and immunohistochemistry for alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OP) and osteocalcin (OC). In the first week of the experimental group, woven bone with ALP-positive osteoblasts occupied the lower half of the cavity. The collagenous membrane included numerous ALP-negative cells and OP-immunoreactive extracellular matrices. At 2 weeks, the ALP-, OP- and OC-immunoreactivity came to be recognizable in the region of collagenous membrane. Since ALP-negative soft tissue separated the collagenous membrane and the new bone originating from the cavity bottom, the collagenous membrane appeared to induce osteogenesis in situ. At 3 weeks, numerous collagen fibers of the membrane were embedded in the adjacent bone matrix. At 4 weeks, the membrane-associated and the cavity-derived bones had completely integrated, showing the same height of the periosteal ridge as the surrounding alveolar bones. The collagen fibers of a GBR-membrane appear to participate in osteogenic differentiation. PMID:15885767

  1. Nutrient-enhanced diet reduces noise-induced damage to the inner ear and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Le Prell, Colleen G; Gagnon, Patricia M; Bennett, David C; Ohlemiller, Kevin K

    2011-07-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated broadly as a cause of cell death and neural degeneration in multiple disease conditions; however, the evidence for successful intervention with dietary antioxidant manipulations has been mixed. In this study, we investigated the potential for protection of cells in the inner ear using a dietary supplement with multiple antioxidant components, which were selected for their potential interactive effectiveness. Protection against permanent threshold shift (PTS) was observed in CBA/J mice maintained on a diet supplemented with a combination of β-carotene, vitamins C and E, and magnesium when compared with PTS in control mice maintained on a nutritionally complete control diet. Although hair cell survival was not enhanced, noise-induced loss of type II fibrocytes in the lateral wall was significantly reduced (P < 0.05), and there was a trend toward less noise-induced loss in strial cell density in animals maintained on the supplemented diet. Taken together, our data suggest that prenoise oral treatment with the high-nutrient diet can protect cells in the inner ear and reduce PTS in mice. The demonstration of functional and morphologic preservation of cells in the inner ear with oral administration of this antioxidant supplemented diet supports the possibility of translation to human patients and suggests an opportunity to evaluate antioxidant protection in mouse models of oxidative stress-related disease and pathology. PMID:21708355

  2. Magnetically induced behaviour of ferritin corpuscles in avian ears: can cuticulosomes function as magnetosomes?

    PubMed Central

    Jandacka, Petr; Burda, Hynek; Pistora, Jaromir

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoreception is an enigmatic, poorly understood sensory ability, described mainly on the basis of behavioural studies in animals of diverse taxa. Recently, corpuscles containing superparamagnetic iron-storage protein ferritin were found in the inner ear hair cells of birds, a predominantly single ferritin corpuscle per cell. It was suggested that these corpuscles might represent magnetosomes and function as magnetosensors. Here we determine ferritin low-field paramagnetic susceptibility to estimate its magnetically induced intracellular behaviour. Physical simulations show that ferritin corpuscles cannot be deformed or rotate in weak geomagnetic fields, and thus cannot provide magnetoreception via deformation of the cuticular plate. Furthermore, we reached an alternative hypothesis that ferritin corpuscle in avian ears may function as an intracellular electromagnetic oscillator. Such an oscillator would generate additional cellular electric potential related to normal cell conditions. Though the phenomenon seems to be weak, this effect deserves further analyses. PMID:25551148

  3. Objective Assessment of Endogenous Collagen In Vivo during Tissue Repair by Laser Induced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Satish B. S.; Fernandes, Edward Mark; Rao, Anuradha C. K.; Prasad, Keerthana; Mahato, Krishna K.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen, a triple helical protein with the primary role of mechanical function, provides tensile strength to the skin, and plays a pivotal task in tissue repair. During tissue regeneration, collagen level increases gradually and therefore, monitoring of such changes in vivo by laser induced fluorescence was the main objective behind the present study. In order to accomplish this, 15 mm diameter excisional wounds were created on six to eight week old Swiss albino mice. The collagen deposition accelerated upon irradiation of single exposure of 2 J/cm2 He-Ne laser dose immediately after wounding was recorded by laser induced autofluorescence in vivo along with un-illuminated and un-wounded controls. Autofluorescence spectra were recorded for each animal of the experimental groups on 0, 5, 10, 30, 45 and 60 days post-wounding, by exciting the granulation tissue/skin with 325 nm He-Cd laser. The variations in the average collagen intensities from the granulation tissue/skin of mice were inspected as a function of age and gender. Further, the spectral findings of the collagen synthesis in wound granulation tissue/un-wounded skin tissues were validated by Picro-Sirius red- polarized light microscopy in a blinded manner through image analysis of the respective collagen birefringence. The in vivo autofluorescence studies have shown a significant increase in collagen synthesis in laser treated animals as compared to the un-illuminated controls. Image analysis of the collagen birefringence further authenticated the ability of autofluorescence in the objective monitoring of collagen in vivo. Our results clearly demonstrate the potential of laser induced autofluorescence in the monitoring of collegen synthesis during tissue regeneration, which may have clinical implications. PMID:24874229

  4. Objective assessment of endogenous collagen in vivo during tissue repair by laser induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Satish B S; Fernandes, Edward Mark; Rao, Anuradha C K; Prasad, Keerthana; Mahato, Krishna K

    2014-01-01

    Collagen, a triple helical protein with the primary role of mechanical function, provides tensile strength to the skin, and plays a pivotal task in tissue repair. During tissue regeneration, collagen level increases gradually and therefore, monitoring of such changes in vivo by laser induced fluorescence was the main objective behind the present study. In order to accomplish this, 15 mm diameter excisional wounds were created on six to eight week old Swiss albino mice. The collagen deposition accelerated upon irradiation of single exposure of 2 J/cm2 He-Ne laser dose immediately after wounding was recorded by laser induced autofluorescence in vivo along with un-illuminated and un-wounded controls. Autofluorescence spectra were recorded for each animal of the experimental groups on 0, 5, 10, 30, 45 and 60 days post-wounding, by exciting the granulation tissue/skin with 325 nm He-Cd laser. The variations in the average collagen intensities from the granulation tissue/skin of mice were inspected as a function of age and gender. Further, the spectral findings of the collagen synthesis in wound granulation tissue/un-wounded skin tissues were validated by Picro-Sirius red- polarized light microscopy in a blinded manner through image analysis of the respective collagen birefringence. The in vivo autofluorescence studies have shown a significant increase in collagen synthesis in laser treated animals as compared to the un-illuminated controls. Image analysis of the collagen birefringence further authenticated the ability of autofluorescence in the objective monitoring of collagen in vivo. Our results clearly demonstrate the potential of laser induced autofluorescence in the monitoring of collegen synthesis during tissue regeneration, which may have clinical implications. PMID:24874229

  5. A Mouse Ear Model for Bystander Studies Induced by Microbeam Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, M; Randers-Pehrson, G; Smilenov, L B; Kleiman, N J; Young, E; Ponnayia, B; Brenner, D J

    2015-08-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been observed in vitro and in cell and tissue culture models, however, there are few reported studies showing these effects in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study on bystander effects induced by microbeam irradiation in an intact living mammal. The mouse ear was used to investigate radiation-induced bystander effects in keratinocytes, utilizing a 3 MeV proton microbeam (LET 13.1 keV/μm) with a range in skin of about 135 μm. Using a custom-designed holder, the ear of an anesthetized C57BL/6J mouse was flattened by gentle suction and placed over the microbeam port to irradiate cells along a 35 μm wide, 6 mm long path. Immunohistochemical analysis of γ-H2AX foci formation in tissue sections revealed, compared to control tissue, proton-induced γ-H2AX foci formation in one of the two epidermal layers of the mouse ear. Strikingly, a higher number of cells than expected showed foci from direct irradiation effects. Although the proton-irradiated line was ~35 μm wide, the average width spanned by γ-H2AX-positive cells exceeded 150 μm. Cells adjacent to or in the epidermal layer opposite the γ-H2AX-positive region did not exhibit foci. These findings validate this mammalian model as a viable system for investigating radiation-induced bystander effects in an intact living organism.

  6. Cholesterol-induced changes of type VIII collagen expression and distribution in carotid arteries of rabbit.

    PubMed

    Plenz, G; Dorszewski, A; Völker, W; Ko, Y S; Severs, N J; Breithardt, G; Robenek, H

    1999-10-01

    Lipoproteins play a major role in cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. In the vascular wall, they strongly influence the organization of extracellular matrix. The present study set out to investigate the changes in the extracellular matrix of the vessel wall induced by atherogenic diet, focusing on type VIII collagen, a vascular collagen that has not previously been investigated in detail. The influence of cholesterol diet on the expression, distribution, and deposition of type VIII collagen was examined in carotid arteries of New Zealand White rabbits. Carotid arteries of rabbits receiving diet supplemented with 1% cholesterol for 6 weeks and those on the same regimen followed by normal chow for 1 day, 10 days, 5 weeks, and 12 weeks were studied and compared with controls not exposed to the cholesterol diet. Carotid arteries of normocholesterolemic rabbits contained type VIII collagen-expressing cells in all layers, with focal accumulations of expressing cells in the subendothelial areas, the outer medial zone, and the adventitia. In response to cholesterol diet, type VIII collagen synthesis was reduced in media and adventitia and the distribution patterns changed. Expressing cells were found predominantly in the endothelium, and type VIII collagen accumulated in the intimal space. Immunogold labeling for electron microscopy revealed that type VIII collagen in the intima is associated with microfibrils extending from the internal elastic lamina. Withdrawal of cholesterol resulted in reestablishment of the normal distribution pattern. Northern and Western blot analyses supported the immunoconfocal and in situ hybridization data, demonstrating decreased type VIII collagen expression in response to cholesterol diet and progressive recovery to normal levels with time after withdrawal of cholesterol. Our study demonstrates that type VIII collagen is modulated in the presence of cholesterol. The data indicate that type VIII collagen is specifically remodeled

  7. Non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush induces HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingsheng; Zhang, Ying; Dusevich, Vladimir; Liu, Yi; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) brush has been regarded as a promising technique to enhance dental interfacial bonding. However, the principal enhancement mechanisms have not been well identified. In this study, the effect of non-thermal plasmas on grafting of HEMA, a typical dental monomer, onto dentin collagen thin films was investigated. Methods Human dentin was sectioned into 10-um-thick films. After total demineralization in 0.5 M EDTA solution for 30 min, the dentin collagen films were water-rinsed, air-dried, treated with 35 wt% HEMA aqueous solution. The films were then subject to plasma-exposure under a NTAP brush with different time (1–8 min) / input power (5–15 w). For comparison, the dentin collagen films were also treated with the above HEMA solution containing photo-initiators, then subject to light-curing. After plasma-exposure or light-curing, the HEMA-collagen films were rinsed in deionized water, and then examined by FTIR spectroscopy and TEM. Results The FITR results indicated that plasma-exposure could induce significant HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen thin films. In contrast, light-curing led to no detectable interaction of HEMA with dentin collagen. Quantitative IR spectral analysis (i.e., 1720/3075 or 749/3075, HEMA/collagen ratios) further suggested that the grafting efficacy of HEMA onto the plasma-exposed collagen thin films strongly depended on the treatment time and input power of plasmas. TEM results indicated that plasma treatment did not alter collagen’s banding structure. Significance The current study provides deeper insight into the mechanism of dental adhesion enhancement induced by non-thermal plasmas treatment. The NTAP brush could be a promising method to create chemical bond between resin monomers and dentin collagen. PMID:25458523

  8. Inhibition of Glycoprotein VI Clustering by Collagen as a Mechanism of Inhibiting Collagen-Induced Platelet Responses: The Example of Losartan

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peng; Loyau, Stéphane; Tchitchinadze, Maria; Ropers, Jacques; Jondeau, Guillaume; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of platelets to collagen triggers the formation of a platelet clot. Pharmacological agents capable of inhibiting platelet activation by collagen are thus of potential therapeutic interest. Thrombus formation is initiated by the interaction of the GPIb-V-IX complex with collagen-bound vWF, while GPVI interaction with collagen triggers platelet activation that is reinforced by ADP and thromboxane A2. Losartan is an angiotensin II (Ang II) type I receptor (AT1R) antagonist proposed to have an antiplatelet activity via the inhibition of both the thromboxane A2 (TXA2) receptor (TP) and the glycoprotein VI (GPVI). Here, we characterized in vitro the effects of losartan at different doses on platelet responses: losartan inhibited platelet aggregation and secretion induced by 1 μg.mL-1 and 10 μg.mL-1 of collagen with an IC50 of ~ 6 μM. Losartan inhibited platelet responses induced by the GPVI specific collagen related peptide but not by the α2β1 specific peptide. However, losartan did not inhibit the binding of recombinant GPVI to collagen, which is not in favor of a simple competition. Indeed, the clustering of GPVI observed in flow cytometry and using the Duolink methodology, was inhibited by losartan. The impact of a therapeutic dose of losartan (100 mg/day) on platelet responses was analyzed ex vivo in a double blind study. No statistically significant differences were observed between losartan-treated (n=25) and non-treated (n=30) patients in terms of collagen and U46619-induced platelet activation. These data indicate that in treated patients, losartan does not achieve a measurable antiplatelet effect but provide the proof of concept that inhibiting collagen-induced GPVI clustering is of pharmacological interest to obtain an antithrombotic efficacy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00763893 PMID:26052700

  9. Electrospun tilapia collagen nanofibers accelerating wound healing via inducing keratinocytes proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Nanping; Xue, Yang; Ding, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Mo, Xiumei; Sun, Jiao

    2016-07-01

    The development of biomaterials with the ability to induce skin wound healing is a great challenge in biomedicine. In this study, tilapia skin collagen sponge and electrospun nanofibers were developed for wound dressing. The collagen sponge was composed of at least two α-peptides. It did not change the number of spleen-derived lymphocytes in BALB/c mice, the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+) lymphocytes, and the level of IgG or IgM in Sprague-Dawley rats. The tensile strength and contact angle of collagen nanofibers were 6.72±0.44MPa and 26.71±4.88°, respectively. They also had good thermal stability and swelling property. Furthermore, the nanofibers could significantly promote the proliferation of human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and stimulate epidermal differentiation through the up-regulated gene expression of involucrin, filaggrin, and type I transglutaminase in HaCaTs. The collagen nanofibers could also facilitate rat skin regeneration. In the present study, electrospun biomimetic tilapia skin collagen nanofibers were succesfully prepared, were proved to have good bioactivity and could accelerate rat wound healing rapidly and effectively. These biological effects might be attributed to the biomimic extracellular matrix structure and the multiple amino acids of the collagen nanofibers. Therefore, the cost-efficient tilapia collagen nanofibers could be used as novel wound dressing, meanwhile effectively avoiding the risk of transmitting animal disease in the future clinical apllication. PMID:27037778

  10. Polymerized-Type I Collagen Induces Upregulation of Foxp3-Expressing CD4 Regulatory T Cells and Downregulation of IL-17-Producing CD4+ T Cells (Th17) Cells in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Macip-Rodríguez, Perla; Galindo-Feria, Angeles S.; Cruz-Robles, David; Soto-Abraham, Virgina; Escobar-Hernández, Sergio; Aguilar, Diana; Alpizar-Rodríguez, Deshiré; Férez-Blando, Karen; Llorente, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that polymerized-type I collagen (polymerized collagen) exhibits potent immunoregulatory properties. This work evaluated the effect of intramuscular administration of polymerized collagen in early and established collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice and analyzed changes in Th subsets following therapy. Incidence of CIA was of 100% in mice challenged with type II collagen. Clinimorphometric analysis showed a downregulation of inflammation after administration of all treatments (P < 0.05). Histological analysis showed that the CIA-mice group had extensive bone erosion, pannus and severe focal inflammatory infiltrates. In contrast, there was a remarkable reduction in the severity of arthritis in mice under polymerized collagen, methotrexate or methotrexate/polymerized collagen treatment. Polymerized Collagen but not methotrexate induced tissue joint regeneration. Polymerized Collagen and methotrexate/polymerized collagen but not methotrexate alone induces downregulation of CD4+/IL17A+ T cells and upregulation of Tregs and CD4+/IFN-γ+ T cells. Thus, Polymerized Collagen could be an effective therapeutic agent in early and established rheumatoid arthritis by exerting downregulation of autoimmune inflammation. PMID:22028728

  11. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  12. Swimmer's Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Swimmer's Ear KidsHealth > For Kids > Swimmer's Ear Print A A ... How Do I Know if I Have Swimmer's Ear? Swimmer's ear may start with some itching, but ...

  13. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Tubes Ear Tubes Patient Health Information News media ... and throat specialist) may be considered. What are ear tubes? Ear tubes are tiny cylinders placed through ...

  14. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo; Kim, So Young; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Taehoon G.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify a function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in Hs27. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YIGSR peptide enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis both of gene and protein levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There were no changes in cell proliferation and MMP-1 level in YIGSR treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR effect on collagen synthesis mediated activation of FAK, pyk2 and ERK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR-induced FAK and ERK activation was modulated by FAK and MEK inhibitors. -- Abstract: The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the {beta}1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67 kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate

  15. Isorhamnetin attenuates collagen-induced arthritis via modulating cytokines and oxidative stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuewen; Zhong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress were involved in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Isorhamnetin has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities, but its effects on RA have not been investigated. In order to observe the possible therapeutic effects of isorhamnetin on RA, we established a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model and treated the animal with isorhamnetin for 3 weeks. Besides, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and isorhamnetin. The severity of arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, joint destruction score and inflammation score. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-10 and IL-35 in the joint tissue homogenate and cell culture medium as well as anti-type II collagen antibody in serum were measured using ELISA. Contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in joint tissue homogenate were measured using assay kits. We found collagen immunization induced significant arthritis in mice and isorhamnetin at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day could significantly attenuate the collagen-induced arthritis. Isorhamnetin also modulated the production of cytokines and suppressed the oxidative stress in the mice with collagen-induced arthritis at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day. These data suggested that isorhamnetin might be a potential agent for the management of RA. PMID:26629181

  16. Isorhamnetin attenuates collagen-induced arthritis via modulating cytokines and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewen; Zhong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress were involved in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Isorhamnetin has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities, but its effects on RA have not been investigated. In order to observe the possible therapeutic effects of isorhamnetin on RA, we established a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model and treated the animal with isorhamnetin for 3 weeks. Besides, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and isorhamnetin. The severity of arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, joint destruction score and inflammation score. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-10 and IL-35 in the joint tissue homogenate and cell culture medium as well as anti-type II collagen antibody in serum were measured using ELISA. Contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in joint tissue homogenate were measured using assay kits. We found collagen immunization induced significant arthritis in mice and isorhamnetin at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day could significantly attenuate the collagen-induced arthritis. Isorhamnetin also modulated the production of cytokines and suppressed the oxidative stress in the mice with collagen-induced arthritis at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day. These data suggested that isorhamnetin might be a potential agent for the management of RA. PMID:26629181

  17. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Svoboda, Kathy K.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Gordon, Marion K.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2013-04-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin γ2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing from 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin γ2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin γ2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. - Highlights: ► We demonstrated ER stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model. ► We described the asymmetrical nature of wound repair in the MEVM. ► We identified the distribution of various ER stress markers in the MEVM.

  18. The effects of an inhibitor of diglyceride lipase on collagen-induced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Elke C G; Ortar, Giorgio; McNicol, Archie

    2013-12-01

    Human platelet activation by collagen occurs in a dose-dependent manner. High concentrations of collagen bind to a pair of receptors, the α2β1 integrin and glycoprotein (GP)VI/Fc-receptor γ-chain (FcRγ), which stimulate a cascade of events including Syk, LAT, Btk, Gads, and phospholipase Cγ2, leading to calcium release and protein kinase C (PKC) activation. Calcium and PKC are responsible for a range of platelet responses including exocytosis and aggregation, as well as the cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2)-mediated release of arachidonic acid, which is converted to thromboxane (Tx)A2. In contrast, low concentrations of collagen are acutely aspirin-sensitive, and calcium release and aggregation are TxA2-dependent. Under these conditions, cPLA2 is not involved and it has been suggested that phospholipase C generates 1,2-diacylglycerol (DG) from which arachidonic acid is liberated by diglyceride lipase (DGL). Here a novel DGL blocker (OMDM-188) inhibited collagen-, but not arachidonic acid-induced aggregation and TxA2 synthesis. Furthermore, OMDM-188 inhibited collagen-induced arachidonic acid release. Finally OMDM-188 inhibited collagen-induced p38(MAPK) phosphorylation, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, with no effect on the phosphorylation of either enzyme in response to arachidonic acid. Taken together, these data suggest a role for a pathway involving phospholipase C liberating DG from membrane phospholipids in response to minimally activating concentrations of collagen. The DG serves as a substrate for DGL, potentially under the regulations of p38(MAPK), to release arachidonic acid, which is subsequently converted to TxA2, which mediates the final platelet response.

  19. In vivo left ventricular function and collagen expression in aldosterone/salt-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Gil, J F; Delcayre, C; Robert, V; Wassef, M; Trouve, P; Mougenot, N; Charlemagne, D; Lechat, P

    1998-12-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is linked to aldosterone-induced hypertension, but the effects on in vivo left ventricular (LV) function are not established. We studied the relations between in vivo LV function and aldosterone/salt cardiac fibrosis. Adult guinea pigs (GPs) were treated for 3 months with an aldosterone infusion and high-salt diet. This treatment induced arterial hypertension (+35%) and moderate LV hypertrophy (LVH; +60%) without right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy. Echo-Doppler LV assessment demonstrated unaltered cardiac output, stroke volume, or LV relaxation. Type I collagen messenger RNA (mRNA) was significantly increased in both ventricles (LV, +48%; RV, +77%) and accompanied by a significant increase in total collagen deposition (LV, from 0.52% in controls to 4.4% in treated GPs; RV, from 0.82 to 5.5% in treated GPs). Plasma norepinephrine levels increased 2.6-fold (p < 0.01) and correlated with the increase in collagen deposition in both ventricles. Collagen content was not correlated with hypertension or LVH. We conclude that aldosterone administration induces cardiac collagen accumulation and a sympathetic stimulation, which might preserve systolic and diastolic function. PMID:9869498

  20. Changes in corneal collagen induced by holmium:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timberlake, George T.; Reinke, Martin H.; Miller, Alvin

    1996-05-01

    Holmium:YAG laser thermokeratoplasty corrects hyperopia (farsightedness) by producing small areas of corneal collagen shrinkage that cause the central cornea to bulge outward, increasing optical power. Collagen shrinkage is probably caused by laser-heated corneal water, but details of the shrinkage mechanism are not known. We investigated the shrinkage mechanism by measuring changes in corneal ultrastructure, surface shrinkage, water content, and strength following Ho:YAG laser exposures. Morphological changes in collagen were documented by measurements from electron micrographs. Corneal adhesive strength was determined by measuring tearing force in a plane parallel to the corneal surface. Laser-induced water loss was measured by weighing corneal samples before and after exposure. Corneal surface shrinkage was assessed by photographing the movement of particles on the cornea. Lasered collagen fibrils increased in diameter, lost their orderly arrangement, and appeared `frayed.' The corneal surface contracted toward lasered areas with a maximal shift of approximately 190 micrometers , more than could be explained by a model based on collagen fibril changes. Water loss plays a minor role in corneal shrinkage since corneal samples lost about only about 1.4% of their weight after massive laser exposure. Despite marked changes in collagen structure, corneal adhesive force was unchanged.

  1. Hindlimb unloading induces a collagen isoform shift in the soleus muscle of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. A.; Lesniewski, L. A.; Muller-Delp, J. M.; Majors, A. K.; Scalise, D.; Delp, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether hindlimb unloading (HU) alters the extracellular matrix of skeletal muscle, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 0 (n = 11), 1 (n = 11), 14 (n = 13), or 28 (n = 11) days of unloading. Remodeling of the soleus and plantaris muscles was examined biochemically for collagen abundance via measurement of hydroxyproline, and the percentage of cross-sectional area of collagen was determined histologically with picrosirius red staining. Total hydroxyproline content in the soleus and plantaris muscles was unaltered by HU at any time point. However, the relative proportions of type I collagen in the soleus muscle decreased relative to control (Con) with 14 and 28 days HU (Con 68 +/- 5%; 14 days HU 53 +/- 4%; 28 days HU 53 +/- 7%). Correspondingly, type III collagen increased in soleus muscle with 14 and 28 days HU (Con 32 +/- 5%; 14 days HU 47 +/- 4%; 28 days HU 48 +/- 7%). The proportion of type I muscle fibers in soleus muscle was diminished with HU (Con 96 +/- 2%; 14 days HU 86 +/- 1%; 28 days HU 83 +/- 1%), and the proportion of hybrid type I/IIB fibers increased (Con 0%; 14 days HU 8 +/- 2%; 28 days HU 14 +/- 2%). HU had no effect on the proportion of type I and III collagen or muscle fiber composition in plantaris muscle. The data demonstrate that HU induces a shift in the relative proportion of collagen isoform (type I to III) in the antigravity soleus muscle, which occurs concomitantly with a slow-to-fast myofiber transformation.

  2. Effects of integrin ανβ3 on differentiation and collagen synthesis induced by connective tissue growth factor in human hypertrophic scar fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaolong; Li, Na; Tao, Ke; Fang, Xiaobing; Liu, Jiaqi; Wang, Yaojun; Wang, Hongtao; Shi, Jihong; Wang, Yunchuan; Ji, Peng; Cai, Weixia; Bai, Xiaozhi; Zhu, Xiongxiang; Han, Juntao; Hu, Dahai

    2014-11-01

    CCN2 is a matricellular protein that appears to be important in scar formation. CCN2 mediates the pro-fibrotic effects in hypertrophic scars (HTSs) through an unknown mechanism. However, many activities of CCN2 protein are known to be mediated by direct binding to integrin receptors. In this study, we investigated the role of integrin α(ν)β(3) in the differentiation of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (HTSFs) induced by CCN2. The levels of integrin α(ν)β(3) between normal skin and hypertrophic scar (HTS) tissues were compared, and integrin α(ν)β(3) was found to be upregulated in HTS. CCN2 was shown to induce HTSF differentiation and collagen (COL) synthesis at the mRNA and protein levels. Based on these results, the expression of integrin α(ν)β(3) was upregulated by CCN2 stimulation during HTSF differentiation. Blockade of integrin α(ν)β(3) prevented CCN2-induced HTSF differentiation and COL synthesis. Furthermore, the CCN2-induced increase in contractility of the HTSF in COL lattices was inhibited by integrin α(ν)β(3) blocking antibodies. HTSs were established in a rabbit ear model, and the inhibitor of integrin α(ν)β(3) significantly improved the architecture of the rabbit ear scar. Results of the present study showed that integrin α(ν)β(3) contributes to pro-fibrotic CCN2 signaling. Blocking this pathway may therefore be beneficial for the treatment of HTS.

  3. Morphologic study of changes of collagenous tissue in the amnion and cervix during prostaglandin-induced abortion and delivery.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Y; Yoshida, Y

    1990-07-01

    Marked dissociation of the cervical collagenous tissue during prostaglandin-induced abortion is well recognized, but the response of collagenous tissue of the amnion to prostaglandin treatment is not known. A morphologic study of amniotic collagenous tissue was performed after prostaglandin-induced abortion and prostaglandin-induced term delivery. The collagenous fibers of the amnion were found to be closely packed with no ground substances and formed in a thick layer. Cervical collagenous tissue of the same patients showed a marked dissociation of fibers and abundant ground substance. The fetus was often delivered within a complete sac at midtrimester. These findings suggest differences in collagenous tissue responses to prostaglandin treatment between the amnion and cervix. PMID:2375370

  4. Effect of drill-induced noise on hearing in non-operated ear

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, Seyyed Hamidreza; Fazel, Alireza; Rogha, Mehrdad; Nilforoush, Mohamadhosein; Solooki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of drill-generated noise on hearing loss in non-operated ear and if any, was temporary or persistent. Materials and Methods: In this prospective clinical study, 23 patients who had undergone mastoidectomy and normal contralateral hearing were enrolled. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively (1 and 7 days) following surgery using low and high-frequency pure tone audiometry (PTA) and low and high-frequency transient evoked and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) testing. Results: Comparing preoperative and 1-day after surgery, PTA averages were significantly different at low frequencies, but no statistical significant differences were observed at 0.25 KHz and high-frequencies. Comparing 1-day after surgery and 7 days after surgery showed that, PTA averages at 0.5, 2 and 2 KHz were significantly different with no significant differences at the other average of thresholds in low and high frequencies; PTA average at 1 KHz was significantly different with, no significant differences at the other averages of thresholds in low and high frequencies. DPOAEs showed a significant difference preoperative and 1-day after surgery, 1-day and 7 days after, but DPOAEs were not significantly different. Transiently evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) had a significant difference preoperative and 1-day after surgery, 1-day and 7 days after but when comparing preoperative and 7 days after surgery, TEOAEs were not significantly different. Conclusions: Drill-induced noise during ear surgery (mastoidectomy) can cause reversible changes in PTA, DPOAEs and TEOAEs in the non-operated ear. PMID:27274502

  5. Aortic VCAM-1: an early marker of vascular inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Denys, Anne; Clavel, Gaëlle; Lemeiter, Delphine; Schischmanoff, Olivier; Boissier, Marie-Christophe; Semerano, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There are limited experimental data on vascular involvement in arthritis models. To study the link between CVD and inflammation in RA, we developed a model of vascular dysfunction and articular inflammation by collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. We studied the expression of vascular inflammatory markers in CIA with and without concomitant hyperlipidic diet (HD). Collagen-induced arthritis was induced with intradermal injection of chicken type-II collagen followed by a boost 21 days later. Mice with and without CIA were fed a standard diet or an HD for 12 weeks starting from the day of the boost. Arthritis severity was evaluated with a validated clinical score. Aortic mRNA levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-17 were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 localization in the aortic sinus was determined by immunohistochemistry. Atherosclerotic plaque presence was assessed in aortas. Collagen-induced arthritis was associated with increased expression of VCAM-1, independent of diet. VCAM-1 overexpression was detectable as early as 4 weeks after collagen immunization and persisted after 15 weeks. The HD induced atheroma plaque formation and aortic iNOS expression regardless of CIA. Concomitant CIA and HD had no additive effect on atheroma or VCAM-1 or iNOS expression. CIA and an HD diet induced a distinct and independent expression of large-vessel inflammation markers in B6 mice. This model may be relevant for the study of CVD in RA. PMID:26859834

  6. Regional alterations of type I collagen in rat tibia induced by skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, Masashi; Arnaud, Sara B.; Tanzawa, Hideki; Kitamura, Eiji; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of mineral density in weight-bearing bones that leads to inferior bone mechanical strength. This appears to be caused by a failure of bone formation; however, its mechanisms still are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize collagen, the predominant matrix protein in bone, in various regions of tibia of rats that were subjected to skeletal unloading by 4 weeks tail suspension. Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (4 months old) were divided into tail suspension and ambulatory controls (eight rats each). After the tail suspension, tibias from each animal were collected and divided into five regions and collagen was analyzed. The collagen cross-linking and the extent of lysine (Lys) hydroxylation in unloaded bones were significantly altered in proximal epiphysis, diaphysis, and, in particular, proximal metaphysis but not in distal regions. The pool of immature/nonmineralized collagen measured by its extractability with a chaotropic solvent was significantly increased in proximal metaphysis. These results suggest that skeletal unloading induced an accumulation of post-translationally altered nonmineralized collagen and that these changes are bone region specific. These alterations might be caused by impaired osteoblastic function/differentiation resulting in a mineralization defect.

  7. Piperlongumine Blocks JAK2-STAT3 to Inhibit Collagen-Induced Platelet Reactivity Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species†

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hengjie; Houck, Katie L.; Tian, Ye; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Hull, Ken; Zhou, Zhou; Zhou, Mingzhao; Wu, Xiaoping; Tweardy, David J.; Romo, Daniel; Fu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhang, Jianning; Dong, Jing-fei

    2015-01-01

    Background Piperlongumine (PL) is a compound isolated from the piper longum plant. It possesses anti-cancer activities through blocking the transcription factor STAT3 and by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer, but not normal cells. It also inhibits platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but the underlying mechanism is not known. Objective We conducted in vitro experiments to test the hypothesis that PL regulates a non-transcriptional activity of STAT3 to specifically reduce the reactivity of human platelets to collagen. Results PL dose-dependently blocked collagen-induced platelet aggregation, calcium influx, CD62p expression and thrombus formation on collagen with a maximal inhibition at 100 μM. It reduced platelet microvesiculation induced by collagen. PL blocked the activation of JAK2 and STAT3 in collagen-stimulated platelets. This inhibitory effect was significantly reduced in platelets pretreated with a STAT3 inhibitor. Although PL induced ROS production in platelets; quenching ROS using excessive reducing agents: 20 μM GSH and 0.5 mM L-Cysteine, did not block the inhibitory effects. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor Apocynin also had no effect. Conclusions PL inhibited collagen-induced platelet reactivity by targeting the JAK2-STAT3 pathway. We also provide experimental evidence that PL and collagen induce different oxidants that have differential effects on platelets. Studying these differential effects may uncover new mechanisms of regulating platelet functions by oxidants in redox signals. PMID:26645674

  8. Effect of cadmium chloride exposure during the induction of collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Md Meraj; Neha; Khan, Haider A

    2015-08-01

    The precise cause of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis remains uncertain. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in animals is the most commonly used model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Exposure of humans and animals to toxic metals is widespread. Cadmium is one of the most prevalent nephrotoxic heavy metal, but it may cause other systemic toxicity as well. Cadmium may cause adverse health effects by impairment of the immune systems and induction of reactive oxygen species. Since rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis involve immune system disorder and chronic inflammation, the present study has been designed to find out the effect of cadmium chloride exposure on clinical manifestation of development of collagen induced rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis was induced in rats by intradermal injection of emulsion of type II collagen in Complete Freund's Adjuvant. Rats were treated with cadmium chloride dissolved in drinking water at concentrations of 5ppm and 50ppm for 21 days from day of immunization. The effects of cadmium in the rats were assessed by biochemical parameters (articular elastase, articular nitrite, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase) histopathological analysis and immunohistochemical expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in rat joint tissue. Histopathological changes further confirmed the biochemical and immunohistochemical results. Our results suggest that exposure to cadmium chloride during the induction phase of collagen induced arthritis abrogate disease development at lower dose whereas exacerbates at higher dose in Wistar rats. PMID:26070417

  9. Anethole prevents hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and collagen metabolism alterations in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Galicka, Anna; Krętowski, Rafał; Nazaruk, Jolanta; Cechowska-Pasko, Marzanna

    2014-09-01

    The collagen metabolism alterations triggered by reactive oxygen species are involved in the development of various connective tissue diseases and skin aging. This study was designed to examine whether (E)-anethole possesses a protective effect on H2O2-induced alterations in collagen metabolism as well as whether it can prevent apoptosis in human skin fibroblasts. In cells treated with 300 µM H₂O₂, a decrease in collagen biosynthesis of 54% was observed. Pretreatment of cells with 0.5 µM anethole for 1 h completely prevented this alteration. Changes at the protein level positively correlated with alterations of type I collagen mRNA expression. We have shown that H2O2 caused increase in the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 as well as that an increase in MMP-2 activity can contribute to the 8% decrease in the amount of collagen secreted into the medium. The most efficient suppression of these changes was observed in the presence of 0.5 µM of anethole. At 10 µM, in addition to suppression, an inhibitory effect of anethole on MMP-9 activity was documented. Additionally, the 60% H₂O₂-induced decrease in cell viability was suppressed by 1 µM of anethole and a 4-fold increase in cell apoptosis was suppressed by 0.5 µM of anethole. Our results suggest that anethole, which is a small lipophilic and non-toxic molecule with the ability to prevent H₂O₂-induced collagen metabolism alterations and apoptosis in human skin fibroblasts, would prove useful in the development of effective agents in pharmacotherapy of oxidative stress-related skin diseases.

  10. Glutaraldehyde induces cell shape changes in isolated outer hair cells from the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Slepecky, N; Ulfendahl, M

    1988-01-01

    Individual isolated outer hair cells (OHCs) from the cochlea were maintained in a collagen gel and viewed in the light microscope. They were observed during fixation and processing for transmission electron microscopy and individual cells were selected for observation in the electron microscope. Application of glutaraldehyde at several concentrations caused OHCs to become shorter. Shrinkage occurred during dehydration but there was no further change during infiltration with the epoxy resin. Ultrastructural analysis of isolated cells fixed with glutaraldehyde and postfixed with osmium tetroxide showed that these cells were similar to cells fixed in the intact cochlea. The glutaraldehyde-induced cell shape change is similar to the shortening seen in intact OHCs in response to the application of solutions containing high potassium or caffeine. Application of glutaraldehyde to cells pretreated with potassium or caffeine caused further shortening. Glutaraldehyde-induced cell shape change was not blocked by the application of tetracaine, which did prevent potassium-induced and caffeine-induced shortening. Glutaraldehyde-induced cell shape change was not stopped by short treatment with N-ethylmaleimide, which did inhibit potassium-induced shortening. Results from these experiments suggest that the glutaraldehyde-induced OHC shape change is not caused by an effect on the membrane or by calcium activation of a contractile response. Shortening may be caused by shrinkage due to cross-linking of proteins.

  11. Role of T lymphocytes in collagen II-induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Klareskog, L.; Holmdahl, R.; Larsson, E.; Wigzell, H.

    1983-01-01

    The role of T lymphocytes in collagen II induced arthritis in rats has been investigated. Functional T cells were needed for the development of arthritis since none out of 14 nude rats injected with collagen type II developed arthritis, whereas 11 out of 14 of their normal counterparts did. With the help of antibodies specific for Ia antigens and different T cell subsets in the rats, an immunohistochemical method was used to demonstrate that T cells, predominantly of `helper' type and anti-Ia reactive non-T cells were abundant in the arthritic synovial tissue. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:6219836

  12. Folic Acid Improves Inner Ear Vascularization in Hyperhomocysteinemic Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Soumi; Munjal, Charu; Tyagi, Neetu; Sen, Utpal; Tyagi, Aaron C.; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2013-01-01

    More than 29 million adults in the United States have been diagnosed with hearing loss. Interestingly, elevated homocysteine (Hcy) levels, known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is also associated with impaired hearing. However, the associated mechanism remains obscure. The collagen receptor such as discoidin domain receptor 1 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) play a significant role in inner ear structure and function. We hypothesize that HHcy increases hearing thresholds by compromise in inner ear vasculature resulted from impaired Hcy metabolism, increased oxidative stress, collagen IVa and collagen la turnover. The treatment with folic acid (FA) protects elevated hearing thresholds and prevents reduction in vessel density by lowering abundant collagen deposition and oxidative stress in inner ear. To test this hypothesis we employed 8 weeks old male wild type (WT), cystathionine-beta-synthase heterozygote knockout (CBS+/−) mice, WT+FA (0.0057 μg/g/day, equivalent to a 400 μg/70 kg/day human dose in drinking water); and CBS(+/−)+FA. The mice were treated for four weeks. The hearing thresholds were determined by recording the auditory brainstem responses. Integrity of vessels was analyzed by perfusion of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracer. Endothelial permeability was assessed, which indicated restoration of HRP leakage by FA treatment. A total Hcy level was increased in stria vascularis (SV) and spiral ligament (SL) of CBS+/− mice which was lowered by FA. Interestingly, FA treatment lowered Col IVa Immunostaining by affecting its turnover. The levels of MMP-2, -9, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and cystathione gamma lyase (CSE) were measured by Western blot analysis. The oxidative stress was high in SV and SL of CBS+/− compared to WT however the treatment with FA lowered oxidative stress in CBS+/− mice. These data suggested that hearing loss in CBS+/− mice was primarily due to leakage in inner ear circulation, also partly by induced

  13. The inner ear is involved in the aggravation of nociceptive behavior induced by lowering barometric pressure of nerve injured rats.

    PubMed

    Funakubo, Megumi; Sato, Jun; Honda, Takashi; Mizumura, Kazue

    2010-01-01

    Patients suffering from neuropathic pain often complain of pain aggravation when the weather is changing. The exact mechanism for weather change-induced pain has not been clarified. We have previously demonstrated that experimentally lowering barometric pressure (LP) intensifies pain-related behaviors in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI). In the present experiment we examined whether this pain aggravating effect of LP exposure in nerve injured rats is still present after lesioning of the inner ear. We used both CCI and spinal nerve ligation (SNL) models for this study. We injected into the middle ear sodium arsanilate solution (100mg/ml, 50microl/ear), which is known to degenerate vestibular hair cells, under anesthesia the day before surgery. Rats were exposed to LP (27hPa decrease over 8min) 7-9 days after CCI or 5-8 days after SNL surgery, and pain-related behavior (number of paw lifts induced by von Frey hair stimuli) was measured. When the inner ear lesioned SNL or CCI rats were exposed to LP, they showed no augmentation of pain-related behavior. On the other hand, the pain aggravating effect of a temperature decrease (from 24 to 17 degrees C) was maintained in both SNL and CCI rats. These results suggest that the barometric sensor/sensing system influencing nociceptive behavior during LP in rats is located in the inner ear.

  14. Abortion in mice induced by intravenous injections of antibodies to type IV collagen or laminin.

    PubMed

    Foidart, J M; Yaar, M; Figueroa, A; Wilk, A; Brown, K S; Liotta, L A

    1983-03-01

    Purified antibodies to laminin or Type IV collagen administered intravenously to pregnant mice were found to localize in the basement membranes of all maternal tissues as well as the parietal and visceral yolk sacs and trophoblast basement membranes but not in embryonic tissues. Antibodies to Type IV collagen induced a higher incidence of abortions, retroplacental hematomas and fetal deaths. When administered intraamniotically, both antiserums were embryotoxic. The functional consequences of the attachment of antibodies to these specific basement membrane antigens appear to be hemorrhage within the parietal and visceral yolk sacs and separation of fetal from maternal tissues. Complement activation appears to play an important role in the interruptions of pregnancy, because this was not observed in strains of mice lacking C5, the fifth component of complement, in mice depleted of C3 by administration of cobra venom factor, or in mice injected with the F(ab) fragments of antibody to Type IV collagen or laminin.

  15. Lack of collagen VI promotes neurodegeneration by impairing autophagy and inducing apoptosis during aging

    PubMed Central

    Castagnaro, Silvia; Gregorio, Ilaria; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein with a broad distribution in different tissues and mostly deposited at the close periphery of the cell surface. Previous studies revealed that collagen VI protects neurons from the toxicity of amyloid-βpeptides and from UV-induced damage. However, the physiological role of this protein in the central nervous system (CNS) remains unknown. Here, we established primary neural cultures from murine cortex and hippocampus, and carried out in vitro and in vivo studies in wild-type and collagen VI null (Col6a1−/−) mice. Col6a1−/− neural cultures displayed an increased incidence of spontaneous apoptosis and higher vulnerability to oxidative stress, accompanied by altered regulation of autophagy with increased p62 protein levels and decreased LC3 lipidation. Analysis of brain sections confirmed increased apoptosis and abnormal regulation of autophagy in the CNS of collagen VI-deficient animals. To investigate the in vivo physiological consequences of these CNS defects, we carried out functional studies and found that motor and memory task performances were impaired in aged Col6a1−/− mice. These findings indicate that lack of collagen VI leads to spontaneous apoptosis and defective autophagy in neural cells, and point at a protective role for this ECM protein in the CNS during physiological aging. PMID:27060109

  16. Contribution of elastin and collagen to the pathogenesis of monocrotaline induced pulmonary hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Todorovich, L.; Johnson, D.; Ranger, P.; Keeley, F.; Rabinovitch, M.

    1986-03-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were selected randomly for subcutaneous injections, 24 with monocrotaline (M) (60mg/kg) and 24 with an equivolume of saline, and studied 8, 16 or 28 days later. The right (RV) and left ventricle with septum (LV + S) were separated and weighed. The pulmonary artery (PA) was assessed by light and electron microscopy. Synthesis of elastin collagen and non-collagenous proteins was determined by measuring incorporations of /sup 3/H-valine, /sup 14/C-OH-proline and /sup 14/C-proline respectively. Total content of elastin was determined by weight of residue after CNBr digestion, and of collagen by total OH-proline content in SDS and CNBr extracts. At 16 days, the M injected rats developed a 6-fold increase in PA elastin synthesis and a 2-fold increase in medial wall thickness. Ultrastructural changes included increased microtubules and golgi apparatus in endothelium, decreased proportion of mature elastin in subendothelium and increased ground substance in media. By 28 days, M rats showed a progressive increase in PA elastin and collagen synthesis, greater than 20-fold, and in medial wall thickness, 3-fold. This was associated with a 2-fold increase in total elastin in proportion to the increase in PA weight and the development of RV hypertrophy (RV/LV + S increased more than 2-fold). Progressive irreversible pulmonary hypertension induced by M may be related to continuing stimulation of PA elastin and collagen synthesis.

  17. Gallium nitrate ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeog; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Roh, Kug-Hwan; Seo, Su-Kil; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Sae-Gwang; Lim, Jun-Goo; Lee, Won-Jin; Kim, Myoung-Hun; Cho, Kwang-rae; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease. Gallium nitrate has been reported to reserve immunosuppressive activities. Therefore, we assessed the therapeutic effects of gallium nitrate in the mouse model of developed type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced by bovine type II collagen with Complete Freund's adjuvant. CIA mice were intraperitoneally treated from day 36 to day 49 after immunization with 3.5mg/kg/day, 7mg/kg/day gallium nitrate or vehicle. Gallium nitrate ameliorated the progression of mice with CIA. The clinical symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis did not progress after treatment with gallium nitrate. Gallium nitrate inhibited the increase of CD4(+) T cell populations (p<0.05) and also inhibited the type II collagen-specific IgG2a-isotype autoantibodies (p<0.05). Gallium nitrate reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ (p<0.05) and the mRNA expression levels of these cytokine and MMPs (MMP2 and MMP9) in joint tissues. Western blotting of members of the NF-κB signaling pathway revealed that gallium nitrate inhibits the activation of NF-κB by blocking IκB degradation. These data suggest that gallium nitrate is a potential therapeutic agent for autoimmune inflammatory arthritis through its inhibition of the NF-κB pathway, and these results may help to elucidate gallium nitrate-mediated mechanisms of immunosuppression in patients with RA.

  18. Riboflavin/UVA Collagen Cross-Linking-Induced Changes in Normal and Keratoconus Corneal Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sally; Boote, Craig; Kamma-Lorger, Christina S.; Rajan, Madhavan S.; Harris, Jonathan; Dooley, Erin; Hawksworth, Nicholas; Hiller, Jennifer; Terill, Nick J.; Hafezi, Farhad; Brahma, Arun K.; Quantock, Andrew J.; Meek, Keith M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of Ultraviolet-A collagen cross-linking with hypo-osmolar and iso-osmolar riboflavin solutions on stromal collagen ultrastructure in normal and keratoconus ex vivo human corneas. Methods Using small-angle X-ray scattering, measurements of collagen D-periodicity, fibril diameter and interfibrillar spacing were made at 1 mm intervals across six normal post-mortem corneas (two above physiological hydration (swollen) and four below (unswollen)) and two post-transplant keratoconus corneal buttons (one swollen; one unswollen), before and after hypo-osmolar cross-linking. The same parameters were measured in three other unswollen normal corneas before and after iso-osmolar cross-linking and in three pairs of swollen normal corneas, in which only the left was cross-linked (with iso-osmolar riboflavin). Results Hypo-osmolar cross-linking resulted in an increase in corneal hydration in all corneas. In the keratoconus corneas and unswollen normal corneas, this was accompanied by an increase in collagen interfibrillar spacing (p<0.001); an increase in fibril diameter was also seen in two out of four unswollen normal corneas and one unswollen keratoconus cornea (p<0.001). Iso-osmolar cross-linking resulted in a decrease in tissue hydration in the swollen normal corneas only. Although there was no consistent treatment-induced change in hydration in the unswollen normal samples, iso-osmolar cross-linking of these corneas did result in a compaction of collagen fibrils and a reduced fibril diameter (p<0.001); these changes were not seen in the swollen normal corneas. Collagen D-periodicity was not affected by either treatment. Conclusion The observed structural changes following Ultraviolet-A cross-linking with hypo-osmolar or iso-osmolar riboflavin solutions are more likely a consequence of treatment-induced changes in tissue hydration rather than cross-linking. PMID:21850225

  19. The mechanism of hydralazine-induced collagen biosynthesis in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Karna, Ewa; Szoka, Lukasz; Palka, Jerzy A

    2013-04-01

    The finding that hydralazine (HYD) affects collagen metabolism led us to investigate the mechanism of its action on collagen biosynthesis, prolidase expression and activity, expression of α2β1 integrin, insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases (ERK1, ERK2), and transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and nuclear factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) in human dermal fibroblasts. Confluent fibroblasts were treated with micromolar concentrations (50-500 μM) of HYD for 24 h. HYD had no influence on cell viability. It was found that HYD-dependent increase in collagen biosynthesis was accompanied by a parallel increase in prolidase activity and expression, HIF-1α expression, and decrease in DNA biosynthesis, compared to untreated cells. Since collagen biosynthesis and prolidase activity are regulated by a signal induced by activated α2β1 integrin receptor as well as IGF-IR, the expression of these receptors was measured by Western immunoblot analysis. The exposure of the cells to HYD contributed to the increase in IGF-IR expression without any effect on α2β1 integrin receptor and FAK expressions. It was accompanied by a decrease in expression of MAP kinases and NF-κB p65, the known inhibitor of collagen gene expression. The data suggest that the HYD-dependent increase of collagen biosynthesis in cultured human skin fibroblasts results from activation of IGF-IR expression and prolidase activity and downregulation of NF-κB p65.

  20. Swimmer's ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) Vinegar (acetic acid) ear drops People with chronic swimmer's ear may ... drop of alcohol with 1 drop of white vinegar and placing the mixture into the ears after ...

  1. Ear Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... ear, where they make your eardrum vibrate. The vibrations are transmitted through three tiny bones, called ossicles, in your middle ear. The vibrations travel to your inner ear, a snail-shaped ...

  2. Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Ear Infections Overview How does the ear work? A tube called the eustachian (say: "you-stay-shee-an") tube connects the middle ear with the back of the nose. Normally this ...

  3. Cauliflower Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What's Cauliflower Ear? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Cauliflower Ear? Print A A A Text Size Have you ever seen someone whose ear looks bumpy and lumpy? The person might have ...

  4. Ear barotrauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ear popping - barotrauma; Pressure-related ear pain; Eustachian tube dysfunction - barotrauma ... air pressure outside of the body. The Eustachian tube is a connection between the middle ear and ...

  5. Phenylethanoids in the herb of Plantago lanceolata and inhibitory effect on arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear edema.

    PubMed

    Murai, M; Tamayama, Y; Nishibe, S

    1995-10-01

    The five phenylethanoids, acteoside (1), cistanoside F (2), lavandulifolioside (3), plantamajoside (4) and isoacteoside (5) were isolated from the herb of Plantago lanceolata L. (Plantaginaceae). Compounds 1, the major phenylethanoid in the herb of P. lanceolata L., and 4, the major phenylethanoid in the herb of P. asiatica L., showed inhibitory effects on arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear edema. PMID:7480214

  6. Phenylethanoids in the herb of Plantago lanceolata and inhibitory effect on arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear edema.

    PubMed

    Murai, M; Tamayama, Y; Nishibe, S

    1995-10-01

    The five phenylethanoids, acteoside (1), cistanoside F (2), lavandulifolioside (3), plantamajoside (4) and isoacteoside (5) were isolated from the herb of Plantago lanceolata L. (Plantaginaceae). Compounds 1, the major phenylethanoid in the herb of P. lanceolata L., and 4, the major phenylethanoid in the herb of P. asiatica L., showed inhibitory effects on arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear edema.

  7. Two-photon induced collagen cross-linking in bioartificial cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuetemeyer, Kai; Kensah, George; Heidrich, Marko; Meyer, Heiko; Martin, Ulrich; Gruh, Ina; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2011-08-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a promising strategy for regenerative therapies to overcome the shortage of donor organs for transplantation. Besides contractile function, the stiffness of tissue engineered constructs is crucial to generate transplantable tissue surrogates with sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the high pressure present in the heart. Although several collagen cross-linking techniques have proven to be efficient in stabilizing biomaterials, they cannot be applied to cardiac tissue engineering, as cell death occurs in the treated area. Here, we present a novel method using femtosecond (fs) laser pulses to increase the stiffness of collagen-based tissue constructs without impairing cell viability. Raster scanning of the fs laser beam over riboflavin-treated tissue induced collagen cross-linking by two-photon photosensitized singlet oxygen production. One day post-irradiation, stress-strain measurements revealed increased tissue stiffness by around 40% being dependent on the fibroblast content in the tissue. At the same time, cells remained viable and fully functional as demonstrated by fluorescence imaging of cardiomyocyte mitochondrial activity and preservation of active contraction force. Our results indicate that two-photon induced collagen cross-linking has great potential for studying and improving artificially engineered tissue for regenerative therapies.

  8. Libby amphibole-induced mesothelial cell autoantibodies promote collagen deposition in mice.

    PubMed

    Gilmer, John; Serve, Kinta; Davis, Chad; Anthony, Marti; Hanson, Robert; Harding, Tanner; Pfau, Jean C

    2016-06-01

    Libby amphibole (LA) causes a unique progressive lamellar pleural fibrosis (LPF) that is associated with pulmonary function decline. Pleural fibrosis among the LA-exposed population of Libby, MT, has been associated with the production of anti-mesothelial cell autoantibodies (MCAA), which induce collagen production from cultured human mesothelial cells. We hypothesized that the progressive nature of LPF could be at least partially attributed to an autoimmune process and sought to demonstrate that LA-induced MCAA trigger collagen deposition in vivo. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to LA for 7 mo, and serum was tested for MCAA by cell-based ELISA on primary mouse mesothelial cells. When treated in vitro with serum from mice exposed to LA, mesothelial cells upregulated collagen matrix production. This effect was lost when the serum was cleared of IgG using protein G beads, implicating IgG autoantibodies. Using the peritoneal cavity as a surrogate for the pleural cavity, groups of naïve (non-asbestos-exposed) mice were injected intraperitoneally with 1) control serum, 2) one dose of serum from LA-exposed mice (LA serum), 3) two doses of LA serum, or 4) two doses of LA serum cleared of IgG. After 1 mo, analysis of collagen in peritoneal walls using two-photon confocal microscopy (SHG analysis) and a hydroxyproline assay demonstrated significant increases in collagen by LA serum but not control or cleared serum. These data support the hypothesis that MCAA in LA-exposed mice induce fibrotic responses in vivo, demonstrating that an autoimmune component may be contributing to the progressive pleural fibrosis seen in LA-exposed patients. PMID:27106292

  9. Developing functional musculoskeletal tissues through hypoxia and lysyl oxidase-induced collagen cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Eleftherios A.; Responte, Donald J.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2014-01-01

    The inability to recapitulate native tissue biomechanics, especially tensile properties, hinders progress in regenerative medicine. To address this problem, strategies have focused on enhancing collagen production. However, manipulating collagen cross-links, ubiquitous throughout all tissues and conferring mechanical integrity, has been underinvestigated. A series of studies examined the effects of lysyl oxidase (LOX), the enzyme responsible for the formation of collagen cross-links. Hypoxia-induced endogenous LOX was applied in multiple musculoskeletal tissues (i.e., cartilage, meniscus, tendons, ligaments). Results of these studies showed that both native and engineered tissues are enhanced by invoking a mechanism of hypoxia-induced pyridinoline (PYR) cross-links via intermediaries like LOX. Hypoxia was shown to enhance PYR cross-linking 1.4- to 6.4-fold and, concomitantly, to increase the tensile properties of collagen-rich tissues 1.3- to 2.2-fold. Direct administration of exogenous LOX was applied in native cartilage and neocartilage generated using a scaffold-free, self-assembling process of primary chondrocytes. Exogenous LOX was found to enhance native tissue tensile properties 1.9-fold. LOX concentration- and time-dependent increases in PYR content (∼16-fold compared with controls) and tensile properties (approximately fivefold compared with controls) of neocartilage were also detected, resulting in properties on par with native tissue. Finally, in vivo subcutaneous implantation of LOX-treated neocartilage in nude mice promoted further maturation of the neotissue, enhancing tensile and PYR content approximately threefold and 14-fold, respectively, compared with in vitro controls. Collectively, these results provide the first report, to our knowledge, of endogenous (hypoxia-induced) and exogenous LOX applications for promoting collagen cross-linking and improving the tensile properties of a spectrum of native and engineered tissues both in vitro and in

  10. Developing functional musculoskeletal tissues through hypoxia and lysyl oxidase-induced collagen cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Makris, Eleftherios A; Responte, Donald J; Paschos, Nikolaos K; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2014-11-11

    The inability to recapitulate native tissue biomechanics, especially tensile properties, hinders progress in regenerative medicine. To address this problem, strategies have focused on enhancing collagen production. However, manipulating collagen cross-links, ubiquitous throughout all tissues and conferring mechanical integrity, has been underinvestigated. A series of studies examined the effects of lysyl oxidase (LOX), the enzyme responsible for the formation of collagen cross-links. Hypoxia-induced endogenous LOX was applied in multiple musculoskeletal tissues (i.e., cartilage, meniscus, tendons, ligaments). Results of these studies showed that both native and engineered tissues are enhanced by invoking a mechanism of hypoxia-induced pyridinoline (PYR) cross-links via intermediaries like LOX. Hypoxia was shown to enhance PYR cross-linking 1.4- to 6.4-fold and, concomitantly, to increase the tensile properties of collagen-rich tissues 1.3- to 2.2-fold. Direct administration of exogenous LOX was applied in native cartilage and neocartilage generated using a scaffold-free, self-assembling process of primary chondrocytes. Exogenous LOX was found to enhance native tissue tensile properties 1.9-fold. LOX concentration- and time-dependent increases in PYR content (∼ 16-fold compared with controls) and tensile properties (approximately fivefold compared with controls) of neocartilage were also detected, resulting in properties on par with native tissue. Finally, in vivo subcutaneous implantation of LOX-treated neocartilage in nude mice promoted further maturation of the neotissue, enhancing tensile and PYR content approximately threefold and 14-fold, respectively, compared with in vitro controls. Collectively, these results provide the first report, to our knowledge, of endogenous (hypoxia-induced) and exogenous LOX applications for promoting collagen cross-linking and improving the tensile properties of a spectrum of native and engineered tissues both in vitro and in

  11. Assessing cisplatin-induced ototoxicity and otoprotection in whole organ culture of the mouse inner ear in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Tropitzsch, Anke; Arnold, Heinz; Bassiouni, Mohamed; Müller, Andrea; Eckhard, Andreas; Müller, Marcus; Löwenheim, Hubert

    2014-06-16

    Cisplatin is a widely used anti-cancer drug. Ototoxicity is a major dose-limiting side-effect. A reproducible mammalian in-vitro model of cisplatin ototoxicity is required to screen and validate otoprotective drug candidates. We utilized a whole organ culture system of the postnatal mouse inner ear in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor under "simulated microgravity" culture conditions. As previously described this system allows whole organ culture of the inner ear and quantitative assessment of ototoxic effects of aminoglycoside induced hair cell loss. Here we demonstrate that this model is also applicable to the assessment of cisplatin induced ototoxicity. In this model cisplatin induced hair cell loss was dose and time dependent. Increasing exposure time of cisplatin led to decreasing EC50 concentrations. Outer hair cells were more susceptible than inner hair cells, and hair cells in the cochlear base were more susceptible than hair cells in the cochlear apex. Initial cisplatin dose determined the final extent of hair cell loss irrespective if the drug was withdrawn or continued. Dose dependant otoprotection was demonstrated by co-administration of the antioxidant agent N-acetyl l-cysteine. The results support the use of this inner ear organ culture system as an in vitro assay and validation platform for inner ear toxicology and the search for otoprotective compounds. PMID:24709139

  12. Protective Effect of Pyruvate Against Radiation-Induced Damage in Collagenized Tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griko, Y. V.; Yan, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation produces both acute and late effects on the collagenized tissues and have profound effects on wound healing. Because of the crucial practical importance for new radioprotective agents, our study has been focused on evaluation of the efficacy of non-toxic naturally occurring compounds to protect tissue integrity against high-dose gamma radiation. Here, we demonstrate that molecular integrity of collagen may serve as a sensitive biological marker for quantitative evaluation of molecular damage to collagenized tissue and efficacy of radioprotective agents. Increasing doses of gamma radiation (0-50kGy) result in progressive destruction of the native collagen fibrils, which provide a structural framework, strength, and proper milieu for the regenerating tissue. The strategy used in this study involved the thermodynamic specification of all structural changes in collagenized matrix of skin, aortic heart valve, and bone tissue induced by different doses and conditions of g-irradiation. This study describes a simple biophysical approach utilizing the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) to characterize the structural resistance of the aortic valve matrix exposed to different doses of g-irradiation. It allows us to identify the specific response of each constituent as well as to determine the influence of the different treatments on the characteristic parameters of protein structure. We found that pyruvate, a substance that naturally occurs in the body, provide significant protection (up to 80%) from biochemical and biomechanical damage to the collagenized tissue through the effective targeting of reactive oxygen species. The recently discovered role of pyruvate in the cell antioxidant defense to O2 oxidation, and its essential constituency in the daily human diet, indicate that the administration of pyruvate-based radioprotective formulations may provide safe and effective protection from deleterious effects of ionizing

  13. Ear Pieces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students make fanciful connections between art and medicine. This project challenges students to interpret "ear idioms" (e.g. "blow it out your ear," "in one ear and out the other") by relying almost entirely on realistic ear drawings, the placement of them, marks, and values. In that…

  14. Native Australian plant extracts differentially induce Collagen I and Collagen III in vitro and could be important targets for the development of new wound healing therapies.

    PubMed

    Adams, Damian H; Shou, Qingyao; Wohlmuth, Hans; Cowin, Allison J

    2016-03-01

    Australian native plants have a long history of therapeutic use in indigenous cultures, however, they have been poorly studied scientifically. We analysed the effects of 14 plant derived compounds from the species Pilidiostigma glabrum, Myoporum montanum, Geijera parviflora, and Rhodomyrtus psidioides for their potential wound healing properties by assessing their ability to induce or suppress Collagen I and Collagen III expression in human skin fibroblasts in culture. The compound 7-geranyloxycoumarin was able to significantly increase Collagen I (23.7%, p<0.0002) expression in comparison to control. Significant suppression of Collagen III was observed for the compounds flindersine (11.1%, p<0.02), and (N-acetoxymethyl) flindersine (27%, p<0.00005). The implications of these finding is that these compounds could potentially alter the expression of different collagens in the skin allowing for the potential development of new wound healing therapies and new approaches for treating various skin diseases as well as photo (sun) damaged, and aged skin.

  15. Simulating Reflex Induced Changes in the Acoustic Impedance of the Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirlin, Mindy W.; Levitt, Harry

    1991-01-01

    A simple procedure for measuring changes in the acoustic impedance of the ear is described. The technique has several applications, including simulation using a standard coupler of changes in real ear impedance produced by the acoustic reflex, and calibration of response time of an otoadmittance meter. (Author/DB)

  16. The effects of experimentally induced conductive hearing loss on spectral and temporal aspects of sound transmission through the ear

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, J. Eric; Koka, Kanthaiah; Thornton, Jennifer L.; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Conductive hearing loss (CHL) is known to produce hearing deficits, including deficits in sound localization ability. The differences in sound intensities and timing experienced between the two tympanic membranes are important cues to sound localization (ILD and ITD, respectively). Although much is known about the effect of CHL on hearing levels, little investigation has been conducted into the actual impact of CHL on sound location cues. This study investigated effects of CHL induced by earplugs on cochlear microphonic (CM) amplitude and timing and their corresponding effect on the ILD and ITD location cues. Acoustic and CM measurements were made in 5 chinchillas before and after earplug insertion, and again after earplug removal using pure tones (500 Hz to 24 kHz). ILDs in the unoccluded condition demonstrated position and frequency dependence where peak far-lateral ILDs approached 30 dB for high frequencies. Unoccluded ear ITD cues demonstrated positional and frequency dependence with increased ITD cue for both decreasing frequency (± 420 µs at 500 Hz, ± 310 µs for 1–4 kHz ) and increasingly lateral sound source locations. Occlusion of the ear canal with foam plugs resulted in a mild, frequency-dependent conductive hearing loss of 10–38 dB (mean 31 ± 3.9 dB) leading to a concomitant frequency dependent increase in ILDs at all source locations. The effective ITDs increased in a frequency dependent manner with ear occlusion as a direct result of the acoustic properties of the plugging material, the latter confirmed via acoustical measurements using a model ear canal with varying volumes of acoustic foam. Upon ear plugging with acoustic foam, a mild CHL is induced. Furthermore, the CHL induced by acoustic foam results in substantial changes in the magnitudes of both the ITD and ILD cues to sound location. PMID:21073935

  17. Ear trauma.

    PubMed

    Eagles, Kylee; Fralich, Laura; Stevenson, J Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Understanding basic ear anatomy and function allows an examiner to quickly and accurately identify at-risk structures in patients with head and ear trauma. External ear trauma (ie, hematoma or laceration) should be promptly treated with appropriate injury-specific techniques. Tympanic membrane injuries have multiple mechanisms and can often be conservatively treated. Temporal bone fractures are a common cause of ear trauma and can be life threatening. Facial nerve injuries and hearing loss can occur in ear trauma.

  18. Osteoblasts extracellular matrix induces vessel like structures through glycosylated collagen I

    SciTech Connect

    Palmieri, D.; Valli, M.; Viglio, S.; Ferrari, N.; Ledda, B.; Volta, C.; Manduca, P.

    2010-03-10

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a fundamental role in angiogenesis affecting endothelial cells proliferation, migration and differentiation. Vessels-like network formation in vitro is a reliable test to study the inductive effects of ECM on angiogenesis. Here we utilized matrix deposed by osteoblasts as substrate where the molecular and structural complexity of the endogenous ECM is preserved, to test if it induces vessel-like network formation by endothelial cells in vitro. ECM is more similar to the physiological substrate in vivo than other substrates previously utilized for these studies in vitro. Osteogenic ECM, prepared in vitro from mature osteoblasts at the phase of maximal deposition and glycosylation of collagen I, induces EAhy926, HUVEC, and HDMEC endothelial cells to form vessels-like structures and promotes the activation of metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2); the functionality of the p-38/MAPK signaling pathway is required. Osteogenic ECM also induces a transient increase of CXCL12 and a decrease of the receptor CXCR4. The induction of vessel-like networks is dependent from proper glycosylation of collagens and does not occur on osteogenic ECMs if deglycosylated by -galactosidase or on less glycosylated ECMs derived from preosteoblasts and normal fibroblasts, while is sustained on ECM from osteogenesis imperfecta fibroblasts only when their mutation is associated with over-glycosylation of collagen type I. These data support that post-translational glycosylation has a role in the induction in endothelial cells in vitro of molecules conductive to self-organization in vessels-like structures.

  19. Protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta-induced annulus fibrosus type II collagen degeneration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Duan, Deyu; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu; Wang, Hong; Xiong, Xiaoqian

    2007-02-01

    The protective effect of niacinamide on interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-induced annulus fibrosus (AF) type II collagen degeneration in vitro and the mechanism were investigated. Chiba's intervertebral disc (IVD) culture models in rabbits were established and 48 IVDs from 12 adult Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: normal control group, niacinamide-treated group, type II collagen degneration group (IL-1beta) and treatment group (niacinamide+IL-1beta). After culture for one week, AFs were collected for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cysteine containing aspartate specific protease-3 (Caspase-3) and type II collagen immunohistochemical examination, and type II collagen reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that rate of iNOS positive staining AF cells in the 4 groups was 17.6%, 10.9%, 73.9% and 19.3% respectively. The positive rate in treatment group was significantly lower than in the type II collagen degeneration group (P<0.01). Rate of Caspase-3 positive staining AF cells in the 4 groups was 3.4%, 4.2%, 17.6% and 10.3% respectively. The positive rate in treatment group was lower than in the type II collagen degeneration group (P<0.01). Type II collagen staining demonstrated that lamellar structure and continuity of collagen in treatment group was better reversed than in the degeneration group. RT-PCR revealed that the expression of type II collagen in treatment group was significantly stronger than that in type II collagen degeneration group (P<0.01). It was concluded that niacinamide could effectively inhibit IL-1beta stimulated increase of iNOS and Caspase-3 in AF, and alleviate IL-1beta-caused destruction and synthesis inhibition of type II collagen. Niacinamide is of potential for clinical treatment of IVD degeneration.

  20. Probing collagen/enzyme mechanochemistry in native tissue with dynamic, enzyme-induced creep.

    PubMed

    Zareian, Ramin; Church, Kelli P; Saeidi, Nima; Flynn, Brendan P; Beale, John W; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2010-06-15

    Mechanical strain or stretch of collagen has been shown to be protective of fibrils against both thermal and enzymatic degradation. The details of this mechanochemical relationship could change our understanding of load-bearing tissue formation, growth, maintenance, and disease in vertebrate animals. However, extracting a quantitative relationship between strain and the rate of enzymatic degradation is extremely difficult in bulk tissue due to confounding diffusion effects. In this investigation, we develop a dynamic, enzyme-induced creep assay and diffusion/reaction rate scaling arguments to extract a lower bound on the relationship between strain and the cutting rate of bacterial collagenase (BC) at low strains. The assay method permits continuous, forced probing of enzyme-induced strain which is very sensitive to degradation rate differences between specimens at low initial strain. The results, obtained on uniaxially loaded strips of bovine corneal tissue (0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 N), demonstrate that small differences in strain alter the enzymatic cutting rate of the BC substantially. It was estimated that a change in tissue elongation of only 1.5% (at approximately 5% strain) reduces the maximum cutting rate of the enzyme by more than half. Estimation of the average load per monomer in the tissue strips indicates that this protective "cutoff" occurs when the collagen monomers are transitioning from an entropic to an energetic mechanical regime. The continuous tracking of the enzymatic cleavage rate as a function of strain during the initial creep response indicates that the decrease in the cleavage rate of the BC is nonlinear (initially steep between 4.5 and 6.5% and then flattens out from 6.5 to 9.5%). The high sensitivity to strain at low strain implies that even lightly loaded collagenous tissue may exhibit significant strain protection. The dynamic, enzyme-induced creep assay described herein has the potential to permit the rapid characterization of collagen

  1. Proteoglycan and Collagen Biochemical Variations during Fluoroquinolone-Induced Chondrotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Marie-Agnès; Gegout-Pottie, Pascale; Minn, Alain; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Terlain, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    Although fluoroquinolone antibacterials have a broad therapeutic use, with a relatively low incidence of severe side effects, they have been reported to induce lesions in the cartilage of growing animals by a mechanism that remains unclear. This study was undertaken to determine the potentially deleterious effect of a high dose of pefloxacin (400 mg/kg of body weight) on two main constituents of cartilage in mice, i.e., proteoglycans and collagen. Variations in levels of proteoglycan anabolism measured by in vivo [35S]sulfate incorporation into cartilage and oxidative modifications of collagen assessed by detection of carbonyl derivatives were monitored after administration of pefloxacin. Treatment of mice with 1 day of pefloxacin treatment significantly decreased the rate of biosynthesis of proteoglycan for the first 24 h. However, no difference was observed after 48 h. The decrease in proteoglycan synthesis was accompanied by a marked drop in serum sulfate concentration and a concomitant increase in urinary sulfate excretion. The decrease in proteoglycan synthesis, also observed ex vivo, may suggest a direct effect of pefloxacin on this process, rather than it being a consequence of a low concentration of sulfate. On the other hand, treatment with pefloxacin for 10 days induced oxidative damage to collagen. In conclusion, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that pefloxacin administration to mice leads to modifications in the metabolism and integrity of extracellular proteins, such as collagen and proteoglycans, which may account for the side effects observed. These results offer new insights to explain quinolone-induced disorders in growing articular cartilage. PMID:10582882

  2. Rac regulates collagen-induced HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Yasunari; Doi, Tomoaki; Akamatsu, Shigeru; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Kondo, Akira; Mizutani, Jun; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kozawa, Osamu; Ogura, Shinji

    2013-10-01

    We previously reported that the collagen-induced phosphorylation of heat shock protein (HSP) 27 via p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is sufficient to induce the secretion of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB and the release of soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) from human platelets. It has been shown that Rac, which belongs to the Rho family of small GTPases, is involved in the collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In this study, we investigated the role of Rac in the collagen-stimulated release of PDGF-AB and sCD40L in human platelets. Human blood was donated from healthy volunteers and platelet-rich plasma was obtained from the blood samples. The samples were then treated with 1.0 µg/ml collagen for 0, 1, 3, or 5 min and Rac1 activity was determined using the Rac1 Activation Assay kit. We found that collagen stimulated the activation of Rac in human platelets in a time-dependent manner. However, pre-treatment with NSC23766, a selective inhibitor of Rac-guanine nucleotide exchange factor interaction, reduced the collagen-induced platelet aggregation. NSC23766 markedly attenuated not only the collagen-induced p44/p42 MAP kinase phosphorylation, but also the phosphorylation of HSP27 at three serine residues (Ser-15, Ser-78 and Ser-82). In addition, the collagen‑induced release of PDGF-AB and sCD40L was significantly suppressed by NSC23766 in a dose-dependent manner. These results strongly suggest that Rac regulates the collagen-induced HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase in human platelets, resulting in the stimulation of PDGF-AB secretion and the release of sCD40L.

  3. Dense fibrillar collagen is a potent inducer of invadopodia via a specific signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Swatkoski, Stephen; Matsumoto, Kazue; Campbell, Catherine B.; Petrie, Ryan J.; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Li, Xin; Mueller, Susette C.; Bugge, Thomas H.; Gucek, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) can regulate multiple cellular activities and the matrix itself in dynamic, bidirectional processes. One such process is local proteolytic modification of the ECM. Invadopodia of tumor cells are actin-rich proteolytic protrusions that locally degrade matrix molecules and mediate invasion. We report that a novel high-density fibrillar collagen (HDFC) matrix is a potent inducer of invadopodia, both in carcinoma cell lines and in primary human fibroblasts. In carcinoma cells, HDFC matrix induced formation of invadopodia via a specific integrin signaling pathway that did not require growth factors or even altered gene and protein expression. In contrast, phosphoproteomics identified major changes in a complex phosphosignaling network with kindlin2 serine phosphorylation as a key regulatory element. This kindlin2-dependent signal transduction network was required for efficient induction of invadopodia on dense fibrillar collagen and for local degradation of collagen. This novel phosphosignaling mechanism regulates cell surface invadopodia via kindlin2 for local proteolytic remodeling of the ECM. PMID:25646088

  4. Sialylation converts arthritogenic IgG into inhibitors of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Ise, Wataru; Harazono, Akira; Takakura, Daisuke; Fukuyama, Hidehiro; Baba, Yoshihiro; Narazaki, Masashi; Shoda, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Nobunori; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ji, Shuting; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Fujio, Keishi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Furukawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated IgG antibodies such as anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) have diverse glycosylation variants; however, key sugar chains modulating the arthritogenic activity of IgG remain to be clarified. Here, we show that reduced sialylation is a common feature of RA-associated IgG in humans and in mouse models of arthritis. Genetically blocking sialylation in activated B cells results in exacerbation of joint inflammation in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. On the other hand, artificial sialylation of anti-type II collagen antibodies, including ACPAs, not only attenuates arthritogenic activity, but also suppresses the development of CIA in the antibody-infused mice, whereas sialylation of other IgG does not prevent CIA. Thus, our data demonstrate that sialylation levels control the arthritogenicity of RA-associated IgG, presenting a potential target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:27046227

  5. Sialylation converts arthritogenic IgG into inhibitors of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Ise, Wataru; Harazono, Akira; Takakura, Daisuke; Fukuyama, Hidehiro; Baba, Yoshihiro; Narazaki, Masashi; Shoda, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Nobunori; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ji, Shuting; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Fujio, Keishi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Furukawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated IgG antibodies such as anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) have diverse glycosylation variants; however, key sugar chains modulating the arthritogenic activity of IgG remain to be clarified. Here, we show that reduced sialylation is a common feature of RA-associated IgG in humans and in mouse models of arthritis. Genetically blocking sialylation in activated B cells results in exacerbation of joint inflammation in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. On the other hand, artificial sialylation of anti-type II collagen antibodies, including ACPAs, not only attenuates arthritogenic activity, but also suppresses the development of CIA in the antibody-infused mice, whereas sialylation of other IgG does not prevent CIA. Thus, our data demonstrate that sialylation levels control the arthritogenicity of RA-associated IgG, presenting a potential target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:27046227

  6. Identification and characterization of a collagen-induced platelet aggregation inhibitor, triplatin, from salivary glands of the assassin bug, Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Morita, Akihiro; Isawa, Haruhiko; Orito, Yuki; Iwanaga, Shiroh; Chinzei, Yasuo; Yuda, Masao

    2006-07-01

    To facilitate feeding, certain hematophagous invertebrates possess inhibitors of collagen-induced platelet aggregation in their saliva. However, their mechanisms of action have not been fully elucidated. Here, we describe two major salivary proteins, triplatin-1 and -2, from the assassin bug, Triatoma infestans, which inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen but not by other agents including ADP, arachidonic acid, U46619 and thrombin. Furthermore, these triplatins also inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen-related peptide, a specific agonist of the major collagen-signaling receptor glycoprotein (GP)VI. Moreover, triplatin-1 inhibited Fc receptor gamma-chain phosphorylation induced by collagen, which is the first step of GPVI-mediated signaling. These results strongly suggest that triplatins target GPVI and inhibit signal transduction necessary for platelet activation by collagen. This is the first report on the mechanism of action of collagen-induced platelet aggregation inhibitors from hematophagus invertebrates. PMID:16759235

  7. Loudness changes resulting from an electrically induced middle-ear reflex.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in order to determine the changes in loudness brought about by electro-cutaneous elicitation of the middle-ear reflex. Subjects were required to judge the relative loudness of the second of three consecutive 30-msec bursts of tone, the second tone being accompanied by an electrical shock to the external auditory meatus, capable of eliciting a contraction of the middle-ear muscles. The difference between these judgments and those of the control condition (shock on the arm) was taken to represent a measure of the attenuation provided by contraction of the middle-ear muscles. Test tones were 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 Hz at levels of 65, 75, 85, 95, and 105 dB. The results indicate that the middle-ear reflex decreases the middle-ear's transmission mainly for low-frequency sounds. The results fail to lend support to the Loeb-Riopelle hypothesis that the middle-ear reflex acts as a limiter, rather than a linear attenuator.

  8. The inhibition of collagenase induced degradation of collagen by the galloyl-containing polyphenols tannic acid, epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate.

    PubMed

    Jackson, John K; Zhao, Jinying; Wong, Wesley; Burt, Helen M

    2010-05-01

    Collagen based cosmetic fillers require repeat treatments due to collagenase derived degradation of the filler in the intradermal injection site. The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibition of this degradation by the galloyl-containing compounds tannic acid, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), epicatechin gallate (ECG) and gallic acid (GA). A gel permeation chromatography assay was developed to quantitate the collagenase induced reductions in collagen molecular weight. The binding of the compounds to collagen was measured using HPLC. The stabilization of collagen was measured using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Tannic acid, EGCG and ECG (but not GA) were found to strongly inhibit collagen degradation at concentrations in the low micromolar range. The compounds bound strongly to collagen and stabilized collagen. It is concluded that tannic acid, EGCG and ECG bind to collagen via extensive hydrogen bonding augmented by some hydrophobic interactions and prevent the free access of collagenase to active sites on the collagen chains.

  9. Your Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Protect your hearing by wearing earplugs at loud music concerts and around noisy machinery, like in wood ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? What Is an Ear Infection? ...

  10. Ear wax

    MedlinePlus

    The ear canal is lined with hair follicles and glands that produce a waxy oil called cerumen. The wax will most ... Wax can build up and block the ear canal. Wax blockage is one of the most common ...

  11. Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... affects the middle ear and is called otitis media. The tubes inside the ears become clogged with fluid and mucus. This can affect hearing, because sound cannot get through all that fluid. If your child isn't old enough to say "My ear ...

  12. Super Ears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Stan

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students design, construct, and test "super ears" to investigate sound and hearing. Students work in groups of three and explore how the outer ear funnels sound waves to the inner ear and how human hearing compares to that of other animals. (NB)

  13. Angiotensin-II inhibitor (olmesartan)-induced collagenous sprue with resolution following discontinuation of drug.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jennifer A; Steephen, Anita; Lewin, Matthew

    2013-10-28

    Collagenous sprue (CS) is a pattern of small-bowel injury characterized histologically by marked villous blunting, intraepithelial lymphocytes, and thickened sub-epithelial collagen table. Clinically, patients present with diarrhea, abdominal pain, malabsorption, and weight loss. Gluten intolerance is the most common cause of villous blunting in the duodenum; however, in a recent case series by the Mayo Clinic, it has been reported that olmesartan can have a similar effect. In this case report, a 62-year-old female with a history of hypothyroidism and hypertension managed for several years with olmesartan presented with abdominal pain, weight loss, and nausea. Despite compliance to a gluten-free diet, the patient's symptoms worsened, losing 20 pounds in 3 wk. Endoscopy showed thickening, scalloping, and mosaiform changes of the duodenal mucosa. The biopsy showed CS characterized by complete villous atrophy, lymphocytosis, and thickened sub-epithelial collagen table. After 2 mo cessation of olmesartan, the patient's symptoms improved, and follow-up endoscopy was normal with complete villous regeneration. These findings suggest that olmesartan was a contributing factor in the etiology of this patient's CS. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of drug-induced CS and potential reversibility after discontinuation of medication. PMID:24187471

  14. Libby amphibole-induced mesothelial cell autoantibodies bind to surface plasminogen and alter collagen matrix remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Robert; Evilia, Caryn; Gilmer, John; Woods, Linda; Black, Brad; Flores, Raja; Pfau, Jean C

    2016-08-01

    Lamellar pleural thickening (LPT) is a fibrotic disease induced by exposure to Libby amphibole (LA) asbestos that causes widespread scarring around the lung, resulting in deterioration of pulmonary function. Investigating the effects of autoantibodies to mesothelial cells (MCAA) present in the study populations has been a major part of the effort to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis. It has been shown in vitro that human mesothelial cells (Met5a) exposed to MCAA increase collagen deposition into the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we sought to further elucidate how MCAA drive increased collagen deposition by identifying the protein targets bound by MCAA on the cellular surface using biotinylation to label and isolate surface proteins. Isolated surface protein fractions were identified as containing MCAA targets using ELISA The fractions that demonstrated binding by MCAA were then analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and MASCOT analysis. The most promising result from the MASCOT analysis, plasminogen (PLG), was tested for MCAA binding using purified human PLG in an ELISA We report that serum containing MCAA bound at an optical density (OD) 3 times greater than that of controls, and LA-exposed subjects had a high frequency of positive tests for anti-PLG autoantibodies. This work implicates the involvement of the plasminogen/plasmin system in the mechanism of excess collagen deposition in Met5a cells exposed to MCAA Elucidating this mechanism could contribute to the understanding of LPT. PMID:27519611

  15. Distinct roles of sphingosine kinase 1 and 2 in murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wen-Qi; Irwan, Anastasia Windy; Goh, Hong Heng; Melendez, Alirio J; McInnes, Iain B; Leung, Bernard P

    2009-08-01

    Sphingosine kinase (SphK) phosphorylates sphingosine into sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). S1P plays a critical role in angiogenesis, inflammation, and various pathologic conditions. To date, two mammalian isoenzymes, SphK1 and SphK2, have been identified. Although both SphK1 and SphK2 share overall homology and produce the common product, S1P, it has been proposed they display different unique and separate functions. In this study, we examined the role of SphK1 and SphK2 in a murine collagen-induced arthritis model by down-regulating each isoenzyme via specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). Prophylactic i.p. administration of SphK1 siRNA significantly reduced the incidence, disease severity, and articular inflammation compared with control siRNA recipients. Treatment of SphK1 siRNA also down-regulated serum levels of S1P, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and IgG2a anti-collagen Ab. Ex vivo analysis demonstrated significant suppression of collagen-specific proinflammatory/Th1 cytokine (IL-6, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma) release in SphK siRNA-treated mice. Interestingly, mice received with SphK2 siRNA develop more aggressive disease; higher serum levels of IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma; and proinflammatory cytokine production to collagen in vitro when compared with control siRNA recipients. Together, these results demonstrate the distinct immunomodulatory roles of SphK1 and SphK2 in the development of inflammatory arthritis by regulating the release of proinflammatory cytokines and T cell responses. These findings raise the possibility that drugs which specifically target SphK1 activity may play a beneficial role in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis.

  16. The Aminopeptidase CD13 Induces Homotypic Aggregation in Neutrophils and Impairs Collagen Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Fiddler, Christine A.; Parfrey, Helen; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Luo, Ding; Nash, Gerard B.; Murphy, Gillian; Chilvers, Edwin R.

    2016-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (CD13) is a widely expressed cell surface metallopeptidase involved in the migration of cancer and endothelial cells. Apart from our demonstration that CD13 modulates the efficacy of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis in neutrophils, no other function for CD13 has been ascribed in this cell. We hypothesized that CD13 may be involved in neutrophil migration and/or homotypic aggregation. Using purified human blood neutrophils we confirmed the expression of CD13 on neutrophils and its up-regulation by pro-inflammatory agonists. However, using the anti-CD13 monoclonal antibody WM-15 and the aminopeptidase enzymatic inhibitor bestatin we were unable to demonstrate any direct involvement of CD13 in neutrophil polarisation or chemotaxis. In contrast, IL-8-mediated neutrophil migration in type I collagen gels was significantly impaired by the anti-CD13 monoclonal antibodies WM-15 and MY7. Notably, these antibodies also induced significant homotypic aggregation of neutrophils, which was dependent on CD13 cross-linking and was attenuated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 inhibition. Live imaging demonstrated that in WM-15-treated neutrophils, where homotypic aggregation was evident, the number of cells entering IL-8 impregnated collagen I gels was significantly reduced. These data reveal a novel role for CD13 in inducing homotypic aggregation in neutrophils, which results in a transmigration deficiency; this mechanism may be relevant to neutrophil micro-aggregation in vivo. PMID:27467268

  17. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Christina D; Akama-Garren, Elliot H; Stein, Emily A; Petralia, Jacob D; Ruiz, Pedro J; Edalati, Abdolhossein; Lindstrom, Tamsin M; Robinson, William H

    2012-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune synovitis characterized by the formation of pannus and the destruction of cartilage and bone in the synovial joints. Although immune cells, which infiltrate the pannus and promote inflammation, play a prominent role in the pathogenesis of RA, other cell types also contribute. Proliferation of synovial fibroblasts, for example, underlies the formation of the pannus, while proliferation of endothelial cells results in neovascularization, which supports the growth of the pannus by supplying it with nutrients and oxygen. The synovial fibroblasts also promote inflammation in the synovium by producing cytokines and chemokines. Finally, osteoclasts cause the destruction of bone. In this study, we show that erlotinib, an inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), reduces the severity of established collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of RA, and that it does so by targeting synovial fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and osteoclasts. Erlotinib-induced attenuation of autoimmune arthritis was associated with a reduction in number of osteoclasts and blood vessels, and erlotinib inhibited the formation of murine osteoclasts and the proliferation of human endothelial cells in vitro. Erlotinib also inhibited the proliferation and cytokine production of human synovial fibroblasts in vitro. Moreover, EGFR was highly expressed and activated in the synovium of mice with collagen-induced arthritis and patients with RA. Taken together, these findings suggest that EGFR plays a central role in the pathogenesis of RA and that EGFR inhibition may provide benefits in the treatment of RA.

  18. STAT6-Dependent Collagen Synthesis in Human Fibroblasts Is Induced by Bovine Milk.

    PubMed

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Zöller, Nadja; Kleemann, Johannes; Müller, Jutta; Kaufmann, Roland; Hofmann, Matthias; Bernd, August; Meissner, Markus; Valesky, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Since the domestication of the urus, 10.000 years ago, mankind utilizes bovine milk for different purposes. Besides usage as a nutrient also the external application of milk on skin has a long tradition going back to at least the ancient Aegypt with Cleopatra VII as a great exponent. In order to test whether milk has impact on skin physiology, cultures of human skin fibroblasts were exposed to commercial bovine milk. Our data show significant induction of proliferation by milk (max. 2,3-fold, EC50: 2,5% milk) without toxic effects. Surprisingly, bovine milk was identified as strong inducer of collagen 1A1 synthesis at both, the protein (4-fold, EC50: 0,09% milk) and promoter level. Regarding the underlying molecular pathways, we show functional activation of STAT6 in a p44/42 and p38-dependent manner. More upstream, we identified IGF-1 and insulin as key factors responsible for milk-induced collagen synthesis. These findings show that bovine milk contains bioactive molecules that act on human skin cells. Therefore, it is tempting to test the herein introduced concept in treatment of atrophic skin conditions induced e.g. by UV light or corticosteroids.

  19. STAT6-Dependent Collagen Synthesis in Human Fibroblasts Is Induced by Bovine Milk

    PubMed Central

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Zöller, Nadja; Kleemann, Johannes; Müller, Jutta; Kaufmann, Roland; Hofmann, Matthias; Bernd, August; Meissner, Markus; Valesky, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Since the domestication of the urus, 10.000 years ago, mankind utilizes bovine milk for different purposes. Besides usage as a nutrient also the external application of milk on skin has a long tradition going back to at least the ancient Aegypt with Cleopatra VII as a great exponent. In order to test whether milk has impact on skin physiology, cultures of human skin fibroblasts were exposed to commercial bovine milk. Our data show significant induction of proliferation by milk (max. 2,3-fold, EC50: 2,5% milk) without toxic effects. Surprisingly, bovine milk was identified as strong inducer of collagen 1A1 synthesis at both, the protein (4-fold, EC50: 0,09% milk) and promoter level. Regarding the underlying molecular pathways, we show functional activation of STAT6 in a p44/42 and p38-dependent manner. More upstream, we identified IGF-1 and insulin as key factors responsible for milk-induced collagen synthesis. These findings show that bovine milk contains bioactive molecules that act on human skin cells. Therefore, it is tempting to test the herein introduced concept in treatment of atrophic skin conditions induced e.g. by UV light or corticosteroids. PMID:26134630

  20. STAT6-Dependent Collagen Synthesis in Human Fibroblasts Is Induced by Bovine Milk.

    PubMed

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Zöller, Nadja; Kleemann, Johannes; Müller, Jutta; Kaufmann, Roland; Hofmann, Matthias; Bernd, August; Meissner, Markus; Valesky, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Since the domestication of the urus, 10.000 years ago, mankind utilizes bovine milk for different purposes. Besides usage as a nutrient also the external application of milk on skin has a long tradition going back to at least the ancient Aegypt with Cleopatra VII as a great exponent. In order to test whether milk has impact on skin physiology, cultures of human skin fibroblasts were exposed to commercial bovine milk. Our data show significant induction of proliferation by milk (max. 2,3-fold, EC50: 2,5% milk) without toxic effects. Surprisingly, bovine milk was identified as strong inducer of collagen 1A1 synthesis at both, the protein (4-fold, EC50: 0,09% milk) and promoter level. Regarding the underlying molecular pathways, we show functional activation of STAT6 in a p44/42 and p38-dependent manner. More upstream, we identified IGF-1 and insulin as key factors responsible for milk-induced collagen synthesis. These findings show that bovine milk contains bioactive molecules that act on human skin cells. Therefore, it is tempting to test the herein introduced concept in treatment of atrophic skin conditions induced e.g. by UV light or corticosteroids. PMID:26134630

  1. Effect of (3,5,6-trimethylpyrazin-2-yl)methyl 2-[4-(2-methylpropyl)phenyl]propanoate (ITE), a newly developed anti-inflammatory drug, on type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tao; Cao, Ying-Lin; Xu, Bei-Bei; Zhou, Xiao-Mian

    2004-06-01

    The effect of (3,5,6-trimethylpyrazin-2-yl)methyl 2-[4-(2-methylpropyl)phenyl]propanoate (ITE) on type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis in mice was studied. Mice were immunized twice with CII, ITE being given orally once a day for 40 d after the 1st immunization. Clinical assessment showed that ITE had no effect on the day of onset of arthritis but did lowered the incidence rate of arthritis and the arthritis score. And ITE had a marked suppressive effect on the mouse hind paw edema induced by CII. ITE suppressed the delayed-type mouse ear skin reaction to CII but had no effect on the level of serum anti-CII antibodies. These results suggest that ITE inhibits the development of CII-induced arthritis in mice by suppressing delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII.

  2. Murine CMV-Induced Hearing Loss Is Associated with Inner Ear Inflammation and Loss of Spiral Ganglia Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Golemac, Mijo; Pugel, Ester Pernjak; Jonjic, Stipan; Britt, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) occurs in 0.5–1% of live births and approximately 10% of infected infants develop hearing loss. The mechanism(s) of hearing loss remain unknown. We developed a murine model of CMV induced hearing loss in which murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection of newborn mice leads to hematogenous spread of virus to the inner ear, induction of inflammatory responses, and hearing loss. Characteristics of the hearing loss described in infants with congenital HCMV infection were observed including, delayed onset, progressive hearing loss, and unilateral hearing loss in this model and, these characteristics were viral inoculum dependent. Viral antigens were present in the inner ear as were CD3+ mononuclear cells in the spiral ganglion and stria vascularis. Spiral ganglion neuron density was decreased after infection, thus providing a mechanism for hearing loss. The lack of significant inner ear histopathology and persistence of inflammation in cochlea of mice with hearing loss raised the possibility that inflammation was a major component of the mechanism(s) of hearing loss in MCMV infected mice. PMID:25875183

  3. Influence of Term of Exposure to High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity on Myocardial Collagen Type I and III

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Danielle Cristina Tomaz; Lima-Leopoldo, Ana Paula; Leopoldo, André Soares; de Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé; do Nascimento, André Ferreira; de Oliveira, Sílvio Assis; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is a risk factor for many medical complications; medical research has shown that hemodynamic, morphological and functional abnormalities are correlated with the duration and severity of obesity. Objective Present study determined the influence of term of exposure to high-fat diet-induced obesity on myocardial collagen type I and III. Methods Thirty-day-old male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into two groups: a control (C) group fed a standard rat chow and an obese (Ob) group alternately fed one of four palatable high-fat diets. Each diet was changed daily, and the rats were maintained on their respective diets for 15 (C15 and Ob15) and 30 (C30 and Ob30) consecutive weeks. Obesity was determined by adiposity index. Results The Ob15 group was similar to the C15 group regarding the expression of myocardial collagen type I; however, expression in the Ob30 group was less than C30 group. The time of exposure to obesity was associated with a reduction in collagen type I in Ob30 when compared with Ob15. Obesity did not affect collagen type III expression. Conclusion This study showed that the time of exposure to obesity for 30 weeks induced by unsaturated high-fat diet caused a reduction in myocardial collagen type I expression in the obese rats. However, no effect was seen on myocardial collagen type III expression. PMID:24676371

  4. Bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the external ear canal: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Froelich, K; Radeloff, A; Köhler, C; Mlynski, R; Müller, J; Hagen, R; Kleinsasser, N H

    2011-08-01

    In 2003, osteonecrosis of the jaw was described as an intraoral complication of bisphosphonate therapy. More recently, cases of avascular necrosis of the hip were reported in patients with long-lasting bisphosphonate therapy. Thus, it was the aim of the present study to analyze cases of benign osteonecrosis of the external ear canal and to retrospectively identify a possible relationship to long-lasting bisphosphonate therapy. 13 patients with osteonecrosis of the external ear canal operated on between 2005 and 2009 were included. Patient histories were reviewed for possible previous or current bisphosphonate therapy. Three patients with osteonecrosis of the external ear canal and long-term bisphosphonate therapy could be identified. They had been treated either for breast cancer or multiple myeloma. Certainly, the jaw is an area of increased risk for developing osteonecrosis with its high mechanical stress and intraoral bacterial flora. However, osteonecrosis of the hips and the external ear canal in patients receiving long-term bisphosphonate therapy necessitate further investigation of a possible systemic, bisphosphonate-related phenomenon. PMID:21327733

  5. Human-induced contaminant impacts on migratory birds: lessons from the North American eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sladky, Kurt K.; Quist, Charlotte; Ramirez, Pedro; Hill, David; Dein, F. Joshua

    2003-01-01

    The effects of aquatic contaminants generated by soda ash mining processes on the North American eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis) population illustrates important issues associated with human-induced habitat degradation on the health of migratory species. Eared grebes have been extensively studied in their staging and breeding habitats, but little is known about their 2- to 3-day migratory periods. During migration, few bodies of water are available to the birds for refuge between freshwater breeding areas in Canada and hypersaline lakes (e.g., Great Salt Lake in Utah or Mono Lake in California) to which they migrate. One geographic refuge area includes a series of "tailings" ponds associated with soda ash mining operations in southwestern Wyoming. The ponds range from 100-1200 acres, with water containing high concentrations of sodium decahydrate (Na2CO3•10H2O). At cool temperatures (generally < 40°F) sodium decahydrate precipitates out of the water and crystallizes on solid objects in the ponds or on the water surface. Bird mortality on these ponds has been recognized since the early 1970's, and the mining companies have developed hazing strategies and rehabilitation programs in order to minimize mortality. In order to determine causes of grebe mortality and devise strategies to reduce mortality, a field epidemiologic investigation was developed with the following objectives: 1) to determine whether eared grebes have quantifiable physiologic abnormalities associated with exposure to soda ash mine pond water; 2) to evaluate physical effects of sodium decahydrate crystallization on grebe survival; 3) to establish cause of death based on necropsy of deceased grebes; 4) to determine long-term survivability of eared grebes after exposure to the pond water; and 5) to evaluate water quality and determine whether aquatic invertebrates are present in the ponds as a possible food source.

  6. NLRP3 Inflammasome Plays an Important Role in the Pathogenesis of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Zheng, Yi; Li, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between NLRP3 and the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis. Methods. We used the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. The mice were divided into two groups: the model group (CIA, n = 16) and the control group (Normal, n = 8). The mice were sacrificed seven weeks after immunization. The arthritis score and imaging evaluation (X-rays, Micro-CT, and MRI) were performed. Synovial tissue NLRP3 expression and peripheral blood cytokine levels were analyzed. Results. The arthritis score (6.00 ± 2.52), imaging score (4.63 ± 0.92), and synovial tissue NLRP3 expression (4.00 ± 2.03) significantly increased in the CIA mice. The expression of synovial NLRP3 was positively correlated with arthritis clinical and radiographic scores (r = 0.792 and r = 0.669, resp.). Conclusions. The synovial NLRP3 expression increased at the early onset of RA. Synovial NLRP3 expression level was correlated with the clinical arthritis severity and extent of radiological destruction, suggesting that NLRP3 is involved in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:27034595

  7. Collagen-Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds Induce Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells Osteogenic Differentiation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fabbi, Claudia; Figallo, Elisa; Lo Furno, Debora; Gulino, Rosario; Colarossi, Cristina; Fullone, Francesco; Giuffrida, Rosario; Parenti, Rosalba; Memeo, Lorenzo; Forte, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play a crucial role in regulating normal skeletal homeostasis and, in case of injury, in bone healing and reestablishment of skeletal integrity. Recent scientific literature is focused on the development of bone regeneration models where MSCs are combined with biomimetic three-dimensional scaffolds able to direct MSC osteogenesis. In this work the osteogenic potential of human MSCs isolated from adipose tissue (hADSCs) has been evaluated in vitro in combination with collagen/Mg doped hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Results demonstrate the high osteogenic potential of hADSCs when cultured in specific differentiation induction medium, as revealed by the Alizarin Red S staining and gene expression profile analysis. In combination with collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffold, hADSCs differentiate into mature osteoblasts even in the absence of specific inducing factors; nevertheless, the supplement of the factors markedly accelerates the osteogenic process, as confirmed by the expression of specific markers of pre-osteoblast and mature osteoblast stages, such as osterix, osteopontin (also known as bone sialoprotein I), osteocalcin and specific markers of extracellular matrix maturation and mineralization stages, such as ALPL and osteonectin. Hence, the present work demonstrates that the scaffold per se is able to induce hADSCs differentiation, while the addition of osteo-inductive factors produces a significant acceleration of the osteogenic process. This observation makes the use of our model potentially interesting in the field of regenerative medicine for the treatment of bone defects. PMID:26982592

  8. Inhibition by Artocarpus tonkinensis of the development of collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ngoc, D D T; Catrina, A I; Lundberg, K; Harris, H E; Ha, N T; Anh, P T; Larsson, P

    2005-03-01

    Extracts of the leaves and roots from the tree Artocarpus tonkinensis A Cheval (family Moraceae) are used in traditional Vietnamese medicine in order to treat backache as well as rheumatic joint diseases. We prepared an ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extract from this plant and tested its anti-inflammatory properties in an experimental arthritis model, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in Dark Agouti rats by means of immunization with collagen type II (CII) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Starting at the day of immunization, the rats were treated daily with intraperitoneal injections of Artocarpus extract. Arthritis progression was measured by means of clinical scoring of paws and anti-CII antibody titres were measured by means of ELISA. In vitro, lymph node (LN) cell cultures were treated with Artocarpus extract and the apoptosis-inducing effect was determined with FACS staining by using annexin V and propidium iodide as well as the TUNEL method. Treatment of the rats with Artocarpus extract decreased arthritis incidence and severity and delayed disease onset. When treatment was started after the onset of arthritis, a tendency towards arthritis amelioration was observed. In vitro, Artocarpus extract acted as a T-cell modulator, inhibiting mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis of activated LN-derived lymphocytes. Thus, we have demonstrated that an EtOAc extract of Artocarpus, a plant traditionally used in Vietnamese folk medicine for treating arthritic conditions, has beneficial effects in an experimental arthritis model. This effect is likely to be T cell-dependent and mediated through apoptosis induction in activated cells.

  9. Exacerbation of collagen induced arthritis by Fcγ receptor targeted collagen peptide due to enhanced inflammatory chemokine and cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Szarka, Eszter; Neer, Zsuzsa; Balogh, Péter; Ádori, Monika; Angyal, Adrienn; Prechl, József; Kiss, Endre; Kövesdi, Dorottya; Sármay, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies specific for bovine type II collagen (CII) and Fcγ receptors play a major role in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our aim was to clarify the mechanism of immune complex-mediated inflammation and modulation of the disease. CII pre-immunized DBA/1 mice were intravenously boosted with extravidin coupled biotinylated monomeric CII-peptide epitope (ARGLTGRPGDA) and its complexes with biotinylated FcγRII/III specific single chain Fv (scFv) fragment. Disease scores were monitored, antibody titers and cytokines were determined by ELISA, and binding of complexes was detected by flow cytometry and immune histochemistry. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was monitored by protein profiler microarray. When intravenously administered into collagen-primed DBA/1 mice, both CII-peptide and its complex with 2.4G2 scFv significantly accelerated CIA and increased the severity of the disease, whereas the monomeric peptide and monomeric 2.4G2 scFv had no effect. FcγRII/III targeted CII-peptide complexes bound to marginal zone macrophages and dendritic cells, and significantly elevated the synthesis of peptide-specific IgG2a. Furthermore, CII-peptide containing complexes augmented the in vivo secretion of cytokines, including IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, IL-23, and chemokines (CXCL13, MIP-1, MIP-2). These data indicate that complexes formed by the CII-peptide epitope aggravate CIA by inducing the secretion of chemokines and the IL-12/23 family of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these results suggest that the in vivo emerging immune complexes formed with autoantigen(s) may trigger the IL-12/23 dependent pathways, escalating the inflammation in RA. Thus blockade of these cytokines may be beneficial to downregulate immune complex-induced inflammation in autoimmune arthritis. PMID:22532778

  10. Exacerbation of collagen induced arthritis by Fcγ receptor targeted collagen peptide due to enhanced inflammatory chemokine and cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Szarka, Eszter; Neer, Zsuzsa; Balogh, Péter; Adori, Monika; Angyal, Adrienn; Prechl, József; Kiss, Endre; Kövesdi, Dorottya; Sármay, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies specific for bovine type II collagen (CII) and Fcγ receptors play a major role in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our aim was to clarify the mechanism of immune complex-mediated inflammation and modulation of the disease. CII pre-immunized DBA/1 mice were intravenously boosted with extravidin coupled biotinylated monomeric CII-peptide epitope (ARGLTGRPGDA) and its complexes with biotinylated FcγRII/III specific single chain Fv (scFv) fragment. Disease scores were monitored, antibody titers and cytokines were determined by ELISA, and binding of complexes was detected by flow cytometry and immune histochemistry. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was monitored by protein profiler microarray. When intravenously administered into collagen-primed DBA/1 mice, both CII-peptide and its complex with 2.4G2 scFv significantly accelerated CIA and increased the severity of the disease, whereas the monomeric peptide and monomeric 2.4G2 scFv had no effect. FcγRII/III targeted CII-peptide complexes bound to marginal zone macrophages and dendritic cells, and significantly elevated the synthesis of peptide-specific IgG2a. Furthermore, CII-peptide containing complexes augmented the in vivo secretion of cytokines, including IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, IL-23, and chemokines (CXCL13, MIP-1, MIP-2). These data indicate that complexes formed by the CII-peptide epitope aggravate CIA by inducing the secretion of chemokines and the IL-12/23 family of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these results suggest that the in vivo emerging immune complexes formed with autoantigen(s) may trigger the IL-12/23 dependent pathways, escalating the inflammation in RA. Thus blockade of these cytokines may be beneficial to downregulate immune complex-induced inflammation in autoimmune arthritis. PMID:22532778

  11. The Preventive Effects of Nanopowdered Peanut Sprout-added Caciocavallo Cheese on Collagen-induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoon Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (NPCC) on the prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in DBA/IJ mice immunized with type II collagen. After the induction of arthritis, the mice were being divided into five groups: (1) normal, no immunization; (2) CIA, collagen-induced arthritis; (3) MTX, collagen-induced arthritis treated with methotrexate (0.3 mg/kg body weight); (4) CC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d); (5) NPCC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d). Nanopowdered peanut sprout was ranged from 300 to 350 nm, while regular powdered peanut sprouts were ranged from 50 to 150 μm. The NPCC group had considerable reductions of clinical scores and paw thicknesses at the end of experiment as compared to the CIA group. In the serum analysis, the TNF-α, IL-1β, IL- 6 and IgG1 levels in the NPCC group have decreased by 69.4, 75.9, 66.6, and 61.9%, respectively, when compared to the CIA group. The histological score and spleen index of the NPCC group were significantly lower than the CIA group. In conclusion, the feeding NPCC method could delay and/or prevent the rheumatoid arthritis in the collagen-induced arthritis mouse model. Based on this study, nanopowdered peanut sprouts could be applied to various functional cheeses. PMID:26760745

  12. Freeze-thaw induced biomechanical changes in arteries: role of collagen matrix and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubramanian, Ramji T; Wolkers, Wim F; Shenoi, Mithun M; Barocas, Victor H; Lafontaine, Daniel; Soule, Charles L; Iaizzo, Paul A; Bischof, John C

    2010-03-01

    thermal stability (approximately 4.8 degrees C increase in denaturation onset), 0.1 M mannitol treatment did not result in any significant change. Both 0.1 and 0.2 M treatments caused no change in SMC function. Finally, freeze-thaw (506+/-159 kPa), hyperthermia (268+/-132 kPa) and 0.2 M mannitol (304+/-125 kPa) treatments all caused significant increase in the physiological elastic modulus (Eartery) compared to control (185+/-92 kPa) with the freeze-thaw resulting in the highest modulus. These studies suggest that changes in collagen matrix arrangement due to dehydration as well as SMC destruction occurring during freeze-thaw are important mechanisms of freeze-thaw induced biomechanical changes.

  13. Homocysteine Induces Collagen I Expression by Downregulating Histone Methyltransferase G9a

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wenjing; Long, Yanjun; Li, Shuang; Liu, Ze; Zhu, Fengxin; Hou, Fan Fan; Nie, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) leads to several clinical manifestations including hepatic fibrosis. Excess deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) components including collagen is the eponymous lesion of liver fibrosis. In this study, we demonstrated that elevated concentration of Hcy induced the expression of collagen type I in cultured human liver cells as well as in liver tissue of HHcy mice. Meanwhile, Hcy inhibited the expression of histone methyltransferase G9a. Mechanistically, silencing endogenous G9a by siRNA enhanced the promoter activity of COL1A1 in LO2 cells. Conversely, overexpressing G9a inhibited the promoter activity of COL1A1. CHIP assay demonstrated that G9a binds to the neuron-restrictive silencer element (NRSE) on the promoter of COL1A1. Hcy treatment decreased the binding of G9a on NRSE, which in turn decreased the level of H3K9me2 on the promoter of COL1A1, led to upregulation of COL1A1. Taken together, these results provide a novel mechanism on explaining how HHcy promotes ECM production. PMID:26192994

  14. Adiponectin exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis via enhancing Th17 response and prompting RANKL expression.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoxuan; Feng, Xiaoke; Tan, Wenfeng; Lin, Na; Hua, Minhui; Wei, Yu; Wang, Fang; Li, Ningli; Zhang, Miaojia

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported adiponectin (AD) is highly expressed in the inflamed synovial joint tissue and correlates closely with progressive bone erosion in Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Here, we investigate the role of adiponectin in regulating Th17 response and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) in mice with CIA mice by intraarticularly injection of adiponectin into knee joints on day 17, day 20 and day 23 post first collagen immunization. The increased adiponectin expression was found in inflamed joint tissue of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Adiponectin injection resulted in an earlier onset of arthritis, an aggravated arthritic progression, more severe synovial hyperplasia, bone erosion and osteoporosis in CIA mice. CD4(+)IL-17(+) Th17 cells, IL-17 mRNA and RANKL mRNA expression were markedly increased in the joint tissue of adiponectin treated CIA mice. Moreover, adiponectin treatment markedly enhanced Th17 cell generation from naive CD4(+) T cells in vitro, which accompanied by the high expression of Th17 transcription factor ROR-γt, and Th17 cytokine genes included IL-22 and IL-23. This study reveals a novel effect of adiponectin in exacerbating CIA progression by enhancing Th17 cell response and RANKL expression. PMID:26063682

  15. The role of lipopolysaccharide injected systemically in the reactivation of collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Shin; Ohsawa, Motoyasu

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the role of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the reactivation of autoimmune disease by using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice in which autoimmunity to the joint cartilage component type II collagen (CII) was involved.CIA was induced by immunization with CII emulsified with complete Freund's adjuvant at the base of the tail (day 0) followed by a booster injection on day 21. Varying doses of LPS from E. coli were i.p. injected on day 50.Arthritis began to develop on day 25 after immunization with CII and reached a peak on day 35. Thereafter, arthritis subsided gradually but moderate joint inflammation was still observed on day 50. An i.p. injection of LPS on day 50 markedly reactivated arthritis on a dose-related fashion. Histologically, on day 55, there were marked oedema of synovium which had proliferated by the day of LPS injection, new formation of fibrin, and intense infiltration of neutrophils accompanied with a large number of mononuclear cells. The reactivation of CIA by LPS was associated with increases in anti-CII IgG and IgG2a antibodies as well as various cytokines including IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α. LPS from S. enteritidis, S. typhimurium, and K. neumoniae and its component, lipid A from E. coli also reactivated the disease. Polymyxin B sulphate suppressed LPS- or lipid A-induced reactivation of CIA.These results suggest that LPS may play an important role in the reactivation of autoimmune joint inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis in humans. PMID:10742285

  16. Keratocytes are induced to produce collagen type II: A new strategy for in vivo corneal matrix regeneration.

    PubMed

    Greene, Carol Ann; Green, Colin R; Dickinson, Michelle E; Johnson, Virginia; Sherwin, Trevor

    2016-09-10

    The stroma, the middle layer of the cornea, is a connective tissue making up most of the corneal thickness. The stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of highly organised lamellae which are made up of tightly packed fibrils primarily composed of collagens type I and V. This layer is interspersed with keratocytes, mesenchymal cells of neural crest origin. We have previously shown that adult corneal keratocytes exhibit phenotypic plasticity and can be induced into a neuronal phenotype. In the current study we evaluated the potential of keratocytes to produce collagen type II via phenotypic reprogramming with exogenous chondrogenic factors. The cornea presents a challenge to tissue engineers owing to its high level of organisation and the phenotypic instability of keratocytes. Traditional approaches based on a scar model do not support the engineering of functional stromal tissue. Type II collagen is not found in the adult cornea but is reported to be expressed during corneal development, raising the possibility of using such an approach to regenerate the corneal ECM. Keratocytes in culture and within intact normal and diseased tissue were induced to produce collagen type II upon treatment with transforming growth factor Beta3 (TGFβ3) and dexamethasone. In vivo treatment of rat corneas also resulted in collagen type II deposition and a threefold increase in corneal hardness and elasticity. Furthermore, the treatment of corneas and subsequent deposition of collagen type II did not cause opacity, fibrosis or scarring. The induction of keratocytes with specific exogenous factors and resulting deposition of type II collagen in the stroma can potentially be controlled by withdrawal of the factors. This might be a promising new approach for in vivo corneal regeneration strategies aimed at increasing corneal integrity in diseases associated with weakened ectatic corneal tissue such as keratoconus.

  17. Keratocytes are induced to produce collagen type II: A new strategy for in vivo corneal matrix regeneration.

    PubMed

    Greene, Carol Ann; Green, Colin R; Dickinson, Michelle E; Johnson, Virginia; Sherwin, Trevor

    2016-09-10

    The stroma, the middle layer of the cornea, is a connective tissue making up most of the corneal thickness. The stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of highly organised lamellae which are made up of tightly packed fibrils primarily composed of collagens type I and V. This layer is interspersed with keratocytes, mesenchymal cells of neural crest origin. We have previously shown that adult corneal keratocytes exhibit phenotypic plasticity and can be induced into a neuronal phenotype. In the current study we evaluated the potential of keratocytes to produce collagen type II via phenotypic reprogramming with exogenous chondrogenic factors. The cornea presents a challenge to tissue engineers owing to its high level of organisation and the phenotypic instability of keratocytes. Traditional approaches based on a scar model do not support the engineering of functional stromal tissue. Type II collagen is not found in the adult cornea but is reported to be expressed during corneal development, raising the possibility of using such an approach to regenerate the corneal ECM. Keratocytes in culture and within intact normal and diseased tissue were induced to produce collagen type II upon treatment with transforming growth factor Beta3 (TGFβ3) and dexamethasone. In vivo treatment of rat corneas also resulted in collagen type II deposition and a threefold increase in corneal hardness and elasticity. Furthermore, the treatment of corneas and subsequent deposition of collagen type II did not cause opacity, fibrosis or scarring. The induction of keratocytes with specific exogenous factors and resulting deposition of type II collagen in the stroma can potentially be controlled by withdrawal of the factors. This might be a promising new approach for in vivo corneal regeneration strategies aimed at increasing corneal integrity in diseases associated with weakened ectatic corneal tissue such as keratoconus. PMID:27539660

  18. Identification of a major quantitative trait locus for ear size induced by space flight in sweet corn.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y T; Li, G K; Yang, Z L; Hu, J G; Zheng, J R; Qi, X T

    2014-01-01

    The development of molecular markers has contributed to progress in identifying the gene(s) responsible for favorable variations in maize studies. In this study, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was conducted using simple sequence repeat markers in an F2 sweet corn population from a cross between parental line 1132 and space flight-induced mutant line 751 to identify the loci contributing to an increase in some yield traits. A primary mutated genomic region was located on chromosome 9. In total, 26 QTL were detected for eight yield-related traits and assembled into three clusters on chromosome 9. The largest QTL cluster at bin 9.02/03, primarily contributing to >10% of the phenotypic variation in ear and cob diameters, was likely due to a major QTL. Desired alleles of these QTL were provided by the mutant line 751. The primary action of the major mutant allele was an additive effect. Another mutant locus, which was induced in bin 9.01, increased cob and ear diameters by dominant genetic action. PMID:24782164

  19. Collagen Induces Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells by Signaling through Osteoclast-Associated Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Heidi S.; Nitze, Louise M.; Zeuthen, Louise H.; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J.; Hamilton, John A.; Berchtold, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB–dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR–collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs. PMID:25725106

  20. Collagen induces maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by signaling through osteoclast-associated receptor.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Heidi S; Nitze, Louise M; Zeuthen, Louise H; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Hamilton, John A; Berchtold, Martin W; Panina, Svetlana

    2015-04-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB-dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR-collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs.

  1. Epithelial derived CTGF promotes breast tumor progression via inducing EMT and collagen I fibers deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Sheng, Jianting; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Jiyong; Cui, Kemi; Chang, Jenny; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Interactions among tumor cells, stromal cells, and extracellular matrix compositions are mediated through cytokines during tumor progression. Our analysis of 132 known cytokines and growth factors in published clinical breast cohorts and our 84 patient-derived xenograft models revealed that the elevated connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in tumor epithelial cells significantly correlated with poor clinical prognosis and outcomes. CTGF was able to induce tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and promote stroma deposition of collagen I fibers to stimulate tumor growth and metastasis. This process was mediated through CTGF-tumor necrosis factor receptor I (TNFR1)-IκB autocrine signaling. Drug treatments targeting CTGF, TNFR1, and IκB signaling each prohibited the EMT and tumor progression. PMID:26318291

  2. Anti-arthritic effect of eugenol on collagen-induced arthritis experimental model.

    PubMed

    Grespan, Renata; Paludo, Marcia; Lemos, Henrique de Paula; Barbosa, Carmem Patrícia; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Dalalio, Marcia Machado de Oliveira; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to test the efficacy of eugenol, a compound obtained from the essential oil of cloves (Syzygium aromaticum) in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a well characterized murine model of rheumatoid arthritis. Macroscopic clinical evidence of CIA manifests first as periarticular erythema and edema in the hind paws. Treatment with eugenol starting at the onset of arthritis (day 25) ameliorated these clinical signs of CIA. Furthermore, eugenol inhibited mononuclear cell infiltration into the knee joints of arthritic mice and also lowered the levels of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor growth factor (TGF)-β) within the ankle joints. Eugenol treatment did not affect the in vitro cell viability as assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Therefore, eugenol ameliorates experimental arthritis and could be useful as a beneficial supplement in treating human arthritis. PMID:23037170

  3. Vascular pentraxin 3 controls arterial thrombosis by targeting collagen and fibrinogen induced platelets aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Bonacina, F.; Barbieri, S.S.; Cutuli, L.; Amadio, P.; Doni, A.; Sironi, M.; Tartari, S.; Mantovani, A.; Bottazzi, B.; Garlanda, C.; Tremoli, E.; Catapano, A.L.; Norata, G.D.

    2016-01-01

    Aim The long pentraxin PTX3 plays a non-redundant role during acute myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis and in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling during vascular injury, clotting and fibrin deposition. The aim of this work is to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective role of PTX3 during arterial thrombosis. Methods and results PTX3 KO mice transplanted with bone marrow from WT or PTX3 KO mice presented a significant reduction in carotid artery blood flow following FeCl3 induced arterial thrombosis (− 80.36 ± 11.5% and − 95.53 ± 4.46%), while in WT mice transplanted with bone marrow from either WT or PTX3 KO mice, the reduction was less dramatic (− 45.55 ± 1.37% and − 53.39 ± 9.8%), thus pointing to a protective effect independent of a hematopoietic cell's derived PTX3. By using P-selectin/PTX3 double KO mice, we further excluded a role for P-selectin, a target of PTX3 released by neutrophils, in vascular protection played by PTX3. In agreement with a minor role for hematopoietic cell-derived PTX3, platelet activation (assessed by flow cytometric expression of markers of platelet activation) was similar in PTX3 KO and WT mice as were haemostatic properties. Histological analysis indicated that PTX3 localizes within the thrombus and the vessel wall, and specific experiments with the N-terminal and the C-terminal PTX3 domain showed the ability of PTX3 to selectively dampen either fibrinogen or collagen induced platelet adhesion and aggregation. Conclusion PTX3 interacts with fibrinogen and collagen and, by dampening their pro-thrombotic effects, plays a protective role during arterial thrombosis. PMID:26976330

  4. Therapeutic effect of dioscin on collagen-induced arthritis through reduction of Th1/Th2.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yachun; Xing, Enhong; Song, Hongru; Feng, Guiying; Liang, Xiujun; An, Gao; Zhao, Xiaofei; Wang, Mi

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the therapeutic effect of dioscin on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Mice model of CIA was induced by chicken collagen II and arthritis index was assessed. After suspension of dioscin (100mg/kg/d) or triptolide was intragastrically administered, the left paw swelling and body weight of each mouse were measured. Then tissue samples were assayed by histopathological analysis. The levels of Th1 and Th2 were detected by flow cytometry. The expression of p-STAT1, p-STAT4 and p-STAT6 was demonstrated by western blot analysis, and T-bet and GATA-3 expression was detected by RT-PCR. The paw swelling and arthritis index were decreased and body weight was increased in the high dose of dioscin group compared to the model group (P<0.05). Histopathological analysis revealed that the damage of synovium tissue in dioscin and triptolide group alleviated. The ratio of Th1/Th2 in the dioscin group (0.82±0.24) and triptolide group (0.99±0.44) was lower than that in the model group (1.84±0.70, P<0.05). Additionally, p-STAT4 expression was decreased, and both p-STAT6 and GATA3 expression was increased in the dioscin group than that in the model group (P<0.05). Dioscin might have some therapeutic effects on CIA through regulating the proportion of Th1/Th2 cells, which could reduce the expression of p-STAT4, increase the expression of p-STAT6 and GATA3 in the synovial tissue. PMID:27449327

  5. Betahistine attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis by suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 cell responses.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kuo-Tung; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Der-Yuan; Lim, Yun-Ping; Chen, Yi-Ming; Li, Yi-Rong; Yang, Deng-Ho; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic effects of betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. CIA was induced in DBA/1 male mice by primary immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml chicken type II collagen (CII) mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in an 1:1 ratio, and booster immunization with 100μl of emulsion containing 2mg/ml CII mixed with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) in an 1:1 ratio. Immunization was performed subcutaneously at the base of the tail. After being boosted on day 21, betahistine (1 and 5mg/kg) was orally administered daily for 2weeks. The severity of CIA was determined by arthritic scores and assessment of histopathological joint destruction. Expression of cytokines in the paw and anti-CII antibodies in the serum was evaluated by ELISA. The proliferative response against CII in the lymph node cells was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. The frequencies of different CII specific CD4(+) T cell subsets in the lymph node were determined by flow-cytometric analysis. Betahistine treatment attenuated the severity of arthritis and reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-23 and IL-17A, in the paw tissues of CIA mice. Lymph node cells from betahistine-treated mice showed a decrease in proliferation, as well as a lower frequency of Th17 cells. In vitro, betahistine suppressed CD4(+) T cell differentiation into Th17 cells. These results indicate that betahistine is effective in suppressing both inflammatory and Th17 responses in mouse CIA and that it may have therapeutic value as an adjunct treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27494687

  6. Tacrolimus (FK506) prevents early stages of ethanol induced hepatic fibrosis by targeting LARP6 dependent mechanism of collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Manojlovic, Zarko; Blackmon, John; Stefanovic, Branko

    2013-01-01

    Tacrolimus (FK506) is a widely used immunosuppressive drug. Its effects on hepatic fibrosis have been controversial and attributed to immunosuppression. We show that in vitro FK506, inhibited synthesis of type I collagen polypeptides, without affecting expression of collagen mRNAs. In vivo, administration of FK506 at a dose of 4 mg/kg completely prevented development of alcohol/carbon tetrachloride induced liver fibrosis in rats. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) was absent in the FK506 treated livers and expression of collagen α2(I) mRNA was at normal levels. Collagen α1(I) mRNA was increased in the FK506 treated livers, but this mRNA was not translated into α1(I) polypeptide. No significant inflammation was associated with the fibrosis model used. FK506 binding protein 3 (FKBP3) is one of cellular proteins which binds FK506 with high affinity. We discovered that FKBP3 interacts with LARP6 and LARP6 is the major regulator of translation and stability of collagen mRNAs. In the presence of FK506 the interaction between FKBP3 and LARP6 is weakened and so is the pull down of collagen mRNAs with FKBP3. We postulate that FK506 inactivates FKBP3 and that lack of interaction of LARP6 and FKBP3 results in aberrant translation of collagen mRNAs and prevention of fibrosis. This is the first report of such activity of FK506 and may renew the interest in using this drug to alleviate hepatic fibrosis.

  7. Tacrolimus (FK506) Prevents Early Stages of Ethanol Induced Hepatic Fibrosis by Targeting LARP6 Dependent Mechanism of Collagen Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Manojlovic, Zarko; Blackmon, John; Stefanovic, Branko

    2013-01-01

    Tacrolimus (FK506) is a widely used immunosuppressive drug. Its effects on hepatic fibrosis have been controversial and attributed to immunosuppression. We show that in vitro FK506, inhibited synthesis of type I collagen polypeptides, without affecting expression of collagen mRNAs. In vivo, administration of FK506 at a dose of 4 mg/kg completely prevented development of alcohol/carbon tetrachloride induced liver fibrosis in rats. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) was absent in the FK506 treated livers and expression of collagen α2(I) mRNA was at normal levels. Collagen α1(I) mRNA was increased in the FK506 treated livers, but this mRNA was not translated into α1(I) polypeptide. No significant inflammation was associated with the fibrosis model used. FK506 binding protein 3 (FKBP3) is one of cellular proteins which binds FK506 with high affinity. We discovered that FKBP3 interacts with LARP6 and LARP6 is the major regulator of translation and stability of collagen mRNAs. In the presence of FK506 the interaction between FKBP3 and LARP6 is weakened and so is the pull down of collagen mRNAs with FKBP3. We postulate that FK506 inactivates FKBP3 and that lack of interaction of LARP6 and FKBP3 results in aberrant translation of collagen mRNAs and prevention of fibrosis. This is the first report of such activity of FK506 and may renew the interest in using this drug to alleviate hepatic fibrosis. PMID:23755290

  8. Chemically Modified Interleukin-6 Aptamer Inhibits Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Cynomolgus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Ikuo; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Tomoki; Sumida, Shun-ichiro; Ibaragi, Shigeru; Kasai, Hayato; Horai, Naoto; Drolet, Daniel W.; Gupta, Shashi; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a potent mediator of inflammatory and immune responses, and a validated target for therapeutic intervention of inflammatory diseases. Previous studies have shown that SL1026, a slow off-rate modified aptamer (SOMAmer) antagonist of IL-6, neutralizes IL-6 signaling in vitro. In the present study, we show that SL1026 delays the onset and reduces the severity of rheumatoid symptoms in a collagen-induced arthritis model in cynomolgus monkeys. SL1026 (1 and 10 mg/kg), administered q.i.d., delayed the progression of arthritis and the concomitant increase in serum IL-6 levels compared to the untreated control group. Furthermore, SL1026 inhibited IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation ex vivo in T lymphocytes from human blood and IL-6-induced C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A production in human primary hepatocytes. Importantly, SOMAmer treatment did not elicit an immune response, as evidenced by the absence of anti-SOMAmer antibodies in plasma of treated monkeys. These results demonstrate that SOMAmer antagonists of IL-6 may be attractive agents for the treatment of IL-6-mediated diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26579954

  9. Novel therapeutic compound tuftsin-phosphorylcholine attenuates collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bashi, T; Shovman, O; Fridkin, M; Volkov, A; Barshack, I; Blank, M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2016-04-01

    Treatment with helminthes and helminthes ova improved the clinical symptoms of several autoimmune diseases in patients and in animal models. Phosphorylcholine (PC) proved to be the immunomodulatory molecule. We aimed to decipher the tolerogenic potential of tuftsin-PC (TPC), a novel helminth-based compound in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CIA DBA/1 mice were treated with TPC subcutaneously (5 µg/0.1 ml) or orally (250 µg/0.1 ml), starting prior to disease induction. The control groups were treated with PBS. Collagen antibodies were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), cytokine protein levels by ELISA kits and regulatory T (Treg ) and regulatory B (Breg ) cell phenotypes by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). TPC-treated mice had a significantly lower arthritis score of 1.5 in comparison with control mice 11.8 (P < 0.0001) in both subcutaneous and orally treated groups at day 31. Moreover, histology analysis demonstrated highly inflamed joints in control mice, whereas TPC-treated mice maintained normal joint structure. Furthermore, TPC decreased the titres of circulating collagen II antibodies in mice sera (P < 0.0001), enhanced expression of IL-10 (P < 0.0001) and inhibited production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-1β (P < 0.0001). TPC significantly expanded the CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) Treg cells and CD19(+) IL-10(+) CD5(high) CD1d(high) T cell immunoglobulin mucin-1 (TIM-1(+) ) Breg cell phenotypes (P < 0.0001) in treated mice. Our data indicate that treatment with TPC attenuates CIA in mice demonstrated by low arthritic score and normal joints histology. TPC treatment reduced proinflammatory cytokines and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine expression, as well as expansion of Treg and Breg cells. Our results may lead to a new approach for a natural therapy for early rheumatoid arthritis onset. PMID:26618631

  10. Effects of low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, So Yean; Sim, Joon-Soo; Jeong, Choon Sik; Chang, Seung Yeup; Choi, Don Woong; Toida, Toshihiko; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2004-01-01

    In order to evaluate the improvement in the treatment of chronic arthritis, we investigated chondroitin sulfate depolymerization product (low molecular weight chondroitin sulfate, LMWCS) and intact chondroitin sulfate (CS) in vitro and in vivo. LMWCS was prepared by a chemical depolymerization process induced by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of copper salts. LMWCS (300 mg/kg) and CS (1200 mg/kg) were orally administered to DBA/1J mice once daily for 14 d prior to initial immunization with type II collagen. Their elastase activities and the production of cytokines in sera were examined on type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice. We also compared the paracellular transport of LMWCS and CS across Caco-2 cell monolayers and examined the inhibitory effects on elastase activities. LMWCS inhibited elastase activity slightly, but CS did not show inhibition. Hind paw edema was significantly decreased by LMWCS treatment. Levels of anti-type II collagen antibody and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in sera were also reduced by LMWCS treatment but not in case of CS, although no significant difference was observed between LMWCS and CS on interleukin-6 (IL-6) induction. The LMWCS preparation showed preventive effects on the type II collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and better permeability through Caco-2 cells. PMID:14709897

  11. Ear emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... and ruptured eardrums can be caused by: Inserting cotton swabs, toothpicks, pins, pens, or other objects into ... The person will have severe pain. Place sterile cotton gently in the outer ear canal to keep ...

  12. Elephant ear

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in elephant ear plants are: Oxalic acid Asparagine, a protein found in this plant Note: ... days to a week if treated correctly. Rarely, oxalic acid may cause swelling severe enough to block the ...

  13. Nanoparticulate Delivery of Agents for Induced Elastogenesis in 3-Dimensional Collagenous Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Lavanya; Sivaraman, Balakrishnan; Vaidya, Pratik; Ramamurthi, Anand

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of elastic matrix in the infrarenal aortic wall is a critical parameter underlying the formation and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). It is mediated by the chronic overexpression of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) -2 and -9, leading to a progressive loss of elasticity and weakening of the aortic wall. Delivery of therapeutic agents to inhibit MMPs, while concurrently coaxing cell-based regenerative repair of the elastic matrix represents a potential strategy for slowing or arresting AAA growth. Our prior studies have demonstrated elastogenic induction of healthy and aneurysmal aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and inhibition of MMPs, following exogenous delivery of elastogenic factors such as TGF-β1, as well as MMP-inhibitors such as doxycycline (DOX) in two-dimensional (2-D) culture. Based on these findings, and others that demonstrated elastogenic benefits of nanoparticulate delivery of these agents in 2-D culture, we have developed poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for localized, controlled and sustained delivery of DOX and TGF-β1 to human aortic SMCs (HASMCs) within a three-dimensional (3-D) gels of type-I collagen gel, which closely evoke the arterial tissue microenvironment. DOX and TGF-β1 released from these NPs influenced elastogenic outcomes positively within the collagen constructs over 21 days of culture, which were comparable to that induced by exogenous supplementation of DOX and TGF-β1 within the culture medium. However, this was accomplished at doses ∼20-fold lower than the exogenous dosages of the agents, illustrating that their localized, controlled, and sustained delivery from NPs embedded within a 3-D scaffold is an efficient strategy for directed elastogenesis. PMID:24737693

  14. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Systemic Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Manasa G.; Kour, Supinder; Piprode, Vikrant; Mittal, Monika; Kumar, Anil; Rani, Lekha; Pote, Satish T.; Mishra, Gyan C.; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammatory synovitis leading to joint destruction and systemic bone loss. The inflammation-induced bone loss is mediated by increased osteoclast formation and function. Current antirheumatic therapies primarily target suppression of inflammatory cascade with limited or no success in controlling progression of bone destruction. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by virtue of their tissue repair and immunomodulatory properties have shown promising results in various autoimmune and degenerative diseases. However, the role of MSCs in prevention of bone destruction in RA is not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) on in vitro formation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and pathological bone loss in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA. We observed that ASCs significantly inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)–induced osteoclastogenesis in both a contact-dependent and -independent manner. Additionally, ASCs inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-17, and IL-1β. Furthermore, treatment with ASCs at the onset of CIA significantly reduced clinical symptoms and joint pathology. Interestingly, ASCs protected periarticular and systemic bone loss in CIA mice by maintaining trabecular bone structure. We further observed that treatment with ASCs reduced osteoclast precursors in bone marrow, resulting in decreased osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, ASCs suppressed autoimmune T cell responses and increased the percentages of peripheral regulatory T and B cells. Thus, we provide strong evidence that ASCs ameliorate inflammation-induced systemic bone loss in CIA mice by reducing osteoclast precursors and promoting immune tolerance. PMID:26538398

  15. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Systemic Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Manasa G; Kour, Supinder; Piprode, Vikrant; Mittal, Monika; Kumar, Anil; Rani, Lekha; Pote, Satish T; Mishra, Gyan C; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammatory synovitis leading to joint destruction and systemic bone loss. The inflammation-induced bone loss is mediated by increased osteoclast formation and function. Current antirheumatic therapies primarily target suppression of inflammatory cascade with limited or no success in controlling progression of bone destruction. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by virtue of their tissue repair and immunomodulatory properties have shown promising results in various autoimmune and degenerative diseases. However, the role of MSCs in prevention of bone destruction in RA is not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) on in vitro formation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and pathological bone loss in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA. We observed that ASCs significantly inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis in both a contact-dependent and -independent manner. Additionally, ASCs inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-17, and IL-1β. Furthermore, treatment with ASCs at the onset of CIA significantly reduced clinical symptoms and joint pathology. Interestingly, ASCs protected periarticular and systemic bone loss in CIA mice by maintaining trabecular bone structure. We further observed that treatment with ASCs reduced osteoclast precursors in bone marrow, resulting in decreased osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, ASCs suppressed autoimmune T cell responses and increased the percentages of peripheral regulatory T and B cells. Thus, we provide strong evidence that ASCs ameliorate inflammation-induced systemic bone loss in CIA mice by reducing osteoclast precursors and promoting immune tolerance.

  16. Full-Length Fibronectin Drives Fibroblast Accumulation at the Surface of Collagen Microtissues during Cell-Induced Tissue Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Foolen, Jasper; Shiu, Jau-Ye; Mitsi, Maria; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Christopher S; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Generating and maintaining gradients of cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a prerequisite for the development of functionality of healthy tissue. Therefore, gaining insights into the drivers of spatial organization of cells and the role of ECM during tissue morphogenesis is vital. In a 3D model system of tissue morphogenesis, a fibronectin-FRET sensor recently revealed the existence of two separate fibronectin populations with different conformations in microtissues, i.e. 'compact and adsorbed to collagen' versus 'extended and fibrillar' fibronectin that does not colocalize with the collagen scaffold. Here we asked how the presence of fibronectin might drive this cell-induced tissue morphogenesis, more specifically the formation of gradients in cell density and ECM composition. Microtissues were engineered in a high-throughput model system containing rectangular microarrays of 12 posts, which constrained fibroblast-populated collagen gels, remodeled by the contractile cells into trampoline-shaped microtissues. Fibronectin's contribution during the tissue maturation process was assessed using fibronectin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (Fn-/- MEFs) and floxed equivalents (Fnf/f MEFs), in fibronectin-depleted growth medium with and without exogenously added plasma fibronectin (full-length, or various fragments). In the absence of full-length fibronectin, Fn-/- MEFs remained homogenously distributed throughout the cell-contracted collagen gels. In contrast, in the presence of full-length fibronectin, both cell types produced shell-like tissues with a predominantly cell-free compacted collagen core and a peripheral surface layer rich in cells. Single cell assays then revealed that Fn-/- MEFs applied lower total strain energy on nanopillar arrays coated with either fibronectin or vitronectin when compared to Fnf/f MEFs, but that the presence of exogenously added plasma fibronectin rescued their contractility. While collagen decoration of

  17. Mucosal Administration of Collagen V Ameliorates the Atherosclerotic Plaque Burden by Inducing Interleukin 35-dependent Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Park, Arick C; Huang, Guorui; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Massoudi, Dawiyat; Kernien, John F; Vignali, Dario A; Sullivan, Jeremy A; Wilkes, David S; Burlingham, William J; Greenspan, Daniel S

    2016-02-12

    We have shown previously that collagen V (col(V)) autoimmunity is a consistent feature of atherosclerosis in human coronary artery disease and in the Apoe(-/-) mouse model. We have also shown sensitization of Apoe(-/-) mice with col(V) to markedly increase the atherosclerotic burden, providing evidence of a causative role for col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerotic pathogenesis. Here we sought to determine whether induction of immune tolerance to col(V) might ameliorate atherosclerosis, providing further evidence for a causal role for col(V) autoimmunity in atherogenesis and providing insights into the potential for immunomodulatory therapeutic interventions. Mucosal inoculation successfully induced immune tolerance to col(V) with an accompanying reduction in plaque burden in Ldlr(-/-) mice on a high-cholesterol diet. The results therefore demonstrate that inoculation with col(V) can successfully ameliorate the atherosclerotic burden, suggesting novel approaches for therapeutic interventions. Surprisingly, tolerance and reduced atherosclerotic burden were both dependent on the recently described IL-35 and not on IL-10, the immunosuppressive cytokine usually studied in the context of induced tolerance and amelioration of atherosclerotic symptoms. In addition to the above, using recombinant protein fragments, we were able to localize two epitopes of the α1(V) chain involved in col(V) autoimmunity in atherosclerotic Ldlr(-/-) mice, suggesting future courses of experimentation for the characterization of such epitopes.

  18. Anti-Arthritic Effect of Chebulanin on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yinglan; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yao; Zhou, Dan; Dai, Qing; Liu, Songqing

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic degenerative autoimmune disease characterized by persistent inflammation of synovial membranes, which leads to cartilage destruction and bone erosion. To date, there are no effective therapies to slow the progress of this degenerative condition. Here, we evaluate the anti-arthritic effect of chebulanin, an abundant anti-inflammatory agent isolated from Terminalia chebula, in collagen induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice by intragastric administration. Arthritic severity was scored by performing histopathological evaluation of the joints and measuring the expression of inflammatory cytokines and relative enzymes by immunohistochemical staining. In parallel, bone destruction and erosion were confirmed by micro-CT. Our data revealed that chebulanin significantly improved the severity of arthritis. Specifically, the histopathological characteristics of the tissues were improved and expression of TNF-α, IL-6, MMP-3 and COX-2 in the paws and joints of the treated mice decreased in a dose-dependent manner compared with control mice. Furthermore, micro-CT analysis revealed that chebulanin induced a dose-dependent reduction in cartilage destruction and bone erosion. Taken together, our findings suggest that chebulanin suppresses the expression of inflammatory mediators and prevents cartilage destruction and bone erosion in mice. Therefore, chebulanin is a strong therapeutic alternative for the treatment of RA. PMID:26402786

  19. Resistance to collagen-induced arthritis in SHPS-1 mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzawa, Chie; Kaneko, Yoriaki; Murata, Yoji; Miyake, Astuko; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okajo, Jun; Tomizawa, Takeshi; Kaneko, Yuka; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Matozaki, Takashi Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2008-07-04

    SHPS-1 is a transmembrane protein that binds the protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 through its cytoplasmic region and is abundantly expressed on dendritic cells and macrophages. Here we show that mice expressing a mutant form of SHPS-1 fail to develop type-II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA), a model for rheumatoid arthritis in humans. Histological examinations of the arthritic paws from immunized wild-type mice revealed that cartilage was destroyed in association with marked mononuclear cell infiltration, while only mild cell infiltration was observed in immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice. Consistently, the serum levels of both IgG and IgG2a specific to CII and of IL-1{beta} in immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice were markedly reduced compared with those apparent for wild-type mice. The CII-induced proliferation of, and production of cytokines by, T cells from immunized SHPS-1 mutant mice were reduced compared to wild-type cells. These results suggest that SHPS-1 is essential for development of CIA.

  20. Compression loading-induced stress responses in intervertebral disc cells encapsulated in 3D collagen constructs

    PubMed Central

    Chooi, Wai Hon; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Cells protect themselves from stresses through a cellular stress response. In the interverebral disc, such response was also demonstrated to be induced by various environmental stresses. However, whether compression loading will cause cellular stress response in the nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) is not well studied. By using an in vitro collagen microencapsulation model, we investigated the effect of compression loading on the stress response of NPCs. Cell viability tests, and gene and protein expression experiments were conducted, with primers for the heat shock response (HSR: HSP70, HSF1, HSP27 and HSP90), and unfolded protein response (UPR: GRP78, GRP94, ATF4 and CHOP) genes and an antibody to HSP72. Different gene expression patterns occurred due to loading type throughout experiments. Increasing the loading strain for a short duration did not increase the stress response genes significantly, but over longer durations, HSP70 and HSP27 were upregulated. Longer loading durations also resulted in a continuous upregulation of HSR genes and downregulation of UPR genes, even after load removal. The rate of apoptosis did not increase significantly after loading, suggesting that stress response genes might play a role in cell survival following mechanical stress. These results demonstrate how mechanical stress might induce and control the expression of HSR and UPR genes in NPCs. PMID:27197886

  1. Changes and significance of IL-25 in chicken collagen II-induced experimental arthritis (CIA).

    PubMed

    Kaiwen, Wang; Zhaoliang, Su; Yinxia, Zhao; Siamak, Sandoghchian Shotorbani; Zhijun, Jiao; Yuan, Xue; Heng, Yang; Dong, Zheng; Yanfang, Liu; Pei, Shen; Shengjun, Wang; Qixiang, Shao; Xinxiang, Huang; Liwei, Lu; Huaxi, Xu

    2012-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease. It is a systemic inflammatory disease, characterized by chronic, symmetrical, multi-articular synovial arthritis. IL-25 (IL-17E) is a member of the recently emerged cytokine family (IL-17s), which is expressed in Th2 cells and bone marrow-derived mast cells. Unlike the other members of this family, IL-25 is capable of inducing Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and also promotes the release of some pro-immune factors (IL-6 and IL-8). IL-25 is also a pleiotropic factor, which constitutes a tissue-specific pathological injury and chronic inflammation. In this study, we used chicken collagen II-induced experimental arthritis (CIA) model in DBA/1 mice to investigate the relationship between IL-25 and other inflammatory factors, revealing the possible mechanism in CIA. Our results showed that the expression level of IL-25 was enhanced in the late stage of CIA, and IL-17 was increased in the early stage of the disease. It is well known that IL-17 has a crucial role in the development of RA pathogenesis, and IL-25 plays a significant role in humoral immune. For reasons given above, we suggested that the IL-25 inhibited IL-17 expression to some extent, while enhancing the production of IL-4. It was confirmed that IL-25 not only regulated the cellular immune, but also involved the humoral immune in rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. The effect of taurine on high potassium-and noradrenaline-induced contraction in rabbit ear artery.

    PubMed Central

    Franconi, F.; Giotti, A.; Manzini, S.; Martini, F.; Stendardi, I.; Zilletti, L.

    1982-01-01

    1 Intraluminal administration of taurine (40 mM) did not affect the contractile tone of rabbit isolated ear artery 2 Taurine (10-80 mM) exerted a powerful concentration-dependent, vasodilator action in arteries contracted with high potassium medium. 3 In the same experimental conditions, the taurine analogues beta-alanine and homotaurine, had no effect. 4 Taurine (40-80 mM) did not affect in a significant manner the tonic component of the noradrenaline (5x10(-6 M)-induced contraction. 5 When noradrenaline (5x10(-6M) was followed by the administration of high potassium medium a further increase in intraluminal pressure was observed. Under these conditions taurine (40 mM) reversed specifically the component due to the high potassium medium. PMID:7066608

  3. Clinical and histological assessment of collagen-induced arthritis progression in the diabetes-resistant BB/Wor rat.

    PubMed

    Knoerzer, D B; Donovan, M G; Schwartz, B D; Mengle-Gaw, L J

    1997-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis in the diabetes-resistant BB (DR BB)/Wor rat is a severe, aggressive disease initiated by immunization with heterologous native Type II collagen. Onset of clinical symptoms reproducibly occurs in 100% of animals between days 10 and 12 following collagen immunization. Hypertrophy of the synovial lining is the first histological manifestation of the early inflammatory arthritis. A mild inflammatory infiltrate in the synovium rapidly becomes a fibrovascular pannus eroding articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Beginning at the joint margins, an active synovitis is present. Light microscopy and immunohistochemical staining show the infiltrate to be comprised of mononuclear (lymphocytes, macrophages) and polymorphonuclear inflammatory cells. In addition, there is histological evidence for chronic inflammatory nodules and necrotizing vasculitis in connective tissue from diseased joints, both morphologic features associated with rheumatoid arthritis in humans. Subchondral bone erosion appears to be mediated largely by the resorptive action of activated osteoclasts. These histological parameters of disease progression in the DR BB/Wor rat are similar to human rheumatoid arthritis. The extensive degree of similarity in the pathology of DR BB/Wor rat collagen-induced arthritis and human rheumatoid arthritis supports the role of this model as an in vivo disease model for human rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:9061845

  4. Effect of γ-tocotrienol in counteracting oxidative stress and joint damage in collagen-induced arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    RADHAKRISHNAN, AMMU; TUDAWE, DULANTHI; CHAKRAVARTHI, SRIKUMAR; CHIEW, GAN SENG; HALEAGRAHARA, NAGARAJA

    2014-01-01

    Tocotrienols exhibit a significant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effect in numerous human diseases. However, the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of tocotrienols in arthritic conditions are not well documented. Therefore, the effect of γ-tocotrienol supplementation against oxidative stress and joint pathology in collagen-induced arthritis in rats was investigated in the present study. Adult female Dark Agouti rats were randomly divided into groups: Control, γ-tocotrienol alone, arthritis alone and arthritis with γ-tocotrienol. Arthritis was induced using 4 mg/kg body weight collagen in complete Freund’s adjuvant. The rats were treated orally with 5 mg/kg body weight of γ-tocotrienol between day 21 and day 45. After 45 days, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total glutathione (GSH) assays were conducted. γ-tocotrienol significantly reduced the arthritis-induced changes in body weight, CRP, TNF-α, SOD and the total GSH levels. There was a significant reduction in the arthritis-induced histopathological changes in the γ-tocotrienol treatment group. The data indicated that administration of γ-tocotrienol resulted in a significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect on collagen-induced arthritis; therefore, γ-tocotrienol may have therapeutic potential as a long-term anti-arthritic agent in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. PMID:24940448

  5. Fucoidan as an inhibitor of thermally induced collagen glycation examined by acetate electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Pielesz, Anna; Paluch, Jadwiga

    2014-08-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation (Maillard reaction) in vitro could be a simple method to obtain glycoconjugates for studying their biological properties. Hence, fucoidan was retained by acetate electrophoresis indicating a strong interaction with the protein. A loss of colour in fucoidan bands was found for samples incubated with collagen as compared with samples of free fucoidan. Also under in vitro conditions at 100°C - simulating a sudden burn incident - fucoidan binds with collagen as a result of the Maillard reaction. In contrast, the colour of the fucoidan bands intensified for samples incubated with collagen, with the addition of glucose. Electrophoretic analyses were carried out after heating the samples to a temperature simulating a burn incident. The bands were found to intensify for samples incubated with collagen during a 30-day-long incubation. Thus, spontaneous in vitro glycation - i.e. without the addition of glucose - was confirmed. This process is highly intensified both by the temperature and time of incubation. For a sample incubated in vitro in a fucoidan solution containing glucose, glycation was confirmed in a preliminary FTIR and acetate electrophoresis examinations, occurring in collagen obtained from chicken skins. In particular, a new band emerging around 1746 cm(-1) was observed for above samples, as was its increasing intensity, as compared with samples without the addition of glucose. In the collagen glycation assay, while glucose reacts with collagen and forms cross-linked aggregates, fucoidan decreases the process of aggregation and recovery of native collagen.

  6. Collagen-gel-induced resistance of overlying keratinocyte cultures to photosensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsantonis, John C.; Georgiou, Savas K.; Providaki, Mary G.; Vlahonikolis, John G.; Tosca, Andronicki D.

    1997-12-01

    In the present study it was found that human keratinocytes grown on collagen substrate, exhibited increased resistance to the hematoprophyrin-mediated photodynamic treatment, in comparison to keratinocytes grown on Petri dishes without collagen. Interestingly, no protection was afforded by the collagen gel to the cells in the corresponding control ('hematoprophyrin only' and 'light only') experiments. This observation was found to be independent of light dose and drug concentration, and the relative degree of resistance was the same for both normal and malignant cells. The degree of keratinocyte resistance was found to be closely related to the duration of cell attachment on the collagen substrate. These results are indicative of an active interference of collagen gel with the cellular evolution of the photodynamic phenomenon and they are also suggestive of variation in the photodynamic treatment efficacy according to the cellular environment.

  7. Garcinia Cambogia attenuates diet-induced adiposity but exacerbates hepatic collagen accumulation and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Je; Choi, Myung-Sook; Park, Yong Bok; Kim, Sang Ryong; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Jung, Un Ju

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate long-term effects of Garcinia Cambogia (GC), weight-loss supplement, on adiposity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese mice. METHODS: Obesity-prone C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD, 45 kcal% fat) with or without GC (1%, w/w) for 16 wk. The HFD contained 45 kcal% fat, 20 kcal% protein and 35 kcal% carbohydrate. They were given free access to food and distilled water, and food consumption and body weight were measured daily and weekly, respectively. Data were expressed as the mean ± SE. Statistical analyses were performed using the statistical package for the social science software program. Student’s t test was used to assess the differences between the groups. Statistical significance was considered at P < 0.05. RESULTS: There were no significant changes in body weight and food intake between the groups. However, the supplementation of GC significantly lowered visceral fat accumulation and adipocyte size via inhibition of fatty acid synthase activity and its mRNA expression in visceral adipose tissue, along with enhanced enzymatic activity and gene expression involved in adipose fatty acid β-oxidation. Moreover, GC supplementation resulted in significant reductions in glucose intolerance and the plasma resistin level in the HFD-fed mice. However, we first demonstrated that it increased hepatic collagen accumulation, lipid peroxidation and mRNA levels of genes related to oxidative stress (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) and inflammatory responses (tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) as well as plasma alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase levels, although HFD-induced hepatic steatosis was not altered. CONCLUSION: GC protects against HFD-induced obesity by modulating adipose fatty acid synthesis and β-oxidation but induces hepatic fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:23922466

  8. Resveratrol inhibits collagen-induced platelet stimulation through suppressing NADPH oxidase and oxidative inactivation of SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji Yong; Min, Ji Hyun; Wang, Su Bin; Chae, Yun Hee; Baek, Jin Young; Kim, Myunghee; Ryu, Jae-Sang; Chang, Tong-Shin

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced upon collagen stimulation are implicated in propagating various platelet-activating pathways. Among ROS-producing enzymes, NADPH oxidase (NOX) is largely responsible for collagen receptor-dependent ROS production. Therefore, NOX has been proposed as a novel target for the development of antiplatelet agent. We here investigate whether resveratrol inhibits collagen-induced NOX activation and further examine the effects of resveratrol on ROS-dependent signaling pathways in collagen-stimulated platelets. Collagen-induced superoxide anion production in platelets was inhibited by resveratrol. Resveratrol suppressed collagen-induced phosphorylation of p47(phox), a major regulatory subunit of NOX. Correlated with the inhibitory effects on NOX, resveratrol protected SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) from ROS-mediated inactivation and subsequently attenuated the specific tyrosine phosphorylation of key components (spleen tyrosine kinase, Vav1, Bruton's tyrosine kinase, and phospholipase Cγ2) for collagen receptor signaling cascades. Resveratrol also inhibited downstream responses such as cytosolic calcium elevation, P-selectin surface exposure, and integrin-αIIbβ3 activation. Furthermore, resveratrol inhibited platelet aggregation and adhesion in response to collagen. The antiplatelet effects of resveratrol through the inhibition of NOX-derived ROS production and subsequent oxidative inactivation of SHP-2 suggest that resveratrol is a potential compound for prevention and treatment of thrombovascular diseases.

  9. Full-Length Fibronectin Drives Fibroblast Accumulation at the Surface of Collagen Microtissues during Cell-Induced Tissue Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Foolen, Jasper; Shiu, Jau-Ye; Mitsi, Maria; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Christopher S.; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Generating and maintaining gradients of cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM) components is a prerequisite for the development of functionality of healthy tissue. Therefore, gaining insights into the drivers of spatial organization of cells and the role of ECM during tissue morphogenesis is vital. In a 3D model system of tissue morphogenesis, a fibronectin-FRET sensor recently revealed the existence of two separate fibronectin populations with different conformations in microtissues, i.e. ‘compact and adsorbed to collagen’ versus ‘extended and fibrillar’ fibronectin that does not colocalize with the collagen scaffold. Here we asked how the presence of fibronectin might drive this cell-induced tissue morphogenesis, more specifically the formation of gradients in cell density and ECM composition. Microtissues were engineered in a high-throughput model system containing rectangular microarrays of 12 posts, which constrained fibroblast-populated collagen gels, remodeled by the contractile cells into trampoline-shaped microtissues. Fibronectin’s contribution during the tissue maturation process was assessed using fibronectin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (Fn-/- MEFs) and floxed equivalents (Fnf/f MEFs), in fibronectin-depleted growth medium with and without exogenously added plasma fibronectin (full-length, or various fragments). In the absence of full-length fibronectin, Fn-/- MEFs remained homogenously distributed throughout the cell-contracted collagen gels. In contrast, in the presence of full-length fibronectin, both cell types produced shell-like tissues with a predominantly cell-free compacted collagen core and a peripheral surface layer rich in cells. Single cell assays then revealed that Fn-/- MEFs applied lower total strain energy on nanopillar arrays coated with either fibronectin or vitronectin when compared to Fnf/f MEFs, but that the presence of exogenously added plasma fibronectin rescued their contractility. While collagen

  10. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors mitigate collagen synthesis induced by a single dose of radiation to the whole thorax.

    PubMed

    Kma, Lakhan; Gao, Feng; Fish, Brian L; Moulder, John E; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Medhora, Meetha

    2012-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to use angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to mitigate the increase in lung collagen synthesis that is induced by irradiation to the lung, which could result from accidental exposure or radiological terrorism. Rats (WAG/RijCmcr) were given a single dose of 13 Gy (dose rate of 1.43 Gy/min) of X-irradiation to the thorax. Three structurally-different ACE inhibitors, captopril, enalapril and fosinopril were provided in drinking water beginning 1 week after irradiation. Rats that survived acute pneumonitis (at 6-12 weeks) were evaluated monthly for synthesis of lung collagen. Other endpoints included breathing rate, wet to dry lung weight ratio, and analysis of lung structure. Treatment with captopril (145-207 mg/m(2)/day) or enalapril (19-28 mg/m(2)/day), but not fosinopril (19-28 mg/m(2)/day), decreased morbidity from acute pneumonitis. Lung collagen in the surviving irradiated rats was increased over that of controls by 7 months after irradiation. This increase in collagen synthesis was not observed in rats treated with any of the three ACE inhibitors. Analysis of the lung morphology at 7 months supports the efficacy of ACE inhibitors against radiation-induced fibrosis. The effectiveness of fosinopril against fibrosis, but not against acute pneumonitis, suggests that pulmonary fibrosis may not be a simple consequence of injury during acute pneumonitis. In summary, three structurally-different ACE inhibitors mitigate the increase in collagen synthesis 7 months following irradiation of the whole thorax and do so, even when therapy is started one week after irradiation. PMID:22302041

  11. Lysyl hydroxylase 2 induces a collagen cross-link switch in tumor stroma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yulong; Terajima, Masahiko; Yang, Yanan; Sun, Li; Ahn, Young-Ho; Pankova, Daniela; Puperi, Daniel S; Watanabe, Takeshi; Kim, Min P; Blackmon, Shanda H; Rodriguez, Jaime; Liu, Hui; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Minelli, Rosalba; Scott, Kenneth L; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Guilak, Farshid; Pati, Debananda; Thilaganathan, Nishan; Burns, Alan R; Creighton, Chad J; Martinez, Elisabeth D; Zal, Tomasz; Grande-Allen, K Jane; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Kurie, Jonathan M

    2015-03-01

    Epithelial tumor metastasis is preceded by an accumulation of collagen cross-links that heighten stromal stiffness and stimulate the invasive properties of tumor cells. However, the biochemical nature of collagen cross-links in cancer is still unclear. Here, we postulated that epithelial tumorigenesis is accompanied by changes in the biochemical type of collagen cross-links. Utilizing resected human lung cancer tissues and a p21CIP1/WAF1-deficient, K-rasG12D-expressing murine metastatic lung cancer model, we showed that, relative to normal lung tissues, tumor stroma contains higher levels of hydroxylysine aldehyde-derived collagen cross-links (HLCCs) and lower levels of lysine aldehyde-derived cross-links (LCCs), which are the predominant types of collagen cross-links in skeletal tissues and soft tissues, respectively. Gain- and loss-of-function studies in tumor cells showed that lysyl hydroxylase 2 (LH2), which hydroxylates telopeptidyl lysine residues on collagen, shifted the tumor stroma toward a high-HLCC, low-LCC state, increased tumor stiffness, and enhanced tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Together, our data indicate that LH2 enhances the metastatic properties of tumor cells and functions as a regulatory switch that controls the relative abundance of biochemically distinct types of collagen cross-links in the tumor stroma. PMID:25664850

  12. Lysyl hydroxylase 2 induces a collagen cross-link switch in tumor stroma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yulong; Terajima, Masahiko; Yang, Yanan; Sun, Li; Ahn, Young-Ho; Pankova, Daniela; Puperi, Daniel S; Watanabe, Takeshi; Kim, Min P; Blackmon, Shanda H; Rodriguez, Jaime; Liu, Hui; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Minelli, Rosalba; Scott, Kenneth L; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Guilak, Farshid; Pati, Debananda; Thilaganathan, Nishan; Burns, Alan R; Creighton, Chad J; Martinez, Elisabeth D; Zal, Tomasz; Grande-Allen, K Jane; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Kurie, Jonathan M

    2015-03-01

    Epithelial tumor metastasis is preceded by an accumulation of collagen cross-links that heighten stromal stiffness and stimulate the invasive properties of tumor cells. However, the biochemical nature of collagen cross-links in cancer is still unclear. Here, we postulated that epithelial tumorigenesis is accompanied by changes in the biochemical type of collagen cross-links. Utilizing resected human lung cancer tissues and a p21CIP1/WAF1-deficient, K-rasG12D-expressing murine metastatic lung cancer model, we showed that, relative to normal lung tissues, tumor stroma contains higher levels of hydroxylysine aldehyde-derived collagen cross-links (HLCCs) and lower levels of lysine aldehyde-derived cross-links (LCCs), which are the predominant types of collagen cross-links in skeletal tissues and soft tissues, respectively. Gain- and loss-of-function studies in tumor cells showed that lysyl hydroxylase 2 (LH2), which hydroxylates telopeptidyl lysine residues on collagen, shifted the tumor stroma toward a high-HLCC, low-LCC state, increased tumor stiffness, and enhanced tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Together, our data indicate that LH2 enhances the metastatic properties of tumor cells and functions as a regulatory switch that controls the relative abundance of biochemically distinct types of collagen cross-links in the tumor stroma.

  13. Lysyl hydroxylase 2 induces a collagen cross-link switch in tumor stroma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulong; Terajima, Masahiko; Yang, Yanan; Sun, Li; Ahn, Young-Ho; Pankova, Daniela; Puperi, Daniel S.; Watanabe, Takeshi; Kim, Min P.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Rodriguez, Jaime; Liu, Hui; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Minelli, Rosalba; Scott, Kenneth L.; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Guilak, Farshid; Pati, Debananda; Thilaganathan, Nishan; Burns, Alan R.; Creighton, Chad J.; Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Zal, Tomasz; Grande-Allen, K. Jane; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tumor metastasis is preceded by an accumulation of collagen cross-links that heighten stromal stiffness and stimulate the invasive properties of tumor cells. However, the biochemical nature of collagen cross-links in cancer is still unclear. Here, we postulated that epithelial tumorigenesis is accompanied by changes in the biochemical type of collagen cross-links. Utilizing resected human lung cancer tissues and a p21CIP1/WAF1-deficient, K-rasG12D-expressing murine metastatic lung cancer model, we showed that, relative to normal lung tissues, tumor stroma contains higher levels of hydroxylysine aldehyde–derived collagen cross-links (HLCCs) and lower levels of lysine aldehyde–derived cross-links (LCCs), which are the predominant types of collagen cross-links in skeletal tissues and soft tissues, respectively. Gain- and loss-of-function studies in tumor cells showed that lysyl hydroxylase 2 (LH2), which hydroxylates telopeptidyl lysine residues on collagen, shifted the tumor stroma toward a high-HLCC, low-LCC state, increased tumor stiffness, and enhanced tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Together, our data indicate that LH2 enhances the metastatic properties of tumor cells and functions as a regulatory switch that controls the relative abundance of biochemically distinct types of collagen cross-links in the tumor stroma. PMID:25664850

  14. Polymorphism of the MHC class II Eb gene determines the protection against collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Zanelli, E.; Krco, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an animal model of auto immune polyarthritis, sharing similarities with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Paradoxally, susceptibility to mouse CIA is controlled by the H2A loci (DQ homologous) while RA is linked to HLA.DR genes (H2E homologous). We recently showed that the E{beta}{sup d} molecule prevents CIA development in susceptible H2{sup q} mice. We addressed the question of whether H2Eb polymorphism will influence CIA incidence as HLA.DRB1 polymorphism does in RA. In F{sub 1} mice, only H2Eb{sup d} and H2Eb{sup s} molecules showed protection. Using recombinant B10.RDD (Eb{sup d/b}) mice, we found that CIA protection was mediated by the first domain of the E{beta}{sup d} molecule. Using peptides covering the third hypervariable region of the E{beta} chain, we found a perfect correlation between presentation of E{beta} peptides by the H2A{sup q} molecule and protection on CIA. Therefore, the mechanism by which H2Eb protects against CIA seems to rely on the affinity of E{beta} peptides for the H2A{sup q} molecule. 35 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. [THE INFLUENCE OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE ON COLLAGEN-INDUCED AGGREGATION OF HUMAN PLATELETS].

    PubMed

    Petrova, I V; Trubacheva, O A; Mangataeva, O S; Suslova, T E; Kovalev, I V; Gusakova, S V

    2015-10-01

    Study the impact of hydrogen sulfide on collagen-induced platelet aggregation from healthy donors and patients with type 2 diabetes. In healthy individuals, in contrast to patients with type 2 diabetes, NaHS significantly inhibited platelet aggregation. Activators of cAMP signaling (forskolin and phosphodiesterase inhibitor) significantly reduced platelet aggregation in both groups of examinees. NO-synthase inhibitors increased platelet aggregation in healthy volunteers, but not in patients with type 2 diabetes. The presence of H2S donor did not alter the extent of platelet aggregation at high concentrations of cAMP or decreased production of nitric oxide. It is assumed that the antiplatelet effect of H2S is not associated with the effect on the signal system, mediated cAMP or nitric oxide. Change H2S-dependent regulation of platelet aggregation in patients with type 2 diabetes is caused by disorders have been reported with this disease: the increase of intracellular calcium ion concentration, oxidative damage to proteins, hyperhomocysteinemia, glycosylation of key proteins involved in this process.

  16. Retrovirus-induced insertional mutagenesis: mechanism of collagen mutation in Mov13 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, D D; Wu, H; Hartung, S; Breindl, M; Jaenisch, R

    1991-01-01

    The Mov13 mouse strain carries a mutation in the alpha 1(I) procollagen gene which is due to the insertion of a Moloney murine leukemia provirus into the first intron. This insertion results in the de novo methylation of the provirus and flanking DNA, the alteration of chromatin structure, and the transcriptional inactivity of the collagen promoter. To address the mechanism of mutagenesis, we reintroduced a cloned and therefore demethylated version of the Mov13 mutant allele into mouse fibroblasts. The transfected gene was not transcribed, indicating that the transcriptional defect was not due to the hypermethylation. Rather, this result strongly suggests that the mutation is due to the displacement or disruption of cis-acting regulatory DNA sequences within the first intron. We also constructed a Mov13 variant allele containing a single long terminal repeat instead of the whole provirus. This construct also failed to express mRNA, indicating that the Mov13 mutation does not revert by provirus excision as has been observed for other retrovirus-induced mutations. Images PMID:1922037

  17. Antigen-specific T cell–mediated gene therapy in collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Atsuo; Seroogy, Christine M.; Sandora, Matthew R.; Tarner, Ingo H.; Costa, Gina L.; Taylor-Edwards, Cariel; Bachmann, Michael H.; Contag, Christopher H.; Fathman, C. Garrison

    2001-01-01

    Autoantigen-specific T cells have tissue-specific homing properties, suggesting that these cells may be ideal vehicles for the local delivery of immunoregulatory molecules. We tested this hypothesis by using type II collagen–specific (CII-specific) CD4+ T hybridomas or primary CD4+ T cells after gene transfer, as vehicles to deliver an immunoregulatory protein for the treatment of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). CII-specific T cells or hybridomas were transduced using retroviral vectors to constitutively express the IL-12 antagonist, IL-12 p40. Transfer of engineered CD4+ T cells after immunization significantly inhibited the development of CIA, while cells transduced with vector control had no effect. The beneficial effect on CIA of IL-12 p40-transduced T cells required TCR specificity against CII, since transfer of T cells specific for another antigen producing equivalent amounts of IL-12 p40 had no effect. In vivo cell detection using bioluminescent labels and RT-PCR showed that transferred CII-reactive T-cell hybridomas accumulated in inflamed joints in mice with CIA. These results indicate that the local delivery of IL-12 p40 by T cells inhibited CIA by suppressing autoimmune responses at the site of inflammation. Modifying antigen-specific T cells by retroviral transduction for local expression of immunoregulatory proteins thus offers a promising strategy for treating RA. PMID:11375419

  18. A metabolically-stabilized phosphonate analog of lysophosphatidic acid attenuates collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nikitopoulou, Ioanna; Kaffe, Eleanna; Sevastou, Ioanna; Sirioti, Ivi; Samiotaki, Martina; Madan, Damian; Prestwich, Glenn D; Aidinis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a destructive arthropathy with systemic manifestations, characterized by chronic synovial inflammation. Under the influence of the pro-inflammatory milieu synovial fibroblasts (SFs), the main effector cells in disease pathogenesis become activated and hyperplastic while releasing a number of signals that include pro-inflammatory factors and tissue remodeling enzymes. Activated RA SFs in mouse or human arthritic joints express significant quantities of autotaxin (ATX), a lysophospholipase D responsible for the majority of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) production in the serum and inflamed sites. Conditional genetic ablation of ATX from SFs resulted in attenuation of disease symptoms in animal models, an effect attributed to diminished LPA signaling in the synovium, shown to activate SF effector functions. Here we show that administration of 1-bromo-3(S)-hydroxy-4-(palmitoyloxy)butyl-phosphonate (BrP-LPA), a metabolically stabilized analog of LPA and a dual function inhibitor of ATX and pan-antagonist of LPA receptors, attenuates collagen induced arthritis (CIA) development, thus validating the ATX/LPA axis as a novel therapeutic target in RA.

  19. Aqueous and Methanolic Extracts of Caulerpa mexicana Suppress Cell Migration and Ear Edema Induced by Inflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bitencourt, Mariana Angelica Oliveira; Dantas, Gracielle Rodrigues; Lira, Daysianne Pereira; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria; de Miranda, George Emmanuel Cavalcanti; de Oliveira Santos, Barbara Viviana; Souto, Janeusa Trindade

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of the inflammatory response is essential to maintaining homeostasis. Several studies have investigated new drugs that may contribute to avoiding or minimizing excessive inflammatory process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of extracts of green algae Caulerpa mexicana on models inflammation. In mice, the inflammatory peritonitis model is induced by zymosan. Previous treatment of mice with aqueous and methanolic extracts of C. mexicana was able to suppress the cell migration to the peritoneal cavity, in a time-dependent but not in a dose-dependent manner. The treatment of mice with C. mexicana extracts also decreased the xylene-induced ear edema, exerting strong inhibitory leukocyte migration elicited by zymosan into the air pouch. We concluded that administration of the extracts resulted in a reduction of cell migration to different sites as well as a decrease in edema formation induced by chemical irritants. This study demonstrates for the first time the anti-inflammatory effect of aqueous and methanolic extracts from the green marine algae Caulerpa mexicana. PMID:21892348

  20. Anti-rheumatoid arthritic effects of Saussurea involucrata on type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meihong; Guo, Qianying; Wang, Shuangjia; Wang, Na; Wei, Liren; Wang, Junbo

    2016-02-01

    Saussurea involucrata (SI) has long been used under the herbal name "snow lotus" for treatment of inflammation and pain-related diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. The present study aimed to evaluate the pharmacological effects of SI on collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis in rats. Rats with collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis were orally administered SI (420 mg kg(-1)) for 40 consecutive days. Histopathological examination indicated that SI alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells and synovial hyperplasia and slows joint destruction. SI intervention reduced the serum levels of RF, COMP, CRP and anti-CII IgG. Results also showed that SI is a potential therapeutic agent for alleviating the severity of the disease based on the reduced arthritic index. It was concluded that SI can ameliorate inflammation and joint destruction in CIA rats. PMID:26508519

  1. Differentiation and Molecular Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived on Gelatin or Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Obara, Chizuka; Takizawa, Kazuya; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Hazawa, Masaharu; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Gotoh, Takaya; Yasuda, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    The generation of induced-pluripotential stem cells- (iPSCs-) derived mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs) is an attractive and promising approach for preparing large, uniform batches of applicable MSCs that can serve as an alternative cell source of primary MSCs. Appropriate culture surfaces may influence their growth and differentiation potentials during iMSC derivation. The present study compared molecular properties and differentiation potential of derived mouse iPS-MSCs by deriving on gelatin or collagen-coated surfaces. The cells were derived by a one-step method and expressed CD73 and CD90, but CD105 was downregulated in iMSCs cultured only on gelatin-coated plates with increasing numbers of passages. A pairwise scatter analysis revealed similar expression of MSC-specific genes in iMSCs derived on gelatin and on collagen surfaces as well as in primary mouse bone marrow MSCs. Deriving iMSCs on gelatin and collagen dictated their osteogenic and adipose differentiation potentials, respectively. Derived iMSCs on gelatin upregulated Bmp2 and Lif prior to induction of osteogenic or adipose differentiation, while PPARγ was upregulated by deriving on collagen. Our results suggest that extracellular matrix components such as gelatin biases generated iMSC differentiation potential towards adipose or bone tissue in their derivation process via up- or downregulation of these master genes. PMID:27642306

  2. Differentiation and Molecular Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived on Gelatin or Collagen.

    PubMed

    Obara, Chizuka; Takizawa, Kazuya; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Hazawa, Masaharu; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Gotoh, Takaya; Yasuda, Takeshi; Tajima, Katsushi

    2016-01-01

    The generation of induced-pluripotential stem cells- (iPSCs-) derived mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs) is an attractive and promising approach for preparing large, uniform batches of applicable MSCs that can serve as an alternative cell source of primary MSCs. Appropriate culture surfaces may influence their growth and differentiation potentials during iMSC derivation. The present study compared molecular properties and differentiation potential of derived mouse iPS-MSCs by deriving on gelatin or collagen-coated surfaces. The cells were derived by a one-step method and expressed CD73 and CD90, but CD105 was downregulated in iMSCs cultured only on gelatin-coated plates with increasing numbers of passages. A pairwise scatter analysis revealed similar expression of MSC-specific genes in iMSCs derived on gelatin and on collagen surfaces as well as in primary mouse bone marrow MSCs. Deriving iMSCs on gelatin and collagen dictated their osteogenic and adipose differentiation potentials, respectively. Derived iMSCs on gelatin upregulated Bmp2 and Lif prior to induction of osteogenic or adipose differentiation, while PPARγ was upregulated by deriving on collagen. Our results suggest that extracellular matrix components such as gelatin biases generated iMSC differentiation potential towards adipose or bone tissue in their derivation process via up- or downregulation of these master genes. PMID:27642306

  3. Efficacy of Annona squamosa L in the synthesis of glycosaminoglycans and collagen during wound repair in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ponrasu, Thangavel; Suguna, Lonchin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to find out the effects of Annona squamosa on the formation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen during wound healing in normal and diabetic rats. Diabetes induced rats were segregated into 4 groups, each containing six animals. Groups I and III served as the normal and diabetic control while groups II and IV served as normal and diabetic treated. The animals were treated with 200 μL of Annona squamosa extract topically. The granulation tissues formed were removed on the 8th day and the amount of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen formed was evaluated by sequential extraction and SDSPAGE, respectively. Histological evaluation was also carried out using Masson's trichrome stain. In vitro wound healing efficacy of A. squamosa in human dermal fibroblast culture (HDF) was also carried out. The fibroblasts treated with varying concentrations of A. squamosa were examined for proliferation and closure of the wound area and photographed. A. squamosa increased cellular proliferation in HDF culture. The granulation tissues of treated wounds showed increased levels of glycosaminoglycans (P < 0.05) and collagen which were also confirmed by histopathology. The results strongly substantiate the beneficial effects of A. squamosa on the formation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen during wound healing.

  4. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss].

    PubMed

    Hesse, G

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most dominant handicaps in modern societies, which additionally very often is not realized or not admitted. About one quarter of the general population suffers from inner ear hearing loss and is therefore restricted in communicational skills. Demographic factors like increasing age play an important role as well as environmental influences and an increasing sound and noise exposure especially in leisure activities. Thus borders between a "classical" presbyacusis - if it ever existed - and envirionmentally induced hearing loss disappear. Today restrictions in hearing ability develop earlier in age but at the same time they are detected and diagnosed earlier. This paper can eventually enlighten the wide field of inner ear hearing loss only fragmentarily; therefore mainly new research, findings and developments are reviewed. The first part discusses new aspects of diagnostics of inner ear hearing loss and different etiologies. PMID:27259171

  5. Treatment of Collagen-Induced Arthritis Using Immune Modulatory Properties of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyu-Hyung; Mun, Chin Hee; Kang, Mi-Il; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Soo-Kon; Park, Yong-Beom

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immune modulatory properties. We investigated the potential therapeutic effects of human bone marrow (BM)-, adipose tissue (AD)-, and cord blood (CB)-derived MSCs in an experimental animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and explored the mechanism underlying immune modulation by MSCs. We evaluated the therapeutic effect of clinically available human BM-, AD-, and CB-derived MSCs in DBA/1 mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA mice were injected intraperitoneally with three types of MSCs. Treatment control animals were injected with 35 mg/kg methotrexate (MTX) twice weekly. Clinical activity in CIA mice, degree of inflammation, cytokine expression in the joint, serum cytokine levels, and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were evaluated. Mice treated with human BM-, AD-, and CB-MSCs showed significant improvement in clinical joint score, comparable to MTX-treated mice. Histologic examination showed greatly reduced joint inflammation and damage in MSC-treated mice compared with untreated mice. Microcomputed tomography also showed little joint damage in the MSC-treated group. MSCs significantly decreased serum interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, and interferon-γ and increased IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β levels. Tregs were increased in mice treated with MSCs compared to untreated or MTX-treated mice. Human BM-, AD-, and CB-MSCs significantly suppressed joint inflammation in CIA mice. The cells decreased proinflammatory cytokines and upregulated anti-inflammatory cytokines and induced Tregs. Therefore, our study suggests that the use of human BM-, AD-, and CB-MSCs could be an effective therapeutic approach for RA. PMID:25853338

  6. Imatinib mesylate inhibits osteoclastogenesis and joint destruction in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA).

    PubMed

    Ando, Wataru; Hashimoto, Jun; Nampei, Akihide; Tsuboi, Hideki; Tateishi, Kosuke; Ono, Takeshi; Nakamura, Norimasa; Ochi, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2006-01-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a key factor for osteoclastogenesis at the bone-pannus interface in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as a receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Imatinib mesylate inhibits the phosphorylation of c-fms, a receptor for M-CSF. The present study investigates the effect of imatinib mesylate on joint destruction in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and on osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Imatinib mesylate (50 or 150 mg/kg), dexamethasone, or vehicle was administered daily to CIA rats for 4 weeks from the onset of arthritis. Hind-paw swelling and body weight were measured weekly. At weeks 2 and 4, the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints and the ankle and subtalar joints were radiographically and histologically assessed. The effect of imatinib mesylate on osteoclast formation from rat bone marrow cells with M-CSF and soluble RANKL (sRANKL) in vitro was also examined. Radiographic assessment showed that 150 mg/kg imatinib mesylate suppressed the destruction of the MTP and the ankle and subtalar joints at week 2, and MTP joint destruction at week 4 in CIA rats, although hind-paw swelling was not suppressed. The number of TRAP-positive cells at the bone-pannus interface was significantly reduced in the group administered with 150 mg/kg imatinib mesylate compared with that given vehicle at week 4. Imatinib mesylate dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of M-CSF-dependent osteoclast precursor cells in vitro as well as osteoclast formation induced by M-CSF and sRANKL. These findings suggest that imatinib mesylate could prevent joint destruction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha down-regulates type i collagen through Sp3 transcription factor in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Duval, Elise; Bouyoucef, Mouloud; Leclercq, Sylvain; Baugé, Catherine; Boumédiene, Karim

    2016-09-01

    Cartilage engineering is one challenging issue in regenerative medicine. Low oxygen tension or hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1α) gene therapy are promising strategies in the field of cartilage repair. Previously, we showed that hypoxia and its mediator HIF-1 regulate matrix genes expression (collagens and aggrecan). Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of type I collagen (COL1A1) by HIF-1 in human articular chondrocytes. We show that HIF-1α reduces COL1A1 transcription, through a distal promoter (-2300 to -1816 bp upstream transcription initiation site), containing two GC boxes that bind Sp transcription factors (Sp1/Sp3). Sp1 acts as a positive regulator but is not induced by HIF-1. COL1A1 inhibition caused by HIF-1 implies only Sp3, which accumulates and competes Sp1 binding on COL1A1 promoter. Additionally, Sp3 ectopic expression inhibits COL1A1, while Sp3 knockdown counteracts the downregulation of COL1A1 induced by HIF-1. In conclusion, we established a new regulatory model of COL1A1 regulation by HIF-1, and bring out its relationship with Sp3 transcription factor. In a fundamental level, these findings give insights in the mechanisms controlling COL1A1 gene expression. This may be helpful to improve strategies to impair type I collagen expression during chondrocyte differentiation for cartilage engineering. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(9):756-763, 2016. PMID:27521280

  8. Ear examination

    MedlinePlus

    The ear canal differs in size, shape, and color from person to person. Normally, the canal is skin-colored and has small hairs. Yellowish-brown earwax may be present. The eardrum is a light-gray color or a shiny pearly-white. Light should reflect off ...

  9. Cosmetic ear surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  10. Ear Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information ... they may improve appearance and self-confidence. Can Ear Deformities Be Corrected? Formation of the ear during ...

  11. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  12. Better Ear Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Better Ear Health Better Ear Health Patient Health Information News ... often helpful to those with this condition. Swimmer’s Ear An infection of the outer ear structures caused ...

  13. How the Ear Works

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You How the Ear Works How the Ear Works Patient Health Information News media interested in ... public relations staff at newsroom@entnet.org . The ear has three main parts: the outer ear (including ...

  14. Methacrylation Induces Rapid, Temperature-Dependent, Reversible Self-Assembly of Type-I Collagen

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Type-I collagen self-assembles into a fibrillar gel at physiological temperature and pH to provide a cell-adhesive, supportive, structural network. As such, it is an attractive, popular scaffold for in vitro evaluations of cellular behavior and for tissue engineering applications. In this study, type-I collagen is modified to introduce methacrylate groups on the free amines of the lysine residues to create collagen methacrylamide (CMA). CMA retains the properties of collagen such as self-assembly, biodegradability, and natural bioactivity but is also photoactive and can be rapidly cross-linked or functionalized with acrylated molecules when irradiated with ultraviolet light in the presence of a photoinitiator. CMA also demonstrates unique temperature-dependent behavior. For natural type-I collagen, the overall structure of the fiber network remains largely static over time scales of a few hours upon heating and cooling at temperatures below its denaturation point. CMA, however, is rapidly thermoreversible and will oscillate between a liquid macromer suspension and a semisolid fibrillar hydrogel when the temperature is modulated between 10 and 37 °C. Using a series of mechanical, scattering, and spectroscopic methods, we demonstrate that structural reversibility is manifest across multiple scales from the protein topology of the triple helix up through the rheological properties of the CMA hydrogel. Electron microscopy imaging of CMA after various stages of heating and cooling shows that the canonical collagen-like D-periodic banding ultrastructure of the fibers is preserved. A rapidly thermoreversible collagen-based hydrogel is expected to have wide utility in tissue engineering and drug delivery applications as a biofunctional, biocompatible material. Thermal reversibility also makes CMA a powerful model for studying the complex process of hierarchical collagen self-assembly. PMID:25208340

  15. Biosynthesis of collagen crosslinks. III. In vivo labeling and stability of lung collagen in rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Reiser, K.M. )

    1989-08-01

    Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 1 mCi (each) of (3H)lysine at Day 11 of neonatal life to label their lung collagen. Five weeks later, half of the animals were given an intratracheal injection of 1.5 U of bleomycin sulfate via a tracheostomy; control animals received saline intratracheally by the same technique. Age-matched groups of control and bleomycin-treated rats were killed, and their lung collagen was analyzed at zero (control animals only), 1, 2, 4, 6, and 10 wk after bleomycin administration, a time course appropriate for development of pulmonary fibrosis in this animal model. We measured radioactivity in hydroxylysine and in the difunctional collagen crosslinks hydroxylysinonorleucine and dihydroxylysinonorleucine at each time point. No evidence of breakdown of this pool of mature, preformed collagen was observed in lungs of either the control or the bleomycin-treated rats. We also measured the total lung content of hydroxypyridinium, a trifunctional collagen crosslink, by its intrinsic fluorescence. There was no evidence of collagen degradation in lungs of either group of rats by this criterion either. We conclude that there is no biochemically detectable turnover of mature lung collagen, defined as that pool of lung collagen that is obligatorily extracellular (i.e., crosslinked and containing labeled hydroxylysine from an injection of precursor 5 to 15 wk earlier), in either normal rat lungs or lungs of rats made fibrotic with bleomycin. Statistical analysis of the data suggests that our methodology was sensitive and precise enough to have detected turnover of less than 0.5% of lung collagen per day, some 20-fold less than estimates of lung collagen turnover that have been suggested to be occurring in vivo by others using different techniques and presumably studying different pools of lung collagen.

  16. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo; Kim, So Young; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Taehoon G

    2012-11-23

    The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the β1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate peptide for the treatment of skin aging and wrinkles.

  17. How can the auditory efferent system protect our ears from noise-induced hearing loss? Let us count the ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Lynne; Miller, Judi A. Lapsley

    2015-12-01

    It is a cause for some debate as to how the auditory olivocochlear (OC) efferent system could protect hearing from noise trauma. In this review, we examined physiological research to find mechanisms that could effectively attenuate the response to sound. For each purported mechanism, we indicate which part of the OC-efferent system is responsible for the function and the site of action. These mechanisms include basilar-membrane phase shifts at high stimulus levels; changes in outer-hair-cell stiffness and phase lag associated with efferent slow effects; small decreases in endocochlear potentials causing small decreases in outer- and inner-hair-cell output; low-spontaneous-rate and medium-spontaneous-rate fibers showing OC-induced decrements at high levels; auditory-nerve initial-peak reduction; OC effect increasing over minutes; cholinergic activation of anti-apoptotic pathways; and anti-excitotoxicity. There are clearly multiple opportunities for the OC-efferent system to protect the inner ear from noise trauma. From further exploration into the mechanisms outlined here, as well as to-be-discovered mechanisms, we will gain a greater understanding of the protective nature of the OC-efferent system. These findings could aid our ability to design better predictive tests for people at risk for noise-induced hearing loss.

  18. Investigation of photoplethysmography and arterial blood oxygen saturation from the ear-canal and the finger under conditions of artificially induced hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Budidha, K; Kyriacou, P A

    2015-08-01

    Pulse oximeters relay on the technique of photoplethysmography (PPG) to estimate arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). In conditions of poor peripheral perfusion such as hypotension, hypothermia, and vasoconstriction, pulse oximeters become inaccurate or provide no reading. This is due to the poor quality of the PPG signals detected at that instance. In order to overcome this problem, the ear canal has been proposed as a alternative measurement site for measuring reliable SpO2. Hence, an ear canal PPG sensor was developed along with a PPG processing system. The performance of the sensor was evaluated by measuring the red and infrared PPGs and SpO2 from 10 healthy volunteers undergoing artificially induced hypothermia. The results from the ear canal sensor were compared with simultaneously acquired results from the finger. Hypothermia was induced by exposing the volunteers to cold temperatures of 10 ± 1°C. The results acquired suggest that the ear canal pulse oximeter endures more in estimating SpO2 values accurately when compared with the more common finger pulse oximeter. PMID:26738137

  19. Puerarin attenuates inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody-induced arthritis via TLR4/NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changxing; Wang, Weidong; Jin, Xiaping; Shen, Jianguo; Hu, Weifeng; Jiang, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Puerarin is an important active ingredient in the root of kudzu vine due to its pharmacological properties. The aim of the present study is to contribute to the existing knowledge of the effect of puerarin in the attenuation of inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody-induced arthritis via toll‑like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling. Arthritis was induced using injection of anti‑type II collagen antibodies. Treatment with puerarin was observed to significantly decrease clinical scoring of the collagen antibody‑induced arthritis and suppress oxidative stress and the inflammatory response in mice. Furthermore, puerarin was demonstrated to inhibit mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase‑9 and protein expression of TLR4 following collagen antibody-induced arthritis in mice. The effect of puerarin may be associated with the suppression of NF‑κB activity in collagen antibody‑induced arthritis mice. Furthermore, upregulation of phosphorylated (p)‑Janus kinase 2 and p‑signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 protein expression was suppressed by puerarin. The results of the present study indicate, for the first time, the effect of puerarin to attenuate inflammation and oxidation in mice with collagen antibody‑induced arthritis via TLR4/NF-κB signaling. PMID:27278131

  20. IL-10 signaling in CD4+ T cells is critical for the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction IL-10 is a very important anti-inflammatory cytokine. However, the role of this cytokine in T cells in the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis is unclear. The purpose of this study was to define the role of IL-10 signaling in T cells in the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis. Methods IL-10 receptor dominant-negative transgenic (Tg) and control mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen to induce arthritis. The severity of arthritis was monitored and examined histologically. T-cell activation and cytokine production were analyzed using flow cytometry. T-cell proliferation was examined by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Antigen-specific antibodies in serum were measured by ELISA. Foxp3 expression in CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) was determined by intracellular staining or Foxp3-RFP reporter mice. The suppressive function of Foxp3+CD4+ Tregs was determined in vitro by performing a T-cell proliferation assay. The level of IL-17 mRNA in joints was measured by real-time PCR. A two-tailed nonparametric paired test (Wilcoxon signed-rank test) was used to calculate the arthritis and histological scores. Student's paired or unpaired t-test was used for all other statistical analyses (InStat version 2.03 software; GraphPad Software, San Diego, CA, USA). Results Blocking IL-10 signaling in T cells rendered mice, especially female mice, highly susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis. T-cell activation and proliferation were enhanced and produced more IFN-γ. The suppressive function of CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells was significantly impaired in Tg mice because of the reduced ability of Tregs from Tg mice to maintain their levels of Foxp3. This was further confirmed by transferring Foxp3-RFP cells from Tg or wild-type (Wt) mice into a congenic Wt host. The higher level of IL-17 mRNA was detected in inflammatory joints of Tg mice, probably due to the recruitment of IL-17+γδ T cells into the arthritic joints. Conclusion IL-10 signaling in T

  1. Radiation-Induced Middle Ear and Mastoid Opacification in Skull Base Tumors Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Gary V.; Ahmed, Salmaan; Allen, Pamela; Gidley, Paul W.; Woo, Shiao Y.; DeMonte, Franco; Chang, Eric L.; Mahajan, Anita

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of middle ear (ME) pathology in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) for skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 61 patients treated with RT between 2003 and 2008 for skull base tumors was conducted. Clinical outcomes and demographics were reviewed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was performed on the eustachian canal (EC), ME, mastoid air cells, vestibular apparatus, cochlea, internal auditory canal, lateral and posterior nasopharynx, and temporal lobes to relate doses to symptoms and radiographic change. Otomastoid opacification was rated 0 (none), 1 (mild), 2 (moderate), and 3 (severe) by a neuroradiologist blinded to clinical outcomes and doses. Results: The median prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 14-74 Gy). The ME mean dose was 14 Gy and 34 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3 opacification, respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean mastoid dose was 10 Gy and 26 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3, respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean EC dose was 17 Gy and 32 Gy for Grade 0-1 and 2-3, respectively (p = 0.0001). Otomastoid opacification resolved in 17 of 40 patients (42.5%), at a mean of 17 months after RT (range, 2-45 months). Otomastoid opacification persisted in 23 of 40 patients (57.5%), with a mean follow-up of 23 months (range, 2-55 months). Multivariate analysis showed that mastoid dose >30 Gy (odds ratio = 28.0, p < 0.001) and posterior nasopharynx dose of >30 Gy (odds ratio = 4.9, p = 0.009) were associated with Grade 2-3 effusions, whereas other factors including dose to EC and ME were not significant. Conclusions: A mean RT dose >30 Gy to the mastoid air cells or posterior nasopharynx is associated with increased risk of moderate to severe otomastoid opacification, which persisted in more than half of patients at 2-year follow-up.

  2. Vegetable peptones increase production of type I collagen in human fibroblasts by inducing the RSK-CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-β phosphorylation pathway.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunsun; Cho, Jae Youl; Park, Deokhoon; Kim, Min Hee; Park, Beomseok; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Jongsung

    2015-02-01

    Skin aging appears to be principally attributed to a decrease in type I collagen level and the regeneration ability of dermal fibroblasts. We hypothesized that vegetable peptones promote cell proliferation and production of type I collagen in human dermal fibroblasts. Therefore, we investigated the effects of vegetable peptones on cell proliferation and type I collagen production and their possible mechanisms in human dermal fibroblasts. Vegetable peptones significantly promoted cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, the human luciferase type I collagen α2 promoter and type I procollagen synthesis assays showed that the vegetable peptones induced type I procollagen production by activating the type I collagen α2 promoter. Moreover, the vegetable peptones activated p90 ribosomal s6 kinase, which was mediated by activating the Raf-p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. Furthermore, the vegetable peptone-induced increase in cell proliferation and type I collagen production decreased upon treatment with the ERK inhibitor PD98059. Taken together, these findings suggest that increased proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts and enhanced production of type I collagen by vegetable peptones occur primarily by inducing the p90 ribosomal s6 kinase-CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β phosphorylation pathway, which is mediated by activating Raf-ERK signaling.

  3. Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis (AMIC): Combining Microfracturing and a Collagen I/III Matrix for Articular Cartilage Resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Benthien, J P; Behrens, P

    2010-01-01

    Options for the treatment of cartilage defects include chondral resurfacing with abrasion, debridement, autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT), matrix-induced chondrocyte transplantation (MACI), or osteochondral autologous transplantation (OATS). This article describes the new method of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC), a 1-step procedure combining subchondral microfracture with the fixation of a collagen I/III membrane by a partially autologous fibrin glue. Indications and contraindications are provided; a technical note is given. This method is primarily applied in osteochondral lesions of the knee and ankle joints; other joints may qualify.

  4. A three-dimensional collagen construct to model lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of BV2 microglia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We report a novel method of culturing microglia in three dimension (3D) using collagen as a substrate. By culturing microglia within a matrix, we aim to emulate the physical state of microglia embedded within parenchyma. Methods BV2 microglia cell suspensions were prepared with type I collagen and cast into culture plates. To characterise the BV2 microglia cultured in 3D, the cultures were evaluated for their viability, cell morphology and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation. Conventional monolayer cultures (grown on uncoated and collagen-coated polystyrene) were set up concurrently for comparison. Results BV2 microglia in 3D collagen matrices were viable at 48 hrs of culture and exhibit a ramified morphology with multiplanar cytoplasmic projections. Following stimulation with 1 μg/ml LPS, microglia cultured in 3D collagen gels increase their expression of nitric oxide (NO) and CD40, indicating their capacity to become activated within the matrix. Up to 97.8% of BV2 microglia grown in 3D cultures gained CD40 positivity in response to LPS, compared to approximately 60% of cells grown in a monolayer (P < .05). BV2 microglia in 3D collagen gels also showed increased mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α and the chemoattractant MCP-1 following LPS stimulation. Conclusions In summary, BV2 microglia cultured in 3D collagen hydrogels exhibit multiplanar cytoplasmic projections and undergo a characteristic and robust activation response to LPS. This culture system is accessible to a wide range of analyses and provides a useful new in vitro tool for research into microglial activation. PMID:25074682

  5. Collagen/silk fibroin bi-template induced biomimetic bone-like substitutes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianglin; Zhou, Wei; Hu, Wei; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Shenqi; Zhang, Shengmin

    2011-12-01

    A novel bi-template induced co-assembly method was employed to fabricate biomimetic bone substitute materials, collagen (COL)-fibroin/hydroxyapatite (COL-SF/HA) composite by using a combination of Type I COL and silk fibroin (SF) molecular templates. As a control, COL/HA and SF/HA composites were also synthesized via single-template assembly technology. The structure and morphology of the resulting assembly composites were investigated by X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectra, transmission electron microscope, and thermogravimetric analysis. Their sizes and size distributions were measured by DLS. The results indicated that the mineral phases in COL-SF/HA, COL-HA, and SF-HA composites were needle-like nano-HA crystals. In comparison to those in COL-HA and SF-HA, the mineral phase in COL-SF/HA displayed smaller size and more narrow distribution. Of all above biomimetic composites, the HA was well assembled with molecular template(s), and the organic content of the composite was about 12%-20%, which was quite similar to the natural bone in composition. CD and SDS-PAGE were used to examine the secondary structure and subunit composition of template proteins. The results revealed that the spatial structure of co-assembly template proteins played a pivotal role in controlling and regulating HA crystal nucleation and growth. Based on the experimental results above, a possible co-assembly mechanism for the HA growing on fibrous bi-template proteins was suggested.

  6. Effect of Ultraviolet A-induced Crosslinking on Dentin Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Seseogullari-Dirihan, Roda; Tjäderhane, Leo; Pashley, David H; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of using UVA-induced crosslinking with or without riboflavin as photosensitizers on degradation of dentin matrix by dentin proteases. Methods Demineralized dentin specimens (0.4×3×6mm, n=10/group) were subjected to: (RP1), 0.1% riboflavin-5 phosphate/UVA for 1 min; (RP5), 0.1% riboflavin-5 phosphate/UVA for 5 min; (R1), 0.1% riboflavin/UVA for 1 min; (R5), 0.1% riboflavin-UVA for 5 min; (UV1), UVA for 1 min; (UV5), UVA for 5 min. Specimens were incubated in 1 mL zinc and calcium containing media for 1 day and 1 week. An untreated group served as control (CM). After incubation, the loss of dry mass of samples was measured and aliquots of media were analyzed for the release of C-terminal fragment telopeptide (ICTP vs CTX) of collagen to evaluate for cathepsin K (CA-K) and total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated degradation. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA at α=0.05. Results Although UVA radiation alone reduced dentin degradation, UVA-activated riboflavin or riboflavin-5 phosphate inhibited MMP and CA-K activities more than UVA alone. The effects of crosslinking were more pronounced in 7-day samples; only with CA-K were the effects of crosslinking with or without photosensitizer significantly different from controls in 1-day samples. Significance The use of bioactive forms (RP) or longer treatment time did not result with better effect. The use of UVA crosslinking reduces dentin matrix degradation, especially with photosensitizers. PMID:26314255

  7. Lupeol acetate ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis and osteoclastogenesis of mice through improvement of microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Hsun; Chuang, Hui-Yen; Chen, Chien-Hui; Chen, Wun-Ke; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2016-04-01

    Lupeol has been shown with anti-inflammation and antitumor capability, however, the poor bioavailability limiting its applications in living subjects. Lupeol acetate (LA), a derivative of lupeol, shows similar biological activities as lupeol but with better bioavailability. Here RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were treated with 0-80μM of LA, and assayed for TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, MCP-1 using Western blotting. Moreover, osteoclatogenesis was examined with reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. For in vivo study, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA)-bearing DBA/1J mice were randomly separated into three groups: vehicle, LA-treated (50mg/kg) and curcumin-treated (100mg/kg). Therapeutic efficacies were assayed by the clinical score, expression levels of serum cytokines including TNF-α and IL-1β, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) microPET/CT and histopathology. The results showed that LA could inhibit the activation, migration, and formation of osteoclastogenesis of macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. In RA-bearing mice, the expressions of inflammation-related cytokines were suppressed, and clinical symptoms and bone erosion were ameliorated by LA. The accumulation of (18)F-FDG in the joints of RA-bearing mice was also significantly decreased by LA. The results indicate that LA significantly improves the symptoms of RA by down-regulating expressions of inflammatory cytokines and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:27044833

  8. Adding Water to the Mill: Olmesartan-Induced Collagenous Sprue—A Case Report and Brief Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Desruisseaux, Claudine; Bensoussan, Michaël; Désilets, Etienne; Tran, Hanh-Khiem; Arcand, Robert; Poirier, Germain; Wisniewski, Andrew; Manière, Thibaut

    2016-01-01

    Collagenous sprue (CS) is a distinct clinicopathological disorder histologically defined by a thickened subepithelial band (Freeman, 2011). It is a rare condition which has been recently observed in a significant proportion of sprue-like enteropathy associated with olmesartan, a novel entity described by Rubio-Tapia et al. in 2012. CS is historically associated with a poor prognosis (Marthey et al., 2014). However, histological and clinical improvements have been described in most studies with concomitant usage of corticosteroids and/or gluten-free diet (Marthey et al., 2014). We report a unique case of olmesartan-induced collagenous sprue in a 79-year-old man that showed complete histological and clinical remission with the sole withdrawal of the incriminating drug. The literature on this topic is briefly reviewed. PMID:27446843

  9. Adding Water to the Mill: Olmesartan-Induced Collagenous Sprue-A Case Report and Brief Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Desruisseaux, Claudine; Bensoussan, Michaël; Désilets, Etienne; Tran, Hanh-Khiem; Arcand, Robert; Poirier, Germain; Wisniewski, Andrew; Manière, Thibaut

    2016-01-01

    Collagenous sprue (CS) is a distinct clinicopathological disorder histologically defined by a thickened subepithelial band (Freeman, 2011). It is a rare condition which has been recently observed in a significant proportion of sprue-like enteropathy associated with olmesartan, a novel entity described by Rubio-Tapia et al. in 2012. CS is historically associated with a poor prognosis (Marthey et al., 2014). However, histological and clinical improvements have been described in most studies with concomitant usage of corticosteroids and/or gluten-free diet (Marthey et al., 2014). We report a unique case of olmesartan-induced collagenous sprue in a 79-year-old man that showed complete histological and clinical remission with the sole withdrawal of the incriminating drug. The literature on this topic is briefly reviewed. PMID:27446843

  10. Advanced glycation end products suppress lysyl oxidase and induce bone collagen degradation in a rat model of renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Chiharu; Uto, Kenta; Honda, Kazuho; Kato, Yoshiharu; Oda, Hideaki

    2013-11-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is a major problem in patients with renal insufficiency. The present study was designed to elucidate the role of bone collagen changes and osteoblast differentiation in a rat model of ROD pathogenesis induced by adenine. Typical characteristics of renal failure, including increased serum urea nitrogen, creatinine, inorganic phosphorus, and intact parathyroid hormone levels, and decreased serum calcium and 1,25(OH)2D3 levels, were observed in adenine-induced rats. Micro-computed tomography analysis of the femur in adenine-induced rats showed decreased bone mineral density and osteoporotic changes, confirmed by the three-point bending test. The cancellous bone histomorphometric parameters of the tibia showed increased osteoblast number, decreased osteoclast surface with peritrabecular fibrosis, and increased osteoid tissue, indicating a severe mineralization disorder similar to clinical ROD. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed irregular alignment and increased diameter of bone collagen fibrils in adenine-induced rats. Protein expression analysis showed greater accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in peritrabecular osteoblasts of adenine-induced rats than in the controls. In contrast, suppressed expression of runt-related transcription factor 2, alkaline phosphatase, secreted phosphoprotein 1 (Spp1), and lysyl oxidase (Lox) mRNA levels, particularly the amount of active LOX protein, were observed. In in-vitro experiments, mineralizing MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells stimulated with AGE-modified bovine serum albumin had attenuated the expression of Spp1 mRNA levels and active LOX protein, with a decrease in extracellular nodules of mineralization. These observations provide clues to ROD pathogenesis, as they indicate that the suppression of osteoblast differentiation and decreased active LOX protein associated with accumulation of AGEs in osteoblasts caused structural abnormalities of bone collagen fibrils and

  11. Potentiation of butylated hydroxytoluene-induced acute lung damage by oxygen: cell kinetics and collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Haschek, W.M.; Reiser, K.M.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.; Kehrer, J.P.; Smith, L.H.; Last, J.A.; Witschi, H.P.

    1983-01-01

    Changes in cell proliferation and in collagen synthesis were studied in young adult male BALB/c mice injected intraperitoneally with 400 mg/kg of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in corn oil or corn oil alone and immediately exposed to 70% oxygen or air for 6 days. Mice received (/sup 3/H)thymidine either as a single injection 90 min before being killed or as a continual infusion via an osmotic minipump. Autoradiography was done 2 to 14 days after BHT injection, and cell kinetic studies were performed. In a similar experiment, mice were injected intraperitoneally with (/sup 3/H)proline 3 h before being killed, and type I/type III collagen ratio in newly synthesized lung collagen was determined. It was found that exposure to 70% oxygen immediately after the administration of BHT initially delayed the epithelial cell proliferation and the decrease in the percentage of newly synthesized type III collagen that occurred after BHT alone. Once the animals were removed from oxygen there was a compensatory burst of cell proliferation and a precipitous drop in the percentage of newly synthesized type III collagen. The proliferating cell population after removal from oxygen was primarily interstitial and not epithelial. When exposure to oxygen was delayed, cell proliferation was similar to that seen after BHT injection alone.

  12. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-09-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation.

  13. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H.; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation. PMID:27598131

  14. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation. PMID:27598131

  15. Increased p66Shc in the Inner Ear of D-Galactose-Induced Aging Mice with Accumulation of Mitochondrial DNA 3873-bp Deletion: p66Shc and mtDNA Damage in the Inner Ear during Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Juan; Yang, Yang; Yao, Ling-Li; Zhou, Xing-Xing; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Xiang; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2012-01-01

    Aging has been associated with mitochondrial DNA damage. P66Shc is an age-related adaptor protein that has a substantial impact on mitochondrial metabolism through regulation of the cellular response to oxidative stress. Our study aimed to establish a D-galactose (D-gal)-induced inner ear aging mouse model and to investigate the potential role of p66Shc and its serine 36-phosphorylated form in the inner ear during aging by using this model. Real-time PCR was performed to detect the mtDNA 3873-bp deletion and the level of p66Shc mRNA in the cochlear lateral wall. Western blot analysis was performed to analyze the total and mitochondrial protein levels of p66Shc and the level of Ser36-P-p66Shc in the cochlear lateral wall. Immunofluoresence was performed to detect the location of the Ser36-P-p66Shc expression in the cochlear lateral wall. The results showed that the accumulation of the mtDNA 3873-bp deletion, total and mitochondrial protein levels of p66Shc and level of Ser36-P-p66Shc were significantly increased in the cochlear lateral wall of the D-gal-treated group when compared to the control group and that Ser36-P-p66Shc was mainly localized in the cytoplasm of the cells in the stria vascularis. During aging, the oxidative stress-related increase of p66Shc and Ser36-P-p66Shc might be associated with the accumulation of the mtDNA 3873-bp deletion in the inner ear. PMID:23209752

  16. A new 5-lipoxygenase selective inhibitor derived from Artocarpus communis strongly inhibits arachidonic acid-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Koshihara, Y; Fujimoto, Y; Inoue, H

    1988-06-01

    Natural compounds isolated from the Indonesian plant, Artocarpus communis, inhibit 5-lipoxygenase of cultured mastocytoma cells. One of five compounds, AC-5-1, strongly inhibits 5-lipoxygenase with a half-inhibition dose of 5 +/- 0.12 X 10(-8) M. However, prostaglandin synthesizing activity is not inhibited until 10(-5) M. AC-5-1 is a highly selective inhibitor for 5-lipoxygenase. The AC-5-1 at 10(-5) M inhibits 96% of leukotriene C4 synthesis of mouse peritoneal cells facilitated by calcium-ionophore. Arachidonic acid-induced ear edema of mice, an in vivo inflammatory model, involving leukotriene induction, is strongly inhibited by AC-5-1 in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition is the strongest of any inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase reported previously. Since the natural compound AC-5-1 can selectively inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and affect in vivo inflammation, it will be interesting to investigate the role of leukotrienes on inflammation and other physiological processes.

  17. The exercise-induced biochemical milieu enhances collagen content and tensile strength of engineered ligaments.

    PubMed

    West, Daniel W D; Lee-Barthel, Ann; McIntyre, Todd; Shamim, Baubak; Lee, Cassandra A; Baar, Keith

    2015-10-15

    Exercise stimulates a dramatic change in the concentration of circulating hormones, such as growth hormone (GH), but the biological functions of this response are unclear. Pharmacological GH administration stimulates collagen synthesis; however, whether the post-exercise systemic milieu has a similar action is unknown. We aimed to determine whether the collagen content and tensile strength of tissue-engineered ligaments is enhanced by serum obtained post-exercise. Primary cells from a human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were used to engineer ligament constructs in vitro. Blood obtained from 12 healthy young men 15 min after resistance exercise contained GH concentrations that were ∼7-fold greater than resting serum (P < 0.001), whereas IGF-1 was not elevated at this time point (P = 0.21 vs. rest). Ligament constructs were treated for 7 days with medium supplemented with serum obtained at rest (RestTx) or 15 min post-exercise (ExTx), before tensile testing and collagen content analysis. Compared with RestTx, ExTx enhanced collagen content (+19%; 181 ± 33 vs. 215 ± 40 μg per construct P = 0.001) and ligament mechanical properties - maximal tensile load (+17%, P = 0.03 vs. RestTx) and ultimate tensile strength (+10%, P = 0.15 vs. RestTx). In a separate set of engineered ligaments, recombinant IGF-1, but not GH, enhanced collagen content and mechanics. Bioassays in 2D culture revealed that acute treatment with post-exercise serum activated mTORC1 and ERK1/2. In conclusion, the post-exercise biochemical milieu, but not recombinant GH, enhances collagen content and tensile strength of engineered ligaments, in association with mTORC1 and ERK1/2 activation.

  18. Fabrication of Compositionally and Topographically Complex Robust Tissue Forms by 3D-Electrochemical Compaction of Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Younesi, Mousa; Islam, Anowarul; Kishore, Vipuil; Panit, Stefi; Akkus, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Collagen solutions are phase-transformed to mechanically robust shell structures with curviplanar topographies using electrochemically induced pH gradients. The process enables rapid layer-by-layer deposition of collagen-rich mixtures over the entire field simultaneously to obtain compositionally diverse multilayered structures. In-plane tensile strength and modulus of the electrocompacted collagen sheet samples were 5200 -fold and 2300 -fold greater than that of uncompacted collagen samples. Out of plane compression tests showed 27 -fold and fold increase in compressive stress and 46 -fold increase in compressive modulus compared to uncompacted collagen sheets. Cells proliferated 4.9 times faster, and cellular area spread was 2.7 times greater on compacted collagen sheets. Electrocompaction also resulted in 2.9 times greater focal adhesion area than on regular collagen hydrogel. The reported improvements in the cell-matrix interactions with electrocompaction would serve to expedite the population of electrocompacted collagen scaffolds by cells. The capacity of the method to fabricate nonlinear curved topographies with compositional heterogeneous layers is demonstrated by sequential deposition of collagenhydroxyapatite layer over a collagen layer. The complex curved topography of the nasal structure is replicated by the electrochemical compaction method. The presented electrochemical compaction process is an enabling modality which holds significant promise for reconstruction of a wide spectrum of topographically complex systems such as joint surfaces, craniofacial defects, ears, nose or urogenital forms. PMID:26069162

  19. Benign ear cyst or tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Osteomas; Exostoses; Tumor - ear; Cysts - ear; Ear cysts; Ear tumors; Bony tumor of the ear canal ... bony tumors of the ear canal (exostoses and osteomas) are caused by excess growth of bone. Repeated ...

  20. Royal jelly protects against ultraviolet B-induced photoaging in human skin fibroblasts via enhancing collagen production.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Min; Hwang, Eunson; Lee, Kwang Gill; Han, Sang-Mi; Cho, Yunhi; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2011-09-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) is a honeybee product containing proteins, carbohydrates, fats, free amino acids, vitamins, and minerals. As its principal unsaturated fatty acid, RJ contains 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10-HDA), which may have antitumor and antibacterial activity and a capacity to stimulate collagen production. RJ has attracted interest in various parts of the world for its pharmacological properties. However, the effects of RJ on ultraviolet (UV)-induced photoaging of the skin have not been reported. In this study we measured the 10-HDA content of RJ by high-performance liquid chromatography and tested the effects of RJ on UVB-induced skin photoaging in normal human dermal fibroblasts. The effects of RJ and 10-HDA on UVB-induced photoaging were tested by measuring procollagen type I, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 after UVB irradiation. The RJ contained about 0.211% 10-HDA. The UVB-irradiated human skin fibroblasts treated with RJ and 10-HDA had increased procollagen type I and TGF-β1 productions, but the level of MMP-1 was not changed. Thus RJ may potentially protect the skin from UVB-induced photoaging by enhancing collagen production.

  1. Arginase inhibition prevents bleomycin-induced pulmonary hypertension, vascular remodeling, and collagen deposition in neonatal rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, Hartmut; Dhaliwal, Rupinder; Ivanovska, Julijana; Kantores, Crystal; McNamara, Patrick J; Scott, Jeremy A; Belik, Jaques; Jankov, Robert P

    2015-03-15

    Arginase is an enzyme that limits substrate L-arginine bioavailability for the production of nitric oxide by the nitric oxide synthases and produces L-ornithine, which is a precursor for collagen formation and tissue remodeling. We studied the pulmonary vascular effects of arginase inhibition in an established model of repeated systemic bleomycin sulfate administration in neonatal rats that results in pulmonary hypertension and lung injury mimicking the characteristics typical of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. We report that arginase expression is increased in the lungs of bleomycin-exposed neonatal rats and that treatment with the arginase inhibitor amino-2-borono-6-hexanoic acid prevented the bleomycin-induced development of pulmonary hypertension and deposition of collagen. Arginase inhibition resulted in increased L-arginine and L-arginine bioavailability and increased pulmonary nitric oxide production. Arginase inhibition also normalized the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and reduced bleomycin-induced nitrative stress while having no effect on bleomycin-induced inflammation. Our data suggest that arginase is a promising target for therapeutic interventions in neonates aimed at preventing lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension.

  2. Collagen/β1 integrin interaction is required for embryoid body formation during cardiogenesis from murine induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The interactions between stem cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) mediated by integrins play important roles in the processes that determine stem cell fate. However, the role of ECM/integrin interaction in the formation of embryoid bodies (EBs) during cardiogenesis from murine induced pluripotent stem cells (miPSCs) remains unclear. Results In the present study, collagen type I and β1 integrin were expressed and upregulated synergistically during the formation of miPSC-derived EBs, with a peak expression at day 3 of differentiation. The blockage of collagen/β1 integrin interaction by β1 integrin blocking antibody resulted in the production of defective EBs that were characterized by decreased size and the absence of a shell-like layer composed of primitive endoderm cells. The quantification of spontaneous beating activity, cardiac-specific gene expression and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) immunostaining showed that the cardiac differentiation of these defective miPSC-derived EBs was lower than that of control EBs. Conclusions These findings indicate that collagen/β1 integrin interaction is required for the growth and cardiac differentiation of miPSC-derived EBs and will be helpful in future engineering of the matrix microenvironment within EBs to efficiently direct the cardiac fate of pluripotent stem cells to promote cardiovascular regeneration. PMID:23350814

  3. Collagenous gastroduodenitis.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rai, Mridula; Scholes, John V

    2011-10-01

    Collagenous gastroduodenitis is a rare histopathologic entity characterized by marked subepithelial collagen deposition with associated mucosal inflammatory infiltrate. Only 4 cases have been reported, of which 3 had associated collagenous colitis. Collagenous gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement is exceptionally rare with only 1 case reported so far in the literature. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with dyspepsia and mild anemia, who was found to have nodular gastric and duodenal mucosa on endoscopic examination. Histopathology showed collagenous gastroduodenitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second (and first in English literature) reported case of isolated collagenous gastroduodenitis.

  4. Collagenous gastroduodenitis.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rai, Mridula; Scholes, John V

    2011-10-01

    Collagenous gastroduodenitis is a rare histopathologic entity characterized by marked subepithelial collagen deposition with associated mucosal inflammatory infiltrate. Only 4 cases have been reported, of which 3 had associated collagenous colitis. Collagenous gastroduodenitis without colonic involvement is exceptionally rare with only 1 case reported so far in the literature. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with dyspepsia and mild anemia, who was found to have nodular gastric and duodenal mucosa on endoscopic examination. Histopathology showed collagenous gastroduodenitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second (and first in English literature) reported case of isolated collagenous gastroduodenitis. PMID:21346601

  5. Increased Inner Ear Susceptibility to Noise Injury in Mice With Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Takeshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Katsunuma, Sayaka; Hasegawa, Shingo; Tanimoto, Hitoshi; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the pathophysiology of diabetes-associated hearing impairment in type 1 diabetes using mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes (C57BL/6J; male). Hearing function was evaluated 1, 3, and 5 months after induction of diabetes (five diabetic and five control animals per time point) using auditory-evoked brain stem responses (ABRs). Mice (four diabetic and four control) were exposed to loud noise (105 dB) 5 months after induction of diabetes. ABRs were measured before and after noise exposure. Cochlear blood flows were measured by laser-Doppler flowmeter. Spiral ganglion cells (SGCs) were counted. Vessel endothelial cells were observed by CD31 immunostaining. Chronologic changes in the ABR threshold shift were not significantly different between the diabetic and control groups. However, vessel walls in the modiolus of the cochleae were significantly thicker in the diabetic group than the control group. Additionally, recovery from noise-induced injury was significantly impaired in diabetic mice. Reduced cochlea blood flows and SGC loss were observed in diabetic mice cochleae after noise exposure. Our data suggest that diabetic cochleae are more susceptible than controls to loud noise exposure, and decreased cochlear blood flow due to sclerosis of the vessels and consequent loss of SGCs are possible mechanisms of hearing impairment in diabetic patients. PMID:22851574

  6. Stretch-induced network reconfiguration of collagen fibres in the human facet capsular ligament.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sijia; Bassett, Danielle S; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials can display complex spatial patterns of cellular responses to external forces. Revealing and predicting the role of these patterns in material failure require an understanding of the statistical dependencies between spatially distributed changes in a cell's local biomechanical environment, including altered collagen fibre kinematics in the extracellular matrix. Here, we develop and apply a novel extension of network science methods to investigate how excessive tensile stretch of the human cervical facet capsular ligament (FCL), a common source of chronic neck pain, affects the local reorganization of collagen fibres. We define collagen alignment networks based on similarity in fibre alignment angles measured by quantitative polarized light imaging. We quantify the reorganization of these networks following macroscopic loading by describing the dynamic reconfiguration of network communities, regions of the material that display similar fibre alignment angles. Alterations in community structure occur smoothly over time, indicating coordinated adaptation of fibres to loading. Moreover, flexibility, a measure of network reconfiguration, tracks the loss of FCL's mechanical integrity at the onset of anomalous realignment (AR) and regions of AR display altered community structure. These findings use novel network-based techniques to explain abnormal collagen fibre reorganization, a dynamic and coordinated multivariate process underlying tissue failure. PMID:26819333

  7. Stretch-induced network reconfiguration of collagen fibres in the human facet capsular ligament.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sijia; Bassett, Danielle S; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials can display complex spatial patterns of cellular responses to external forces. Revealing and predicting the role of these patterns in material failure require an understanding of the statistical dependencies between spatially distributed changes in a cell's local biomechanical environment, including altered collagen fibre kinematics in the extracellular matrix. Here, we develop and apply a novel extension of network science methods to investigate how excessive tensile stretch of the human cervical facet capsular ligament (FCL), a common source of chronic neck pain, affects the local reorganization of collagen fibres. We define collagen alignment networks based on similarity in fibre alignment angles measured by quantitative polarized light imaging. We quantify the reorganization of these networks following macroscopic loading by describing the dynamic reconfiguration of network communities, regions of the material that display similar fibre alignment angles. Alterations in community structure occur smoothly over time, indicating coordinated adaptation of fibres to loading. Moreover, flexibility, a measure of network reconfiguration, tracks the loss of FCL's mechanical integrity at the onset of anomalous realignment (AR) and regions of AR display altered community structure. These findings use novel network-based techniques to explain abnormal collagen fibre reorganization, a dynamic and coordinated multivariate process underlying tissue failure.

  8. Long-term overproduction of collagen in radiation-induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Remy, J.; Wegrowski, J.; Crechet, F.; Martin, M.; Daburon, F. )

    1991-01-01

    Collagen metabolism was investigated in the fibrotic tissue which developed in pig thigh muscle 6 to 15 months after acute gamma irradiation. During this period, total collagen deposits in the fibrotic tissue increased 10-fold compared to the healthy muscle tissue. These deposits were composed mainly of type I and III collagen, and the type I/type III ratio was lower in the fibrotic than in the muscle tissue. Small pieces of both fibrotic and muscle tissue were incubated with (14C)proline. The (14C)hydroxyproline content of the fibrotic tissue reflected large concomitant increases in the synthesis of total collagen, mainly of types I and III, which rose 14- and 17-fold, respectively. Similarly, the level of type I and type III procollagen mRNAs rose 9- and 5-fold, respectively, in the fibrotic tissue versus the muscle tissue. These results suggest that procollagen gene transcription or RNA maturation in the cell nuclei is activated in the fibrotic tissue. The possibility that such activation is due to the long-term inflammatory state of this tissue is discussed.

  9. Type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats. Passive transfer with serum and evidence that IgG anticollagen antibodies can cause arthritis

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We have found that serum from rats with type II collagen-induced arthritis, when fractionated with 50% ammonium sulfate and concentrated, would transfer arthritis to nonimmunized recipients. The arthritis in recipients developed within 18-72 h and displayed all of the major histopathologic characteristics of the early lesion in immunized animals but was transient and less severe. Although consideration was given to the possibility that a circulating immune complex was involved, no evidence of such a complex was detected. Further fractionation of the serum yielded an IgG anticollagen antibody that was fully active in transferring disease. The antibody's reaction was inhibited by the native bovine type II collagen used for immunization of donors and the antibody strongly cross-reacted with homologous type II collage but not with denatured collagen. These studies demonstrate that arthritis in rats can be induced with anti- type II collagen antibodies and suggest that an autoimmune process is involved. Because antibodies to collagen have also been detected in human rheumatic diseases, further investigation of the characteristics of collagen antibodies capable of inducing arthritis seems warranted. PMID:7054355

  10. Aronia melanocarpa Concentrate Ameliorates Pro-Inflammatory Responses in HaCaT Keratinocytes and 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate-Induced Ear Edema in Mice.

    PubMed

    Goh, Ah Ra; Youn, Gi Soo; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Won, Moo Ho; Han, Sang-Zin; Lim, Soon Sung; Lee, Keun Wook; Choi, Soo Young; Park, Jinseu

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal expression of pro-inflammatory mediators such as cell adhesion molecules and cytokines has been implicated in various inflammatory skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Aronia melanocarpa concentrate (AC) and its action mechanisms using in vivo and in vitro skin inflammation models. Topical application of AC on mouse ears significantly suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced ear edema formation, as judged by measuring ear thickness and weight, and histological analysis. Topical administration of AC also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in TPA-stimulated mouse ears. Pretreatment with AC suppressed TNF-α-induced ICAM-I expression and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. In addition, AC significantly decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation as well as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation in TNF-α-stimulated HaCaT cells. AC and its constituent cyanidin 3-glucoside also attenuated TNF-α-induced IKK activation, IκB degradation, p65 phosphorylation/nuclear translocation, and p65 DNA binding activity in HaCaT cells. Overall, our results indicate that AC exerts anti-inflammatory activities by inhibiting expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in vitro and in vivo possibly through suppression of ROS-MAPK-NF-κB signaling pathways. Therefore, AC may be developed as a therapeutic agent to treat various inflammatory skin diseases.

  11. CZ415, a Highly Selective mTOR Inhibitor Showing in Vivo Efficacy in a Collagen Induced Arthritis Model.

    PubMed

    Cansfield, Andrew D; Ladduwahetty, Tammy; Sunose, Mihiro; Ellard, Katie; Lynch, Rosemary; Newton, Anthea L; Lewis, Ann; Bennett, Gavin; Zinn, Nico; Thomson, Douglas W; Rüger, Anne J; Feutrill, John T; Rausch, Oliver; Watt, Alan P; Bergamini, Giovanna

    2016-08-11

    CZ415, a potent ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor with unprecedented selectivity over any other kinase is described. In addition to a comprehensive characterization of its activities in vitro, in vitro ADME, and in vivo pharmacokinetic data are reported. The suitability of this inhibitor for studying in vivo mTOR biology is demonstrated in a mechanistic mouse model monitoring mTOR proximal downstream phosphorylation signaling. Furthermore, the compound reported here is the first ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor described to show efficacy in a semitherapeutic collagen induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. PMID:27563401

  12. Mechanical investigations of sound-induced responses in a simple ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotny, Manuela; Hummel, Jennifer; Kössl, Manfred; Udayashankar, Arun Palghat; Wolf, Konstantin

    2015-12-01

    Previous in-vivo studies have shown that the tonotopically-organized hearing organ, the crista acustica, of the bushcricket Mecopoda elongata is a promising model for investigations of basic hearing mechanics. This linearly arranged organ with a length of <1 mm consists of about 45 receptor units and processes frequencies from about 4 up to at least 80 kHz. Pure-tone stimulation of the crista acustica leads to travelling waves along the longitudinal axis of the hearing organ. We found that the amplitude maximum of the sound-induced travelling waves is shifted in the radial direction during the propagation of the travelling wave. The overall amplitude maximum was found to be located always on one side (anterior) in respect to the transduction place. This mechanical biasing presumably optimizes the signal transduction. Additionally, the amplitude response maximum of the travelling wave during one cycle of motion exhibits different degrees in the radial shift. During broad-band noise stimulation, the mechanical response of the crista acustica exhibits a low-frequency dominance. When using the conspecific chirp of M. elongata (2-90 kHz), as stimulus frequencies above 30 kHz do not lead to large responses even though the hearing organ is able to detect frequencies up to at least 80 kHz, covering the frequency range of the chirp with its amplitude maximum at about 70 kHz.

  13. Collagen fillers.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Leslie; Kaufman, Joely; Saghari, Sogol

    2006-01-01

    Collagen implants, both animal and human derived, have been used for soft tissue augmentation for many years. Bovine collagen fillers were the most popular injectable implants for nearly two decades in the United States. Since then, human bioengineered collagen products have been available in addition to hyaluronic acid-containing fillers. This article outlines the different types of injectable collagen implants, injection techniques, preferred methods of treatment, and possible adverse reactions to the injectable materials.

  14. Delphinidin prevents high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by inhibition of NOX-1 and mitochondrial superoxide in mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Seung Eun; Jo, Hye Jun; Kim, Yong-Woon; Cho, Young-Je; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Park, So-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the effect of delphinidin on high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis in mesangial cells. Glucose dose-dependently (5.6-25 mM) increased cell proliferation and collagen I and IV mRNA levels, whereas pretreatment with delphinidin (50 μM) prevented cell proliferation and the increased collagen mRNA levels induced by high glucose (25 mM). High glucose increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and this was suppressed by pretreating delphinidin or the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine. NADPH oxidase (NOX) 1 was upregulated by high glucose, but pretreatment with delphinidin abrogated this upregulation. Increased mitochondrial superoxide by 25 mM glucose was also suppressed by delphinidin. The NOX inhibitor apocynin and mitochondria-targeted antioxidant Mito TEMPO inhibited ROS generation and cell proliferation induced by high glucose. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 was increased by high glucose, which was suppressed by delphinidin, apocynin or Mito TEMPO. Furthermore, PD98059 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) prevented the high glucose-induced cell proliferation and increased collagen mRNA levels. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β protein levels were elevated by high glucose, and pretreatment with delphinidin or PD98059 prevented this augmentation. These results suggest that delphinidin prevents high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by inhibition of NOX-1 and mitochondrial superoxide in mesangial cells.

  15. Intravenous anesthetic propofol suppresses prostaglandin E2 and cysteinyl leukotriene production and reduces edema formation in arachidonic acid-induced ear inflammation.

    PubMed

    Inada, Takefumi; Hirota, Kiichi; Shingu, Koh

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is an intravenous drug widely used for anesthesia and sedation. Previously, propofol was shown to inhibit cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activities. Because these enzyme-inhibiting effects have only been demonstrated in vitro, this study sought to ascertain whether similar effects might also be observed in vivo. In the current studies, effects of propofol were tested in a murine model of arachidonic acid-induced ear inflammation. Specifically, propofol - as a pre-treatment -- was intraperitoneally and then topical application of arachidonic acid was performed. After 1 h, tissue biopsies were collected and tested for the presence of edema and for levels of inflammatory mediators. The results indicated that the administration of propofol significantly suppressed ear edema formation, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, and tissue production of both prostaglandin E2 and cysteinyl leukotrienes. From the data, it can be concluded that propofol could exert anti-COX and anti-5-LOX activities in an in vivo model and that these activities in turn could have, at least in part, suppressed arachidonic acid-induced edema formation in the ear.

  16. The inhibitory mechanism of crude saponin fraction from Korean Red Ginseng in collagen-induced platelet aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Bo Ra; Kim, Su Jung; Hong, Seung Bok; Park, Hwa-Jin; Cho, Jae Youl; Rhee, Man Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background Korean Red Ginseng has been used as a traditional oriental medicine to treat illness and to promote health for several thousand years in Eastern Asia. It is widely accepted that ginseng saponins, ginsenosides, are the major active ingredients responsible for Korean Red Ginseng’s therapeutic activity against many kinds of illness. Although the crude saponin fraction (CSF) displayed antiplatelet activity, the molecular mechanism of its action remains to be elucidated. Methods The platelet aggregation was induced by collagen, the ligand of integrin αIIβI and glycoprotein VI. The crude saponin’s effects on granule secretion [e.g., calcium ion mobilization and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release] were determined. The activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs), and p38 MAPK, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt was analyzed by immunoblotting. In addition, the activation of integrin αIIbβIII was examined by fluorocytometry. Results CSF strongly inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation and ATP release in a concentration-dependent manner. It also markedly suppressed [Ca2+]i mobilization in collagen-stimulated platelets. Immunoblotting assay revealed that CSF significantly suppressed ERK1/2, p38, JNK, PI3K, Akt, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 phosphorylation. In addition, our fraction strongly inhibited the fibrinogen binding to integrin αIIbβ3. Conclusion Our present data suggest that CSF may have a strong antiplatelet property and it can be considered as a candidate with therapeutic potential for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders involving abnormal platelet function. PMID:26199561

  17. Alkaline phosphatase induces the mineralization of sheets of collagen implanted subcutaneously in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Beertsen, W; van den Bos, T

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether alkaline phosphatase (ALP) can cause the mineralization of collagenous matrices in vivo, bovine intestinal ALP was covalently bound to slices of guanidine-extracted demineralized bovine dentin (DDS). The preparations were implanted subcutaneously over the right half of the rat skull. Control slices not treated with the enzyme were implanted over the left half of the skull of the same animals. Specimens were harvested after periods varying from 1 to 4 wk. It was shown that ALP-coupled DDS rapidly accumulated hydroxyapatite crystals. 4 wk after implantation, the content of calcium and phosphate per microgram of hydroxyproline amounted up to 80 and 60%, respectively, of that found in normal bovine dentin. Our observations present direct evidence that ALP may play a crucial role in the induction of hydroxyapatite deposition in collagenous matrices in vivo. Images PMID:1602003

  18. Ear tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Myringotomy; Tympanostomy; Ear tube surgery; Pressure equalization tubes; Ventilating tubes; Ear infection - tubes; Otitis - tubes ... trapped fluid can flow out of the middle ear. This prevents hearing loss and reduces the risk ...

  19. Ears and Altitude

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ears and Altitude Ears and Altitude Patient Health Information ... uncomfortable feeling of fullness or pressure. Why do ears pop? Normally, swallowing causes a little click or ...

  20. Ear tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100045.htm Ear tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 4 Overview The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Update Date 8/ ...

  1. Travel Inside the Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menu Home Health Info Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Balance Taste and Smell Voice, Speech, and Language ... here Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Travel Inside the Ear Video When sound waves ...

  2. Hypoxia-induced collagen crosslinking as a mechanism for enhancing mechanical properties of engineered articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Makris, E.A.; Hu, J.C.; Athanasiou, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The focus of tissue engineering of neocartilage has traditionally been on enhancing extracellular matrix and thus biomechanical properties. Emphasis has been placed on the enhancement of collagen type and quantity, and, concomitantly, tensile properties. The objective of this study was to improve crosslinking of the collagen network by testing the hypothesis that hypoxia could promote pyridinoline (PYR) crosslinks and, thus, improve neocartilage’s tensile properties. Methods Chondrocyte expression of lysyl oxidase (LOX), an enzyme responsible for the formation of collagen PYR crosslinks, was first assessed pre- and post- hypoxia application. Then, the mechanical properties of self-assembled neocartilage constructs were measured, after 4 weeks of culture, for groups exposed to 4% O2 at different initiation times and durations, i.e., during the 1st and 3rd weeks, 3rd and 4th weeks, 4th week only, continuously after cell seeding, or never. Results Results showed that LOX gene expression was upregulated ~20-fold in chondrocytes in response to hypoxia. Hypoxia applied during the 3rd and 4th weeks significantly increased PYR crosslinks without affecting collagen content. Excitingly, neocartilage tensile properties were increased ~2-fold. It should be noted that these properties exhibited a distinct temporal dependence to hypoxia exposure, since upregulation of these properties was due to hypoxia applied only during the 3rd and 4th weeks. Conclusion These data elucidate the role of hypoxia-mediated upregulation of LOX and subsequent increases in PYR crosslinks in engineered cartilage. These results hold promise toward applying hypoxia at precise time points to promote tensile integrity and direct construct maturation. PMID:23353112

  3. Preliminary evaluation of collagen as a component in the thermally induced 'weld'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemole, G. M., Jr.; Anderson, R. Rox; DeCoste, Sue

    1991-06-01

    A simple thermodynamic approach to tissue 'welding' was studied. Fresh bovine tendon (67% type I collagen) was sectioned into disk shaped pieces, pairs of which were inserted between bowed glass coverslips and wrapped in aluminum foil. The packets were heated in a waterbath according to two protocols. In group I, packets were tested for four minutes at temperatures between 55-65 degree(s)C, in 1 degree(s)C intervals. In group II, the packets were kept at 62 degree(s)C for 4 minutes while the rate of cooling was altered. The force necessary to separate the tendon disks was then measured. The optimal temperature for tissue bonding (group I) was 62 degree(s)C (598 gm/in2). Stress values below 250 gm/in2 could be achieved without heat application and were considered non-welds. Group II showed that the faster the sample cools, the stronger the bond. Several conclusions can be postulated. The narrow temperature region necessary for tissue 'welding' strongly suggests that melting of type I collagen fibrils is involved. Bonding presumably occurs at 62 degree(s)C by allowing (alpha) -strands from the collagen super-helix molecule to form new, random connections. Group II results suggest that trans-incisional reannealing of unraveled helices does not play a role in tissue bonding. Rapid cooling allows less time for extended helix reformation; same-side a-helix reannealing may inhibit effective welds by reducing sites for trans-incisional visco-elastic bonding. Although the exact nature and optimization of thermal tissue 'welds' remains unclear, the behavior of collagen appears to play a central role.

  4. Role for high-glucose-induced protein O-GlcNAcylation in stimulating cardiac fibroblast collagen synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Hugo; Fricovsky, Eduardo; Ihm, Sang; Schimke, Magdalena; Maya-Ramos, Lisandro; Aroonsakool, Nakon; Ceballos, Guillermo; Dillmann, Wolfgang; Villarreal, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Excess enzyme-mediated protein O-GlcNAcylation is known to occur with diabetes mellitus. A characteristic of diabetic cardiomyopathy is the development of myocardial fibrosis. The role that enhanced protein O-GlcNAcylation plays in modulating the phenotype of cardiac fibroblasts (CF) is unknown. To address this issue, rat CF were cultured in normal glucose (NG; 5 mM glucose) or high-glucose (HG; 25 mM) media for 48 h. Results demonstrate that CF cultured in HG have higher levels (∼50%) of overall protein O-GlcNAcylation vs. NG cells. Key regulators of collagen synthesis such as transforming-growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), SMADs 2/3, and SMAD 7 protein levels, including those of arginase I and II, were altered, leading to increases in collagen levels. The nuclear transcription factor Sp1 and arginase II evidence excess O-GlcNAcylation in HG cells. Expression in CF of an adenovirus coding for the enzyme N-acetylglucosaminidase, which removes O-GlcNAc moieties from proteins, decreased Sp1 and arginase II O-GlcNAcylation and restored HG-induced perturbations in CF back to NG levels. These findings may have important pathophysiological implications for the development of diabetes-induced cardiac fibrosis. PMID:24553187

  5. Mechanism for Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR56-Mediated RhoA Activation Induced By Collagen III Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Rong; Jeong, Sung-Jin; Yang, Annie; Wen, Miaoyun; Saslowsky, David E.; Lencer, Wayne I.; Araç, Demet; Piao, Xianhua

    2014-01-01

    GPR56 is a member of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Despite the importance of GPR56 in brain development, where mutations cause a devastating human brain malformation called bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria (BFPP), the signaling mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. Like many other adhesion GPCRs, GPR56 is cleaved via a GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain into N- and C-terminal fragments (GPR56N and GPR56C); however, the biological significance of this cleavage is elusive. Taking advantage of the recent identification of a GPR56 ligand and the presence of BFPP-associated mutations, we investigated the molecular mechanism of GPR56 signaling. We demonstrate that ligand binding releases GPR56N from the membrane-bound GPR56C and triggers the association of GPR56C with lipid rafts and RhoA activation. Furthermore, one of the BFPP-associated mutations, L640R, does not affect collagen III-induced lipid raft association of GPR56. Instead, it specifically abolishes collagen III-mediated RhoA activation. Together, these findings reveal a novel signaling mechanism that may apply to other members of the adhesion GPCR family. PMID:24949629

  6. A role for adhesion and degranulation-promoting adapter protein in collagen-induced platelet activation mediated via integrin α2β1

    PubMed Central

    JARVIS, G. E.; BIHAN, D.; HAMAIA, S.; PUGH, N.; GHEVAERT, C. J. G.; PEARCE, A. C.; HUGHES, C. E.; WATSON, S. P.; WARE, J.; RUDD, C. E.; FARNDALE, R. W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Collagen-induced platelet activation is a key step in the development of arterial thrombosis via its interaction with the receptors glycoprotein (GP)VI and integrin α2β1. Adhesion and degranulation-promoting adapter protein (ADAP) regulates αIIbβ3 in platelets and αLβ2 in T cells, and is phosphorylated in GPVI-deficient platelets activated by collagen. Objectives To determine whether ADAP plays a role in collagen-induced platelet activation and in the regulation and function of α2β1. Methods Using ADAP−/− mice and synthetic collagen peptides, we investigated the role of ADAP in platelet aggregation, adhesion, spreading, thromboxane synthesis, and tyrosine phosphorylation. Results and Conclusions Platelet aggregation and phosphorylation of phospholipase Cγ2 induced by collagen were attenuated in ADAP−/− platelets. However, aggregation and signaling induced by collagen-related peptide (CRP), a GPVI-selective agonist, were largely unaffected. Platelet adhesion to CRP was also unaffected by ADAP deficiency. Adhesion to the α2β1-selective ligand GFOGER and to a peptide (III-04), which supports adhesion that is dependent on both GPVI and α2β1, was reduced in ADAP−/− platelets. An impedance-based label-free detection technique, which measures adhesion and spreading of platelets, indicated that, in the absence of ADAP, spreading on GFOGER was also reduced. This was confirmed with non-fluorescent differential-interference contrast microscopy, which revealed reduced filpodia formation in ADAP−/− platelets adherent to GFOGER. This indicates that ADAP plays a role in mediating platelet activation via the collagen-binding integrin α2β1. In addition, we found that ADAP−/− mice, which are mildly thrombocytopenic, have enlarged spleens as compared with wild-type animals. This may reflect increased removal of platelets from the circulation. PMID:22103309

  7. Native type IV collagen induces cell migration through a CD9 and DDR1-dependent pathway in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Castro-Sanchez, Luis; Soto-Guzman, Adriana; Navarro-Tito, Napoleon; Martinez-Orozco, Raul; Salazar, Eduardo Perez

    2010-11-01

    CD9 is a member of the tetraspanin family and is widely expressed in the plasma membrane of several cell types as well as malignant cells. CD9 associates with a number of transmembrane proteins, which facilitates biological processes, including cell signaling, adhesion, migration and proliferation. DDR1 is activated by native type IV collagen and overexpressed in human breast cancer. Type IV collagen is the main component of basement membranes, and may interact with cell surface biomolecules, promoting adhesion and motility. However, the role of DDR1 and type IV collagen in the regulation of CD9-cell surface levels and migration in breast cancer cells has not been studied in detail. We demonstrate here that native type IV collagen induces a transient increase of CD9-cell surface levels through a DDR1-dependent pathway in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, as revealed by flow cytometry and Western blotting using specific antibodies that recognize CD9. In contrast, type IV collagen does not induce any increase of CD9-cell surface levels in the mammary non-tumorigenic epithelial cells MCF10A and MCF12A. Transient increase of CD9-cell surface levels is coupled with clathrin-mediated endocytosis and it is dependent of DDR1 expression. In addition, type IV collagen induces cell migration through a DDR1 and CD9-dependent pathway. In summary, our data demonstrate, for the first time, that native type IV collagen induces a transient increase of CD9-cell surface levels and cell migration through a DDR1 and CD9-dependent pathway in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

  8. Comparative effects of biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction, and tocopherol in enhancing collagen synthesis and inhibiting collagen degradation in stress-induced premature senescence model of human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Makpol, Suzana; Jam, Faidruz Azura; Khor, Shy Cian; Ismail, Zahariah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2013-01-01

    Biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF), and tocopherol have shown antiaging properties. However, the combined effects of these compounds on skin aging are yet to be investigated. This study aimed to elucidate the skin aging effects of biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol on stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) model of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) by determining the expression of collagen and MMPs at gene and protein levels. Primary HDFs were treated with biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol prior to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure. The expression of COL1A1, COL3A1, MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, and MMP9 genes was determined by qRT-PCR. Type I and type III procollagen proteins were measured by Western blotting while the activities of MMPs were quantified by fluorometric Sensolyte MMP Kit. Our results showed that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol upregulated collagen genes and downregulated MMP genes (P < 0.05). Type I procollagen and type III procollagen protein levels were significantly increased in response to biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol treatment (P < 0.05) with reduction in MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 activities (P < 0.05). These findings indicated that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol effectively enhanced collagen synthesis and inhibited collagen degradation and therefore may protect the skin from aging.

  9. Comparative effects of biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction, and tocopherol in enhancing collagen synthesis and inhibiting collagen degradation in stress-induced premature senescence model of human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Makpol, Suzana; Jam, Faidruz Azura; Khor, Shy Cian; Ismail, Zahariah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2013-01-01

    Biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF), and tocopherol have shown antiaging properties. However, the combined effects of these compounds on skin aging are yet to be investigated. This study aimed to elucidate the skin aging effects of biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol on stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) model of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) by determining the expression of collagen and MMPs at gene and protein levels. Primary HDFs were treated with biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol prior to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure. The expression of COL1A1, COL3A1, MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, and MMP9 genes was determined by qRT-PCR. Type I and type III procollagen proteins were measured by Western blotting while the activities of MMPs were quantified by fluorometric Sensolyte MMP Kit. Our results showed that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol upregulated collagen genes and downregulated MMP genes (P < 0.05). Type I procollagen and type III procollagen protein levels were significantly increased in response to biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol treatment (P < 0.05) with reduction in MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 activities (P < 0.05). These findings indicated that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol effectively enhanced collagen synthesis and inhibited collagen degradation and therefore may protect the skin from aging. PMID:24396567

  10. Comparative Effects of Biodynes, Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction, and Tocopherol in Enhancing Collagen Synthesis and Inhibiting Collagen Degradation in Stress-Induced Premature Senescence Model of Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Jam, Faidruz Azura; Ismail, Zahariah; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah

    2013-01-01

    Biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF), and tocopherol have shown antiaging properties. However, the combined effects of these compounds on skin aging are yet to be investigated. This study aimed to elucidate the skin aging effects of biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol on stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) model of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) by determining the expression of collagen and MMPs at gene and protein levels. Primary HDFs were treated with biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol prior to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure. The expression of COL1A1, COL3A1, MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, and MMP9 genes was determined by qRT-PCR. Type I and type III procollagen proteins were measured by Western blotting while the activities of MMPs were quantified by fluorometric Sensolyte MMP Kit. Our results showed that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol upregulated collagen genes and downregulated MMP genes (P < 0.05). Type I procollagen and type III procollagen protein levels were significantly increased in response to biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol treatment (P < 0.05) with reduction in MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 activities (P < 0.05). These findings indicated that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol effectively enhanced collagen synthesis and inhibited collagen degradation and therefore may protect the skin from aging. PMID:24396567

  11. Biomechanical strain induces elastin and collagen production in human pluripotent stem cell-derived vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wanjare, Maureen; Agarwal, Nayan

    2015-01-01

    Blood vessels are subjected to numerous biomechanical forces that work harmoniously but, when unbalanced because of vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) dysfunction, can trigger a wide range of ailments such as cerebrovascular, peripheral artery, and coronary artery diseases. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) serve as useful therapeutic tools that may help provide insight on the effect that such biomechanical stimuli have on vSMC function and differentiation. In this study, we aimed to examine the effect of biomechanical strain on vSMCs derived from hPSCs. The effects of two types of tensile strain on hPSC-vSMC derivatives at different stages of differentiation were examined. The derivatives included smooth muscle-like cells (SMLCs), mature SMLCs, and contractile vSMCs. All vSMC derivatives aligned perpendicularly to the direction of cyclic uniaxial strain. Serum deprivation and short-term uniaxial strain had a synergistic effect in enhancing collagen type I, fibronectin, and elastin gene expression. Furthermore, long-term uniaxial strain deterred collagen type III gene expression, whereas long-term circumferential strain upregulated both collagen type III and elastin gene expression. Finally, long-term uniaxial strain downregulated extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in more mature vSMC derivatives while upregulating elastin in less mature vSMC derivatives. Overall, our findings suggest that in vitro application of both cyclic uniaxial and circumferential tensile strain on hPSC-vSMC derivatives induces cell alignment and affects ECM gene expression. Therefore, mechanical stimulation of hPSC-vSMC derivatives using tensile strain may be important in modulating the phenotype and thus the function of vSMCs in tissue-engineered vessels. PMID:26108668

  12. Biomechanical strain induces elastin and collagen production in human pluripotent stem cell-derived vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wanjare, Maureen; Agarwal, Nayan

    2015-01-01

    Blood vessels are subjected to numerous biomechanical forces that work harmoniously but, when unbalanced because of vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) dysfunction, can trigger a wide range of ailments such as cerebrovascular, peripheral artery, and coronary artery diseases. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) serve as useful therapeutic tools that may help provide insight on the effect that such biomechanical stimuli have on vSMC function and differentiation. In this study, we aimed to examine the effect of biomechanical strain on vSMCs derived from hPSCs. The effects of two types of tensile strain on hPSC-vSMC derivatives at different stages of differentiation were examined. The derivatives included smooth muscle-like cells (SMLCs), mature SMLCs, and contractile vSMCs. All vSMC derivatives aligned perpendicularly to the direction of cyclic uniaxial strain. Serum deprivation and short-term uniaxial strain had a synergistic effect in enhancing collagen type I, fibronectin, and elastin gene expression. Furthermore, long-term uniaxial strain deterred collagen type III gene expression, whereas long-term circumferential strain upregulated both collagen type III and elastin gene expression. Finally, long-term uniaxial strain downregulated extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in more mature vSMC derivatives while upregulating elastin in less mature vSMC derivatives. Overall, our findings suggest that in vitro application of both cyclic uniaxial and circumferential tensile strain on hPSC-vSMC derivatives induces cell alignment and affects ECM gene expression. Therefore, mechanical stimulation of hPSC-vSMC derivatives using tensile strain may be important in modulating the phenotype and thus the function of vSMCs in tissue-engineered vessels. PMID:26108668

  13. Synergistic effect of interleukin 1 alpha on nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-induced up-regulation of human beta-defensin 2 in middle ear epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung-Kyun; Lee, Haa-Yung; Pan, Huiqi; Takeshita, Tamotsu; Park, Raekil; Cha, Kiweon; Andalibi, Ali; Lim, David J

    2006-01-01

    Background We recently showed that beta-defensins have antimicrobial activity against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and that interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) up-regulates the transcription of beta-defensin 2 (DEFB4 according to new nomenclature of the Human Genome Organization) in human middle ear epithelial cells via a Src-dependent Raf-MEK1/2-ERK signaling pathway. Based on these observations, we investigated if human middle ear epithelial cells could release IL-1 alpha upon exposure to a lysate of NTHi and if this cytokine could have a synergistic effect on beta-defensin 2 up-regulation by the bacterial components. Methods The studies described herein were carried out using epithelial cell lines as well as a murine model of acute otitis media (OM). Human cytokine macroarray analysis was performed to detect the released cytokines in response to NTHi exposure. Real time quantitative PCR was done to compare the induction of IL-1 alpha or beta-defensin 2 mRNAs and to identify the signaling pathways involved. Direct activation of the beta-defensin 2 promoter was monitored using a beta-defensin 2 promoter-Luciferase construct. An IL-1 alpha blocking antibody was used to demonstrate the direct involvement of this cytokine on DEFB4 induction. Results Middle ear epithelial cells released IL-1 alpha when stimulated by NTHi components and this cytokine acted in an autocrine/paracrine synergistic manner with NTHi to up-regulate beta-defensin 2. This synergistic effect of IL-1 alpha on NTHi-induced beta-defensin 2 up-regulation appeared to be mediated by the p38 MAP kinase pathway. Conclusion We demonstrate that IL-1 alpha is secreted by middle ear epithelial cells upon exposure to NTHi components and that it can synergistically act with certain of these molecules to up-regulate beta-defensin 2 via the p38 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:16433908

  14. [Hypopharyngeal carcinoma and red ear drum].

    PubMed

    Bender, B; Widmann, G; Riechelmann, H; Schmutzhard, J

    2011-04-01

    A 46-year-old male patient with an unresectable hypopharyngeal carcinoma was treated with primary radio-chemotherapy. At follow-up, the patient presented with a red ear drum and combined hearing loss. Because of radiotherapy-induced tubal dysfunction, paracentesis was performed. Biopsy of the polypoid middle ear mucosa revealed petrous bone infiltration of hypopharyngeal carcinoma. MRI studies revealed paracarotideal tumor infiltration to the petrous bone and the middle ear arising from a cervical retropharyngeal lymph node metastasis. PMID:20963385

  15. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Mello, Maria Luiza S.

    2016-01-01

    Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs) with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140–820 cm-1) after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of –SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of –SO3- groups (1236–1225 cm-1) overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the –SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder) at 1027–1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue

  16. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2016-01-01

    Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs) with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1) after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1) overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder) at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue under

  17. Alteration of gene expression in human middle ear epithelial cells induced by influenza A virus and its implication for the pathogenesis of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hua Hua; Long, James P; Li, Daneng; DeMaria, Thomas F

    2004-10-01

    Influenza A virus infection plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced acute otitis media in children. An understanding of how influenza A virus modulates host cellular responses is critically important in efforts to explore the molecular mechanisms of this synergism. We used microarray technology to characterize the mRNA expression profile in human middle ear epithelial cells induced by influenza A virus. Alterations of mRNA expression in 142 out of approximately 12,600 genes were observed at 24h after virus infection. Of these 142 genes with altered expression, interferon inducible genes, chemokine and cytokine genes, pro- and antiapoptotic genes, signal transduction and transcription factors, cellular immune response, cell cycle and metabolism genes were the most prominent. Our results reveal several previously unknown alterations of host gene expression induced by influenza A virus which may provide new targets for further analysis of its role in this particular host-pathogen interaction.

  18. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the mineralization of type I collagen via a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process.

    PubMed

    Olszta, M J; Douglas, E P; Gower, L B

    2003-05-01

    We have put forth the hypothesis that collagen is mineralized during bone formation by means of a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process, in which a liquid-phase mineral precursor could be drawn into the gaps and grooves of the collagen fibrils by capillary action, and upon solidification, leave the collagenous matrix embedded with nanoscopic crystallites of hydroxyapatite. This hypothesis is based upon our observations of capillarity seen for liquid-phase mineral precursors generated with calcium carbonate. Here, we demonstrate proof-of-concept of this mechanism by mineralizing Cellagen sponges (type I reconstituted bovine collagen) in the presence of a liquid-precursor phase to calcium carbonate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the mineralized collagen, which in combination with selective etching studies, revealed the extent to which the mineral phase infiltrated the collagenous matrix. A roughly periodic array of disk-like crystals was found to be embedded within the collagen fibers, demonstrating that the mineral phase spans across the diameter of the fibers. Some of the morphological features of the mineralized fibers in our in vitro model system are similar to those seen in natural bone (albeit of a different mineral phase), lending support to our hypothesis that these non-equilibrium morphologies might be generated by a PILP process. SEM provides a different perspective on the morphology of bone, and has been useful here for examining the extent of mineralization in composite structures generated via the PILP process. However, further investigation is needed to examine the nanostructural arrangement of the crystallites embedded within the collagenous matrix.

  19. Effects of Wutou Decoction on DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications in Rats with Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Fei; Wen, Cai-Yu-Zhu; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Yu; Huang, Ying; Hu, Yong-Hong; Tu, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wutou decoction (WTD) has been wildly applied in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and experimental arthritis in rats for many years. Epigenetic deregulation is associated with the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis; however, the effects of WTD on epigenetic changes are unclear. This study is set to explore the effects of WTD on DNA methylation and histone modifications in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Methods. The CIA model was established by the stimulation of collagen and adjuvant. The knee synovium was stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and methylated CpG binding domain 2 (MBD2) expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by Real-Time PCR. The global DNA histone H3-K4/H3-K27 methylation and total histones H3 and H4 acetylation of PBMCs were detected. Results. Our data demonstrated that the DNMT1 mRNA expression was significantly lowered in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). The DNA methylation level was significantly reduced in group WTD compared to that in group CIA (P < 0.05). Moreover, H3 acetylation of PBMCs was overexpressed in WTD compared with CIA (P < 0.05). Conclusions. WTD may modulate DNA methylation and histone modifications, functioning as anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:27042192

  20. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Colletti, R B; Trainer, T D

    1989-12-01

    Subepithelial fibrosis has previously been reported in the small intestine (collagenous sprue) and colon (collagenous colitis). We report a 15-yr-old girl with chronic gastritis and subepithelial fibrosis of the gastric corpus who presented with recurrent abdominal pain and acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Nodularity and erythema of the gastric corpus were persistent endoscopic findings. Biopsies revealed patchy chronic active gastritis with a striking focal thick band of collagen immediately beneath the surface epithelial cells that did not extend to deeper portions of the lamina propria. Contrast radiography demonstrated an abnormal mucosa of the gastric corpus with a mosaiclike surface pattern. Numerous studies have failed to elucidate the etiology. Despite treatment with ranitidine, sucralfate, and furazolidone, there has been no clinical or pathologic improvement. The pathogenesis and prognosis of collagenous gastritis, and its relationship to collagenous sprue and collagenous colitis, remain to be defined. PMID:2583419

  1. CYTOKINE-INDUCED CHROMATIN MODIFICATIONS OF THE TYPE I COLLAGEN ALPHA 2 GENE DURING INTESTINAL ENDOTHELIAL-TO-MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Tammy; Scarpa, Melania; Rieder, Florian; West, Gail; Stylianou, Eleni

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibrosis of the intestine is currently an irreversible complication of Inflammatory Bowel Disease yet little is understood of the underlying pathogenesis and anti-fibrotic strategies remain elusive. To develop effective therapies, knowledge of the mechanism of transcription and excessive deposition of type I collagen - a hallmark of fibrosis, is needed. We have shown previously that endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) contributes to the pool of intestinal fibrotic cells and that a cytokine cocktail (IL1-β, TNF-α and TGF-β) induces Collagen I alpha 2 (COL1A2) mRNA and protein. Methods Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on pure cultures of human intestinal mucosal endothelial cells undergoing EndoMT were performed with antibodies to specific histone modifications and RNA polymerase II. RT-PCR was used to quantify the levels of Col1A2 and endothelial specific von Willebrand factor (vWF) mRNA. Results We show that cytokines induce selective chromatin modifications (histone 4 hyperacetylation and hypermethylation of histone 3) and phosphorylated RNA polymerase II at the COL1A2 promoter. Hypoacetylated and hypomethylated histone 3 was detected on the repressed vWF gene. Prolonged exposure to cytokines (16 days) retained hyperacetylation of select lysines in H4 on the COL1A2 promoter. Removal of cytokines after 16 days and continued culture for 10 days, showed persistent hyperacetylation at lysine 16 in histone H4. Conclusion This is the first study to show that COL1A2 gene expression is associated with cytokine-induced, temporally ordered and persistent chromatin modifications and suggests that these are important determinants of gene expression in EndoMT and intestinal fibrosis. PMID:23635716

  2. Expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand is related to sex differences in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Pan, Xiongxiong; Zhu, Qin; Lu, Hao; Wang, Kunpeng; Ni, Xuhao; Lu, Yunjie; Gu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Osteoclasts are responsible for bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis, and women show greater disease activity and functional disability than men. This study aimed to examine differences in the pathogenesis of collagen-induced arthritis and osteoclastogenesis between female and male mice in vivo and in vitro. Female mice exhibited worse disease progression and increased osteoclastogenesis, as measured by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining than male mice. Significantly higher levels of CD11b(+) cells were detected in the bone marrow of female mice than that of male mice. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand was higher in female mice that were immunized with or without collagen II. These findings highlighted sex differences in arthritis morbidity and suggested that female mice are more likely to develop arthritis than male mice. Further studies are needed to investigate the mechanisms of sex differences in collagen-induced arthritis. PMID:25863233

  3. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Richa; Chetty, Runjan

    2010-12-01

    A 25-year-old patient presented with epigastric pain, which on gastric biopsy revealed the characteristic appearance of collagenous gastritis. There was a thick prominent subepithelial band that was confirmed to be collagen with a Masson's trichrome stain. There was associated Helicobacter pylori gastritis but no evidence of a lymphocytic gastritis. The patient did not have watery diarrhea. Collagenous gastritis can occur in young patients, be restricted to the stomach, and can be associated with celiac disease. PMID:19103610

  4. Oncostatin M stimulates proliferation, induces collagen production and inhibits apoptosis of human lung fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Scaffidi, Amelia K; Mutsaers, Steven E; Moodley, Yuben P; McAnulty, Robin J; Laurent, Geoffrey J; Thompson, Philip J; Knight, Darryl A

    2002-01-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM), a member of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) cytokine family, acts on a variety of cells and elicits diversified biological responses, suggesting potential roles in the regulation of cell survival, differentiation and proliferation.We have examined the effect of OSM on the regulation of human lung fibroblast proliferation, collagen production and spontaneous apoptosis. The proliferative effects of OSM (0.5 – 100 ng ml−1) were assessed using a MTS assay as well as [3H]-thymidine incorporation and cell counts at 24 and 48 h. Hydroxyproline was measured as an index of procollagen production by high pressure liquid chromotography (HPLC). Apoptosis was determined by annexin staining.OSM enhanced the mitotic activity of lung fibroblasts in a time and dose dependent manner. Maximum proliferation of 57% above control was observed after incubation for 48 h with 2 ng ml−1 OSM (P<0.05).Incubation with the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase inhibitor, PD98059 or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genestein both significantly reduced the mitogenic effect of OSM (P<0.05).In contrast, proliferation in response to OSM was not regulated by induction of cyclo-oxygenase and subsequent prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release or by IL-6.OSM also stimulated fibroblasts to synthesize pro-collagen by a maximum of 35% above control levels after 48 h (P<0.05).OSM significantly inhibited the spontaneous apoptosis of fibroblasts at 24 and 48 h.These results provide evidence that OSM has pro-fibrotic properties and suggest that it may play a role in normal lung wound repair and fibrosis. PMID:12086989

  5. Anti-inflammatory activities of light emitting diode irradiation on collagen-induced arthritis in mice (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Yusuke; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an auto-immune disease afflicting multiple joints of the body, where as a result of the increase in inflammatory cytokines and tissue destructive factors such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3, deterioration of the bones and cartilages of the joints occurs. The present investigation was carried out to study the anti-inflammatory activities of light emitting diode (LED) irradiation on hind paw inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice models. Materials and method: RA in the CIA mouse model was induced by immunization of DBA/1J mice with intradermal injections of an emulsion of bovine type II collagen and complete Freund's adjuvant. A total of 20 CIA mice were subdivided into the following groups: control group, CIA group and 2 groups of LED irradiated CIA mice (LED groups) (n=5 per group). The mouse knee joint area in the LED groups (the 570 nm and 940 nm groups) was irradiated with LED energy, three times a week for 500 s per session over 8 weeks at a dose of 5 J/cm2. The hind paw swelling was assessed by the increase in hind paw thickness. The serum levels of the inflammatory cytokines and arthritic factor MMP-3 were determined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In the LED-570 and LED-940 groups at 4 weeks after arthritis induction, the swelling inhibition index was 18.1±4.9 and 29.3±4.0 respectively. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and MMP-3 serum levels were significantly lower in the LED-940 group. Conclusions: LED irradiation, particularly in the near-infrared was effective for inhibition of the inflammatory reactions caused by RA. PMID:25368445

  6. A Membrane-Type-1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) – Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Axis Regulates Collagen-Induced Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Assent, Delphine; Bourgot, Isabelle; Hennuy, Benoît; Geurts, Pierre; Noël, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Maquoi, Erik

    2015-01-01

    During tumour dissemination, invading breast carcinoma cells become confronted with a reactive stroma, a type I collagen-rich environment endowed with anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. To develop metastatic capabilities, tumour cells must acquire the capacity to cope with this novel microenvironment. How cells interact with and respond to their microenvironment during cancer dissemination remains poorly understood. To address the impact of type I collagen on the fate of tumour cells, human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were cultured within three-dimensional type I collagen gels (3D COL1). Using this experimental model, we have previously demonstrated that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), a proteinase overexpressed in many aggressive tumours, promotes tumour progression by circumventing the collagen-induced up-regulation of BIK, a pro-apoptotic tumour suppressor, and hence apoptosis. Here we performed a transcriptomic analysis to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating 3D COL1-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Control and MT1-MMP expressing MCF-7 cells were cultured on two-dimensional plastic plates or within 3D COL1 and a global transcriptional time-course analysis was performed. Shifting the cells from plastic plates to 3D COL1 activated a complex reprogramming of genes implicated in various biological processes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a 3D COL1-mediated alteration of key cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, RNA processing and cytoskeleton remodelling. By using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors, we identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase specifically activated by collagen, as the initiator of 3D COL1-induced apoptosis. Our data support the concept that MT1-MMP contributes to the inactivation of the DDR1-BIK signalling axis through the cleavage of collagen fibres and/or the alteration of DDR1 receptor signalling unit, without triggering a

  7. Bioengineered collagens

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  8. Protective Effect of Cod (Gadus macrocephalus) Skin Collagen Peptides on Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huina; Wang, Zhicong; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Bafang

    2016-07-01

    This research was performed to explore the protective effect of cod skin collagen peptides (CCP) on gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid. The CCP were fractionated into low molecular CCP (LMCCP, Mw < 3 kDa) and high molecular CCP (HMCCP, Mw > 3 kDa). In HMCCP and LMCCP, glycine of accounted for about one-third of the total amino acids without cysteine and tryptophan, and hydrophobic amino acids accounted for about 50%. After 21 d CCP treatment (60 or 300 mg/kg, p.o./daily), the healing effects on acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers were evaluated by macroscopic measure, microscopic measure, and immune histochemistry. Moreover, the expression levels of the growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was detected. The results showed that both LMCCP and HMCCP could significantly decrease the ulcer areas and promote the healing of the lesions. They also could improve the levels of hexosamine, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, and reduce the content of malondialdehyde and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, the expression level of TGFβ1 gene and HSP70 mRNA was significantly improved by the treatment. It suggested that CCP could be able to improve symptoms of gastric ulcer and probably be used in the treatment of gastric ulcer. PMID:27219644

  9. Opium addiction and cauliflower ears: a case report.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, E

    1991-02-01

    The case of an elderly Chinese male opium addict with cauliflower ears is discussed. He had no history of contact sports that could have led to auricular trauma resulting in deformed ears. Besides cauliflower ears, he had features of chronic bronchitis. The association between opium addiction and cauliflower ears was first described way back in 1932. It was attributed to the prolonged opium induced sleep on hard surface subjecting the ears to repeated pressure and trauma. With the changing pattern of drug abuse, opium abuse related cauliflower ears will become a vanishing sign.

  10. Mesothelial Cell Autoantibodies Induce Collagen Deposition in vitro & Using a Case Study to Introduce Undergraduates to Bioinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serve, Kinta M.

    Part I. Pleural fibrosis, a non-malignant, asbestos-related respiratory disease characterized by excessive collagen deposition, is progressive, debilitating, and potentially fatal. Disease severity may be influenced by the type of asbestos fiber inhaled, with Libby amphibole (LA) a seemingly more potent mediator of pleural fibrosis than chrysotile (CH) asbestos. This difference in severity may be due to the reported immunological component associated with LA but not CH related diseases. Here, we report the potential mechanisms by which asbestos-associated mesothelial cell autoantibodies (MCAAs) contribute to pleural fibrosis development. MCAAs are shown to bind cultured human pleural mesothelial cells and induce the deposition of type I collagen proteins in the absence of phenotypic changes typically associated with fibrosis development. However, additional extracellular proteins seem to differentially contribute to LA and CH MCAA-associated collagen deposition. Our data also suggest that IgG subclass distributions differ between LA and CH MCAAs, potentially altering the antibody effector functions. Differences in MCAA mechanisms of action and effector functions may help explain the disparate clinical disease phenotypes noted between LA and CH-exposed populations and may provide insights for development of novel therapeutic strategies. Part II. As scientific research becomes increasingly reliant on computational tools, it is more important than ever before to train students to use these tools. While educators agree that biology students should gain experience with bioinformatics, there exists no consensus as to how to integrate these concepts into the already demanding undergraduate curriculum. The Portal-21 project offers a solution by utilizing on-line learning case studies to allow flexibility for classroom integration. Presented here are the results from two field tests of a case study developed to introduce the common bioinformatics tools pBLAST and PubMed to

  11. Attenuation of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis by oxymatrine is associated with regulation of fibroblast proliferation and collagen production in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohong; Sun, Renshan; Hu, Jianming; Mo, Ziyao; Yang, Zifeng; Liao, Dongjiang; Zhong, Nanshan

    2008-09-01

    There is no satisfactory treatment for pulmonary fibrosis, which is characterized by altered control of proliferation of mesenchymal fibroblasts and extracellular matrix production. Oxymatrine is an alkaloid extracted from the Chinese herb Sophora japonica (Sophora flavescens Ait.) with capacities of anti-inflammation, inhibition of immune reaction, antivirus, protection against acute lung injury and antihepatic fibrosis. In this study, the effect of oxymatrine on pulmonary fibrosis was investigated using a bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis mouse model. The results showed that bleomycin challenge provoked severe pulmonary fibrosis with marked increase in hydroxyproline content of lung tissue and lung fibrosis fraction, which was prevented by oxymatrine in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, bleomycin injection resulted in a marked increase of myeloperoxidase activity and malondialdehyde level that was attenuated by oxymatrine. Administration of oxymatrine inhibited the proliferation of murine lung fibroblasts, arrested the cells at G(0)/G(1) phase and reduced the expression of cell cycle regulatory protein, cyclin D1 in vitro. Furthermore, the steady-state production of collagen and the expression of alpha1(I) pro-collagen and alpha2(I) pro-collagen mRNA in fibroblasts were inhibited by oxymatrine in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggested that oxymatrine may attenuate pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin in mice, partly through inhibition of inflammatory response and lipid peroxidation in lung induced by bleomycin and reduction of fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. PMID:18684219

  12. Asiaticoside induces type I collagen synthesis and osteogenic differentiation in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Nowwarote, Nunthawan; Osathanon, Thanaphum; Jitjaturunt, Peachaya; Manopattanasoontorn, Sukuman; Pavasant, Prasit

    2013-03-01

    Asiaticoside, an active ingredient extracted from Centella asiatica, has been widely used to promote wound healing. In this study, the effects of asiaticoside on proliferation, protein synthesis, and osteogenic differentiation in human periodontal ligament cells (HPDLs) were investigated. HPDLs were treated with asiaticoside at concentrations of 25, 50, and 100 µg/mL. Cell number was determined by MTT assay. The mRNA expression was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry were used to confirm protein synthesis. Osteogenic differentiation was determined by alkaline phosphatase activity, osteoblast marker gene expression, and in vitro mineralization. The results showed that asiaticoside treatment, ranging from 25 to 100 mg/mL, had no effect on cytotoxicity or cell proliferation. When HPDLs were treated with asiaticoside in serum-free medium, dose-dependent increases in the levels of fibronectin and collagen type I mRNA and protein were observed at 72 h. Moreover, asiaticoside attenuated matrix metalloproteinase-1 but enhanced tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 mRNA expression. The addition of asiaticoside to osteogenic medium resulted in an increase in alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity, up-regulation of osteoblast marker gene mRNA expression, and enhancement of mineralization by HPDLs. These results suggest the potential application of asiaticoside for enhancing periodontal tissue healing.

  13. Collagenous gastroduodenitis on collagenous colitis.

    PubMed

    Stolte, M; Ritter, M; Borchard, F; Koch-Scherrer, G

    1990-07-01

    We report on a case of collagenous gastroduodenitis with concomitant collagenous colitis in a 75-year-old woman with watery diarrhea of approximately six months' standing. The step biopsy material obtained from the colon revealed continuous collagenous colitis with thickening of the basal membrane to 30 microns. The biopsies taken from the stomach and duodenum also revealed a band-like deposition of collagen in the duodenum (bulb and proximal portion of the descending portion) along the basal membrane of the lining epithelium, associated with partial atrophy of the villi. In the stomach, this band of collagen was located, parallel to the mucosal surface, at the level of the floor of the foveolae. PMID:2209504

  14. Dopamine D2 Receptor Is Involved in Alleviation of Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Yi-Qian; Deng, Qiao-Wen; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Human and murine lymphocytes express dopamine (DA) D2-like receptors including DRD2, DRD3, and DRD4. However, their roles in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are less clear. Here we showed that lymphocyte DRD2 activation alleviates both imbalance of T-helper (Th)17/T-regulatory (Treg) cells and inflamed symptoms in a mouse arthritis model of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was prepared by intradermal injection of chicken collagen type II (CII) in tail base of DBA/1 mice or Drd2 (-/-) C57BL/6 mice. D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole downregulated expression of proinflammatory Th17-related cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 17 and IL-22 but further upregulated expression of anti-inflammatory Treg-related cytokines transforming growth factor- (TGF-) β and IL-10 in lymphocytes in vitro and in ankle joints in vivo in CIA mice. Quinpirole intraperitoneal administration reduced both clinical arthritis score and serum anti-CII IgG level in CIA mice. However, Drd2 (-/-) CIA mice manifested more severe limb inflammation and higher serum anti-CII IgG level and further upregulated IL-17 and IL-22 expression and downregulated TGF-β and IL-10 expression than wild-type CIA mice. In contrast, Drd1 (-/-) CIA mice did not alter limb inflammation or anti-CII IgG level compared with wild-type CIA mice. These results suggest that DRD2 activation is involved in alleviation of CIA symptoms by amelioration of Th17/Treg imbalance. PMID:26693483

  15. Delivery of rhBMP-2 Plasmid DNA Complexes via a PLLA/Collagen Electrospun Scaffold Induces Ectopic Bone Formation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xia; Komatsu, David E; Hadjiargyrou, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The development of effective strategies for gene delivery is a critical goal in DNA-based tissue engineering. Previously, our laboratory utilized the process of electrospinning to fabricate plasmid DNA-based polymeric scaffolds. Although there lease of DNA was robust, the in vitro transfection efficiency was low. In order to optimize these results, we recently modified our approach and utilized a strategy to adsorb plasmid DNA transfection complexes onto a PLLA/Collagen I electrospun scaffold for the delivery of recombinant human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (rhBMP-2). BMP-2 was selected since it is currently clinically used to stimulate osteogenesis. Initially, we tested this approach using β-gal plasmid DNA complexes adsorbed onto PLLA/Collagen I scaffolds and obtained a transfection efficiency of 41% of that of the positive control (over 90%, DNA complexes in solution). Next, we utilized the same approach using the rhBMP-2 plasmid DNA complexes with the pre-osteoblastic. cell line, MC3T3, and detected robust (13-fold) expression of rhBMP-2 mRNA following transfection. Lastly, a mouse muscle pouch model was used to evaluate in vivo gene delivery efficacy and ectopic bone inducing capability of the scaffold adsorbed rhBMP-2 transfection complexes. Results showed that both rhBMP-2mRNA and protein were expressed and stimulated some ectopic bone formation. As such, adsorption of plasmid DNA complexes can be an effective strategy for tissue engineering in vivo, but further research is required to optimize our approach and obtain a clinically meaningful tissue response. PMID:27319221

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity of lycopene isolated from Chlorella marina on type II collagen induced arthritis in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Renju, G L; Muraleedhara Kurup, G; Saritha Kumari, C H

    2013-04-01

    The role of commercially available lycopene (all-trans) from tomato in controlling arthritis has been reported. Even though many reports are available that the cis form of lycopene is more biologically active, no report seems to be available on lycopene (cis and trans) isolated from an easily available and culturable sources. In the present study, the anti-arthritic effect of lycopene (cis and trans) from the algae Chlorella marina (AL) has been compared with lycopene (all-trans) from tomato (TL) and indomethacin (Indo). Arthritis (CIA) was developed in male Sprague dawley rats by collagen and the following parameters were studied. The activities of inflammatory marker enzymes like cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were found to be decreased on treatment with AL when compared to TL and Indo. Changes in Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cells (RBC) count, hemoglobin (Hb), C-reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF), and ceruloplasmin levels observed in the blood of arthritic animals were brought back to normal by AL when compared to TL and Indo. Histopathology of paw and joint tissues showed marked reduction in edema on supplementation of AL. Thus these results indicate the potential beneficiary effect of algal lycopene on collagen induced arthritis in rats when compared to TL and even to the commonly used anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin. Therefore lycopene from C. marina would be recommended as a better natural source with increased activity and without side effects in the treatment of anti-inflammatory diseases. PMID:23237458

  17. Recombinant Collagen Studies Link the Severe Conformational Changes Induced by Osteogenesis Imperfecta Mutations to the Disruption of a Set of Interchain Salt Bridges*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ke; Nowak, Iwona; Kirchner, Michele; Xu, Yujia

    2008-01-01

    The clinical severity of Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), also known as the brittle bone disease, relates to the extent of conformational changes in the collagen triple helix induced by Gly substitution mutations. The lingering question is why Gly substitutions at different locations of collagen cause different disruptions of the triple helix. Here, we describe markedly different conformational changes of the triple helix induced by two Gly substitution mutations placed only 12 residues apart. The effects of the Gly substitutions were characterized using a recombinant collagen fragment modeling the 63-residue segment of the α1 chain of type I collagen containing no Hyp (residues 877-939) obtained from Escherichia coli. Two Gly → Ser substitutions at Gly-901 and Gly-913 associated with, respectively, mild and severe OI variants were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis. Biophysical characterization and limited protease digestion experiments revealed that while the substitution at Gly-901 causes relatively minor destabilization of the triple helix, the substitution at Gly-913 induces large scale unfolding of an unstable region C-terminal to the mutation site. This extensive unfolding is caused by the intrinsic low stability of the C-terminal region of the helix and the mutation induced disruption of a set of salt bridges, which functions to lock this unstable region into the triple helical conformation. The extensive conformational changes associated with the loss of the salt bridges highlight the long range impact of the local interactions of triple helix and suggest a new mechanism by which OI mutations cause severe conformational damages in collagen. PMID:18845533

  18. Accumulation of Regulatory T Cells and Chronic Inflammation in the Middle Ear in a Mouse Model of Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion Induced by Combined Eustachian Tube Blockage and Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Infection.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Takashi; Kodama, Satoru; Kawano, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Masashi

    2015-11-09

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is associated with chronic otitis media (COM). In this study, we generated a murine model of COM by using eustachian tube (ET) obstruction and NTHi (10(7) CFU) inoculation into the tympanic bulla, and we investigated the relationship between regulatory T cells (Treg) and chronic inflammation in the middle ear. Middle ear effusions (MEEs) and middle ear mucosae (MEM) were collected at days 3 and 14 and at 1 and 2 months after inoculation. Untreated mice served as controls. MEEs were used for bacterial counts and to measure the concentrations of cytokines. MEM were collected for histological evaluation and flow cytometric analysis. Inflammation of the MEM was prolonged throughout this study, and the incidence of NTHi culture-positive MEE was 38% at 2 months after inoculation. The levels of interleukin-1β (IL-β), tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-10, and transforming growth factor β were increased in the middle ear for up to 2 months after inoculation. CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) Treg accumulated in the middle ear, and the percentage of Treg in the MEM increased for up to 2 months after inoculation. Treg depletion induced a 99.9% reduction of bacterial counts in MEEs and also significantly reduced the ratio of NTHi culture-positive MEE. The levels of these cytokines were also reduced in MEEs. In summary, we developed a murine model of COM, and our findings indicate that Treg confer infectious tolerance to NTHi in the middle ear.

  19. Accumulation of Regulatory T Cells and Chronic Inflammation in the Middle Ear in a Mouse Model of Chronic Otitis Media with Effusion Induced by Combined Eustachian Tube Blockage and Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Satoru; Kawano, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is associated with chronic otitis media (COM). In this study, we generated a murine model of COM by using eustachian tube (ET) obstruction and NTHi (107 CFU) inoculation into the tympanic bulla, and we investigated the relationship between regulatory T cells (Treg) and chronic inflammation in the middle ear. Middle ear effusions (MEEs) and middle ear mucosae (MEM) were collected at days 3 and 14 and at 1 and 2 months after inoculation. Untreated mice served as controls. MEEs were used for bacterial counts and to measure the concentrations of cytokines. MEM were collected for histological evaluation and flow cytometric analysis. Inflammation of the MEM was prolonged throughout this study, and the incidence of NTHi culture-positive MEE was 38% at 2 months after inoculation. The levels of interleukin-1β (IL-β), tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-10, and transforming growth factor β were increased in the middle ear for up to 2 months after inoculation. CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg accumulated in the middle ear, and the percentage of Treg in the MEM increased for up to 2 months after inoculation. Treg depletion induced a 99.9% reduction of bacterial counts in MEEs and also significantly reduced the ratio of NTHi culture-positive MEE. The levels of these cytokines were also reduced in MEEs. In summary, we developed a murine model of COM, and our findings indicate that Treg confer infectious tolerance to NTHi in the middle ear. PMID:26553466

  20. Middle ear infection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A middle ear infection is also known as otitis media. It is one of the most common of childhood infections. With this illness, the middle ear becomes red, swollen, and inflamed because of bacteria ...

  1. Ear drainage culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... needed. Your health care provider will use a cotton swab to collect the sample from inside the ... Using a cotton swab to take a sample of drainage from the outer ear is not painful. However, ear pain may ...

  2. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  3. Ear Infections in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... shaped organ that converts sound vibrations from the middle ear into electrical signals. The auditory nerve carries these signals from the cochlea to the brain. Other nearby parts of the ear also can be involved in ...

  4. Ear surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100016.htm Ear surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Overview This image demonstrates normal appearance of the ears in relation to the face. Update Date 10/ ...

  5. Ear infection - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... Chole RA. Chronic otitis media, mastoiditis, and petrositis. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  6. Designation of a Novel DKK1 Multiepitope DNA Vaccine and Inhibition of Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Sibo; Li, Shentao; Du, Yuxuan; Dou, Yunpeng; Li, Zhanguo; Yuan, Huihui; Zhao, Wenming

    2015-01-01

    Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), a secretory inhibitor of canonical Wnt signaling, plays a critical role in certain bone loss diseases. Studies have shown that serum levels of DKK1 are significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and are correlated with the severity of the disease, which indicates the possibility that bone erosion in RA may be inhibited by neutralizing the biological activity of DKK1. In this study, we selected a panel of twelve peptides using the software DNASTAR 7.1 and screened high affinity and immunogenicity epitopes in vitro and in vivo assays. Furthermore, we optimized four B cell epitopes to design a novel DKK1 multiepitope DNA vaccine and evaluated its bone protective effects in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of RA. High level expression of the designed vaccine was measured in supernatant of COS7 cells. In addition, intramuscular immunization of BALB/c mice with this vaccine was also highly expressed and sufficient to induce the production of long-term IgG, which neutralized natural DKK1 in vivo. Importantly, this vaccine significantly attenuated bone erosion in CIA mice compared with positive control mice. These results provide evidence for the development of a DNA vaccine targeted against DKK1 to attenuate bone erosion. PMID:26075259

  7. Recombinant growth factor mixtures induce cell cycle progression and the upregulation of type I collagen in human skin fibroblasts, resulting in the acceleration of wound healing processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Hyun; Choi, Kyung-Ha; Cho, Jae-We; Kim, So Young; Kwon, Tae Rin; Choi, Sun Young; Choi, Yoo Mi; Lee, Jay; Yoon, Ho Sang; Kim, Beom Joon

    2014-05-01

    Application of growth factor mixtures has been used for wound healing and anti-wrinkles agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant growth factor mixtures (RGFM) on the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, type I collagen, and wound healing processes of acute animal wound models. The results showed that RGFM induced increased rates of cell proliferation and cell migration of human skin fibroblasts (HSF). In addition, expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)4, and Cdk2 proteins was markedly increased with a growth factor mixtures treatment in fibroblasts. Expression of type I collagen was also increased in growth factor mixtures-treated HSF. Moreover, growth factor mixtures-induced the upregulation of type I collagen was associated with the activation of Smad2/3. In the animal model, RGFM-treated mice showed accelerated wound closure, with the closure rate increasing as early as on day 7, as well as re-epithelization and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration than phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated mice. In conclusion, the results indicated that RGFM has the potential to accelerate wound healing through the upregulation of type I collagen, which is partly mediated by activation of Smad2/3-dependent signaling pathway as well as cell cycle progression in HSF. The topical application of growth factor mixtures to acute and chronic skin wound may accelerate the epithelization process through these molecular mechanisms.

  8. Enriched Astaxanthin Extract from Haematococcus pluvialis Augments Growth Factor Secretions to Increase Cell Proliferation and Induces MMP1 Degradation to Enhance Collagen Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsin-Yu; Lee, Chelsea; Pan, Jian-Liang; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shu-Hung; Lan, Chi-Wei John; Liu, Wang-Ta; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Hseu, You-Cheng; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hui-Min David

    2016-01-01

    Among many antioxidants that are used for the repairing of oxidative stress induced skin damages, we identified the enriched astaxanthin extract (EAE) from Haematococcus pluvialis as a viable ingredient. EAE was extracted from the red microalgae through supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction. To compare the effectiveness, EAE wastreated on human dermal fibroblasts with other components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and doxycycline. With sirius red staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we found that PMA decreased the collagen concentration and production while overall the addition of doxycycline and EAE increased the collagen concentration in a trial experiments. EAE increased collagen contents through inhibited MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA expression and induced TIMP1, the antagonists of MMPs protein, gene expression. As for when tested for various proteins through western blotting, it was seen that the addition of EAE increased the expression of certain proteins that promote cell proliferation. Testing those previous solutions using growth factor assay, it was noticeable that EAE had a positive impact on cell proliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) than doxycycline, indicating that it was a better alternative treatment for collagen production. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agentsand food supplements. PMID:27322248

  9. Enriched Astaxanthin Extract from Haematococcus pluvialis Augments Growth Factor Secretions to Increase Cell Proliferation and Induces MMP1 Degradation to Enhance Collagen Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-Yu; Lee, Chelsea; Pan, Jian-Liang; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shu-Hung; Lan, Chi-Wei John; Liu, Wang-Ta; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Hseu, You-Cheng; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hui-Min David

    2016-01-01

    Among many antioxidants that are used for the repairing of oxidative stress induced skin damages, we identified the enriched astaxanthin extract (EAE) from Haematococcus pluvialis as a viable ingredient. EAE was extracted from the red microalgae through supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction. To compare the effectiveness, EAE wastreated on human dermal fibroblasts with other components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and doxycycline. With sirius red staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we found that PMA decreased the collagen concentration and production while overall the addition of doxycycline and EAE increased the collagen concentration in a trial experiments. EAE increased collagen contents through inhibited MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA expression and induced TIMP1, the antagonists of MMPs protein, gene expression. As for when tested for various proteins through western blotting, it was seen that the addition of EAE increased the expression of certain proteins that promote cell proliferation. Testing those previous solutions using growth factor assay, it was noticeable that EAE had a positive impact on cell proliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) than doxycycline, indicating that it was a better alternative treatment for collagen production. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agentsand food supplements. PMID:27322248

  10. Effects of Sandimmune Neoral on Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DA Rats: Characterization by High Resolution Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and by Histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Nicolau; Bruttel, Konrad; Schuurman, Henk; Mir, Anis

    1998-03-01

    In the present work the time course of collagen-induced arthritis and the effect of Sandimmune Neoral in this model of arthritis were followed in the rat over an extended period of time (70 days) using high resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High resolution 3D gradient-echo (TR = 100 ms; TE = 3.8 ms) images with a voxel size of 94 × 81 × 60 μm3were acquired from the hind paw of DA rats (n= 21) at various time points after injection of type II bovine collagen into the tail. Eleven rats were treated with Neoral (15 mg/kg/day p.o. together with vehicle) for 42 days starting at day 14 after collagen injection. The remaining controls received vehicle. Pathomorphological changes associated with the collagen-induced arthritic process, e.g., increase of joint space and cartilage and bone erosion, could be observedin vivoin the control group. In contrast, no changes in the joint architecture were detected in Neoral-treated animals. Indeed, Neoral showed strong anti-inflammatory effects and marked protection against cartilage and bone destruction in this model. Qualitative information derived from the MR images correlated significantly with histological findings.

  11. Enriched Astaxanthin Extract from Haematococcus pluvialis Augments Growth Factor Secretions to Increase Cell Proliferation and Induces MMP1 Degradation to Enhance Collagen Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-Yu; Lee, Chelsea; Pan, Jian-Liang; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shu-Hung; Lan, Chi-Wei John; Liu, Wang-Ta; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Hseu, You-Cheng; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hui-Min David

    2016-06-16

    Among many antioxidants that are used for the repairing of oxidative stress induced skin damages, we identified the enriched astaxanthin extract (EAE) from Haematococcus pluvialis as a viable ingredient. EAE was extracted from the red microalgae through supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction. To compare the effectiveness, EAE wastreated on human dermal fibroblasts with other components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and doxycycline. With sirius red staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we found that PMA decreased the collagen concentration and production while overall the addition of doxycycline and EAE increased the collagen concentration in a trial experiments. EAE increased collagen contents through inhibited MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA expression and induced TIMP1, the antagonists of MMPs protein, gene expression. As for when tested for various proteins through western blotting, it was seen that the addition of EAE increased the expression of certain proteins that promote cell proliferation. Testing those previous solutions using growth factor assay, it was noticeable that EAE had a positive impact on cell proliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) than doxycycline, indicating that it was a better alternative treatment for collagen production. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agentsand food supplements.

  12. Behaviour of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Progenitors on Collagen Scaffolds Varied in Freezing Temperature and Laminin Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Khayyatan, Fahimeh; Nemati, Shiva; Kiani, Sahar; Hojjati Emami, Shahriar; Baharvand, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Biomaterial technology, when combined with emerging human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technology, provides a promising strategy for patient-specific tissue engineering. In this study, we have evaluated the physical effects of collagen scaffolds fabricated at various freezing temperatures on the behavior of hiPSC-derived neural progenitors (hiPSC-NPs). In addition, the coating of scaffolds using different concentrations of laminin was examined on the cells. Materials and Methods: Initially, in this experimental study, the collagen scaffolds fabricated from different collagen concentrations and freezing temperatures were characterized by determining the pore size, porosity, swelling ratio, and mechanical properties. Effects of cross-linking on free amine groups, volume shrinkage and mass retention was also assessed. Then, hiPSC-NPs were seeded onto the most stable three-dimensional collagen scaffolds and we evaluated the effect of pore structure. Additionally, the different concentrations of laminin coating of the scaffolds on hiPSC-NPs behavior were assessed. Results: Scanning electron micrographs of the scaffolds showed a pore diameter in the range of 23-232 μm for the scaffolds prepared with different fabrication parameters. Also porosity of all scaffolds was >98% with more than 94% swelling ratio. hiPSC-NPs were subsequently seeded onto the scaffolds that were made by different freezing temperatures in order to assess for physical effects of the scaffolds. We observed similar proliferation, but more cell infiltration in scaffolds prepared at lower freezing temperatures. The laminin coating of the scaffolds improved NPs proliferation and infiltration in a dose-dependent manner. Immunofluorescence staining and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the compatibility of undifferentiated and differentiated hiPSC-NPs on these scaffolds. Conclusion: The results have suggested that the pore structure and laminin coating of collagen scaffolds

  13. A novel RGD antagonist that targets both alphavbeta3 and alpha5beta1 induces apoptosis of angiogenic endothelial cells on type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Meerovitch, Karen; Bergeron, Frédéric; Leblond, Lorraine; Grouix, Brigitte; Poirier, Cathy; Bubenik, Monica; Chan, Laval; Gourdeau, Henriette; Bowlin, Terry; Attardo, Giorgio

    2003-02-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion is necessary for endothelial cell proliferation and apoptosis, which is a major determinant in tumor-induced angiogenesis. In this study, we compared two novel, structurally similar, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptidomimetic compounds having different integrin selectivities, for their inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis on functionally relevant extracellular matrices (ECM) for angiogenesis. BCH-14661 was specific for integrin alphavbeta3, whereas BCH-15046 nonselectively antagonized integrins alphavbeta3, alphavbeta5, and alpha5beta1. Both compounds were potent inducers of endothelial cell apoptosis when plated on RGD-dependent ECM (vitronectin, VN), which was dependent on the ability to induce cell detachment. However, with endothelial cells plated on RGD-independent ECM (type I collagen, COL), only BCH-15046 was able to significantly prevent growth and induce apoptosis. This effect was not dependent on the induction of detachment. Experiments using the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor GM 6001 revealed that cleavage of COL was not required for the ability of BCH-15046 to induce apoptosis. However, the inhibition of growth factor-stimulated endothelial cell proliferation, required MMPs, and correlated with BCH-15046s' potent inhibition of endothelial cell attachment to denatured collagen. Antibody inhibition experiments showed that adhesion to denatured collagen required integrins alphavbeta3 and beta1, but not alphavbeta5. In addition, BCH-15046 exerted a significant inhibition of VEGF-stimulated angiogenesis in the chick chorioallontoic membrane in vivo. These results suggest that integrin antagonism of both alphavbeta3 and alpha5beta1 are important for MMP-independent induction of apoptosis on COL and MMP-dependent inhibition of endothelial cell-denatured collagen interactions required for proliferation.

  14. Effects of linagliptin and liraglutide on glucose- and angiotensin II-induced collagen formation and cytoskeleton degradation in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-wei; Zhang, Fen-xi; Yang, Fen; Ding, Zu-feng; Agarwal, Nidhi; Guo, Zhi-kun; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors can not only lower blood glucose levels, but also alleviate cardiac remodeling after myocardial ischemia and hypertension. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor (linagliptin) and a GLP-1 activator (liraglutide) on glucose- and angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced collagen formation and cytoskeleton reorganization in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro, and elucidated the related mechanisms. Methods: Cardiac fibroblasts were isolated from the hearts of 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice, and then exposed to different concentrations of glucose or Ang II for 24 h. The expression of fibrotic signals (fibronectin, collagen-1, -3 and -4), as well as ERK1/2 and NF-κB-p65 in the fibroblasts was examined using Western blotting assays. F-actin degradation was detected under inverted laser confocal microscope in fibroblasts stained with Rhodamine phalloidin. Results: Glucose (1–40 mmol/L) and Ang II (10−8–10−5 mol/L) dose-dependently increased the expression of fibronectin, collagens, phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-NF-κB-p65 in cardiac fibroblasts. High concentrations of glucose (≥40 mmol/L) and Ang II (≥10−6 mol/L) caused a significant degradation of F-actin (less assembly F-actin fibers and more disassembly fibers). ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 (10 μmol/L) and NF-κB inhibitor JSH-23 (10 μmol/L) both markedly suppressed glucose- and angiotensin II-induced fibronectin and collagen expressions in cardiac fibroblasts. Furthermore, pretreatment with liraglutide (10–100 nmol/L) or linagliptin (3 and 30 nmol/L) significantly decreased glucose- and Ang II-induced expression of fibrotic signals, phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-NF-κB-p65 in cardiac fibroblasts. Moreover, pretreatment with liraglutide (30 nmol/L) or liraglutide (100 nmol/L) markedly inhibited glucose-induced F-actin degradation, however, only liraglutide inhibited Ang II-induced F-actin degradation. Conclusion

  15. SARS Coronavirus Fusion Peptide-Derived Sequence Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zu T.; Sigalov, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    During the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, the viruses have evolved numerous strategies to counter and evade host antiviral immune responses in order to establish a successful infection, replicate and persist in the host. Recently, based on our model of immune signaling, the Signaling Chain HOmoOLigomerization (SCHOOL) model, we suggested specific molecular mechanisms used by different viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) to modulate the host immune response mediated by members of the family of multichain immune recognition receptors (MIRRs). This family includes T cell receptor (TCR) that is critically involved in immune diseases such as autoimmune arthritis. In the present study, we provide compelling experimental in vivo evidence in support of our hypothesis. Using the SCHOOL approach and the SARS-CoV fusion peptide sequence, we rationally designed a novel immunomodulatory peptide that targets TCR. We showed that this peptide ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and protects against bone and cartilage damage. Incorporation of the peptide into self-assembling lipopeptide nanoparticles that mimic native human high density lipoproteins significantly increases peptide dosage efficacy. Together, our data further confirm that viral immune evasion strategies that target MIRRs can be transferred to therapeutic strategies that require similar functionalities. PMID:27349522

  16. SARS Coronavirus Fusion Peptide-Derived Sequence Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zu T; Sigalov, Alexander B

    2016-01-01

    During the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, the viruses have evolved numerous strategies to counter and evade host antiviral immune responses in order to establish a successful infection, replicate and persist in the host. Recently, based on our model of immune signaling, the Signaling Chain HOmoOLigomerization (SCHOOL) model, we suggested specific molecular mechanisms used by different viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) to modulate the host immune response mediated by members of the family of multichain immune recognition receptors (MIRRs). This family includes T cell receptor (TCR) that is critically involved in immune diseases such as autoimmune arthritis. In the present study, we provide compelling experimental in vivo evidence in support of our hypothesis. Using the SCHOOL approach and the SARS-CoV fusion peptide sequence, we rationally designed a novel immunomodulatory peptide that targets TCR. We showed that this peptide ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and protects against bone and cartilage damage. Incorporation of the peptide into self-assembling lipopeptide nanoparticles that mimic native human high density lipoproteins significantly increases peptide dosage efficacy. Together, our data further confirm that viral immune evasion strategies that target MIRRs can be transferred to therapeutic strategies that require similar functionalities. PMID:27349522

  17. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells contribute to bone erosion in collagen-induced arthritis by differentiating to osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Huang, Yuefang; Wang, Shuang; Fu, Rong; Guo, Chaohuan; Wang, Hongyue; Zhao, Jijun; Gaskin, Felicia; Chen, Jingxian; Yang, Niansheng; Fu, Shu Man

    2015-12-01

    Bone erosion is a sign of severe rheumatoid arthritis and osteoclasts play a major role in the bone resorption. Recently, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) has been reported to be increased in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The number of circulating MDSCs is shown to correlate with rheumatoid arthritis. These findings suggest that MDSCs are precursor cells involved in bone erosion. In this study, MDSCs isolated from mice with CIA stimulated with M-CSF and RANKL in vitro expressed osteoclast markers and acquired osteoclast bone resorption function. MDSCs sorted from CIA mice were transferred into the tibia of normal DBA/1J mice and bones were subjected to histological and Micro CT analyses. The transferred CIA-MDSCs were shown to differentiate into TRAP(+) osteoclasts that were capable of bone resorption in vivo. MDSCs isolated from normal mice had more potent suppressor activity and much less capability to differentiate to osteoclast. Additional experiments showed that NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 or IκB inhibitor peptide blocked the differentiation of MDSCs to osteoclast and bone resorption. IL-1Ra also blocked this differentiation. In contrast, the addition of IL-1α further enhanced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. These results suggest that MDSCs are a source of osteoclast precursors and inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, contributing significantly to erosive changes seen in rheumatoid arthritis and related disorders. PMID:26318644

  18. Immunosuppressive activity of deer antler extracts of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, on type II collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Koo; Kim, Kap-Sung; Kim, Sung-Il; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Lee, In-Seon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2006-01-01

    Unossified horn or pilose antler cut from deer, which belong to the Cervidae generally is termed Nokyong. Nokyong is one of the most famous Korean traditional medicines and has been considered to possess sexual-reinforcing and antiaging actions. In this study, water extract of deer antler extract (DAA) prepared from the growing antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe was used to investigate the efficacy of the DAA on the development of type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Male rats were immunized with an emulsion of 200 microg of CII and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The rats then were administered by injection a suspension of DAA or phosphate-buffered saline. The effect of DAA on cellular responses to CII was examined. The injection of DAA suppressed the CII-specific secretion of interferon (IFN)-gamma from splenocytes ex vivo. The influence of DAA also was evaluated on the incidence and development of arthritis in rat CIA. Rats were immunized twice at a 3-wk interval with bovine CII, with DAA being given by injection once a d for 14 d with four different regimens. A 14-d course of DAA treatment at a daily dose of 100 microg/kg, which began on the d of the first CII immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis, as well as antibody formation and delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII. Treatment with DAA resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and immune responses to CII.

  19. Cystamine immobilization on TiO 2 film surfaces and the influence on inhibition of collagen-induced platelet activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yujuan; Weng, Yajun; Zhang, Liping; Jing, Fengjuan; Huang, Nan; Chen, Junying

    2011-12-01

    Poor haemocompatibility is a main issue of artificial cardiovascular materials in clinical application. Nitric oxide (NO), produced by vascular endothelial cells, is a well known inhibitor of platelet adhesion and activation. Thus, NO-releasing biomaterials are beneficial for improving haemocompatibility of blood-contacting biomedical devices. In this paper, a novel method was developed for enhancement of haemocompatibility by exploiting endogenous NO donors. TiO 2 films were firstly synthesized on Si (1 0 0) wafers via unbalanced magnetron sputtering technology, and then polydopamine was grafted on TiO 2 films and used as a linker for further immobilization of cystamine. The obtained surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. NO generation is evaluated by saville-griess reagents, and it shows that cystamine immobilized samples are able to catalytically generate NO by decomposing endogenous S-nitrosothiols (RSNO). In vitro platelet adhesion results reveal that cystamine modified surfaces can inhibit collagen-induced platelet activation. ELISA analysis reveals that cGMP in platelets obviously increases on cystamine immobilized surface, which suggests the reducing of platelet activation is through NO/cGMP signal channel. It can be concluded that cystamine immobilized surface shows better blood compatibility by catalyzing NO release from the endogenous NO donor. It may be a promising method for improvement of haemocompatibility of blood-contacting implants.

  20. Evaluation of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody therapy using murine type II collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bailin; Song, Zheng; Wu, Bin; Gardner, Debra; Shealy, David; Song, Xiao-Yu; Wooley, Paul H

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that is critical for T/B-cell differentiation and maturation, immunoglobulin secretion, acute-phase protein production, and macrophage/monocyte functions. Extensive research into the biology of IL-6 has implicated IL-6 in the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of RA. An anti-murine IL-6 mAb that neutralizes mouse IL-6 activities was tested in animal model of collagen-induced arthritis. Prophylactic treatment with anti-IL-6 mAb significantly reduced the incidence and severity of arthritis compared to control mAb treated mice. The mitogenic response of B and T cells isolated from the lymph nodes of anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced compared to cells isolated from control mAb treated mice. The overall histopathology score for paws from the anti-IL-6 treated mice was significantly reduced when compared to paws from mice treated with control mAb, including both inflammatory (synovitis and pannus) and erosive (erosions and architecture) parameters. Reduced loss of cartilage matrix components was also observed in the anti-IL-6 treated mice. Collectively, these data suggest that IL-6 plays a major role in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus support the potential benefit of anti-IL-6 mAb treatment in rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:19368720

  1. The Predicted Proteomic Network Associated with the Antiarthritic Action of Qingfu Guanjieshu in Collagen-II-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting Yu; Zhou, Hua; Wong, Yuen Fan; Wu, Pui Kei; Hsiao, Wen-Luan Wendy; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Liu, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Qingfu Guanjieshu (QFGJS) is an herbal preparation for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Previous studies revealed that QFGJS significantly inhibited experimental arthritis and acute inflammation, accompanied by reduction of proinflammatory cytokines and elevation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. This study aims to identify the targeted proteins and predict the proteomic network associated with the drug action of QFGJS by using 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques. Thirty female Wistar rats were evenly grouped as normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats. The antiarthritic effect of QFGJS was examined with a 19-day treatment course, and the knee synovial tissues of animals from each group were obtained for 2D gel and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis. Results showed that QFGJS significantly ameliorated collagen II-induced arthritis when administrated at 2.8 g/kg body weight for 19 days. 2D gel image analysis revealed 89 differentially expressed proteins in the synovial tissues among the normal and vehicle- and QFGJS-treated CIA rats from over 1000 proteins of which 63 proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis, and 32 proteins were included for classification of functions using Gene Ontology (GO) method. Finally, 14 proteins were analyzed using bioinformatics, and a predicted proteomic network related to the anti-arthritic effect of QFGJS was established, and Pgk1 plays a central role. PMID:23781264

  2. Salubrinal acts as a Dusp2 inhibitor and suppresses inflammation in anti-collagen antibody-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Kazunori; Nishimura, Akinobu; Chen, Andy; Takigawa, Shinya; Sudo, Akihiro; Yokota, Hiroki

    2015-04-01

    Dual-specificity phosphatase 2 (Dusp2; also called phosphatase of activated cells 1, PAC1) is highly expressed in activated immune cells. We examined whether a potential inhibitor of Dusp2, salubrinal, prevents inflammatory cytokine expression in immune cells and arthritic responses in a mouse model of anti-collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA). Salubrinal is a synthetic chemical that inhibits de-phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α). In this study, we examined the effects of salubrinal on expression of inflammation linked genes as well as a family of DUSP genes using genome-wide microarrays, qPCR, and RNA interference. We also evaluated the effects of salubrinal on arthritic responses in CAIA mice using clinical and histological scores. The results revealed that salubrinal decreased inflammatory gene expression in macrophages, T lymphocytes, and mast cells. Dusp2 was suppressed by salubrinal in LPS-activated macrophages as well as PMA/ionomycin-activated T lymphocytes and mast cells. Furthermore, a partial silencing of Dusp2 downregulated IL1β and Cox2, and the inflammatory signs of CAIA mice were significantly suppressed by salubrinal. Collectively, this study presents a novel therapeutic possibility of salubrinal for inflammatory arthritis such as RA through inhibition of Dusp2. PMID:25619567

  3. Deacetylase inhibition increases regulatory T cell function and decreases incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Saouaf, Sandra J; Li, Bin; Zhang, Geng; Shen, Yuan; Furuuchi, Narumi; Hancock, Wayne W; Greene, Mark I

    2009-10-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an established mouse model of disease with hallmarks of clinical rheumatoid arthritis. Histone/protein deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are known to inhibit the pathogenesis of CIA and other models of autoimmune disease, although the mechanisms responsible are unclear. Regulatory T cell (Treg) function is defective in rheumatoid arthritis. FOXP3 proteins in Tregs are present in a dynamic protein complex containing histone acetyltransferase and HDAC enzymes, and FOXP3 itself is acetylated on lysine residues. We therefore investigated the effects of HDACi therapy on regulatory T cell function in the CIA model. Administration of an HDACi, valproic acid (VPA), significantly decreased disease incidence (p<0.005) and severity (p<0.03) in CIA. In addition, VPA treatment increased both the suppressive function of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs (p<0.04) and the numbers of CD25(+)FOXP3(+) Tregs in vivo. Hence, clinically approved HDACi such as VPA may limit autoimmune disease in vivo through effects on the production and function of FOXP3(+) Treg cells. PMID:19577564

  4. Deacetylase Inhibition Increases Regulatory T Cell Function and Decreases Incidence and Severity of Collagen-induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Saouaf, Sandra J.; Li, Bin; Zhang, Geng; Shen, Yuan; Furuuchi, Narumi; Hancock, Wayne W.; Greene, Mark I.

    2009-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an established mouse model of disease with hallmarks of clinical rheumatoid arthritis. Histone/protein deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are known to inhibit the pathogenesis of CIA and other models of autoimmune disease, although the mechanisms responsible are unclear. Regulatory T cell (Treg) function is defective in rheumatoid arthritis. FOXP3 proteins in Tregs are present in a dynamic protein complex containing histone acetyltransferase and HDAC enzymes, and FOXP3 itself is acetylated on lysine residues. We therefore investigated the effects of HDACi therapy on regulatory T cell function in the CIA model. Administration of an HDACi, valproic acid (VPA), significantly decreased disease incidence (p<0.005) and severity (p<0.03) in CIA. In addition, VPA treatment increased both the suppressive function of CD4+CD25+ Tregs (p<0.04) and the numbers of CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs in vivo. Hence, clinically approved HDACi such as VPA may limit autoimmune disease in vivo through effects on the production and function of FOXP3+ Treg cells. PMID:19577564

  5. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells contribute to bone erosion in collagen-induced arthritis by differentiating to osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Huang, Yuefang; Wang, Shuang; Fu, Rong; Guo, Chaohuan; Wang, Hongyue; Zhao, Jijun; Gaskin, Felicia; Chen, Jingxian; Yang, Niansheng; Fu, Shu Man

    2015-12-01

    Bone erosion is a sign of severe rheumatoid arthritis and osteoclasts play a major role in the bone resorption. Recently, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) has been reported to be increased in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The number of circulating MDSCs is shown to correlate with rheumatoid arthritis. These findings suggest that MDSCs are precursor cells involved in bone erosion. In this study, MDSCs isolated from mice with CIA stimulated with M-CSF and RANKL in vitro expressed osteoclast markers and acquired osteoclast bone resorption function. MDSCs sorted from CIA mice were transferred into the tibia of normal DBA/1J mice and bones were subjected to histological and Micro CT analyses. The transferred CIA-MDSCs were shown to differentiate into TRAP(+) osteoclasts that were capable of bone resorption in vivo. MDSCs isolated from normal mice had more potent suppressor activity and much less capability to differentiate to osteoclast. Additional experiments showed that NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 or IκB inhibitor peptide blocked the differentiation of MDSCs to osteoclast and bone resorption. IL-1Ra also blocked this differentiation. In contrast, the addition of IL-1α further enhanced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. These results suggest that MDSCs are a source of osteoclast precursors and inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, contributing significantly to erosive changes seen in rheumatoid arthritis and related disorders.

  6. H2-M polymorphism in mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis involves the peptide binding groove

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W.; Loos, M.; Maeurer, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    The ability to develop type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is associated with the major histocompatibility I-A gene and with as yet poorly defined regulatory molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen processing and presentation pathway. H2-M molecules are thought to be involved in the loading of antigenic peptides into the MHC class II binding cleft. We sequenced H2-Ma, H2-Mb1, and H2-Mb2 genes from CIA-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains and identified four different Ma and Mb2 alleles, and three different Mb1 alleles defined by polymorphic residues within the predicted peptide binding groove. Most CIA-resistant mouse strains share common Ma, Mb1, and Mb2 alleles. In contrast, H2-M alleles designated Ma-III, Ma-IV, Mb1-III, and Mb2-IV could be exclusively identified in the CIA-susceptible H2{sup r} and H2{sup q} haplotypes, suggesting that allelic H2-M molecules may modulate the composition of different CII peptides loaded onto MHC class II molecules, presumably presenting {open_quotes}arthritogenic{close_quotes} epitopes to T lymphocytes. 42 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. A new phenylpyrazoleanilide, y-320, inhibits interleukin 17 production and ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Hiroyuki; Ishibuchi, Seigo; Oshita, Koichi; Seki, Noriyasu; Kataoka, Hirotoshi; Sugahara, Kunio; Adachi, Kunitomo; Chiba, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-15 and IL-17 are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) because both pro-inflammatory cytokines are found in synovial fluid of RA patients. In this study, we examined the pharmacological profiles of Y-320, a new phenylpyrazoleanilide immunomodulator. Y-320 inhibited IL-17 production by CD4 T cells stimulated with IL-15 with IC50 values of 20 to 60 nM. Oral administration of Y-320 (0.3 to 3 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the development and progression of arthritis and joint destruction with reduction of IL-17 mRNA expression in arthritic joints of type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1J mice. Y-320 in combination with anti-murine tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibody showed a synergistic effect on mouse CIA. Moreover, therapeutic treatment with Y-320 (0.3 and 1 mg/kg orally) ameliorated CIA in cynomolgus monkeys. Our results suggest that Y-320, an orally active inhibitor for IL-17 production, provides a useful therapy for RA. PMID:24366113

  8. Alternate carbohydrate and nontraditional inducer leads to increased productivity of a collagen binding domain fusion protein via fed-batch fermentation.

    PubMed

    Fruchtl, McKinzie; Sakon, Joshua; Beitle, Robert

    2016-05-20

    The production of collagen binding domain fusion proteins is of significant importance because of their potential as therapeutic biomaterials. It was previously reported that the expression of collagen-binding domain fusion proteins in Escherichia coli was higher when expressed using lactose as an inducer and chemically defined growth media on a shake flask scale. In an effort to further investigate factors that affect expression levels on a fed-batch scale, alternative induction techniques were tested in conjunction with fed-batch fermentation. In this paper, we discuss ten fed-batch fermentation experiments utilizing either glucose or glycerol feed and using lactose or isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) as an induction source. It was found that glycerol-fed fermentations induced with lactose allowed for greater expression of target protein, though lesser cell densities were achieved.

  9. Adamts1 is highly induced in rachitic bones of FGF23 transgenic mice and participates in degradation of non-mineralized bone matrix collagen.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lijuan; Andersson, Göran; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Melhus, Håkan; Lind, Thomas

    2013-01-18

    Transgenic mice overexpressing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) in osteoblasts have a rachitic bone phenotype. These mice display hypomineralized bones, increased expression of osteoblast markers, but osteoclast numbers are unaltered or slightly reduced. Paradoxically, they show increased serum levels of the bone resorption marker CTX, a type I collagen degradation fragment. Here we analyzed a matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) like secreted protease, Adamts1, that has previously been associated with osteoblastic type I collagen breakdown in vitro. Bones from FGF23 transgenic (tg) mice displayed increased Adamts1 protein upon both immunohistological staining and Western blotting. We further found Adamts1 protein together with excessively degraded type I collagen in the non-mineralized bone fraction of FGF23 tg mice. A similar degradation pattern of type I collagen was noticed upon forced expression of Adamts1 in osteoblastic cells in vitro. Importantly, these Adamts1-expressing osteoblastic cells exhibited increased release of CTX fragments when cultured on demineralized bone discs. Together, these results demonstrate for the first time that Adamts1 can be highly induced in bone tissue and that this MMP-like protease can increase osteoblastic release of CTX fragments from non-mineralized bone. Thus, Adamts1 potentially contributes to the increased serum levels of CTX in rickets/osteomalacia.

  10. Differentiation and Molecular Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived on Gelatin or Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Obara, Chizuka; Takizawa, Kazuya; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Hazawa, Masaharu; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Gotoh, Takaya; Yasuda, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    The generation of induced-pluripotential stem cells- (iPSCs-) derived mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs) is an attractive and promising approach for preparing large, uniform batches of applicable MSCs that can serve as an alternative cell source of primary MSCs. Appropriate culture surfaces may influence their growth and differentiation potentials during iMSC derivation. The present study compared molecular properties and differentiation potential of derived mouse iPS-MSCs by deriving on gelatin or collagen-coated surfaces. The cells were derived by a one-step method and expressed CD73 and CD90, but CD105 was downregulated in iMSCs cultured only on gelatin-coated plates with increasing numbers of passages. A pairwise scatter analysis revealed similar expression of MSC-specific genes in iMSCs derived on gelatin and on collagen surfaces as well as in primary mouse bone marrow MSCs. Deriving iMSCs on gelatin and collagen dictated their osteogenic and adipose differentiation potentials, respectively. Derived iMSCs on gelatin upregulated Bmp2 and Lif prior to induction of osteogenic or adipose differentiation, while PPARγ was upregulated by deriving on collagen. Our results suggest that extracellular matrix components such as gelatin biases generated iMSC differentiation potential towards adipose or bone tissue in their derivation process via up- or downregulation of these master genes. PMID:27642306

  11. Prolidase-dependent mechanism of (Z)-8,9-epoxyheptadeca-1,11,14-triene-induced inhibition of collagen biosynthesis in cultured human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Szoka, Lukasz; Karna, Ewa; Nazaruk, Jolanta; Palka, Jerzy A

    2016-01-01

    The effects of polyolefinic compound from roots of Cirsium palustre, (Z)-8,9-epoxyheptadeca-1,11,14-triene (EHT) on collagen biosynthesis, prolidase activity, expression of insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR), β1 integrin, MAP kinases (pERK1/2), the transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were evaluated in human dermal fibroblasts treated with micromolar concentrations (40-200 μM) for 24 h. It was found that EHT-dependent inhibition of collagen biosynthesis was accompanied by parallel inhibition in prolidase activity. Since IGF-I is the most potent regulator of both processes and prolidase is regulated by β1 integrin signalling, the effect of EHT on IGF-IR and β1 integrin receptor expressions were evaluated. Exposure of the cells to EHT contributed to distinct increase in IGF-IR and slight increase in β1 integrin receptor expressions. It was accompanied by decrease in expression of pERK1/2, HIF-1α and NF-κB. EHT-dependent inhibition of collagen biosynthesis results from inhibition of prolidase activity, the enzyme involved in collagen biosynthesis.

  12. Adamts1 is highly induced in rachitic bones of FGF23 transgenic mice and participates in degradation of non-mineralized bone matrix collagen.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lijuan; Andersson, Göran; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Melhus, Håkan; Lind, Thomas

    2013-01-18

    Transgenic mice overexpressing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) in osteoblasts have a rachitic bone phenotype. These mice display hypomineralized bones, increased expression of osteoblast markers, but osteoclast numbers are unaltered or slightly reduced. Paradoxically, they show increased serum levels of the bone resorption marker CTX, a type I collagen degradation fragment. Here we analyzed a matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) like secreted protease, Adamts1, that has previously been associated with osteoblastic type I collagen breakdown in vitro. Bones from FGF23 transgenic (tg) mice displayed increased Adamts1 protein upon both immunohistological staining and Western blotting. We further found Adamts1 protein together with excessively degraded type I collagen in the non-mineralized bone fraction of FGF23 tg mice. A similar degradation pattern of type I collagen was noticed upon forced expression of Adamts1 in osteoblastic cells in vitro. Importantly, these Adamts1-expressing osteoblastic cells exhibited increased release of CTX fragments when cultured on demineralized bone discs. Together, these results demonstrate for the first time that Adamts1 can be highly induced in bone tissue and that this MMP-like protease can increase osteoblastic release of CTX fragments from non-mineralized bone. Thus, Adamts1 potentially contributes to the increased serum levels of CTX in rickets/osteomalacia. PMID:23261447

  13. Development and characterization of a rapid polymerizing collagen for soft tissue augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Devore, Dale; Zhu, Jiaxun; Brooks, Robert; McCrate, Rebecca Rone; Grant, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A liquid collagen has been developed that fibrilizes upon injection. Rapid polymerizing collagen (RPC) is a type I porcine collagen that undergoes fibrillization upon interaction with ionic solutions, such as physiological solutions. The ability to inject liquid collagen would be beneficial for many soft tissue augmentation applications. In this study, RPC was synthesized and characterized as a possible dermal filler. Transmission electron microscopy, ion induced RPC fibrillogenesis tests, collagenase resistance assay, and injection force studies were performed to assess RPC's physicochemical properties. An in vivo study was performed which consisted of a 1‐, 3‐, and 6‐month study where RPC was injected into the ears of miniature swine. The results demonstrated that the liquid RPC requires low injection force (<7 N); fibrillogenesis and banding of collagen occurs when RPC is injected into ionic solutions, and RPC has enhanced resistance to collagenase breakdown. The in vivo study demonstrated long‐term biocompatibility with low irritation scores. In conclusion RPC possesses many of the desirable properties of a soft tissue augmentation material. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 758–767, 2016. PMID:26488368

  14. Hepatoprotective effect of juglone on dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver fibrosis and its effect on hepatic antioxidant defence and the expression levels of α-SMA and collagen III.

    PubMed

    Zhou, De-Jiang; Mu, Dong; Jiang, Ming-De; Zheng, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Yong; He, Sheng; Weng, Min; Zeng, Wei-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the antifibrotic effects of juglone on dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)‑induced fibrosis in rats. Juglone, which is a quinone, significantly decreased DMN‑induced rat hepatic fibrosis, which was associated with increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, decreased oxidative stress and reduced levels of α‑smooth muscle actin (α‑SMA) and collagen (Col) III in the liver. Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, hyaluronic acid, laminin, type III precollagen and type IV collagen were significantly reduced by treatment with juglone. Liver fibrosis was induced in male Sprague‑Dawley rats by subcutaneous injections of DMN solution and hepatic fibrosis was assessed using Massons trichome staining. The expression levels of α‑SMA and Col III were determined using immunohistochemical techniques. The activities of SOD and malondialdehyde in liver homogenates were also determined. The results suggested that juglone augmented the antioxidative capability of the liver, possibly by stimulating the activity of SOD, which promoted the inactivation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and decreased the accumulation of extracellular matrix collagen in the liver, thereby alleviating hepatic fibrosis. Silymarin was used as a positive control for liver fibrosis protection. It was hypothesized that juglone alleviates or mitigates oxidative stress‑mediated hepatic fibrosis by upregulating the expression of peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor γ and inhibiting the activation of HSC.

  15. Heat-induced changes in the mechanics of a collagenous tissue: isothermal, isotonic shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Chen, S S; Wright, N T; Humphrey, J D

    1998-06-01

    We present data from isothermal, isotonic-shrinkage tests wherein bovine chordae tendineae were subjected to well-defined constant temperatures (from 65 to 90 degrees C), durations of heating (from 180 to 3600 s), and isotonic uniaxial stresses during heating (from 100 to 650 kPa). Tissue response during heating and "recovery" at 37 degrees C following heating was evaluated in terms of the axial shrinkage, a gross indicator of underlying heat-induced denaturation. There were three key findings. First, scaling the heating time via temperature and load-dependent characteristic times for the denaturation process collapsed all shrinkage data to a single curve, and thereby revealed a time-temperature-load equivalency. Second, the characteristic times exhibited an Arrhenius-type behavior with temperature wherein the slopes were nearly independent of applied load--this suggested that applied loads during heating affect the activation entropy, not energy. Third, all specimens exhibited a time-dependent, partial recovery when returned to 37 degrees C following heating, but the degree of recovery decreased with increases in the load imposed during heating. These new findings on heat-induced changes in tissue behavior will aid in the design of improved clinical heating protocols and provide guidance for the requisite constitutive formulations. PMID:10412406

  16. The role of collagen in extralobar pulmonary artery stiffening in response to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chen Yen; Wang, Zhijie; Tabima, Diana M; Eickhoff, Jens C; Chesler, Naomi C

    2010-12-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) causes extralobar pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening, which potentially impairs right ventricular systolic function. Changes in the extracellular matrix proteins collagen and elastin have been suggested to contribute to this arterial stiffening. We hypothesized that vascular collagen accumulation is a major cause of extralobar PA stiffening in HPH and tested our hypothesis with transgenic mice that synthesize collagen type I resistant to collagenase degradation (Col1a1(R/R)). These mice and littermate controls that have normal collagen degradation (Col1a1(+/+)) were exposed to hypoxia for 10 days; some were allowed to recover for 32 days. In vivo PA pressure and isolated PA mechanical properties and collagen and elastin content were measured for all groups. Vasoactive studies were also performed with U-46619, Y-27632, or calcium- and magnesium-free medium. Pulmonary hypertension occurred in both mouse strains due to chronic hypoxia and resolved with recovery. HPH caused significant PA mechanical changes in both mouse strains: circumferential stretch decreased, and mid-to-high-strain circumferential elastic modulus increased (P < 0.05 for both). Impaired collagen type I degradation prevented a return to baseline mechanical properties with recovery and, in fact, led to an increase in the low and mid-to-high-strain moduli compared with hypoxia (P < 0.05 for both). Significant changes in collagen content were found, which tended to follow changes in mid-to-high-strain elastic modulus. No significant changes in elastin content or vasoactivity were observed. Our results demonstrate that collagen content is important to extralobar PA stiffening caused by chronic hypoxia. PMID:20852040

  17. The role of collagen in extralobar pulmonary artery stiffening in response to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Chen Yen; Wang, Zhijie; Tabima, Diana M.; Eickhoff, Jens C.

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) causes extralobar pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening, which potentially impairs right ventricular systolic function. Changes in the extracellular matrix proteins collagen and elastin have been suggested to contribute to this arterial stiffening. We hypothesized that vascular collagen accumulation is a major cause of extralobar PA stiffening in HPH and tested our hypothesis with transgenic mice that synthesize collagen type I resistant to collagenase degradation (Col1a1R/R). These mice and littermate controls that have normal collagen degradation (Col1a1+/+) were exposed to hypoxia for 10 days; some were allowed to recover for 32 days. In vivo PA pressure and isolated PA mechanical properties and collagen and elastin content were measured for all groups. Vasoactive studies were also performed with U-46619, Y-27632, or calcium- and magnesium-free medium. Pulmonary hypertension occurred in both mouse strains due to chronic hypoxia and resolved with recovery. HPH caused significant PA mechanical changes in both mouse strains: circumferential stretch decreased, and mid-to-high-strain circumferential elastic modulus increased (P < 0.05 for both). Impaired collagen type I degradation prevented a return to baseline mechanical properties with recovery and, in fact, led to an increase in the low and mid-to-high-strain moduli compared with hypoxia (P < 0.05 for both). Significant changes in collagen content were found, which tended to follow changes in mid-to-high-strain elastic modulus. No significant changes in elastin content or vasoactivity were observed. Our results demonstrate that collagen content is important to extralobar PA stiffening caused by chronic hypoxia. PMID:20852040

  18. Inhibitory Effects of 4'-Demethylnobiletin, a Metabolite of Nobiletin, on 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-Induced Inflammation in Mouse Ears.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xian; Song, Mingyue; Rakariyatham, Kanyasiri; Zheng, Jinkai; Wang, Minqi; Xu, Fei; Gao, Zili; Xiao, Hang

    2015-12-30

    Nobiletin (NOB) is major citrus flavonoid with many health-promoting benefits. We reported previously that 4'-demethylnobiletin (4DN), a major metabolite of NOB, significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In this study, we further studied the anti-inflammatory effects of 4DN in TPA-induced skin inflammation in mice. We demonstrated that topical application of 4DN decreased TPA-induced ear edema by >88 ± 4.77% in mice. This inhibitory effect was associated with inhibition on TPA-induced up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. Immunoblotting results showed that 4DN resulted in profound effects on multiple proteins related with inflammation and carcinogenesis. 4DN significantly decreased the expression levels of iNOS, COX-2, and MMP-9, suppressed phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt and ERK, and increased the levels of HO-1 and NQO1 in TPA-treated mice. Overall, the results demonstrated that 4DN had strong anti-inflammatory effects in vivo, which provided a scientific basis for using NOB to inhibit inflammation-driven diseases.

  19. Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Zika & Pregnancy Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery KidsHealth > For Parents > Middle Ear Infections and Ear ... medio y colocación de tubos de ventilación Why Surgery? Many kids get middle ear infections (known as ...

  20. Collagenous gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoyi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Takashi; Kondo, Yutaka; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Iijima, Katsunori; Imatani, Akira; Watanabe, Mika; Shirane, Akio; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we report a case of rare collagenous gastritis. The patient was a 25-year-old man who had experienced nausea, abdominal distention and epigastralgia since 2005. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) carried out at initial examination by the patient's local doctor revealed an extensively discolored depression from the upper gastric body to the lower gastric body, mainly including the greater curvature, accompanied by residual mucosa with multiple islands and nodularity with a cobblestone appearance. Initial biopsies sampled from the nodules and accompanying atrophic mucosa were diagnosed as chronic gastritis. In August, 2011, the patient was referred to Tohoku University Hospital for observation and treatment. EGD at our hospital showed the same findings as those by the patient's local doctor. Pathological findings included a membranous collagen band in the superficial layer area of the gastric mucosa, which led to a diagnosis of collagenous gastritis. Collagenous gastritis is an extremely rare disease, but it is important to recognize its characteristic endoscopic findings to make a diagnosis. PMID:23363075

  1. Pathology of the Ear

    PubMed Central

    Orengo, Ida; Robbins, Kerri; Marsch, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    The external ear is exposed to weathering and trauma; it also has sparse vascularity, making it prone to infection and disease. The external location of the cutaneous ear makes it easily visible for diagnosis and accessible for treatment. In this article, the authors focus on diseases of the ear that are most commonly encountered and may be subject to surgical and medical evaluation and/or treatment. Epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical course, and treatment for each disease entity are discussed. PMID:23115534

  2. S100a8/NF-κB signal pathway is involved in the 800-nm diode laser-induced skin collagen remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaolin; Ge, Minggai; Qin, Xiaofeng; Xu, Peng; Zhu, Pingya; Dang, Yongyan; Gu, Jun; Ye, Xiyun

    2016-05-01

    The 800-nm diode laser is widely used for hair removal and also promotes collagen synthesis, but the molecular mechanism by which dermis responses to the thermal damage induced by the 800-nm diode laser is still unclear. Ten 2-month-old mice were irradiated with the 800-nm diode laser at 20, 40, and 60 J/cm(2), respectively. Skin samples were taken for PCR, Western blot analysis, and histological study at day 3 or 30 after laser irradiation. The expression of S100a8 and its two receptors (advanced glycosylation end product-specific receptor, RAGE and toll-like receptor 4, TRL4) was upregulated at day 3 after laser treatments. P-p65 levels were also elevated, causing the increase of cytokine (tumor necrosis factor, TNF-α and interleukin 6, IL-6) and MMPs (MMP1a, MMP9). At day 30, PCR and Western blot analysis showed significant increase of type I and III procollagen in the dermis treated with laser. Importantly, skin structure was markedly improved in the laser-irradiated skin compared with the control. Thus, it seemed that S100a8 upregulation triggered NF-κB signal pathway through RAGE and TLR4, responding to laser-induced dermis wound healing. The involvement of the NF-κB pathway in MMP gene transcription promoted the turnover of collagen in the skin, accelerating new collagen synthesis.

  3. S100a8/NF-κB signal pathway is involved in the 800-nm diode laser-induced skin collagen remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaolin; Ge, Minggai; Qin, Xiaofeng; Xu, Peng; Zhu, Pingya; Dang, Yongyan; Gu, Jun; Ye, Xiyun

    2016-05-01

    The 800-nm diode laser is widely used for hair removal and also promotes collagen synthesis, but the molecular mechanism by which dermis responses to the thermal damage induced by the 800-nm diode laser is still unclear. Ten 2-month-old mice were irradiated with the 800-nm diode laser at 20, 40, and 60 J/cm(2), respectively. Skin samples were taken for PCR, Western blot analysis, and histological study at day 3 or 30 after laser irradiation. The expression of S100a8 and its two receptors (advanced glycosylation end product-specific receptor, RAGE and toll-like receptor 4, TRL4) was upregulated at day 3 after laser treatments. P-p65 levels were also elevated, causing the increase of cytokine (tumor necrosis factor, TNF-α and interleukin 6, IL-6) and MMPs (MMP1a, MMP9). At day 30, PCR and Western blot analysis showed significant increase of type I and III procollagen in the dermis treated with laser. Importantly, skin structure was markedly improved in the laser-irradiated skin compared with the control. Thus, it seemed that S100a8 upregulation triggered NF-κB signal pathway through RAGE and TLR4, responding to laser-induced dermis wound healing. The involvement of the NF-κB pathway in MMP gene transcription promoted the turnover of collagen in the skin, accelerating new collagen synthesis. PMID:26914682

  4. [Evolution of the ear].

    PubMed

    Qvist, Morten Rosenkilde

    2009-12-14

    The evolution of the ear may be traced through transitional fossils, comparative anatomy and embryology. The organ of hearing evolved from receptors of the vestibulary organ of fish. The tympanic ear developed in amphibians at the transition to terrestrial life, and the hyomandibula was isolated as the first middle ear bone, the columella stapes. Reptile jaw bones, quadratum and articulare, transformed to malleus and incus in mammals. With selective advantages during the evolution, an increasing structural complexity of the ear accompanied improved sound transmission and reception.

  5. Substance P ameliorates collagen II-induced arthritis in mice via suppression of the inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Son, Youngsook

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • SP can increase IL-10 levels and reduce TNF-α and IL-17 levels in RA. • SP causes the increase in T{sub reg}, M2 macrophage, and MSCs in RA. • SP-induced immune suppression leads to the blockade of RA progression. • SP can be used as the therapeutics for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases. - Abstract: Current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapies such as biologics inhibiting pathogenic cytokines substantially delay RA progression. However, patient responses to these agents are not always complete and long lasting. This study explored whether substance P (SP), an 11 amino acids long endogenous neuropeptide with the novel ability to mobilize mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and modulate injury-mediated inflammation, can inhibit RA progression. SP efficacy was evaluated by paw swelling, clinical arthritis scoring, radiological analysis, histological analysis of cartilage destruction, and blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in vivo. SP treatment significantly reduced local inflammatory signs, mean arthritis scores, degradation of joint cartilage, and invasion of inflammatory cells into the synovial tissues. Moreover, the SP treatment markedly reduced the size of spleens enlarged by excessive inflammation in CIA, increased IL-10 levels, and decreased TNF-α and IL-17 levels. Mobilization of stem cells and induction of T{sub reg} and M2 type macrophages in the circulation were also increased by the SP treatment. These effect of SP might be associated with the suppression of inflammatory responses in RA and, furthermore, blockade of RA progression. Our results propose SP as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune-related inflammatory diseases.

  6. Myeloid deletion of SIRT1 suppresses collagen-induced arthritis in mice by modulating dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seong Ji; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Lim, Hye Song; Hah, Young-Sool; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Kim, Hyun-Ok; Cheon, Yun-Hong; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Jang, Kyu Yun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Park, Byung-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Il

    2016-01-01

    The type III histone deacetylase silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) is an enzyme that is critical for the modulation of immune and inflammatory responses. However, the data on its role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are limited and controversial. To better understand how SIRT1 regulates adaptive immune responses in RA, we evaluated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in myeloid cell-specific SIRT1 knockout (mSIRT1 KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Arthritis severity was gauged on the basis of clinical, radiographic and pathologic scores. Compared with their WT counterparts, the mSIRT1 KO mice exhibited less severe arthritis, which was less destructive to the joints. The expression levels of inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases and ROR-γT were also reduced in the mSIRT1 KO mice compared with the WT mice and were paralleled by reductions in the numbers of Th1 and Th17 cells and CD80- or CD86-positive dendritic cells (DCs). In addition, impaired DC maturation and decreases in the Th1/Th17 immune response were observed in the mSIRT1 KO mice. T-cell proliferation was also investigated in co-cultures with antigen-pulsed DCs. In the co-cultures, the DCs from the mSIRT1 KO mice showed decreases in T-cell proliferation and the Th1/Th17 immune response. In this study, myeloid cell-specific deletion of SIRT1 appeared to suppress CIA by modulating DC maturation. Thus, a careful investigation of DC-specific SIRT1 downregulation is needed to gauge the therapeutic utility of agents targeting SIRT1 in RA. PMID:26987484

  7. Anti-angiogenic effect of total saponins of Rhizoma Dioscorea nipponica on collagen induced-arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiu-Jun; Guo, Ya-Chun; Sun, Tong-You; Song, Hong-Ru; Gao, Ya-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic autoimmune and incurable disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effect and mechanism of the total saponins of Rhizoma Dioscorea nipponica (TSRDN) in RA. A collagen induced-arthritis (CIA) rat model was established. CIA rats were randomly divided into three groups and lavaged with an equal volume of solvent (CIA group), TSRDN (25 mg/kg/day, RDN group) and tripterygium (TP; 12 mg/kg/day, TP group) for 21 days, respectively. Normal rats served as a control group. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining was used to observe the histopathological injury of synovial tissues. The level of CD31, which used for marking and counting, micro vessel density (MVD) and the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) were detected by immunohistochemical analysis. Additionally, the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was determined using an ELISA kit. HE staining showed obvious synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration, pannus formation, cartilage and bone erosion in the CIA group rats. In addition, compared with control group, the level of MVD, the expression of VEGF and STAT3, and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB were all increased in CIA group rat synovial tissue (all P<0.01); however, TSRDN or tripterygium were able to inhibit these changes (all P<0.01). It was speculated that TSRDN may prevent angiogenesis by inhibiting the expression of STAT3 and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB p65, thereby potentially improving CIA.

  8. Assessment of collagen antibody-induced arthritis in BALB/c mice using bioimaging analysis and histopathological examination

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Joo Hye; Lee, Won Kil; Lee, Yun Seok

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the therapeutic potential of sulfasalazine and prednisolone in a mouse collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) model. Twenty-five male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into five groups: group 1 (G1): control, group 2 (G2): probe control, group 3 (G3): CAIA, group 4 (G4): CAIA+sulfasalazine (10 mg/kg, oral), and group 5 (G5): CAIA+prednisolone (100 mg/kg, oral). Fluorescence bioimaging was performed in vivo 24 and 48 h after treatment with a fluorescence probe (OsteoSense® 680 EX), and all mice were sacrificed. The hind knee joints were fixed in 10% neutral phosphate-buffered formalin, and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histopathological analyses were performed. The paw thickness increased in a time-dependent manner in G3 mice, but trended toward a decrease in both G4 and G5 mice. Fluorescence intensity increased in G3 mice at 24 and 48 h after fluorescence probe treatment, but the fluorescence intensity in G4 and G5 mice was lower than that in G3. Micro-CT analyses showed that the joint surfaces of G3 mice had a rough and irregular articular appearance, but the occurrence of these irregularities was lower in G4 and G5. Hematoxylin and eosin and Safranin O-fast green staining confirmed that destruction of the cartilage and bony structures, synovial hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltration all occurred in G3, and that the occurrence of these phenomena was lower in G4 and G5 than in G3. Taken together, these results suggest that sulfasalazine and prednisolone can reduce acute rheumatoid arthritis in mice. PMID:27729929

  9. Anti-angiogenic effect of total saponins of Rhizoma Dioscorea nipponica on collagen induced-arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiu-Jun; Guo, Ya-Chun; Sun, Tong-You; Song, Hong-Ru; Gao, Ya-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic autoimmune and incurable disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effect and mechanism of the total saponins of Rhizoma Dioscorea nipponica (TSRDN) in RA. A collagen induced-arthritis (CIA) rat model was established. CIA rats were randomly divided into three groups and lavaged with an equal volume of solvent (CIA group), TSRDN (25 mg/kg/day, RDN group) and tripterygium (TP; 12 mg/kg/day, TP group) for 21 days, respectively. Normal rats served as a control group. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining was used to observe the histopathological injury of synovial tissues. The level of CD31, which used for marking and counting, micro vessel density (MVD) and the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) were detected by immunohistochemical analysis. Additionally, the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was determined using an ELISA kit. HE staining showed obvious synovial hyperplasia, inflammatory cell infiltration, pannus formation, cartilage and bone erosion in the CIA group rats. In addition, compared with control group, the level of MVD, the expression of VEGF and STAT3, and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB were all increased in CIA group rat synovial tissue (all P<0.01); however, TSRDN or tripterygium were able to inhibit these changes (all P<0.01). It was speculated that TSRDN may prevent angiogenesis by inhibiting the expression of STAT3 and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB p65, thereby potentially improving CIA. PMID:27698704

  10. Folliculocystic and Collagen Hamartoma: A New Entity?

    PubMed Central

    An, Je Min; Kim, Ye Seul; Park, Young Lip

    2015-01-01

    Folliculocystic and collagen hamartoma is a newly described complex hamartoma characterized by abundant collagen deposition, concentric perifollicular fibrosis, and keratin- filled infundibular cysts that are visible on histopathological examination. Here, we report the case of a 19-year-old Korean man who had large brownish infiltrated plaques with numerous follicular comedo-like openings and subcutaneous cystic masses on his right temporal scalp and ear since birth. Histopathological examination showed abundant collagen deposition in the dermis that extended up to the subcutaneous fat layer, multifocal infundibular cysts packed with keratin, and perifollicular inflammation and fibrosis. Hence, we describe a new type of hamartoma with folliculocystic and collagen components but without tuberous sclerosis. PMID:26512173

  11. MiR-182-5p protects inner ear hair cells from cisplatin-induced apoptosis by inhibiting FOXO3a.

    PubMed

    Li, Yimeng; Li, Ao; Wu, Jingfang; He, Yingzi; Yu, Huiqian; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of a variety of malignancies. However, the clinical application of cisplatin is hampered by the resultant irreversible hearing loss due to hair cell apoptosis. To date, no practical regimen to resolve this has been developed. Meanwhile, the role of microRNA in protecting hair cells from cisplatin-induced apoptosis in the inner ear has not been extensively investigated. In this study, we monitored miR-183, -96, and -182 turnover in the cochlea during cisplatin treatment in vitro. We found that overexpression of miR-182, but not miR-183 and -96, improved hair cell survival after 3 μM cisplatin treatment in vitro. We demonstrated that overexpression of miR-182 repressed the intrinsic apoptotic pathway by inhibiting the translation of FOXO3a. Our study offers a new therapeutic target for alleviating cisplatin-induced hair cell apoptosis in a rapid and tissue-specific manner. PMID:27607577

  12. MiR-182-5p protects inner ear hair cells from cisplatin-induced apoptosis by inhibiting FOXO3a

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yimeng; Li, Ao; Wu, Jingfang; He, Yingzi; Yu, Huiqian; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of a variety of malignancies. However, the clinical application of cisplatin is hampered by the resultant irreversible hearing loss due to hair cell apoptosis. To date, no practical regimen to resolve this has been developed. Meanwhile, the role of microRNA in protecting hair cells from cisplatin-induced apoptosis in the inner ear has not been extensively investigated. In this study, we monitored miR-183, -96, and -182 turnover in the cochlea during cisplatin treatment in vitro. We found that overexpression of miR-182, but not miR-183 and -96, improved hair cell survival after 3 μM cisplatin treatment in vitro. We demonstrated that overexpression of miR-182 repressed the intrinsic apoptotic pathway by inhibiting the translation of FOXO3a. Our study offers a new therapeutic target for alleviating cisplatin-induced hair cell apoptosis in a rapid and tissue-specific manner. PMID:27607577

  13. Considerations on the use of ear chondrocytes as donor chondrocytes for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Mandl, Erik W; Jahr, Holger; Koevoet, Wendy; Nolst-Trenité, Gilbert; Verhaar, Jan A N

    2004-01-01

    Articular cartilage is often used for research on cartilage tissue engineering. However, ear cartilage is easier to harvest, with less donor-site morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether adult human ear chondrocytes were capable of producing cartilage after expansion in monolayer culture. Cell yield per gram of cartilage was twice as high for ear than for articular cartilage. Moreover, ear chondrocytes proliferated faster. Cell proliferation could be further stimulated by the use of serum-free medium with Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) in stead of medium with 10% serum. To evaluate chondrogenic capacity, multiplied chondrocytes were suspended in alginate and implanted subcutaneously in athymic mice. After 8 weeks the constructs demonstrated a proteoglycan-rich matrix that contained collagen type II. Constructs of ear chondrocytes showed a faint staining for elastin. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that expression of collagen type II was 2-fold upregulated whereas expression of collagen type I was 2-fold down regulated in ear chondrocytes expanded in serum-free medium with FGF2 compared to serum-containing medium. Expression of alkaline phosphatase and collagen type X were low indicating the absence of terminal differentiation. We conclude that ear chondrocytes can be used as donor chondrocytes for cartilage tissue engineering. Furthermore, it may proof to be a promising alternative cell source to engineer cartilage for articular repair.

  14. Preventive magnesium supplement protects the inner ear against noise-induced impairment of blood flow and oxygenation in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Heidemarie; Scheibe, Fred

    2002-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated in the guinea pig that preventive dietary magnesium supplement can significantly reduce hearing loss caused by acute impulse noise exposure. To elucidate the underlying protective mechanisms of magnesium, the present study examined its effect on noise-induced impairment of cochlear blood flow (CoBF) and perilymphatic oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in two groups of guinea pigs maintained on optimal or suboptimal dietary magnesium status. While laser Doppler flowmetry was used to determine CoBF, perilymphatic pO2 was measured polarographically using micro-coaxial platinum needle electrodes. Auditory function was tested by recording compound action potentials. Animals were exposed to a selected high-intensity impulse noise series (L(peak) 167 dB, 1/s, 38 min). In the low magnesium groups, the noise exposure resulted in a mean decrease of CoBF and perilymphatic PO2 by about 10 and 35 per cent of the initial value, respectively. In contrast, in the high magnesium groups, neither parameter displayed any noise-induced decreases, and there was even a tendency to a slight increase. Magnesium also reduced the hearing loss significantly by 10 to 35 dB over the frequency range (2-16 kHz) tested. Both the CoBF and the perilymphatic pO2 were found to correlate with the serum magnesium. The piesent findings show that in the guinea pig preventive dietary magnesium supplement can protect the inner ear against noise-induced impairment of blood flow and oxygenation, which may partly be responsible for noise-induced hearing loss.

  15. Synthesis of the Peptide Ac-Wahx-KTTKS and Evaluation of the Ability to Induce In Vitro Collagen Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Guglielmi, Danila A S; Martinelli, Ariane M; Rissi, Nathália C; Cilli, Eduardo M; Soares, Christiane P; Chiavacci, Leila A

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis of a peptide analogue of the KTTKS, termed Ac- Wahx-KTTKS and evaluate its cytotoxicity and role in biosynthesis of collagen for future application in skin aging. The peptide was obtained with purity higher than 97.5%. In the cytotoxicity assay, we observed non-toxic effects for Ac-WAhx-KTTKS at concentrations below 600 µM for HaCaT and 500 µM for HepG2 cells, respectively. After 24 and 48 h it was possible to observe significant changes in collagen synthesis in the groups treated with various concentrations of the peptide. In conclusion, the Ac-Wahx- KTTKS peptide increased collagen synthesis in fibroblasts by 80% and it is a promising candidate for improving skin aging. PMID:27184584

  16. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... the middle ear and the back of the nose and upper throat. ... down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are ...

  17. Preeclampsia serum-induced collagen I expression and intracellular calcium levels in arterial smooth muscle cells are mediated by the PLC-γ1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rongzhen; Teng, Yincheng; Huang, Yajuan; Gu, Jinghong; Ma, Li; Li, Ming; Zhou, Yuedi

    2014-09-26

    In women with preeclampsia (PE), endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction can lead to altered secretion of paracrine factors that induce peripheral vasoconstriction and proteinuria. This study examined the hypothesis that PE sera may directly or indirectly, through human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs), stimulate phospholipase C-γ1-1,4,5-trisphosphate (PLC-γ1-IP3) signaling, thereby increasing protein kinase C-α (PKC-α) activity, collagen I expression and intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). HUASMCs and HUVECs were cocultured with normal or PE sera before PLC-γ1 silencing. Increased PLC-γ1 and IP3 receptor (IP3R) phosphorylation was observed in cocultured HUASMCs stimulated with PE sera (P<0.05). In addition, PE serum significantly increased HUASMC viability and reduced their apoptosis (P<0.05); these effects were abrogated with PLC-γ1 silencing. Compared with normal sera, PE sera increased [Ca(2+)]i in cocultured HUASMCs (P<0.05), which was inhibited by PLC-γ1 and IP3R silencing. Finally, PE sera-induced PKC-α activity and collagen I expression was inhibited by PLC-γ1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) (P<0.05). These results suggest that vasoactive substances in the PE serum may induce deposition in the extracellular matrix through the activation of PLC-γ1, which may in turn result in thickening and hardening of the placental vascular wall, placental blood supply shortage, fetal hypoxia-ischemia and intrauterine growth retardation or intrauterine fetal death. PE sera increased [Ca(2+)]i and induced PKC-α activation and collagen I expression in cocultured HUASMCs via the PLC-γ1 pathway.

  18. Cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) as a new chiral triacid scaffold capable of inducing triple helix formation of collagen peptides containing either a native sequence or Pro-Hyp-Gly repeats.

    PubMed

    Rump, Erik T; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Hilbers, Hans W; de Groot, Philip G; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2002-10-18

    A new triacid scaffold is described based on the cone-shaped cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) molecule that facilitates the triple helical folding of peptides containing either a unique blood platelet binding collagen sequence or collagen peptides composed of Pro-Hyp-Gly repeats. The latter were synthesized by segment condensation using Fmoc-Pro-Hyp-Gly-OH. Peptides were coupled to this CTV scaffold and also coupled to the Kemp's triacid (KTA) scaffold. After assembly of peptide H-Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Glu(OAll)-Arg-Gly-Val-Glu (OAll)-Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-NH2 (13) by an orthogonal synthesis strategy to both triacid scaffolds, followed by deprotection of the allyl groups, the molecular constructs spontaneously folded into a triple helical structure. In contrast, the non-assembled peptides did not. The melting temperature (Tm) of (+/-) CTV[CH2C(O)N(H)Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Glu-Arg-Gly-Val-Glu-Gly- [Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-NH2]3 (14) is 19 degrees C, whereas KTA[Gly-Gly-[Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Glu-Arg-Gly-Val-Glu-Gly- [Pro-Hyp-Gly]2-NH2]3 (15) has a Tm of 20 degrees C. Thus, it was shown for the first time that scaffolds were also effective in stabilizing the triple helix of native collagen sequences. The different stabilizing properties of the two CTV enantiomers could be measured after coupling of racemic CTV triacid to the collagen peptide, and subsequent chromatographic separation of the diastereomers. After assembly of the two chiral CTV scaffolds to the model peptide H-Gly-Gly-(Pro-Hyp-Gly)5-NH2 (24), the (+)-enantiomer of CTV 28b was found to serve as a better triple helix-inducing scaffold than the (-)-enantiomer 28a. In addition to an effect of the chirality of the CTV scaffold, a certain degree of flexibility between the CTV cone and the folded peptide was also shown to be of importance. Restricting the flexibility from two to one glycine residues resulted in a significant difference between the two collagen mimics 20a and 20b, whereas the difference was

  19. Celastrol attenuates bone erosion in collagen-Induced arthritis mice and inhibits osteoclast differentiation and function in RANKL-induced RAW264.7.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ke; Xu, Lingxiao; Feng, Xiaoke; Zhang, Qiande; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng

    2015-02-01

    Recently, the traditional Chinese medicine Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f (TwHF) of the Celastraceae family has attracted increasing attention for its potential therapeutic application in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is well accepted that TwHF exerts the antirheumatic activity and mainly depends on its potent anti-inflammatory property. To further explore the therapeutic potential of the well-defined TwHF-derived single compound - celastrol in RA, we study the therapeutic efficacy of celastrol on bone erosion in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice and delineate its effects on osteoclast differentiation and functions in RANKL-induced osteoclast precursors RAW264.7 cell line. In CIA mice, daily injection of celastrol (beginning on day 28 after arthritis induction) markedly suppressed arthritis, and reduced bone damage in the joints as demonstrated by histology and bone micro-computed tomography (CT). The effects were accompanied by reductions of osteoclast cells in joints, serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) 5b, and expression of osteoclastic genes (Trap, Ctsk, Ctr, Mmp-9) and transcriptional factors (c-Fos, c-Jun and NFATc1). When RAW264.7 cells were treated with RANKL, celastrol inhibited the formation of TRAP+ multinucleated cells and the bone-resorbing activity in dose-dependent manners. Furthermore, celastrol reduced the RANKL-induced expression of osteoclastic genes and transcriptional factors, as well as phosphorylation of NF-kB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). These findings show that celastrol could directly inhibit osteoclast formation and function, suggesting a novel therapeutic strategy of celastrol for managing RA, especially in preventing bone destruction.

  20. Ear canal cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Holt, J J

    1992-06-01

    Although cholesteatomas are more commonly found in the middle ear and the mastoid, the disease can occur in the external ear canal. All cases of ear canal cholesteatoma treated by the author were reviewed. There were nine ears in seven patients, who had an average age of 62 years. The lesions ranged in size from a few millimeters to extensive mastoid destruction. Smaller lesions can be managed by frequent cleaning as an office procedure. Larger lesions require surgery, either canaloplasty or mastoidectomy. The otolaryngologist should suspect this disease in the elderly. Microscopic examination of the ear with meticulous cleaning of all wax, especially in elderly patients, is most useful in detecting early disease. Frequent applications of mineral oil to the canal should be used in the management of the disease and to prevent recurrence.

  1. Exposure to Mimivirus Collagen Promotes Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Hülsmeier, Andreas J.; Hochhold, Nina; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in animals, also occur in some recently described nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses such as Mimiviridae, which replicate in amoebae. To clarify the impact of viral collagens on the immune response of animals exposed to Mimiviridae, we have investigated the localization of collagens in Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus particles and the response of mice to immunization with mimivirus particles. Using protein biotinylation, we have first shown that viral collagen encoded by open reading frame L71 is present at the surface of mimivirus particles. Exposure to mimivirus collagens elicited the production of anti-collagen antibodies in DBA/1 mice immunized intradermally with mimivirus protein extracts. This antibody response also targeted mouse collagen type II and was accompanied by T-cell reactivity to collagen and joint inflammation, as observed in collagen-induced arthritis following immunization of mice with bovine collagen type II. The broad distribution of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses in the environment suggests that humans are constantly exposed to such large virus particles. A survey of blood sera from healthy human subjects and from rheumatoid arthritis patients indeed demonstrated that 30% of healthy-subject and 36% of rheumatoid arthritis sera recognized the major mimivirus capsid protein L425. Moreover, whereas 6% of healthy-subject sera recognized the mimivirus collagen protein L71, 22% of rheumatoid arthritis sera were positive for mimivirus L71. Accordingly, our study shows that environmental exposure to mimivirus represents a risk factor in triggering autoimmunity to collagens. PMID:24173233

  2. IL-35 stimulation of CD39+ regulatory T cells confers protection against collagen II-induced arthritis via the production of IL-10.

    PubMed

    Kochetkova, Irina; Golden, Sarah; Holderness, Kathryn; Callis, Gayle; Pascual, David W

    2010-06-15

    IL-35 is produced by regulatory T cells, and this novel cytokine can downregulate Th17 cell development and inhibit autoimmune inflammation. In this work, an rIL-35, as a single-chain fusion between murine IL-12p35 and EBV-induced gene 3, was expressed in yeast. This rIL-35 inhibited OVA-specific cellular and Ab responses in OVA-challenged recipients of DO11.10 CD4+ T cells. Likewise, IL-35 inhibited clinical manifestation of collagen-induced arthritis or could cease further disease exacerbation upon initiation of IL-35 treatment. Exogenous IL-35 treatments suppressed Th1 and Th17 cells and promoted CD39 expression by CD4+ T cells. Sorted CD25-CD39+CD4+ T cells from IL-35-treated mice produced IL-10 and, upon adoptive transfer, were sufficiently potent to inhibit subsequent development of inflammation in mice with collagen-induced arthritis, whereas sorted CD25+CD39+CD4+ T cells showed reduced potency. IL-35 treatments of IL-10-/- mice failed to induce protective CD39+CD4+ T cells, demonstrating the effector role of IL-10 by IL-35 immunosuppression.

  3. Uighur medicine abnormal savda munzip (ASMq) suppresses expression of collagen and TGF-β1 with concomitant induce Smad7 in human hypertrophic scar fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Kong, Menglong; Ma, Tao; Gao, Weicheng; Ma, Shaolin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic scar (HS) is a common dermal disease, for which numerous treatments are currently available but they do not always yield excellent therapeutic results. Hence, alternative strategy are needed. Recent basic and clinic research has shown that Uighur medicine abnormal savda munzip (ASMq) has anti-hypertrophic scar properties but its molecular mechanism is unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of ASMq on TGF-β/Smads signaling in fibroblasts derived from hypertrophic scar. Purpose: To investigate the effect of ASMq on the TGF-β/Smads signaling pathway in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (HSFs). Methods: Hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (HSFs) were isolated from human of hypertrophic scar and passaged to the 3~4 generation, which were treated with the different concentrations of ASMq. Cells treated with 5-Fu served as the positive control group. After treatment for 48 hours, expressions of Smad7, TGF-β1, type I and III collagen, were examined by immunocytochemistry, reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results: ASMq markedly enhanced the expression of inhibitory Smad7, with suppression of type I and III collagen and TGF-β1. We observed that treatment of ASMq induced Smad7 to enter the cytoplasm from the nucleus of hypertrophic fibroblasts. Conclusions: ASMq inhibits scarring probably by enhancing the expression of inhibitory Smad7, and inhibiting TGF-β1, collagen expression, and is a potential treatment for scarring. PMID:26309506

  4. Altered expression of small proteoglycans, collagen, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 in developing bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Westergren-Thorsson, G; Hernnäs, J; Särnstrand, B; Oldberg, A; Heinegård, D; Malmström, A

    1993-01-01

    The development of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats was studied over a period of 21 d after an intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. The expression of three small proteoglycans (biglycan, decorin, and fibromodulin), collagen III and TGF-beta 1 was studied by RNA-transfer blot analysis. The proteoglycans were also studied by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blots. TGF-beta 1 mRNA increased threefold already on day 3 and remained elevated until day 10. After the increase of TGF-beta 1 mRNA the messages for biglycan and collagen III steadily increased to reach a maximum 10 d after bleomycin instillation. The mRNA for biglycan increased maximally fourfold and that of collagen III 2.5-fold. Decorin mRNA, in contrast to biglycan decreased and reached 20% of control on day 10. The message for fibromodulin remained constant throughout the study period. The amounts of biglycan and decorin in the tissue changed in accordance with the mRNA levels. The results corroborate and extend previous in vitro studies concerning the effect of TGF-beta 1 on the metabolism of small proteoglycans and show that these macromolecules are regulated differently also in vivo. The marked alterations of biglycan and decorin during the development of fibrosis suggests that these proteoglycans have a regulating role in this process. Images PMID:7688761

  5. Intra-articular nuclear factor-κB blockade ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by eliciting regulatory T cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Min, S-Y; Yan, M; Du, Y; Wu, T; Khobahy, E; Kwon, S-R; Taneja, V; Bashmakov, A; Nukala, S; Ye, Y; Orme, J; Sajitharan, D; Kim, H-Y; Mohan, C

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB is a transcription factor implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we have examined the effect of intra-articular administration of the IKK inhibitor, NEMO-binding domain peptide (NBD), on the severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). NBD peptides were injected intra-articularly into the knee joints of DBA/1J mice after the onset of disease. Collagen-injected mice given a scrambled peptide served as controls. Arthritis severity was determined by visual examination of paws. Intra-articular NBD injection reduced the arthritis score and ameliorated morphological signs of bone destruction compared to the controls. Serum levels of type-II collagen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a antibodies were lower in NBD-treated mice versus the control mice, whereas the levels of type-II collagen-specific IgG1 antibodies were increased by NBD treatment. NBD treatment diminished the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-17 and interferon (IFN)-γ in serum, but increased the regulatory cytokine IL-10. NBD-treated CIA mice exhibited significantly higher percentages and numbers of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3+)CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells than controls. Immunofluorescence analysis of NBD-treated mice revealed that FoxP3 and Ym1, a marker of alternatively activated macrophages, were juxtaposed to each other within draining inguinal lymph nodes. Intra-articular administration of NBD peptide is effective as an experimental therapy in a murine model of RA. Nevertheless, the intra-articular treatment modality is still associated with systemic effects on the immune system. PMID:23574318

  6. Mesothelial Cell Autoantibodies Induce Collagen Deposition in vitro & Using a Case Study to Introduce Undergraduates to Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serve, Kinta M.

    2013-01-01

    Part I. Pleural fibrosis, a non-malignant, asbestos-related respiratory disease characterized by excessive collagen deposition, is progressive, debilitating, and potentially fatal. Disease severity may be influenced by the type of asbestos fiber inhaled, with Libby amphibole (LA) a seemingly more potent mediator of pleural fibrosis than chrysotile…

  7. Deletion of IFT20 in early stage T lymphocyte differentiation inhibits the development of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann; Sarkar, Debanjan; Yang, Shuying

    2014-01-01

    IFT20 is the smallest member of the intraflagellar transport protein (IFT) complex B. It is involved in cilia formation. Studies of IFT20 have been confined to ciliated cells. Recently, IFT20 was found to be also expressed in non-ciliated T cells and have functions in immune synapse formation and signaling in vitro. However, how IFT20 regulates T-cell development and activation in vivo is still unknown. We deleted the IFT20 gene in early and later stages of T-cell development by crossing IFT20flox/flox (IFT20f/f) mice with Lck-Cre and CD4-Cre transgenic mice, and investigated the role of IFT20 in T-cell maturation and in the development of T cell-mediated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We found that both Lck-Cre/IFT20f/f and CD4-Cre/IFT20f/f mice were indistinguishable from their wild-type littermates in body size, as well as in the morphology and weight of the spleen and thymus. However, the number of CD4- and CD8-positive cells was significantly lower in thymus and spleen in Lck-Cre/IFT20f/f mice. Meanwhile, the incidence and severity of CIA symptoms were significantly decreased, and inflammation in the paw was significantly inhibited in Lck-Cre/IFT20f/f mice compared to Lck-Cre/IFT20+/+ littermates. Deletion IFT20 in more mature T cells of CD4-Cre/IFT20f/f mice had only mild effects on the development of T cells and CIA. The expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TGF-β1 were significantly downregulated in the paw of Lck-Cre/IFT20f/f mice, but just slight decreased in CD4-Cre/IFT20f/f mice. These results demonstrate that deletion of IFT20 in the early stage of T-cell development inhibited CIA development through regulating T-cell development and the expression of critical cytokines. PMID:26097753

  8. Bioassay-guided chemical study of the anti-inflammatory effect of Senna villosa (Miller) H.S. Irwin & Barneby (Leguminosae) in TPA-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Susunaga-Notario, Ana del Carmen; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Almanza-Pérez, Julio Cesar; Gutiérrez-Carrillo, Atilano; Arrieta-Báez, Daniel; López-López, Ana Laura; Román-Ramos, Rubén; Flores-Sáenz, José Luis Eduardo; Alarcón-Aguilar, Francisco Javier

    2014-07-15

    Senna villosa (Miller) is a plant that grows in México. In traditional Mexican medicine, it is used topically to treat skin infections, pustules and eruptions and to heal wounds by scar formation. However, studies of its potential anti-inflammatory effects have not been performed. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-inflammatory effect of extracts from the leaves of Senna villosa and to perform a bioassay-guided chemical study of the extract with major activity in a model of ear edema induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). The results reveal that the chloroform extract from Senna villosa leaves has anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties. Nine fractions were obtained from the bioassay-guided chemical study, including a white precipitate from fractions 2 and 3. Although none of the nine fractions presented anti-inflammatory activity, the white precipitate exhibited pharmacological activity. It was chemically characterized using mass spectrometry and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, resulting in a mixture of three aliphatic esters, which were identified as the principal constituents: hexyl tetradecanoate (C20H40O2), heptyl tetradecanoate (C21H42O2) and octyl tetradecanoate (C22H44O2). This research provides, for the first time, evidence of the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties of compounds isolated from Senna villosa.

  9. Bioassay-guided chemical study of the anti-inflammatory effect of Senna villosa (Miller) H.S. Irwin & Barneby (Leguminosae) in TPA-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Susunaga-Notario, Ana del Carmen; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Almanza-Pérez, Julio Cesar; Gutiérrez-Carrillo, Atilano; Arrieta-Báez, Daniel; López-López, Ana Laura; Román-Ramos, Rubén; Flores-Sáenz, José Luis Eduardo; Alarcón-Aguilar, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Senna villosa (Miller) is a plant that grows in México. In traditional Mexican medicine, it is used topically to treat skin infections, pustules and eruptions and to heal wounds by scar formation. However, studies of its potential anti-inflammatory effects have not been performed. The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-inflammatory effect of extracts from the leaves of Senna villosa and to perform a bioassay-guided chemical study of the extract with major activity in a model of ear edema induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). The results reveal that the chloroform extract from Senna villosa leaves has anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties. Nine fractions were obtained from the bioassay-guided chemical study, including a white precipitate from fractions 2 and 3. Although none of the nine fractions presented anti-inflammatory activity, the white precipitate exhibited pharmacological activity. It was chemically characterized using mass spectrometry and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, resulting in a mixture of three aliphatic esters, which were identified as the principal constituents: hexyl tetradecanoate (C20H40O2), heptyl tetradecanoate (C21H42O2) and octyl tetradecanoate (C22H44O2). This research provides, for the first time, evidence of the anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties of compounds isolated from Senna villosa. PMID:25029073

  10. Differential effects of isoflurane and CO2 inhalation on plasma levels of inflammatory markers associated with collagen-induced arthritis in DBA mice.

    PubMed

    Lawrance, Christopher C; Lucas, Edralin A; Clarke, Stephen L; Smith, Brenda J; Kuvibidila, Solo

    2009-07-01

    Inhalation of CO2 or isoflurane is a commonly used method of euthanasia with mice, but information related to their effects on serum inflammatory markers in chronic models of inflammation is limited. In the current study, nineteen-week old DBA female mice with (n = 53) or without (n = 51) collagen-induced arthritis were randomly assigned to euthanization with CO2 (n = 55) or isoflurane (n = 49. Plasma was collected for the measurement of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by ELISA. When mice without and with collagen-induced arthritis were pooled, compared to CO2, administration of isoflurane was associated with lower production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha (pg/ml, mean +/- SEM) (26.1 +/- 2.82 versus 48.1 +/- 7.99) and IL-6 (25.18 +/- 2.73 versus 48.1 +/- 6.82) (ANOVA, p < 0.05). In contrast to TNF-alpha and IL-6, administration of CO2 decreased the plasma sICAM-1 level (1170+/- 50 versus 758 +/- 24 for CO2) (p < 0.00001). When data were analyzed as a function of collagen-induced arthritis, the differences between CO2 and isoflurane persisted. Low plasma sICAM-1 levels found in CO2 euthanasia group may be due to degradation. Since mice are the most common animal model for studying inflammation, researchers should be aware of these iatrogenic experimental variables before interpreting their data.

  11. Diallylsulfide attenuates excessive collagen production and apoptosis in a rat model of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis through the involvement of protease activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Kalayarasan, Srinivasan; Sriram, Narayanan; Soumyakrishnan, Syamala; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) can be a devastating lung disease. It is primarily caused by inflammation leading to severe damage of the alveolar epithelial cells. The pathophysiology of PF is not yet been clearly defined, but studying lung parenchymal injury by involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the activation of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) may provide promising results. PAR-2 is a G-protein coupled receptor is known to play an important role in the development of PF. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory role of diallylsulfide (DAS) against ROS mediated activation of PAR-2 and collagen production accompanied by epithelial cell apoptosis. Bleomycin induced ROS levels may prompt to induce the expression of PAR-2 as well as extracellular matrix proteins (ECM), such as MMP 2 and 9, collagen specific proteins HSP-47, α-SMA, and cytokines IL-6, and IL-8RA. Importantly DAS treatment effectively decreased the expression of all these proteins. The inhibitory effect of DAS on profibrotic molecules is mediated by blocking the ROS level. To identify apoptotic signaling as a mediator of PF induction, we performed apoptotic protein expression, DNA fragmentation analysis and ultrastructural details of the lung tissue were performed. DAS treatment restored all these changes to near normalcy. In conclusion, treatment of PF bearing rats with DAS results in amelioration of the ROS production, PAR-2 activation, ECM production, collagen synthesis and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis during bleomycin induction. We attained the first evidence that treatment of DAS decreases the ROS levels and may provide a potential therapeutic effect attenuating bleomycin induced PF.

  12. Diallylsulfide attenuates excessive collagen production and apoptosis in a rat model of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis through the involvement of protease activated receptor-2

    SciTech Connect

    Kalayarasan, Srinivasan Sriram, Narayanan; Soumyakrishnan, Syamala; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) can be a devastating lung disease. It is primarily caused by inflammation leading to severe damage of the alveolar epithelial cells. The pathophysiology of PF is not yet been clearly defined, but studying lung parenchymal injury by involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the activation of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) may provide promising results. PAR-2 is a G-protein coupled receptor is known to play an important role in the development of PF. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory role of diallylsulfide (DAS) against ROS mediated activation of PAR-2 and collagen production accompanied by epithelial cell apoptosis. Bleomycin induced ROS levels may prompt to induce the expression of PAR-2 as well as extracellular matrix proteins (ECM), such as MMP 2 and 9, collagen specific proteins HSP-47, α-SMA, and cytokines IL-6, and IL-8RA. Importantly DAS treatment effectively decreased the expression of all these proteins. The inhibitory effect of DAS on profibrotic molecules is mediated by blocking the ROS level. To identify apoptotic signaling as a mediator of PF induction, we performed apoptotic protein expression, DNA fragmentation analysis and ultrastructural details of the lung tissue were performed. DAS treatment restored all these changes to near normalcy. In conclusion, treatment of PF bearing rats with DAS results in amelioration of the ROS production, PAR-2 activation, ECM production, collagen synthesis and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis during bleomycin induction. We attained the first evidence that treatment of DAS decreases the ROS levels and may provide a potential therapeutic effect attenuating bleomycin induced PF. - Highlights: • DAS inhibits PAR-2 activity; bleomycin stimulates PAR-2 activity. • Increase in PAR-2 activity is correlated with pulmonary fibrosis • DAS reduces pro-inflammatory activity linked to facilitating pulmonary fibrosis. • DAS inhibits apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells.

  13. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Pyeongwisan on LPS-Stimulated Murine Macrophages and Mouse Models of Acetic Acid-Induced Writhing Response and Xylene-Induced Ear Edema

    PubMed Central

    Oh, You-Chang; Jeong, Yun Hee; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ha, Jeong-Ho; Gu, Min Jung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Pyeongwisan (PW) is an herbal medication used in traditional East Asian medicine to treat anorexia, abdominal distension, borborygmus and diarrhea caused by gastric catarrh, atony and dilatation. However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of PW on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in macrophages and on local inflammation in vivo. We investigated the biological effects of PW on the production of inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, we evaluated the analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response and the inhibitory activity on xylene-induced ear edema in mice. PW showed anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In addition, PW strongly suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a NO synthesis enzyme, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and inhibited NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Also, PW suppressed TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β cytokine production in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, PW showed an analgesic effect on the writhing response and an inhibitory effect on mice ear edema. We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time. Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance. PMID:25569097

  14. Ear problems in swimmers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao-Che; Liu, Chia-Yu; Shiao, An-Suey; Wang, Tyrone

    2005-08-01

    Acute diffuse otitis externa (swimmer's ear), otomycosis, exostoses, traumatic eardrum perforation, middle ear infection, and barotraumas of the inner ear are common problems in swimmers and people engaged in aqua activities. The most common ear problem in swimmers is acute diffuse otitis externa, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most common pathogen. The symptoms are itching, otalgia, otorrhea, and conductive hearing loss. The treatment includes frequent cleansing of the ear canal, pain control, oral or topical medications, acidification of the ear canal, and control of predisposing factors. Swimming in polluted waters and ear-canal cleaning with cotton-tip applicators should be avoided. Exostoses are usually seen in people who swim in cold water and present with symptoms of accumulated debris, otorrhea and conductive hearing loss. The treatment for exostoses is transmeatal surgical removal of the tumors. Traumatic eardrum perforations may occur during water skiing or scuba diving and present with symptoms of hearing loss, otalgia, otorrhea, tinnitus and vertigo. Tympanoplasty might be needed if the perforations do not heal spontaneously. Patients with chronic otitis media with active drainage should avoid swimming, while patients who have undergone mastoidectomy and who have no cavity problems may swim. For children with ventilation tubes, surface swimming is safe in a clean, chlorinated swimming pool. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss and some degree of vertigo may occur after diving because of rupture of the round or oval window membrane.

  15. A Rationally Designed TNF-α Epitope-Scaffold Immunogen Induces Sustained Antibody Response and Alleviates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Jin; Xu, Aizhang; Zhong, Conghao; Lu, Wuguang; Deng, Li; Li, Rongxiu

    2016-01-01

    The TNF-α biological inhibitors have significantly improved the clinical outcomes of many autoimmune diseases, in particular rheumatoid arthritis. However, the practical uses are limited due to high costs and the risk of anti-drug antibody responses. Attempts to develop anti-TNF-α vaccines have generated encouraging data in animal models, however, data from clinical trials have not met expectations. In present study, we designed a TNF-α epitope-scaffold immunogen DTNF7 using the transmembrane domain of diphtheria toxin, named DTT as a scaffold. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that the grafted TNF-α epitope is entirely surface-exposed and presented in a native-like conformation while the rigid helical structure of DTT is minimally perturbed, thereby rendering the immunogen highly stable. Immunization of mice with alum formulated DTNF7 induced humoral responses against native TNF-α, and the antibody titer was sustained for more than 6 months, which supports a role of the universal CD4 T cell epitopes of DTT in breaking self-immune tolerance. In a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, DTNF7-alum vaccination markedly delayed the onset of collagen-induced arthritis, and reduced incidence as well as clinical score. DTT is presumed safe as an epitope carrier because a catalytic inactive mutant of diphtheria toxin, CRM197 has good clinical safety records as an active vaccine component. Taken all together, we show that DTT-based epitope vaccine is a promising strategy for prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27658047

  16. p38 MAP kinase inhibitor suppresses transforming growth factor-β2-induced type 1 collagen production in trabecular meshwork cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue-Mochita, Miyuki; Inoue, Toshihiro; Fujimoto, Tomokazu; Kameda, Takanori; Awai-Kasaoka, Nanako; Ohtsu, Naoki; Kimoto, Kenichi; Tanihara, Hidenobu

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is an age-related neurodegenerative disease of retinal ganglion cells, and appropriate turnover of the extracellular matrix in the trabecular meshwork is important in its pathology. Here, we report the effects of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and p38 MAP kinase on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2-induced type I collagen production in human trabecular meshwork cells. TGF-β2 increased RhoA activity, actin polymerization, and myosin light chain 2 phosphorylation. These effects were significantly inhibited by Y-27632, but not SB203580. TGF-β2 also increased promoter activity, mRNA synthesis, and protein expression of COL1A2. These effects were significantly inhibited by SB203580, but not Y-27632. Additionally, Y-27632 did not significantly inhibit TGF-β2-induced promoter activation, or phosphorylation or nuclear translocation of Smad2/3, whereas SB203580 partially suppressed these processes. Collectively, TGF-β2-induced production of type 1 collagen is suppressed by p38 inhibition and accompanied by partial inactivation of Smad2/3, in human trabecular meshwork cells.

  17. Synoviolin inhibitor LS-102 reduces endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced collagen secretion in an in vitro model of stress-related interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Fukami; Aratani, Satoko; Fujita, Hidetoshi; Yagishita, Naoko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Makita, Koshi; Setoguchi, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The deletion mutation of exon 4 in surfactant protein C (SP-C), a lung surfactant protein, has been identified in parent-child cases of familial interstitial pneumonia. It has been shown that this mutation induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Synoviolin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is localized to the ER and is an important factor in the degradation of ER-related proteins. It has been demonstrated that synoviolin is involved in liver fibrosis. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of synoviolin in the pathogenesis of interstitial pneumonia caused by the exon 4 deletion in the SP-C gene. We transfected wild-type and exon 4-deleted SP-C genes into A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells and measured the secretion of collagen, which is a representative extracellular matrix protein involved in fibrosis. Secreted collagen levels were increased in the culture medium in SP-C mutants compared to the wild-type cells. Furthermore, the transcription of mRNAs coding for factors associated with fibrosis was increased. Subsequently, to assess the involvement of synoviolin, we constructed plasmids with a luciferase gene under the control of the synoviolin promoter. The A549 cells were transfected with the construct along with the exon 4-deleted SP-C plasmid for use in the luciferase assay. We found a 1.6-fold increase in luciferase activity in the cells carrying exon 4 deleted SP-C, as well as an increase in intrinsic synoviolin expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Collagen secretion was decreased by the addition of LS-102, a synoviolin inhibitor, to the A549 culture medium following transfection with wild-type and exon 4-deleted SP-C. These results demonstrate that synoviolin is involved in the onset of interstitial pneumonia induced by exon 4-deleted SP-C, which suggests that synoviolin inhibitors may be used in the treatment of the disease.

  18. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk factors for acute ear infections include: Attending day care (especially centers with more than 6 children) Changes ... hands and toys often. If possible, choose a day care that has 6 or fewer children. This can ...

  19. Ear Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eardrum, ear canal, ossicles, cochlea, or the vestibular nerve. Here's a look at the most common ... may cause permanent hearing loss or balance problems. Vestibular therapy may help kids with balance problems. And ...

  20. Middle Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  1. Sports injuries of the ear.

    PubMed

    Wagner, G A

    1972-07-01

    The author describes common sports injuries involving the ear. Such injuries include hematoma, lacerations, foreign bodies (tattoo), and thermal injuries. Ear canal injuries include swimmer's ear and penetrating injuries. Tympanum injuries include tympanic membrane perforations, ossicular discontinuity, eustachian tube dysfunction, temporal bone fractures and traumatic facial nerve palsy. Inner ear injuries include traumatic sensorineural deafness. The author emphasizes the management of these injuries.

  2. Differences in osteoblast miRNA induced by cell binding domain of collagen and silicate-based synthetic bone.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Annalisa; Pezzetti, Furio; Brunelli, Giorgio; Zollino, Ilaria; Scapoli, Luca; Martinelli, Marcella; Arlotti, Marzia; Carinci, Francesco

    2007-11-01

    PerioGlas (PG) is an silicate-based (i.e. anorganic) material used for grafting periodontal osseous defects since the ninety whereas P-15 is an analog of the cell binding domain of collagen (i.e. organic material) that is successfully used in clinical trial to promote bone formation. However, how PG (i.e anorganic material) and P-15 (i.e. collagen) differentially alter osteoblast activity to promote bone formation is unknown. We therefore attempted to get more insight by using microRNA microarray techniques to investigate the translation process in osteoblasts differentially exposed to PG and P-15. We identified 3 up-regulated miRNA (i.e. mir-30b, mir-26a, mir-92) and 8 down-regulated miRNA (i.e. mir-337, mir-377, mir-25, mir-200b, mir-129, mir-373, mir-133b, mir-489). The data reported are, to our knowledge, the first study on translation regulation in osteoblatsts differentially exposed to cell binding domain of collagen and to silicate-based material. Both enhance the translation of several miRNA belonging to osteogenetic genes, but P-15 acts preferentially on homeobox genes.

  3. Administration of adipose-derived stem cells enhances vascularity, induces collagen deposition, and dermal adipogenesis in burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Bliley, Jacqueline M; Argenta, Anne; Satish, Latha; McLaughlin, Meghan M; Dees, Aaron; Tompkins-Rhoades, Casey; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter

    2016-09-01

    Current treatment options for severe burn wounds are often insufficient in reconstructing skin and soft tissue defects. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), a readily available source of multipotent stem cells, represent a promising therapy for the treatment of full-thickness burn wounds. Full-thickness burn wounds were created on the paraspinal region of athymic mice. A one-time, sub-eschar injection of 6.8×10(6) ASCs in PBS or PBS alone was administered at 24-h postoperatively. Time to healing was quantified using Image J analysis. At days 4, 7, 14, and 21, mice were sacrificed and tissues were excised for molecular and histological analysis. ASCs were able to survive in burn wounds as determined by the presence of PKH labeling and human PPARγ expression within the wounds. CD-31 staining demonstrated increased vascularity in ASC-treated wounds at POD 4 (p<0.05). Molecular studies showed enhanced adipogenesis, as well as type III and type I collagen deposition in the ASC treated group (p<0.05). An increase in the mRNA expression ratio of type III to type I collagen was also observed following ASC treatment (p<0.05). By enhancing vascularity, collagen deposition, and adipogenesis, ASCs show promise as an adjunctive therapy for the current treatment of full thickness burn wounds.

  4. Head-to-head comparison of protocol modifications for the generation of collagen-induced arthritis in a specific-pathogen free facility using DBA/1 mice.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Sherry; Strait, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a widely used mouse model for studying inflammatory arthritis (IA). However, CIA induction protocols differ between laboratories, and direct comparison between protocol variations has not been reported. To address this issue, DBA/1 mice housed in conventional and specific-pathogen free (SPF) facilities were administered various combinations of two doses of collagen type II (CII) in complete (CFA) or incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA); some mice were also injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or additional CII at specific intervals. Mice were evaluated for IA over the subsequent 2 months. Depending directly on the combination of CII, CFA, IFA, and LPS used, the incidence of IA ranged between 20%-100%, and severity extended from mild to severe even in an SPF environment. Our results demonstrate for the first time in head-to-head comparisons that specific variations in the use of CII, CFA, IFA, and LPS can induce a range of arthritic disease intensity and severity in an SPF facility. Thus, distinct experimental settings can be designed for robust assessment of factors that either exacerbate or inhibit arthritis pathogenesis. Furthermore, by achieving 100% incidence in an SPF facility, the protocols provide a practical and humane benefit by reducing the number of mice necessary for experimental assessment. PMID:26956089

  5. Lathyrism-induced alterations in collagen cross-links influence the mechanical properties of bone material without affecting the mineral

    PubMed Central

    Paschalis, E.P.; Tatakis, D.N.; Robins, S.; Fratzl, P.; Manjubala, I.; Zoehrer, R.; Gamsjaeger, S.; Buchinger, B.; Roschger, A.; Phipps, R.; Boskey, A.L.; Dall'Ara, E.; Varga, P.; Zysset, P.; Klaushofer, K.; Roschger, P.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study a rat animal model of lathyrism was employed to decipher whether anatomically confined alterations in collagen cross-links are sufficient to influence the mechanical properties of whole bone. Animal experiments were performed under an ethics committee approved protocol. Sixty-four female (47 day old) rats of equivalent weights were divided into four groups (16 per group): Controls were fed a semi-synthetic diet containing 0.6% calcium and 0.6% phosphorus for 2 or 4 weeks and β-APN treated animals were fed additionally with β-aminopropionitrile (0.1% dry weight). At the end of this period the rats in the four groups were sacrificed, and L2–L6 vertebra were collected. Collagen cross-links were determined by both biochemical and spectroscopic (Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI)) analyses. Mineral content and distribution (BMDD) were determined by quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI), and mineral maturity/crystallinity by FTIRI techniques. Micro-CT was used to describe the architectural properties. Mechanical performance of whole bone as well as of bone matrix material was tested by vertebral compression tests and by nano-indentation, respectively. The data of the present study indicate that β-APN treatment changed whole vertebra properties compared to non-treated rats, including collagen cross-links pattern, trabecular bone volume to tissue ratio and trabecular thickness, which were all decreased (p < 0.05). Further, compression tests revealed a significant negative impact of β-APN treatment on maximal force to failure and energy to failure, while stiffness was not influenced. Bone mineral density distribution (BMDD) was not altered either. At the material level, β-APN treated rats exhibited increased Pyd/Divalent cross-link ratios in areas confined to a newly formed bone. Moreover, nano-indentation experiments showed that the E-modulus and hardness were reduced only in newly formed bone areas under the influence

  6. Sulfonamide inhibitors of α2β1 integrin reveal the essential role of collagen receptors in in vivo models of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nissinen, Liisa; Ojala, Marika; Langen, Barbara; Dost, Rita; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Käpylä, Jarmo; Marjamäki, Anne; Heino, Jyrki

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of α2β1 integrin, a major cellular collagen receptor, have been reported to inhibit platelet function, kidney injury, and angiogenesis. Since α2β1 integrin is abundantly expressed on various inflammation-associated cells, we tested whether recently developed α2β1 blocking sulfonamides have anti-inflammatory properties. Integrin α2β1 inhibitors were shown to reduce the signs of inflammation in arachidonic acid-induced ear edema, PAF stimulated air pouch, ovalbumin-induced skin hypersensitivity, adjuvant arthritis, and collagen-induced arthritis. Thus, these sulfonamides are potential drugs for acute and allergic inflammation, hypersensitivity, and arthritis. One sulfonamide with potent anti-inflammatory activity has previously been reported to be selective for activated integrins, but not to inhibit platelet function. Thus, the experiments also revealed fundamental differences in the action of nonactivated and activated α2β1 integrins in inflammation when compared to thrombosis. PMID:26171226

  7. Tryptase inhibitor APC 366 prevents hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting collagen synthesis induced by tryptase/protease-activated receptor 2 interactions in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Chen, Baian; Li, Shengli; Sun, Quan

    2014-06-01

    Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 2 is a G-protein-coupled receptor that is activated by mast cell tryptase. PAR-2 activation augments profibrotic pathways through the induction of extracellular matrix proteins. PAR-2 is widely expressed in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), but the role of tryptase/PAR-2 interaction in liver fibrosis is unclear. We studied the development of bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats treated with mast cell tryptase inhibitor APC 366, and showed that APC 366 reduced hepatic fibrosis scores, collagen content and serum biochemical parameters. Reduced fibrosis was associated with decreased expression of PAR-2 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Our findings demonstrate that mast cell tryptase induces PAR-2 activation to augment HSC proliferation and promote hepatic fibrosis in rats. Treatment with tryptase antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach to prevent fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease.

  8. Tryptase inhibitor APC 366 prevents hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting collagen synthesis induced by tryptase/protease-activated receptor 2 interactions in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Chen, Baian; Li, Shengli; Sun, Quan

    2014-06-01

    Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 2 is a G-protein-coupled receptor that is activated by mast cell tryptase. PAR-2 activation augments profibrotic pathways through the induction of extracellular matrix proteins. PAR-2 is widely expressed in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), but the role of tryptase/PAR-2 interaction in liver fibrosis is unclear. We studied the development of bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats treated with mast cell tryptase inhibitor APC 366, and showed that APC 366 reduced hepatic fibrosis scores, collagen content and serum biochemical parameters. Reduced fibrosis was associated with decreased expression of PAR-2 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Our findings demonstrate that mast cell tryptase induces PAR-2 activation to augment HSC proliferation and promote hepatic fibrosis in rats. Treatment with tryptase antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach to prevent fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. PMID:24735816

  9. Helminth Antigens Enable CpG-Activated Dendritic Cells to Inhibit the Symptoms of Collagen-induced Arthritis through Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carranza, Franco; Falcón, Cristian Roberto; Nuñez, Nicolás; Knubel, Carolina; Correa, Silvia Graciela; Bianco, Ismael; Maccioni, Mariana; Fretes, Ricardo; Triquell, María Fernanda; Motrán, Claudia Cristina; Cervi, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) have the potential to control the outcome of autoimmunity by modulating the immune response. In this study, we tested the ability of Fasciola hepatica total extract (TE) to induce tolerogenic properties in CpG-ODN (CpG) maturated DC, to then evaluate the therapeutic potential of these cells to diminish the inflammatory response in collagen induced arthritis (CIA). DBA/1J mice were injected with TE plus CpG treated DC (T/C-DC) pulsed with bovine collagen II (CII) between two immunizations with CII and clinical scores CIA were determined. The levels of CII-specific IgG2 and IgG1 in sera, the histological analyses in the joints, the cytokine profile in the draining lymph node (DLN) cells and in the joints, and the number, and functionality of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells (Treg) were evaluated. Vaccination of mice with CII pulsed T/C-DC diminished the severity and incidence of CIA symptoms and the production of the inflammatory cytokine, while induced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The therapeutic effect was mediated by Treg cells, since the adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ T cells, inhibited the inflammatory symptoms in CIA. The in vitro blockage of TGF-β in cultures of DLN cells plus CII pulsed T/C-DC inhibited the expansion of Treg cells. Vaccination with CII pulsed T/C-DC seems to be a very efficient approach to diminish exacerbated immune response in CIA, by inducing the development of Treg cells, and it is therefore an interesting candidate for a cell-based therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:22848374

  10. Therapeutic Effect of Ergotope Peptides on Collagen-Induced Arthritis by Downregulation of Inflammatory and Th1/Th17 Responses and Induction of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaoyin; Deng, Shaohua; Li, Shan; Xi, Yebin; Li, Chengzhen; Wang, Li; He, Dongyi; Wang, Zhaojun; Chen, Guangjie

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that results in a chronic and inflammatory disorder. Dynamic balance of helper T cells (Th) 1 and 17 and regulatory T cells (Treg) is broken in RA. Since there is no cure for RA at present, it is necessary to find a truly effective and convenient treatment. Several studies have intended to induce ergotopic regulation to treat autoimmune diseases. This study was undertaken to find potential ergotope peptides and investigate their effects in treating the animal model of RA and their underlying regulatory mechanisms. First, we selected functional ergotope peptides from 25 overlapping peptides derived from the interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) α chain, and then used these peptides to treat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We showed ergotope peptides as immunomodulatory factors with great benefits at the clinical and pathologic levels. This effect was associated with inhibition of type II collagen (CII)-specific proliferation and autoantibody production as well as induction of antiergotypic immune response, downregulation of both Th1 and Th17 cells and their related components, and emergence of Treg cells that had suppressive action on autoreactive T cells. We also proved that cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and IL-10 are two important mediators that are critical to Treg suppressive function. Inhibition of Th1 and Th17 in established CIA could be attributed to ergotope-induced Treg cells. Our findings reveal that ergotope peptides induce regulatory immune responses and restore immune tolerance, suggesting that treatment with ergotope peptides may be a novel approach to therapy for RA patients and has good application prospects, with cheap, effective, convenient, wide-spectrum features. PMID:27579476

  11. Involvement of P2X7 receptor signaling on regulating the differentiation of Th17 cells and type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhi-Dan; Zhang, Ya-Yuan; Guo, Yi-Hong; Huang, Na; Ma, Hui-Hui; Huang, Hui; Yu, Hai-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17 producing T helper (Th17) cells are major effector cells in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has emerged as a potential site in the regulation of inflammation in RA but little is known of its functional role on the differentiation of Th17 cells. This study investigates the in vitro and in vivo effects of P2X7R on Th17 cell differentiation during type II collagen (CII) induced experimental arthritis model. In CII-treated dendritic cells (DCs) and DC/CD4+ T coculture system, pretreatment with pharmacological antagonists of P2X7R (Suramin and A-438079) caused strong inhibition of production of Th17-promoting cytokines (IL-1β, TGF-β1, IL-23p19 and IL-6). Exposure to CII induced the elevation of mRNAs encoding retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α and γt, which were abolished by pretreatment with P2X7R antagonists. Furthermore, blocking P2X7R signaling abolished the CII-mediated increase in IL-17A. Blockade of P2X7R remarkably inhibited hind paw swelling and ameliorated pathological changes in ankle joint of the collagen-induced arthritis mice. Thus, we demonstrated a novel function for P2X7R signaling in regulating CII-induced differentiation of Th17 cells. P2X7R signaling facilitates the development of the sophisticated network of DC-derived cytokines that favors a Th17 phenotype. PMID:27775097

  12. A complement C3 inhibitor specifically targeted to sites of complement activation effectively ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongbin; Qiao, Fei; Atkinson, Carl; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2007-12-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) represents an animal model of autoimmune polyarthritis with similarities to human rheumatoid arthritis, and therapy with various systemic complement-inhibitory proteins has been investigated in this model with varying results. We investigated the use of complement receptor 2 (CR2)-Crry, a complement inhibitor with the ability to target C3 breakdown products deposited in a rheumatic joint. Following induction of CIA in DBA/1J mice, animals were treated with either PBS or CR2-Crry (every other day, every 4 days, or with a single injection). The severity of clinical disease was significantly reduced in all CR2-Crry-treated groups compared with controls. Joints from mice receiving multiple doses of CR2-Crry showed significantly decreased inflammatory cell infiltrate, cartilage damage, pannus formation, and bone damage. CR2-Crry treatment also significantly decreased production of anti-collagen IgG and the inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta. IL-10 and IL-1Ra levels were increased in CR2-Crry-treated mice. CR2-Crry localized preferentially in the joints of mice with CIA. Analysis of IgG and C3 deposition in the joints of treated animals indicated that both complement regulation and the modulation of anti-collagen Ab production contributed to the protective effects of CR2-Crry. Of interest, a previous study reported that Crry-Ig, an untargeted counterpart of CR2-Crry, had minimal effect on disease, even when administered at a sufficiently high dose to maintain chronic complement inhibition. PMID:18025232

  13. Expression of a collagen-binding domain fusion protein: effect of amino acid supplementation, inducer type, and culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Fruchtl, McKinzie; Sakon, Joshua; Beitle, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Collagen binding domain fusion proteins are of significant importance because of their potential as therapeutic biomaterials. In this paper, we investigate the production of such therapeutic proteins via fermentation of Escherichia coli on both an undefined medium and a defined medium. Defined media with amino acid supplementation provided higher amounts of therapeutic protein than undefined media with no supplementation. Additionally, utilizing lactose instead of isopropyl-β-d-thio-galactoside (IPTG) for induction and extending batch time yielded higher amounts of the model therapeutic.

  14. Interleukin-35 (IL-35) inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes isolated from mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunxia; Wu, Suqin; Li, Yuxuan; Jiang, Shenyi; Lin, Tiantian; Xia, Liping; Shen, Hui; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disorder of the joints that affects 0.5-1 % of adults. Excessive growth of the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) promotes hyperplasia of synovial tissues and causes its invasion into the bone and cartilage, which eventually causes deformity and dysfunction of affected joints. Interleukin 35 (IL-35) was shown to suppress the inflammatory responses to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) via upregulation of T regulatory cells and suppression of T helper type 17 cells in a mouse model. To study the effects of IL-35 on the proliferation and apoptosis frequency of cultured FLS isolated from mice with CIA as well as to examine the effects of IL-35 on CIA in vivo. Thirty DBA/1 J mice, which are used as an animal model for RA, were divided randomly (ten mice per group) to a CIA group (collagen treatment), a CIA + IL-35 group (collagen and IL-35 treatments), and a control group (no treatment). Starting on the 24th day after collagen administration, IL-35 was injected intraperitoneally into mice of the CIA + IL-35 group once per day for 10 days. An arthritis index was calculated, and pathological analysis of synovial tissue was performed. FLS isolated from CIA mice were treated with various concentrations of IL-35 (12.5-100 ng/ml). The MTT assay was used to examine FLS proliferation, and apoptosis frequency of FLS was detected by flow cytometry. On day 24, the CIA mice began to exhibit arthritis symptoms, and the symptoms rapidly progressed with time. Treatment with IL-35 significantly alleviated arthritis symptoms and reduced the synovial tissue inflammation. In addition, IL-35 treatment inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis in cultured FLS from CIA mice in a dose-dependent manner. IL-35 could ameliorate the symptoms of arthritis in the CIA mouse model in vivo and inhibited FLS proliferation while promoting FLS apoptosis in vitro, thereby exhibited the potential in inhibiting the progression of RA.

  15. Interleukin-35 (IL-35) inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes isolated from mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunxia; Wu, Suqin; Li, Yuxuan; Jiang, Shenyi; Lin, Tiantian; Xia, Liping; Shen, Hui; Lu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disorder of the joints that affects 0.5-1 % of adults. Excessive growth of the fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) promotes hyperplasia of synovial tissues and causes its invasion into the bone and cartilage, which eventually causes deformity and dysfunction of affected joints. Interleukin 35 (IL-35) was shown to suppress the inflammatory responses to collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) via upregulation of T regulatory cells and suppression of T helper type 17 cells in a mouse model. To study the effects of IL-35 on the proliferation and apoptosis frequency of cultured FLS isolated from mice with CIA as well as to examine the effects of IL-35 on CIA in vivo. Thirty DBA/1 J mice, which are used as an animal model for RA, were divided randomly (ten mice per group) to a CIA group (collagen treatment), a CIA + IL-35 group (collagen and IL-35 treatments), and a control group (no treatment). Starting on the 24th day after collagen administration, IL-35 was injected intraperitoneally into mice of the CIA + IL-35 group once per day for 10 days. An arthritis index was calculated, and pathological analysis of synovial tissue was performed. FLS isolated from CIA mice were treated with various concentrations of IL-35 (12.5-100 ng/ml). The MTT assay was used to examine FLS proliferation, and apoptosis frequency of FLS was detected by flow cytometry. On day 24, the CIA mice began to exhibit arthritis symptoms, and the symptoms rapidly progressed with time. Treatment with IL-35 significantly alleviated arthritis symptoms and reduced the synovial tissue inflammation. In addition, IL-35 treatment inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis in cultured FLS from CIA mice in a dose-dependent manner. IL-35 could ameliorate the symptoms of arthritis in the CIA mouse model in vivo and inhibited FLS proliferation while promoting FLS apoptosis in vitro, thereby exhibited the potential in inhibiting the progression of RA. PMID:27379996

  16. Remission of Collagen-Induced Arthritis through Combination Therapy of Microfracture and Transplantation of Thermogel-Encapsulated Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Yinan; Yang, Modi; Zhang, Yanbo; Chang, Fei; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-01-01

    The persistent inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) always leads to partial synovial hyperplasia and the destruction of articular cartilage. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) have been proven to possess immunosuppressive effects, and widely explored in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, poor inhibitory effect on local inflammatory state and limited capacity of preventing destruction of articular cartilage by systemic BMMSCs transplantation were observed. Herein, toward the classical type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats, the combination treatment of microfracture and in situ transplantation of thermogel-encapsulated BMMSCs was verified to obviously down-regulate the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In addition, it resulted in the decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and anti-collagen type II antibody, in the serum. Simultaneously, the combination therapy also could inhibit the proliferation of antigen specific lymphocytes and local joint inflammatory condition, and prevent the articular cartilage damage. The results indicated that the treatment programs could effectively stimulate the endogenous and exogenous BMMSCs to exhibit the immunosuppression and cartilage protection capability. This study provided a new therapeutic strategy for autoimmune inflammatory diseases, such as RA. PMID:25774788

  17. Abrogation of collagen-induced arthritis by a peptidyl arginine deiminase inhibitor is associated with modulation of T cell-mediated immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Kawalkowska, Joanna; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Ghari, Fatemeh; Davis, Simon; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul R.; Williams, Richard O.; Fischer, Roman; La Thangue, Nicholas B.; Venables, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing citrulline, a post-translational modification of arginine, are generated by peptidyl arginine deiminases (PAD). Citrullinated proteins have pro-inflammatory effects in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we examine the therapeutic effects in collagen-induced arthritis of the second generation PAD inhibitor, BB-Cl-amidine. Treatment after disease onset resulted in the reversal of clinical and histological changes of arthritis, associated with a marked reduction in citrullinated proteins in lymph nodes. There was little overall change in antibodies to collagen or antibodies to citrullinated peptides, but a shift from pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17-type responses to pro-resolution Th2-type responses was demonstrated by serum cytokines and antibody subtypes. In lymph node cells from the arthritic mice treated with BB-Cl-amidine, there was a decrease in total cell numbers but an increase in the proportion of Th2 cells. BB-Cl-amidine had a pro-apoptotic effect on all Th subsets in vitro with Th17 cells appearing to be the most sensitive. We suggest that these immunoregulatory effects of PAD inhibition in CIA are complex, but primarily mediated by transcriptional regulation. We suggest that targeting PADs is a promising strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27210478

  18. Effects of hydrogen sulfide on the expression of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and collagen type I in human periodontal ligament cells induced by tension force stimulation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jing; Hua, Yongmei

    2016-10-01

    Periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) are important in homeostasis and remodeling in the mechanically‑stimulated periodontium. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on periodontal tissue remodeling by examining the mRNA and protein expression levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OCN) and collagen type I (COL‑1) in human (h)PDLCs induced by tension force application. Cultured hPDLCs were treated with H2S for 24 h, followed by application of a tension force for 1, 3 and 6 h. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined using a Cell Counting Kit 8 assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. The mRNA expression levels of ALP, OCN and COL‑1 were quantified using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis, and western blot analysis was used to detect the protein levels of ALP, OCN and COL‑1. The results demonstrated that the mRNA and protein expression levels of ALP, OCN and COL‑1 increased with H2S treatment in a concentration‑dependent manner, which was enhanced by the application of tension force in a relatively short period of time. These findings suggested that H2S may be important in periodontal tissue remodeling during orthodontic tooth movement via increasing hPDLC differentiation, tissue mineralization, bone formation and collagen synthesis. PMID:27573279

  19. Amelioration of collagen-induced arthritis by Salix nigra bark extract via suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Sahu, Debasis; Das, Hasi Rani; Sharma, Deepak

    2011-12-01

    Our study goals to investigate the anti-arthritic potential of Salix nigra bark methanol extract (SNME) against both inflammation and oxidative stress in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rat model. Results showed that SNME exhibited maximum scavenging activity against superoxide, hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide radicals along with the suppression of lipid peroxidation. Female wistar rats were immunized with porcine type II collagen and treated with SNME (100 mg/kg body weight) for 15 days starting on day 20. SNME significantly inhibited the paw swelling and arthritic score; exhibited maximum CIA inhibition of 93.7% by the end of the experimental period. Administration of SNME to arthritic rats significantly improved the histological findings in joints as evident by reduced infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells and smooth synovial lining. Roentgenograms of tibiotarsal joints of both SNME and indomethacin-treated rats showed protection against osteophyte formation, soft tissue swelling and bone resorption. Furthermore, levels of inflammatory mediators (nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) measured in both plasma and joint exudates were significantly reduced by SNME treatment. Increased oxidative stress observed in the arthritic animals was also found to be significantly restored in SNME- treated rats. Taken together, our studies clearly indicate the potential of S. nigra as an anti-arthritic agent.

  20. Recombinant human IgA1 and IgA2 autoantibodies to type VII collagen induce subepidermal blistering ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Recke, Andreas; Trog, Luisa M; Pas, Hendri H; Vorobyev, Artem; Abadpour, Aida; Jonkman, Marcel F; van Zandbergen, Ger; Kauderer, Claudia; Zillikens, Detlef; Vidarsson, Gestur; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2014-08-15

    Subepidermal autoimmune blistering dermatoses (AIBD) are prototypic autoantibody-mediated diseases. In epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), an autoimmune disease with severe and chronic skin blistering, autoantibodies are directed against type VII collagen. IgG is the predominant autoantibody isotype of EBA, the pathogenicity of which has been demonstrated in a variety of in vivo and ex vivo disease models. In contrast, there is not much evidence for the pathogenicity of IgA, which may appear as the only autoantibody isotype in some EBA patients. To investigate the pathogenic potential of IgA autoantibodies, we generated chimeric V gene-matched human IgA1, IgA2, and control IgG1 autoantibodies directed against type VII collagen. Immobilized immune complexes containing the rIgA1 and rIgA2 autoantibodies induced the dose-dependent release of reactive oxygen species from neutrophil granulocytes, a precondition for blister formation. Moreover, both rIgA1 and rIgA2 induced leukocyte-dependent dermal-epidermal separation in cryosections of human skin. In contrast with rIgG1, neither rIgA1 nor rIgA2 was capable of inducing complement deposition at the dermal-epidermal junction. Because complement activation is a prerequisite for blister induction, this lack of function compared with IgG1 may be compensated for by the stronger activation of neutrophil granulocytes by both IgA1 and IgA2. For IgG-mediated AIBD, immunoadsorption therapy is a convenient treatment modality for the removal of pathogenic autoantibodies, particularly in treatment-resistant cases. The results of this study show the pathogenic potential of IgA autoantibodies and support the development of adsorber matrices for IgA-mediated AIBD.

  1. Tetrandrine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by restoring the balance between Th17 and Treg cells via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xusheng; Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Tetrandrine is an alkaloid constituent of the root of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. The long-term clinical uses of tetrandrine for treatments of rheumatalgia and arthralgia as well as the inhibition of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis imply that tetrandrine may have therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we explored its anti-RA mechanism in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in relation to the balance between T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type II collagen and were orally administered tetrandrine for 14 consecutive days. Then, the mice were sacrificed, their joints were removed for histological analysis, and spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were removed to examine the Th17 and Treg cells. Tetrandrine markedly alleviated the severity of arthritis, reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the Th17/Treg balance, as demonstrated by the serum levels of their related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-10) and the proportion of each cell type. Tetrandrine inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and induced Treg cell differentiation in vitro . Notably, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was proven to play a crucial role in tetrandrine-mediated T cell differentiation. The correlation between AhR activation, regulation of Th17/Treg and amelioration of arthritis by tetrandrine was verified in the CIA mice. Moreover, tetrandrine might be a ligand of AhR because it facilitated the expression of the AhR target gene cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and the activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Taken together, tetrandrine exerts its anti-arthritis efficacy by restoring Th17/Treg balance via AhR. PMID:26640276

  2. The 45 kDa collagen-binding fragment of fibronectin induces matrix metalloproteinase-13 synthesis by chondrocytes and aggrecan degradation by aggrecanases.

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Heather; Ung, Linh; Fosang, Amanda J

    2002-01-01

    Fragments of fibronectin occur naturally in vivo and are increased in the synovial fluid of arthritis patients. We have studied the 45 kDa fragment (Fn-f 45), representing the N-terminal collagen-binding domain of fibronectin, for its ability to modulate the expression of metalloproteinases by porcine articular chondrocytes in vitro. We report that stimulation of cultured chondrocytes, or cartilage explants, with Fn-f 45 increased the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13; collagenase-3) released into the conditioned medium in a dose-dependent manner. Increased levels of MMP-13 were due to stimulation of MMP-13 synthesis, rather than release of MMP-13 from accumulated matrix stores. Fn-f 45 also stimulated the synthesis of MMP-3 (stromelysin-1) from cultured chondrocytes and cartilage cultures. The Fn-f 45-induced increase in MMP-3 and MMP-13 synthesis occurred via an interleukin 1-independent mechanism, since the receptor antagonist of interleukin-1 was unable to block the increased synthesis. The gelatinases, MMP-2 and MMP-9, were not modulated by Fn-f 45 in these culture systems. Fn-f 45 also stimulated the release of aggrecan from cartilage explants into conditioned medium. Neoepitope antibodies specific for aggrecan fragments generated by MMPs or aggrecanases showed that the Fn-f 45-induced aggrecan loss was mediated by aggrecanases, and not by MMPs. Extracts of cultured cartilage contained elevated levels of the aggrecanase-derived ITEGE(373)-G1 domain, whereas levels of the matrix metalloproteinase-derived DIPEN(341)-G1 domain were unchanged. These studies show that Fn-f 45 can induce a catabolic phenotype in articular chondrocytes by up-regulating the expression of metalloproteinases specific for the degradation of collagen and aggrecan. PMID:11988091

  3. Tetrandrine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by restoring the balance between Th17 and Treg cells via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xusheng; Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Tetrandrine is an alkaloid constituent of the root of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. The long-term clinical uses of tetrandrine for treatments of rheumatalgia and arthralgia as well as the inhibition of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis imply that tetrandrine may have therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we explored its anti-RA mechanism in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in relation to the balance between T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type II collagen and were orally administered tetrandrine for 14 consecutive days. Then, the mice were sacrificed, their joints were removed for histological analysis, and spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were removed to examine the Th17 and Treg cells. Tetrandrine markedly alleviated the severity of arthritis, reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the Th17/Treg balance, as demonstrated by the serum levels of their related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-10) and the proportion of each cell type. Tetrandrine inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and induced Treg cell differentiation in vitro . Notably, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was proven to play a crucial role in tetrandrine-mediated T cell differentiation. The correlation between AhR activation, regulation of Th17/Treg and amelioration of arthritis by tetrandrine was verified in the CIA mice. Moreover, tetrandrine might be a ligand of AhR because it facilitated the expression of the AhR target gene cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and the activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Taken together, tetrandrine exerts its anti-arthritis efficacy by restoring Th17/Treg balance via AhR.

  4. Listening to the Ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher Alan

    Otoacoustic emissions demonstrate that the ear creates sound while listening to sound, offering a promising acoustic window on the mechanics of hearing in awake, listening human beings. That window is clouded, however, by an incomplete knowledge of wave reflection and transmission, both forth and back within the cochlea and through the middle ear. This thesis "does windows," addressing wave propagation and scattering on both sides of the middle ear. A summary of highlights follows. Measurements of the cochlear input impedance in cat are used to identify a new symmetry in cochlear mechanics--termed "tapering symmetry" after its geometric interpretation in simple models--that guarantees that the wavelength of the traveling wave changes slowly with position near the stapes. Waves therefore propagate without reflection through the basal turns of the cochlea. Analytic methods for solving the cochlear wave equations using a perturbative scattering series are given and used to demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, conventional cochlear models exhibit negligible internal reflection whether or not they accurately represent the tapering symmetries of the inner ear. Frameworks for the systematic "deconstruction" of eardrum and middle-ear transduction characteristics are developed and applied to the analysis of noninvasive measurements of middle-ear and cochlear mechanics. A simple phenomenological model of inner-ear compressibility that correctly predicts hearing thresholds in patients with missing or disarticulated middle-ear ossicles is developed and used to establish an upper bound on cochlear compressibility several orders of magnitude smaller than that provided by direct measurements. Accurate measurements of stimulus -frequency evoked otoacoustic emissions are performed and used to determine the form and frequency variation of the cochlear traveling-wave ratio noninvasively. Those measurements are inverted to obtain the spatial distribution of mechanical

  5. Listening to the ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher A.

    Otoacoustic emissions demonstrate that the ear creates sound while listening to sound, offering a promising acoustic window on the mechanics of hearing in awake, listening human beings. That window is clouded, however, by an incomplete knowledge of wave reflection and transmission, both forth and back within the cochlea and through the middle ear. This thesis "does windows," addressing wave propagation and scattering on both sides of the middle ear. A summary of highlights follows. Measurements of the cochlear input impedance in cat are used to identify a new symmetry in cochlear mechanics-termed "tapering symmetry" after its geometric interpretation in simple models-that guarantees that the wavelength of the traveling wave changes slowly with position near the stapes. Waves therefore propagate without reflection through the basal turns of the cochlea. Analytic methods for solving the cochlear wave equations using a perturbative scattering series are given and used to demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, conventional cochlear models exhibit negligible internal reflection whether or not they accurately represent the tapering symmetries of the inner ear. Frameworks for the systematic "deconstruction" of eardrum and middle-ear transduction characteristics are developed and applied to the analysis of noninvasive measurements of middle-ear and cochlear mechanics. A simple phenomenological model of inner-ear compressibility that correctly predicts hearing thresholds in patients with missing or disarticulated middle-ear ossicles is developed and used to establish an upper bound on cochlear compressibility several orders of magnitude smaller than that provided by direct measurements. Accurate measurements of stimulus frequency evoked otoacoustic emissions are performed and used to determine the form and frequency variation of the cochlear traveling-wave ratio noninvasively. Those measurements are inverted to obtain the spatial distribution of mechanical

  6. Limited efficacy of Fever Tag(®) temperature sensing ear tags in calves with naturally occurring bovine respiratory disease or induced bovine viral diarrhea virus infection.

    PubMed

    McCorkell, Robert; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; Windeyer, Claire; Schaefer, Al

    2014-07-01

    Temperature sensing ear tags were tested in 1) auction-derived calves with 50% incidence of bovine respiratory disease, and 2) specific pathogen-free calves infected with bovine virus diarrhea virus. There were no false positives, but tag placement, probe displacement, and a high threshold for activation all contributed to failure to reliably detect sick calves.

  7. Training to Use Voice Onset Time as a Cue to Talker Identification Induces a Left-Ear/Right-Hemisphere Processing Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Alexander L.; Driscoll, Courtney

    2006-01-01

    We examined the effect of perceptual training on a well-established hemispheric asymmetry in speech processing. Eighteen listeners were trained to use a within-category difference in voice onset time (VOT) to cue talker identity. Successful learners (n = 8) showed faster response times for stimuli presented only to the left ear than for those…

  8. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins.

  9. Lactobacillus casei reduces the inflammatory joint damage associated with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) by reducing the pro-inflammatory cytokines: Lactobacillus casei: COX-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Amdekar, Sarika; Singh, Vinod; Singh, Rambir; Sharma, Poonam; Keshav, Poonam; Kumar, Avnish

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of Lactobacillus casei in treating rheumatoid arthritis using collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) animal model. Healthy female Wistar rats (weight-180-200 g) were included in this study. Oral administration of L. casei was started on the same day. Indomethacin was used as standard reference drug. Serum level of IL-6, α-TNF, and IL-10 were observed. Four-point arthritis indexes were also assessed at the end of week for 28th day. L. casei-treated rats had shown normal histopathology without any synovial infiltration, pannus formation, cartilage, and bone destruction. Arthritis score was also lower for the group treated with L. casei. Oral administration of L. casei significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines. Present study suggests that L. casei has potent antiarthritic effect in CIA model. Inhibition of COX-2 via inhibiting the pro-inflammatory cytokines is an understanding of the complex interactions involved in these pathways.

  10. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins. PMID:27599513

  11. Evaluation of area-based collagen scoring by nonlinear microscopy in chronic hepatitis C-induced liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sevrain, David; Dubreuil, Matthieu; Dolman, Grace Elizabeth; Zaitoun, Abed; Irving, William; Guha, Indra Neil; Odin, Christophe; Le Grand, Yann

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we analyze a fibrosis scoring method based on measurement of the fibrillar collagen area from second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy images of unstained histological slices from human liver biopsies. The study is conducted on a cohort of one hundred chronic hepatitis C patients with intermediate to strong Metavir and Ishak stages of liver fibrosis. We highlight a key parameter of our scoring method to discriminate between high and low fibrosis stages. Moreover, according to the intensity histograms of the SHG images and simple mathematical arguments, we show that our area-based method is equivalent to an intensity-based method, despite saturation of the images. Finally we propose an improvement of our scoring method using very simple image processing tools. PMID:25909005

  12. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients. PMID:27621603

  13. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients. PMID:27621603

  14. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients.

  15. Evaluation of area-based collagen scoring by nonlinear microscopy in chronic hepatitis C-induced liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sevrain, David; Dubreuil, Matthieu; Dolman, Grace Elizabeth; Zaitoun, Abed; Irving, William; Guha, Indra Neil; Odin, Christophe; Le Grand, Yann

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a fibrosis scoring method based on measurement of the fibrillar collagen area from second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy images of unstained histological slices from human liver biopsies. The study is conducted on a cohort of one hundred chronic hepatitis C patients with intermediate to strong Metavir and Ishak stages of liver fibrosis. We highlight a key parameter of our scoring method to discriminate between high and low fibrosis stages. Moreover, according to the intensity histograms of the SHG images and simple mathematical arguments, we show that our area-based method is equivalent to an intensity-based method, despite saturation of the images. Finally we propose an improvement of our scoring method using very simple image processing tools. PMID:25909005

  16. Antisense targeting of TGF-{beta}1 augments BMP-induced upregulation of osteopontin, type I collagen and Cbfa1 in human Saos-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Zhong-Jian . E-mail: zshen2@wisc.edu; Kook Kim, Sang; Youn Jun, Do; Park, Wan; Ho Kim, Young; Malter, James S.; Jo Moon, Byung . E-mail: bjmoon@mail.knu.ac.kr

    2007-04-15

    Despite commonalities in signal transduction in osteoblasts from different species, the role of TGF-{beta}1 on bone formation remains elusive. In particular, the role of autocrine TGF-{beta}1 on human osteoblasts is largely unknown. Here we show the effect of TGF-{beta}1 knock-down on the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts induced by BMP2. Treatment with antisense TGF-{beta}1 moderately increased the rate of cell proliferation, which was completely reversed by the exogenous addition of TGF-{beta}1. Notably, TGF-{beta}1 blockade significantly enhanced BMP2-induced upregulation of mRNAs encoding osteopontin, type I collagen and Cbfa1, which was suppressed by exogenous TGF-{beta}1. Moreover, TGF-{beta}1 knock-down increased BMP2-induced phosphorylation of Smad1/5 as well as their nuclear import, which paralleled a reduction of inhibitory Smad6. These data suggest autocrine TGF-{beta}1 antagonizes BMP signaling through modulation of inducible Smad6 and the activity of BMP specific Smad1/5.

  17. IL-35 is a novel cytokine with therapeutic effects against collagen-induced arthritis through the expansion of regulatory T cells and suppression of Th17 cells.

    PubMed

    Niedbala, Wanda; Wei, Xiao-Qing; Cai, Beilei; Hueber, Axel J; Leung, Bernard P; McInnes, Iain B; Liew, Foo Y

    2007-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) and the p35 subunit of IL-12 have been reported to form a heterodimeric hematopoietin in human and mouse. We have constructed a heterodimeric protein covalently linking EBI3 and p35, to form a novel cytokine which we now call IL-35. The Fc fusion protein of IL-35 induced proliferation of murine CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells when stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies in vitro. The IL-35-expanded CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell population expressed Foxp3 and produced elevated levels of IL-10, whereas the IL-35-induced CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells produced IFN-gamma but not IL-4. The in vitro expanded CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells retained their suppressive functions against CD4(+)CD25(-) effector cells. Furthermore, when cultured with soluble anti-CD3 antibody and antigen-presenting cells, IL-35 suppressed the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) effector cells. Moreover, IL-35 inhibited the differentiation of Th17 cells in vitro. In vivo, IL-35 effectively attenuated established collagen-induced arthritis in mice, with concomitant suppression of IL-17 production but enhanced IFN-gamma synthesis. Thus, IL-35 is a novel anti-inflammatory cytokine suppressing the immune response through the expansion of regulatory T cells and suppression of Th17 cell development.

  18. Intranasal Administration of Type V Collagen Reduces Lung Carcinogenesis through Increasing Endothelial and Epithelial Apoptosis in a Urethane-Induced Lung Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Parra, Edwin Roger; Alveno, Renata Antunes; Faustino, Carolina Brito; Corrêa, Paula Yume Sato Serzedello; Vargas, Camilla Mutai; de Morais, Jymenez; Rangel, Maristela Peres; Velosa, Ana Paula Pereira; Fabro, Alexandre Todorovic; Teodoro, Walcy Rosolia; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza

    2016-08-01

    Type V collagen (Col V) is a "minor" component of normal lung extracellular matrix, which is subjected to decreased and abnormal synthesis in human lung infiltrating adenocarcinoma. We previously reported that a direct link between low amounts of Col V and decreased cell apoptosis may favor cancer cell growth in the mouse lung after chemical carcinogenesis. Moreover, this collagen species was able to trigger DNA fragmentation and impair survival of neoplastic cells. In this study, we have extended our investigation with the aim to obtain further evidence that the death induced by Col V-treatment is of the caspase-9 apoptotic type. We used (1) optical and electron microscopy, (2) quantitation of TUNEL-labeled cells and (3) analysis of the expression levels of Col V and selected genes coding for apoptosis-linked factors, by conventional RT-PCR. BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with 1.5 g/kg body weight of urethane. After urethane injection, the animals received intranasal administration of 20 µg/20 µl of Col V every day during 2 months. We report here that Col V treatment was able to determine significant increase in Col V protein and gene expression and in the percentage of TUNEL-positive cells, to up-regulate caspase-9, resulting in low growth of tumor cells. Our data validate chemical carcinogenesis as a suitable "in vivo" model for further and more detailed studies on the molecular mechanisms of the death response induced by Col V in lung infiltrating adenocarcinoma opening new strategies for treatment.

  19. Blockade of interleukin-6 receptor enhances the anti-arthritic effect of glucocorticoids without decreasing bone mineral density in mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Yoshida, H; Hashizume, M; Tanaka, K; Matsumoto, Y

    2015-11-01

    In a mouse arthritis model, we investigated whether interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) blockade would enhance the anti-arthritic effect of glucocorticoids (GCs). DBA/1J mice were immunized with type II collagen (CII), and were treated with prednisolone (PSL) and/or anti-mouse IL-6R antibody (MR16-1). Also, the effects of IL-6 on gene expression and the nuclear translocation of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) were examined in cultured cells treated with dexamethasone (DEX). PSL reduced the arthritis score dose-dependently in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. The arthritis score in the PSL (3 mg/kg) + MR16-1 group was lower than in the PSL (3 mg/kg) group, and at the same level as in the PSL (6 mg/kg) group. Lumbar vertebra bone mineral density (BMD) was decreased significantly in CIA mice and was higher in the PSL (3 mg/kg) + MR16-1 group than in the PSL (6 mg/kg) group. In the in-vitro synovial cells, IL-6 pretreatment attenuated the inhibitory effect of DEX on cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and inhibited the nuclear translocation of GR induced by DEX. In contrast, in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells, IL-6 pretreatment exacerbated the decrease in expression of osteocalcin and the increase in expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) by DEX. We demonstrated that IL-6 signalling blockade by an anti-IL-6R antibody can augment the anti-arthritic effect of GCs and inhibit the bone loss they cause. PMID:26201536

  20. ETP-46321, a dual p110α/δ class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor modulates T lymphocyte activation and collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aragoneses-Fenoll, L; Montes-Casado, M; Ojeda, G; Acosta, Y Y; Herranz, J; Martínez, S; Blanco-Aparicio, C; Criado, G; Pastor, J; Dianzani, U; Portolés, P; Rojo, J M

    2016-04-15

    Class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are essential to function of normal and tumor cells, and to modulate immune responses. T lymphocytes express high levels of p110α and p110δ class IA PI3K. Whereas the functioning of PI3K p110δ in immune and autoimmune reactions is well established, the role of p110α is less well understood. Here, a novel dual p110α/δ inhibitor (ETP-46321) and highly specific p110α (A66) or p110δ (IC87114) inhibitors have been compared concerning T cell activation in vitro, as well as the effect on responses to protein antigen and collagen-induced arthritis in vivo. In vitro activation of naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 was inhibited more effectively by the p110δ inhibitor than by the p110α inhibitor as measured by cytokine secretion (IL-2, IL-10, and IFN-γ), T-bet expression and NFAT activation. In activated CD4(+) T cells re-stimulated through CD3 and ICOS, IC87114 inhibited Akt and Erk activation, and the secretion of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17A, and IFN-γ better than A66. The p110α/δ inhibitor ETP-46321, or p110α plus p110δ inhibitors also inhibited IL-21 secretion by differentiated CD4(+) T follicular (Tfh) or IL-17-producing (Th17) helper cells. In vivo, therapeutic administration of ETP-46321 significantly inhibited responses to protein antigen as well as collagen-induced arthritis, as measured by antigen-specific antibody responses, secretion of IL-10, IL-17A or IFN-γ, or clinical symptoms. Hence, p110α as well as p110δ Class IA PI3Ks are important to immune regulation; inhibition of both subunits may be an effective therapeutic approach in inflammatory autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Molecular Strategy to Reduce In Vivo Collagen Barrier Promotes Entry of NCX1 Positive Inducible Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCNCX1+) into Ischemic (or Injured) Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Ronald W.; Yu, Xi-Yong; Luther, Kristin; Xu, Meifeng; Zhao, Ting C.; Yang, Huang-Tian; Qi, Zhihua; LaSance, Kathleen; Ashraf, Muhammad; Wang, Yigang

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of collagen composition on engraftment of progenitor cells within infarcted myocardium. Background We previously reported that intramyocardial penetration of stem/progenitor cells in epicardial patches was enhanced when collagen was reduced in hearts overexpressing adenylyl cyclase-6 (AC6). In this study we hypothesized an alternative strategy wherein overexpression of microRNA-29b (miR-29b), inhibiting mRNAs that encode cardiac fibroblast proteins involved in fibrosis, would similarly facilitate progenitor cell migration into infarcted rat myocardium. Methods In vitro: A tri-cell patch (Tri-P) consisting of cardiac sodium-calcium exchanger-1 (NCX1) positive iPSC (iPSCNCX1+), endothelial cells (EC), and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) was created, co-cultured, and seeded on isolated peritoneum. The expression of fibrosis-related genes was analyzed in cardiac fibroblasts (CFb) by qPCR and Western blot. In vivo: Nude rat hearts were administered mimic miRNA-29b (miR-29b), miRNA-29b inhibitor (Anti-29b), or negative mimic (Ctrl) before creation of an ischemically induced regional myocardial infarction (MI). The Tri-P was placed over the infarcted region 7 days later. Angiomyogenesis was analyzed by micro-CT imaging and immunofluorescent staining. Echocardiography was performed weekly. Results The number of green fluorescent protein positive (GFP+) cells, capillary density, and heart function were significantly increased in hearts overexpressing miR-29b as compared with Ctrl and Anti-29b groups. Conversely, down-regulation of miR-29b with anti-29b in vitro and in vivo induced interstitial fibrosis and cardiac remodeling. Conclusion Overexpression of miR-29b significantly reduced scar formation after MI and facilitated iPSCNCX1+ penetration from the cell patch into the infarcted area, resulting in restoration of heart function after MI. PMID:23990893

  2. The red ear syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Red Ear Syndrome (RES) is a very rare disorder, with approximately 100 published cases in the medical literature. Red ear (RE) episodes are characterised by unilateral or bilateral attacks of paroxysmal burning sensations and reddening of the external ear. The duration of these episodes ranges from a few seconds to several hours. The attacks occur with a frequency ranging from several a day to a few per year. Episodes can occur spontaneously or be triggered, most frequently by rubbing or touching the ear, heat or cold, chewing, brushing of the hair, neck movements or exertion. Early-onset idiopathic RES seems to be associated with migraine, whereas late-onset idiopathic forms have been reported in association with trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). Secondary forms of RES occur with upper cervical spine disorders or temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction. RES is regarded refractory to medical treatments, although some migraine preventative treatments have shown moderate benefit mainly in patients with migraine-related attacks. The pathophysiology of RES is still unclear but several hypotheses involving peripheral or central nervous system mechanisms have been proposed. PMID:24093332

  3. From Ear to Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimura, Doreen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper Doreen Kimura gives a personal history of the "right-ear effect" in dichotic listening. The focus is on the early ground-breaking papers, describing how she did the first dichotic listening studies relating the effects to brain asymmetry. The paper also gives a description of the visual half-field technique for lateralized stimulus…

  4. External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drops, keeping water out of the ear, and pain relievers are the most common forms of treatment. External otitis may involve the entire canal, as ... does not allow fungus to grow as well. Treatment of boils depends on ... relievers, such as oxycodone with acetaminophen , can be given ...

  5. Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Throat Issues & Down Syndrome Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & Down Syndrome Ear, nose, and throat (ENT) problems are common ... What ENT Problems Are Common in Children With Down Syndrome? External Ear Canal Stenosis Stenotic ear canals (narrow ...

  6. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... The outer ear or "pinna" forms when the baby is growing in the mother's womb. The growth of this ear part ...

  7. [Blast injuries of the ear].

    PubMed

    Haralampiev, K; Ristić, B

    1991-01-01

    Blast injury of the ear is the actual military medical problem. The ear, due to its anatomo-physiologic characteristics, is more sensitive to effects of blast waves than other organs and systems. The anatomic and functional ear damages, their symptoms, etiology and clinical course are described. The diagnosis and treatment have been pointed out. PMID:1807053

  8. Ear Infections and Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Joanne E.; Zeisel, Susan A.

    Ear infections in infants and preschoolers can cause mild or moderate temporary hearing loss, which may in turn affect a child's ability to understand and learn language. Noting that providing children with proper medical treatment for ear infections or middle ear fluid is important in preventing possible problems with language development, this…

  9. The Effector Protein BPE005 from Brucella abortus Induces Collagen Deposition and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Downmodulation via Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Rey Serantes, Diego; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Vanzulli, Silvia; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Comerci, Diego José; Delpino, María Victoria

    2015-12-14

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. In the present study, we identified a virulence factor involved in the modulation of hepatic stellate cell function and consequent fibrosis during Brucella abortus infection. This study assessed the role of BPE005 protein from B. abortus in the fibrotic phenotype induced on hepatic stellate cells during B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the fibrotic phenotype induced by B. abortus on hepatic stellate (LX-2) cells was dependent on BPE005, a protein associated with the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB from B. abortus. Our results indicated that B. abortus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) secretion through the activity of the BPE005-secreted protein and induces concomitant collagen deposition by LX-2 cells. BPE005 is a small protein containing a cyclic nucleotide monophosphate binding domain (cNMP) that modulates the LX-2 cell phenotype through a mechanism that is dependent on the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that B. abortus tilts LX-2 cells to a profibrogenic phenotype employing a functional T4SS and the secreted BPE005 protein through a mechanism that involves the cAMP and PKA signaling pathway.

  10. The Effector Protein BPE005 from Brucella abortus Induces Collagen Deposition and Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Downmodulation via Transforming Growth Factor β1 in Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Rey Serantes, Diego; Herrmann, Claudia Karina; Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Vanzulli, Silvia; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Comerci, Diego José

    2015-01-01

    The liver is frequently affected in patients with active brucellosis. In the present study, we identified a virulence factor involved in the modulation of hepatic stellate cell function and consequent fibrosis during Brucella abortus infection. This study assessed the role of BPE005 protein from B. abortus in the fibrotic phenotype induced on hepatic stellate cells during B. abortus infection in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the fibrotic phenotype induced by B. abortus on hepatic stellate (LX-2) cells was dependent on BPE005, a protein associated with the type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB from B. abortus. Our results indicated that B. abortus inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) secretion through the activity of the BPE005-secreted protein and induces concomitant collagen deposition by LX-2 cells. BPE005 is a small protein containing a cyclic nucleotide monophosphate binding domain (cNMP) that modulates the LX-2 cell phenotype through a mechanism that is dependent on the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that B. abortus tilts LX-2 cells to a profibrogenic phenotype employing a functional T4SS and the secreted BPE005 protein through a mechanism that involves the cAMP and PKA signaling pathway. PMID:26667834

  11. Experimental African Trypanosome Infection by Needle Passage or Natural Tsetse Fly Challenge Thwarts the Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1 Prone Mice via an Impairment of Antigen Specific B Cell Autoantibody Titers

    PubMed Central

    De Trez, Carl; Katsandegwaza, Brunette; Caljon, Guy; Magez, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis is a B cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Recently published studies have demonstrated that in some rare cases pathogens can confer protection from autoimmunity. Trypanosoma brucei parasites are tsetse fly transmitted extracellular protozoans causing sleeping sickness disease in humans and Nagana in livestock in sub-Saharan endemic areas. In the past, we demonstrated that trypanosome infections impair B cell homeostasis and abolish vaccine-induced protection against unrelated antigens. Hence, here we hypothesized that trypanosome infection can affect the onset of CIA by specifically dampening specific B-cell responses and type II collagen antibody titers in DBA/1 prone mice. We observed a substantial delay in the onset of collagen-induced arthritis in T. brucei-infected DBA/1 mice that correlates with a drastic decrease of type II collagen titers of the different IgG isotypes in the serum. Treatment of infected mice with Berenil, a trypanocidal drug, restored the development of CIA-associated clinical symptoms. Interestingly, these data were confirmed by the challenge of immunized DBA/1 prone mice with T. brucei-infected tsetse flies. Together, these results demonstrate that T. brucei infection is impairing the maintenance of the antigen specific plasma B cell pool driving the development of CIA in DBA/1 prone mice. PMID:26110416

  12. Alpha adrenoceptors in the rabbit ear thermoregulatory microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Koman, L A; Smith, B P; Gordon, E S; Smith, T L

    1998-03-01

    The rabbit ear microcirculation was analyzed in a chronic unanesthetized model to evaluate alpha adrenergic microvascular control in a thermoregulatory end organ. This model allowed direct measurement of microcirculatory responses without the effects of anesthetics or inflammatory responses induced by acute surgical intervention. The ipsilateral facial artery was catheterized for drug injections into the experimental ear. Microvascular diameter changes following stimulation or blockade of adrenoceptor (AR) subtypes were observed directly through a chronic microvascular chamber implanted in the rabbit ear. Vascular alpha1- and alpha2-ARs appear to be distributed differently across the arterioles and AVAs of the rabbit ear. Both alpha1- and alpha2-ARs appear to contribute to vasoconstriction of AVAs in the conscious rabbit ear. In contrast, alpha1-AR's (vs alpha2-ARs) appear to predominate in adrenergically mediated sympathetic vasoconstriction of arterioles. PMID:9521886

  13. Drug delivery to the ear.

    PubMed

    Hoskison, E; Daniel, M; Al-Zahid, S; Shakesheff, K M; Bayston, R; Birchall, J P

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery to the ear is used to treat conditions of the middle and inner ear such as acute and chronic otitis media, Ménière's disease, sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus. Drugs used include antibiotics, antifungals, steroids, local anesthetics and neuroprotective agents. A literature review was conducted searching Medline (1966-2012), Embase (1988-2012), the Cochrane Library and Ovid (1966-2012), using search terms 'drug delivery', 'middle ear', 'inner ear' and 'transtympanic'. There are numerous methods of drug delivery to the middle ear, which can be categorized as topical, systemic (intravenous), transtympanic and via the Eustachian tube. Localized treatments to the ear have the advantages of targeted drug delivery allowing higher therapeutic doses and minimizing systemic side effects. The ideal scenario would be a carrier system that could cross the intact tympanic membrane loaded with drugs or biochemical agents for the treatment of middle and inner ear conditions.

  14. Lack of acetylcholine nicotine alpha 7 receptor suppresses development of collagen-induced arthritis and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Westman, M; Saha, S; Morshed, M; Lampa, J

    2010-10-01

    Activation of the alpha7 receptor (α7nAChR) has been shown to be important in inflammation and immune regulation, and is also essential in the neural cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of α7nAChR in the development of experimental arthritis and immune activation. Mice lacking the α7nAChR were immunized with collagen II and the development of arthritis was assessed. Another group of α7nAChR-deficient mice was immunized with ovalbumin, spleen and lymph node cells were isolated and the proliferative responses to restimulation with ovalbumin or concanavalin A were investigated. We could demonstrate significantly milder arthritis and less cartilage destruction, together with a decrease of T cell content in lymph nodes in mice lacking the α7nAChR compared to wild-type controls. In addition, mice lacking the α7nAChR had a deficient proliferative response to concanavalin A, whereas antigen presentation-dependent proliferation was not affected. These results indicate important roles for α7nAChR in arthritis development as well as in regulation of T cell-dependent immunological mechanisms. In addition, the data implicate α7nAChR as a therapeutic target for modulation of adaptive immune responses.

  15. Deletion of the major bullous pemphigoid epitope region of collagen XVII induces blistering, autoimmunization, and itching in mice.

    PubMed

    Hurskainen, Tiina; Kokkonen, Nina; Sormunen, Raija; Jackow, Joanna; Löffek, Stefanie; Soininen, Raija; Franzke, Claus-Werner; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Tasanen, Kaisa

    2015-05-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common autoimmune subepidermal blistering skin disease with a characteristic of pruritus and blistering. BP patients carry inflammation-triggering autoantibodies against the collagen XVII (ColXVII, also known as BP180) juxtamembraneous extracellular noncollagenous 16A (NC16A) domain involved in ectodomain shedding. Deletion of the corresponding NC14A region in a genetically modified mouse model (ΔNC14A) decreased the amount of ColXVII in skin, but it did not prevent ectodomain shedding. Newborn ΔNC14A mice had no macroscopic phenotypic changes. However, subepidermal microblisters, rudimentary hemidesmosomes, and loose basement membrane zone were observed by microscopy. ΔNC14A mice grow normally, but at around 3 months of age they start to scratch themselves and develop crusted erosions. Furthermore, perilesional eosinophilic infiltrations in the skin, eosinophilia, and elevated serum IgE levels are detected. Despite the removal of the major BP epitope region, ΔNC14A mice developed IgG and IgA autoantibodies with subepidermal reactivity, indicating autoimmunization against a dermo-epidermal junction component. Moreover, IgG autoantibodies recognized a 180-kDa keratinocyte protein, which was sensitive to collagenase digestion. We show here that ΔNC14A mice provide a highly reproducible BP-related mouse model with spontaneous breakage of self-tolerance and development of autoantibodies.

  16. CARD11 blockade suppresses murine collagen-induced arthritis via inhibiting CARD11/Bcl10 assembly and T helper type 17 response.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Zhao, J; Zhang, H; Huang, Y; Wang, S; Tu, Q; Yang, N

    2014-05-01

    The scaffold protein caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11 (CARD11) is implicated in the regulation of inflammation and autoimmunity. The present study aimed to explore the role of CARD11 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were treated with either CARD11-targeted interfering RNA (CARD11 siRNA) or control siRNA by intraperitoneal injection every 3 days after CIA establishment. The clinical score of arthritis was recorded every other day. Synovial inflammation and cartilage erosion were evaluated by histology and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). Serum anti-type II collagen (anti-CII) antibodies and cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The CARD11/Bcl10 formation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation was assessed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting, and the percentage of T helper type 17 (Th17) cells was determined by flow cytometry. Systemic administration of CARD11 siRNA significantly reduced the clinical score of CIA severity. As indicated by the histology, joint inflammation and destruction were attenuated by CARD11 siRNA treatment. Micro-CT demonstrated less severe joint destruction in CARD11 siRNA-treated mice than in control mice. CARD11 siRNA treatment resulted in inhibition of CARD11/Bcl10 formation and the subsequent NF-κB activation. In addition, treatment with CARD11 siRNA resulted in a pronounced decrease in proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-17. Serum anti-CII antibody and the percentage of Th17 cells were also significantly reduced. CARD11 is involved in the pathogenesis of CIA by formation of the CARD11/Bcl10 complex and enhancement of the Th17 cell response. Targeting CARD11 provides a novel research direction in the development of therapeutic strategies for RA.

  17. IL-1 alpha beta blockade prevents cartilage and bone destruction in murine type II collagen-induced arthritis, whereas TNF-alpha blockade only ameliorates joint inflammation.

    PubMed

    Joosten, L A; Helsen, M M; Saxne, T; van De Loo, F A; Heinegard, D; van Den Berg, W B

    1999-11-01

    Anti-TNF-alpha treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients markedly suppresses inflammatory disease activity, but so far no tissue-protective effects have been reported. In contrast, blockade of IL-1 in rheumatoid arthritis patients, by an IL-1 receptor antagonist, was only moderately effective in suppressing inflammatory symptoms but appeared to reduce the rate of progression of joint destruction. We therefore used an established collagen II murine arthritis model (collagen-induced arthritis(CIA)) to study effects on joint structures of neutralization of either TNF-alpha or IL-1. Both soluble TNF binding protein and anti-IL-1 treatment ameliorated disease activity when applied shortly after onset of CIA. Serum analysis revealed that early anti-TNF-alpha treatment of CIA did not decrease the process in the cartilage, as indicated by the elevated COMP levels. In contrast, anti-IL-1 treatment of established CIA normalized COMP levels, apparently alleviating the process in the tissue. Histology of knee and ankle joints corroborated the finding and showed that cartilage and joint destruction was significantly decreased after anti-IL-1 treatment but was hardly affected by anti-TNF-alpha treatment. Radiographic analysis of knee and ankle joints revealed that bone erosions were prevented by anti-IL-1 treatment, whereas the anti-TNF-alpha-treated animals exhibited changes comparable to the controls. In line with these findings, metalloproteinase activity, visualized by VDIPEN production, was almost absent throughout the cartilage layers in anti-IL-1-treated animals, whereas massive VDIPEN appearance was found in control and sTNFbp-treated mice. These results indicate that blocking of IL-1 is a cartilage- and bone-protective therapy in destructive arthritis, whereas the TNF-alpha antagonist has little effect on tissue destruction.

  18. CARD11 blockade suppresses murine collagen-induced arthritis via inhibiting CARD11/Bcl10 assembly and T helper type 17 response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Zhao, J; Zhang, H; Huang, Y; Wang, S; Tu, Q; Yang, N

    2014-01-01

    The scaffold protein caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11 (CARD11) is implicated in the regulation of inflammation and autoimmunity. The present study aimed to explore the role of CARD11 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were treated with either CARD11-targeted interfering RNA (CARD11 siRNA) or control siRNA by intraperitoneal injection every 3 days after CIA establishment. The clinical score of arthritis was recorded every other day. Synovial inflammation and cartilage erosion were evaluated by histology and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). Serum anti-type II collagen (anti-CII) antibodies and cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The CARD11/Bcl10 formation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation was assessed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting, and the percentage of T helper type 17 (Th17) cells was determined by flow cytometry. Systemic administration of CARD11 siRNA significantly reduced the clinical score of CIA severity. As indicated by the histology, joint inflammation and destruction were attenuated by CARD11 siRNA treatment. Micro-CT demonstrated less severe joint destruction in CARD11 siRNA-treated mice than in control mice. CARD11 siRNA treatment resulted in inhibition of CARD11/Bcl10 formation and the subsequent NF-κB activation. In addition, treatment with CARD11 siRNA resulted in a pronounced decrease in proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-17. Serum anti-CII antibody and the percentage of Th17 cells were also significantly reduced. CARD11 is involved in the pathogenesis of CIA by formation of the CARD11/Bcl10 complex and enhancement of the Th17 cell response. Targeting CARD11 provides a novel research direction in the development of therapeutic strategies for RA. PMID:24443940

  19. Effects of the selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator compound A on bone metabolism and inflammation in male mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rauner, Martina; Thiele, Sylvia; Sinningen, Kathrin; Winzer, Maria; Salbach-Hirsch, Juliane; Gloe, Ina; Peschke, Katrin; Haegeman, Guy; Tuckermann, Jan P; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2013-10-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent drugs to treat rheumatoid arthritis but exert adverse skeletal effects. Compound A (CpdA) is a selective GC receptor modulator with an improved risk/benefit profile in mouse models of inflammation and bone loss. Here we tested whether CpdA also exerts bone-sparing effects under proinflammatory circumstances using the collagen-induced arthritis model, a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis. CpdA decreased disease activity, paw swelling, and the paw temperature by 43%, 12%, and 7%, respectively, but was less potent than dexamethasone (DEX), which reduced these parameters by 72%, 22%, and 10%, respectively. Moreover, T cells isolated from CpdA- and DEX-treated animals were less active based on proliferation rates after challenge with type II collagen and produced smaller amounts of interferon-γ and TNF as compared with T cells from PBS-treated mice. Histological assessment of the joints confirmed the weaker potency of CpdA as compared with DEX in preventing infiltration of inflammatory cells, induction of osteoclastogenesis, and destruction of articular cartilage. Due to the lack of GC-susceptible arthritis models, we were not able to fully address the bone-sparing potential of CpdA in inflammatory conditions. Nevertheless, the bone formation marker procollagen type 1 N-terminal peptide, a surrogate marker for GC-mediated suppression of bone formation, was significantly decreased by DEX in arthritic mice but not by CpdA. Our data indicate that CpdA moderately suppresses inflammation, whereas the concurrent effects on bone remain unknown. In light of its narrow therapeutic range, CpdA may be more useful as a molecular tool for dissecting GC actions rather than a therapeutic agent.

  20. Effects of the selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator compound A on bone metabolism and inflammation in male mice with collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rauner, Martina; Thiele, Sylvia; Sinningen, Kathrin; Winzer, Maria; Salbach-Hirsch, Juliane; Gloe, Ina; Peschke, Katrin; Haegeman, Guy; Tuckermann, Jan P; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2013-10-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent drugs to treat rheumatoid arthritis but exert adverse skeletal effects. Compound A (CpdA) is a selective GC receptor modulator with an improved risk/benefit profile in mouse models of inflammation and bone loss. Here we tested whether CpdA also exerts bone-sparing effects under proinflammatory circumstances using the collagen-induced arthritis model, a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis. CpdA decreased disease activity, paw swelling, and the paw temperature by 43%, 12%, and 7%, respectively, but was less potent than dexamethasone (DEX), which reduced these parameters by 72%, 22%, and 10%, respectively. Moreover, T cells isolated from CpdA- and DEX-treated animals were less active based on proliferation rates after challenge with type II collagen and produced smaller amounts of interferon-γ and TNF as compared with T cells from PBS-treated mice. Histological assessment of the joints confirmed the weaker potency of CpdA as compared with DEX in preventing infiltration of inflammatory cells, induction of osteoclastogenesis, and destruction of articular cartilage. Due to the lack of GC-susceptible arthritis models, we were not able to fully address the bone-sparing potential of CpdA in inflammatory conditions. Nevertheless, the bone formation marker procollagen type 1 N-terminal peptide, a surrogate marker for GC-mediated suppression of bone formation, was significantly decreased by DEX in arthritic mice but not by CpdA. Our data indicate that CpdA moderately suppresses inflammation, whereas the concurrent effects on bone remain unknown. In light of its narrow therapeutic range, CpdA may be more useful as a molecular tool for dissecting GC actions rather than a therapeutic agent. PMID:23885015

  1. Collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in mice features regulatory transcriptional network connecting major histocompatibility complex (MHC H2) with autoantigen genes in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Donate, Paula B; Fornari, Thaís A; Junta, Cristina M; Magalhães, Danielle A; Macedo, Cláudia; Cunha, Thiago M; Nguyen, Catherine; Cunha, Fernando Q; Passos, Geraldo A

    2011-05-01

    Considering that imbalance of central tolerance in the thymus contributes to aggressive autoimmunity, we compared the expression of peripheral tissue autoantigens (PTA) genes, which are involved in self-representation in the thymic stroma, of two mouse strains; DBA-1/J (MHC-H2(q)) susceptible and DBA-2/J (MHC-H2(d)) resistant to collagen induced arthritis (CIA). We evaluate whether these strains differ in their thymic gene expression, allowing identification of genes that might play a role in susceptibility/resistance to CIA. Microarray profiling showed that 1093 PTA genes were differentially modulated between collagen immunized DBA-1/J and DBA-2/J mice. These genes were assigned to 17 different tissues/organs, including joints/bone, characterizing the promiscuous gene expression (PGE), which is implicated in self-representation. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data and quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that Aire (autoimmune regulator), an important regulator of the PGE process, Aire-dependent (insulin), Aire-independent (Col2A1 and Gad67), and other 22 joint/bone autoantigen genes were down-regulated in DBA-1/J compared with DBA-2/J in the thymus. Considering the importance of MHC-H2 in peptide-self presentation and autoimmunity susceptibility, we reconstructed transcriptional networks of both strains based on actual microarray data. The networks clearly demonstrated different MHC-H2 transcriptional interactions with PTAs genes. DBA-1/J strain featured MHC-H2 as a node influencing downstream genes. Differently, in DBA-2/J strain network MHC-H2 was exclusively self-regulated and does not control other genes. These findings provide evidence that CIA susceptibility in mice may be a reflex of a cascade-like transcriptional control connecting different genes to MHC-H2 in the thymus.

  2. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  3. Dendritic Cell-Specific Deletion of β-Catenin Results in Fewer Regulatory T-Cells without Exacerbating Autoimmune Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Alves, C. Henrique; Ober-Blöbaum, Julia L.; Brouwers-Haspels, Inge; Asmawidjaja, Patrick S.; Mus, Adriana M. C.; Razawy, Wida; Molendijk, Marlieke; Clausen, Björn E.; Lubberts, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells that have the dual ability to stimulate immunity and maintain tolerance. However, the signalling pathways mediating tolerogenic DC function in vivo remain largely unknown. The β-catenin pathway has been suggested to promote a regulatory DC phenotype. The aim of this study was to unravel the role of β-catenin signalling to control DC function in the autoimmune collagen-induced arthritis model (CIA). Deletion of β-catenin specifically in DCs was achieved by crossing conditional knockout mice with a CD11c-Cre transgenic mouse line. Bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) were generated and used to study the maturation profile of these cells in response to a TLR2 or TLR4 ligand stimulation. CIA was induced by intra-dermal immunization with 100 μg chicken type II collagen in complete Freund’s adjuvant on days 0 and 21. CIA incidence and severity was monitored macroscopically and by histology. The T cell profile as well as their cytokine production were analysed by flow cytometry. Lack of β-catenin specifically in DCs did not affect the spontaneous, TLR2- or TLR4-induced maturation and activation of BMDCs or their cytokine production. Moreover, no effect on the incidence and severity of CIA was observed in mice lacking β-catenin in CD11c+ cells. A decreased frequency of splenic CD3+CD8+ T cells and of regulatory T cells (Tregs) (CD4+CD25highFoxP3+), but no changes in the frequency of splenic Th17 (CCR6+CXCR3-CCR4+), Th2 (CCR6-CXCR3-CCR4+) and Th1 (CCR6-CXCR3+CCR4-) cells were observed in these mice under CIA condition. Furthermore, the expression of IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, IL-4 or IFNγ was also not affected. Our data indicate that ablation of β-catenin expression in DCs did not alter the course and severity of CIA. We conclude that although deletion of β-catenin resulted in a lower frequency of Tregs, this decrease was not sufficient to aggravate the onset and severity of CIA. PMID:26587585

  4. Propylthiouracil, independent of its antithyroid effect, decreases VSMC collagen expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Jan; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Lin, Kwang-Huei; Yang, Su-Hui

    2009-01-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU), in addition to its antithyroid effect, is recently found to have a potent antiatherosclerotic effect. Because collagen accumulation is the major contributor to the growth of atherosclerotic lesions and the neointimal formation after arterial injury, the aim of this study is to investigate the impact of PTU on collagen regulation. In the rat carotid injury model, PTU administration reversed the up-regulation of collagen in the neointima induced by balloon injury. In vitro, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), the main origin of arterial collagen, were treated with PTU. Propylthiouracil caused a concentration-dependent decrease in collagen I and III steady-state protein and mRNA levels, as determined by immuno-cytochemistry, Western, and/or Northern blot analyses. Transient transfection experiments using rat type I collagen promoter construct showed that PTU failed to affect collagen gene transcription in VSMCs. Actinomycin D studies demonstrated that the half-life of collagens mRNA decreased with PTU treatment, suggesting that PTU down-regulates collagen expression predominantly at the post-transcriptional level. Taken together, these data suggest that PTU inhibits VSMC collagen production via destabilization of collagen mRNA that contributes to its beneficial effect on atherogenesis and neointimal formation after arterial injury. However, whether the destabilization of collagen may induce plaque rupture in PTU-treated arteries merits further investigation.

  5. Systemic gene transfer of binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) prevents disease progression in murine collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shields, A M; Klavinskis, L S; Antoniou, M; Wooley, P H; Collins, H L; Panayi, G S; Thompson, S J; Corrigall, V M

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) has previously demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in multiple models of inflammatory arthritis. We investigated whether these immunoregulatory properties could be exploited using gene therapy techniques. A single intraperitoneal injection of lentiviral vector containing the murine BiP (Lenti-mBiP) or green fluorescent protein (Lenti-GFP) transgene was administered in low- or high-dose studies during early arthritis. Disease activity was assessed by visual scoring, histology, serum cytokine and antibody production measured by cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and ELISA, respectively. Lentiviral vector treatment caused significant induction of interferon (IFN)-γ responses regardless of the transgene; however, further specific effects were directly attributable to the BiP transgene. In both studies Lenti-mBiP suppressed clinical arthritis significantly. Histological examination showed that low-dose Lenti-mBiP suppressed inflammatory cell infiltration, cartilage destruction and significantly reduced pathogenic anti-type II collagen (CII) antibodies. Lenti-mBiP treatment caused significant up-regulation of soluble cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (sCTLA-4) serum levels and down-regulation of interleukin (IL)-17A production in response to CII cell restimulation. In-vitro studies confirmed that Lenti-mBiP spleen cells could significantly suppress the release of IL-17A from CII primed responder cells following CII restimulation in vitro, and this suppression was associated with increased IL-10 production. Neutralization of CTLA-4 in further co-culture experiments demonstrated inverse regulation of IL-17A production. In conclusion, these data demonstrate proof of principle for the therapeutic potential of systemic lentiviral vector delivery of the BiP transgene leading to immunoregulation of arthritis by induction of soluble CTLA-4 and suppression of IL-17A production. PMID:25228326

  6. Formation of apatite-collagen complexes.

    PubMed

    Doi, Y; Horiguchi, T; Moriwaki, Y; Kitago, H; Kajimoto, T; Iwayama, Y

    1996-05-01

    An apatite-collagen complex was prepared in calcium beta-glycerophosphate solutions at pH 9.0 and 37 degrees C with the purpose of developing new bone substitutes that more closely resemble bone than currently available materials. Reconstituted type I collagen as well as sheet collagen were crosslinked in the presence of alkaline phosphatase and egg-yolk phosvitin. The crosslinked collagens were immersed in daily-renewed calcium beta-glycerophosphate solutions for 2 and 4 weeks to induce the deposition of apatite on the collagen fibers. After 2 weeks of reaction, for example, apatites deposited approximately two times the crosslinked collagen in weight. With reconstituted collagen, the complex showed some elasticity but no apatite was visually observed to detach under deformation with fingers and forceps. The complex, moreover, did not disintegrate when immersed in saline or animal blood. Nevertheless, the complex resorbed with no evidence of cytotoxicity when implanted in muscle tissues. These findings suggest that the apatite-collagen complex prepared would be useful as bone substitutes, especially for periodontal osseous lesion repair and alveolar ridge augmentation. PMID:8731148

  7. Changes in focal adhesion kinase expression in rats with collagen-induced arthritis and efficacy of intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs alone or in combination.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui-Ying; Luo, Jing; Li, Xiao-Feng; Lv, Qian; Wen, Hong-Yan; Song, Qing-Zhen; Zhao, Wen-Peng; Zhao, Xiang-Cong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Si-Yu; Zhi, Jian-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is known to promote the proliferation, migration and survival of synovial cells and plays an important role in the occurrence, development and pathological process of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to observe FAK changes in synovial cells of rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and after intervention with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or in combination in a CIA female SD rat model induced by collagen type II. The rats were randomized to 8 groups: normal control group, CIA model control group, methotrexate (MTX, 0.9 mg/kg/w) group, cyclophosphamide (CTX, 24 mg/kg/3 w) group, leflunomide (LEF, 1.2 mg/kg/d) group, MTX + CTX group, LEF + CTX group, and MTX + LEF group. They were intervened with DMARDs alone or in combination for six weeks. The experiment lasted a total of 9 weeks in vivo. Articular inflammation was measured during the process of drug intervention in terms of the degree of swelling degree in the right hind foot using a venire caliper. All animals were sacrificed by breaking the neck after 9 weeks. Then, the ankle was fixed, decalcified, embedded, and HE stained, and prepared into slices to observe pathological changes in the synovial tissue. FAK expression in synovial cells was assayed by immunohistochemistry and the mean optical density (OD) value was measured using the HPIAS-2000 image analysis system. It was found that FAK expression was negative in normal control group, positive in CIA model control group, and decreased in the three DMARD combination treatment groups significantly as compared with that in the three single-drug groups (P < 0.05). FAK expression in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group decreased more significantly than that in MTX + LEF group (P < 0.05), and there was no statistically significant difference between LEF + CTX and MTX + CTX groups. The arthritis index and pathological change in the synovial tissue in LEF + CTX group or MTX + CTX group

  8. ETP-46321, a dual p110α/δ class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor modulates T lymphocyte activation and collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aragoneses-Fenoll, L; Montes-Casado, M; Ojeda, G; Acosta, Y Y; Herranz, J; Martínez, S; Blanco-Aparicio, C; Criado, G; Pastor, J; Dianzani, U; Portolés, P; Rojo, J M

    2016-04-15

    Class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are essential to function of normal and tumor cells, and to modulate immune responses. T lymphocytes express high levels of p110α and p110δ class IA PI3K. Whereas the functioning of PI3K p110δ in immune and autoimmune reactions is well established, the role of p110α is less well understood. Here, a novel dual p110α/δ inhibitor (ETP-46321) and highly specific p110α (A66) or p110δ (IC87114) inhibitors have been compared concerning T cell activation in vitro, as well as the effect on responses to protein antigen and collagen-induced arthritis in vivo. In vitro activation of naive CD4(+) T lymphocytes by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 was inhibited more effectively by the p110δ inhibitor than by the p110α inhibitor as measured by cytokine secretion (IL-2, IL-10, and IFN-γ), T-bet expression and NFAT activation. In activated CD4(+) T cells re-stimulated through CD3 and ICOS, IC87114 inhibited Akt and Erk activation, and the secretion of IL-2, IL-4, IL-17A, and IFN-γ better than A66. The p110α/δ inhibitor ETP-46321, or p110α plus p110δ inhibitors also inhibited IL-21 secretion by differentiated CD4(+) T follicular (Tfh) or IL-17-producing (Th17) helper cells. In vivo, therapeutic administration of ETP-46321 significantly inhibited responses to protein antigen as well as collagen-induced arthritis, as measured by antigen-specific antibody responses, secretion of IL-10, IL-17A or IFN-γ, or clinical symptoms. Hence, p110α as well as p110δ Class IA PI3Ks are important to immune regulation; inhibition of both subunits may be an effective therapeutic approach in inflammatory autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26883061

  9. Anti-arthritic activity of Fu-Fang-Lu-Jiao-Shuang on collagen-induced arthritis in Balb/c mice and its underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyan; Sun, Weiguang; Chen, Laxia; Xu, Xin; Wu, Yunxia; Zhang, Jinwen; Zhang, Yonghui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, autoimmune disorder characterized by progressive multiple joint destruction, deformity, disability and premature death in most patients. Fu-Fang-Lu-Jiao-Shuang (FFLJS) is an effective traditional Chinese medicine, which has long been used clinically to treat RA patients. Objective: The objective of this study is aimed to evaluate the anti-rheumatic effects of FFLJS on collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model, as well as the underlying mechanisms, which have not previously been explored. Materials and Methods: CIA was induced by immunization with type II collagen (CII) in male Balb/c mice. The mice in the onset of arthritis were treated daily with FFLJS (125 or 500 mg/kg) or 1% carboxymethyl cellulose-Na for 28 days. Paw thickness and arthritic score were evaluated to confirm the anti-arthritic effect of FFLJS on CIA in mice. Levels of anti-CII antibody, proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1) β, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as well as prostaglandin E-2 (PGE-2) in serum and histological changes in the ankle joint were also analyzed. In addition, expressions of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3 and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases-1 (TIMP-1) in synovial tissue were also detected to further study the molecular mechanism of the anti-arthritic effects of FFLJS. Results: During therapeutic treatment, FFLJS significantly reduced paw thickness and arthritic score in CIA mice, decreased the amounts of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IL-17, PGE-2 and anti-CII antibody in serum. In addition, FFLJS treatment could prevent the bone destruction by reducing the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-3, increasing the expression of TIMP-1 in synovial tissue of CIA mice. Conclusion: These findings offer the convincing evidence for the first time that the anti-rheumatic effects of FFLJS might be related to down-regulation of TNF-α, IL-1 β, IL-17 and PGE-2 levels for acute arthritis, and regulation of MMP-1, MMP-3

  10. Complications of collagenous colitis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh-James

    2008-03-21

    Microscopic forms of colitis have been described, including collagenous colitis. This disorder generally has an apparently benign clinical course. However, a number of gastric and intestinal complications, possibly coincidental, may develop with collagenous colitis. Distinctive inflammatory disorders of the gastric mucosa have been described, including lymphocytic gastritis and collagenous gastritis. Celiac disease and collagenous sprue (or collagenous enteritis) may occur. Colonic ulceration has been associated with use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, while other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, may evolve from collagenous colitis. Submucosal "dissection", colonic fractures or mucosal tears and perforation from air insufflation during colonoscopy may occur and has been hypothesized to be due to compromise of the colonic wall from submucosal collagen deposition. Similar changes may result from increased intraluminal pressure during barium enema contrast studies. Finally, malignant disorders have also been reported, including carcinoma and lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:18350593

  11. The ear: Diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vignaud, J.; Jardin, C.; Rosen, L.

    1986-01-01

    This is an English translation of volume 17-1 of Traite de radiodiagnostic and represents a reasonably complete documentation of the diseases of the temporal bone that have imaging manifestations. The book begins with chapters on embryology, anatomy and radiography anatomy; it continues with blood supply and an overview of temporal bone pathology. Subsequent chapters cover malformations, trauma, infections, tumors, postoperative changes, glomus tumors, vertebasilar insufficiency, and facial nerve canal lesions. A final chapter demonstrates and discusses magnetic resonance images of the ear and cerebellopontine angle.

  12. MORPHOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL STUDIES OF COLLAGEN FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, D. A.; Green, N. M.; Chapman, J. A.

    1961-01-01

    Electron micrographs of thin sections of nuclear, microsomal, and mitochondrial fractions obtained from a carrageenin-induced granuloma showed considerable contamination of the heavier by the lighter fractions. Striated collagen fibrils could be identified in the nuclei + debris fraction. Only a few striated fibrils occurred in the mitochondrial fraction; very fine filaments (diameter 50 A) could be seen in this fraction, but could not be distinguished with certainty from fibrillar material derived from broken nuclei. 35 per cent of the mitochondrial and 80 per cent of the microsomal collagen was extractable by 0.2 M NaCl and could be purified by the standard methods of solution and reprecipitation. The amino acid composition of these collagen fractions determined by ion exchange chromatography was within the range normally found for collagen and gelatin from other mammalian species, allowing for 10 to 20 per cent of some non-collagenous contaminant of the microsomal collagen. Hydroxyproline and proline were isolated by chromatography on paper from hydrolysates of the nuclear, mitochondrial, and microsomal collagen fractions, after incubation of tissue slices with L-14C-proline. The specific activities of the hydroxyproline from these collagens were in the approximate ratio 1:2:6, while that of bound hydroxyproline derived from the supernatant was only 1, indicating primary synthesis of collagen in the microsomes. Attempts to demonstrate incorporation of L-14C-proline into collagen or into free hydroxyproline in cell free systems were unsuccessful, nor was it possible to demonstrate non-specific incorporation of L-14C-valine into TCA-insoluble material by various combinations of subcellular fractions. PMID:13763869

  13. The collagen binding domain of gelatinase A modulates degradation of collagen IV by gelatinase B.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Magda; Monaco, Susanna; Van Den Steen, Philippe E; Sbardella, Diego; Grasso, Giuseppe; Marini, Stefano; Overall, Christopher M; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Coletta, Massimo

    2009-02-20

    Type IV collagen remodeling plays a critical role in inflammatory responses, angiogenesis and metastasis. Its remodeling is executed by a family of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), of which the constitutive gelatinase A (MMP2) and the inducible gelatinase B (MMP9) are key examples. Thus, in many pathological conditions, both gelatinases act together. Kinetic data are reported for the enzymatic processing at 37 degrees C of type IV collagen from human placenta by MMP9 and its modulation by the fibronectin-like collagen binding domain (CBD) of MMP2. The alpha1 and alpha2 chain components of type IV collagen were cleaved by gelatinases and identified by mass spectrometry as well as Edman sequencing. Surface plasmon resonance interaction assays showed that CBD bound type IV collagen at two topologically distinct sites. On the basis of linked-function analysis, we demonstrated that CBD of MMP2 tuned the cleavage of collagen IV by MMP9, presumably by inducing a ligand-linked structural change on the type IV collagen. At low concentrations, the CBD bound the first site and thereby allosterically modulated the binding of MMP9 to collagen IV, thus enhancing the collagenolytic activity of MMP9. At high concentrations, CBD binding to the second site interfered with MMP9 binding to collagen IV, acting as a competitive inhibitor. Interestingly, modulation of collagen IV degradation by inactive forms of MMP2 also occurred in a cell-based system, revealing that this interrelationship affected neutrophil migration across a collagen IV membrane. The regulation of the proteolytic processing by a catalytically inactive domain (i.e., CBD) suggests that the two gelatinases might cooperate in degrading substrates even when either one is inactive. This observation reinforces the idea of exosite targets for MMP inhibitors, which should include all macromolecular substrate recognition sites.

  14. Collagen fiber formation and proliferation as a mechanism of cancer prevention and regression induced by extract from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: correlation between clinical observation and animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, T; Watanabe, S; Hyodoh, F; Saito, T

    1988-01-01

    Administration of polysaccharides extracted from human Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli, Aoyama B strain (SSM) produced regression of breast cancer in 2 women. Biopsies of tumor nodules from these patients revealed intense proliferation of collagen fibers from the stromal cells. SSM apparently promoted the proliferation and maturation of collagen fibers from the stromal cells and matrix destroyed by tumor infiltration. Transplantation of human tumor cell lines into athymic mice resulted in the formation of collagen fibers surrounding the cancer cells. SSM promoted the proliferation and maturation of collagen fibers encasing the tumor cells. The intensity of collagen fiber formation varied with the kind of cancer cells used. The degree of proliferation of collagen fibers correlated with the antitumor effects of SSM. There was hardly any migration of lymphocytes, monocytes, and macrophages in the affected sites. It is interpreted that SSM stimulates the proliferation and maturation of collagen fibers in the host as a major mechanism of its antitumor property. When examined by circular dichroism this proliferation was found to be dependent upon changes in the molecular structure of the substances which make up the cell membrane. Fibronectin was presumed to be important among these substances.

  15. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-01-01

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27571073

  16. Collagen-graft mixed cellulose esters membrane maintains undifferentiated morphology and markers of potential pluripotency in feeder-free culture of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lotfalah Moradi, Sadegh; Hajishafieeha, Zahra; Nojedehi, Shahrzad; Dinarvand, Vida; Hesami Tackallou, Saeed; Roy, Ram V; Ardeshirylajimi, Abdolreza; Soleimani, Masoud

    2016-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are unique and unlimited clinical sources of stem cell therapy for the regenerative medicine. Feeder layer preparation is an important step for iPSCs production, which is expensive, time-consuming and requires conversance. In the present study, we investigated the maintenance of pluripotency, and stemness of the iPSCs through feeder-free culture on a collagen-grafted Mixed Cellulose Esters membrane (MCE-COL) after three passages during twelve days. Results have demonstrated that the iPSCs cultured on MCE-COL membrane had a fine, typical undifferentiated morphology, increased proliferation rate and significant multi-lineage differentiation potential. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and pluripotency associated gene markers expression further confirmed that iPSCs cultured on the surface of MCE-COL had more ALP positive colonies and enhanced expression of Oct-4, Nanog, Sox-2 and ALP in comparison with MCE and control groups. Since MCE-COL membrane has three dimensional structure and bioactivity, it has the potential for usage in the feeder-free culture of iPSCs, and could be a suitable candidate to use as a feeder layer in stem cells preparation. PMID:27449919

  17. Xianfanghuomingyin, a Chinese Compound Medicine, Modulates the Proliferation and Differentiation of T Lymphocyte in a Collagen-Induced Arthritis Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Wei, Yi; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Jingwei; Dong, Bin; Zhu, Lingqun

    2016-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), xianfanghuomingyin (XFHM) is used to treat autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we studied the mechanisms underlying its treatment effects, especially its anti-inflammatory effects in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. We found that cartilage destruction and pannus formation were alleviated by treatment with XFHM. The abnormal differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells was downregulated significantly by XFHM, and Th2 and Treg cells were upregulated. Moreover, the expression levels of specific cytokines and transcription factors related to Th1 cells (interferon γ [IFNγ], T-bet) and Th17 cells (interleukin- [IL-] 17) and the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-gamma (RORγ) were downregulated. Serum IL-4 and GATA-3, which contribute to Th2 cells differentiation, increased significantly after XFHM administration. These results indicate that XFHM can restore the balance of T lymphocytes and reestablish the immunological tolerance to inhibit autoinflammatory disorder of RA. Taken together, XFHM can be used as a complementary or alternative traditional medicine to treat RA.

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of interleukin-23 receptor cytokine-binding homology region rebalance T cell distribution in rodent collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Yu, Dongmei; Wang, Xin; Luo, Cheng; Chen, Yucong; Lei, Wen; Wang, Chen; Ge, Yaoyao; Xue, Wenyao; Tian, Qiqi; Gao, Xiangdong; Yao, Wenbing

    2016-01-01

    IL-23 is an important cytokine to regulate Th17 cell differentiation and promote the proliferation of inflammatory cells in Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases. The collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rat is a model of rheumatoid arthritis characterized by pronounced inflammatory auto-responses from B and T cells, especially Th17 cells in lesions. In the present study, we used rhIL23R-CHR to block the IL-23 signaling pathway to probe the importance of IL-23 in misbalancing the ratio of Th17/Th9/Treg cells in CIA rats. After treatments with rhIL23R-CHR, the CIA rats showed a significant decrease of secretions of IL-17 and IL-9, whereas FoxP3 was activated in the process, indicating that IL-23 can manipulate the balance of Th17/Th9/Treg cells. Similar to the animal model, IL-23 also possessed remarkable proinflammatory effects on human fibroblast-like synoviocyte cells (HFLS), showing synergetic outcomes with TNF-α. Together, IL-23 could act as a modulator to imbalance the ratio of Th17/Th9/Treg cells, and rhIL23R-CHR could serve as a potential therapeutic agent for RA patients. PMID:27177334

  19. A herbal formula comprising Rosae Multiflorae Fructus and Lonicerae Japonicae Flos, attenuates collagen-induced arthritis and inhibits TLR4 signalling in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Brian Chi Yan; Yu, Hua; Guo, Hui; Su, Tao; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Li, Ting; Cao, Hui-Hui; Tse, Anfernee Kai-Wing; Wu, Zheng-Zhi; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2016-01-01

    RL, a traditional remedy for Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), comprises two edible herbs, Rosae Multiflorae Fructus and Lonicerae Japonicae Flos. We have reported that RL could inhibit the production of inflammatory mediators in immune cells. Here we investigated the effects and the mechanism of action of RL in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. RL significantly increased food intake and weight gain of CIA rats without any observable adverse effect; ameliorated joint erythema and swelling; inhibited immune cell infiltration, bone erosion and osteophyte formation in joints; reduced joint protein expression levels of TLR4, phospho-TAK1, phospho-NF-κB p65, phospho-c-Jun and phospho-IRF3; lowered levels of inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-17A and MCP-1 in sera and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-17A in joints); elevated serum IL-10 level; reinvigorated activities of antioxidant SOD, CAT and GSH-Px in the liver and serum; reduced Th17 cell proportions in splenocytes; inhibited splenocyte proliferation and activation; and lowered serum IgG level. In conclusion, RL at nontoxic doses inhibited TLR4 signaling and potently improved clinical conditions of CIA rats. These findings provide further pharmacological justifications for the traditional use of RL in RA management. PMID:26860973

  20. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-08-26

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway.

  1. Xianfanghuomingyin, a Chinese Compound Medicine, Modulates the Proliferation and Differentiation of T Lymphocyte in a Collagen-Induced Arthritis Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Nie, Bo; Li, Xue; Wei, Yi; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Jingwei; Lou, Lixia; Dong, Bin; Wu, Aiming; Zhang, Dongmei; Zhu, Lingqun; Zhao, Jiuli; Chai, Limin

    2016-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), xianfanghuomingyin (XFHM) is used to treat autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we studied the mechanisms underlying its treatment effects, especially its anti-inflammatory effects in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. We found that cartilage destruction and pannus formation were alleviated by treatment with XFHM. The abnormal differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells was downregulated significantly by XFHM, and Th2 and Treg cells were upregulated. Moreover, the expression levels of specific cytokines and transcription factors related to Th1 cells (interferon γ [IFNγ], T-bet) and Th17 cells (interleukin- [IL-] 17) and the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-gamma (RORγ) were downregulated. Serum IL-4 and GATA-3, which contribute to Th2 cells differentiation, increased significantly after XFHM administration. These results indicate that XFHM can restore the balance of T lymphocytes and reestablish the immunological tolerance to inhibit autoinflammatory disorder of RA. Taken together, XFHM can be used as a complementary or alternative traditional medicine to treat RA. PMID:27656238

  2. Matrine Exerts a Strong Anti-Arthritic Effect on Type II Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Rats by Inhibiting Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jiang; Fang, Fan-Fu; Li, Xiu-Qing; Shu, Zhi-Heng; Jiang, Yi-Ping; Han, Ting; Peng, Wei; Zheng, Cheng-Jian

    2016-01-01

    To investigate anti-arthritic effects of matrine isolated from the roots of S. flavescens on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and to explore its related potential mechanisms, CIA rats were established and administered with matrine (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg/days, for 30 days). Subsequently, blood was collected to determine serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, IL-10, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9, and hind paws and knee joints were collected for histopathological examination. Furthermore, indices of the thymus and spleen were determined, and synovial tissues were collected to determine the protein expressions of p-IκB, IκB, Cox-2 and iNOS. Our results indicated that matrine significantly suppressed inflammatory reactions and synovial tissue destruction. Matrine inhibited paw swelling, arthritis indices and weight loss in CIA rats. Additionally, matrine decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. Matrine also down-regulated expressions of p-IκB, Cox-2, and iNOS but up-regulated IκB in synovial tissues in CIA rats. The results suggested matrine possesses an anti-arthritic effect in CIA rats via inhibiting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and proteins that promote the NF-κB pathway. PMID:27571073

  3. Chemical characterization of a red raspberry fruit extract and evaluation of its pharmacological effects in experimental models of acute inflammation and collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Figueira, M E; Câmara, M B; Direito, R; Rocha, J; Serra, A T; Duarte, C M M; Fernandes, A; Freitas, M; Fernandes, E; Marques, M C; Bronze, M R; Sepodes, B

    2014-12-01

    Berries are an important dietary source of fibres, vitamins, minerals and some biologically active non-nutrients. A red raspberry fruit extract was characterized in terms of phenolic content and the anti-inflammatory properties and protective effects were evaluated in two experimental models of inflammation. The antioxidant potential of the extract, the cellular antioxidant activity and the effects over neutrophils' oxidative burst were also studied to provide a mechanistic insight for the anti-inflammatory effects observed. The extract was administered in a dose of 15 mg kg(-1), i.p. and significantly inhibited paw oedema formation in the rat. The same dose was administered via i.p. and p.o. routes in the collagen-induced arthritis model in the rat. The extract showed pharmacological activity and was able to significantly reduce the development of clinical signs of arthritis and markedly reduce the degree of bone resorption, soft tissue swelling and osteophyte formation, preventing articular destruction in treated animals.

  4. Designing Anti-inflammatory Drugs from Parasitic Worms: A Synthetic Small Molecule Analogue of the Acanthocheilonema viteae Product ES-62 Prevents Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In spite of increasing evidence that parasitic worms may protect humans from developing allergic and autoimmune diseases and the continuing identification of defined helminth-derived immunomodulatory molecules, to date no new anti-inflammatory drugs have been developed from these organisms. We have approached this matter in a novel manner by synthesizing a library of drug-like small molecules based upon phosphorylcholine, the active moiety of the anti-inflammatory Acanthocheilonema viteae product, ES-62, which as an immunogenic protein is unsuitable for use as a drug. Following preliminary in vitro screening for inhibitory effects on relevant macrophage cytokine responses, a sulfone-containing phosphorylcholine analogue (11a) was selected for testing in an in vivo model of inflammation, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Testing revealed that 11a was as effective as ES-62 in protecting DBA/1 mice from developing CIA and mirrored its mechanism of action in downregulating the TLR/IL-1R transducer, MyD88. 11a is thus a novel prototype for anti-inflammatory drug development. PMID:24228757

  5. MZ B cells migrate in a T-bet dependent manner and might contribute to the remission of collagen-induced arthritis by the secretion of IL-10.

    PubMed

    Huber, Krisztina; Sármay, Gabriella; Kövesdi, Dorottya

    2016-09-01

    In mice, marginal zone (MZ) B cells are found principally in the MZ of the spleen and characterized as CD23-negative cells, primarily express polyreactive BCRs, high levels of complement receptor-2 and TLRs. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a commonly used animal model of human rheumatoid arthritis, considered as a Th1-mediated disease. Although the importance of MZ B cells in the initiation of CIA is well established, their role in remission is unexplored. Besides, playing a central role in Th1 cell development, T-box transcription factor (T-bet) has important functions in B cells. T-bet is regulated by IFN-γ and through the BCR and TLR9, the signals that have an impact on regulatory IL-10 production. In this work, we aimed to analyze the contribution of T-bet to the function of IL-10-positive MZ B cells. We demonstrate that during the remission phase of CIA, MZ B cells express an elevated level of T-bet and confirm the existence of IL-10/T-bet coexpressing cells. Moreover, we show that T-bet-expressing MZ B cells migrate toward CXCR3 ligand and secrete IL-10 by inflammatory stimuli. Our data suggest that T-bet might contribute to the remission of CIA by facilitating the regulatory potential of IL-10-positive MZ B cells. PMID:27343199

  6. Xianfanghuomingyin, a Chinese Compound Medicine, Modulates the Proliferation and Differentiation of T Lymphocyte in a Collagen-Induced Arthritis Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Wei, Yi; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Jingwei; Dong, Bin; Zhu, Lingqun

    2016-01-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), xianfanghuomingyin (XFHM) is used to treat autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we studied the mechanisms underlying its treatment effects, especially its anti-inflammatory effects in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. We found that cartilage destruction and pannus formation were alleviated by treatment with XFHM. The abnormal differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells was downregulated significantly by XFHM, and Th2 and Treg cells were upregulated. Moreover, the expression levels of specific cytokines and transcription factors related to Th1 cells (interferon γ [IFNγ], T-bet) and Th17 cells (interleukin- [IL-] 17) and the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-gamma (RORγ) were downregulated. Serum IL-4 and GATA-3, which contribute to Th2 cells differentiation, increased significantly after XFHM administration. These results indicate that XFHM can restore the balance of T lymphocytes and reestablish the immunological tolerance to inhibit autoinflammatory disorder of RA. Taken together, XFHM can be used as a complementary or alternative traditional medicine to treat RA. PMID:27656238

  7. Inner ear decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J C; Thomas, W G; Youngblood, D G; Bennett, P B

    1976-09-01

    With recent increases in commercial, military, and sport diving to deeper depths, inner ear injuries during such exposures have been encountered more frequently and noted during several phases of diving: during compression, at stable deep depths, with excessive noise exposure in diving, and during decompression. The pathophysiology of these injuries differs, depending upon the phase of diving in which the injuries occur. In this report, 23 cases of hearing loss, tinnitus, and/or vertigo occurring during or shortly after decompression are presented. Thirteen of these cases occurred in helium-oxygen dives involving a change to air during the latter stages of decompression. A significant correlation is present between prompt recompression treatment, relief of symptoms, and lack of residual deficits. Current knowledge indicates that the management of otologic decompression sickness should include: 1. prompt recompression to at least 99 feet deeper than the symptom onset depth; 2. recompression using the previous helium-oxygen mixture when the injuries occur during or shortly after a switch from helium-oxygen to air during the latter stages of decompression; 3. the use of parenteral diazepam for symptom relief and cyclic inhalations of oxygen enriched treatment gases; and 4. the avoidance of further diving by divers who exhibit permanent inner ear injuries after the acute symptoms have subsided.

  8. Retrovirus-induced interference with collagen I gene expression in Mov13 fibroblasts is maintained in the absence of DNA methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H; Hartung, S; Breindl, M

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the role of DNA methylation in repression of the murine alpha 1 type I collagen (COL1A1) gene in Mov13 fibroblasts. In Mov13 mice, a retroviral provirus has inserted into the first intron of the COL1A1 gene and blocks its expression at the level of transcriptional initiation. We found that regulatory sequences in the COL1A1 promoter region that are involved in the tissue-specific regulation of the gene are unmethylated in collagen-expressing wild-type fibroblasts and methylated in Mov13 fibroblasts, confirming and extending earlier observations. To directly assess the role of DNA methylation in the repression of COL1A1 gene transcription, we treated Mov13 fibroblasts with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine. This treatment resulted in a demethylation of the COL1A1 regulatory sequences but failed to activate transcription of the COL1A1 gene. Moreover, the 5-azacytidine treatment induced a transcription-competent chromatin structure in the retroviral sequences but not in the COL1A1 promoter. In DNA transfection and microinjection experiments, we found that the provirus interfered with transcriptional activity of the COL1A1 promoter in Mov13 fibroblasts but not in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In contrast, the wild-type COL1A1 promoter was transcriptionally active in Mov13 fibroblasts. These experiments showed that the COL1A1 promoter is potentially transcriptionally active in the presence of proviral sequences and that Mov13 fibroblasts contain the trans-acting factors required for efficient COL1A1 gene expression. Our results indicate that the provirus insertion in Mov13 can inactivate COL1A1 gene expression at several levels. It prevents the developmentally regulated establishment of a transcription-competent methylation pattern and chromatin structure of the COL1A1 domain and, in the absence of DNA methylation, appears to suppress the COL1A1 promoter in a cell-specific manner, presumably by assuming a dominant chromatin structure that may be

  9. The therapeutic effect of extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dong Hoon; Kim, Myoung Ok; Kim, Sung Hyun; Shin, Mi Jung; Kim, Bong Soo; Kim, Hei Jung; Lee, Sang Ryeul; Lee, Sang Gyu; Yoo, Seung-Ah; Kim, Wan Uk; Hyun, Byung Hwa; Park, Young Sik; Kim, Tae Yoon; Ryoo, Zae Young

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within an inflamed joint has been suggested as playing a significant pathogenic role. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is a major scavenger enzyme of ROS, which has received growing attention for its therapeutic potential. To investigate the therapeutic effect of EC-SOD in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), we used mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) of transgenic mice that overexpresses EC-SOD on the skin by using hK14 promoter. DBA/1 mice that had been treated with bovine type II collagen were administrated subcutaneous injections of EC-SOD transgenic MEF (each at 1.4 x 10(60 cells) on days 28, 35, and 42 after primary immunization. To test EC-SOD activity, blood samples were collected in each group on day 49. The EC-SOD activity was nearly 1.5-fold higher in the transgenic MEF-treated group than in the nontransgenic MEF-treated group (p < 0.05). The severity of arthritis in mice was scored in a double-blind manner, with each paw being assigned a separate clinical score. The severity of arthritis in EC-SOD transgenic MEF-treated mice was significantly suppressed in the arthritic clinical score (p < 0.05). To investigate the alteration of cytokine levels, ELISA was used to measure blood samples. Levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha were reduced in the transgenic MEF-treated group (p < 0.05). Abnormalities of the joints were examined by H&E staining. There were no signs of inflammation except for mild hyperplasia of the synovium in the transgenic MEF-treated group. The proliferation of CII-specific T cells was lower in the transgenic MEF-treated mice than in those in the other groups. The transfer of EC-SOD transgenic MEF has shown a therapeutic effect in CIA mice and this approach may be a safer and more effective form of therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis through modulating oxidative stress and suppressing nuclear factor-kappa B pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yinhang; Li, Siming; Liu, Yaonan; Tian, Guiyou; Yuan, Qingyan; Bai, Fuliang; Wang, Wenfei; Zhang, Zhiyi; Ren, Guiping; Zhang, Yu; Li, Deshan

    2015-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that circulating FGF21 levels are elevated in the serum and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study is to investigate efficacy of FGF21 for treatment of RA and the molecular mechanisms of the therapeutic effect on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Mice with CIA were subcutaneously administered with FGF21 (5, 2 or 1mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), IL-1β antibody (5mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), IL-17A antibody (5mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) and dexamethasone (DEX) (1mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)), respectively. The effects of treatment were determined by arthritis severity score, histological damage and cytokine production. The activation of NF-κB was analyzed by Western blotting. We also detected the levels of oxidative stress parameters. Our results showed that FGF21 had beneficial effects on clinical symptom and histological lesion of CIA mice. Similar to antibody and DEX, FGF21 treatment alleviated the severity of arthritis by reducing humoral and cellular immune responses and down-regulating the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. FGF21 treatment also reduced the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ and MMP-3 and increased level of IL-10 in the spleen tissue or the plasma of CIA mice in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, FGF21 inhibited IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and induced significant changes of oxidative stress parameters (MDA, SOD, CAT, GSH-PX and GSH) in the plasma. FGF21 exerts therapeutic efficacy for RA through antioxidant reaction and inhibiting NF-κB inflammatory pathway. This study provides evidence that FGF21 may be a promising therapeutic agent for RA patients. PMID:25601498

  11. Methyl salicylate lactoside inhibits inflammatory response of fibroblast-like synoviocytes and joint destruction in collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Wenyu; Huang, Chao; Zhang, Xue; Xin, Sheng; Zhou, Yiming; Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dan; Li, Yongjie; Zhou, Sibai; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai; Du, Guanhua

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Methyl salicylate 2-O-β-d-lactoside (MSL), whose chemical structure is similar to that of salicylic acid, is a natural product derivative isolated from a traditional Chinese herb. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of MSL in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and explore its underlying mechanism. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The anti-arthritic effects of MSL were evaluated on human rheumatoid fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in vitro and CIA in mice in vivo by obtaining clinical scores, measuring hind paw thickness and inflammatory cytokine levels, radiographic evaluations and histopathological assessments. KEY RESULTS Treatment with MSL after the onset of arthritis significantly prevented the progression and development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in CIA mice without megascopic gastric mucosa damage. In addition, MSL inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, the phosphorylation and translocation of NF-κB, and cell proliferation induced by TNF-α in FLS. MSL non-selectively inhibited the activity of COX in vitro, but was a more potent inhibitor of COX-2 than COX-1. MSL also inhibited the phosphorylation of inhibitor of NF-κB kinase, IκBα and p65, thus blocking the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in TNF-α-stimulated FLS. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS MSL exerts therapeutic effects on CIA mice, suppressing the inflammatory response and joint destruction by non-selectively inhibiting the activity of COX and suppressing activation of the NF-κB signalling pathway, but without damaging the gastric mucosa. Therefore, MSL has great potential to be developed into a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA. PMID:24712652

  12. Norisoboldine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis through regulating the balance between Th17 and regulatory T cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wang, Ting; Yu, Juntao; Wu, Xin; Lu, Qian; Chou, Guixin; Wang, Zhengtao; Kong, Lingyi; Dai, Yue; Xia, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Norisoboldine (NOR), the main active ingredient of the dry root of Lindera aggregata, was previously proven to have substantial therapeutic effects on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice by oral administration. However, it exhibited a very poor bioavailability in normal rats. The pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamics disconnection attracts us to explore its anti-arthritic mechanism in more detail. In this study, NOR, administered orally, markedly attenuated the pathological changes in CIA rats, which was accompanied by the down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that the plasma concentration of NOR was moderately elevated in CIA rats compared with normal rats, but it was still far lower than the minimal effective concentration required for inhibiting the proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes in vitro. Interestingly, NOR was shown to regulate the balance between Th17 and regulatory T (Treg) cells in the intestinal lymph nodes more strikingly than in other tissues. It could increase the expression of Foxp3 mRNA in both gut and joints, and markedly up-regulate the number of integrin α4β7 (a marker of gut source)-positive Foxp3{sup +} cells in the joints of CIA rats. These results suggest that the gut might be the primary action site of NOR, and NOR exerts anti-arthritis effect through regulating the balance between Th17 and Treg cells in intestinal lymph nodes and yielding a trafficking of lymphocytes (especially Treg cells) from the gut to joint. The findings of the present study also provide a plausible explanation for the anti-arthritic effects of poorly absorbed compounds like NOR. - Highlights: • Norisoboldine, administered orally, markedly attenuates the clinical signs of CIA. • Norisoboldine regulates the balance of Th17/Treg cells in the intestinal lymph node. • Norisoboldine induces the migration of Treg cells from the gut to joint.

  13. Treatment and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia with PTH-CBD, a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog, in a non-depilated mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is a psychologically devastating complication of chemotherapy for which there is currently no effective therapy. PTH-CBD is a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog that has shown promise as a therapy for alopecia disorders. To compare the efficacy of prophylactic versus therapeutic administration of PTH-CBD in chemotherapy-induced alopecia using a mouse model that mimics the cyclic chemotherapy dosing used clinically. C57BL/6J mice were treated with a single subcutaneous injection of PTH-CBD (320 mcg/kg) or vehicle control before or after hair loss developing from three courses of cyclophosphamide chemotherapy (50–150 mg/kg/week). Mice receiving chemotherapy alone developed hair loss and depigmentation over 6–12 months. Mice pretreated with PTH-CBD did not develop these changes and maintained a normal-appearing coat. Mice treated with PTH-CBD after development of hair loss showed a partial recovery. Observations of hair loss were confirmed quantitatively by gray scale analysis. Histological examination showed that in mice receiving chemotherapy alone, there were small, dystrophic hair follicles mostly in the catagen phase. Mice receiving PTH-CBD before chemotherapy showed a mix of normal-appearing telogen and anagen hair follicles with no evidence of dystrophy. Mice receiving PTH-CBD therapy after chemotherapy showed intermediate histological features. PTH-CBD was effective in both the prevention and the treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice, but pretreatment appears to result in a better cosmetic outcome. PTH-CBD shows promise as an agent in the prevention of this complication of chemotherapy and improving the quality of life for cancer patients. PMID:24025564

  14. Wax blockage in the ear (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ear canal is lined with hair follicles and glands that produce a waxy oil called cerumen. Sometimes the ... wax than can be easily excreted out the ear. This extra wax may harden within the ear ...

  15. Otoscopic exam of the ear (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... intrument which is used to look into the ear canal. The ear speculum (a cone-shaped viewing piece of the otoscope) is slowly inserted into the ear canal while looking into the otoscope. The speculum ...

  16. Middle ear infection (otitis media) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inflammation and/or infection of the middle ear. Acute otitis media (acute ear infection) occurs ... or viral infection of the fluid of the middle ear, which causes production of fluid or pus. ...

  17. Enigmatic insight into collagen.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  18. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen.

  19. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  20. Successful Bilateral Composite Ear Reattachment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary: A successful bilateral ear composite graft nonmicrosurgical reattachment is presented. In cases where suitable vessels are unavailable for microsurgical revascularization, the reconstructive challenge can be formidable for salvaging the unique anatomic and aesthetic structure of the ear. The case is presented of an 18-year-old woman who was a victim of an assault wherein both of her ears were intentionally amputated by her attacker. She underwent successful surgical reattachment followed by a postoperative regimen of hyperbaric oxygen, cooling, and meticulous wound care. The patient achieved 100% survival of her left ear graft and 95% survival of her right ear graft. Clinical photographs at 18 months are presented, along with a discussion of the possible implications for other reconstructive applications. PMID:25289367

  1. Ear Reconstruction in Young Children.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, John

    2015-12-01

    The use of a porous high-density polyethylene ear implant, rather than a costal cartilage framework, allows ear reconstruction in young children before they enter school. The fact that the growth of the normal ear matures early allows for good symmetry. If the implant is covered completely with a large, well-vascularized superficial parietal fascia flap and appropriately color-matched skin, an ear with excellent projection and definition can be obtained with minimal complications and long-term viability. Ear reconstruction in young children is preferred by the author because the necessary fascial flap coverage is thinner, easier to harvest than in older patients, and can be done in a single outpatient procedure with minimal discomfort or psychological trauma. PMID:26667634

  2. Two Ears Are Not Always Better than One: Mandatory Vowel Fusion Across Spectrally Mismatched Ears in Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Lina A J; Eggleston, Jessica L; Walker, Emily P; Oh, Yonghee

    2016-08-01

    Hearing loss and auditory prostheses can alter auditory processing by inducing large pitch mismatches and broad pitch fusion between the two ears. Similar to integration of incongruent inputs in other sensory modalities, the mismatched, fused pitches are often averaged across ears for simple stimuli. Here, we measured parallel effects on complex stimulus integration using a new technique based on vowel classification in five bilateral hearing aid users and eight bimodal cochlear implant users. Continua between five pairs of synthetic vowels were created by varying the first formant spectral peak while keeping the second formant constant. Comparison of binaural and monaural vowel classification functions for each vowel pair continuum enabled visualization of the following frequency-dependent integration trends: (1) similar monaural and binaural functions, (2) ear dominance, (3) binaural averaging, and (4) binaural interference. Hearing aid users showed all trends, while bimodal cochlear implant users showed mostly ear dominance or interference. Interaural pitch mismatches, frequency ranges of binaural pitch fusion, and the relative weightings of pitch averaging across ears were also measured using tone and/or electrode stimulation. The presence of both large interaural pitch mismatches and broad pitch fusion was not sufficient to predict vowel integration trends such as binaural averaging or interference. The way that pitch averaging was weighted between ears also appears to be important for determining binaural vowel integration trends. Abnormally broad spectral fusion and the associated phoneme fusion across mismatched ears may underlie binaural speech perception interference observed in hearing aid and cochlear implant users. PMID:27220769

  3. The adaptor molecule signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) is essential in mechanisms involving the Fyn tyrosine kinase for induction and progression of collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ming-Chao; Veillette, André

    2013-11-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) is an Src homology 2 domain-only adaptor involved in multiple immune cell functions. It has also been linked to immunodeficiencies and autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we examined the role and mechanism of action of SAP in autoimmunity using a mouse model of autoimmune arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). We found that SAP was essential for development of CIA in response to collagen immunization. It was also required for production of collagen-specific antibodies, which play a key role in disease pathogenesis. These effects required SAP expression in T cells, not in B cells. In mice immunized with a high dose of collagen, the activity of SAP was nearly independent of its ability to bind the protein tyrosine kinase Fyn and correlated with the capacity of SAP to promote full differentiation of follicular T helper (TFH) cells. However, with a lower dose of collagen, the role of SAP was more dependent on Fyn binding, suggesting that additional mechanisms other than TFH cell differentiation were involved. Further studies suggested that this might be due to a role of the SAP-Fyn interaction in natural killer T cell development through the ability of SAP-Fyn to promote Vav-1 activation. We also found that removal of SAP expression during progression of CIA attenuated disease severity. However, it had no effect on disease when CIA was clinically established. Together, these results indicate that SAP plays an essential role in CIA because of Fyn-independent and Fyn-dependent effects on TFH cells and, possibly, other T cell types.

  4. Surgical correction of constricted ear combined with Stahl's ear.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ye; Lin, Lin; Yang, Qinhua; Pan, Bo; Zhao, Yanyong; He, Leren; Jiang, Haiyue

    2015-07-01

    Constricted ear combined with Stahl's ear is a rare ear deformity, which is a kind of complex congenital auricular deformity. From 1 January 2007 to 1 January 2014, 19 patients with constricted ear combined with Stahl's ear (Spock ear) were enrolled in this study, most of which were unilaterally deformed. To correct the deformity, a double Z-shaped skin incision was made on the posterior side of the auricle, with the entire layer of cartilage cut parallel to the helix traversing the third crus to form a fan-shaped cartilage flap. The superior crura of the antihelix were shaped by the folding cartilage rim. The cartilage of the abnormal third crus was made part of the new superior crura of antihelix, and the third crus was eliminated. The postoperative aesthetic assessment of the reshaped auricle was graded by both doctors and patients (or their parents). Out of the 19 patients, the number of satisfying cases of the symmetry, helix stretch, elimination of the third crus, the cranioauricular angle, and the substructure of the reshaped ears was 14 (nine excellent and five good), 16 (six excellent and 10 good), 17 (eight excellent and nine good), 15 (five excellent and 10 good), and 13 (two excellent and 11 good), respectively. With a maximum of a 90-month follow-up, no complication was observed. The results of the study suggested that this rare deformity could be corrected by appropriate surgical treatment, with a satisfied postoperative appearance.

  5. Effects of ear-canal pressurization on middle-ear bone- and air-conduction responses

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Kenji; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Kim, Namkeun; Du, Yu; Puria, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    In extremely loud noise environments, it is important to not only protect one’s hearing against noise transmitted through the air-conduction (AC) pathway, but also through the bone-conduction (BC) pathways. Much of the energy transmitted through the BC pathways is concentrated in the mid-frequency range around 1.5–2 kHz, which is likely due to the structural resonance of the middle ear. One potential approach for mitigating this mid-frequency BC noise transmission is to introduce a positive or negative static pressure in the ear canal, which is known to reduce BC as well as AC hearing sensitivity. In the present study, middle-ear ossicular velocities at the umbo and stapes were measured using human cadaver temporal bones in response to both BC and AC excitations, while static air pressures of ±400 mm H2O were applied in the ear canal. For the maximum negative pressure of −400 mm H2O, mean BC stapes-velocity reductions of about 5–8 dB were observed in the frequency range from 0.8 to 2.5 kHz, with a peak reduction of 8.6(± 4.7) dB at 1.6 kHz. Finite-element analysis indicates that the peak BC-response reduction tends to be in the mid-frequency range because the middle-ear BC resonance, which is typically around 1.5–2 kHz, is suppressed by the pressure-induced stiffening of the middle-ear structure. The measured data also show that the BC responses are reduced more for negative static pressures than for positive static pressures. This may be attributable to a difference in the distribution of the stiffening among the middle-ear components depending on the polarity of the static pressure. The characteristics of the BC-response reductions are found to be largely consistent with the available psychoacoustic data, and are therefore indicative of the relative importance of the middle-ear mechanism in BC hearing. PMID:19944139

  6. Collagenous gastritis: Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease characterized by the subepithelial deposition of collagen bands thicker than 10 μm and the infiltration of inflammatory mononuclear cells in the lamina propria. Collagenous colitis and collagenous sprue have similar histological characteristics to collagenous gastritis and are thought to be part of the same disease entity. However, while collagenous colitis has become more common in the field of gastroenterology, presenting with clinical symptoms of chronic diarrhea in older patients, collagenous gastritis is rare. Since the disease was first reported in 1989, only 60 cases have been documented in the English literature. No safe and effective treatments have been identified from randomized, controlled trials. Therefore, better understanding of the disease and the reporting of more cases will help to establish diagnostic criteria and to develop therapeutic strategies. Therefore, here we review the clinical characteristics, endoscopic and histological findings, treatment, and clinical outcomes from case reports and case series published to date, and provide a summary of the latest information on the disease. This information will contribute to improved knowledge of collagenous gastritis so physicians can recognize and correctly diagnose the disease, and will help to develop a standard therapeutic strategy for future clinical trials. PMID:25789098

  7. Collagenous gastritis: Review.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Kenya; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sato, Yuichi; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Terai, Shuji

    2015-03-16

    Collagenous gastritis is a rare disease characterized by the subepithelial deposition of collagen bands thicker than 10 μm and the infiltration of inflammatory mononuclear cells in the lamina propria. Collagenous colitis and collagenous sprue have similar histological characteristics to collagenous gastritis and are thought to be part of the same disease entity. However, while collagenous colitis has become more common in the field of gastroenterology, presenting with clinical symptoms of chronic diarrhea in older patients, collagenous gastritis is rare. Since the disease was first reported in 1989, only 60 cases have been documented in the English literature. No safe and effective treatments have been identified from randomized, controlled trials. Therefore, better understanding of the disease and the reporting of more cases will help to establish diagnostic criteria and to develop therapeutic strategies. Therefore, here we review the clinical characteristics, endoscopic and histological findings, treatment, and clinical outcomes from case reports and case series published to date, and provide a summary of the latest information on the disease. This information will contribute to improved knowledge of collagenous gastritis so physicians can recognize and correctly diagnose the disease, and will help to develop a standard therapeutic strategy for future clinical trials. PMID:25789098

  8. Radiation-induced changes in collagen isotypes I, III, and IV in the lung of LAF1 mouse: effects of time, dose, and WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.G.; Kenning, J.M.; Dawson, D.T.

    1988-09-01

    Alterations in the amount and distribution of pulmonary connective tissue are commonly observed subsequent to thoracic radiotherapy. The extent to which these changes are important in the expression of radiation damage and its repair remains unclear. We have quantitated changes in the parenchymal levels of collagen types I, III, and IV in the lungs of LAF1 mice at intervals to 1 year, following doses of 0-14 Gy, 300 kV X rays, or 0-18 Gy in the presence of the radioprotective compound, WR-2721. The method of quantitation, which involves video image analysis of fluorescent antibody stained, cryostat tissue sections, provides both quantitative and morphological information for the three collagen isotypes. Type I collagen peaked in tissue content at 15 and 30 weeks postirradiation (p.i.), with transient return to control values 20-25 weeks p.i. Type III collagen peaked at 15 and 25 weeks p.i. and declined in tissue content at 20 and 30 weeks. Type IV peaked 15-20 weeks following irradiation, returned to control levels at 25 weeks, and reached a plateau above control values after 30 weeks. Fluctuations in collagen levels in the parenchyma were dose dependent but were not simultaneous, indicating a radiation response characterized by alpha-chain-specific regulation of collagen biosynthesis and breakdown. In general, WR-2721, which enhanced postirradiation survival (DMF, 1.3), reduced the magnitude and altered the timing of collagen fluctuations; again, the effects were type specific. The results clearly demonstrate that the postirradiation response of the connective tissue is dose dependent, is specific to each macromolecule, and involves both deposition and removal of extracellular matrix. These processes are independently influenced by the presence during irradiation of WR-2721.

  9. Allogeneic Murine Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Migration to Inflamed Joints In Vivo and Amelioration of Collagen Induced Arthritis When Transduced to Express CTLA4Ig

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Frank; Ritter, Thomas; O'Flatharta, Cathal; Howard, Linda; Shaw, Georgina; Anegon, Ignacio; Murphy, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Despite the immunosuppressive, homing, and regenerative capabilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), their ability to migrate to arthritic joints and influence the course of arthritis in vivo remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine if allogeneic MSCs migrate to inflamed joints in vivo and to determine if MSCs expressing the costimulation blocker cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4 coupled to immunoglobulin-G (CTLA4Ig) could be used to ameliorate collagen induced arthritis (CIA). The migration of systemically delivered inbred mouse strain (FVB) MSCs to migrate to inflamed joints in CIA was studied using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, the effect of BALB/c MSCs modified with an adenoviral vector to express CTLA4Ig, on T cell function in vitro and on CIA in vivo was assessed. After systemic delivery of FVB MSCs, eGFP DNA was detectable in the joints of mice with CIA confirming that some MSCs had reached to inflamed joints. BALB/c MSCs suppressed the secretion of both TNFα and IFNγ, and reduced the ratio of Th1:Th2 cytokine expression, by DBA/1 T cells in vitro irrespective of viral modification. The expression of CTLA4Ig did not augment this effect. Despite a worsening of disease scores after infusion of BALB/c MSCs in vivo, BALB/c MSCs expressing CTLA4Ig significantly delayed the onset of inflammatory arthritis in CIA. These data demonstrate that allogeneic MSCs can migrate to the inflamed joints of CIA in vivo and that genetically modified allogeneic MSCs may be considered for development of gene therapy strategies for inflammatory arthritis PMID:23895495

  10. Korean Red Ginseng Saponin Fraction Rich in Ginsenoside-Rb1, Rc and Rb2 Attenuates the Severity of Mouse Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Endale, Mehari; Im, Eun Ju; Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Sung Dae; Song, Yong-Bum; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Chaekyun; Kim, Seung-Hyung; Roh, Seong-Soo; Rhee, Man Hee

    2014-01-01

    Despite a multitude of reports on anti-inflammatory properties of ginseng extracts or individual ginsenosides, data on antiarthritic effect of ginseng saponin preparation with mixed ginsenosides is limited. On the other hand, a combined therapy of safe and inexpensive plant-derived natural products such as ginsenosides can be considered as an alternative to treat arthritis. Our previous in vitro data displayed a strong anti-inflammatory action of red ginseng saponin fraction-A (RGSF-A). We, herein, report a marked antiarthritic property of RGSF-A rich in ginsenoside Rb1, Rc, and Rb2. Collagen-induced arthritic (CIA) mice were treated with RGSF-A or methotrexate (MTX) for 5 weeks. Joint pathology, serum antibody production and leukocye activation, cytokine production in the circulation, lymph nodes, and joints were examined. RGSF-A markedly reduced severity of arthritis, cellular infiltration, and cartilage damage. It suppressed CD3+/CD69+, CD4+/CD25+, CD8+ T-cell, CD19+, B220/CD23+ B-cell, MHCII+/CD11c+, and Gr-1+/CD11b+ cell activations. It further suppressed anti-CII- or anti-RF-IgG/IgM, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-17, and IL-6 secretions but stimulated IL-10 levels in the serum, joint, or splenocyte. RGSF-A attenuated arthritis severity, modified leukocyte activations, and restored cytokine imbalances, suggesting that it can be considered as an antiarthritic agent with the capacity to ameliorate the immune and inflammatory responses in CIA mice. PMID:24833816

  11. Alport alloantibodies but not Goodpasture autoantibodies induce murine glomerulonephritis: Protection by quinary crosslinks locking cryptic α3(IV) collagen autoepitopes in vivo 1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wentian; Wang, Xu-Ping; Kashtan, Clifford E.; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    The noncollagenous (NC1) domains of α3α4α5(IV) collagen in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) are targets of Goodpasture autoantibodies or Alport post-transplant nephritis alloantibodies mediating rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Because the autoepitopes but not the alloepitopes become cryptic upon assembly of α3α4α5NC1 hexamers, we investigated how the accessibility of B cell epitopes in vivo influences the development of glomerulonephritis in mice passively immunized with human anti-GBM antibodies. Alport alloantibodies, which bound to native murine α3α4α5NC1 hexamers in vitro, deposited linearly along the mouse GBM in vivo, eliciting crescentic glomerulonephritis in Fcgr2b−/− mice susceptible to antibody-mediated inflammation. Goodpasture autoantibodies, which bound to murine α3NC1 monomer and dimer subunits but not to native α3α4α5NC1 hexamers in vitro, neither bound to the mouse GBM in vivo nor induced experimental glomerulonephritis. This was due to quinary NC1 cross-links, recently identified as sulfilimine bonds, which comprehensively locked the cryptic Goodpasture autoepitopes in the mouse GBM. In contrast, non-crosslinked α3NC1 subunits were identified as a native target of Goodpasture autoantibodies in the GBM of squirrel monkeys—a species susceptible to Goodpasture autoantibody-mediated nephritis. Thus, crypticity of B cell autoepitopes in tissues uncouples potentially pathogenic autoantibodies from autoimmune disease. Crosslinking of α3α4α5NC1 hexamers represents a novel mechanism averting autoantibody binding and subsequent tissue injury by post-translational modifications of an autoantigen. PMID:20709951

  12. Rapid-onset clinical and mechanistic effects of anti-C5aR treatment in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, C; Wenander, C S; Usher, P A; Hebsgaard, J B; Sondergaard, B-C; Rønø, B; Mackay, C; Friedrichsen, B; Chang, C; Tang, R; Hornum, L

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical evidence supports targeting the C5a receptor (C5aR) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To support ongoing clinical development of an anti-C5aR monoclonal antibody, we have investigated for the first time the mechanism of action and the pharmacodynamics of a blocking anti-murine C5aR (anti-mC5aR) surrogate antibody in mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). First, efficacy was demonstrated in a multiple-dose treatment study. Almost complete inhibition of clinical disease progression was obtained, including reduced bone and cartilage destruction in anti-mC5aR-treated mice. Then, the mechanism of action was examined by looking for early effects of anti-mC5aR treatment in single-dose treatment studies. We found that 48 h after single-dose treatment with anti-mC5aR, the neutrophil and macrophage infiltration into the paws was already reduced. In addition, several inflammatory markers, including tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-17A were reduced locally in the paws, indicating reduction of local inflammation. Furthermore, dose-setting experiments supported a beneficial clinical effect of dosing above the C5aR saturation level. In conclusion, these preclinical data demonstrated rapid onset effects of antibody blockade of C5aR. The data have translational value in supporting the Novo Nordisk clinical trials of an anti-C5aR antibody in rheumatoid arthritis patients, by identifying potential biomarkers of treatment effects as well as by providing information on pharmacodynamics and novel insights into the mechanism of action of monoclonal antibody blockade of C5aR. PMID:24665841

  13. Rapid-onset clinical and mechanistic effects of anti-C5aR treatment in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Andersson, C; Wenander, C S; Usher, P A; Hebsgaard, J B; Sondergaard, B-C; Rønø, B; Mackay, C; Friedrichsen, B; Chang, C; Tang, R; Hornum, L

    2014-07-01

    Preclinical evidence supports targeting the C5a receptor (C5aR) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To support ongoing clinical development of an anti-C5aR monoclonal antibody, we have investigated for the first time the mechanism of action and the pharmacodynamics of a blocking anti-murine C5aR (anti-mC5aR) surrogate antibody in mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). First, efficacy was demonstrated in a multiple-dose treatment study. Almost complete inhibition of clinical disease progression was obtained, including reduced bone and cartilage destruction in anti-mC5aR-treated mice. Then, the mechanism of action was examined by looking for early effects of anti-mC5aR treatment in single-dose treatment studies. We found that 48 h after single-dose treatment with anti-mC5aR, the neutrophil and macrophage infiltration into the paws was already reduced. In addition, several inflammatory markers, including tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-17A were reduced locally in the paws, indicating reduction of local inflammation. Furthermore, dose-setting experiments supported a beneficial clinical effect of dosing above the C5aR saturation level. In conclusion, these preclinical data demonstrated rapid onset effects of antibody blockade of C5aR. The data have translational value in supporting the Novo Nordisk clinical trials of an anti-C5aR antibody in rheumatoid arthritis patients, by identifying potential biomarkers of treatment effects as well as by providing information on pharmacodynamics and novel insights into the mechanism of action of monoclonal antibody blockade of C5aR.

  14. Inhibitory effects of deer antler aqua-acupuncture, the pilose antler of Cervus Korean TEMMINCK var mantchuricus Swinhoe, on type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Kye; Kim, Kyung-Sook; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Kap-Sung; Lee, Young-Choon; Chang, Young-Chae; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2003-07-01

    Water extract of deer antler aqua-acupunture (DAA) prepared from the growing antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, was used to investigate the efficacy of a traditional immunosuppressive and immuno-activating Korean aqua-acupuncture, on the development of type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. The onset of arthritis was observed at the 24th day after the CII-immunization in rats, and the severity of CIA was gradually developed. As compared with rats treated with saline, DAA i.p. injected at doses of more than 50 microg/kg once a day for 14 days inhibited the ability of inguinal lymph node cells to produce T cell cytokines interleukin 2 and interferon-gamma when the cells were obtained from rats 24 days after immunization and cultured in vitro with CII. Treatment with DAA also inhibited the production of macrophage cytokines interleukin-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha in response to in vitro stimulation of lymph node and macrophage cells with CII. In addition, in order to evaluate the influence of DAA on the incidence and development of arthritis in rat CIA, rats were immunized twice at a 3-week interval with bovine CII, with DAA being given i.p. once a day for 14 days with four different regimens. A 14-day course of DAA treatment at a daily dose of 100 microg/kg, which began on the day of the first CII immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis, as well as antibody formation and delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII. Treatment with DAA, which started on the same day as the booster immunization, also resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and of immune responses to CII. However, treatment with DAA, which was prophylactically started prior to a primary immunization, did not inhibit the development of arthritis and immune response to CII. Furthermore, DAA extract did not affect the established diseases.

  15. Treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus with autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis: clinical and magnetic resonance evaluation at one-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    USUELLI, FEDERICO GIUSEPPE; GRASSI, MIRIAM; MANZI, LUIGI; GUARRELLA, VINCENZO; BOGA, MICHELE; DE GIROLAMO, LAURA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study is to report the clinical and imaging results recorded by a series of patients in whom osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) were repaired using the autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis (ACIC) technique with a completely arthroscopic approach. Methods nine patients (mean age 37.4±10 years) affected by OLTs (lesion size 2.1±0.9 cm2) were treated with the ACIC technique. The patients were evaluated clinically both preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale (AOFAS) and a visual analog scale (VAS). For morphological evaluation, the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score was used. Results the AOFAS score improved from 51.4±11.6 preoperatively to 71.8±20.6 postoperatively, while the VAS value decreased from 6.9±1.8 to 3.2±1.9. The mean MOCART score was 51.7±16.6 at 12 months of follow-up; these scores did not directly correlate with the clinical results. Conclusion use of the ACIC technique for arthroscopic repair of OLTs allowed satisfactory clinical results to be obtained in most of the patients as soon as one year after surgery, with no major complications or delayed revision surgery. ACIC is a valid and low-invasive surgical technique for the treatment of chondral and osteochondral defects of the talus. Level of evidence therapeutic case series, level IV.

  16. The role of high-mobility group box protein 1 in collagen antibody-induced arthritis is dependent on vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Biscetti, F; Flex, A; Pecorini, G; Angelini, F; Arena, V; Stigliano, E; Gremese, E; Tolusso, B; Ferraccioli, G

    2016-04-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been implicated in angiogenesis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to define more clearly the role of HMGB1 in the synovial angiogenesis and pathogenesis of an immune model of arthritis. BALB/c mice were injected with monoclonal anti-collagen antibody cocktail followed by lipopolysaccharide to induce arthritis. HMGB1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were over-expressed in the areas of the synovium where more inflammation and neoangiogenesis were present. The selective blockade of HMGB1 or VEGF resulted alternatively in a lower severity of arthritis evaluated by the arthritis index. Furthermore, exogenous HMGB1 administration caused a worsening of arthritis, associated with VEGF up-regulation and increased synovial angiogenesis. The selective inhibition of VEGF also resulted in no induction of arthritis in mice receiving exogenous HMGB1. Cytokine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analyses performed on peripheral blood and synovial fluid demonstrated a significant reduction of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α in mice where HMGB1 and VEGF pathways were blocked. Interestingly, the selective blockade of HMGB1 and VEGF resulted in an increase of the peripheral IL-17A concentration. The development of arthritis mediated by HMGB1 and the synovial angiogenesis can be blocked by inhibiting the VEGF activity. The proinflammatory and proangiogenic cytokine IL-17A was increased when HMGB1 is inhibited, but the synovial angiogenesis was nevertheless reduced in this model of arthritis. Taken together, these findings shed new light on the role of this nuclear protein in the pathogenesis of arthritis in an RA-like model. PMID:26671547

  17. Two Novel α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Ligands: In Vitro Properties and Their Efficacy in Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van Maanen, Marjolein A.; Papke, Roger L.; Koopman, Frieda A.; Koepke, Jessica; Bevaart, Lisette; Clark, Roger; Lamppu, Diana; Elbaum, Daniel; LaRosa, Gregory J.; Tak, Paul P.; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can downregulate inflammation via the release of acetylcholine (ACh) by the vagus nerve. This neurotransmitter binds to the α7 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChR), expressed on macrophages and other immune cells. We tested the pharmacological and functional profile of two novel compounds, PMP-311 and PMP-072 and investigated their role in modulating collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. Methods Both compounds were characterized with binding, electrophysiological, and pharmacokinetic studies. For in vivo efficacy studies in the CIA model the compounds were administered daily by oral gavage from day 20 till sacrifice at day 34. Disease progression was monitored by visual clinical scoring and measurement of paw swelling. Inflammation and joint destruction were examined by histology and radiology. Results Treatment with PMP-311 was effective in preventing disease onset, reducing clinical signs of arthritis, and reducing synovial inflammation and bone destruction. PMP-072 also showed a trend in arthritis reduction at all concentrations tested. The data showed that while both compounds bind to α7nAChR with high affinity, PMP-311 acts like a classical agonist of ion channel activity, and PMP-072 can actually act as an ion channel antagonist. Moreover, PMP-072 was clearly distinct from typical competitive antagonists, since it was able to act as a silent agonist. It synergizes with the allosteric modulator PNU-120596, and subsequently activates desensitized α7nAChR. However, PMP-072 was less efficacious than PMP-311 at both channel activation and desensitization, suggesting that both conducting and non-conducting states maybe of importance in driving an anti-inflammatory response. Finally, we found that the anti-arthritic effect can be observed despite limited penetration of the central nervous system. Conclusions These data provide direct evidence that the α7nAChR in immune cells does not

  18. Treatment of osteochondral lesions of the talus with autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis: clinical and magnetic resonance evaluation at one-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    USUELLI, FEDERICO GIUSEPPE; GRASSI, MIRIAM; MANZI, LUIGI; GUARRELLA, VINCENZO; BOGA, MICHELE; DE GIROLAMO, LAURA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study is to report the clinical and imaging results recorded by a series of patients in whom osteochondral lesions of the talus (OLTs) were repaired using the autologous collagen-induced chondrogenesis (ACIC) technique with a completely arthroscopic approach. Methods nine patients (mean age 37.4±10 years) affected by OLTs (lesion size 2.1±0.9 cm2) were treated with the ACIC technique. The patients were evaluated clinically both preoperatively and at 12 months after surgery using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale (AOFAS) and a visual analog scale (VAS). For morphological evaluation, the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score was used. Results the AOFAS score improved from 51.4±11.6 preoperatively to 71.8±20.6 postoperatively, while the VAS value decreased from 6.9±1.8 to 3.2±1.9. The mean MOCART score was 51.7±16.6 at 12 months of follow-up; these scores did not directly correlate with the clinical results. Conclusion use of the ACIC technique for arthroscopic repair of OLTs allowed satisfactory clinical results to be obtained in most of the patients as soon as one year after surgery, with no major complications or delayed revision surgery. ACIC is a valid and low-invasive surgical technique for the treatment of chondral and osteochondral defects of the talus. Level of evidence therapeutic case series, level IV. PMID:27602347

  19. Collagen: Biochemistry, biomechanics, biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Nimni, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date reference for new ideas, information, and concepts in collagen research. The first volume emphasizes the relationship between the molecular structure and function of collagen, including descriptions of collagen types which exist in tissues as well as how these molecules organize into fibrils and the nature of the chemical crosslinks which stabilize them. In Volume II the biomechanical behavior of various specialized tissues, abnormal accumulation of collagen in the form of scars of fibrous infiltration are examined/and wound healing, tissue regulation and repair are covered in detail. Volume III explores the increasing application of collagen technology to the field of bioprosthesis, including the production of heart valve bioprosthesis, blood vessels, ligament substitutes, and bone substitutes.

  20. Backbone dynamics in collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Abil E.

    2004-11-01

    Peptide backbone motions of collagen have been extensively studied in the past. The experimental results were interpreted using a model of a collagen rod librating about its helix axis. Considering the size of the collagen molecule and the presence of cross-linked molecules, motional amplitudes derived for the helix axis libration were unusually high. Using solid-state NMR 13C chemical shift anisotropy and 2H quadrupolar lineshape analysis for five different isotope labelled collagens we show that motional averaging of the NMR interactions occurs primarily via small-angle librations about internal bond directions. This type of dynamics is compatible with both the presence of cross-links in collagen and the X-ray data, as well as dynamic models used for other proteins.

  1. Development of a recombinant human collagen-type III based hemostat.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Hillas, P; Tang, J; Balan, J; Notbohm, H; Polarek, J

    2004-04-15

    Animal-tissue-derived collagen, containing mostly type I collagen with a minor amount of type III collagen, has been widely used in the production of hemostats for many decades, although it has been known for a long time that type III collagen is more likely to induce platelet aggregation in vitro. Because it is hard to purify type III from animal tissue, it has not been possible to correlate this finding with in vivo data. In this report, it is demonstrated that recombinant human collagen III fibrils are more capable of inducing platelet aggregation in vitro than those comprised of bovine collagen I, in agreement with previously published data on tissue-derived type III collagen. When formed into three-dimensional matrices, the use of type III collagen results in formulations with better mechanical integrity, larger surface area, and higher hemostatic activity in a rabbit spleen injury model as compared with commercially available hemostats formed from bovine type I collagen.

  2. Epidermal Stem Cells Cultured on Collagen-Modified Chitin Membrane Induce In Situ Tissue Regeneration of Full-Thickness Skin Defects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yan; Dai, Libing; Li, Xiaojian; Liang, Rong; Guan, Guangxiong; Zhang, Zhi; Cao, Wenjuan; Liu, Zhihe; Mei, Shirley; Liang, Weiguo; Qin, Shennan; Xu, Jiake; Chen, Honghui

    2014-01-01

    A Large scale of full-thickness skin defects is lack of auto-grafts and which requires the engineered skin substitutes for repair and regeneration. One major obstacle in skin tissue engineering is to expand epidermal stem cells (ESCs) and develop functional substitutes. The other one is the scaffold of the ESCs. Here, we applied type I collagen-modified chitin membrane to form collagen-chitin biomimetic membrane (C-CBM), which has been proved to have a great biocompatibility and degraded totally when it was subcutaneously transplanted into rat skin. ESCs were cultured, and the resulting biofilm was used to cover full-thickness skin defects in nude mice. The transplantation of ESCs- collagen- chitn biomimetic membrane (ESCs-C-CBM) has achieved in situ skin regeneration. In nude mice, compared to controls with collagen-chitin biomimetic membrane (C-CBM) only, the ESCs-C-CBM group had significantly more dermatoglyphs on the skin wound 10 w after surgery, and the new skin was relatively thick, red and elastic. In vivo experiments showed obvious hair follicle cell proliferation in the full-thickness skin defect. Stem cell markers examination showed active ESCs in repair and regeneration of skin. The results indicate that the collagen-modified chitin membrane carry with ESCs has successfully regener