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Sample records for colliculus central nucleus

  1. Representation of interaural time difference in the central nucleus of the barn owl's inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Wagner, H; Takahashi, T; Konishi, M

    1987-10-01

    This paper investigates the role of the central nucleus of the barn owl's inferior colliculus in determination of the sound-source azimuth. The central nucleus contains many neurons that are sensitive to interaural time difference (ITD), the cue for azimuth in the barn owl. The response of these neurons varies in a cyclic manner with the ITD of a tone or noise burst. Response maxima recur at integer multiples of the period of the stimulating tone, or, if the stimulus is noise, at integer multiples of the period corresponding to the neuron's best frequency. Such neurons can signal, by means of their relative spike rate, the phase difference between the sounds reaching the left and right ears. Since an interaural phase difference corresponds to more than one ITD, these neurons represent ITD ambiguously. We call this phenomenon phase ambiguity. The central nucleus is tonotopically organized and its neurons are narrowly tuned to frequency. Neurons in an array perpendicular to isofrequency laminae form a physiological and anatomical unit; only one ITD, the array-specific ITD, activates all neurons in an array at the same relative level. We, therefore, may say that, in the central nucleus, an ITD is conserved in an array of neurons. Array-specific ITDs are mapped and encompass the entire auditory space of the barn owl. Individual space-specific neurons of the external nucleus, which receive inputs from a wide range of frequency channels (Knudsen and Konishi, 1978), are selective for a unique ITD. Space-specific neurons do not show phase ambiguity when stimulated with noise (Takahashi and Konishi, 1986). Space-specific neurons receive inputs from arrays that are selective for the same ITD. The collective response of the neurons in an array may be the basis for the absence of phase ambiguity in space-specific neurons. PMID:3668618

  2. Development of Intrinsic Connectivity in the Central Nucleus of the Mouse Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Joshua; Nguyen, Tuan

    2014-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) in the mammalian midbrain is the major subcortical auditory integration center receiving ascending inputs from almost all auditory brainstem nuclei as well as descending inputs from the thalamus and cortex. In addition to these extrinsic inputs, the IC also contains a dense network of local, intracollicular connections, which are thought to provide gain control and contribute to the selectivity for complex acoustic features. However, in contrast to the organization of extrinsic IC afferents, the development and functional organization of intrinsic connections in the IC has remained poorly understood. Here we used laser-scanning photostimulation with caged glutamate to characterize the spatial distribution and strength of local synaptic connections in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of newborn mice until after hearing onset (P2-P22). We demonstrate the presence of an extensive excitatory and inhibitory intracollicular network already at P2. Excitatory and inhibitory synaptic maps to individual IC neurons formed continuous maps that largely overlapped with each other and that were aligned with the presumed isofrequency axis of the central nucleus of the IC. Although this characteristic organization was present throughout the first three postnatal weeks, the size of input maps was developmentally regulated as input maps underwent an expansion during the first week that was followed by a dramatic refinement after hearing onset. These changes occurred in parallel for excitatory and inhibitory input maps. However, the functional elimination of intrinsic connections was greater for excitatory than for inhibitory connections, resulting in a predominance of intrinsic inhibition after hearing onset. PMID:25378168

  3. Early segregation of layered projections from the lateral superior olivary nucleus to the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus in the neonatal cat.

    PubMed

    Gabriele, Mark L; Shahmoradian, Sarah H; French, Christopher C; Henkel, Craig K; McHaffie, John G

    2007-10-10

    The central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (IC) is a laminated structure that receives multiple converging afferent projections. These projections terminate in a layered arrangement and are aligned with dendritic arbors of the predominant disc-shaped neurons, forming fibrodendritic laminae. Within this structural framework, inputs terminate in a precise manner, establishing a mosaic of partially overlapping domains that likely define functional compartments. Although several of these patterned inputs have been described in the adult, relatively little is known about their organization prior to hearing onset. The present study used the lipophilic carbocyanine dyes DiI and DiD to examine the ipsilateral and contralateral projections from the lateral superior olivary (LSO) nucleus to the IC in a developmental series of paraformaldehyde-fixed kitten tissue. By birth, the crossed and uncrossed projections had reached the IC and were distributed across the frequency axis of the central nucleus. At this earliest postnatal stage, projections already exhibited a characteristic banded arrangement similar to that described in the adult. The heaviest terminal fields of the two inputs were always complementary in nature, with the ipsilateral input appearing slightly denser. This early arrangement of interdigitating ipsilateral and contralateral LSO axonal bands that occupy adjacent sublayers supports the idea that the initial establishment of this highly organized mosaic of inputs that defines distinct synaptic domains within the IC occurs largely in the absence of auditory experience. Potential developmental mechanisms that may shape these highly ordered inputs prior to hearing onset are discussed.

  4. Alignment of sound localization cues in the nucleus of the brachium of the inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Young, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate sound localization is based on three acoustic cues (interaural time and intensity difference and spectral cues from directional filtering by the pinna). In natural listening conditions, every spatial position of a sound source provides a unique combination of these three cues in “natural alignment.” Although neurons in the central nucleus (ICC) of the inferior colliculus (IC) are sensitive to multiple cues, they do not favor their natural spatial alignment. We tested for sensitivity to cue alignment in the nucleus of the brachium of the IC (BIN) in unanesthetized marmoset monkeys. The BIN receives its predominant auditory input from ICC and projects to the topographic auditory space map in the superior colliculus. Sound localization cues measured in each monkey were used to synthesize broadband stimuli with aligned and misaligned cues; spike responses to these stimuli were recorded in the BIN. We computed mutual information (MI) between the set of spike rates and the stimuli containing either aligned or misaligned cues. The results can be summarized as follows: 1) BIN neurons encode more information about auditory space when cues are aligned compared with misaligned. 2) Significantly more units prefer aligned cues in the BIN than in ICC. 3) An additive model based on summing the responses to stimuli with the localization cues varying individually accurately predicts the alignment preference with all cues varying. Overall, the results suggest that the BIN is the first site in the ascending mammalian auditory system that is tuned to natural combinations of sound localization cues. PMID:24671535

  5. Projections of the cochlear nuclei and nucleus laminaris to the inferior colliculus of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T T; Konishi, M

    1988-08-01

    The barn owl determines the directions from which sounds emanate by computing the interaural differences in the timing and intensity of sounds. These cues for sound localization are processed in independent channels originating at nucleus magnocellularis (NM) and nucleus angularis (NA), the cochlear nuclei. The cells of NM are specialized for encoding the phase of sounds in the ipsilateral ear. The cells of NA are specialized for encoding the intensity of sounds in the ipsilateral ear. NM projects solely, bilaterally, and tonotopically to nucleus laminaris (NL). NL and NA project to largely nonoverlapping zones in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICc), thus forming hodological subdivisions in which time and intensity information may be processed. The terminal field of NL occupies a discrete zone in the rostromedial portion of the contralateral ICc, which we have termed the "core" of ICc. The terminal field of NA surrounds the core of ICc and thus forms a "shell" around it. The projection from NL to the core conserves tonotopy. Low-frequency regions of NL project to the dorsal portions of the core whereas higher-frequency regions project to more ventral portions. This innervation pattern is consistent with earlier physiological studies of tonotopy. Physiological studies have also suggested that NL and the core of ICs contain a representation of the location of a sound source along the horizontal axis. Our data suggest that the projection from NL to the core preserves spatiotopy. Thus, the dorsal portion of NL on the left, which contains a representation of eccentric loci in the right hemifield, innervates the area of the right ICc core that represents eccentric right loci. The more ventral portion of the left NL, which represents loci close to the vertical meridian, innervates the more rostral portions of the right core, which also represents loci near the vertical meridian. PMID:2463286

  6. Preservation of spectrotemporal tuning between the nucleus laminaris and the inferior colliculus of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Christianson, G Björn; Peña, José Luis

    2007-05-01

    Performing sound recognition is a task that requires an encoding of the time-varying spectral structure of the auditory stimulus. Similarly, computation of the interaural time difference (ITD) requires knowledge of the precise timing of the stimulus. Consistent with this, low-level nuclei of birds and mammals implicated in ITD processing encode the ongoing phase of a stimulus. However, the brain areas that follow the binaural convergence for the computation of ITD show a reduced capacity for phase locking. In addition, we have shown that in the barn owl there is a pooling of ITD-responsive neurons to improve the reliability of ITD coding. Here we demonstrate that despite two stages of convergence and an effective loss of phase information, the auditory system of the anesthetized barn owl displays a graceful transition to an envelope coding that preserves the spectrotemporal information throughout the ITD pathway to the neurons of the core of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. PMID:17314241

  7. Responses from two firing patterns in inferior colliculus neurons to stimulation of the lateral lemniscus dorsal nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-ting; Wang, Ning-yu; Wang, Yan-jun; Xu, Zhi-qing; Liu, Jin-feng; Bai, Yun-fei; Dai, Jin-sheng; Zhao, Jing-yi

    2016-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid neurons (GABAergic neurons) in the inferior colliculus are classified into various patterns based on their intrinsic electrical properties to a constant current injection. Although this classification is associated with physiological function, the exact role for neurons with various firing patterns in acoustic processing remains poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed characteristics of inferior colliculus neurons in vitro, and recorded responses to stimulation of the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Seven inferior colliculus neurons were tested and were classified into two firing patterns: sustained-regular (n = 4) and sustained-adapting firing patterns (n = 3). The majority of inferior colliculus neurons exhibited slight changes in response to stimulation and bicuculline. The responses of one neuron with a sustained-adapting firing pattern were suppressed after stimulation, but recovered to normal levels following application of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor antagonist. One neuron with a sustained-regular pattern showed suppressed stimulation responses, which were not affected by bicuculline. Results suggest that GABAergic neurons in the inferior colliculus exhibit sustained-regular or sustained-adapting firing patterns. Additionally, GABAergic projections from the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus to the inferior colliculus are associated with sound localization. The different neuronal responses of various firing patterns suggest a role in sound localization. A better understanding of these mechanisms and functions will provide better clinical treatment paradigms for hearing deficiencies. PMID:27335563

  8. Shared and distinct retinal input to the mouse superior colliculus and dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Erika M.; Gauvain, Gregory; Sivyer, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian retina conveys the vast majority of information about visual stimuli to two brain regions: the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) and the superior colliculus (SC). The degree to which retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) send similar or distinct information to the two areas remains unclear despite the important constraints that different patterns of RGC input place on downstream visual processing. To resolve this ambiguity, we injected a glycoprotein-deficient rabies virus coding for the expression of a fluorescent protein into the dLGN or SC; rabies virus labeled a smaller fraction of RGCs than lipophilic dyes such as DiI but, crucially, did not label RGC axons of passage. Approximately 80% of the RGCs infected by rabies virus injected into the dLGN were colabeled with DiI injected into the SC, suggesting that many dLGN-projecting RGCs also project to the SC. However, functional characterization of RGCs revealed that the SC receives input from several classes of RGCs that largely avoid the dLGN, in particular RGCs in which 1) sustained changes in light intensity elicit transient changes in firing rate and/or 2) a small range of stimulus sizes or temporal fluctuations in light intensity elicit robust activity. Taken together, our results illustrate several unexpected asymmetries in the information that the mouse retina conveys to two major downstream targets and suggest that differences in the output of dLGN and SC neurons reflect, at least in part, differences in the functional properties of RGCs that innervate the SC but not the dLGN. PMID:27169509

  9. Descending projections from auditory cortex to excitatory and inhibitory cells in the nucleus of the brachium of the inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Mellott, Jeffrey G.; Bickford, Martha E.; Schofield, Brett R.

    2014-01-01

    Descending projections from the auditory cortex (AC) terminate in subcortical auditory centers from the medial geniculate nucleus (MG) to the cochlear nucleus, allowing the AC to modulate the processing of acoustic information at many levels of the auditory system. The nucleus of the brachium of the inferior colliculus (NBIC) is a large midbrain auditory nucleus that is a target of these descending cortical projections. The NBIC is a source of several auditory projections, including an ascending projection to the MG. This ascending projection appears to originate from both excitatory and inhibitory NBIC cells, but whether the cortical projections contact either of these cell groups is unknown. In this study, we first combined retrograde tracing and immunochemistry for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD, a marker of GABAergic cells) to identify GABAergic and non-GABAergic NBIC projections to the MG. Our first result is that GAD-immunopositive cells constitute ~17% of the NBIC to MG projection. We then used anterograde labeling and electron microscopy to examine the AC projection to the NBIC. Our second result is that cortical boutons in the NBIC form synapses with round vesicles and asymmetric synapses, consistent with excitatory effects. Finally, we combined fluorescent anterograde labeling of corticofugal axons with immunochemistry and retrograde labeling of NBIC cells that project to the MG. These final results suggest first that AC axons contact both GAD-negative and GAD-positive NBIC cells and, second, that some of cortically-contacted cells project to the MG. Overall, the results imply that corticofugal projections can modulate both excitatory and inhibitory ascending projections from the NBIC to the auditory thalamus. PMID:25339870

  10. Anatomical Evidence that the Superior Colliculus Controls Saccades through Central Mesencephalic Reticular Formation Gating of Omnipause Neuron Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Niping; Perkins, Eddie; Zhou, Lan; Warren, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Omnipause neurons (OPNs) within the nucleus raphe interpositus (RIP) help gate the transition between fixation and saccadic eye movements by monosynaptically suppressing activity in premotor burst neurons during fixation, and releasing them during saccades. Premotor neuron activity is initiated by excitatory input from the superior colliculus (SC), but how the tectum's saccade-related activity turns off OPNs is not known. Since the central mesencephalic reticular formation (cMRF) is a major SC target, we explored whether this nucleus has the appropriate connections to support tectal gating of OPN activity. In dual-tracer experiments undertaken in macaque monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), cMRF neurons labeled retrogradely from injections into RIP had numerous anterogradely labeled terminals closely associated with them following SC injections. This suggested the presence of an SC–cMRF–RIP pathway. Furthermore, anterograde tracers injected into the cMRF of other macaques labeled axonal terminals in RIP, confirming this cMRF projection. To determine whether the cMRF projections gate OPN activity, postembedding electron microscopic immunochemistry was performed on anterogradely labeled cMRF terminals with antibody to GABA or glycine. Of the terminals analyzed, 51.4% were GABA positive, 35.5% were GABA negative, and most contacted glycinergic cells. In summary, a trans-cMRF pathway connecting the SC to the RIP is present. This pathway contains inhibitory elements that could help gate omnipause activity and allow other tectal drives to induce the bursts of firing in premotor neurons that are necessary for saccades. The non-GABAergic cMRF terminals may derive from fixation units in the cMRF. PMID:24107960

  11. Wisteria Floribunda Agglutinin-Labeled Perineuronal Nets in the Mouse Inferior Colliculus, Thalamic Reticular Nucleus and Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fader, Sarah M.; Imaizumi, Kazuo; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Lee, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are specialized extracellular matrix molecules that are associated with the closing of the critical period, among other functions. In the adult brain, PNNs surround specific types of neurons, however the expression of PNNs in the auditory system of the mouse, particularly at the level of the midbrain and forebrain, has not been fully described. In addition, the association of PNNs with excitatory and inhibitory cell types in these structures remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to investigate the expression of PNNs in the inferior colliculus (IC), thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and primary auditory cortex (A1) of the mouse brain by labeling with wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). To aid in the identification of inhibitory neurons in these structures, we employed the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT)-Venus transgenic mouse strain, which robustly expresses an enhanced yellow-fluorescent protein (Venus) natively in nearly all gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory neurons, thus enabling a rapid and unambiguous assessment of inhibitory neurons throughout the nervous system. Our results demonstrate that PNNs are expressed throughout the auditory midbrain and forebrain, but vary in their local distribution. PNNs are most dense in the TRN and least dense in A1. Furthermore, PNNs are preferentially associated with inhibitory neurons in A1 and the TRN, but not in the IC of the mouse. These data suggest regionally specific roles for PNNs in auditory information processing. PMID:27089371

  12. Wisteria Floribunda Agglutinin-Labeled Perineuronal Nets in the Mouse Inferior Colliculus, Thalamic Reticular Nucleus and Auditory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Fader, Sarah M; Imaizumi, Kazuo; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Lee, Charles C

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are specialized extracellular matrix molecules that are associated with the closing of the critical period, among other functions. In the adult brain, PNNs surround specific types of neurons, however the expression of PNNs in the auditory system of the mouse, particularly at the level of the midbrain and forebrain, has not been fully described. In addition, the association of PNNs with excitatory and inhibitory cell types in these structures remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to investigate the expression of PNNs in the inferior colliculus (IC), thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and primary auditory cortex (A1) of the mouse brain by labeling with wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA). To aid in the identification of inhibitory neurons in these structures, we employed the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT)-Venus transgenic mouse strain, which robustly expresses an enhanced yellow-fluorescent protein (Venus) natively in nearly all gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory neurons, thus enabling a rapid and unambiguous assessment of inhibitory neurons throughout the nervous system. Our results demonstrate that PNNs are expressed throughout the auditory midbrain and forebrain, but vary in their local distribution. PNNs are most dense in the TRN and least dense in A1. Furthermore, PNNs are preferentially associated with inhibitory neurons in A1 and the TRN, but not in the IC of the mouse. These data suggest regionally specific roles for PNNs in auditory information processing. PMID:27089371

  13. Neuronal relationships between the dorsal periaqueductal nucleus and the inferior colliculus (nucleus commissuralis) in the cat. A Golgi study.

    PubMed

    Herrera, M; Sánchez del Campo, F; Ruiz, A; Smith Agreda, V

    1988-06-01

    Cell types in the dorsal periaqueductal nucleus (PAGd) were studied with the aid of the rapid Golgi method in young cats. The neurons were subdivided into fusiform and stellate types with several varieties of the latter class according to the final destination of their axons. Fusiform neurons send their axons to the neuropil of the Ncom. In turn these neurons receive descending fibres from the nucleus commissuralis (Ncom) which seem to establish axo-dendritic contacts. Also commissural neurons receive contacts from ascending fibres of the PAGd. On the basis of Golgi material it is concluded that particular neuronal types of the PAGd could establish reciprocal connections with neuronal elements of the ventral part of the Ncom. The present study supports the hypothesis that the PAGd could be subdivided into discrete cell groups according to their afferent and efferent projections.

  14. The Distinct Role of the Amygdala, Superior Colliculus and Pulvinar in Processing of Central and Peripheral Snakes

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Inês; Soares, Sandra C.; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Visual processing of ecologically relevant stimuli involves a central bias for stimuli demanding detailed processing (e.g., faces), whereas peripheral object processing is based on coarse identification. Fast detection of animal shapes holding a significant phylogenetic value, such as snakes, may benefit from peripheral vision. The amygdala together with the pulvinar and the superior colliculus are implicated in an ongoing debate regarding their role in automatic and deliberate spatial processing of threat signals. Methods Here we tested twenty healthy participants in an fMRI task, and investigated the role of spatial demands (the main effect of central vs. peripheral vision) in the processing of fear-relevant ecological features. We controlled for stimulus dependence using true or false snakes; snake shapes or snake faces and for task constraints (implicit or explicit). The main idea justifying this double task is that amygdala and superior colliculus are involved in both automatic and controlled processes. Moreover the explicit/implicit instruction in the task with respect to emotion is not necessarily equivalent to explicit vs. implicit in the sense of endogenous vs. exogenous attention, or controlled vs. automatic processes. Results We found that stimulus-driven processing led to increased amygdala responses specifically to true snake shapes presented in the centre or in the peripheral left hemifield (right hemisphere). Importantly, the superior colliculus showed significantly biased and explicit central responses to snake-related stimuli. Moreover, the pulvinar, which also contains foveal representations, also showed strong central responses, extending the results of a recent single cell pulvinar study in monkeys. Similar hemispheric specialization was found across structures: increased amygdala responses occurred to true snake shapes presented to the right hemisphere, with this pattern being closely followed by the superior colliculus and the

  15. Encoding of the amplitude modulation of pulsatile electrical stimulation in the feline cochlear nucleus by neurons in the inferior colliculus; effects of stimulus pulse rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreery, Douglas; Han, Martin; Pikov, Victor; Yadav, Kamal; Pannu, Satinderpall

    2013-10-01

    Objectives. Persons without a functional auditory nerve cannot benefit from cochlear implants, but some hearing can be restored by an auditory brainstem implant (ABI) with stimulating electrodes implanted on the surface of the cochlear nucleus (CN). Most users benefit from their ABI, but speech recognition tends to be poorer than for users of cochlear implants. Psychophysical studies suggest that poor modulation detection may contribute to the limited performance of ABI users. In a cat model, we determined how the pulse rate of the electrical stimulus applied within or on the CN affects temporal and rate encoding of amplitude modulation (AM) by neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). Approach. Stimulating microelectrodes were implanted chronically in and on the cats' CN, and multi-site recording microelectrodes were implanted chronically into the ICC. Encoding of AM pulse trains by neurons in the ICC was characterized as vector strength (VS), the synchrony of neural activity with the AM, and as the mean rate of neuronal action potentials (neuronal spike rate (NSR)). Main results. For intranuclear microstimulation, encoding of AM as VS was up to 3 dB greater when stimulus pulse rate was increased from 250 to 500 pps, but only for neuronal units with low best acoustic frequencies, and when the electrical stimulation was modulated at low frequencies (10-20 Hz). For stimulation on the surface of the CN, VS was similar at 250 and 500 pps, and the dynamic range of the VS was reduced for pulse rates greater than 250 pps. Modulation depth was encoded strongly as VS when the maximum stimulus amplitude was held constant across a range of modulation depth. This ‘constant maximum’ protocol allows enhancement of modulation depth while preserving overall dynamic range. However, modulation depth was not encoded as strongly as NSR. Significance. The findings have implications for improved sound processors for present and future ABIs. The performance of

  16. Corticofugal regulation of auditory sensitivity in the bat inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Jen, P H; Chen, Q C; Sun, X D

    1998-12-01

    Under free-field stimulation conditions, corticofugal regulation of auditory sensitivity of neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, was studied by blocking activities of auditory cortical neurons with Lidocaine or by electrical stimulation in auditory cortical neuron recording sites. The corticocollicular pathway regulated the number of impulses, the auditory spatial response areas and the frequency-tuning curves of inferior colliculus neurons through facilitation or inhibition. Corticofugal regulation was most effective at low sound intensity and was dependent upon the time interval between acoustic and electrical stimuli. At optimal inter-stimulus intervals, inferior colliculus neurons had the smallest number of impulses and the longest response latency during corticofugal inhibition. The opposite effects were observed during corticofugal facilitation. Corticofugal inhibitory latency was longer than corticofugal facilitatory latency. Iontophoretic application of gamma-aminobutyric acid and bicuculline to inferior colliculus recording sites produced effects similar to what were observed during corticofugal inhibition and facilitation. We suggest that corticofugal regulation of central auditory sensitivity can provide an animal with a mechanism to regulate acoustic signal processing in the ascending auditory pathway.

  17. Study of the inferior colliculus in patients with schizophrenia by magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Granados, B; Martinez-Bisbal, M C; Sanjuan, J; Aguilar, E J; Marti-Bonmati, L; Molla, E; Celda, B

    2014-07-01

    INTRODUCTION. Previous studies have suggested morphometric and functional abnormalities in the inferior colliculus in patients with schizophrenia. Auditory hallucinations are one of the central symptoms in schizophrenia. In this complex and multidimensional event both attention and emotion are thought to play a key role. AIM. To study metabolic changes in the inferior colliculus, a nucleus integrated in the auditory pathway, in patients with schizophrenia and the possible relationship with auditory hallucinations. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging studies were performed in 30 right-handed patients with chronic schizophrenia (19 of them with auditory hallucinations) and 28 controls. A magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging 2D slice was acquired and the voxels representative of both inferior colliculi were selected. N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr) and choline (Cho) peak areas were measured. RESULTS. The patients with schizophrenia showed a NAA/Cr significant reduction in the right inferior colliculus compared to the control subjects. The metabolic data in the right inferior colliculus were correlated with emotional auditory hallucinations items. CONCLUSIONS. The contribution of the inferior colliculus on neural underpinnings of auditory hallucinations is particularly relevant for the right inferior colliculus and is centered on attention-emotional component of this symptom.

  18. Projections of physiologically defined subdivisions of the inferior colliculus in the mustached bat: targets in the medial geniculate body and extrathalamic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, J J; Larue, D T; Winer, J A

    1994-08-01

    This study examined the output of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus to the medial geniculate body and other parts of the nervous system in the mustached bat (Pteronotus parnellii). Small deposits of anterograde tracers (horseradish peroxidase, [3H]leucine, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase, or biocytin) were made at physiologically defined sites in the central nucleus representing major components of the bat's echolocation signal. The topography, frequency specificity, and axonal morphology of these outputs were studied. The medial geniculate body was a major target of inferior collicular neurons, with three distinct input patterns. The projection to the ventral division was tonotopically organized, but had a relatively sparse contribution from neurons representing frequency modulated components of the biosonar pulse. The second input was to the rostral medial geniculate body, in which projections from inferior collicular neurons representing constant frequency sonar components were separated from those representing frequency modulated components. A third input was to the suprageniculate nucleus, which received strong, topographically arranged projections. Inputs to the dorsal nucleus and medial division were also observed. Extrathalamic regions receiving input included the pontine gray, external nucleus of the inferior colliculus, pericollicular tegmentum, nucleus of the brachium of the inferior colliculus, and pretectum. These central nucleus projections differed in organization and the structure of axon terminals, suggesting different physiological influences on their target nuclei. These results demonstrate that the central nucleus has divergent projections to various sensory and premotor nuclei, besides its well-established projection to the medial geniculate body.

  19. Combination-sensitive neurons in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Mittmann, D H; Wenstrup, J J

    1995-10-01

    We examined whether neurons in the inferior colliculus of the mustached bat (Pteronotus parnellii) are combination sensitive, responding to both low- and high-frequency components of the bat's sonar signal. These neurons, previously reported in the thalamus and cortex, analyze sonar target features including distance. Of 82 single units and 36 multiple units from the 58-112 kHz representations of the inferior colliculus, most (86%) displayed sensitivity to low-frequency sounds that was tuned in the range of the fundamental biosonar component (24-31 kHz). All histologically localized units were in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). There were two major types of combination-sensitive influences. Many neurons were facilitated by low-frequency sounds and selective for particular delays between the low- and high-frequency components. In other neurons, the low-frequency signal was inhibitory if presented simultaneously or a few milliseconds prior to the high-frequency signal. The results indicate that mechanisms creating specialized frequency comparisons and delay sensitivity in combination-sensitive neurons operate at the ICC or below. Since combination sensitivity or multipeaked tuning curves occur in the auditory systems of many species, ICC neurons in these animals may also respond to species-specific frequency combinations.

  20. Coexistence of central nucleus, cores, and rods: Diagnostic relevance

    PubMed Central

    Dhinakaran, Sathiyabama; Kumar, Rashmi Santhosh; Thakkar, Ravindra; Narayanappa, Gayathri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital myopathies (CMs) though considered distinct disorders, simultaneous occurrence of central nucleus, nemaline rods, and cores in the same biopsy are scarcely reported. Objective: A retrospective reassessment of cases diagnosed as CMs to look for multiple pathologies missed, if any, during the initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Enzyme histochemical, and immunohistochemical-stained slides from 125 cases diagnosed as congenital myopathy were reassessed. Results: The study revealed 15 cases (12%) of congenital myopathy with more than one morphological feature. Central nucleus with cores (n = 11), central nucleus, nemaline rods and cores (n = 3), and nemaline rods with cores (n = 1). 4/11 cases were diagnosed as centronuclear myopathy (CNM) in the first instance; in addition, cores were revealed on reassessment. Discussion: The prevalence of CMs of all neuromuscular disorders is approximately 6 in 100,000 live births, with regional variations. Three main defined CMs include centro nuclear myopathy (CNM), nemaline rod myopathy (NRM), and central core disease (CCD). However, they are more diverse with overlapping clinical and histopathological features, thus broadening the spectra within each category of congenital myopathy. Conclusion: Identification of cases with overlap of pathological features has diagnostic relevance. PMID:27293330

  1. Neuronal morphology in subdivisions of the inferior colliculus of chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Niederleitner, Bertram; Luksch, Harald

    2012-05-01

    The avian inferior colliculus (IC), also referred to as the nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis pars dorsalis (MLd), is an auditory midbrain nucleus that converges auditory cues from tonotopically organized brainstem nuclei. This information is relayed onto the optic tectum on the one hand and to nucleus ovoidalis on the other hand. Morphologically, there has been considerable debate about the number and nomenclature of the subnuclei within the IC. Here, we provide morphological characteristics of single cells in five IC subnuclei in chicken. The cellular structure within the IC was studied by whole-cell patch technique and biocytin iontophoresis. In addition, histological staining was performed, to delineate the borders between subnuclei of the IC. We were able to discriminate between 5 subnuclei: the core of the central nucleus (ICCc), the medial and lateral shell of the central nucleus (ICCms and ICCls), the external nucleus (ICX) and the superficial nucleus (ICS) of the IC. Our findings suggest the existence of at least two different morphologies of neurons with two subtypes each. The IC in chicken is a largely homogenous nucleus in terms of neuronal anatomy on a cellular level. However, its compartmentation into diversified subnuclei with different neurophysiological characteristics suggests a complex system to process auditory information. The auditory system in chicken is not as hypertrophied as in specialists such as the barn owl, but appears to have comparable connectivity and cellular morphology. PMID:22525356

  2. Consolidation of altered associability information by amygdala central nucleus.

    PubMed

    Schiffino, Felipe L; Holland, Peter C

    2016-09-01

    The surprising omission of a reinforcer can enhance the associability of the stimuli that were present when the reward prediction error was induced, so that they more readily enter into new associations in the future. Previous research from this laboratory identified brain circuit elements critical to the enhancement of stimulus associability by the omission of an expected event and to the subsequent expression of that altered associability in more rapid learning. These elements include the amygdala, the midbrain substantia nigra, the basal forebrain substantia innominata, the dorsolateral striatum, the secondary visual cortex, and the posterior parietal cortex. Here, we found that consolidation of a surprise-enhanced associability memory in a serial prediction task depends on processing in the amygdala central nucleus (CeA) after completion of sessions that included the surprising omission of an expected event. Post-surprise infusions of anisomycin, lidocaine, or muscimol prevented subsequent display of surprise-enhanced associability. Because previous studies indicated that CeA function is unnecessary for the expression of associability enhancements that were induced previously when CeA function was intact (Holland & Gallagher, 2006), we interpreted these results as indicating that post-surprise activity of CeA ("surprise replay") is necessary for the consolidation of altered associability memories elsewhere in the brain, such as the posterior parietal cortex (Schiffino et al., 2014a). PMID:27427328

  3. Role of amygdala central nucleus in feature negative discriminations.

    PubMed

    Holland, Peter C

    2012-10-01

    Consistent with a popular theory of associative learning, the Pearce-Hall (1980) model, the surprising omission of expected events enhances cue associability (the ease with which a cue may enter into new associations), across a wide variety of behavioral training procedures. Furthermore, previous experiments from this laboratory showed that these enhancements are absent in rats with impaired function of the amygdala central nucleus (CeA). A notable exception to these assertions is found in feature negative (FN) discrimination learning, in which a "target" stimulus is reinforced when it is presented alone but nonreinforced when it is presented in compound with another, "feature" stimulus. According to the Pearce-Hall model, reinforcer omission on compound trials should enhance the associability of the feature relative to control training conditions. However, prior experiments have shown no evidence that CeA lesions affect FN discrimination learning. Here we explored this apparent contradiction by evaluating the hypothesis that the surprising omission of an event confers enhanced associability on a cue only if that cue itself generates the disconfirmed prediction. Thus, in a FN discrimination, the surprising omission of the reinforcer on compound trials would enhance the associability of the target stimulus but not that of the feature. Our data confirmed this hypothesis and showed this enhancement to depend on intact CeA function, as in other procedures. The results are consistent with modern reformulations of both cue and reward processing theories that assign roles for both individual and aggregate error terms in associative learning.

  4. Rodent anxiety and kindling of the central amygdala and nucleus basalis.

    PubMed

    Adamec, R; Shallow, T

    We studied lasting behavioral effects of kindling of three parts of the central nucleus of the amygdala and the anterior nucleus basalis in the right hemisphere of male Wistar rats. Kindling lastingly changed two measures of anxiety in the elevated plus-maze. The nature of the change depended on the location of the kindled focus. Kindling of the posterior central nucleus decreased both open-arm exploration and frequency of risk assessment in the elevated plus-maze 1 week after the fourth stage 5 seizure. Kindling of the middle parts of the central nucleus was without behavioral effects. Kindling of the anterior central nucleus and the anterior nucleus basalis increased risk assessment, which was interpreted as an anxiolytic effect. Changes in risk assessment produced by kindling of the central nucleus were dependent on open-arm avoidance, whereas the effects of nucleus basalis kindling were independent of open-arm avoidance. Analysis of covariance and factor analysis support the view that control of risk assessment is by circuitry, which is independent of that which controls open-arm avoidance. Moreover, part of this circuitry appears to involve the anterior nucleus basalis. Changes in plus-maze behavior were independent of changes in exploration or activity in either the plus-maze or hole board. These findings add to a growing body of evidence that suggests that subtle differences in location of a kindled focus within the rat amygdala lead to different behavioral outcomes.

  5. Projection from the accommodation-related area in the superior colliculus of the cat.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Ohtsuka, K

    1996-04-01

    Our previous study has indicated that accommodative responses can be evoked with weak currents applied to a circumscribed area of the superior colliculus in the cat. We investigated efferent projections from this area with biocytin in the present study. The accommodation area in the superior colliculus was identified by systematic microstimulation in each of five anesthetized cats. Accommodative responses were detected by an infrared optometer. After mapping the superior colliculus, biocytin was injected through a glass micropipette into the accommodation area, where accommodative responses were elicited with low-intensity microstimulation. In addition, accommodative responses to stimulation of the superior colliculus were compared before and after an injection of muscimol, an agonist of inhibitory neurotransmitter, into the pretectum. Following the injection of biocytin, in the ascending projections, labeled terminals were seen mainly in the caudal portion of the nucleus of the optic tract, the nucleus of the posterior commissure, the posterior pretectal nucleus, the olivary pretectal nucleus, the mesencephalic reticular formation at the level of the oculomotor nucleus, and the lateral posterior nucleus of the thalamus on the ipsilateral side. Less dense terminals were seen in the anterior pretectal nucleus, the zona incerta, and the centromedian nucleus of the thalamus. In the descending projections, labeled terminals were observed mainly in the paramedian pontine reticular formation, the nucleus raphe interpositus, and the dorsomedial portion of the nucleus reticularis tegmenti pontis on the contralateral side. Less dense terminals were also seen in the nucleus of the brachium of the inferior colliculus, the cuneiform nucleus, the medial part of the paralemniscal tegmental field, and the dorsolateral division of the pontine nuclei on the ipsilateral side. Following the injection of muscimol into the pretectum, including the nucleus of the optic tract, the

  6. Role of amygdala central nucleus in feature negative discriminations

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Consistent with a popular theory of associative learning, the Pearce-Hall (1980) model, the surprising omission of expected events enhances cue associability (the ease with which a cue may enter into new associations), across a wide variety of behavioral training procedures. Furthermore, previous experiments from this laboratory showed that these enhancements are absent in rats with impaired function of the amygdala central nucleus (CeA). A notable exception to these assertions is found in feature negative (FN) discrimination learning, in which a “target” stimulus is reinforced when it is presented alone but nonreinforced when it is presented in compound with another, “feature” stimulus. According to the Pearce-Hall model, reinforcer omission on compound trials should enhance the associability of the feature relative to control training conditions. However, prior experiments have shown no evidence that CeA lesions affect FN discrimination learning. Here we explored this apparent contradiction by evaluating the hypothesis that the surprising omission of an event confers enhanced associability on a cue only if that cue itself generates the disconfirmed prediction. Thus, in a FN discrimination, the surprising omission of the reinforcer on compound trials would enhance the associability of the target stimulus but not that of the feature. Our data confirmed this hypothesis, and showed this enhancement to depend on intact CeA function, as in other procedures. The results are consistent with modern reformulations of both cue and reward processing theories that assign roles for both individual and aggregate error terms in associative learning. PMID:22889308

  7. Adaptive adjustment of connectivity in the inferior colliculus revealed by focal pharmacological inactivation.

    PubMed

    Gold, J I; Knudsen, E I

    2001-04-01

    In the midbrain sound localization pathway of the barn owl, a map of auditory space is synthesized in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX) and transmitted to the optic tectum. Early auditory experience shapes these maps of auditory space in part by modifying the tuning of the constituent neurons for interaural time difference (ITD), a primary cue for sound-source azimuth. Here we show that these adaptive modifications in ITD tuning correspond to changes in the pattern of connectivity within the inferior colliculus. We raised owls with an acoustic filtering device in one ear that caused frequency-dependent changes in sound timing and level. As reported previously, device rearing shifted the representation of ITD in the ICX and tectum but not in the primary source of input to the ICX, the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). We applied the local anesthetic lidocaine (QX-314) iontophoretically in the ICC to inactivate small populations of neurons that represented particular values of frequency and ITD. We measured the effect of this inactivation in the optic tecta of a normal owl and owls raised with the device. In the normal owl, inactivation at a critical site in the ICC eliminated responses in the tectum to the frequency-specific ITD value represented at the site of inactivation in the ICC. The location of this site was consistent with the known pattern of ICC-ICX-tectum connectivity. In the device-reared owls, adaptive changes in the representation of ITD in the tectum corresponded to dramatic and predictable changes in the locations of the critical sites of inactivation in the ICC. Given that the abnormal representation of ITD in the tectum depended on frequency and was likely conveyed directly from the ICX, these results suggest that experience causes large-scale, frequency-specific adjustments in the pattern of connectivity between the ICC and the ICX. PMID:11287481

  8. A neural network model of the inferior colliculus with modifiable lateral inhibitory synapses for human echolocation.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Osamu; Kuroiwa, Kazuharu

    2002-03-01

    We propose a neural network model of the inferior colliculus (IC) for human echolocation. Neuronal mechanisms for human echolocation were investigated by simulating the model. The model consists of the neural networks of the central nucleus (ICc) and external nucleus (ICx) of the inferior colliculus. The neurons of the ICc receive interaural sound stimuli via multiple contralateral delay lines and a single ipsilateral delay line. The neurons of the ICc send output signals to the neurons of the ICx in a convergent manner. We stimulated the ICc with pairs of a direct sound (a sonar sound) and an echo sound (the reflection from an object). Information about the distance between the model and the object is expressed by the delay time of the echo sound with respect to the direct sound. The results presented here show that neurons of the ICc responsive to interaural onset time differences contribute to the creation of an auditory distance map in the ICx. We trained the model with various pairs of direct-echo sounds and modified synaptic connection strengths of the networks according to the Hebbian rule. It is shown that self-organized long-term depression of lateral inhibitory synaptic connections plays an important role in enhancing echolocation skills.

  9. Neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological study of opioid pathways in the mesencephalic tectum: effect of mu(1)- and kappa-opioid receptor blockade on escape behavior induced by electrical stimulation of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Osaki, M Y; Castellan-Baldan, L; Calvo, F; Carvalho, A D; Felippotti, T T; de Oliveira, R; Ubiali, W A; Paschoalin-Maurin, T; Elias-Filho, D H; Motta, V; da Silva, L A; Coimbra, N C

    2003-12-01

    Deep layers of the superior colliculus (DLSC), the dorsal and ventral periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), and inferior colliculus (IC) are midbrain structures involved in the generation of defensive behavior. beta-Endorphin and Leu-enkephalin are some neurotransmitters that may modulate such behavior in mammals. Light microscopy immunocytochemistry with streptavidin method was used for the localization of the putative cells of defensive behavior with antibodies for endogenous opioids in rat brainstem. Midbrain structures showed positive neurons to beta-endorphin and Leu-enkephalin in similar distributions in the experimental animals, but we also noted the presence of varicose fibers positive to endogenous opioids in the PAG. Neuroanatomical techniques showed varicose fibers from the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus to ventral aspects of the PAG, at more caudal levels. Naloxonazine and nor-binaltorphimine, competitive antagonists that block mu(1)- and kappa-opioid receptors, were then used in the present work to investigate the involvement of opioid peptide neural system in the control of the fear-induced reactions evoked by electrical stimulation of the neural substrates of the inferior colliculus. The fear-like responses were measured by electrical stimulation of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus, eliciting the escape behavior, which is characterized by vigorous running and jumping. Central administration of opioid antagonists (2.5 microg/0.2 microl and 5.0 microg/0.2 microl) was performed in non-anesthetized animals (Rattus norvegicus), and the behavioral manifestations of fear were registered after 10 min, 2 h, and 24 h of the pretreatment. Naloxonazine caused an increase of the defensive threshold, as compared to control, suggesting an antiaversive effect of the antagonism on mu(1)-opioid receptor. This finding was corroborated with central administration of nor-binaltorphimine, which also induced a decrease of the fear-like responses

  10. Diencephalic connections of the superior colliculus in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H

    1996-10-01

    Using different tracer substances the pathways connecting the superior colliculus with the diencephalon were studied in the Madagascan hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi), a nocturnal insectivore with tiny eyes, a small and little differentiated superior colliculus and a visual cortex with no obvious fourth granular layer. The most prominent tecto-thalamic projection terminated in the ipsilateral dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus. The entire region receiving contralateral retinal afferents was labeled with variable density. In addition, there was a widespread, homogeneously distributed collicular input to the lateralis posterior-pulvinar complex and a distinct tectal projection to the suprageniculate nucleus. The latter projections were bilateral with a clear ipsilateral predominance. Among the intra- and paralaminar nuclei the centralis lateralis complex was most heavily labeled on both sides, followed by the nucleus centralis medialis. The paralamellar portion of the nucleus medialis dorsalis and the nucleus parafascicularis received sparse projections. A clear projection to the nucleus ventralis medialis could not be demonstrated but its presence was not entirely excluded either. There were also projections to medial thalamic nuclei, particularly the reuniens complex and the nucleus paraventricularis thalami. The main tecto-subthalamic target regions were the zona incerta, the dorsal hypothalamus and distinct subdivisons of the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus. These regions also gave rise to projections to the superior colliculus, as did the intergeniculate leaflet. The pathways oriented toward the visual or frontal cortex and the projections possibly involved in limbic and circadian mechanisms were compared with the connectivity patterns reported in mammals with more differentiated brains. Particular attention was given to the tenrec's prominent tecto-geniculate projection, the presumed W- or K-pathway directed toward the supragranular layers.

  11. Visual modulation of auditory responses in the owl inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Bergan, Joseph F; Knudsen, Eric I

    2009-06-01

    The barn owl's central auditory system creates a map of auditory space in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX). Although the crucial role visual experience plays in the formation and maintenance of this auditory space map is well established, the mechanism by which vision influences ICX responses remains unclear. Surprisingly, previous experiments have found that in the absence of extensive pharmacological manipulation, visual stimuli do not drive neural responses in the ICX. Here we investigated the influence of dynamic visual stimuli on auditory responses in the ICX. We show that a salient visual stimulus, when coincident with an auditory stimulus, can modulate auditory responses in the ICX even though the same visual stimulus may elicit no neural responses when presented alone. For each ICX neuron, the most effective auditory and visual stimuli were located in the same region of space. In addition, the magnitude of the visual modulation of auditory responses was dependent on the context of the stimulus presentation with novel visual stimuli eliciting consistently larger response modulations than frequently presented visual stimuli. Thus the visual modulation of ICX responses is dependent on the characteristics of the visual stimulus as well as on the spatial and temporal correspondence of the auditory and visual stimuli. These results demonstrate moment-to-moment visual enhancements of auditory responsiveness that, in the short-term, increase auditory responses to salient bimodal stimuli and in the long-term could serve to instruct the adaptive auditory plasticity necessary to maintain accurate auditory orienting behavior. PMID:19321633

  12. Lagged cells in the inferior colliculus of the awake ferret

    PubMed Central

    Shechter, Barak; Marvit, Peter; Depireux, Didier A

    2010-01-01

    Neurons in primary auditory cortex (AI) encode complex features of the spectral content of sound, such as direction selectivity. Recent findings of temporal symmetry in AI predict a specific organization of the subcortical input into cortex that contributes to the emergence of direction selectivity. We demonstrate two sub-populations of neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus, which differ in their steady-state temporal response profile: lagged and non-lagged. The lagged cells (23%) are shifted in temporal phase with respect to non-lagged cells and are characterized by an “inhibition first” and delayed excitation in their spectro-temporal receptive fields. Non-lagged cells (77%) have a canonical “excitation first” response. However, we find no difference in the response onset latency to pure tone stimuli between the two sub-populations. Given the homogeneity of tonal response latency, we predict that these lagged cells receive inhibitory input mediated by cortical feedback projections. PMID:20092554

  13. Spectral and Temporal Modulation Tradeoff in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Francisco A.; Read, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    The cochlea encodes sounds through frequency-selective channels that exhibit low-pass modulation sensitivity. Unlike the cochlea, neurons in the auditory midbrain are tuned for spectral and temporal modulations found in natural sounds, yet the role of this transformation is not known. We report a distinct tradeoff in modulation sensitivity and tuning that is topographically ordered within the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (CNIC). Spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRFs) were obtained with 16-channel electrodes inserted orthogonal to the isofrequency lamina. Surprisingly, temporal and spectral characteristics exhibited an opposing relationship along the tonotopic axis. For low best frequencies (BFs), units were selective for fast temporal and broad spectral modulations. A systematic progression was observed toward slower temporal and finer spectral modulation sensitivity at high BF. This tradeoff was strongly reflected in the arrangement of excitation and inhibition and, consequently, in the modulation tuning characteristics. Comparisons with auditory nerve fibers show that these trends oppose the pattern imposed by the peripheral filters. These results suggest that spectrotemporal preferences are reordered within the tonotopic axis of the CNIC. This topographic organization has profound implications for the coding of spectrotemporal features in natural sounds and could underlie a number of perceptual phenomena. PMID:20018831

  14. Central pupillary light reflex circuits in the cat: I. The olivary pretectal nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wensi; May, Paul J

    2014-12-15

    The central pathways subserving the feline pupillary light reflex were examined by defining retinal input to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPt), the midbrain projections of this nucleus, and the premotor neurons within it. Unilateral intravitreal wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injections revealed differences in the pattern of retinal OPt termination on the two sides. Injections of WGA-HRP into OPt labeled terminals bilaterally in the anteromedian nucleus, and to a lesser extent in the supraoculomotor area, centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus, and nucleus of the posterior commissure. Labeled terminals, as well as retrogradely labeled multipolar cells, were present in the contralateral OPt, indicating a commissural pathway. Injections of WGA-HRP into the anteromedian nucleus labeled fusiform premotor neurons within the OPt, as well as multipolar cells in the nucleus of the posterior commissure. Connections between retinal terminals and the pretectal premotor neurons were characterized by combining vitreous chamber and anteromedian nucleus injections of WGA-HRP in the same animal. Fusiform-shaped, retrogradely labeled cells fell within the anterogradely labeled retinal terminal field in the OPt. Ultrastructural analysis revealed labeled retinal terminals containing clear spherical vesicles. They contacted labeled pretectal premotor neurons via asymmetric synaptic densities. These results provide an anatomical substrate for the pupillary light reflex in the cat. Pretectal premotor neurons receive direct retinal input via synapses suggestive of an excitatory drive, and project directly to nuclei containing preganglionic motoneurons. These projections are concentrated in the anteromedian nucleus, indicating its involvement in the pupillary light reflex.

  15. An Overrepresentation of High Frequencies in the Mouse Inferior Colliculus Supports the Processing of Ultrasonic Vocalizations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lazaro, Jose A.; Shepard, Kathryn N.; Miranda, Jason A.; Liu, Robert C.; Lesica, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Mice are of paramount importance in biomedical research and their vocalizations are a subject of interest for researchers across a wide range of health-related disciplines due to their increasingly important value as a phenotyping tool in models of neural, speech and language disorders. However, the mechanisms underlying the auditory processing of vocalizations in mice are not well understood. The mouse audiogram shows a peak in sensitivity at frequencies between 15-25 kHz, but weaker sensitivity for the higher ultrasonic frequencies at which they typically vocalize. To investigate the auditory processing of vocalizations in mice, we measured evoked potential, single-unit, and multi-unit responses to tones and vocalizations at three different stages along the auditory pathway: the auditory nerve and the cochlear nucleus in the periphery, and the inferior colliculus in the midbrain. Auditory brainstem response measurements suggested stronger responses in the midbrain relative to the periphery for frequencies higher than 32 kHz. This result was confirmed by single- and multi-unit recordings showing that high ultrasonic frequency tones and vocalizations elicited responses from only a small fraction of cells in the periphery, while a much larger fraction of cells responded in the inferior colliculus. These results suggest that the processing of communication calls in mice is supported by a specialization of the auditory system for high frequencies that emerges at central stations of the auditory pathway. PMID:26244986

  16. An Overrepresentation of High Frequencies in the Mouse Inferior Colliculus Supports the Processing of Ultrasonic Vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Lazaro, Jose A; Shepard, Kathryn N; Miranda, Jason A; Liu, Robert C; Lesica, Nicholas A

    2015-01-01

    Mice are of paramount importance in biomedical research and their vocalizations are a subject of interest for researchers across a wide range of health-related disciplines due to their increasingly important value as a phenotyping tool in models of neural, speech and language disorders. However, the mechanisms underlying the auditory processing of vocalizations in mice are not well understood. The mouse audiogram shows a peak in sensitivity at frequencies between 15-25 kHz, but weaker sensitivity for the higher ultrasonic frequencies at which they typically vocalize. To investigate the auditory processing of vocalizations in mice, we measured evoked potential, single-unit, and multi-unit responses to tones and vocalizations at three different stages along the auditory pathway: the auditory nerve and the cochlear nucleus in the periphery, and the inferior colliculus in the midbrain. Auditory brainstem response measurements suggested stronger responses in the midbrain relative to the periphery for frequencies higher than 32 kHz. This result was confirmed by single- and multi-unit recordings showing that high ultrasonic frequency tones and vocalizations elicited responses from only a small fraction of cells in the periphery, while a much larger fraction of cells responded in the inferior colliculus. These results suggest that the processing of communication calls in mice is supported by a specialization of the auditory system for high frequencies that emerges at central stations of the auditory pathway.

  17. Temporal properties of inferior colliculus neurons to photonic stimulation in the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaodong; Young, Hunter; Matic, Agnella Izzo; Zirkle, Whitney; Rajguru, Suhrud; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-08-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) may be beneficial in auditory prostheses because of its spatially selective activation of spiral ganglion neurons. However, the response properties of single auditory neurons to INS and the possible contributions of its optoacoustic effects are yet to be examined. In this study, the temporal properties of auditory neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) of guinea pigs in response to INS were characterized. Spatial selectivity of INS was observed along the tonotopically organized ICC. Trains of laser pulses and trains of acoustic clicks were used to evoke single unit responses in ICC of normal hearing animals. In response to INS, ICC neurons showed lower limiting rates, longer latencies, and lower firing efficiencies. In deaf animals, ICC neurons could still be stimulated by INS while unresponsive to acoustic stimulation. The site and spatial selectivity of INS both likely shaped the temporal properties of ICC neurons.

  18. Temporal properties of inferior colliculus neurons to photonic stimulation in the cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaodong; Young, Hunter; Matic, Agnella Izzo; Zirkle, Whitney; Rajguru, Suhrud; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) may be beneficial in auditory prostheses because of its spatially selective activation of spiral ganglion neurons. However, the response properties of single auditory neurons to INS and the possible contributions of its optoacoustic effects are yet to be examined. In this study, the temporal properties of auditory neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) of guinea pigs in response to INS were characterized. Spatial selectivity of INS was observed along the tonotopically organized ICC. Trains of laser pulses and trains of acoustic clicks were used to evoke single unit responses in ICC of normal hearing animals. In response to INS, ICC neurons showed lower limiting rates, longer latencies, and lower firing efficiencies. In deaf animals, ICC neurons could still be stimulated by INS while unresponsive to acoustic stimulation. The site and spatial selectivity of INS both likely shaped the temporal properties of ICC neurons. PMID:26311831

  19. Inputs to combination-sensitive neurons of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, J J; Mittmann, D H; Grose, C D

    1999-07-12

    In the mustached bat, combination-sensitive neurons display integrative responses to combinations of acoustic elements in biosonar or social vocalizations. One type of combination-sensitive neuron responds to multiple harmonics of the frequency-modulated (FM) components in the sonar pulse and echo of the bat. These neurons, termed FM-FM neurons, are sensitive to the pulse-echo delay and may encode the distance of sonar targets. FM-FM neurons are common in high-frequency regions of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) and may be created there. If so, they must receive low-frequency inputs in addition to the expected high-frequency inputs. We placed single deposits of a tracer at FM-FM recording sites in the ICC and then analyzed retrograde labeling in the brainstem and midbrain. We were particularly interested in labeling patterns suggestive of low-frequency input to these FM-FM neurons. In most nuclei containing labeled cells, there was a single focus of labeling in regions thought to be responsive to high-frequency sounds. More complex labeling patterns were observed in three nuclei. In the anteroventral cochlear nucleus, labeling in the anterior and marginal cell divisions occurred in regions thought to respond to low-frequency sounds. This labeling comprised 6% of total brainstem labeled cells. Labeling in the intermediate nucleus of the lateral lemniscus and the magnocellular part of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus together comprised nearly 40% of all labeled cells. In both nuclei, multiple foci of labeling occurred. These different foci may represent groups of cells tuned to different frequency bands. Thus, one or more of these three nuclei may provide low-frequency input to high-frequency-sensitive cells in the ICC, creating FM-FM responses. We also examined whether ICC neurons responsive to lower frequencies project to high-frequency-sensitive ICC regions; only 0.15% of labeling originated from these lower frequency

  20. Baroreflex failure in a patient with central nervous system lesions involving the nucleus tractus solitarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biaggioni, I.; Whetsell, W. O.; Jobe, J.; Nadeau, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Animal studies have shown the importance of the nucleus tractus solitarii, a collection of neurons in the brain stem, in the acute regulation of blood pressure. Impulses arising from the carotid and aortic baroreceptors converge in this center, where the first synapse of the baroreflex is located. Stimulation of the nucleus tractus solitarii provides an inhibitory signal to other brain stem structures, particularly the rostral ventrolateral medulla, resulting in a reduction in sympathetic outflow and a decrease in blood pressure. Conversely, experimental lesions of the nucleus tractus solitarii lead to loss of baroreflex control of blood pressure, sympathetic activation, and severe hypertension in animals. In humans, baroreflex failure due to deafferentation of baroreceptors has been previously reported and is characterized by episodes of severe hypertension and tachycardia. We present a patient with an undetermined process of the central nervous system characterized pathologically by ubiquitous infarctions that were particularly prominent in the nucleus tractus solitarii bilaterally but spared the rostral ventrolateral medulla. Absence of a functioning baroreflex was evidenced by the lack of reflex tachycardia to the hypotensive effects of sodium nitroprusside, exaggerated pressor responses to handgrip and cold pressor test, and exaggerated depressor responses to meals and centrally acting alpha 2-agonists. This clinicopathological correlate suggests that the patient's baroreflex failure can be explained by the unique combination of the destruction of sympathetic inhibitory centers (ie, the nucleus tractus solitarii) and preservation of centers that exert a positive modulation on sympathetic tone (ie, the rostral ventrolateral medulla).

  1. Centrality-dependent forward J/ψ production in high energy proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducloué, B.; Lappi, T.; Mäntysaari, H.

    2016-03-01

    Forward J/ψ production and suppression in high energy proton-nucleus collisions can be an important probe of gluon saturation. In an earlier work we studied this process in the Color Glass Condensate framework and showed that using the Glauber approach to extrapolate the dipole cross section of a proton to a nucleus leads to results closer to experimental data than previous calculations in this framework. Here we investigate the centrality dependence of the nuclear suppression in this model and show a comparison of our results with recent LHC data.

  2. Connections of the superior colliculus with the tegmentum and the cerebellum in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H

    1997-06-01

    Different tracer substances were injected into the superior colliculus (CoS) in order to study its afferents and efferents with the meso-rhombencephalic tegmentum, the precerebellar nuclei and the cerebellum in the Madagascan hedgehog tenrec. The overall pattern of tectal connectivity in tenrec was similar to that in other mammals, as, e.g. the efferents to the contralateral paramedian reticular formation. Similarly the origin of the cerebello-tectal projection in mainly the lateral portions of the tenrec's cerebellar nuclear complex corresponded to the findings in species with little binocular overlap. In comparison to other mammals, however, the tenrec showed a consistent projection to the ipsilateral inferior olivary nucleus, in addition to the classical contralateral tecto-olivary projection. The tenrec's CoS also appeared to receive an unusually prominent monoaminergic input particularly from the substantia nigra, pars compacta. There was a reciprocal tecto-parabigeminal projection, a distinct nuclear aggregation of parabigeminal neurons, however, was difficult to identify. The dorsal lemniscal nucleus did not show perikaryal labeling in contrast to the paralemniscal region. Similar to the cat but unlike the rat there were a few neurons in the nucleus of the central acoustic tract. Unlike the cat, but similar to the rat there was a distinct, predominantly ipsilateral projection to the magnocellular reticular field known to project spinalward.

  3. Central amygdaloid nucleus lesion attenuates exaggerated hemodynamic responses to noise stress in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Galeno, T M; Van Hoesen, G W; Brody, M J

    1984-01-23

    The regional hemodynamic basis of the cardiovascular response to acute noise stress in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and the role of the central amygdaloid nucleus in mediating this response was investigated. Using the pulsed Doppler flow probe technique it was determined that in response to noise, SHR exhibit a significantly greater percent increase in renal and mesenteric vascular resistance than WKY. Vascular responses in the hindquarter were similar in both groups. Bilateral lesion of the central amygdaloid nucleus or its output pathways to the brainstem decreased the cardiovascular response to noise in both SHR and WKY, with SHR and WKY lesion rats responding similarly. The central amygdaloid nucleus appears to participate in the cardiovascular response to acute noise stress in SHR and WKY. Although other structures in the limbic system network may contribute to integration of responses that involve the amygdala the present data suggest that this structure may play a central role in mediating the exaggerated cardiovascular responsiveness of SHR to environmental stress.

  4. Genetic identification of the central nucleus and other components of the central extended amygdala in chicken during development.

    PubMed

    Vicario, Alba; Abellán, Antonio; Desfilis, Ester; Medina, Loreta

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the central extended amygdala shows a highly complex organization, and is essential for animal survival due to its implication in fear responses. However, many aspects of its evolution are still unknown, and this structure is especially poorly understood in birds. The aim of this study was to define the central extended amygdala in chicken, by means of a battery of region-specific transcription factors (Pax6, Islet1, Nkx2.1) and phenotypic markers that characterize these different subdivisions in mammals. Our results allowed the identification of at least six distinct subdivisions in the lateral part of the avian central extended amygdala: (1) capsular central subdivision; (2) a group of intercalated-like cell patches; (3) oval central nucleus; (4) peri-intrapeduncular (peri-INP) island field; (5) perioval zone; and (6) a rostral part of the subpallial extended amygdala. In addition, we identified three subdivisions of the laterodorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTLd) belonging to the medial region of the chicken central extended amygdala complex. Based on their genetic profile, cellular composition and apparent embryonic origin of the cells, we discuss the similarity of these different subdivisions of chicken with different parts of the mouse central amygdala and surrounding cell masses, including the intercalated amygdalar masses and the sublenticular part of the central extended amygdala. Most of the subdivisions include various subpopulations of cells that apparently originate in the dorsal striatal, ventral striatal, pallidal, and preoptic embryonic domains, reaching their final location by either radial or tangential migrations. Similarly to mammals, the central amygdala and BSTLd of chicken project to the hypothalamus, and include different neurons expressing proenkephalin, corticotropin-releasing factor, somatostatin or tyrosine hydroxylase, which may be involved in the control of different aspects of fear/anxiety-related behavior

  5. A periodic network of neurochemical modules in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Chernock, Michelle L; Larue, David T; Winer, Jeffery A

    2004-02-01

    A new organization has been found in shell nuclei of rat inferior colliculus. Chemically specific modules with a periodic distribution fill about half of layer 2 of external cortex and dorsal cortex. Modules contain clusters of small glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive neurons and large boutons at higher density than in other inferior colliculus subdivisions. The modules are also present in tissue stained for parvalbumin, cytochrome oxidase, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase, and acetylcholinesterase. Six to seven bilaterally symmetrical modules extend from the caudal extremity of the external cortex of the inferior colliculus to its rostral pole. Modules are from approximately 800 to 2200 microm long and have areas between 5000 and 40,000 microm2. Modules alternate with immunonegative regions. Similar modules are found in inbred and outbred strains of rat, and in both males and females. They are absent in mouse, squirrel, cat, bat, macaque monkey, and barn owl. Modules are immunonegative for glycine, calbindin, serotonin, and choline acetyltransferase. The auditory cortex and ipsi- and contralateral inferior colliculi project to the external cortex. Somatic sensory influences from the dorsal column nuclei and spinal trigeminal nucleus are the primary ascending sensory input to the external cortex; ascending auditory input to layer 2 is sparse. If the immunopositive modular neurons receive this input, the external cortex could participate in spatial orientation and somatic motor control through its intrinsic and extrinsic projections. PMID:14759566

  6. The representation of sound localization cues in the barn owl's inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Singheiser, Martin; Gutfreund, Yoram; Wagner, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    The barn owl is a well-known model system for studying auditory processing and sound localization. This article reviews the morphological and functional organization, as well as the role of the underlying microcircuits, of the barn owl's inferior colliculus (IC). We focus on the processing of frequency and interaural time (ITD) and level differences (ILD). We first summarize the morphology of the sub-nuclei belonging to the IC and their differentiation by antero- and retrograde labeling and by staining with various antibodies. We then focus on the response properties of neurons in the three major sub-nuclei of IC [core of the central nucleus of the IC (ICCc), lateral shell of the central nucleus of the IC (ICCls), and the external nucleus of the IC (ICX)]. ICCc projects to ICCls, which in turn sends its information to ICX. The responses of neurons in ICCc are sensitive to changes in ITD but not to changes in ILD. The distribution of ITD sensitivity with frequency in ICCc can only partly be explained by optimal coding. We continue with the tuning properties of ICCls neurons, the first station in the midbrain where the ITD and ILD pathways merge after they have split at the level of the cochlear nucleus. The ICCc and ICCls share similar ITD and frequency tuning. By contrast, ICCls shows sigmoidal ILD tuning which is absent in ICCc. Both ICCc and ICCls project to the forebrain, and ICCls also projects to ICX, where space-specific neurons are found. Space-specific neurons exhibit side peak suppression in ITD tuning, bell-shaped ILD tuning, and are broadly tuned to frequency. These neurons respond only to restricted positions of auditory space and form a map of two-dimensional auditory space. Finally, we briefly review major IC features, including multiplication-like computations, correlates of echo suppression, plasticity, and adaptation. PMID:22798945

  7. The representation of sound localization cues in the barn owl's inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Singheiser, Martin; Gutfreund, Yoram; Wagner, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    The barn owl is a well-known model system for studying auditory processing and sound localization. This article reviews the morphological and functional organization, as well as the role of the underlying microcircuits, of the barn owl's inferior colliculus (IC). We focus on the processing of frequency and interaural time (ITD) and level differences (ILD). We first summarize the morphology of the sub-nuclei belonging to the IC and their differentiation by antero- and retrograde labeling and by staining with various antibodies. We then focus on the response properties of neurons in the three major sub-nuclei of IC [core of the central nucleus of the IC (ICCc), lateral shell of the central nucleus of the IC (ICCls), and the external nucleus of the IC (ICX)]. ICCc projects to ICCls, which in turn sends its information to ICX. The responses of neurons in ICCc are sensitive to changes in ITD but not to changes in ILD. The distribution of ITD sensitivity with frequency in ICCc can only partly be explained by optimal coding. We continue with the tuning properties of ICCls neurons, the first station in the midbrain where the ITD and ILD pathways merge after they have split at the level of the cochlear nucleus. The ICCc and ICCls share similar ITD and frequency tuning. By contrast, ICCls shows sigmoidal ILD tuning which is absent in ICCc. Both ICCc and ICCls project to the forebrain, and ICCls also projects to ICX, where space-specific neurons are found. Space-specific neurons exhibit side peak suppression in ITD tuning, bell-shaped ILD tuning, and are broadly tuned to frequency. These neurons respond only to restricted positions of auditory space and form a map of two-dimensional auditory space. Finally, we briefly review major IC features, including multiplication-like computations, correlates of echo suppression, plasticity, and adaptation. PMID:22798945

  8. Estrogen synthesis in the central nucleus of the amygdala following middle cerebral artery occlusion: role in modulating neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Saleh, T M; Connell, B J; Legge, C; Cribb, A E

    2005-01-01

    Stroke-induced lesions of the insular cortex in the brain have been linked to autonomic dysfunction (sympathoexcitation) leading to arrhythmogenesis and sudden cardiac death. In experimental models, systemic estrogen administration in male rats has been shown to reduce stroke-induced cell death in the insular cortex as well as prevent sympathoexcitation. The central nucleus of the amygdala has been postulated to mediate sympathoexcitatory output from the insular cortex. We therefore set out to determine if endogenous estrogen levels within the central nucleus of the amygdala are altered following stroke and if microinjection of estrogen into the central nucleus of the amygdala modulates autonomic tone. Plasma estrogen concentrations were not altered by middle cerebral artery occlusion (22.86+/-0.14 pg/ml vs. 21.24+/-0.33 pg/ml; P>0.05). In contrast, estrogen concentrations in the central nucleus of the amygdala increased significantly following middle cerebral artery occlusion (from 20.83+/-0.54 pg/ml to 76.67+/-1.59 pg/ml; P<0.05). Local infusion of an aromatase inhibitor, letrozole, into the central nucleus of the amygdala at the time of middle cerebral artery occlusion prevented the increase in estrogen concentration suggesting that this increase was dependent on aromatization from testosterone. Furthermore, bilateral microinjection of estrogen (0.5 microM in 200 nl) directly into the central nucleus of the amygdala significantly decreased arterial pressure and sympathetic tone and increased baroreflex sensitivity, and these effects were enhanced following co-injection with either an N-methyl-D-aspartate or non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist. Taken together, the results suggest that middle cerebral artery occlusion resulted in synthesis of estrogen within the central nucleus of the amygdala and that this enhanced estrogen level may act to attenuate overstimulation of central nucleus of the amygdala neurons to prevent middle cerebral artery occlusion

  9. Immunocytochemical profiles of inferior colliculus neurons in the rat and their changes with aging

    PubMed Central

    Ouda, Ladislav; Syka, Josef

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) plays a strategic role in the central auditory system in relaying and processing acoustical information, and therefore its age-related changes may significantly influence the quality of the auditory function. A very complex processing of acoustical stimuli occurs in the IC, as supported also by the fact that the rat IC contains more neurons than all other subcortical auditory structures combined. GABAergic neurons, which predominantly co-express parvalbumin (PV), are present in the central nucleus of the IC in large numbers and to a lesser extent in the dorsal and external/lateral cortices of the IC. On the other hand, calbindin (CB) and calretinin (CR) are prevalent in the dorsal and external cortices of the IC, with only a few positive neurons in the central nucleus. The relationship between CB and CR expression in the IC and any neurotransmitter system has not yet been well established, but the distribution and morphology of the immunoreactive neurons suggest that they are at least partially non-GABAergic cells. The expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) (a key enzyme for GABA synthesis) and calcium binding proteins (CBPs) in the IC of rats undergoes pronounced changes with aging that involve mostly a decline in protein expression and a decline in the number of immunoreactive neurons. Similar age-related changes in GAD, CB, and CR expression are present in the IC of two rat strains with differently preserved inner ear function up to late senescence (Long-Evans and Fischer 344), which suggests that these changes do not depend exclusively on peripheral deafferentation but are, at least partially, of central origin. These changes may be associated with the age-related deterioration in the processing of the temporal parameters of acoustical stimuli, which is not correlated with hearing threshold shifts, and therefore may contribute to central presbycusis. PMID:23049499

  10. PACAP neurons in the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus are targets of central leptin signaling.

    PubMed

    Hawke, Zoe; Ivanov, Tina R; Bechtold, David A; Dhillon, Harveen; Lowell, Brad B; Luckman, Simon M

    2009-11-25

    The adipose-derived hormone, leptin, was discovered over 10 years ago, but only now are we unmasking its downstream pathways which lead to reduced energy intake (feeding) and increased energy expenditure (thermogenesis). Recent transgenic models have challenged the long-standing supposition that the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) is omnipotent in the central response to leptin, and research focus is beginning to shift to examine roles of extra-arcuate sites. Dhillon et al. (2006) demonstrated that targeted knock out of the signaling form of the leptin receptor (lepr-B) in steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) cells of the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMN) produces obesity of a similar magnitude to the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-driven lepr-B deleted mouse, via a functionally distinct mechanism. These findings reveal that SF-1 cells of the VMN could be equally as important as POMC cells in mediating leptin's anti-obesity effects. However, the identification of molecular and cellular correlates of this relationship remains tantalizingly unknown. Here, we have shown that mRNA expression of the VMN-expressed neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is regulated according to energy status and that it exerts catabolic effects when administered centrally to mice. Furthermore, we have shown that SF-1 and PACAP mRNAs are colocalized in the VMN, and that leptin signaling via lepr-B is required for normal PACAP expression in these cells. Finally, blocking endogenous central PACAP signaling with the antagonist PACAP(6-38) markedly attenuates leptin-induced hypophagia and hyperthermia in vivo. Thus, it appears that PACAP is an important mediator of central leptin effects on energy balance.

  11. Enhancement of forward suppression begins in the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ingham, Neil J; Itatani, Naoya; Bleeck, Stefan; Winter, Ian M

    2016-05-15

    A neuron׳s response to a sound can be suppressed by the presentation of a preceding sound. It has been suggested that this suppression is a direct correlate of the psychophysical phenomenon of forward masking, however, forward suppression, as measured in the responses of the auditory nerve, was insufficient to account for behavioural performance. In contrast the neural suppression seen in the inferior colliculus and auditory cortex was much closer to psychophysical performance. In anaesthetised guinea-pigs, using a physiological two-interval forced-choice threshold tracking algorithm to estimate suppressed (masked) thresholds, we examine whether the enhancement of suppression can occur at an earlier stage of the auditory pathway, the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN). We also compare these responses with the responses from the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICc) using the same preparation. In both nuclei, onset-type neurons showed the greatest amounts of suppression (16.9-33.5dB) and, in the VCN, these recovered with the fastest time constants (14.1-19.9ms). Neurons with sustained discharge demonstrated reduced masking (8.9-12.1dB) and recovery time constants of 27.2-55.6ms. In the VCN the decrease in growth of suppression with increasing suppressor level was largest for chopper units and smallest for onset-type units. The threshold elevations recorded for most unit types are insufficient to account for the magnitude of forward masking as measured behaviourally, however, onset responders, in both the cochlear nucleus and inferior colliculus demonstrate a wide dynamic range of suppression, similar to that observed in human psychophysics. PMID:26944300

  12. Functional organization of mustached bat inferior colliculus: I. Representation of FM frequency bands important for target ranging revealed by 14C-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography and single unit mapping.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, W E; Frisina, R D; Gooler, D M

    1989-06-01

    The representation in the inferior colliculus of the frequency modulated (FM) components of the first (25-30 kHz) and second (50-60 kHz) harmonic of the sonar signal of the mustached bat, which may be important for target range processing, was investigated by using the 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) technique and single-unit mapping. In the 2-DG experiments, bats presented with second harmonic FM stimuli alone showed uptake of label in specific regions of the central nucleus and dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus, and the nucleus of the brachium. In the central nucleus, a dorsoventrally and mediolaterally elongated slab at the caudal border of the anterolateral division was observed. Labeling in the dorsal cortex was contiguous with this band. Bats stimulated with pairs of first and second harmonic FM stimuli separated by short time delays showed similar patterns of labeling, with the addition of another dorsoventrally elongated region of uptake in the more rostral part of the anterolateral division, associated with label in the dorsal cortex. By comparison to control cases exposed to delayed pairs of first and third harmonic signals, or to a second harmonic constant-frequency tone burst at the bat's reference frequency (ca. 60 kHz), we deduced that this additional region of uptake was attributable to the first harmonic FM component. To elucidate further the details of the tonotopic organization and to correlate the frequency representation with anatomical features of the IC, fine-grained maps of single-unit best frequencies were obtained in the central nucleus. Isofrequency contours were reconstructed by computer from five bats after focal, iontophoretic injection of horseradish peroxidase to locate the penetrations and trace connections of the FM2 area. We found that the tissue volume representing FM2 frequencies (50-60 kHz) showed approximately a sixfold overrepresentation for this frequency band. This region occupied most of the caudal portion of the anterolateral

  13. Removing Cool Cores and Central Metallicity Peaks in Galaxy Clusters with Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ~1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  14. Topographic projection from the optic tectum to the auditory space map in the inferior colliculus of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Hyde, P S; Knudsen, E I

    2000-05-29

    In the barn owl (Tyto alba), the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX) contains a map of auditory space that is calibrated by visual experience. The source of the visually based instructive signal to the ICX is unknown. Injections of biotinylated dextran amine and Fluoro-Gold in the ICX retrogradely labelled neurons in layers 8-15 of the ipsilateral optic tectum (OT) that could carry this instructive signal. This projection was point-to-point and in register with the feed-forward, auditory projection from the ICX to the OT. Most labelled neurons were in layers 10-11, and most were bipolar. Tripolar, multipolar, and unipolar neurons were also observed. Multipolar neurons had dendrites that were oriented parallel to the tectal laminae. In contrast, most labelled bipolar and tripolar neurons had dendrites oriented perpendicular to the tectal laminae, extending superficially into the retino-recipient laminae and deep into the auditory recipient laminae. Therefore, these neurons were positioned to receive both visual and auditory information from particular locations in space. Biocytin injected into the superficial layers of the OT labelled bouton-laden axons in the ICX. These axons were generally finer than, but had similar bouton densities as, feed-forward auditory fibers in the ICX, labelled by injections of biocytin into the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). These data demonstrate a point-to-point projection from the OT to the ICX that could provide a spatial template for calibrating the auditory space map in the ICX. PMID:10813778

  15. Serotonin in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M; Thompson, Ann M; Pollak, George D

    2002-06-01

    It has been recognized for some time that serotonin fibers originating in raphe nuclei are present in the inferior colliculi of all mammalian species studied. More recently, serotonin has been found to modulate the responses of single inferior colliculus neurons to many types of auditory stimuli, ranging from simple tone bursts to complex species-specific vocalizations. The effects of serotonin are often quite strong, and for some neurons are also highly specific. A dramatic illustration of this is that serotonin can change the selectivity of some neurons for sounds, including species-specific vocalizations. These results are discussed in light of several theories on the function of serotonin in the IC, and of outstanding issues that remain to be addressed. PMID:12117504

  16. Central control of penile erection: role of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Argiolas, Antonio; Melis, Maria Rosaria

    2005-05-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus is an integration centre between the central and peripheral autonomic nervous systems. It is involved in numerous functions from feeding, metabolic balance, blood pressure and heart rate, to erectile function and sexual behaviour. In particular, a group of oxytocinergic neurons originating in this nucleus and projecting to extra-hypothalamic brain areas (e.g., hippocampus, medulla oblongata and spinal cord) control penile erection in male rats. Activation of these neurons by dopamine and its agonists, excitatory amino acids (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid) or oxytocin itself, or by electrical stimulation leads to penile erection, while their inhibition by gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) and its agonists or by opioid peptides and opiate-like drugs inhibits this sexual response. The activation of these neurons is secondary to the activation of nitric oxide synthase, which produces nitric oxide. Nitric oxide in turn causes, by a mechanism that is as yet unidentified, the release of oxytocin in extra-hypothalamic brain areas. Other compounds recently identified that facilitate penile erection by activating central oxytocinergic neurons are peptide analogues of hexarelin, a growth hormone releasing peptide, pro-VGF-derived peptides, endogenous peptides that may be released by neuronal nerve endings impinging on oxytocinergic cell bodies, SR 141716A, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, and, less convincingly, adrenocorticotropin-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (ACTH-MSH)-related peptides. Paraventricular oxytocinergic neurons and similar mechanisms are also involved in penile erection occurring in physiological contexts, namely noncontact erections that occur in male rats in the presence of an inaccessible receptive female, and during copulation. These findings show that the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus plays an important role in the control of erectile function and sexual activity. As the male rat is a model of

  17. The Zona Incerta Regulates Communication between the Superior Colliculus and the Posteromedial Thalamus: Implications for Thalamic Interactions with the Dorsolateral Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Glenn D.R.; Smith, Jared B.

    2015-01-01

    There is uncertainty concerning the circuit connections by which the superior colliculus interacts with the basal ganglia. To address this issue, anterograde and retrograde tracers were placed, respectively, into the superior colliculus and globus pallidus of Sprague-Dawley rats. In this two-tracer experiment, the projections from the superior colliculus terminated densely in the ventral zona incerta (ZIv), but did not overlap the labeled neurons observed in the subthalamic nucleus. In cases in which anterograde and retrograde tracers were placed, respectively, in sensory-responsive sites in the superior colliculus and posteromedial (POm) thalamus, the labeled projections from superior colliculus innervated the ZIv regions that contained the labeled neurons that project to POm. We also confirmed this colliculo–incertal–POm pathway by depositing a mixture of retrograde and anterograde tracers at focal sites in ZIv to reveal retrogradely labeled neurons in superior colliculus and anterogradely labeled terminals in POm. When combined with retrograde tracer injections in POm, immunohistochemical processing proved that most ZIv projections to POm are GABAergic. Consistent with these findings, direct stimulation of superior colliculus evoked neuronal excitation in ZIv and caused inhibition of spontaneous activity in POm. Collectively, these results indicate that superior colliculus can activate the inhibitory projections from ZIv to the POm. This is significant because it suggests that the superior colliculus could suppress the interactions between POm and the dorsolateral striatum, presumably to halt ongoing behaviors so that more adaptive motor actions are selected in response to unexpected sensory events. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT By demonstrating that the zona incerta regulates communication between the superior colliculus and the posteromedial thalamus, we have uncovered a circuit that partly explains the behavioral changes that occur in response to unexpected

  18. Neural correlates of two different types of extinction learning in the amygdala central nucleus.

    PubMed

    Iordanova, Mihaela D; Deroche, Mickael L D; Esber, Guillem R; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Extinction is a fundamental form of memory updating in which one learns to stop expecting an event that no longer occurs. This learning ensues when one experiences a change in environmental contingencies, that is, when an expected outcome fails to occur (simple extinction), or when a novel inflated expectation of a double outcome (overexpectation) is in conflict with the real outcome, and is a process that has been linked to amygdala function. Here, we show that in rats, the same neuronal population in the amygdala central nucleus updates reward expectancies and behaviour in both types of extinction, and neural changes in one paradigm are reflected in the other. This work may have implications for the management of addiction and anxiety disorders that require treatments based on the outcome omission, and disorders such as obesity that could use overexpectation, but not omission strategies. PMID:27531638

  19. Neural correlates of two different types of extinction learning in the amygdala central nucleus.

    PubMed

    Iordanova, Mihaela D; Deroche, Mickael L D; Esber, Guillem R; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Extinction is a fundamental form of memory updating in which one learns to stop expecting an event that no longer occurs. This learning ensues when one experiences a change in environmental contingencies, that is, when an expected outcome fails to occur (simple extinction), or when a novel inflated expectation of a double outcome (overexpectation) is in conflict with the real outcome, and is a process that has been linked to amygdala function. Here, we show that in rats, the same neuronal population in the amygdala central nucleus updates reward expectancies and behaviour in both types of extinction, and neural changes in one paradigm are reflected in the other. This work may have implications for the management of addiction and anxiety disorders that require treatments based on the outcome omission, and disorders such as obesity that could use overexpectation, but not omission strategies.

  20. Constructing the suprachiasmatic nucleus: a watchmaker's perspective on the central clockworks

    PubMed Central

    Bedont, Joseph L.; Blackshaw, Seth

    2015-01-01

    The circadian system constrains an organism's palette of behaviors to portions of the solar day appropriate to its ecological niche. The central light-entrained clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mammalian circadian system has evolved a complex network of interdependent signaling mechanisms linking multiple distinct oscillators to serve this crucial function. However, studies of the mechanisms controlling SCN development have greatly lagged behind our understanding of its physiological functions. We review advances in the understanding of adult SCN function, what has been described about SCN development to date, and the potential of both current and future studies of SCN development to yield important insights into master clock function, dysfunction, and evolution. PMID:26005407

  1. Neural correlates of two different types of extinction learning in the amygdala central nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Iordanova, Mihaela D.; Deroche, Mickael L. D.; Esber, Guillem R.; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Extinction is a fundamental form of memory updating in which one learns to stop expecting an event that no longer occurs. This learning ensues when one experiences a change in environmental contingencies, that is, when an expected outcome fails to occur (simple extinction), or when a novel inflated expectation of a double outcome (overexpectation) is in conflict with the real outcome, and is a process that has been linked to amygdala function. Here, we show that in rats, the same neuronal population in the amygdala central nucleus updates reward expectancies and behaviour in both types of extinction, and neural changes in one paradigm are reflected in the other. This work may have implications for the management of addiction and anxiety disorders that require treatments based on the outcome omission, and disorders such as obesity that could use overexpectation, but not omission strategies. PMID:27531638

  2. Characteristics of central collision events in Fe-nucleus interactions for 20 - 60 GeV/nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Drake, S.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.

    1985-01-01

    A counter emulsion hybrid chamber in Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment (JACEE-3) was flown on a balloon at the altitude (5.4 g/sq cm) in 1982 with the objective of probing the heavy nuclear collisions above 20 GeV per nucleon. In the energy region, it is suggested that nucleus-nucleus collisions provide dense collisions complex through compression and secondary particle production. In the lower energy region, an evidence of collective flow has been reported. And also, at higher energy region, it has been argued that nucleus has rather large stopping power. In this paper, the high multiplicity characteristics of Fe nucleus central collisions with energies 20 to 50 GeV/nucleon are presented. This is considered to be relevant to compressibility and collective flow of nuclear matter.

  3. Paraventricular nucleus is involved in the central pathway of adipose afferent reflex in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhen; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Wang, Gui-Hua; Wu, Yu-Long; Ma, Chun-Lei

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence indicates a link between sympathetic nervous system activation and obesity, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The adipose afferent reflex (AAR) is a sympathoexcitatory reflex that is activated by afferent neurotransmission from the white adipose tissue (WAT). This study aimed to investigate whether the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) is an important component of the central neurocircuitry of the AAR. In anesthetized rats, the discharge activity of individual PVH neurons was recorded in vivo. Activation of WAT afferents was initiated by capsaicin injection, and the AAR was evaluated by monitoring renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses. The responses of PVH neurons to activation of WAT afferents were evaluated by c-fos immunoreactivity and the discharge activity of individual PVH neurons, which was recorded using extracellular single-unit recording. After activation of WAT afferents, both individual PVH neuron discharge activity and c-fos immunoreactivity increased. Bilateral selective lesions of the neurons in the PVH with kainic acid abolished the AAR. These results indicate that PVH is an important component of the central neurocircuitry of the AAR. PMID:26963333

  4. The role of neurotensin in positive reinforcement in the rat central nucleus of amygdala.

    PubMed

    László, Kristóf; Tóth, Krisztián; Kertes, Erika; Péczely, László; Lénárd, László

    2010-04-01

    In the central nervous system neurotensin (NT) acts as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. It was shown that NT has positive reinforcing effects after its direct microinjection into the ventral tegmental area. The central nucleus of amygdala (CeA), part of the limbic system, plays an important role in learning, memory, regulation of feeding, anxiety and emotional behavior. By means of immunohistochemical and radioimmune methods it was shown that the amygdaloid body is relatively rich in NT immunoreactive elements and NT receptors. The aim of our study was to examine the possible effects of NT on reinforcement and anxiety in the CeA. In conditioned place preference test male Wistar rats were microinjected bilaterally with 100 or 250 ng NT in volume of 0.4 microl or 35 ng neurotensin receptor 1 (NTS1) antagonist SR 48692 alone, or NTS1 antagonist 15 min before 100 ng NT treatment. Hundred or 250 ng NT significantly increased the time rats spent in the treatment quadrant. Prior treatment with the non-peptide NTS1 antagonist blocked the effects of NT. Antagonist itself did not influence the reinforcing effect. In elevated plus maze test we did not find differences among the groups as far as the anxiety index (time spent on the open arms) was concerned. Our results suggest that in the rat ACE NT has positive reinforcing effects. We clarified that NTS1s are involved in this action. It was also shown that NT does not influence anxiety behavior.

  5. A function for binaural integration in auditory grouping and segregation in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Kyle T; Shackleton, Trevor M; Magezi, David A; Palmer, Alan R

    2015-03-15

    Responses of neurons to binaural, harmonic complex stimuli in urethane-anesthetized guinea pig inferior colliculus (IC) are reported. To assess the binaural integration of harmonicity cues for sound segregation and grouping, responses were measured to harmonic complexes with different fundamental frequencies presented to each ear. Simultaneously gated harmonic stimuli with fundamental frequencies of 125 Hz and 145 Hz were presented to the left and right ears, respectively, and recordings made from 96 neurons with characteristic frequencies >2 kHz in the central nucleus of the IC. Of these units, 70 responded continuously throughout the stimulus and were excited by the stimulus at the contralateral ear. The stimulus at the ipsilateral ear excited (EE: 14%; 10/70), inhibited (EI: 33%; 23/70), or had no significant effect (EO: 53%; 37/70), defined by the effect on firing rate. The neurons phase locked to the temporal envelope at each ear to varying degrees depending on signal level. Many of the cells (predominantly EO) were dominated by the response to the contralateral stimulus. Another group (predominantly EI) synchronized to the contralateral stimulus and were suppressed by the ipsilateral stimulus in a phasic manner. A third group synchronized to the stimuli at both ears (predominantly EE). Finally, a group only responded when the waveform peaks from each ear coincided. We conclude that these groups of neurons represent different "streams" of information but exhibit modifications of the response rather than encoding a feature of the stimulus, like pitch. PMID:25540219

  6. Excitatory and facilitatory frequency response areas in the inferior colliculus of the mustached bat.

    PubMed

    Portfors, Christine V; Wenstrup, Jeffrey J

    2002-06-01

    In the mustached bat's central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC), many neurons display facilitatory or inhibitory responses when presented with two tones of distinctly different frequencies. Our previous studies have focused on spectral interactions between specific frequency bands contained in the bat's sonar vocalization. In this study, we describe excitatory and facilitatory frequency response areas across all frequencies in the mustached bat's audible range. We show that many neurons in the ICC have more extensive frequency interactions than previously documented. We recorded responses of 96 single units to single tones and combinations of two tones. Best frequencies of the units ranged from 59-15 kHz. Forty-one units had a single, excitatory frequency response area. The rest of the units had more complex frequency tuning that included multiple excitatory frequency response areas and facilitatory frequency response areas. Some of the facilitatory frequency interactions were between one sound with energy in a sonar frequency band and a second sound with energy in a non-sonar frequency band. We also found that neurons could be facilitated by more than one additional frequency band. Our findings of extensive frequency interactions in the ICC of the mustached bat suggest that some neurons may be well suited for the analysis of complex sounds, possibly including social communication sounds.

  7. Spread of cochlear excitation during stimulation with pulsed infrared radiation: inferior colliculus measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, C.-P.; Rajguru, S. M.; Matic, A. I.; Moreno, E. L.; Fishman, A. J.; Robinson, A. M.; Suh, E.; Walsh, J. T., Jr.

    2011-10-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has received considerable attention over the last few years. It provides an alternative method to artificially stimulate neurons without electrical current or the introduction of exogenous chromophores. One of the primary benefits of INS could be the improved spatial selectivity when compared with electrical stimulation. In the present study, we have evaluated the spatial selectivity of INS in the acutely damaged cochlea of guinea pigs and compared it to stimulation with acoustic tone pips in normal-hearing animals. The radiation was delivered via a 200 µm diameter optical fiber, which was inserted through a cochleostomy into the scala tympani of the basal cochlear turn. The stimulated section along the cochlear spiral ganglion was estimated from the neural responses recorded from the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). ICC responses were recorded in response to cochlear INS using a multichannel penetrating electrode array. Spatial tuning curves (STCs) were constructed from the responses. For INS, approximately 55% of the activation profiles showed a single maximum, ~22% had two maxima and ~13% had multiple maxima. The remaining 10% of the profiles occurred at the limits of the electrode array and could not be classified. The majority of ICC STCs indicated that the spread of activation evoked by optical stimuli is comparable to that produced by acoustic tone pips.

  8. Age-related neurochemical changes in the rhesus macaque inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Engle, James R.; Gray, Daniel T.; Turner, Heather; Udell, Julia B.; Recanzone, Gregg H.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is marked by audiometric hearing deficits that propagate along the auditory pathway. Neurochemical changes as a function of aging have also been identified in neurons along the auditory pathway in both rodents and carnivores, however, very little is known about how these neurochemicals change in the non-human primate. To examine how these compensatory neurochemical changes relate to normal aging and audiometric sensitivity along the auditory pathway, we collected auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and brain specimens from seven rhesus monkeys spanning in age from 15 to 35 years old, and examined the relationship between click evoked ABR thresholds and the ABR evoked pure tone average (PTA) and changes in the number of parvalbumin and NADPH-diaphorase positive cells in the auditory midbrain. We found that the number of parvalbumin positive cells in the central nucleus and the surrounding cortex regions of the inferior colliculus were strongly correlated with advancing age and ABR PTA. We also found that the numbers of NADPHd positive cells in these same regions were not associated with normal aging or changes in the ABR thresholds. These findings suggest that the auditory midbrain undergoes an up-regulation of parvalbumin expressing neurons with aging that is related to changes in the processing of frequencies across the audiometric range. PMID:24795627

  9. Involvement of the basolateral complex and central nucleus of amygdala in the omission effects of different magnitudes of reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Judice-Daher, Danielle M; Tavares, Tatiane F; Bueno, José Lino O

    2012-07-15

    Evidence from appetitive Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning studies suggest that the amygdala is involved in modulation of responses correlated with motivational states, and therefore, to the modulation of processes probably underlying reinforcement omission effects. The present study aimed to clarify whether or not the mechanisms related to reinforcement omission effects of different magnitudes depend on basolateral complex and central nucleus of amygdala. Rats were trained on a fixed-interval 12s with limited hold 6s signaled schedule in which correct responses were always followed by one of two reinforcement magnitudes. Bilateral lesions of the basolateral complex and central nucleus were made after acquisition of stable performance. After postoperative recovery, the training was changed from 100% to 50% reinforcement schedules. The results showed that lesions of the basolateral complex and central nucleus did not eliminate or reduce, but interfere with reinforcement omission effects. The response from rats of both the basolateral complex and central nucleus lesioned group was higher relative to that of the rats of their respective sham-lesioned groups after reinforcement omission. Thus, the lesioned rats were more sensitive to the omission effect. Moreover, the basolateral complex lesions prevented the magnitude effect on reinforcement omission effects. Basolateral complex lesioned rats showed no differential performance following omission of larger and smaller reinforcement magnitude. Thus, the basolateral complex is involved in incentive processes relative to omission of different reinforcement magnitudes. Therefore, it is possible that reinforcement omission effects are modulated by brain circuitry which involves amygdala.

  10. Corticotropin-releasing factor within the central nucleus of the amygdala and the nucleus accumbens shell mediates the negative affective state of nicotine withdrawal in rats

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkiewcz, Catherine A.; Prado, Melissa M.; Isaac, Shani K.; Marshall, Alex; Rylkova, Daria; Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.

    2008-01-01

    Tobacco addiction is a chronic disorder that is characterized by a negative affective state upon smoking cessation and relapse after periods of abstinence. Previous research has shown that an increased central release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) at least partly mediates the deficit in brain reward function associated with nicotine withdrawal in rats. The aim of these studies was to investigate the role of CRF in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), the lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), and the nucleus accumbens shell (Nacc shell) in the deficit in brain reward function associated with precipitated nicotine withdrawal. The intracranial self-stimulation procedure was used to assess the negative affective aspects of nicotine withdrawal. Elevations in brain reward thresholds are indicative of a deficit in brain reward function. In all experiments, the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (3 mg/kg) elevated the brain reward thresholds of the nicotine dependent rats (9 mg/kg/day of nicotine salt) and did not affect the brain reward thresholds of the saline-treated control rats. The administration of the nonspecific CRF1/2 receptor antagonist D-Phe CRF(12–41) into the CeA and the Nacc shell prevented the mecamylamine-induced elevations in brain reward thresholds in the nicotine dependent rats. Blockade of CRF1/2 receptors in the lateral BNST did not prevent the mecamylamine-induced elevations in brain reward thresholds in the nicotine dependent rats. These studies indicate that the negative emotional state associated with precipitated nicotine withdrawal is at least partly mediated by an increased release of CRF in the CeA and Nacc shell. PMID:19145226

  11. Synaptic and network consequences of monosynaptic nociceptive inputs of parabrachial nucleus origin in the central amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Sugimura, Yae K.; Takahashi, Yukari; Watabe, Ayako M.

    2016-01-01

    A large majority of neurons in the superficial layer of the dorsal horn projects to the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPB). LPB neurons then project to the capsular part of the central amygdala (CeA; CeC), a key structure underlying the nociception-emotion link. LPB-CeC synaptic transmission is enhanced in various pain models by using electrical stimulation of putative fibers of LPB origin in brain slices. However, this approach has limitations for examining direct monosynaptic connections devoid of directly stimulating fibers from other structures and local GABAergic neurons. To overcome these limitations, we infected the LPB of rats with an adeno-associated virus vector expressing channelrhodopsin-2 and prepared coronal and horizontal brain slices containing the amygdala. We found that blue light stimulation resulted in monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), with very small latency fluctuations, followed by a large polysynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic current in CeC neurons, regardless of the firing pattern type. Intraplantar formalin injection at 24 h before slice preparation significantly increased EPSC amplitude in late firing-type CeC neurons. These results indicate that direct monosynaptic glutamatergic inputs from the LPB not only excite CeC neurons but also regulate CeA network signaling through robust feed-forward inhibition, which is under plastic modulation in response to persistent inflammatory pain. PMID:26888105

  12. Microtubule-nucleus interactions in Dictyostelium discoideum mediated by central motor kinesins.

    PubMed

    Tikhonenko, Irina; Nag, Dilip K; Robinson, Douglas N; Koonce, Michael P

    2009-05-01

    Kinesins are a diverse superfamily of motor proteins that drive organelles and other microtubule-based movements in eukaryotic cells. These motors play important roles in multiple events during both interphase and cell division. Dictyostelium discoideum contains 13 kinesin motors, 12 of which are grouped into nine families, plus one orphan. Functions for 11 of the 13 motors have been previously investigated; we address here the activities of the two remaining kinesins, both isoforms with central motor domains. Kif6 (of the kinesin-13 family) appears to be essential for cell viability. The partial knockdown of Kif6 with RNA interference generates mitotic defects (lagging chromosomes and aberrant spindle assemblies) that are consistent with kinesin-13 disruptions in other organisms. However, the orphan motor Kif9 participates in a completely novel kinesin activity, one that maintains a connection between the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) and nucleus during interphase. kif9 null cell growth is impaired, and the MTOC appears to disconnect from its normally tight nuclear linkage. Mitotic spindles elongate in a normal fashion in kif9(-) cells, but we hypothesize that this kinesin is important for positioning the MTOC into the nuclear envelope during prophase. This function would be significant for the early steps of cell division and also may play a role in regulating centrosome replication.

  13. Central amygdalar nucleus treated with orexin neuropeptides evoke differing feeding and grooming responses in the hamster.

    PubMed

    Alò, Raffaella; Avolio, Ennio; Mele, Maria; Di Vito, Anna; Canonaco, Marcello

    2015-04-15

    Interaction of the orexinergic (ORXergic) neuronal system with the excitatory (glutamate, l-Glu) or the inhibitory (GABA) neurosignaling complexes evokes major homeostatic physiological events. In this study, effects of the two ORXergic neuropeptides (ORX-A/B) on their receptor (ORX-2R) expression changes were correlated to feeding and grooming actions of the hibernating hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). Infusion of the central amygdala nucleus (CeA) with ORX-A caused hamsters to consume notable quantities of food, while ORX-B accounted for a moderate increase. Interestingly the latter neuropeptide was responsible for greater frequencies of grooming with respect to both controls and the hamsters treated with ORX-A. These distinct behavioral changes turned out to be even greater in the presence of l-Glu agonist (NMDA) while the α1 GABAA receptor agonist (zolpidem, Zol) greatly reduced ORX-A-dependent feeding bouts. Moreover, ORX-A+NMDA mainly promoted greater ORX-2R expression levels with respect to ORX-A-treated hamsters while ORX-B+Zol was instead largely responsible for a down-regulatory trend. Overall, these features point to CeA ORX-2R sites as key sensory limbic elements capable of regulating eating and grooming responses, which may provide useful insights regarding the type of molecular mechanism(s) operating during feeding bouts.

  14. Aberrant retinal projections to midbrain targets mediate spared visual orienting function in hamsters with neonatal lesions of superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Carman, L S; Schneider, G E

    1992-01-01

    Rodents, cats, and most nonmammalian vertebrates with bilateral tectal deafferentation or ablation in adulthood are extremely deficient at orienting to visual stimuli; yet animals with neonatal lesions of superficial layers of the superior colliculus (SC) show partial sparing of this response, particularly for targets in the central visual field. In this study, we sought to determine whether these spared orienting abilities are mediated by aberrant retinal projections to the remaining intermediate layers of the SC, or whether visual cortex (VC) mechanisms or alternative behavioral strategies are responsible. Neonatal golden hamsters received either bilateral heat lesions of the SC (rlSC), or a heat lesion of the right SC and enucleation of the right eye (rSCrE). This latter procedure causes axons from the left eye to recross the tectal midline and terminate in the "wrong" (left) SC (Schneider 1973). As adults, both groups of hamsters were extremely deficient in visually guided approach to stationary targets, although rlSC-lesioned hamsters showed some sparing for central field targets and rSCrE-lesioned hamsters often made wrong-direction turns for targets in the left peripheral field. We then subjected both groups of neonatally lesioned hamsters to bilateral aspiration lesions of the VC. Retesting showed no change in visual orienting behavior as a result of the cortical lesions. Labeling of the optic tract with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) revealed abundant aberrant retinal projections to remaining intermediate layers of the SC and thalamic nucleus lateralis posterior (LP), as well as supernormal innervation of pretectal nuclei, the dorsal terminal nucleus of the accessory optic tract, and the ventral nucleus of the lateral geniculate body (LGv). We conclude that the spared visual orienting capabilities of hamsters with rlSC and rSCrE lesions are mediated by the aberrant midbrain projections, and that cortical mechanisms are not involved in spared visual orienting

  15. Lesions of the central nucleus of the amygdala decrease taste threshold for sodium chloride in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinrong; Yan, Jianqun; Chen, Ke; Lu, Bo; Wang, Qian; Yan, Wei; Zhao, Xiaolin

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies reported that NaCl intake was down-regulated in rats with bilateral lesions of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). In line with the evidence from anatomical and physiological studies, such an inhibition could be the result of altered taste threshold for NaCl, one of the important factors in assessing taste functions. To assess the effect of CeA on the taste threshold for NaCl, a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) to a suprathreshold concentration of NaCl (0.1M) in rats with bilateral lesions of CeA or sham lesions was first established. And then, two-bottle choice tests between water and a series of concentrations of NaCl were conducted. The taste threshold for NaCl is defined as the lowest concentration at which there is a reliable difference scores between conditioned and control subjects. Rats with CeA lesions acquired a taste aversion for 0.1M NaCl when it was paired with LiCl and still retained the aversion after the two-bottle choice test. The results of the two-bottle choice test showed that the taste threshold for NaCl was 0.0006M in rats with CeA lesions, whereas in rats with sham lesions the threshold was 0.005M, which was identical to that of normal rats. The conditioned results confirm the claim that CeA is not essential in the profile of conditioned taste aversion. Our findings demonstrate that lesions of the CeA increased the sensitivity to NaCl taste in rats, indicating that the CeA may be involved in encoding the intensity of salty gustation elicited by NaCl. PMID:22796484

  16. A neural connection between the central part of the medial preoptic nucleus and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis to regulate sexual behavior in male rats.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Sho; Ohishi, Naoya; Yamaguchi, Shohei; Tsukahara, Shinji

    2015-10-01

    The medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) is a regulatory center for male sexual behavior. It consists of sexually dimorphic structures that are male biased, and these structures are found in the central part of the MPN (MPNc). The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) also participates in male sexual behavior, and receives efferent neural projections from the MPNc. In this study, we examined if MPNc neurons projecting to the BNST are activated in male rats displaying sexual behavior. Fluoro-Gold (FG; a retrograde neural tracer) was injected into the BNST of male rats, which were separated into two groups: (1) those in contact with estrous female rats and displayed sexual behavior followed by ejaculation and (2) those without contact with estrous female rats. In both groups, protein expression of c-Fos (a neuronal activity marker) and calbindin (a location marker of the MPNc) were detected by fluorescent immunohistochemistry. The number of c-Fos-immunoreactive cells with or without FG labeling in the MPNc was also measured. The number of c-Fos-immunoreactive cells significantly increased following ejaculation. Approximately 10% of FG-labeled cells in ejaculation male rats were immunoreactive for c-Fos, and this percentage value was significantly higher in this group compared with control male rats. Overall, these results suggest that efferent projections from the MPNc to the BNST function to control sexual behavior in male rats.

  17. Timed restricted feeding restores the rhythms of expression of the clock protein, Period2, in the oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and central nucleus of the amygdala in adrenalectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Segall, L A; Verwey, M; Amir, S

    2008-11-11

    Feeding schedules that limit food availability to a set time of day are powerful synchronizers of the rhythms of expression of the circadian clock protein Period 2 (PER2) in the limbic forebrain in rats. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms that mediate the effect of such timed restricted feeding (TRF) schedules on the expression of PER2. Adrenal glucocorticoids have been implicated in the circadian regulation of clock genes expression in peripheral tissues as well as in the control of the rhythms of expression of PER2 in certain limbic forebrain regions, such as the oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTov) and central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA) in rats. To study the possible involvement of glucocorticoids in the regulation of PER2 expression by TRF, we assessed the effect of adrenalectomy on TRF-entrained PER2 rhythms in the limbic forebrain in rats. Adrenalectomy selectively abolished the rhythms of PER2 in the BNSTov and CEA in normally fed rats, as previously shown, but had no effect on TRF-entrained PER2 rhythms in the same structures. These findings show that the effect of TRF on PER2 rhythms in the limbic forebrain is independent of adrenal glucocorticoids and demonstrate that the involvement of glucocorticoids in the regulation PER2 rhythms in the limbic forebrain is not only region specific, as previously shown, but also state dependent.

  18. Dopaminergic Input to the Inferior Colliculus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nevue, Alexander A; Elde, Cameron J; Perkel, David J; Portfors, Christine V

    2015-01-01

    The response of sensory neurons to stimuli can be modulated by a variety of factors including attention, emotion, behavioral context, and disorders involving neuromodulatory systems. For example, patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have disordered speech processing, suggesting that dopamine alters normal representation of these salient sounds. Understanding the mechanisms by which dopamine modulates auditory processing is thus an important goal. The principal auditory midbrain nucleus, the inferior colliculus (IC), is a likely location for dopaminergic modulation of auditory processing because it contains dopamine receptors and nerve terminals immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. However, the sources of dopaminergic input to the IC are unknown. In this study, we iontophoretically injected a retrograde tracer into the IC of mice and then stained the tissue for TH. We also immunostained for dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), an enzyme critical for the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, to differentiate between dopaminergic and noradrenergic inputs. Retrogradely labeled neurons that were positive for TH were seen bilaterally, with strong ipsilateral dominance, in the subparafascicular thalamic nucleus (SPF). All retrogradely labeled neurons that we observed in other brain regions were TH-negative. Projections from the SPF were confirmed using an anterograde tracer, revealing TH-positive and DBH-negative anterogradely labeled fibers and terminals in the IC. While the functional role of this dopaminergic input to the IC is not yet known, it provides a potential mechanism for context dependent modulation of auditory processing. PMID:26834578

  19. Dopaminergic Input to the Inferior Colliculus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nevue, Alexander A.; Elde, Cameron J.; Perkel, David J.; Portfors, Christine V.

    2016-01-01

    The response of sensory neurons to stimuli can be modulated by a variety of factors including attention, emotion, behavioral context, and disorders involving neuromodulatory systems. For example, patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have disordered speech processing, suggesting that dopamine alters normal representation of these salient sounds. Understanding the mechanisms by which dopamine modulates auditory processing is thus an important goal. The principal auditory midbrain nucleus, the inferior colliculus (IC), is a likely location for dopaminergic modulation of auditory processing because it contains dopamine receptors and nerve terminals immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. However, the sources of dopaminergic input to the IC are unknown. In this study, we iontophoretically injected a retrograde tracer into the IC of mice and then stained the tissue for TH. We also immunostained for dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), an enzyme critical for the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, to differentiate between dopaminergic and noradrenergic inputs. Retrogradely labeled neurons that were positive for TH were seen bilaterally, with strong ipsilateral dominance, in the subparafascicular thalamic nucleus (SPF). All retrogradely labeled neurons that we observed in other brain regions were TH-negative. Projections from the SPF were confirmed using an anterograde tracer, revealing TH-positive and DBH-negative anterogradely labeled fibers and terminals in the IC. While the functional role of this dopaminergic input to the IC is not yet known, it provides a potential mechanism for context dependent modulation of auditory processing. PMID:26834578

  20. Noradrenergic β-Receptor Antagonism within the Central Nucleus of the Amygdala or Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis Attenuates the Negative/Anxiogenic Effects of Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Jennifer M.; Cotten, Samuel W.; Dominguez, Hiram M.; Lane, Jennifer E.; Shelton, Kerisa; Su, Zu-In

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine has been shown to produce both initial rewarding and delayed anxiogenic effects. Although the neurobiology of cocaine's rewarding effects has been well studied, the mechanisms underlying its anxiogenic effects remain unclear. We used two behavioral assays to study these opposing actions of cocaine: a runway self-administration test and a modified place conditioning test. In the runway, the positive and negative effects of cocaine are reflected in the frequency of approach-avoidance conflict that animals develop about entering a goal box associated with cocaine delivery. In the place conditioning test, animals develop preferences for environments paired with the immediate/rewarding effects of cocaine, but avoid environments paired with the drug's delayed/anxiogenic actions. In the present study, these two behavioral assays were used to examine the role of norepinephrine (NE) transmission within the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), each of which has been implicated in drug-withdrawal-induced anxiety and stress-induced response reinstatement. Rats experienced 15 single daily cocaine-reinforced (1.0 mg/kg, i.v.) runway trials 10 min after intracranial injection of the β1 and β2 NE receptor antagonists betaxolol and ICI 118551 or vehicle into the CeA or BNST. NE antagonism of either region dose dependently reduced approach-avoidance conflict behavior compared with that observed in vehicle-treated controls. In addition, NE antagonism selectively interfered with the expression of conditioned place aversions while leaving intact cocaine-induced place preferences. These data suggest a role for NE signaling within the BNST and the CeA in the anxiogenic actions of cocaine. PMID:24599448

  1. The medial preoptic nucleus integrates the central influences of testosterone on the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and its extended circuitries.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Martin; Bingham, Brenda; Gray, Megan; Innala, Leyla; Viau, Victor

    2010-09-01

    Testosterone contributes to sex differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) function in humans and rodents, but the central organization of this regulation remains unclear. The medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) stands out as an important candidate in this regard because it contains androgen receptors and projects to forebrain nuclei integrating cognitive-affective information and regulating HPA responses to homeostatic threat. These include the HPA effector neurons of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, medial amygdala, and lateral septum. To test the extent to which androgen receptors in the MPN engage these cell groups, we compared in adult male rats the effects of unilateral microimplants of testosterone and the androgen receptor antagonist hydroxyflutamide into the MPN on acute restraint induced activation and/or neuropeptide expression levels. The basic effects of these implants were lateralized to the sides of the nuclei ipsilateral to the implants. Testosterone, but not hydroxyflutamide implants, decreased stress-induced Fos and arginine vasopressin (AVP) heteronuclear RNA expression in the PVN, as well as Fos expression in the lateral septum. In unstressed animals, AVP mRNA expression in the PVN decreased and increased in response to testosterone and hydroxflutamide MPN implants, respectively. The differential influences of these implants on AVP mRNA expression were opposite in the medial amygdala. These results confirm a role for androgen receptors in the MPN to concurrently modulate neuropeptide expression and activational responses in the PVN and its extended circuitries. This suggests that the MPN is capable of bridging converging limbic influences to the HPA axis with changes in gonadal status.

  2. Central ghrelin increases food foraging/hoarding that is blocked by GHSR antagonism and attenuates hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael A; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J

    2016-02-01

    The stomach-derived "hunger hormone" ghrelin increases in the circulation in direct response to time since the last meal, increasing preprandially and falling immediately following food consumption. We found previously that peripheral injection of ghrelin potently stimulates food foraging (FF), food hoarding (FH), and food intake (FI) in Siberian hamsters. It remains, however, largely unknown if central ghrelin stimulation is necessary/sufficient to increase these behaviors regardless of peripheral stimulation of the ghrelin receptor [growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR)]. We injected three doses (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 μg) of ghrelin into the third ventricle (3V) of Siberian hamsters and measured changes in FF, FH, and FI. To test the effects of 3V ghrelin receptor blockade, we used the potent GHSR antagonist JMV2959 to block these behaviors in response to food deprivation or a peripheral ghrelin challenge. Finally, we examined neuronal activation in the arcuate nucleus and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus in response to peripheral ghrelin administration and 3V GHSR antagonism. Third ventricular ghrelin injection significantly increased FI through 24 h and FH through day 4. Pretreatment with 3V JMV2959 successfully blocked peripheral ghrelin-induced increases in FF, FH, and FI at all time points and food deprivation-induced increases in FF, FH, and FI up to 4 h. c-Fos immunoreactivity was significantly reduced in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, but not in the arcuate nucleus, following pretreatment with intraperitoneal JMV2959 and ghrelin. Collectively, these data suggest that central GHSR activation is both necessary and sufficient to increase appetitive and consummatory behaviors in Siberian hamsters.

  3. Effects of neonatal enucleation on the functional organization of the superior colliculus in the golden hamster.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, R W

    1980-01-01

    1. The responses of visual, auditory and somatosensory superior collicular neurones were investigated using extracellular single unit recording techniques in hamsters which were subjected to the removal of one eye on the day of birth. 2. Neonatal enucleation resulted in a marked increase in the region of the colliculus from which visual neurones activated by stimulation of the ipsilateral eye could be recorded. In most cases the visuotopic representation in the colliculus ipsilateral to the remaining eye mirrored that observed in the contralateral tectum along both the rostrocaudal and mediolateral axes: in both colliculi temporal retina projected rostrally and inferior retina medially. In some animals, however, there appeared to be a dual mapping of the remaining eye onto the ipsilateral tectum. In these hamsters the central portion of the visual field was represented twice along the rostrocaudal axis of colliculus. 3. No changes in the topography of the somatosensory and auditory representations in the tectum were observed following neonatal enucleation. 4. The laminar distribution of visual neurones in the ipsilateral colliculus was markedly altered in the neonatally enucleated hamsters. Very few exclusively visual units were encountered in the layers ventral to the stratum opticum and almost all of the visual cells recorded in the ipsilateral colliculus were isolated within 150 microM of the tectal surface. 5. In the posterior half of the ipsilateral tectum a large number of extravisually responsive cells were encountered in the stratum griseum superficiale and stratum opticum. This was not the case in the colliculus contralateral to the remaining eye, nor has it ever been observed in normal hamsters. 6. Recordings from animals subjected to both neonatal enucleation and acute bilateral removal of somatosensory and auditory cortex indicated that the projections from these areas to the colliculus were not essential to the observed changes in laminar organization

  4. The central vestibular complex in dolphins and humans: functional implications of Deiters' nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kern, A; Seidel, K; Oelschläger, H H A

    2009-01-01

    Toothed whales (Odontocetes; e.g., dolphins) are well-known for efficient underwater locomotion and for their acrobatic capabilities. Nevertheless, in relation to other mammals including the human and with respect to body size, their vestibular apparatus is reduced, particularly the semicircular canals. Concomitantly, the vestibular nerve and most of the vestibular nuclei are thin and small, respectively, in comparison with those in terrestrial mammals. In contrast, the lateral (Deiters') vestibular nucleus is comparatively well developed in both coastal and pelagic dolphins. In the La Plata dolphin (Pontoporia blainvillei) and the Common dolphin (Delphinus delphis), all of the vestibular nuclei are present and their topographic relations are similar to those in humans. Quantitative analysis, however, revealed that in the dolphin most of the nuclei (superior, medial, descending nucleus) are minute both in absolute and relative terms. Here, the only exception is the lateral vestibular nucleus, which is of comparable size in humans and Pontoporia and decidedly more voluminous in Delphinus. While the small size of the majority of the dolphin's vestibular nuclei correlates well with miniaturization of the semicircular canals, the size of Deiters' nucleus seems to support its relative independence from the vestibular system and a close functional relationship with the cerebellum. In comparison with findings in humans and other terrestrial mammals, both of these aspects seem to be related to the physical conditions of aquatic life and locomotion in three dimensions. PMID:19390175

  5. Excitatory and inhibitory projections in parallel pathways from the inferior colliculus to the auditory thalamus.

    PubMed

    Mellott, Jeffrey G; Foster, Nichole L; Ohl, Andrew P; Schofield, Brett R

    2014-01-01

    Individual subdivisions of the medial geniculate body (MG) receive a majority of their ascending inputs from 1 or 2 subdivisions of the inferior colliculus (IC). This establishes parallel pathways that provide a model for understanding auditory projections from the IC through the MG and on to auditory cortex. A striking discovery about the tectothalamic circuit was identification of a substantial GABAergic component. Whether GABAergic projections match the parallel pathway organization has not been examined. We asked whether the parallel pathway concept is reflected in guinea pig tectothalamic pathways and to what degree GABAergic cells contribute to each pathway. We deposited retrograde tracers into individual MG subdivisions (ventral, MGv; medial, MGm; dorsal, MGd; suprageniculate, MGsg) to label tectothalamic cells and used immunochemistry to identify GABAergic cells. The MGv receives most of its IC input (~75%) from the IC central nucleus (ICc); MGd and MGsg receive most of their input (~70%) from IC dorsal cortex (ICd); and MGm receives substantial input from both ICc (~40%) and IC lateral cortex (~40%). Each MG subdivision receives additional input (up to 32%) from non-dominant IC subdivisions, suggesting cross-talk between the pathways. The proportion of GABAergic cells in each pathway depended on the MG subdivision. GABAergic cells formed ~20% of IC inputs to MGv or MGm, ~11% of inputs to MGd, and 4% of inputs to MGsg. Thus, non-GABAergic (i.e., glutamatergic) cells are most numerous in each pathway with GABAergic cells contributing to different extents. Despite smaller numbers of GABAergic cells, their distributions across IC subdivisions mimicked the parallel pathways. Projections outside the dominant pathways suggest opportunities for excitatory and inhibitory crosstalk. The results demonstrate parallel tectothalamic pathways in guinea pigs and suggest numerous opportunities for excitatory and inhibitory interactions within and between pathways.

  6. Descending and tonotopic projection patterns from the auditory cortex to the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Straka, M M; Hughes, R; Lee, P; Lim, H H

    2015-08-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) receives many corticofugal projections, which can mediate plastic changes such as shifts in frequency tuning or excitability of IC neurons. While the densest projections are found in the IC's external cortices, fibers originating from the primary auditory cortex (AI) have been observed throughout the IC's central nucleus (ICC), and these projections have shown to be organized tonotopically. Some studies have also found projections from other core and non-core cortical regions, though the organization and function of these projections are less known. In guinea pig, there exists a non-core ventrorostral belt (VRB) region that has primary-like properties and has often been mistaken for AI, with the clearest differentiating characteristic being VRB's longer response latencies. To better understand the auditory corticofugal descending system beyond AI, we investigated if there are projections from VRB to the ICC and if they exhibit a different projection pattern than those from AI. In this study, we performed experiments in ketamine-anesthetized guinea pigs, in which we positioned 32-site electrode arrays within AI, VRB, and ICC. We identified the monosynaptic connections between AI-to-ICC and VRB-to-ICC using an antidromic stimulation method, and we analyzed their locations across the midbrain using three-dimensional histological techniques. Compared to the corticocollicular projections to the ICC from AI, there were fewer projections to the ICC from VRB, and these projections had a weaker tonotopic organization. The majority of VRB projections were observed in the caudal-medial versus the rostral-lateral region along an isofrequency lamina of the ICC, which is in contrast to the AI projections that were scattered throughout an ICC lamina. These findings suggest that the VRB directly modulates sound information within the ascending lemniscal pathway with a different or complementary role compared to the modulatory effects of AI, which may

  7. Neurophysiological study on sensorimotor control mechanism in superior colliculus of echolocating bat.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Song, Y D

    2007-04-01

    This paper investigates the neural processes associated with bat sonar vocal production and their relationship with spatial orientation. The bat's heavy reliance on sound processing is reflected in specializations of auditory and motor neural structures. These specializations were utilized by investigating the mammalian superior colliculus (SC); a midbrain sensory motor nucleus mediating orientating behaviours in mammals, including vocal motor orientating. Behavioural and neurophysiological experiments were conducted in the insectivorous echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus. Chronic neural recording techniques were specifically developed to study neuronal activity. Potential application of the results on control systems is also addressed.

  8. Central connectivity of the chorda tympani afferent terminals in the rat rostral nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    Park, Sook Kyung; Lee, Dae Seop; Bae, Jin Young; Bae, Yong Chul

    2016-03-01

    The rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (rNST) receives gustatory input via chorda tympani (CT) afferents from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and transmits it to higher brain regions. To help understand how the gustatory information is processed at the 1st relay nucleus of the brain stem, we investigated the central connectivity of the CT afferent terminals in the central subdivision of the rat rNST through retrograde labeling with horseradish peroxidase, immunogold staining for GABA, glycine, and glutamate, and quantitative ultrastructural analysis. Most CT afferents were small myelinated fibers (<5 µm(2) in cross-sectional area) and made simple synaptic arrangements with 1-2 postsynaptic dendrites. It suggests that the gustatory signal is relayed to a specific group of neurons with a small degree of synaptic divergence. The volume of the identified synaptic boutons was positively correlated with their mitochondrial volume and active zone area, and also with the number of their postsynaptic dendrites. One-fourth of the boutons received synapses from GABA-immunopositive presynaptic profiles, 27 % of which were also glycine-immunopositive. These results suggest that the gustatory information mediated by CT afferents to the rNST is processed in a simple and specific manner. They also suggest that the minority of CT afferents are presynaptically modulated by GABA- and/or glycine-mediated mechanism.

  9. Motor Functions of the Superior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Neeraj J.; Katnani, Husam A.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian superior colliculus (SC) and its nonmammalian homolog, the optic tectum, constitute a major node in processing sensory information, incorporating cognitive factors, and issuing motor commands. The resulting action—to orient toward or away from a stimulus—can be accomplished as an integrated movement across oculomotor, cephalomotor, and skeletomotor effectors. The SC also participates in preserving fixation during intersaccadic intervals. This review highlights the repertoire of movements attributed to SC function and analyzes the significance of results obtained from causality-based experiments (microstimulation and inactivation). The mechanisms potentially used to decode the population activity in the SC into an appropriate movement command are also discussed. PMID:21456962

  10. NMDA and non-NMDA glutamate receptors in auditory transmission in the barn owl inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Feldman, D E; Knudsen, E I

    1994-10-01

    The pharmacology of auditory responses in the inferior colliculus (IC) of the barn owl was investigated by iontophoresis of excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists into two different functional subdivisions of the IC, the external nucleus (ICx) and the lateral shell of the central nucleus (lateral shell), both of which carry out important computations in the processing of auditory spatial information. Combined application of the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5) and the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-5-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) significantly reduced auditory-evoked spikes at all sites in these two subdivisions, and completely eliminated responses at many locations. This suggests that excitatory amino acid receptors mediate the bulk, if not all, of auditory responses in the ICx and lateral shell. NMDA and non-NMDA receptors contributed differently to auditory responses in the two subdivisions. In the ICx, AP5 significantly reduced the number of auditory-evoked spikes at every site tested. On average, AP5 eliminated 55% of auditory-evoked spikes at multiunit sites and 64% at single-unit sites in this structure. In contrast, in the lateral shell, AP5 significantly reduced responses at less than half the sites tested, and, on average, AP5 eliminated only 19% of spikes at multiunit sites and 25% at single-unit sites. When the magnitude of response blockade produced by AP5 at individual multiunit sites was normalized to adjust for site-to-site differences in the efficacy of iontophoresed AP5 and CNQX, AP5 blockade was still significantly greater in the ICx than the lateral shell. CNQX application strongly reduced responses in both subdivisions. These data suggest that NMDA receptor currents make a major contribution to auditory responses in the ICx, while they make only a small contribution to auditory responses in the lateral shell. Non-NMDA receptor currents, on the other hand, contribute to auditory responses in both

  11. Dynamic temporal signal processing in the inferior colliculus of echolocating bats

    PubMed Central

    Jen, Philip H.-S.; Wu, Chung Hsin; Wang, Xin

    2012-01-01

    In nature, communication sounds among animal species including humans are typical complex sounds that occur in sequence and vary with time in several parameters including amplitude, frequency, duration as well as separation, and order of individual sounds. Among these multiple parameters, sound duration is a simple but important one that contributes to the distinct spectral and temporal attributes of individual biological sounds. Likewise, the separation of individual sounds is an important temporal attribute that determines an animal's ability in distinguishing individual sounds. Whereas duration selectivity of auditory neurons underlies an animal's ability in recognition of sound duration, the recovery cycle of auditory neurons determines a neuron's ability in responding to closely spaced sound pulses and therefore, it underlies the animal's ability in analyzing the order of individual sounds. Since the multiple parameters of naturally occurring communication sounds vary with time, the analysis of a specific sound parameter by an animal would be inevitably affected by other co-varying sound parameters. This is particularly obvious in insectivorous bats, which rely on analysis of returning echoes for prey capture when they systematically vary the multiple pulse parameters throughout a target approach sequence. In this review article, we present our studies of dynamic variation of duration selectivity and recovery cycle of neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of the frequency-modulated bats to highlight the dynamic temporal signal processing of central auditory neurons. These studies use single pulses and three biologically relevant pulse-echo (P-E) pairs with varied duration, gap, and amplitude difference similar to that occurring during search, approach, and terminal phases of hunting by bats. These studies show that most collicular neurons respond maximally to a best tuned sound duration (BD). The sound duration to which these neurons are

  12. Secretory cells of the supraoptic nucleus have central as well as neurohypophysial projections.

    PubMed

    Inyushkin, A N; Orlans, H O; Dyball, R E J

    2009-10-01

    Conventional neuroanatomical methods may fail to demonstrate the presence of axons that are finer than 1 microm in diameter because such processes are near or below the limit of resolution of the light microscope. The presence of such axons can, however, be readily demonstrated by recording. The most easily interpreted type of recording for this purpose is the demonstration of antidromic activation of the cell body following stimulation of the region through which the axon passes. We have exploited this technique in the hypothalamus and have demonstrated the presence of double axonal projections or axons branching very near the cell bodies of the secretory cells of the neurohypophysial system in the rat supraoptic nucleus. We found that a small proportion of supraoptic magnocellular cells could be antidromically activated both from the neural stalk and from elsewhere in the hypothalamus, including the suprachiasmatic nucleus (8 cells of a total of 182) and the antero-ventral third ventricular region (AV3V; 4 of 182 cells) near the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT). Collision of antidromic and orthodromic spikes showed that the cells were clearly antidromically (rather than synaptically, or orthodromically) activated from both sites. A stimulus applied to one of the axons prevented propagation of a spike evoked by a pulse delivered to the other axon until sufficient time had elapsed after the first stimulus for the resultant spike to have propagated from the first stimulus site along one cell process (towards the cell body or branch point), and from this point along the other axonal branch to the second stimulus site (there was also a short additional delay period during which the axon at the site of the second stimulus recovered from its absolute refractory period). If the interval between the stimuli was progressively reduced, there came a point where the second spike failed. Such a clear demonstration of dual projections in a system where the

  13. Variable Stars and Stellar Populations in Andromeda XXV. III. A Central Cluster or the Galaxy Nucleus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusano, Felice; Garofalo, Alessia; Clementini, Gisella; Cignoni, Michele; Federici, Luciana; Marconi, Marcella; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Musella, Ilaria; Testa, Vincenzo; Carini, Roberta; Faccini, Marco

    2016-09-01

    We present B and V time series photometry of Andromeda XXV, the third galaxy in our program on the Andromeda’s satellites, which we have imaged with the Large Binocular Cameras of the Large Binocular Telescope. The field of Andromeda XXV is found to contain 62 variable stars, for which we present light curves and characteristics of the light variation (period, amplitudes, variability type, mean magnitudes, etc.). The sample includes 57 RR Lyrae variables (46 fundamental-mode—RRab, and 11 first-overtone—RRc, pulsators), 3 anomalous Cepheids, 1 eclipsing binary system, and 1 unclassified variable. The average period of the RRab stars (< {Pab}> =0.60 σ = 0.04 days) and the period-amplitude diagram place Andromeda XXV in the class of the Oosterhoff-Intermediate objects. From the average luminosity of the RR Lyrae stars we derive for the galaxy a distance modulus of (m-M)0 = 24.63 ± 0.17 mag. The color-magnitude diagram reveals the presence in Andromeda XXV of a single, metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -1.8 dex) stellar population as old as ˜10-12 Gyr, traced by a conspicuous red giant branch and the large population of RR Lyrae stars. We discovered a spherically shaped high density of stars near the galaxy center. This structure appears to be at a distance consistent with Andromeda XXV and we suggest it could either be a star cluster or the nucleus of Andromeda XXV. We provide a summary and compare the number and characteristics of the pulsating stars in the M31 satellites analyzed so far for variability. Based on data collected with the Large Binocular Cameras at the Large Binocular Telescope.

  14. Superior Colliculus and Visual Spatial Attention

    PubMed Central

    Krauzlis, Richard J.; Lovejoy, Lee P.; Zénon, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    The superior colliculus (SC) has long been known to be part of the network of brain areas involved in spatial attention, but recent findings have dramatically refined our understanding of its functional role. The SC both implements the motor consequences of attention and plays a crucial role in the process of target selection that precedes movement. Moreover, even in the absence of overt orienting movements, SC activity is related to shifts of covert attention and is necessary for the normal control of spatial attention during perceptual judgments. The neuronal circuits that link the SC to spatial attention may include attention-related areas of the cerebral cortex, but recent results show that the SC's contribution involves mechanisms that operate independently of the established signatures of attention in visual cortex. These findings raise new issues and suggest novel possibilities for understanding the brain mechanisms that enable spatial attention. PMID:23682659

  15. Birth and migration of neurons in the central posterior/prepacemaker nucleus during adulthood in weakly electric knifefish (Eigenmannia sp.).

    PubMed Central

    Zupanc, G K; Zupanc, M M

    1992-01-01

    In contrast to mammals, fish maintain their capacity to generate neurons in the central nervous system even during adulthood for prolonged periods of life. By employing immunohistochemical, autoradiographic, and electron microscopic techniques, we studied such a postnatal neurogenesis within the complex of the central posterior/prepacemaker nucleus (CP/PPn) in knifefish (Eigenmannia sp.), a weakly electric teleost. The CP/PPn is a bilateral cluster of neurons in the thalamus. It controls frequency modulations of the electric organ discharge as they are used during social interactions. In the CP/PPn region adjacent to the wall of the third ventricle ("ventricular zone"), cells are born continuously and at high rates. They undergo multiple cell divisions before differentiating into neurons. Concomitant with this development, the newborn neurons migrate toward lateral regions of the CP/PPn. In the course of this lateral migration, they appear to acquire immunological and morphological characteristics that are typical for mature CP/PPn neurons. We hypothesize that at least some of the newly generated cells develop finally into functional CP/PPn neurons. Images PMID:1409663

  16. Autoradiographic distribution of 125I calcitonin gene-related peptide binding sites in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Skofitsch, G; Jacobowitz, D M

    1985-01-01

    Using autoradiographic method and 125I-Tyro rat CGRP as a ligand, receptor binding sites were demonstrated in the rat central nervous system. Saturation studies and Scatchard analysis of CGRP-binding to slide mounted tissue sections containing primarily cerebellum showed a single class of receptors with a dissociation constant of 0.96 nM and a Bmax of 76.4 fmol/mg protein. 125I-Tyro rat CGRP binding sites were demonstrated throughout the rat central nervous system. Dense binding was observed in the telencephalon (medial prefrontal, insular and outer layers of the temporal cortex, nucleus accumbens, fundus striatum, central and inferior lateral amygdaloid nuclei, most caudal caudate putamen, organum vasculosum laminae terminalis, subfornical organ), the diencephalon (anterior hypothalamic, suprachiasmatic, arcuate, paraventricular, dorsomedial, periventricular, reuniens, rhomboid, lateral thalamic pretectalis and habenula nuclei, zona incerta), in the mesencephalon (superficial layers of the superior colliculus, central nucleus of the geniculate body, inferior colliculus, nucleus of the fifth nerve, locus coeruleus, nucleus of the mesencephalic tract, the dorsal tegmental nucleus, superior olive), in the molecular layer of the cerebellum, in the medulla oblongata (inferior olive, nucleus tractus solitarii, nucleus commissuralis, nuclei of the tenth and twelfth nerves, the prepositus hypoglossal and the gracilis nuclei, dorsomedial part of the spinal trigeminal tract), in the dorsal gray matter of the spinal cord (laminae I-VI) and the confines of the central canal. Moderate receptor densities were found in the septal area, the "head" of the anterior caudate nucleus, medial amygdaloid and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the pyramidal layers of the hippocampus and dentate gyri, medial preoptic area, ventromedial nucleus, lateral hypothalamic and ventrolateral thalamic area, central gray, reticular part of the substantia nigra, parvocellular reticular nucleus

  17. The central dusty torus in the active nucleus of NGC 1068.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, W; Meisenheimer, K; Röttgering, H J A; Leinert, Ch; Richichi, A; Chesneau, O; Fraix-Burnet, D; Glazenborg-Kluttig, A; Granato, G-L; Graser, U; Heijligers, B; Köhler, R; Malbet, F; Miley, G K; Paresce, F; Pel, J-W; Perrin, G; Przygodda, F; Schoeller, M; Sol, H; Waters, L B F M; Weigelt, G; Woillez, J; De Zeeuw, P T

    2004-05-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) display many energetic phenomena--broad emission lines, X-rays, relativistic jets, radio lobes--originating from matter falling onto a supermassive black hole. It is widely accepted that orientation effects play a major role in explaining the observational appearance of AGNs. Seen from certain directions, circum-nuclear dust clouds would block our view of the central powerhouse. Indirect evidence suggests that the dust clouds form a parsec-sized torus-shaped distribution. This explanation, however, remains unproved, as even the largest telescopes have not been able to resolve the dust structures. Here we report interferometric mid-infrared observations that spatially resolve these structures in the galaxy NGC 1068. The observations reveal warm (320 K) dust in a structure 2.1 parsec thick and 3.4 parsec in diameter, surrounding a smaller hot structure. As such a configuration of dust clouds would collapse in a time much shorter than the active phase of the AGN, this observation requires a continual input of kinetic energy to the cloud system from a source coexistent with the AGN.

  18. The central dusty torus in the active nucleus of NGC 1068.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, W; Meisenheimer, K; Röttgering, H J A; Leinert, Ch; Richichi, A; Chesneau, O; Fraix-Burnet, D; Glazenborg-Kluttig, A; Granato, G-L; Graser, U; Heijligers, B; Köhler, R; Malbet, F; Miley, G K; Paresce, F; Pel, J-W; Perrin, G; Przygodda, F; Schoeller, M; Sol, H; Waters, L B F M; Weigelt, G; Woillez, J; De Zeeuw, P T

    2004-05-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) display many energetic phenomena--broad emission lines, X-rays, relativistic jets, radio lobes--originating from matter falling onto a supermassive black hole. It is widely accepted that orientation effects play a major role in explaining the observational appearance of AGNs. Seen from certain directions, circum-nuclear dust clouds would block our view of the central powerhouse. Indirect evidence suggests that the dust clouds form a parsec-sized torus-shaped distribution. This explanation, however, remains unproved, as even the largest telescopes have not been able to resolve the dust structures. Here we report interferometric mid-infrared observations that spatially resolve these structures in the galaxy NGC 1068. The observations reveal warm (320 K) dust in a structure 2.1 parsec thick and 3.4 parsec in diameter, surrounding a smaller hot structure. As such a configuration of dust clouds would collapse in a time much shorter than the active phase of the AGN, this observation requires a continual input of kinetic energy to the cloud system from a source coexistent with the AGN. PMID:15129274

  19. Cytoarchitecture and efferent projections of the nucleus incertus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Olucha-Bordonau, Francisco E; Teruel, Vicent; Barcia-González, Jorge; Ruiz-Torner, Amparo; Valverde-Navarro, Alfonso A; Martínez-Soriano, Francisco

    2003-09-01

    The nucleus incertus is located caudal to the dorsal raphe and medial to the dorsal tegmentum. It is composed of a pars compacta and a pars dissipata and contains acetylcholinesterase, glutamic acid decarboxylase, and cholecystokinin-positive somata. In the present study, anterograde tracer injections in the nucleus incertus resulted in terminal-like labeling in the perirhinal cortex and the dorsal endopyriform nucleus, the hippocampus, the medial septum diagonal band complex, lateral and triangular septum medial amygdala, the intralaminar thalamic nuclei, and the lateral habenula. The hypothalamus contained dense plexuses of fibers in the medial forebrain bundle that spread in nearly all nuclei. Labeling in the suprachiasmatic nucleus filled specifically the ventral half. In the midbrain, labeled fibers were observed in the interpeduncular nuclei, ventral tegmental area, periaqueductal gray, superior colliculus, pericentral inferior colliculus, pretectal area, the raphe nuclei, and the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis. Retrograde tracer injections were made in areas reached by anterogradely labeled fibers including the medial prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, habenula, nucleus reuniens, superior colliculus, periaqueductal gray, and interpeduncular nuclei. All these injections gave rise to retrograde labeling in the nucleus incertus but not in the dorsal tegmental nucleus. These data led us to conclude that there is a system of ascending projections arising from the nucleus incertus to the median raphe, mammillary complex, hypothalamus, lateral habenula, nucleus reuniens, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, medial septum, and hippocampus. Many of the targets of the nucleus incertus were involved in arousal mechanisms including the synchronization and desynchronization of the theta rhythm.

  20. The Central Amygdala Nucleus is Critical for Incubation of Methamphetamine Craving

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Zeric, Tamara; Kambhampati, Sarita; Bossert, Jennifer M; Shaham, Yavin

    2015-01-01

    Cue-induced methamphetamine seeking progressively increases after withdrawal but mechanisms underlying this ‘incubation of methamphetamine craving' are unknown. Here we studied the role of central amygdala (CeA), ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), brain regions implicated in incubation of cocaine and heroin craving, in incubation of methamphetamine craving. We also assessed the role of basolateral amygdala (BLA) and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). We trained rats to self-administer methamphetamine (10 days; 9 h/day, 0.1 mg/kg/infusion) and tested them for cue-induced methamphetamine seeking under extinction conditions during early (2 days) or late (4–5 weeks) withdrawal. We first confirmed that ‘incubation of methamphetamine craving' occurs under our experimental conditions. Next, we assessed the effect of reversible inactivation of CeA or BLA by GABAA+GABAB receptor agonists (muscimol+baclofen, 0.03+0.3 nmol) on cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during early and late withdrawal. We also assessed the effect of muscimol+baclofen reversible inactivation of vmPFC, dmPFC, and OFC on ‘incubated' cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during late withdrawal. Lever presses in the cue-induced methamphetamine extinction tests were higher during late withdrawal than during early withdrawal (incubation of methamphetamine craving). Muscimol+baclofen injections into CeA but not BLA decreased cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during late but not early withdrawal. Muscimol+baclofen injections into dmPFC, vmPFC, or OFC during late withdrawal had no effect on incubated cue-induced methamphetamine seeking. Together with previous studies, results indicate that the CeA has a critical role in incubation of both drug and non-drug reward craving and demonstrate an unexpected dissociation in mechanisms of incubation of methamphetamine vs cocaine craving. PMID:25475163

  1. The central amygdala nucleus is critical for incubation of methamphetamine craving.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Zeric, Tamara; Kambhampati, Sarita; Bossert, Jennifer M; Shaham, Yavin

    2015-04-01

    Cue-induced methamphetamine seeking progressively increases after withdrawal but mechanisms underlying this 'incubation of methamphetamine craving' are unknown. Here we studied the role of central amygdala (CeA), ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), brain regions implicated in incubation of cocaine and heroin craving, in incubation of methamphetamine craving. We also assessed the role of basolateral amygdala (BLA) and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). We trained rats to self-administer methamphetamine (10 days; 9 h/day, 0.1 mg/kg/infusion) and tested them for cue-induced methamphetamine seeking under extinction conditions during early (2 days) or late (4-5 weeks) withdrawal. We first confirmed that 'incubation of methamphetamine craving' occurs under our experimental conditions. Next, we assessed the effect of reversible inactivation of CeA or BLA by GABAA+GABAB receptor agonists (muscimol+baclofen, 0.03+0.3 nmol) on cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during early and late withdrawal. We also assessed the effect of muscimol+baclofen reversible inactivation of vmPFC, dmPFC, and OFC on 'incubated' cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during late withdrawal. Lever presses in the cue-induced methamphetamine extinction tests were higher during late withdrawal than during early withdrawal (incubation of methamphetamine craving). Muscimol+baclofen injections into CeA but not BLA decreased cue-induced methamphetamine seeking during late but not early withdrawal. Muscimol+baclofen injections into dmPFC, vmPFC, or OFC during late withdrawal had no effect on incubated cue-induced methamphetamine seeking. Together with previous studies, results indicate that the CeA has a critical role in incubation of both drug and non-drug reward craving and demonstrate an unexpected dissociation in mechanisms of incubation of methamphetamine vs cocaine craving.

  2. Electrical self-stimulation in the central amygdaloid nucleus after ibotenic acid lesion of the lateral hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Touzani, K; Velley, L

    1998-02-01

    This experiment was carried out in order to investigate the involvement of lateral hypothalamus (LH) in electrical self-stimulation of the central amygdaloid nucleus (CeA). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were bilaterally implanted with a guide cannula situated above each LH and with two electrodes in the CeA. Self-stimulation was subsequently obtained separately from both right and left electrodes. The LH was then lesioned unilaterally by ibotenic acid (IBO) injection. Eight days later, the effect of this unilateral lesion on self-stimulation of the ipsilateral and contralateral CeA was tested. Then the neurons of the remaining non-lesioned LH side were lesioned with IBO and self-stimulation was tested 15 days after the second lesion. Both unilateral as well as bilateral lesions of LH produced a significant decrease in CeA self-stimulation rates but had no significant effect on the reward effectiveness. The unilateral lesions did not produce any modification of the rate-intensity function in the contralateral CeA. This lesion-induced depression in performance was reversed by treatment with phenobarbital. These results provide clear evidence that the rewarding effects of CeA electrical stimulation do not result from the activation of the LH outputs and that the apparent decrease in CeA self-stimulation may result from the LH lesion-induced increase in the frequency of epileptiform manifestations that occur following amygdaloid stimulation.

  3. Effects of lidocaine injections into the lateral parabrachial nucleus on dipsogenic and pressor response to central angiotensin 2 in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menani, Jose Vanderlei; Beltz, Terry G.

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of bilateral injections of the local anesthetic, lidocaine, into the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) on the dipsogenic and pressor responses induced by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of angiotensin 2 (ANG 2). Centrally injected ANG 2 (50 ng/1 microliter) induced water intake ( IO.2 +/- 0.8 ml/h) and pressor responses (22 +/- 1 mmHg). Prior bilateral injection of 10% lidocaine (200 nl) into the LPBN increased the water intake (14.2 +/- 1.4 ml/h), but did not change the pressor response (17 +/- 1 mmHg) to i.c.v. ANG 2. Lidocaine alone injected into the LPBN also induced a pressor response (23 +/- 3 mmHg). These results showing that bilateral LPBN injection of lidocaine increase water intake induced bv i.c.v. ANG 2 are consistent with electrolytic and neurotoxic lesion studies and suggest that the LPBN is associated with inhibitory mechanisms controlling water intake induced by ANG 2. These results also provide evidence that it is feasible to reversibly anesthetize this brain area to facilitate fluid-related ingestive behavior.

  4. Central amygdala nucleus (Ce) gene expression linked to increased trait-like Ce metabolism and anxious temperament in young primates

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Andrew S.; Oler, Jonathan A.; Shelton, Steven E.; Nanda, Steven A.; Davidson, Richard J.; Roseboom, Patrick H.; Kalin, Ned H.

    2012-01-01

    Children with anxious temperament (AT) are particularly sensitive to new social experiences and have increased risk for developing anxiety and depression. The young rhesus monkey is optimal for studying the origin of human AT because it shares with humans the genetic, neural, and phenotypic underpinnings of complex social and emotional functioning. In vivo imaging in young monkeys demonstrated that central nucleus of the amygdala (Ce) metabolism is relatively stable across development and predicts AT. Transcriptome-wide gene expression, which reflects combined genetic and environmental influences, was assessed within the Ce. Results support a maladaptive neurodevelopmental hypothesis linking decreased amygdala neuroplasticity to early-life dispositional anxiety. For example, high AT individuals had decreased mRNA expression of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 3 (NTRK3). Moreover, variation in Ce NTRK3 expression was inversely correlated with Ce metabolism and other AT-substrates. These data suggest that altered amygdala neuroplasticity may play a role the early dispositional risk to develop anxiety and depression. PMID:23071305

  5. Contributions of the amygdala central nucleus and ventrolateral periaqueductal grey to freezing and instrumental suppression in Pavlovian fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    McDannald, Michael A

    2010-07-29

    In Pavlovian fear conditioning animals receive pairings of a neutral cue and an aversive stimulus such as an electric foot-shock. Through such pairings, the cue will come to elicit a central state of fear that produces a variety of autonomic and behavioral responses, among which are conditioned freezing and suppression of instrumental responding, termed conditioned suppression. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (vlPAG) has been strongly implicated in the acquisition and expression of conditioned fear. However, previous work suggests different roles for the CeA and vlPAG in fear learning maybe revealed when fear is assessed with conditioned freezing or conditioned suppression. To further explore this possibility we gave rats selective lesions of either the CeA or vlPAG and trained them in Pavlovian first-order fear conditioning as well as Pavlovian second-order fear conditioning. We concurrently assessed the acquisition of conditioned freezing and conditioned suppression. We found that vlPAG and CeA lesions impaired both first- and second-order conditioned freezing. VlPAG lesions did not impair, and CeA lesions only transiently impaired, first-order conditioned suppression. However, both vlPAG and CeA lesions impaired second-order conditioned suppression. These results suggest that the CeA and vlPAG are critically important to expressing fear through conditioned freezing but play different and less critical roles in expressing fear through conditioned suppression.

  6. Weak orientation and direction selectivity in lateral geniculate nucleus representing central vision in the gray squirrel Sciurus carolinensis

    PubMed Central

    Zaltsman, Julia B.; Heimel, J. Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Classic studies of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and visual cortex (V1) in carnivores and primates have found that a majority of neurons in LGN exhibit a center-surround organization, while V1 neurons exhibit strong orientation selectivity and, in many species, direction selectivity. Recent work in the mouse and the monkey has discovered previously unknown classes of orientation- and direction-selective neurons in LGN. Furthermore, some recent studies in the mouse report that many LGN cells exhibit pronounced orientation biases that are of comparable strength to the subthreshold inputs to V1 neurons. These results raise the possibility that, in rodents, orientation biases of individual LGN cells make a substantial contribution to cortical orientation selectivity. Alternatively, the size and contribution of orientation- or direction-selective channels from LGN to V1 may vary across mammals. To address this question, we examined orientation and direction selectivity in LGN and V1 neurons of a highly visual diurnal rodent: the gray squirrel. In the representation of central vision, only a few LGN neurons exhibited strong orientation or direction selectivity. Across the population, LGN neurons showed weak orientation biases and were much less selective for orientation compared with V1 neurons. Although direction selectivity was weak overall, LGN layers 3abc, which contain neurons that express calbindin, exhibited elevated direction selectivity index values compared with LGN layers 1 and 2. These results suggest that, for central visual fields, the contribution of orientation- and direction-selective channels from the LGN to V1 is small in the squirrel. As in other mammals, this small contribution is elevated in the calbindin-positive layers of the LGN PMID:25717157

  7. Response selectivity for multiple dimensions of frequency sweeps in the pallid bat inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Fuzessery, Z M

    1994-09-01

    1. While hunting, the pallid bat uses passive sound localization at low frequencies to find terrestrial prey, and echolocation for general orientation. It must therefore process two different types of acoustic input at the same time. The pallid bat's echolocation pulse is a downward frequency-modulated (FM) sweep from 60 to 30 kHz. This study examined the response selectivity of single neurons in the pallid bat's central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) for FM sweeps, comparing the response properties of the high-frequency population, tuned to the biosonar pulse, with the low-frequency population, tuned below the pulse. The working hypothesis was that the high-frequency population would exhibit a response selectivity for downward FM sweeps that was not present in the low-frequency population. 2. Neurons were tested for their selectivity for FM sweep direction, duration, frequency range and bandwidth, and rate of frequency change. The extent to which they responded exclusively to tones, noise, and FM sweeps was also examined. Significant differences in the response properties of neurons in the two populations were found. In the low-frequency population, all neurons responded to tones, but only 50% responded to FM sweeps. Only 23% were selective for sweep direction. In the high-frequency population, all neurons responded to FM sweeps, but 31% did not respond to tones. Over one-half of this population was selective for sweep direction, and of those that were selective, all preferred the downward sweep direction of the biosonar pulse. A large percentage (31%) responded exclusively to downward sweeps, and not to tones or upward sweeps. None of the cells in either population responded to noise, or did so only at very high relative thresholds. 3. Both populations contained neurons that were selective for short stimulus durations that approximated the duration of the biosonar pulse, although the percentage was greater in the high-frequency population (58% vs. 20

  8. Inferior colliculus contributions to phase encoding of stop consonants in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Catherine M; Abrams, Daniel A; Nicol, Trent G; Kraus, Nina

    2011-12-01

    The human auditory brainstem is known to be exquisitely sensitive to fine-grained spectro-temporal differences between speech sound contrasts, and the ability of the brainstem to discriminate between these contrasts is important for speech perception. Recent work has described a novel method for translating brainstem timing differences in response to speech contrasts into frequency-specific phase differentials. Results from this method have shown that the human brainstem response is surprisingly sensitive to phase differences inherent to the stimuli across a wide extent of the spectrum. Here we use an animal model of the auditory brainstem to examine whether the stimulus-specific phase signatures measured in human brainstem responses represent an epiphenomenon associated with far-field (i.e., scalp-recorded) measurement of neural activity, or alternatively whether these specific activity patterns are also evident in auditory nuclei that contribute to the scalp-recorded response, thereby representing a more fundamental temporal processing phenomenon. Responses in anaesthetized guinea pigs to three minimally-contrasting consonant-vowel stimuli were collected simultaneously from the cortical surface vertex and directly from central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICc), measuring volume conducted neural activity and multiunit, near-field activity, respectively. Guinea pig surface responses were similar to human scalp-recorded responses to identical stimuli in gross morphology as well as phase characteristics. Moreover, surface-recorded potentials shared many phase characteristics with near-field ICc activity. Response phase differences were prominent during formant transition periods, reflecting spectro-temporal differences between syllables, and showed more subtle differences during the identical steady state periods. ICc encoded stimulus distinctions over a broader frequency range, with differences apparent in the highest frequency ranges analyzed, up to 3000

  9. Effects of microinjections of apomorphine and haloperidol into the inferior colliculus on the latent inhibition of the conditioned emotional response.

    PubMed

    Melo, Liana L; Pereira, Ellen C H M; Pagini, Cássia H; Coimbra, Norberto C; Brandão, Marcus L; Ferrari, Elenice A M

    2009-03-01

    Electrical or chemical stimulation of the inferior colliculus (IC) induces fear-like behaviors. More recently, consistent evidence has shown that electrical stimulation of the central nucleus of the IC supports Pavlovian conditioning and latent inhibition (LI). LI is characterized by retardation in conditioning and also by an impaired ability to ignore irrelevant stimuli, after a non-reinforced pre-exposure to the conditioned stimulus. LI has been proposed as a behavioral model of cognitive abnormalities seen in schizophrenia. The aim of the present study was to determine whether dopaminergic mechanisms in the IC are involved in LI of the conditioned emotional response (CER). To induce LI, a group of rats was pre-exposed (PE) to six tones in two sessions, while rats that were not pre-exposed (NPE) had two sessions without tone presentations. The conditioning consisted of two tone presentations to the animal, followed immediately by a foot shock. PE and NPE rats received IC microinjections of physiological saline, the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine (9.0 microg/0.5 microL/side), or the dopaminergic antagonist haloperidol (0.5 microg/0.5 microL/side) before both pre-exposure and conditioning. During the test, the PE rats that received saline or haloperidol had a lower suppression of the licking response compared to NPE rats that received vehicle or haloperidol, indicating that latent inhibition was induced. There was no significant difference in the suppression ratio in rats that received apomorphine injections into the IC, indicating reduced latent inhibition. These results suggest that dopamine-mediated mechanisms of the IC are involved in the development of LI.

  10. Differential roles of GABAergic and glycinergic input on FM selectivity in the inferior colliculus of the pallid bat.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anthony J; Fuzessery, Zoltan M

    2011-11-01

    Multiple mechanisms have been shown to shape frequency-modulated (FM) selectivity within the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (IC) in the pallid bat. In this study we focus on the mechanisms associated with sideband inhibition. The relative arrival time of inhibition compared with excitation can be used to predict FM responses as measured with a two-tone inhibition paradigm. An early-arriving low-frequency inhibition (LFI) prevents responses to upward sweeps and thus shapes direction selectivity. A late-arriving high-frequency inhibition (HFI) suppresses slow FM sweeps and thus shapes rate selectivity for downward sweeps. Iontophoretic application of gabazine (GBZ) to block GABA(A) receptors or strychnine (Strych) to block glycine receptors was used to assess the effects of removal of inhibition on each form of FM selectivity. GBZ and Strych had a similar effect on FM direction selectivity, reducing selectivity in up to 86% of neurons when both drugs were coapplied. FM rate selectivity was more resistant to drug application with less than 38% of neurons affected. In addition, only Strych could eliminate FM rate selectivity, whereas GBZ alone was ineffective. The loss of FM selectivity was directly correlated to a loss of the respective inhibitory sideband that shapes that form of selectivity. The elimination of LFI correlated to a loss of FM direction selectivity, whereas elimination of HFI correlated to a loss of FM rate selectivity. Results indicate that 1) although the majority of FM direction selectivity is created within the IC, the majority of rate selectivity is inherited from lower levels of the auditory system, 2) a loss of LFI corresponds to a loss of FM direction selectivity and is created through either GABAergic or glycinergic input, and 3) a loss of HFI corresponds to a loss of FM rate selectivity and is created mainly through glycinergic input.

  11. Stimulation by cochlear implant in unilaterally deaf rats reverses the decrease of inhibitory transmission in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Argence, Meritxell; Vassias, Isabelle; Kerhuel, Lubin; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; de Waele, Catherine

    2008-10-01

    In the last decade, numerous studies have investigated synaptic transmission changes in various auditory nuclei after unilateral cochlear injury. However, few data are available concerning the potential effect of electrical stimulation of the deafferented auditory nerve on the inhibitory neurotransmission in these nuclei. We report here for the first time the effect of chronic electrical stimulation of the deafferented auditory nerve on alpha1 subunit of the glycinergic receptor (GlyRalpha1) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)67 expression in the central nucleus of inferior colliculus (CIC). Adult rats were unilaterally cochleectomized by intracochlear neomycin sulphate injection. Fifteen days later, the ipsilateral auditory nerve was chronically stimulated either 4, 8 or 22 h daily, for 5 days using intracochlear bipolar electrodes. GlyRalpha1 and GAD67 mRNA and protein were quantified in the CIC using in situ hybridization and immunohistofluorescence methods. Our data showed that as after surgical ablation, GlyRalpha1 and GAD67 expression were strongly decreased in the contralateral CIC after unilateral chemical cochleectomy. Most importantly, these postlesional down-modulations were significantly reversed by chronic electrical stimulation of the deafferented auditory nerve. This recovery, however, did not persist for more than 5 days after the cessation of the deafferented auditory nerve electrical stimulation. Thus, downregulations of GlyRalpha1 and GAD67 may be involved both in the increased excitability observed in the CIC after unilateral deafness and consequently in the tinnitus frequently observed in unilateral adult deaf patients. Electrical stimulation of the deafferented auditory nerve in patients may be a potential new approach for treating tinnitus with unilateral hearing loss. PMID:18973578

  12. A neural mechanism of phase-locked responses to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated signals in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takayuki; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Kashimori, Yoshiki

    2015-08-01

    The central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICc) is an auditory region that receives convergent inputs from a large number of lower auditory nuclei. ICc neurons phase-lock to low frequencies of sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) signals but have a different mechanism in the phase-locking from that in neurons of lower nuclei. In the mustached bat, the phase-locking ability in lower nuclei is created by the coincidence of phase-locked excitatory and inhibitory inputs that have slightly different latencies. In contrast, the phase-locking property of ICc neurons is little influenced by the blocking of inhibitory synapses. Moreover, ICc neurons exhibit different characteristics in the spike patterns and synchronicity, classified here by three types of ICc neurons, or sustained, onset, and non-onset phase-locking neurons. However it remains unclear how ICc neurons create the phase-locking ability and the different characteristics. To address this issue, we developed a model of ICc neuronal population. Using this model, we show that the phase-locking ability of ICc neurons to low SAM frequencies is created by an intrinsic membrane property of ICc neuron, limited by inhibitory ion channels. We also show that response characteristics of the three types of neurons arise from the difference in an inhibitory effect sensitive to SAM frequencies. Our model reproduces well the experimental results observed in the mustached bat. These findings provide necessary conditions of how ICc neurons can give rise to the phase-locking ability and characteristic responses to low SAM frequencies. PMID:26032987

  13. Nucleus-nucleus potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Satchler, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The significance of a nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed. Information about such potentials obtained from scattering experiments is reviewed, including recent examples of so-called rainbow scattering that probe the potential at smaller distances. The evidence for interactions involving the nuclear spins is summarized, and their possible origin in couplings to non-elastic channels. Various models of the potentials are discussed.

  14. Effects of pulse phase duration and location of stimulation within the inferior colliculus on auditory cortical evoked potentials in a guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Neuheiser, Anke; Lenarz, Minoo; Reuter, Guenter; Calixto, Roger; Nolte, Ingo; Lenarz, Thomas; Lim, Hubert H

    2010-12-01

    The auditory midbrain implant (AMI), which consists of a single shank array designed for stimulation within the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC), has been developed for deaf patients who cannot benefit from a cochlear implant. Currently, performance levels in clinical trials for the AMI are far from those achieved by the cochlear implant and vary dramatically across patients, in part due to stimulation location effects. As an initial step towards improving the AMI, we investigated how stimulation of different regions along the isofrequency domain of the ICC as well as varying pulse phase durations and levels affected auditory cortical activity in anesthetized guinea pigs. This study was motivated by the need to determine in which region to implant the single shank array within a three-dimensional ICC structure and what stimulus parameters to use in patients. Our findings indicate that complex and unfavorable cortical activation properties are elicited by stimulation of caudal-dorsal ICC regions with the AMI array. Our results also confirm the existence of different functional regions along the isofrequency domain of the ICC (i.e., a caudal-dorsal and a rostral-ventral region), which has been traditionally unclassified. Based on our study as well as previous animal and human AMI findings, we may need to deliver more complex stimuli than currently used in the AMI patients to effectively activate the caudal ICC or ensure that the single shank AMI is only implanted into a rostral-ventral ICC region in future patients.

  15. Desipramine and citalopram attenuate pretest swim-induced increases in prodynorphin immunoreactivity in the dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the lateral division of the central nucleus of the amygdala in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung; Kim, Hee Jeong; Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Sun Hye; Cho, Jin Hee; Cho, Yun Ha; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Kyung Ho

    2014-10-01

    Dynorphin in the nucleus accumbens shell plays an important role in antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test (FST), but it is unclear whether desipramine and citalopram treatments alter prodynorphin levels in other brain areas. To explore this possibility, we injected mice with desipramine and citalopram 0.5, 19, and 23 h after a 15-min pretest swim and observed changes in prodynorphin expression before the test swim, which was conducted 24 h after the pretest swim. The pretest swim increased prodynorphin immunoreactivity in the dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBNST) and lateral division of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeL). This increase in prodynorphin immunoreactivity in the dBNST and CeL was blocked by desipramine and citalopram treatments. Similar changes in prodynorphin mRNA levels were observed in the dBNST and CeL, but these changes did not reach significance. To understand the underlying mechanism, we assessed changes in phosphorylated CREB at Ser(133) (pCREB) immunoreactivity in the dBNST and central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). Treatment with citalopram but not desipramine after the pretest swim significantly increased pCREB immunoreactivity only in the dBNST. These results suggest that regulation of prodynorphin in the dBNST and CeL before the test swim may be involved in the antidepressant-like effect of desipramine and citalopram in the FST and suggest that changes in pCREB immunoreactivity in these areas may not play an important role in the regulation of prodynorphin in the dBNST and CeA.

  16. Goal Representations Dominate Superior Colliculus Activity during Extrafoveal Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Hafed, Ziad M.; Krauzlis, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    The primate superior colliculus (SC) has long been known to be involved in saccade generation. However, SC neurons also exhibit fixation-related and smooth-pursuit-related activity. A parsimonious explanation for these seemingly disparate findings is that the SC contains a map of behaviorally relevant goal locations, rather than just a motor map for saccades and fixation. This explanation predicts that SC activity should reflect the behavioral goal, even when the behavioral response is not fixation or saccades, and even if the goal does not correspond to a visual stimulus. We tested this prediction by employing a tracking task that dissociates the stimulus and goal locations. In this task, monkeys tracked the invisible midpoint between two peripheral bars, such that the visual stimuli were peripheral but the goal was foveal/parafoveal. We recorded from SC neurons representing peripheral locations associated with the stimulus or central locations associated with the goal. Most neurons with peripheral response fields did not respond differently during tracking than during passive viewing of the stimulus under fixation; most neurons with central response fields responded more during tracking than during fixation, despite the lack of a visual stimulus. Moreover, the spatial distribution of activity during tracking was larger than that during fixation or tracking of a foveal stimulus, suggesting that the greater spatial uncertainty about the invisible goal corresponded to more widespread SC activity. These results demonstrate the flexibility with which activity across the SC represents the location - and also the spatial precision - of behaviorally relevant goals for multiple eye movements. PMID:18799675

  17. Microinjection of glycine into the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus produces diuresis, natriuresis, and inhibition of central sympathetic outflow.

    PubMed

    Krowicki, Zbigniew K; Kapusta, Daniel R

    2011-04-01

    Strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and glycine-immunoreactive fibers are expressed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), yet the functional significance of this innervation is unclear. Therefore, these studies examined the changes in cardiovascular and renal function and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) produced by the microinjection of glycine (5 and 50 nmol) into the PVN of conscious Sprague-Dawley rats. Microinjection of glycine into, but not outside of, the PVN dose-dependently increased urine flow rate and urinary sodium excretion and decreased RSNA. At the higher dose, PVN glycine also decreased heart rate; neither 5 nor 50 nmol PVN glycine altered mean arterial pressure. The glycine (50 nmol)-evoked diuresis and natriuresis were abolished in rats continuously infused intravenously with [Arg(8)]-vasopressin. Furthermore, chronic bilateral renal denervation prevented the bradycardia and diuresis to PVN glycine and blunted the natriuresis. In other studies, unilateral PVN pretreatment with the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine (1.6 nmol) prevented the effects of PVN glycine (50 nmol) on heart rate, RSNA, and renal excretory function. When microinjected bilaterally, PVN strychnine (1.6 nmol per site) evoked a significant increase in heart rate and RSNA without altering renal excretory function. These findings demonstrate that in conscious rats glycine acts in the PVN to enhance the renal excretion of water and sodium and decrease central sympathetic outflow to the heart and kidneys. Although endogenous PVN glycine inputs elicit a tonic control of heart rate and RSNA, the renal excretory responses to PVN glycine seem to be caused primarily by the inhibition of arginine vasopressin secretion.

  18. Acute tianeptine treatment selectively modulates neuronal activation in the central nucleus of the amygdala and attenuates fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Godsil, B P; Bontempi, B; Mailliet, F; Delagrange, P; Spedding, M; Jay, T M

    2015-11-01

    Antidepressant drugs are commonly prescribed treatments for anxiety disorders, and there is growing interest in understanding how these drugs impact fear extinction because extinction learning is pivotal to successful exposure-based therapy (EBT). A key objective within this domain is understanding how antidepressants alter the activation of specific elements of the limbic-based network that governs such fear processing. Chronic treatment with the antidepressant tianeptine has been shown to reduce the acquisition of extinction learning in rats, yet the drug's acute influence on activation in prefrontal and amygdalar regions, and on extinction learning are not well understood. To assess its influence on cellular activation, rats were injected with tianeptine and Fos immunoreactivity was measured in these regions. Acute tianeptine treatment selectively altered Fos expression within subdivisions of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA) in a bidirectional manner that varied in relation to ongoing activation within the capsular subdivision and its prefrontal and intra-amygdalar inputs. This pattern of results suggests that the drug can conditionally modulate the activation of CEA subdivisions, which contain microcircuits strongly implicated in fear processing. The effect of acute tianeptine was also examined with respect to the acquisition, consolidation and expression of fear extinction in rats. Acute tianeptine attenuated extinction learning as well as the recall of extinction memory, which underscores that acute dosing with the drug could alter learning during EBT. Together these findings provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism supporting tianeptine's clinical efficacy, as well as its potential influence on CEA-based learning mechanisms. PMID:25560759

  19. Acute tianeptine treatment selectively modulates neuronal activation in the central nucleus of the amygdala and attenuates fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Godsil, B P; Bontempi, B; Mailliet, F; Delagrange, P; Spedding, M; Jay, T M

    2015-11-01

    Antidepressant drugs are commonly prescribed treatments for anxiety disorders, and there is growing interest in understanding how these drugs impact fear extinction because extinction learning is pivotal to successful exposure-based therapy (EBT). A key objective within this domain is understanding how antidepressants alter the activation of specific elements of the limbic-based network that governs such fear processing. Chronic treatment with the antidepressant tianeptine has been shown to reduce the acquisition of extinction learning in rats, yet the drug's acute influence on activation in prefrontal and amygdalar regions, and on extinction learning are not well understood. To assess its influence on cellular activation, rats were injected with tianeptine and Fos immunoreactivity was measured in these regions. Acute tianeptine treatment selectively altered Fos expression within subdivisions of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA) in a bidirectional manner that varied in relation to ongoing activation within the capsular subdivision and its prefrontal and intra-amygdalar inputs. This pattern of results suggests that the drug can conditionally modulate the activation of CEA subdivisions, which contain microcircuits strongly implicated in fear processing. The effect of acute tianeptine was also examined with respect to the acquisition, consolidation and expression of fear extinction in rats. Acute tianeptine attenuated extinction learning as well as the recall of extinction memory, which underscores that acute dosing with the drug could alter learning during EBT. Together these findings provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism supporting tianeptine's clinical efficacy, as well as its potential influence on CEA-based learning mechanisms.

  20. Inactivation of the central nucleus of the amygdala reduces the effect of punishment on cocaine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Xue, YueQiang; Steketee, Jeffery D; Sun, WenLin

    2012-03-01

    Continued cocaine use despite the negative consequences is a hallmark of cocaine addiction. One such consequence is punishment, which is often used by society to curb cocaine use. Unfortunately, we know little about the mechanism involved in regulation by punishment of cocaine use. The fact that cocaine addicts continue to use cocaine despite potentially severe punishment suggests that the mechanism may be impaired. Such impairment is expected to critically contribute to compulsive cocaine use. This study was aimed at testing the hypothesis that the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeN) plays a critical role in such regulation. To this end, rats were trained to press a lever to self-administer cocaine under a chained schedule: a response on one lever (cocaine-seeking lever) led to access to the other lever (cocaine-taking lever), on which a response was reinforced by cocaine and cues. Thereafter, responses on the seeking lever were punished by footshock with a probability of 0.5. Cocaine self-administration (SA) was significantly suppressed by punishment in an intensity-dependent manner. Interestingly, rats trained with daily 6-h (extended access) but not 2-h (limited access) sessions showed resistance to the lower intensity of punishment. Inactivation of the CeN induced a robust anti-punishment effect in both groups. These data provided evidence that the CeN is a critical neural substrate involved in regulation by punishment of cocaine SA. Rats with a history of extended cocaine SA appeared to be less sensitive to punishment. The decreased sensitivity could result from the neuroplastic changes induced by extended cocaine SA in the CeN.

  1. Optogenetic study of the projections from the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis to the central amygdala.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Nur Zeynep; Yamamoto, Ryo; Paré, Denis

    2015-11-01

    It has been proposed that the central amygdala (CeA), particularly its medial sector (CeM), generates brief fear responses to discrete conditioned cues, whereas the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) promotes long-lasting, anxiety-like states in response to more diffuse contingencies. Although it is believed that BNST-CeA interactions determine the transition between short- and long-duration responses, the nature of these interactions remains unknown. To shed light on this question, we used a double viral strategy to drive the expression of channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in BNST cells that project to CeA. Next, using patch-clamp recordings in vitro, we investigated the connectivity of infected cells to noninfected cells in BNST and compared the influence of BNST axons on neurons in the medial and lateral (CeL) parts of CeA. CeA-projecting BNST cells were concentrated in the anterolateral (AL) and anteroventral (AV) sectors of BNST. Dense plexuses of BNST axons were observed throughout CeA. In CeA and BNST, light-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials accounted for a minority of responses (0-9% of tested cells); inhibition prevailed. The incidence of inhibitory responses was higher in CeM than in CeL (66% and 43% of tested cells, respectively). Within BNST, the connections from CeA-projecting to non-CeA-targeting cells varied as a function of the BNST sector: 50% vs. 9% of tested cells exhibited light-evoked responses in BNST-AL vs. BNST-AV, respectively. Overall, these results suggest that via its projection to CeA, BNST exerts an inhibitory influence over cued fear and that BNST neurons projecting to CeA form contrasting connections in different BNST subnuclei. PMID:26400259

  2. Vocal premotor activity in the superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Shiva R; Moss, Cynthia F

    2007-01-01

    Chronic neural recordings were taken from the midbrain superior colliculus (SC) of echolocating bats while they were engaged in one of two distinct behavioral tasks: virtual target amplitude discrimination (VTAD) and real oscillating target tracking (ROTT). In the VTAD task, bats used a limited range of sonar call features to discriminate the amplitude category of echoes, whereas in the ROTT task, the bat produced dynamically modulated sonar calls to track a moving target. Newly developed methods for chronic recordings in unrestrained, behaving bats reveal two consistent bouts of SC neural activity preceding the onset of sonar vocalizations in both tasks. A short lead bout occurs tightly coupled to vocal onset (VTAD, -5.1 to -2.2 ms range, -3.6 +/- 0.7 ms mean lead time; ROTT, -3.0 to + 0.4 ms range, -1.2 +/- 1.3 ms mean lead time), and this activity may play a role in marking the time of each sonar emission. A long lead bout in SC activity occurs earlier and spreads over a longer interval (VTAD, -40.6 to -8.4 ms range, -22.2 +/- 3.9 ms mean lead time; ROTT, -29.8 to -7.1 ms range, -17.5 +/- 9.1 ms mean lead time) when compared with short lead events. In the goal-directed ROTT task, the timing of long lead event times vary with the bat's sonar call duration. This finding, along with behavioral studies demonstrating that bats adjust sonar call duration as they track targets at changing distance, suggests the bat SC contributes to range-dependent adjustments of sonar call duration. PMID:17202477

  3. Vocal premotor activity in the superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Shiva R; Moss, Cynthia F

    2007-01-01

    Chronic neural recordings were taken from the midbrain superior colliculus (SC) of echolocating bats while they were engaged in one of two distinct behavioral tasks: virtual target amplitude discrimination (VTAD) and real oscillating target tracking (ROTT). In the VTAD task, bats used a limited range of sonar call features to discriminate the amplitude category of echoes, whereas in the ROTT task, the bat produced dynamically modulated sonar calls to track a moving target. Newly developed methods for chronic recordings in unrestrained, behaving bats reveal two consistent bouts of SC neural activity preceding the onset of sonar vocalizations in both tasks. A short lead bout occurs tightly coupled to vocal onset (VTAD, -5.1 to -2.2 ms range, -3.6 +/- 0.7 ms mean lead time; ROTT, -3.0 to + 0.4 ms range, -1.2 +/- 1.3 ms mean lead time), and this activity may play a role in marking the time of each sonar emission. A long lead bout in SC activity occurs earlier and spreads over a longer interval (VTAD, -40.6 to -8.4 ms range, -22.2 +/- 3.9 ms mean lead time; ROTT, -29.8 to -7.1 ms range, -17.5 +/- 9.1 ms mean lead time) when compared with short lead events. In the goal-directed ROTT task, the timing of long lead event times vary with the bat's sonar call duration. This finding, along with behavioral studies demonstrating that bats adjust sonar call duration as they track targets at changing distance, suggests the bat SC contributes to range-dependent adjustments of sonar call duration.

  4. Functional Microarchitecture of the Mouse Dorsal Inferior Colliculus Revealed through In Vivo Two-Photon Calcium Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barnstedt, Oliver; Keating, Peter; Weissenberger, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) is an obligatory relay for ascending auditory inputs from the brainstem and receives descending input from the auditory cortex. The IC comprises a central nucleus (CNIC), surrounded by several shell regions, but the internal organization of this midbrain nucleus remains incompletely understood. We used two-photon calcium imaging to study the functional microarchitecture of both neurons in the mouse dorsal IC and corticocollicular axons that terminate there. In contrast to previous electrophysiological studies, our approach revealed a clear functional distinction between the CNIC and the dorsal cortex of the IC (DCIC), suggesting that the mouse midbrain is more similar to that of other mammals than previously thought. We found that the DCIC comprises a thin sheet of neurons, sometimes extending barely 100 μm below the pial surface. The sound frequency representation in the DCIC approximated the mouse's full hearing range, whereas dorsal CNIC neurons almost exclusively preferred low frequencies. The response properties of neurons in these two regions were otherwise surprisingly similar, and the frequency tuning of DCIC neurons was only slightly broader than that of CNIC neurons. In several animals, frequency gradients were observed in the DCIC, and a comparable tonotopic arrangement was observed across the boutons of the corticocollicular axons, which form a dense mesh beneath the dorsal surface of the IC. Nevertheless, acoustically responsive corticocollicular boutons were sparse, produced unreliable responses, and were more broadly tuned than DCIC neurons, suggesting that they have a largely modulatory rather than driving influence on auditory midbrain neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Due to its genetic tractability, the mouse is fast becoming the most popular animal model for sensory neuroscience. Nevertheless, many aspects of its neural architecture are still poorly understood. Here, we image the dorsal auditory midbrain and its

  5. Autoradiographic distribution of /sup 125/I-galanin binding sites in the rat central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Skofitsch, G.; Sills, M.A.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-11-01

    Galanin (GAL) binding sites in coronal sections of the rat brain were demonstrated using autoradiographic methods. Scatchard analysis of /sup 125/I-GAL binding to slide-mounted tissue sections revealed saturable binding to a single class of receptors with a Kd of approximately 0.2 nM. /sup 125/I-GAL binding sites were demonstrated throughout the rat central nervous system. Dense binding was observed in the following areas: prefrontal cortex, the anterior nuclei of the olfactory bulb, several nuclei of the amygdaloid complex, the dorsal septal area, dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the ventral pallidum, the internal medullary laminae of the thalamus, medial pretectal nucleus, nucleus of the medial optic tract, borderline area of the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus adjacent to the spinal trigeminal tract, the substantia gelatinosa and the superficial layers of the dorsal spinal cord. Moderate binding was observed in the piriform, periamygdaloid, entorhinal, insular cortex and the subiculum, the nucleus accumbens, medial forebrain bundle, anterior hypothalamic, ventromedial, dorsal premamillary, lateral and periventricular thalamic nuclei, the subzona incerta, Forel's field H1 and H2, periventricular gray matter, medial and superficial gray strata of the superior colliculus, dorsal parts of the central gray, peripeduncular area, the interpeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra zona compacta, ventral tegmental area, the dorsal and ventral parabrachial and parvocellular reticular nuclei. The preponderance of GAL-binding in somatosensory as well as in limbic areas suggests a possible involvement of GAL in a variety of brain functions.

  6. Neural correlates of active avoidance behavior in superior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jeremy D.; Castro-Alamancos, Manuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Active avoidance of harmful situations seems highly adaptive, but the underlying neural mechanisms are largely unknown. Rats can effectively use the superior colliculus during active avoidance to detect a salient whisker conditioned stimulus (WCS) that signals an aversive event. Here, we recorded unit and field potential activity in the intermediate layers of the superior colliculus of rats during active avoidance behavior. During the period preceding the onset of the WCS, avoids are associated with a higher firing rate than escapes (unsuccessful avoids), indicating that a prepared superior colliculus is more likely to detect the WCS and lead to an avoid. Moreover, during the WCS, a robust ramping up of overall firing rate is observed for trials leading to avoids. The firing rate ramping is not due to shuttling, and may serve to drive downstream circuits to avoid. Therefore, a robust neural correlate of active avoidance behavior is found in the superior colliculus, emphasizing its role in the detection of salient sensory signals that require immediate action. PMID:20573897

  7. Inferior Colliculus Lesions Impair Eyeblink Conditioning in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, John H.; Halverson, Hunter E.; Hubbard, Erin M.

    2007-01-01

    The neural plasticity necessary for acquisition and retention of eyeblink conditioning has been localized to the cerebellum. However, the sources of sensory input to the cerebellum that are necessary for establishing learning-related plasticity have not been identified completely. The inferior colliculus may be a source of sensory input to the…

  8. Calcitonin gene-related peptide erases the fear memory and facilitates long-term potentiation in the central nucleus of the amygdala in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin; Zhang, Jie-Ting; Liu, Jue; Yang, Si; Chen, Tao; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang

    2015-11-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37 amino acid neuropeptide, which plays a critical role in the central nervous system. CGRP binds to G protein-coupled receptors, including CGRP1, which couples positively to adenylyl cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) activation. CGRP and CGRP1 receptors are enriched in central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), the main part of the amygdala, which regulates conditioned fear memories. Here, we reported the importance of CGRP and CGRP1 receptor for synaptic plasticity in the CeA and the extinction of fear memory in rats. Our electrophysiological and behavioral in vitro and in vivo results showed exogenous application of CGRP induced an immediate and lasting long-term potentiation in the basolateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway, but not in the lateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway, while bilateral intra-CeA infusion CGRP (0, 5, 13 and 21 μM/side) dose dependently enhanced fear memory extinction. The effects were blocked by CGRP1 receptor antagonist (CGRP8-37 ), N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors antagonist MK801 and PKA inhibitor H89. These results demonstrate that CGRP can lead to long-term potentiation of basolateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway through a PKA-dependent postsynaptic mechanism that involved N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and enhance the extinction of fear memory in rats. Together, the results strongly support a pivotal role of CGRP in the synaptic plasticity of CeA and extinction of fear memory. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays an essential role in synaptic plasticity in the amygdala and fear memory. We found that CGRP-induced chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) in a dose-dependent way in the BLA-CeA (basolateral and central nucleus of amygdala, respectively) pathway and enhanced fear memory extinction in rats through a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent postsynaptic mechanism that involved NMDA receptors. These results support a pivotal role of CGRP in amygdala.

  9. Roles of β- and α2-adrenoceptors within the central nucleus of the amygdala in the visceral pain-induced aversion in rats.

    PubMed

    Deyama, Satoshi; Takishita, Azusa; Tanimoto, Sachi; Ide, Soichiro; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Satoh, Masamichi; Minami, Masabumi

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the roles of β- and α(2)-adrenoceptors within the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in the negative affective and sensory components of visceral pain in rats. We observed a dose-dependent reduction of intraperitoneal acetic acid-induced conditioned place aversion by bilateral injections of timolol, a β-adrenoceptor antagonist, or clonidine, an α(2)-adrenoceptor agonist, without reducing writhing behaviors. These data suggest a pivotal role of intra-CeA adrenoceptors in the negative affective, but not sensory, component of visceral pain.

  10. A phenomenological model of peripheral and central neural responses to amplitude-modulated tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Paul C.; Carney, Laurel H.

    2004-10-01

    A phenomenological model with time-varying excitation and inhibition was developed to study possible neural mechanisms underlying changes in the representation of temporal envelopes along the auditory pathway. A modified version of an existing auditory-nerve model [Zhang et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 648-670 (2001)] was used to provide inputs to higher hypothetical processing centers. Model responses were compared directly to published physiological data at three levels: the auditory nerve, ventral cochlear nucleus, and inferior colliculus. Trends and absolute values of both average firing rate and synchrony to the modulation period were accurately predicted at each level for a wide range of stimulus modulation depths and modulation frequencies. The diversity of central physiological responses was accounted for with realistic variations of model parameters. Specifically, enhanced synchrony in the cochlear nucleus and rate-tuning to modulation frequency in the inferior colliculus were predicted by choosing appropriate relative strengths and time courses of excitatory and inhibitory inputs to postsynaptic model cells. The proposed model is fundamentally different than others that have been used to explain the representation of envelopes in the mammalian midbrain, and it provides a computational tool for testing hypothesized relationships between physiology and psychophysics. .

  11. Onset of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzicki, M.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Seyboth, P.

    2012-05-15

    The energy dependence of hadron production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions reveals anomalies-the kink, horn, and step. They were predicted as signals of the deconfinement phase transition and observed by the NA49 Collaboration in central PbPb collisions at the CERN SPS. This indicates the onset of the deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions at about 30 A GeV.

  12. Effects of aging on peripheral and central auditory processing in rats.

    PubMed

    Costa, Margarida; Lepore, Franco; Prévost, François; Guillemot, Jean-Paul

    2016-08-01

    Hearing loss is a hallmark sign in the elderly population. Decline in auditory perception provokes deficits in the ability to localize sound sources and reduces speech perception, particularly in noise. In addition to a loss of peripheral hearing sensitivity, changes in more complex central structures have also been demonstrated. Related to these, this study examines the auditory directional maps in the deep layers of the superior colliculus of the rat. Hence, anesthetized Sprague-Dawley adult (10 months) and aged (22 months) rats underwent distortion product of otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) to assess cochlear function. Then, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were assessed, followed by extracellular single-unit recordings to determine age-related effects on central auditory functions. DPOAE amplitude levels were decreased in aged rats although they were still present between 3.0 and 24.0 kHz. ABR level thresholds in aged rats were significantly elevated at an early (cochlear nucleus - wave II) stage in the auditory brainstem. In the superior colliculus, thresholds were increased and the tuning widths of the directional receptive fields were significantly wider. Moreover, no systematic directional spatial arrangement was present among the neurons of the aged rats, implying that the topographical organization of the auditory directional map was abolished. These results suggest that the deterioration of the auditory directional spatial map can, to some extent, be attributable to age-related dysfunction at more central, perceptual stages of auditory processing. PMID:27306460

  13. Effects of aging on peripheral and central auditory processing in rats.

    PubMed

    Costa, Margarida; Lepore, Franco; Prévost, François; Guillemot, Jean-Paul

    2016-08-01

    Hearing loss is a hallmark sign in the elderly population. Decline in auditory perception provokes deficits in the ability to localize sound sources and reduces speech perception, particularly in noise. In addition to a loss of peripheral hearing sensitivity, changes in more complex central structures have also been demonstrated. Related to these, this study examines the auditory directional maps in the deep layers of the superior colliculus of the rat. Hence, anesthetized Sprague-Dawley adult (10 months) and aged (22 months) rats underwent distortion product of otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) to assess cochlear function. Then, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were assessed, followed by extracellular single-unit recordings to determine age-related effects on central auditory functions. DPOAE amplitude levels were decreased in aged rats although they were still present between 3.0 and 24.0 kHz. ABR level thresholds in aged rats were significantly elevated at an early (cochlear nucleus - wave II) stage in the auditory brainstem. In the superior colliculus, thresholds were increased and the tuning widths of the directional receptive fields were significantly wider. Moreover, no systematic directional spatial arrangement was present among the neurons of the aged rats, implying that the topographical organization of the auditory directional map was abolished. These results suggest that the deterioration of the auditory directional spatial map can, to some extent, be attributable to age-related dysfunction at more central, perceptual stages of auditory processing.

  14. Electrophysiologic Responses in Hamster Superior Colliculus Evoked by Regenerating Retinal Axons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keirstead, S. A.; Rasminsky, M.; Fukuda, Y.; Carter, D. A.; Aguayo, A. J.; Vidal-Sanz, M.

    1989-10-01

    Autologous peripheral nerve grafts were used to permit and direct the regrowth of retinal ganglion cell axons from the eye to the ipsilateral superior colliculus of adult hamsters in which the optic nerves had been transected within the orbit. Extracellular recordings in the superior colliculus 15 to 18 weeks after graft insertion revealed excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic responses to visual stimulation. The finding of light-induced responses in neurons in the superficial layers of the superior colliculus close to the graft indicates that axons regenerating from axotomized retinal ganglion cells can establish electrophysiologically functional synapses with neurons in the superior colliculus of these adult mammals.

  15. Controlled movement processing: superior colliculus activity associated with countermanded saccades.

    PubMed

    Paré, Martin; Hanes, Doug P

    2003-07-23

    We investigated whether the monkey superior colliculus (SC), an important midbrain structure for the regulation of saccadic eye movements, contains neurons with activity patterns sufficient to control both the cancellation and the production of saccades. We used a countermanding task to manipulate the probability that, after the presentation of a stop signal, the monkeys canceled a saccade that was planned in response to an eccentric visual stimulus. By modeling each animal's behavioral responses, with a race between GO and STOP processes leading up to either saccade initiation or cancellation, we estimated that saccade cancellation took on average 110 msec. Neurons recorded in the superior colliculus intermediate layers during this task exhibited the discharge properties expected from neurons closely involved in behavioral control. Both saccade- and fixation-related discharged differently when saccades were counter-manded instead of executed, and the time at which they changed their activity preceded the behavioral estimate of saccade cancellation obtained from the same trials by 10 and 13 msec, respectively. Furthermore, these intervals exceed the minimal amount of time needed for SC activity to influence eye movements. The additional observation that saccade-related neurons discharged significantly less when saccades were countermanded instead of executed suggests that saccades are triggered when these neurons reach a critical activation level. Altogether, these findings provide solid evidence that the superior colliculus contains the necessary neural signals to be directly involved in the decision process that regulates whether a saccade is to be produced.

  16. Controlled movement processing: superior colliculus activity associated with countermanded saccades.

    PubMed

    Paré, Martin; Hanes, Doug P

    2003-07-23

    We investigated whether the monkey superior colliculus (SC), an important midbrain structure for the regulation of saccadic eye movements, contains neurons with activity patterns sufficient to control both the cancellation and the production of saccades. We used a countermanding task to manipulate the probability that, after the presentation of a stop signal, the monkeys canceled a saccade that was planned in response to an eccentric visual stimulus. By modeling each animal's behavioral responses, with a race between GO and STOP processes leading up to either saccade initiation or cancellation, we estimated that saccade cancellation took on average 110 msec. Neurons recorded in the superior colliculus intermediate layers during this task exhibited the discharge properties expected from neurons closely involved in behavioral control. Both saccade- and fixation-related discharged differently when saccades were counter-manded instead of executed, and the time at which they changed their activity preceded the behavioral estimate of saccade cancellation obtained from the same trials by 10 and 13 msec, respectively. Furthermore, these intervals exceed the minimal amount of time needed for SC activity to influence eye movements. The additional observation that saccade-related neurons discharged significantly less when saccades were countermanded instead of executed suggests that saccades are triggered when these neurons reach a critical activation level. Altogether, these findings provide solid evidence that the superior colliculus contains the necessary neural signals to be directly involved in the decision process that regulates whether a saccade is to be produced. PMID:12878689

  17. Damage to the dorsomedial thalamic nucleus, central lateral intralaminar thalamic nucleus, and midline thalamic nuclei on the right-side impair executive function and attention under conditions of high demand but not low demand.

    PubMed

    Edelstyn, N M J; Mayes, A R; Ellis, S J

    2014-04-01

    This study reports a patient, OG, with a unilateral right-sided thalamic lesion. High resolution 3T magnetic resonance imaging revealed damage to the parvicellular and magnocellular subdivisions of the dorsomedial thalamus (DMT), the central lateral intralaminar nucleus (also known as the paralamellar DMT), the paraventricular and the central medial midline thalamic nuclei. According to the neuropsychological literature, the DMT, the midline and intralaminar thalamic nuclei influence a wide array of cognitive functions by virtue of their modulatory influences on executive function and attention, and this is particularly indicated under conditions of low arousal or high cognitive demand. We explored this prediction in OG, and compared his performance on a range of low and high demand versions of tests that tapped executive function and attention to a group of 6 age- and IQ-matched controls. OG, without exception, significantly under performed on the high-demand attention and executive function tasks, but performed normally on the low-demand versions. These findings extend and refine current understanding of the effects of thalamic lesion on attention and executive function.

  18. Investigating the dynamics of the brain response to music: A central role of the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Karsten; Fritz, Thomas; Mildner, Toralf; Richter, Maxi; Schulze, Katrin; Lepsien, Jöran; Schroeter, Matthias L; Möller, Harald E

    2015-08-01

    Ventral striatal activity has been previously shown to correspond well to reward value mediated by music. Here, we investigate the dynamic brain response to music and manipulated counterparts using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Counterparts of musical excerpts were produced by either manipulating the consonance/dissonance of the musical fragments or playing them backwards (or both). Results show a greater involvement of the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens both when contrasting listening to music that is perceived as pleasant and listening to a manipulated version perceived as unpleasant (backward dissonant), as well as in a parametric analysis for increasing pleasantness. Notably, both analyses yielded a ventral striatal response that was strongest during an early phase of stimulus presentation. A hippocampal response to the musical stimuli was also observed, and was largely mediated by processing differences between listening to forward and backward music. This hippocampal involvement was again strongest during the early response to the music. Auditory cortex activity was more strongly evoked by the original (pleasant) music compared to its manipulated counterparts, but did not display a similar decline of activation over time as subcortical activity. These findings rather suggest that the ventral striatal/nucleus accumbens response during music listening is strongest in the first seconds and then declines.

  19. Investigating the dynamics of the brain response to music: A central role of the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Karsten; Fritz, Thomas; Mildner, Toralf; Richter, Maxi; Schulze, Katrin; Lepsien, Jöran; Schroeter, Matthias L; Möller, Harald E

    2015-08-01

    Ventral striatal activity has been previously shown to correspond well to reward value mediated by music. Here, we investigate the dynamic brain response to music and manipulated counterparts using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Counterparts of musical excerpts were produced by either manipulating the consonance/dissonance of the musical fragments or playing them backwards (or both). Results show a greater involvement of the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens both when contrasting listening to music that is perceived as pleasant and listening to a manipulated version perceived as unpleasant (backward dissonant), as well as in a parametric analysis for increasing pleasantness. Notably, both analyses yielded a ventral striatal response that was strongest during an early phase of stimulus presentation. A hippocampal response to the musical stimuli was also observed, and was largely mediated by processing differences between listening to forward and backward music. This hippocampal involvement was again strongest during the early response to the music. Auditory cortex activity was more strongly evoked by the original (pleasant) music compared to its manipulated counterparts, but did not display a similar decline of activation over time as subcortical activity. These findings rather suggest that the ventral striatal/nucleus accumbens response during music listening is strongest in the first seconds and then declines. PMID:25976924

  20. [Central auditory prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Lenarz, T; Lim, H; Joseph, G; Reuter, G; Lenarz, M

    2009-06-01

    Deaf patients with severe sensory hearing loss can benefit from a cochlear implant (CI), which stimulates the auditory nerve fibers. However, patients who do not have an intact auditory nerve cannot benefit from a CI. The majority of these patients are neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients who developed neural deafness due to growth or surgical removal of a bilateral acoustic neuroma. The only current solution is the auditory brainstem implant (ABI), which stimulates the surface of the cochlear nucleus in the brainstem. Although the ABI provides improvement in environmental awareness and lip-reading capabilities, only a few NF2 patients have achieved some limited open set speech perception. In the search for alternative procedures our research group in collaboration with Cochlear Ltd. (Australia) developed a human prototype auditory midbrain implant (AMI), which is designed to electrically stimulate the inferior colliculus (IC). The IC has the potential as a new target for an auditory prosthesis as it provides access to neural projections necessary for speech perception as well as a systematic map of spectral information. In this paper the present status of research and development in the field of central auditory prostheses is presented with respect to technology, surgical technique and hearing results as well as the background concepts of ABI and AMI. PMID:19517084

  1. Delay-tuned neurons in the inferior colliculus of the mustached bat: implications for analyses of target distance.

    PubMed

    Portfors, C V; Wenstrup, J J

    1999-09-01

    We examined response properties of delay-tuned neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) of the mustached bat. In the mustached bat, delay-tuned neurons respond best to the combination of the first-harmonic, frequency-modulated (FM1) sweep in the emitted pulse and a higher harmonic frequency-modulated (FM2, FM3 or FM4) component in returning echoes and are referred to as FM-FM neurons. We also examined H1-CF2 neurons. H1-CF2 neurons responded to simultaneous presentation of the first harmonic (H1) in the emitted pulse and the second constant frequency (CF2) component in returning echoes. These neurons served as a comparison as they are thought to encode different features of sonar targets than FM-FM neurons. Only 7% of our neurons (14/198) displayed a single excitatory tuning curve. The rest of the neurons (184) displayed complex responses to sounds in two separate frequency bands. The majority (51%, 101) of neurons were facilitated by the combination of specific components in the mustached bat's vocalizations. Twenty-five percent showed purely inhibitory interactions. The remaining neurons responded to two separate frequencies, without any facilitation or inhibition. FM-FM neurons (69) were facilitated by the FM1 component in the simulated pulse and a higher harmonic FM component in simulated echoes, provided the high-frequency signal was delayed the appropriate amount. The delay producing maximal facilitation ("best delay") among FM-FM neurons ranged between 0 and 20 ms, corresponding to target distances

  2. Ephrin-B2 Reverse Signaling Is Required for Topography but Not Pattern Formation of Lateral Superior Olivary Inputs to the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Matthew M.; Kavianpour, Sarah M.; Gabriele, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Graded and modular expressions of Eph-ephrins are known to provide positional information for the formation of topographic maps and patterning in the developing nervous system. Previously we have shown that ephrin-B2 is expressed in a continuous gradient across the tonotopic axis of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (CNIC), whereas patterns are discontinuous and modular in the lateral cortex of the IC (LCIC). The present study explores the involvement of ephrin-B2 signaling in the development of projections to the CNIC and LCIC arising from the lateral superior olivary nuclei (LSO) prior to hearing onset. Anterograde and retrograde fluorescent tracing methods in neonatal fixed tissue preparations were used to compare topographic mapping and the establishment of LSO layers/modules in wild-type and ephrin-B2lacZ/+ mice (severely compromised reverse signaling). At birth, pioneer LSO axons occupy the ipsilateral IC in both groups but are delayed contralaterally in ephrin-B2lacZ/+ mutants. By the onset of hearing, both wild-type and mutant projections form discernible layers bilaterally in the CNIC and modular arrangements within the ipsilateral LCIC. In contrast, ephrin-B2lacZ/+ mice lack a reliable topography in LSO-IC projections, suggesting that fully functional ephrin-B2 reverse signaling is required for normal projection mapping. Taken together, these ephrin-B2 findings paired with known coexpression of EphA4 suggest the importance of these signaling proteins in establishing functional auditory circuits prior to experience. PMID:23042409

  3. Natural Vocalizations in the Mammalian Inferior Colliculus are Broadly Encoded by a Small Number of Independent Multi-Units

    PubMed Central

    Lyzwa, Dominika; Herrmann, J. Michael; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2016-01-01

    How complex natural sounds are represented by the main converging center of the auditory midbrain, the central inferior colliculus, is an open question. We applied neural discrimination to determine the variation of detailed encoding of individual vocalizations across the best frequency gradient of the central inferior colliculus. The analysis was based on collective responses from several neurons. These multi-unit spike trains were recorded from guinea pigs exposed to a spectrotemporally rich set of eleven species-specific vocalizations. Spike trains of disparate units from the same recording were combined in order to investigate whether groups of multi-unit clusters represent the whole set of vocalizations more reliably than only one unit, and whether temporal response correlations between them facilitate an unambiguous neural representation of the vocalizations. We found a spatial distribution of the capability to accurately encode groups of vocalizations across the best frequency gradient. Different vocalizations are optimally discriminated at different locations of the best frequency gradient. Furthermore, groups of a few multi-unit clusters yield improved discrimination over only one multi-unit cluster between all tested vocalizations. However, temporal response correlations between units do not yield better discrimination. Our study is based on a large set of units of simultaneously recorded responses from several guinea pigs and electrode insertion positions. Our findings suggest a broadly distributed code for behaviorally relevant vocalizations in the mammalian inferior colliculus. Responses from a few non-interacting units are sufficient to faithfully represent the whole set of studied vocalizations with diverse spectrotemporal properties. PMID:26869890

  4. Natural Vocalizations in the Mammalian Inferior Colliculus are Broadly Encoded by a Small Number of Independent Multi-Units.

    PubMed

    Lyzwa, Dominika; Herrmann, J Michael; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2015-01-01

    How complex natural sounds are represented by the main converging center of the auditory midbrain, the central inferior colliculus, is an open question. We applied neural discrimination to determine the variation of detailed encoding of individual vocalizations across the best frequency gradient of the central inferior colliculus. The analysis was based on collective responses from several neurons. These multi-unit spike trains were recorded from guinea pigs exposed to a spectrotemporally rich set of eleven species-specific vocalizations. Spike trains of disparate units from the same recording were combined in order to investigate whether groups of multi-unit clusters represent the whole set of vocalizations more reliably than only one unit, and whether temporal response correlations between them facilitate an unambiguous neural representation of the vocalizations. We found a spatial distribution of the capability to accurately encode groups of vocalizations across the best frequency gradient. Different vocalizations are optimally discriminated at different locations of the best frequency gradient. Furthermore, groups of a few multi-unit clusters yield improved discrimination over only one multi-unit cluster between all tested vocalizations. However, temporal response correlations between units do not yield better discrimination. Our study is based on a large set of units of simultaneously recorded responses from several guinea pigs and electrode insertion positions. Our findings suggest a broadly distributed code for behaviorally relevant vocalizations in the mammalian inferior colliculus. Responses from a few non-interacting units are sufficient to faithfully represent the whole set of studied vocalizations with diverse spectrotemporal properties. PMID:26869890

  5. Central projections of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in the macaque monkey

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, J.; Kankipati, L.; Strang, C.E.; Peterson, B.B.; Dacey, D.; Gamlin, P.D.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms generated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle via intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin and the neuropeptide PACAP. The ipRGCs regulate other non-image-forming visual functions such as the pupillary light reflex, masking behaviour and light induced melatonin suppression. To evaluate whether PACAP immunoreactive retinal projections are useful as a marker for central projection of ipRGCs in the monkey brain, we characterized the occurrence of PACAP in melanopsin expressing ipRGCs and in the retinal target areas in the brain visualized by the anterograde tracer Cholera Toxin subunit B (CtB) in combination with PACAP staining. In the retina, PACAP and melanopsin were found to be co-stored in 99% of melanopsin expressing cells characterized as inner and outer stratifying melanopsin RGCs. Two macaque monkeys were anesthetized and received a unilateral intravitreal injection of CtB. Bilateral retinal projections containing co-localized CtB and PACAP immunostaining were identified in the SCN, the lateral geniculate complex (LGN) including the pregeniculate nucleus (PrGC), the pretectal olivary nucleus (PON), the nucleus of the optic tract (NOT), the brachium of the superior colliculus (BSC), and the superior colliculus (SC). In conclusion, PACAP immunoreactive projections with co-localized CtB represent retinal projections of ipRGCs in the macaque monkey, and support previous retrograde tracer studies demonstrating that melanopsin containing retinal projections reach areas in the primate brain involved in both image and non-image-forming visual processing. PMID:24752373

  6. Maximal subthalamic beta hypersynchrony of the local field potential in Parkinson's disease is located in the central region of the nucleus.

    PubMed

    de Solages, Camille; Hill, Bruce C; Yu, Hong; Henderson, Jaimie M; Bronte-Stewart, Helen

    2011-12-01

    A pathological marker of Parkinson's disease is the existence of abnormal synchrony of neuronal activity within the beta frequency range (13-35 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Recent studies examining the topography of this rhythm have located beta hypersynchrony in the most dorsal part of the STN. In contrast, this study of the topography of the local field potential beta oscillations in 18 STNs with a 1 mm spatial resolution revealed that the point of maximal beta hypersynchrony was located at 53 ± 24% of the trajectory span from the dorsal to the ventral borders of the STN (corresponding to a 3.0 ± 1.6 mm depth for a 5.9 ± 0.75 mm STN span). This suggests that maximal beta hypersynchrony is located in the central region of the nucleus and that further investigation should be done before using STN spectral profiles as an indicator for guiding placement of deep brain stimulation leads. PMID:21205981

  7. Central action of ELABELA reduces food intake and activates arginine vasopressin and corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Santoso, Putra; Maejima, Yuko; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Shimomura, Kenju

    2015-09-30

    ELABELA (ELA) is a novel hormone consisting of 32 amino acid peptides found in humans as well as other vertebrates and is considered to play an important role in the circulatory system through the apelin receptor (APJ). However, whether ELA also acts in the central nervous system remains unknown. Here, we show that ELA functions as an anorexigenic hormone in adult mouse brain. An intracerebroventricular injection of ELA reduces food intake and activates arginine vasopressin (AVP) and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), a hypothalamic region that regulates food intake. Cytosolic calcium ([Ca]i) measurement shows that ELA dose dependently increases [Ca]i in single AVP and CRH-immunoreactive neurons isolated from the PVN. Our data suggest that ELA functions as an anorexigenic hormone through activation of AVP and CRH neurons in the PVN.

  8. Different serotonin receptor agonists have distinct effects on sound-evoked responses in inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M

    2006-11-01

    The neuromodulator serotonin has a complex set of effects on the auditory responses of neurons within the inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain auditory nucleus that integrates a wide range of inputs from auditory and nonauditory sources. To determine whether activation of different types of serotonin receptors is a source of the variability in serotonergic effects, four selective agonists of serotonin receptors in the serotonin (5-HT) 1 and 5-HT2 families were iontophoretically applied to IC neurons, which were monitored for changes in their responses to auditory stimuli. Different agonists had different effects on neural responses. The 5-HT1A agonist had mixed facilitatory and depressive effects, whereas 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C agonists were both largely facilitatory. Different agonists changed threshold and frequency tuning in ways that reflected their effects on spike count. When pairs of agonists were applied sequentially to the same neurons, selective agonists sometimes affected neurons in ways that were similar to serotonin, but not to other selective agonists tested. Different agonists also differentially affected groups of neurons classified by the shapes of their frequency-tuning curves, with serotonin and the 5-HT1 receptors affecting proportionally more non-V-type neurons relative to the other agonists tested. In all, evidence suggests that the diversity of serotonin receptor subtypes in the IC is likely to account for at least some of the variability of the effects of serotonin and that receptor subtypes fulfill specialized roles in auditory processing. PMID:16870843

  9. Noise reduction of coincidence detector output by the inferior colliculus of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Christianson, G Björn; Peña, José Luis

    2006-05-31

    A recurring theme in theoretical work is that integration over populations of similarly tuned neurons can reduce neural noise. However, there are relatively few demonstrations of an explicit noise reduction mechanism in a neural network. Here we demonstrate that the brainstem of the barn owl includes a stage of processing apparently devoted to increasing the signal-to-noise ratio in the encoding of the interaural time difference (ITD), one of two primary binaural cues used to compute the position of a sound source in space. In the barn owl, the ITD is processed in a dedicated neural pathway that terminates at the core of the inferior colliculus (ICcc). The actual locus of the computation of the ITD is before ICcc in the nucleus laminaris (NL), and ICcc receives no inputs carrying information that did not originate in NL. Unlike in NL, the rate-ITD functions of ICcc neurons require as little as a single stimulus presentation per ITD to show coherent ITD tuning. ICcc neurons also displayed a greater dynamic range with a maximal difference in ITD response rates approximately double that seen in NL. These results indicate that ICcc neurons perform a computation functionally analogous to averaging across a population of similarly tuned NL neurons. PMID:16738236

  10. Inhibition sensitive to interaural time difference in the barn owl's inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Albeck, Y

    1997-07-01

    In spontaneously active neurons in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus of the barn owl, a stimulus-driven discharge was followed by a quiescent period lasting tens of milliseconds before the spontaneous activity resumed. The more favorable the interaural time difference, the longer the quiet period. The duration of the quiescent period also depended on stimulus frequency. Frequencies different from the neuron's best frequency induced shorter quiescent periods, although they could elicit similar rates of impulses. Also, the duration of the quiescent period was independent of interaural intensity difference. Thus, the quiet period is not due to an after-hyperpolarization but was an inhibitory effect that depended on the activity of other neurons. In some neurons, discharge continued after the stimulus without a quiescent period and gradually decayed over a period of 50-100 ms past the stimulus offset. The similarity between the quiescent period of the neurons mentioned above and the time course of the poststimulus discharge in these neurons suggests that these neurons serve as inhibitory interneurons. PMID:9259240

  11. Gender differences in corticotropin and corticosterone secretion and corticotropin-releasing factor mRNA expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the central nucleus of the amygdala in response to footshock stress or psychological stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki-Sekino, Azusa; Mano-Otagiri, Asuka; Ohata, Hisayuki; Yamauchi, Naoko; Shibasaki, Tamotsu

    2009-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa is mostly seen in adolescent females, although the gender-differentiation mechanism is unclear. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a key peptide for stress responses such as inhibition of food intake, increases in arousal and locomotor activity, and gonadal dysfunction, is thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa. CRF in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and CRF in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) are involved in the regulation of stress responses, and gender differences in CRF mRNA expression in these regions in response to various stressors are controversial. We therefore examined CRF gene expression in the PVN and CeA as well as corticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone secretion in response to a 60-min period of electric footshock (FS) or psychological stress (PS) induced by a communication box in both male and female rats in proestrus or diestrus in an effort to elucidate the mechanism underlying the gender difference in the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the mechanism underlying the remarkable prevalence of anorexia nervosa in females. Female rats in proestrus showed higher basal plasma ACTH and CRF mRNA expression levels in the PVN and CeA than males. Females more rapidly showed higher plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels and a higher CRF mRNA expression level in the PVN in response to FS than males. Although females in both proestrus and diestrus showed significant increases in plasma ACTH and corticosterone and CRF mRNA expression in the PVN in response to PS, no significant responses of the HPA axis to PS were found in males. FS significantly increased CRF mRNA expression in the CeA in both females and males, with significantly higher peaks in females in proestrus than in males, while PS significantly increased CRF mRNA expression in the CeA only in males. These results suggest that gender affects differentially the function of the stress

  12. Distribution within the barn owl's inferior colliculus of neurons projecting to the optic tectum and thalamus.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Ben J

    2005-11-01

    Behavioral studies in barn owls indicate that both the optic tectum (OT) and the auditory arcopallium (AAr) mediate sound localization through the presence of neurons that respond only when sound comes from a circumscribed direction in space. The early stages of the computations leading to these so-called space-specific neurons are shared in a common brainstem pathway, which then splits at the level of the inferior colliculus (IC) such that the last computational stage is thought to be duplicated. The study presented here addresses whether the space-specific neurons in OT and AAr are indeed partially independent of each other by using anatomical methods more precise than those used in previous studies. Specifically, projection neurons in IC were retrogradely labelled with injections of fluorescein- and rhodamine-conjugated dextran amines into OT and nucleus ovoidalis (OV), the thalamic nucleus leading to AAr. By labelling the OT-projecting and OV-projecting neurons in the same owl, it was confirmed that neurons in IC project to either OV or OT but not both. However, although a segregation was generally observed between the medially positioned OV-projecting neurons and the laterally positioned OT-projecting neurons, there was also a slight overlap between the two populations. Moreover, electrolytic lesions demarcating physiological tuning properties indicate that many OV-projecting neurons are within the area containing space-specific neurons. These results highlight the need for more detailed studies elucidating the microcircuitry and corresponding physiology of IC, such as have been done in the cortices of the mammalian cerebellum and cerebrum. PMID:16175562

  13. Inhibition of the amygdala central nucleus by stimulation of cerebellar output in rats: a putative mechanism for extinction of the conditioned fear response.

    PubMed

    Magal, Ari; Mintz, Matti

    2014-11-01

    The amygdala and the cerebellum serve two distinctively different functions. The amygdala plays a role in the expression of emotional information, whereas the cerebellum is involved in the timing of discrete motor responses. Interaction between these two systems is the basis of the two-stage theory of learning, according to which an encounter with a challenging event triggers fast classical conditioning of fear-conditioned responses in the amygdala and slow conditioning of motor-conditioned responses in the cerebellum. A third stage was hypothesised when an apparent interaction between amygdala and cerebellar associative plasticity was observed: an adaptive rate of cerebellum-dependent motor-conditioned responses was associated with a decrease in amygdala-dependent fear-conditioned responses, and was interpreted as extinction of amygdala-related fear-conditioned responses by the cerebellar output. To explore this hypothesis, we mimicked some components of classical eyeblink conditioning in anesthetised rats by applying an aversive periorbital pulse as an unconditioned stimulus and a train of pulses to the cerebellar output nuclei as a cerebellar neuronal-conditioned response. The central amygdala multiple unit response to the periorbital pulse was measured with or without a preceding train to the cerebellar output nuclei. The results showed that activation of the cerebellar output nuclei prior to periorbital stimulation produced diverse patterns of inhibition of the amygdala response to the periorbital aversive stimulus, depending upon the nucleus stimulated, the laterality of the nucleus stimulated, and the stimulus interval used. These results provide a putative extinction mechanism of learned fear behavior, and could have implications for the treatment of pathologies involving abnormal fear responses by using motor training as therapy.

  14. Inhibition of the amygdala central nucleus by stimulation of cerebellar output in rats: a putative mechanism for extinction of the conditioned fear response.

    PubMed

    Magal, Ari; Mintz, Matti

    2014-11-01

    The amygdala and the cerebellum serve two distinctively different functions. The amygdala plays a role in the expression of emotional information, whereas the cerebellum is involved in the timing of discrete motor responses. Interaction between these two systems is the basis of the two-stage theory of learning, according to which an encounter with a challenging event triggers fast classical conditioning of fear-conditioned responses in the amygdala and slow conditioning of motor-conditioned responses in the cerebellum. A third stage was hypothesised when an apparent interaction between amygdala and cerebellar associative plasticity was observed: an adaptive rate of cerebellum-dependent motor-conditioned responses was associated with a decrease in amygdala-dependent fear-conditioned responses, and was interpreted as extinction of amygdala-related fear-conditioned responses by the cerebellar output. To explore this hypothesis, we mimicked some components of classical eyeblink conditioning in anesthetised rats by applying an aversive periorbital pulse as an unconditioned stimulus and a train of pulses to the cerebellar output nuclei as a cerebellar neuronal-conditioned response. The central amygdala multiple unit response to the periorbital pulse was measured with or without a preceding train to the cerebellar output nuclei. The results showed that activation of the cerebellar output nuclei prior to periorbital stimulation produced diverse patterns of inhibition of the amygdala response to the periorbital aversive stimulus, depending upon the nucleus stimulated, the laterality of the nucleus stimulated, and the stimulus interval used. These results provide a putative extinction mechanism of learned fear behavior, and could have implications for the treatment of pathologies involving abnormal fear responses by using motor training as therapy. PMID:25185877

  15. Layer-specific response properties of the human lateral geniculate nucleus and superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hao; Wen, Wen; He, Sheng

    2015-05-01

    The human LGN and SC consist of distinct layers, but their layer-specific response properties remain poorly understood. In this fMRI study, we characterized visual response properties of the magnocellular (M) and parvocellular (P) layers of the human LGN, as well as at different depths in the SC. Results show that fMRI is capable of resolving layer-specific signals from the LGN and SC. Compared to the P layers of the LGN, the M layers preferred higher temporal frequency, lower spatial frequency stimuli, and their responses saturated at lower contrast. Furthermore, the M layers are colorblind while the P layers showed robust response to both chromatic and achromatic stimuli. Visual responses in the SC were strongest in the superficial voxels, which showed similar spatiotemporal and contrast response properties as the M layers of the LGN, but were sensitive to color and responded strongly to isoluminant color stimulus. Thus, the non-invasive fMRI measures show that the M and P layers of human LGN have similar response properties as that observed in non-human primates and the superficial layers of the human SC prefer transient inputs but are not colorblind. PMID:25703830

  16. Inhibition of CaMKIIα in the Central Nucleus of Amygdala Attenuates Fentanyl-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Li, Chenhong; Yin, Pingping; Wang, Zaijie Jim; Luo, Fang

    2016-10-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is a less-studied phenomenon that has been reported in both preclinical and clinical studies. Although the underlying cause is not entirely understood, OIH is a real-life problem that affects millions of patients on a daily basis. Research has implicated the important contribution of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) to OIH at the level of spinal nociceptors. To expand our understanding of the entire brain circuitry driving OIH, in this study we investigated the role of CaMKIIα in the laterocapcular division of the central amygdala (CeLC), the conjunctive point between the spinal cord and rostro-ventral medulla. OIH was produced by repeated fentanyl administration in the rat. Correlating with the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, CaMKIIα activity was significantly elevated in the CeLC in OIH. In addition, the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in CeLC neurons were significantly increased in OIH. 2-[N-(2-hidroxyethyl)-N-(4-methoxy-benzenesulfonyl)]-amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine, a CaMKIIα inhibitor, dose dependently reversed sensory hypersensitivity, activation of CeLC CaMKIIα, and mEPSCs in OIH. Taken together, our data for the first time implicate a critical role of CeLC CaMKIIα in OIH. PMID:27451410

  17. Sodium salicylate reduces the level of GABAB receptors in the rat's inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Butt, S; Ashraf, F; Porter, L A; Zhang, H

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that sodium salicylate (SS) can cause hearing abnormalities through affecting the central auditory system. In order to understand central effects of the drug, we examined how a single intraperitoneal injection of the drug changed the level of subunits of the type-B γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAB receptor) in the rat's inferior colliculus (IC). Immunohistochemical and western blotting experiments were conducted three hours following a drug injection, as previous studies indicated that a tinnitus-like behavior could be reliably induced in rats within this time period. Results revealed that both subunits of the receptor, GABABR1 and GABABR2, reduced their level over the entire area of the IC. Such a reduction was observed in both cell body and neuropil regions. In contrast, no changes were observed in other brain structures such as the cerebellum. Thus, a coincidence existed between a structure-specific reduction in the level of GABAB receptor subunits in the IC and the presence of a tinnitus-like behavior. This coincidence likely suggests that a reduction in the level of GABAB receptor subunits was involved in the generation of a tinnitus-like behavior and/or used by the nervous system to restore normal hearing following application of SS. PMID:26705739

  18. Ibotenic acid lesions in the amygdaloid central nucleus but not in the lateral subthalamic area prevent the acquisition of differential Pavlovian conditioning of bradycardia in rabbits.

    PubMed

    McCabe, P M; Gentile, C G; Markgraf, C G; Teich, A H; Schneiderman, N

    1992-05-15

    The present study examined the effect of ibotenic acid lesions in the amygdaloid central nucleus (ACe) or in the lateral zona incerta of the subthalamus (LZI) on the acquisition of differential Pavlovian conditioning of bradycardia in rabbits. Previous work has shown that bilateral electrolytic lesions in either ACe or LZI abolished the retention of conditioned heart rate (HR) responses. In order to determine whether these findings were due to destruction of cells intrinsic to ACe or LZI, ibotenic acid lesions were placed bilaterally in either structure or in control sites. Following recovery, animals were subjected to differential Pavlovian conditioning in which one tone (CS+) was paired with periorbital shock and a second tone (CS-) was presented alone. It was found that destruction of cell bodies in ACe, but not LZI, prevented the acquisition of the differential bradycardiac conditioned response. In addition, ACe lesions did not interfere with baseline HR, the HR orienting response, the HR unconditioned response to shock, or the concomitantly conditioned corneoretinal potential. The results of this study suggest that destruction of cells intrinsic to ACe selectively prevents the acquisition of differentially conditioned HR, and perhaps other conditioned responses related to conditioned arousal, but does not affect unlearned HR responses or specific somatomotor conditioned responses.

  19. Inactivation of the central nucleus of the amygdala blocks classical conditioning but not conditioning-specific reflex modification of rabbit heart rate.

    PubMed

    Burhans, Lauren B; Schreurs, Bernard G

    2013-02-01

    Heart rate (HR) conditioning in rabbits is a widely used model of classical conditioning of autonomic responding that is noted for being similar to the development of conditioned heart rate slowing (bradycardia) in humans. We have shown previously that in addition to HR changes to a tone conditioned stimulus (CS), the HR reflex itself can undergo associative change called conditioning-specific reflex modification (CRM) that manifests when tested in the absence of the CS. Because CRM resembles the conditioned bradycardic response to the CS, we sought to determine if HR conditioning and CRM share a common neural substrate. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a critical part of the pathway through which conditioned bradycardia is established. To test whether the CeA is also involved in the acquisition and/or expression of CRM, we inactivated the CeA with muscimol during HR conditioning or CRM testing. CeA inactivation blocked HR conditioning without completely preventing CRM acquisition or expression. These results suggest that the CeA may therefore only play a modulatory role in CRM. Theories on the biological significance of conditioned bradycardia suggest that it may represent a state of hypervigilance that facilitates the detection of new and changing contingencies in the environment. We relate these ideas to our results and discuss how they may be relevant to the hypersensitivity observed in fear conditioning disorders like post-traumatic stress.

  20. Shaker-Related Potassium Channels in the Central Medial Nucleus of the Thalamus Are Important Molecular Targets for Arousal Suppression by Volatile General Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Alexandra M.; Tanaka, Brian S.; Sokolov, Yuri; Goldin, Alan L.; Chandy, K. George; Hall, James E.; Alkire, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular targets and neural circuits that underlie general anesthesia are not fully elucidated. Here, we directly demonstrate that Kv1-family (Shaker-related) delayed rectifier K+ channels in the central medial thalamic nucleus (CMT) are important targets for volatile anesthetics. The modulation of Kv1 channels by volatiles is network specific as microinfusion of ShK, a potent inhibitor of Kv1.1, Kv1.3, and Kv1.6 channels, into the CMT awakened sevoflurane-anesthetized rodents. In heterologous expression systems, sevoflurane, isoflurane, and desflurane at subsurgical concentrations potentiated delayed rectifier Kv1 channels at low depolarizing potentials. In mouse thalamic brain slices, sevoflurane inhibited firing frequency and delayed the onset of action potentials in CMT neurons, and ShK-186, a Kv1.3-selective inhibitor, prevented these effects. Our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of delayed rectifier Kv1 channels to modulation by volatile anesthetics and highlight an arousal suppressing role of Kv1 channels in CMT neurons during the process of anesthesia. PMID:24107962

  1. Angiotensin II and CRF Receptors in the Central Nucleus of the Amygdala Mediate Hemodynamic Response Variability to Cocaine in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Mari A.; Kucenas, Sarah; Bowman, Tamara A.; Ruhlman, Melissa; Knuepfer, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    Stress or cocaine evokes either a large increase in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) or a smaller increase in SVR accompanied by an increase in cardiac output (designated vascular and mixed responders, respectively) in Sprague-Dawley rats. We hypothesized that the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) mediates this variability. Conscious, freely-moving rats, instrumented for measurement of arterial pressure and cardiac output and for drug delivery into the CeA, were given cocaine (5 mg/kg, iv, 4-6 times) and characterized as vascular (n=15) or mixed responders (n=10). Subsequently, we administered cocaine after bilateral microinjections (100 nl) of saline or selective agents in the CeA. Muscimol (80 pmol), a GABAA agonist, or losartan (43.4 pmol), an AT1 receptor antagonist, attenuated the cocaine-induced increase in SVR in vascular responders, selectively, such that vascular responders were no longer different from mixed responders. The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) antagonist, α-helical CRF9-41 (15.7 pmol), abolished the difference between cardiac output and SVR in mixed and vascular responders. We conclude that greater increases in SVR observed in vascular responders are dependent on AT1 receptor activation and, to a lesser extent on CRF receptors. Therefore, AT1 and CRF receptors in the CeA contribute to hemodynamic response variability to intravenous cocaine. PMID:19879859

  2. Overexpression of corticotropin releasing factor in the central nucleus of the amygdala advances puberty and disrupts reproductive cycles in female rats.

    PubMed

    Li, X F; Hu, M H; Li, S Y; Geach, C; Hikima, A; Rose, S; Greenwood, M P; Greenwood, M; Murphy, D; Poston, L; Lightman, S L; O'Byrne, K T

    2014-10-01

    Prolonged exposure to environmental stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and generally disrupts the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Because CRF expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a key modulator in adaptation to chronic stress, and central administration of CRF inhibits the hypothalamic GnRH pulse generator, we tested the hypothesis that overexpression of CRF in the CeA of female rats alters anxiety behavior, dysregulates the HPA axis response to stress, changes pubertal timing, and disrupts reproduction. We used a lentiviral vector to increase CRF expression site specifically in the CeA of preweaning (postnatal day 12) female rats. Overexpression of CRF in the CeA increased anxiety-like behavior in peripubertal rats shown by a reduction in time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze and a decrease in social interaction. Paradoxically, puberty onset was advanced but followed by irregular estrous cyclicity and an absence of spontaneous preovulatory LH surges associated with proestrous vaginal cytology in rats overexpressing CRF. Despite the absence of change in basal corticosterone secretion or induced by stress (lipopolysaccharide or restraint), overexpression of CRF in the CeA significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide, but not restraint, stress-induced suppression of pulsatile LH secretion in postpubertal ovariectomized rats, indicating a differential stress responsivity of the GnRH pulse generator to immunological stress and a potential adaptation of the HPA axis to chronic activation of amygdaloid CRF. These data suggest that the expression profile of this key limbic brain CRF system might contribute to the complex neural mechanisms underlying the increasing incidence of early onset of puberty on the one hand and infertility on the other attributed to chronic stress in modern human society.

  3. Control of the superior colliculus by the lateral prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Everling, Stefan; Johnston, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Several decades of patient, functional imaging and neurophysiological studies have supported a model in which the lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) acts to suppress unwanted saccades by inhibiting activity in the oculomotor system. However, recent results from combined PFC deactivation and neural recordings of the superior colliculus in monkeys demonstrate that the primary influence of the PFC on the oculomotor system is excitatory, and stands in direct contradiction to the inhibitory model of PFC function. Although erroneous saccades towards a visual stimulus are commonly labelled reflexive in patients with PFC damage or dysfunction, the latencies of most of these saccades are outside of the range of express saccades, which are triggered directly by the visual stimulus. Deactivation and pharmacological manipulation studies in monkeys suggest that response errors following PFC damage or dysfunction are not the result of a failure in response suppression but can best be understood in the context of a failure to maintain and implement the proper task set. PMID:24018729

  4. Deficits in saccade target selection after inactivation of superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    McPeek, Robert M; Keller, Edward L

    2004-07-01

    Saccades are rapid eye movements that orient gaze toward areas of interest in the visual scene. Neural activity correlated with saccade target selection has been identified in several brain regions, including the superior colliculus (SC), but it is not known whether the SC is directly involved in target selection, or whether the SC merely receives selection-related signals from cortex in preparation for the execution of eye movements. In monkeys, we used focal reversible inactivation to test the functional contributions of the SC to target selection during visual search, and found that inactivation resulted in clear deficits. When a target appeared in the inactivated field, saccades were often misdirected to distractor stimuli. Control tasks showed that this deficit was not caused by low-level visual or motor impairments. Our results indicate that, in addition to its well-established involvement in movement execution, the SC has an important functional role in target selection. PMID:15195099

  5. Sensitivity of rat inferior colliculus neurons to frequency distributions.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Björn; Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Han, Emily X; Obleser, Jonas; Bartlett, Edward L

    2015-11-01

    Stimulus-specific adaptation refers to a neural response reduction to a repeated stimulus that does not generalize to other stimuli. However, stimulus-specific adaptation appears to be influenced by additional factors. For example, the statistical distribution of tone frequencies has recently been shown to dynamically alter stimulus-specific adaptation in human auditory cortex. The present study investigated whether statistical stimulus distributions also affect stimulus-specific adaptation at an earlier stage of the auditory hierarchy. Neural spiking activity and local field potentials were recorded from inferior colliculus neurons of rats while tones were presented in oddball sequences that formed two different statistical contexts. Each sequence consisted of a repeatedly presented tone (standard) and three rare deviants of different magnitudes (small, moderate, large spectral change). The critical manipulation was the relative probability with which large spectral changes occurred. In one context the probability was high (relative to all deviants), while it was low in the other context. We observed larger responses for deviants compared with standards, confirming previous reports of increased response adaptation for frequently presented tones. Importantly, the statistical context in which tones were presented strongly modulated stimulus-specific adaptation. Physically and probabilistically identical stimuli (moderate deviants) in the two statistical contexts elicited different response magnitudes consistent with neural gain changes and thus neural sensitivity adjustments induced by the spectral range of a stimulus distribution. The data show that already at the level of the inferior colliculus stimulus-specific adaptation is dynamically altered by the statistical context in which stimuli occur. PMID:26354316

  6. Age-related audiovisual interactions in the superior colliculus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Costa, M; Piché, M; Lepore, F; Guillemot, J-P

    2016-04-21

    It is well established that multisensory integration is a functional characteristic of the superior colliculus that disambiguates external stimuli and therefore reduces the reaction times toward simple audiovisual targets in space. However, in a condition where a complex audiovisual stimulus is used, such as the optical flow in the presence of modulated audio signals, little is known about the processing of the multisensory integration in the superior colliculus. Furthermore, since visual and auditory deficits constitute hallmark signs during aging, we sought to gain some insight on whether audiovisual processes in the superior colliculus are altered with age. Extracellular single-unit recordings were conducted in the superior colliculus of anesthetized Sprague-Dawley adult (10-12 months) and aged (21-22 months) rats. Looming circular concentric sinusoidal (CCS) gratings were presented alone and in the presence of sinusoidally amplitude modulated white noise. In both groups of rats, two different audiovisual response interactions were encountered in the spatial domain: superadditive, and suppressive. In contrast, additive audiovisual interactions were found only in adult rats. Hence, superior colliculus audiovisual interactions were more numerous in adult rats (38%) than in aged rats (8%). These results suggest that intersensory interactions in the superior colliculus play an essential role in space processing toward audiovisual moving objects during self-motion. Moreover, aging has a deleterious effect on complex audiovisual interactions.

  7. Classification of frequency response areas in the inferior colliculus reveals continua not discrete classes.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Alan R; Shackleton, Trevor M; Sumner, Christian J; Zobay, Oliver; Rees, Adrian

    2013-08-15

    A differential response to sound frequency is a fundamental property of auditory neurons. Frequency analysis in the cochlea gives rise to V-shaped tuning functions in auditory nerve fibres, but by the level of the inferior colliculus (IC), the midbrain nucleus of the auditory pathway, neuronal receptive fields display diverse shapes that reflect the interplay of excitation and inhibition. The origin and nature of these frequency receptive field types is still open to question. One proposed hypothesis is that the frequency response class of any given neuron in the IC is predominantly inherited from one of three major afferent pathways projecting to the IC, giving rise to three distinct receptive field classes. Here, we applied subjective classification, principal component analysis, cluster analysis, and other objective statistical measures, to a large population (2826) of frequency response areas from single neurons recorded in the IC of the anaesthetised guinea pig. Subjectively, we recognised seven frequency response classes (V-shaped, non-monotonic Vs, narrow, closed, tilt down, tilt up and double-peaked), that were represented at all frequencies. We could identify similar classes using our objective classification tools. Importantly, however, many neurons exhibited properties intermediate between these classes, and none of the objective methods used here showed evidence of discrete response classes. Thus receptive field shapes in the IC form continua rather than discrete classes, a finding consistent with the integration of afferent inputs in the generation of frequency response areas. The frequency disposition of inhibition in the response areas of some neurons suggests that across-frequency inputs originating at or below the level of the IC are involved in their generation. PMID:23753527

  8. Pharmacological specialization of learned auditory responses in the inferior colliculus of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Feldman, D E; Knudsen, E I

    1998-04-15

    Neural tuning for interaural time difference (ITD) in the optic tectum of the owl is calibrated by experience-dependent plasticity occurring in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX). When juvenile owls are subjected to a sustained lateral displacement of the visual field by wearing prismatic spectacles, the ITD tuning of ICX neurons becomes systematically altered; ICX neurons acquire novel auditory responses, termed "learned responses," to ITD values outside their normal, pre-existing tuning range. In this study, we compared the glutamatergic pharmacology of learned responses with that of normal responses expressed by the same ICX neurons. Measurements were made in the ICX using iontophoretic application of glutamate receptor antagonists. We found that in early stages of ITD tuning adjustment, soon after learned responses had been induced by experience-dependent processes, the NMDA receptor antagonist D, L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5) preferentially blocked the expression of learned responses of many ICX neurons compared with that of normal responses of the same neurons. In contrast, the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) blocked learned and normal responses equally. After long periods of prism experience, preferential blockade of learned responses by AP-5 was no longer observed. These results indicate that NMDA receptors play a preferential role in the expression of learned responses soon after these responses have been induced by experience-dependent processes, whereas later in development or with additional prism experience (we cannot distinguish which), the differential NMDA receptor-mediated component of these responses disappears. This pharmacological progression resembles the changes that occur during maturation of glutamatergic synaptic currents during early development. PMID:9526024

  9. Mechanisms of spectral and temporal integration in the mustached bat inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Wenstrup, Jeffrey James; Nataraj, Kiran; Sanchez, Jason Tait

    2012-01-01

    This review describes mechanisms and circuitry underlying combination-sensitive response properties in the auditory brainstem and midbrain. Combination-sensitive neurons, performing a type of auditory spectro-temporal integration, respond to specific, properly timed combinations of spectral elements in vocal signals and other acoustic stimuli. While these neurons are known to occur in the auditory forebrain of many vertebrate species, the work described here establishes their origin in the auditory brainstem and midbrain. Focusing on the mustached bat, we review several major findings: (1) Combination-sensitive responses involve facilitatory interactions, inhibitory interactions, or both when activated by distinct spectral elements in complex sounds. (2) Combination-sensitive responses are created in distinct stages: inhibition arises mainly in lateral lemniscal nuclei of the auditory brainstem, while facilitation arises in the inferior colliculus (IC) of the midbrain. (3) Spectral integration underlying combination-sensitive responses requires a low-frequency input tuned well below a neuron's characteristic frequency (ChF). Low-ChF neurons in the auditory brainstem project to high-ChF regions in brainstem or IC to create combination sensitivity. (4) At their sites of origin, both facilitatory and inhibitory combination-sensitive interactions depend on glycinergic inputs and are eliminated by glycine receptor blockade. Surprisingly, facilitatory interactions in IC depend almost exclusively on glycinergic inputs and are largely independent of glutamatergic and GABAergic inputs. (5) The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB), the lateral lemniscal nuclei, and the IC play critical roles in creating combination-sensitive responses. We propose that these mechanisms, based on work in the mustached bat, apply to a broad range of mammals and other vertebrates that depend on temporally sensitive integration of information across the audible spectrum. PMID:23109917

  10. Excitatory, inhibitory and facilitatory frequency response areas in the inferior colliculus of hearing impaired mice.

    PubMed

    Felix, Richard A; Portfors, Christine V

    2007-06-01

    Individuals with age-related hearing loss often have difficulty understanding complex sounds such as basic speech. The C57BL/6 mouse suffers from progressive sensorineural hearing loss and thus is an effective tool for dissecting the neural mechanisms underlying changes in complex sound processing observed in humans. Neural mechanisms important for processing complex sounds include multiple tuning and combination sensitivity, and these responses are common in the inferior colliculus (IC) of normal hearing mice. We examined neural responses in the IC of C57Bl/6 mice to single and combinations of tones to examine the extent of spectral integration in the IC after age-related high frequency hearing loss. Ten percent of the neurons were tuned to multiple frequency bands and an additional 10% displayed non-linear facilitation to the combination of two different tones (combination sensitivity). No combination-sensitive inhibition was observed. By comparing these findings to spectral integration properties in the IC of normal hearing CBA/CaJ mice, we suggest that high frequency hearing loss affects some of the neural mechanisms in the IC that underlie the processing of complex sounds. The loss of spectral integration properties in the IC during aging likely impairs the central auditory system's ability to process complex sounds such as speech. PMID:17412539

  11. Interactions between amygdala central nucleus and the ventral tegmental area in the acquisition of conditioned cue-directed behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hongjoo J.; Wheeler, Daniel S.; Holland, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Rats orient to and approach localizable visual cues paired with food delivery. Previous studies from this laboratory show that the acquisition and expression of these learned cue-directed responses depend on integrity of a system including the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), and the dorsolateral striatum (DLS). Other investigators have suggested that cue-directed behaviors may also depend on interaction between CeA and the ventral striatum, perhaps via CeA projections to the ventral tegmentral area (VTA). In Experiment 1 we examined the effects of unilateral lesions of CeA and/or VTA on rats’ acquisition of conditioned responses to visual cues paired with food. Contrary to the results of previous studies that examined interactions of CeA with either SNc or DLS, rats with contralateral “disconnection” lesions of CeA and VTA were unimpaired in their acquisition of cue-directed responses. By contrast, rats with lesions of both structures in the same hemisphere failed to learn cue-directed responses, but were normal in their acquisition of conditioned responses directed to the food cup. In Experiment 2, we attempted to characterize VTA’s influence on CeA by examining FOS induction in CeA by a visual cue for food in rats with unilateral lesions of VTA. The results suggested an excitatory influence of VTA on CeA in the presence of food cues. Implications of these results for brain circuits involved in learned orienting and incentive motivation are discussed. PMID:21488988

  12. Electron Microscopic Localization of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor (CRF) and CRF Receptor in Rat and Mouse Central Nucleus of the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Treweek, Jennifer B.; Jaferi, Azra; Colago, Eric E.; Zhou, Ping; Pickel, Virginia M.

    2010-01-01

    Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) is expressed in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), where the CRF receptor (CRFr) plays an important role in anxiety- and stress-related behaviors. To determine the subcellular sites of CRFr activation in this region, we examined the electron microscopic immunolabeling of antisera recognizing CRF or CRFr. The ultrastructural analysis was principally conducted in the lateral subdivision of the rat CeA, with comparisons being made in mice so as to optimally utilize mutant mice in control experiments. The CRFr labeling was seen in many small dendrites and dendritic spines as well as in a few somata, large dendrites, axons, and axon terminals or more rarely in glial processes. Approximately 35% of the CRFr-labeled dendrites contained CRF immunoreactivity, which was distributed diffusely throughout the cytoplasm, or specifically affiliated with either endomembranes or large dense-core vesicles. The CRF-immunoreactive vesicles also were present in somata and axon terminals with or without CRFr labeling. The CRF immunoreactivity was usually absent from both terminals and dendrites joined by asymmetric, excitatory-type synapses, where a postsynaptic location of the CRFr was commonly observed. Numerous terminals containing both CRF and CRFr were seen, however, within the neuropil and sometimes apposing the excitatory synapses. These results provide ultrastructural evidence for a primary involvement of CRF receptors in modulation of the postsynaptic excitability of CeA neurons, an effect that may be limited by the availability of CRF. The findings have important implications for understanding CRF mediation of rapid responses to stress. PMID:19003957

  13. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase in the central nucleus of the amygdala induces anhedonic behavior and recurrent seizures in a rat model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Wang, Helen; Zaveri, Hitten P; Tang, Amber B; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Eid, Tore; Dhaher, Roni

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of depression and suicide is increased in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE); however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Anhedonia, a core symptom of depression that is predictive of suicide, is common in patients with MTLE. Glutamine synthetase, an astrocytic enzyme that metabolizes glutamate and ammonia to glutamine, is reduced in the amygdala in patients with epilepsy and depression and in suicide victims. Here, we sought to develop a novel model of anhedonia in MTLE by testing the hypothesis that deficiency in glutamine synthetase in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) leads to epilepsy and comorbid anhedonia. Nineteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with an osmotic pump infusing either the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine [MSO (n=12)] or phosphate buffered saline [PBS (n=7)] into the right CeA. Seizure activity was monitored by video-intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings for 21days after the onset of MSO infusion. Sucrose preference, a measure of anhedonia, was assessed after 21days. Methionine sulfoximine-infused rats exhibited recurrent seizures during the monitoring period and showed decreased sucrose preference over days when compared with PBS-infused rats (p<0.01). Water consumption did not differ between the PBS-treated group and the MSO-treated group. Neurons were lost in the CeA, but not the medial amygdala, lateral amygdala, basolateral amygdala, or the hilus of the dentate gyrus, in the MSO-treated rats. The results suggest that decreased glutamine synthetase activity in the CeA is a possible common cause of anhedonia and seizures in TLE. We propose that the MSO CeA model can be used for mechanistic studies that will lead to the development and testing of novel drugs to prevent seizures, depression, and suicide in patients with TLE.

  14. Blockade of CRF1 receptors in the central nucleus of the amygdala attenuates the dysphoria associated with nicotine withdrawal in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.; Ford, Jenna; Rogers, Jessica A.; Scheick, Stacey; Ji, Yue; Bishnoi, Mahendra; Alexander, Jon C.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of smokers relapse during the acute withdrawal phase when withdrawal symptoms are most severe. The goal of the present studies was to investigate the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and noradrenergic transmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in the dysphoria associated with smoking cessation. It was investigated if blockade of CRF1 receptors, blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors, or stimulation of α2-adrenergic receptors in the CeA diminishes the deficit in brain reward function associated with nicotine withdrawal in rats. Nicotine dependence was induced by implanting minipumps that delivered a nicotine solution. Withdrawal was precipitated with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine. A discrete-trial intracranial self-stimulation procedure was used to assess the negative affective aspects of nicotine withdrawal. Elevations in brain reward thresholds are indicative of a deficit in brain reward function. In all the experiments, mecamylamine elevated the brain reward thresholds of the rats chronically treated with nicotine and did not affect the brain reward thresholds of the saline-treated control rats. Intra-CeA administration of the CRF1 receptor antagonist R278995/CRA0450 completely prevented the mecamylamine-induced elevations in brain reward thresholds in the nicotine-treated rats and did not affect the brain reward thresholds of the saline-treated control rats. R278995/CRA0450 has also been shown to block sigma-1 receptors but there is no evidence that this could affect negative mood states. Intra-CeA administration of the α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin or the α2-adrenergic receptor agonist clonidine did not affect the brain reward thresholds of the nicotine or saline-treated rats. These studies suggest that CRF1 receptor antagonists may diminish the dysphoria associated with smoking cessation by blocking CRF1 receptors in the CeA. PMID:22182462

  15. NMDA receptors regulate nicotine-enhanced brain reward function and intravenous nicotine self-administration: role of the ventral tegmental area and central nucleus of the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Paul J; Chartoff, Elena; Roberto, Marisa; Carlezon, William A; Markou, Athina

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine is considered an important component of tobacco responsible for the smoking habit in humans. Nicotine increases glutamate-mediated transmission throughout brain reward circuitries. This action of nicotine could potentially contribute to its intrinsic rewarding and reward-enhancing properties, which motivate consumption of the drug. Here we show that the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist LY235959 (0.5-2.5 mg per kg) abolished nicotine-enhanced brain reward function, reflected in blockade of the lowering of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds usually observed after experimenter-administered (0.25 mg per kg) or intravenously self-administered (0.03 mg per kg per infusion) nicotine injections. The highest LY235959 dose (5 mg per kg) tested reversed the hedonic valence of nicotine from positive to negative, reflected in nicotine-induced elevations of ICSS thresholds. LY235959 doses that reversed nicotine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds also markedly decreased nicotine self-administration without altering responding for food reinforcement, whereas the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor antagonist NBQX had no effects on nicotine intake. In addition, nicotine self-administration upregulated NMDA receptor subunit expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), suggesting important interactions between nicotine and the NMDA receptor. Furthermore, nicotine (1 microM) increased NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents in rat CeA slices, similar to its previously described effects in the VTA. Finally, infusion of LY235959 (0.1-10 ng per side) into the CeA or VTA decreased nicotine self-administration. Taken together, these data suggest that NMDA receptors, including those in the CeA and VTA, gate the magnitude and valence of the effects of nicotine on brain reward systems, thereby regulating motivation to consume the drug.

  16. Glutamatergic transmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala is selectively altered in Marchigian Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats: Alcohol and CRF effects.

    PubMed

    Herman, Melissa A; Varodayan, Florence P; Oleata, Christopher S; Luu, George; Kirson, Dean; Heilig, Markus; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Roberto, Marisa

    2016-03-01

    The CRF system of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is important for the processing of anxiety, stress, and effects of acute and chronic ethanol. We previously reported that ethanol decreases evoked glutamate transmission in the CeA of Sprague Dawley rats and that ethanol dependence alters glutamate release in the CeA. Here, we examined the effects of ethanol, CRF and a CRF1 receptor antagonist on spontaneous and evoked glutamatergic transmission in CeA neurons from Wistar and Marchigian Sardinian Preferring (msP) rats, a rodent line genetically selected for excessive alcohol drinking and characterized by heightened activity of the CRF1 system. Basal spontaneous and evoked glutamate transmission in CeA neurons from msP rats was increased compared to Wistar rats. Ethanol had divergent effects, either increasing or decreasing spontaneous glutamate release in the CeA of Wistar rats. This bidirectional effect was retained in msP rats, but the magnitude of the ethanol-induced increase in glutamate release was significantly smaller. The inhibitory effect of ethanol on evoked glutamatergic transmission was similar in both strains. CRF also either increased or decreased spontaneous glutamate release in CeA neurons of Wistar rats, however, in msP rats CRF only increased glutamate release. The inhibitory effect of CRF on evoked glutamatergic transmission was also lost in neurons from msP rats. A CRF1 antagonist produced only minor effects on spontaneous glutamate transmission, which were consistent across strains, and no effects on evoked glutamate transmission. These results demonstrate that the genetically altered CRF system of msP rats results in alterations in spontaneous and stimulated glutamate signaling in the CeA that may contribute to both the anxiety and drinking behavioral phenotypes.

  17. Inhibition of corticotropin releasing factor expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala attenuates stress-induced behavioral and endocrine responses

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Leah B.; Tschetter, Kristi E.; Ronan, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) is a primary mediator of endocrine, autonomic and behavioral stress responses. Studies in both humans and animal models have implicated CRF in a wide-variety of psychiatric conditions including anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, sleep disorders and addiction among others. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a key limbic structure with one of the highest concentrations of CRF-producing cells outside of the hypothalamus, has been implicated in anxiety-like behavior and a number of stress-induced disorders. This study investigated the specific role of CRF in the CeA on both endocrine and behavioral responses to stress. We used RNA Interference (RNAi) techniques to locally and specifically knockdown CRF expression in CeA. Behavior was assessed using the elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field test (OF). Knocking down CRF expression in the CeA had no significant effect on measures of anxiety-like behavior in these tests. However, it did have an effect on grooming behavior, a CRF-induced behavior. Prior exposure to a stressor sensitized an amygdalar CRF effect on stress-induced HPA activation. In these stress-challenged animals silencing CRF in the CeA significantly attenuated corticosterone responses to a subsequent behavioral stressor. Thus, it appears that while CRF projecting from the CeA does not play a significant role in the expression stress-induced anxiety-like behaviors on the EPM and OF it does play a critical role in stress-induced HPA activation. PMID:24194694

  18. AT1 receptor blockade in the central nucleus of the amygdala attenuates the effects of muscimol on sodium and water intake.

    PubMed

    Hu, B; Qiao, H; Sun, B; Jia, R; Fan, Y; Wang, N; Lu, B; Yan, J Q

    2015-10-29

    The blockade of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) with the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol significantly reduces hypertonic NaCl and water intake by sodium-depleted rats. In the present study we investigated the effects of previous injection of losartan, an angiotensin II type-1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, into the CeA on 0.3M NaCl and water intake reduced by muscimol bilaterally injected into the same areas in rats submitted to water deprivation-partial rehydration (WD-PR) and in rats treated with the diuretic furosemide (FURO). Male Sprague-Dawley rats with stainless steel cannulas bilaterally implanted into the CeA were used. Bilateral injections of muscimol (0.2 nmol/0.5 μl, n=8 rats/group) into the CeA in WD-PR-treated rats reduced 0.3M NaCl intake and water intake, and pre-treatment of the CeA with losartan (50 μg/0.5 μl) reversed the inhibitory effect of muscimol. The negative effect of muscimol on sodium and water intake could also be blocked by pretreatment with losartan microinjected into the CeA in rats given FURO (n=8 rats/group). However, bilateral injections of losartan (50 μg/0.5 μl) alone into the CeA did not affect the NaCl or water intake. These results suggest that the deactivation of CeA facilitatory mechanisms by muscimol injection into the CeA is promoted by endogenous angiotensin II acting on AT1 receptors in the CeA, which prevents rats from ingesting large amounts of hypertonic NaCl and water.

  19. NMDA receptors regulate nicotine-enhanced brain reward function and intravenous nicotine self-administration: Role of the ventral tegmental area and central nucleus of the amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Paul J.; Chartoff, Elena; Roberto, Marisa; Carlezon, William A.; Markou, Athina

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine is considered an important component of tobacco responsible for the smoking habit in humans. Nicotine increases glutamate-mediated transmission throughout brain reward circuitries. This action of nicotine could potentially contribute to its intrinsic rewarding and reward-enhancing properties, which motivate consumption of the drug. Here we show that the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist LY235959 (0.5–2.5 mg/kg) abolished nicotine-enhanced brain reward function, reflected in blockade of the lowering of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds usually observed after experimenter-administered (0.25 mg/kg) or intravenously self-administered (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) nicotine injections. The highest LY235959 dose (5 mg/kg) tested reversed the hedonic valence of nicotine from positive to negative, reflected in nicotine-induced elevations of ICSS thresholds. LY235959 doses that reversed nicotine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds also markedly decreased nicotine self-administration without altering responding for food reinforcement, whereas the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist NBQX had no effects on nicotine intake. In addition, nicotine self-administration upregulated NMDA receptor subunit expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), suggesting important interactions between nicotine and the NMDA receptor. Furthermore, nicotine (1 μM) increased NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in rat CeA slices, similar to its previously described effects in the VTA. Finally, infusion of LY235959 (0.1–10 ng/side) into the CeA or VTA decreased nicotine self-administration. Taken together, these data suggest that NMDA receptors, including those in the CeA and VTA, gate the magnitude and valence of the effects of nicotine on brain reward systems, thereby regulating motivation to consume the drug. PMID:18418357

  20. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase in the central nucleus of the amygdala induces anhedonic behavior and recurrent seizures in a rat model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gruenbaum, Shaun E.; Wang, Helen; Zaveri, Hitten P.; Tang, Amber B.; Lee, Tih-Shih W.; Eid, Tore; Dhaher, Roni

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of depression and suicide is increased in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE); however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Anhedonia, a core symptom of depression that is predictive of suicide, is common in patients with MTLE. Glutamine synthetase, an astrocytic enzyme that metabolizes glutamate and ammonia to glutamine, is reduced in the amygdala in patients with epilepsy and depression and in suicide victims. Here, we sought to develop a novel model of anhedonia in MTLE by testing the hypothesis that deficiency in glutamine synthetase in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) leads to epilepsy and comorbid anhedonia. Nineteen male Sprague–Dawley rats were implanted with an osmotic pump infusing either the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine [MSO (n = 12)] or phosphate buffered saline [PBS (n = 7)] into the right CeA. Seizure activity was monitored by video-intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings for 21 days after the onset of MSO infusion. Sucrose preference, a measure of anhedonia, was assessed after 21 days. Methionine sulfoximine-infused rats exhibited recurrent seizures during the monitoring period and showed decreased sucrose preference over days when compared with PBS-infused rats (p < 0.01). Water consumption did not differ between the PBS-treated group and the MSO-treated group. Neurons were lost in the CeA, but not the medial amygdala, lateral amygdala, basolateral amygdala, or the hilus of the dentate gyrus, in the MSO-treated rats. The results suggest that decreased glutamine synthetase activity in the CeA is a possible common cause of anhedonia and seizures in TLE. We propose that the MSO CeA model can be used for mechanistic studies that will lead to the development and testing of novel drugs to prevent seizures, depression, and suicide in patients with TLE. PMID:26262937

  1. Electrical stimulation of the parabrachial nucleus induces reanimation from isoflurane general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Muindi, Fanuel; Kenny, Jonathan D; Taylor, Norman E; Solt, Ken; Wilson, Matthew A; Brown, Emery N; Van Dort, Christa J

    2016-06-01

    Clinically, emergence from general anesthesia is viewed as a passive process where anesthetics are discontinued at the end of surgery and anesthesiologists wait for the drugs to wear off. The mechanisms involved in emergence are not well understood and there are currently no drugs that can actively reverse the state of general anesthesia. An emerging hypothesis states that brain regions that control arousal become active during emergence and are a key part of the return to wakefulness. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that electrical activation of the glutamatergic parabrachial nucleus (PBN) in the brainstem is sufficient to induce reanimation (active emergence) during continuous isoflurane general anesthesia. Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry as a marker of neural activity, we first show a selective increase in active neurons in the PBN during passive emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. We then electrically stimulated the PBN to assess whether it is sufficient to induce reanimation from isoflurane general anesthesia. Stimulation induced behavioral arousal and restoration of the righting reflex during continuous isoflurane general anesthesia. In contrast, stimulation of the nearby central inferior colliculus (CIC) did not restore the righting reflex. Spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG) revealed that stimulation produced a significant decrease in EEG delta power during PBN stimulation. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the PBN provides critical arousal input during emergence from isoflurane anesthesia.

  2. Central melanopsin projections in the diurnal rodent, Arvicanthis niloticus

    PubMed Central

    Langel, Jennifer L.; Smale, Laura; Esquiva, Gema; Hannibal, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The direct effects of photic stimuli on behavior are very different in diurnal and nocturnal species, as light stimulates an increase in activity in the former and a decrease in the latter. Studies of nocturnal mice have implicated a select population of retinal ganglion cells that are intrinsically photosensitive (ipRGCs) in mediation of these acute responses to light. ipRGCs are photosensitive due to the expression of the photopigment melanopsin; these cells use glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) as neurotransmitters. PACAP is useful for the study of central ipRGC projections because, in the retina, it is found exclusively within melanopsin cells. Little is known about the central projections of ipRGCs in diurnal species. Here, we first characterized these cells in the retina of the diurnal Nile grass rat using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The same basic subtypes of melanopsin cells that have been described in other mammals were present, but nearly 25% of them were displaced, primarily in its superior region. PACAP was present in 87.7% of all melanopsin cells, while 97.4% of PACAP cells contained melanopsin. We then investigated central projections of ipRGCs by examining the distribution of immunoreactive PACAP fibers in intact and enucleated animals. This revealed evidence that these cells project to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), pretectum, and superior colliculus. This distribution was confirmed with injections of cholera toxin subunit β coupled with Alexa Fluor 488 in one eye and Alexa Fluor 594 in the other, combined with IHC staining of PACAP. These studies also revealed that the ventral and dorsal LGN and the caudal olivary pretectal nucleus receive less innervation from ipRGCs than that reported in nocturnal rodents. Overall, these data suggest that although ipRGCs and their projections are very similar in diurnal and nocturnal rodents, they may not be identical. PMID:26236201

  3. Central melanopsin projections in the diurnal rodent, Arvicanthis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Langel, Jennifer L; Smale, Laura; Esquiva, Gema; Hannibal, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The direct effects of photic stimuli on behavior are very different in diurnal and nocturnal species, as light stimulates an increase in activity in the former and a decrease in the latter. Studies of nocturnal mice have implicated a select population of retinal ganglion cells that are intrinsically photosensitive (ipRGCs) in mediation of these acute responses to light. ipRGCs are photosensitive due to the expression of the photopigment melanopsin; these cells use glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) as neurotransmitters. PACAP is useful for the study of central ipRGC projections because, in the retina, it is found exclusively within melanopsin cells. Little is known about the central projections of ipRGCs in diurnal species. Here, we first characterized these cells in the retina of the diurnal Nile grass rat using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The same basic subtypes of melanopsin cells that have been described in other mammals were present, but nearly 25% of them were displaced, primarily in its superior region. PACAP was present in 87.7% of all melanopsin cells, while 97.4% of PACAP cells contained melanopsin. We then investigated central projections of ipRGCs by examining the distribution of immunoreactive PACAP fibers in intact and enucleated animals. This revealed evidence that these cells project to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), pretectum, and superior colliculus. This distribution was confirmed with injections of cholera toxin subunit β coupled with Alexa Fluor 488 in one eye and Alexa Fluor 594 in the other, combined with IHC staining of PACAP. These studies also revealed that the ventral and dorsal LGN and the caudal olivary pretectal nucleus receive less innervation from ipRGCs than that reported in nocturnal rodents. Overall, these data suggest that although ipRGCs and their projections are very similar in diurnal and nocturnal rodents, they may not be identical.

  4. Neonatal cortical ablation disrupts multisensory development in superior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wan; Jiang, Huai; Stein, Barry E.

    2006-01-01

    The ability of cat superior colliculus (SC) neurons to synthesize information from different senses depends on influences from two areas of the cortex: the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (AES) and the rostral lateral suprasylvian sulcus (rLS). Reversibly deactivating the inputs to the SC from either of these areas in normal adults severely compromises this ability and the SC-mediated behaviors that depend on it. In the present study we found that removal of these areas in neonatal animals precluded the normal development of multisensory SC processes. At maturity there was a substantial decrease in the incidence of multisensory neurons, and those multisensory neurons that did develop were highly abnormal. Their cross-modal receptive field register was severely compromised, as was their ability to integrate cross-modal stimuli. Apparently, despite the impressive plasticity of the neonatal brain, it cannot compensate for the early loss of these cortices. Surprisingly, however, neonatal removal of either AES or rLS had comparatively minor consequences on these properties. At maturity multisensory SC neurons were quite common: they developed the characteristic spatial register among their unisensory receptive fields and exhibited normal adult-like multisensory integration. These observations suggest that during early ontogeny, when the multisensory properties of SC neurons are being crafted, AES and rLS may have the ability to compensate for the loss of one another’s cortico-collicular influences so that normal multisensory processes can develop in the SC. PMID:16267111

  5. Tinnitus-Related Changes in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Joel I.; Coomber, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus is highly complex, diverse, and difficult to treat, in part due to the fact that the underlying causes and mechanisms remain elusive. Tinnitus is generated within the auditory brain; however, consolidating our understanding of tinnitus pathophysiology is difficult due to the diversity of reported effects and the variety of implicated brain nuclei. Here, we focus on the inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain structure that integrates the vast majority of ascending auditory information and projects via the thalamus to the auditory cortex. The IC is also a point of convergence for corticofugal input and input originating outside the auditory pathway. We review the evidence, from both studies with human subjects and from animal models, for the contribution the IC makes to tinnitus. Changes in the IC, caused by either noise exposure or drug administration, involve fundamental, heterogeneous alterations in the balance of excitation and inhibition. However, differences between hearing loss-induced pathology and tinnitus-related pathology are not well understood. Moreover, variability in tinnitus induction methodology has a significant impact on subsequent neural and behavioral changes, which could explain some of the seemingly contradictory data. Nonetheless, the IC is likely involved in the generation and persistence of tinnitus perception. PMID:25870582

  6. Serotonin shifts first-spike latencies of inferior colliculus neurons.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M; Pollak, George D

    2005-08-24

    Many studies of neuromodulators have focused on changes in the magnitudes of neural responses, but fewer studies have examined neuromodulator effects on response latency. Across sensory systems, response latency is important for encoding not only the temporal structure but also the identity of stimuli. In the auditory system, latency is a fundamental response property that varies with many features of sound, including intensity, frequency, and duration. To determine the extent of neuromodulatory regulation of latency within the inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain auditory nexus, the effects of iontophoretically applied serotonin on first-spike latencies were characterized in the IC of the Mexican free-tailed bat. Serotonin significantly altered the first-spike latencies in response to tones in 24% of IC neurons, usually increasing, but sometimes decreasing, latency. Serotonin-evoked changes in latency and spike count were not always correlated but sometimes occurred independently within individual neurons. Furthermore, in some neurons, the size of serotonin-evoked latency shifts depended on the frequency or intensity of the stimulus, as reported previously for serotonin-evoked changes in spike count. These results support the general conclusion that changes in latency are an important part of the neuromodulatory repertoire of serotonin within the auditory system and show that serotonin can change latency either in conjunction with broad changes in other aspects of neuronal excitability or in highly specific ways. PMID:16120790

  7. Modeling the value of strategic actions in the superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Thevarajah, Dhushan; Webb, Ryan; Ferrall, Christopher; Dorris, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    In learning models of strategic game play, an agent constructs a valuation (action value) over possible future choices as a function of past actions and rewards. Choices are then stochastic functions of these action values. Our goal is to uncover a neural signal that correlates with the action value posited by behavioral learning models. We measured activity from neurons in the superior colliculus (SC), a midbrain region involved in planning saccadic eye movements, while monkeys performed two saccade tasks. In the strategic task, monkeys competed against a computer in a saccade version of the mixed-strategy game "matching-pennies". In the instructed task, saccades were elicited through explicit instruction rather than free choices. In both tasks neuronal activity and behavior were shaped by past actions and rewards with more recent events exerting a larger influence. Further, SC activity predicted upcoming choices during the strategic task and upcoming reaction times during the instructed task. Finally, we found that neuronal activity in both tasks correlated with an established learning model, the Experience Weighted Attraction model of action valuation (Camerer and Ho, 1999). Collectively, our results provide evidence that action values hypothesized by learning models are represented in the motor planning regions of the brain in a manner that could be used to select strategic actions.

  8. Responses of Inferior Colliculus Neurons to Double Harmonic Tones

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhe

    2008-01-01

    The auditory system can segregate sounds that overlap in time and frequency, if the sounds differ in acoustic properties such as fundamental frequency (f0). However, the neural mechanisms that underlie this ability are poorly understood. Responses of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of the anesthetized chinchilla were measured. The stimuli were harmonic tones, presented alone (single harmonic tones) and in the presence of a second harmonic tone with a different f0 (double harmonic tones). Responses to single harmonic tones exhibited no stimulus-related temporal pattern, or in some cases, a simple envelope modulated at f0. Responses to double harmonic tones exhibited complex slowly modulated discharge patterns. The discharge pattern varied with the difference in f0 and with characteristic frequency. The discharge pattern also varied with the relative levels of the two tones; complex temporal patterns were observed when levels were equal, but as the level difference increased, the discharge pattern reverted to that associated with single harmonic tones. The results indicated that IC neurons convey information about simultaneous sounds in their temporal discharge patterns and that the patterns are produced by interactions between adjacent components in the spectrum. The representation is “low-resolution,” in that it does not convey information about single resolved components from either individual sound. PMID:17913991

  9. Modeling the Value of Strategic Actions in the Superior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Thevarajah, Dhushan; Webb, Ryan; Ferrall, Christopher; Dorris, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    In learning models of strategic game play, an agent constructs a valuation (action value) over possible future choices as a function of past actions and rewards. Choices are then stochastic functions of these action values. Our goal is to uncover a neural signal that correlates with the action value posited by behavioral learning models. We measured activity from neurons in the superior colliculus (SC), a midbrain region involved in planning saccadic eye movements, while monkeys performed two saccade tasks. In the strategic task, monkeys competed against a computer in a saccade version of the mixed-strategy game ”matching-pennies”. In the instructed task, saccades were elicited through explicit instruction rather than free choices. In both tasks neuronal activity and behavior were shaped by past actions and rewards with more recent events exerting a larger influence. Further, SC activity predicted upcoming choices during the strategic task and upcoming reaction times during the instructed task. Finally, we found that neuronal activity in both tasks correlated with an established learning model, the Experience Weighted Attraction model of action valuation (Camerer and Ho, 1999). Collectively, our results provide evidence that action values hypothesized by learning models are represented in the motor planning regions of the brain in a manner that could be used to select strategic actions. PMID:20161807

  10. Effect of Reversible Inactivation of Superior Colliculus on Head Movements

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Mark M. G.; Bechara, Bernard; Gandhi, Neeraj J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of limitations in the oculomotor range, many gaze shifts must be accomplished using coordinated movements of the eyes and head. Stimulation and recording data have implicated the primate superior colliculus (SC) in the control of these gaze shifts. The precise role of this structure in head movement control, however, is not known. The present study uses reversible inactivation to gain insight into the role of this structure in the control of head movements, including those that accompany gaze shifts and those that occur in the absence of a change in gaze. Forty-five lidocaine injections were made in two monkeys that had been trained on a series of behavioral tasks that dissociate movements of the eyes and head. Reversible inactivation resulted in clear impairments in the animals’ ability to perform gaze shifts, manifested by increased reaction times, lower peak velocities, and increased durations. In contrast, comparable effects were not found for head movements (with or without gaze shifts) with the exception of a very small increase in reaction times of head movements associated with gaze shifts. Eye-head coordination was clearly affected by the injections with gaze onset occurring relatively later with respect to head onset. Following the injections, the head contributed slightly more to the gaze shift. These results suggest that head movements (with and without gaze shifts) can be controlled by pathways that do not involve SC. PMID:18305088

  11. Neural Prediction of Multidimensional Decisions in Monkey Superior Colliculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Ryohei P.; Hasegawa, Yukako T.; Segraves, Mark A.

    To examine the function of the superior colliculus (SC) in decision-making processes and the application of its single trial activity for “neural mind reading,” we recorded from SC deep layers while two monkeys performed oculomotor go/no-go tasks. We have recently focused on monitoring single trial activities in single SC neurons, and designed a virtual decision function (VDF) to provide a good estimation of single-dimensional decisions (go/no-go decisions for a cue presented at a specific visual field, a response field of each neuron). In this study, we used two VDFs for multidimensional decisions (go/no-go decisions at two cue locations) with the ensemble activity which was simultaneously recorded from a small group (4 to 6) of neurons at both sides of the SC. VDFs predicted cue locations as well as go/no-go decisions. These results suggest that monitoring of ensemble SC activity had sufficient capacity to predict multidimensional decisions on a trial-by-trial basis, which is an ideal candidate to serve for cognitive brain-machine interfaces (BMI) such as two-dimensional word spellers.

  12. Behavioral State Dependency of Neural Activity and Sensory (Whisker) Responses in Superior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jeremy D.

    2010-01-01

    Rats use their vibrissa (whiskers) to explore and navigate the environment. These sensory signals are distributed within the brain stem by the trigeminal complex and are also relayed to the superior colliculus in the midbrain and to the thalamus (and subsequently barrel cortex) in the forebrain. In the intermediate layers of the superior colliculus, whisker-evoked responses are driven by direct inputs from the trigeminal complex (trigeminotectal) and feedback from the barrel cortex (corticotectal). But the effects of the behavioral state of the animal on the spontaneous firing and sensory responses of these neurons are unknown. By recording from freely behaving rats, we show that the spontaneous firing of whisker sensitive neurons in superior colliculus is higher, or in an activated mode, during active exploration and paradoxical sleep and much lower, or in a quiescent/deactivated mode, during awake immobility and slow-wave sleep. Sensory evoked responses in superior colliculus also depend on behavioral state. Most notably, feedback corticotectal responses are significantly larger during the quiescent/deactivated mode, which tracks the barrel cortex responses on which they depend. Finally, sensory evoked responses depend not only on the state of the animal but also on the orienting response elicited by the stimulus, which agrees with the well known role of the superior colliculus in orienting about salient stimuli. PMID:20610783

  13. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) does not affect ethanol-reinforced responding in binge-drinking, nondependent rats.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Angela N; Czachowski, Cristine L

    2012-03-01

    The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) has been implicated as having a significant role in mediating alcohol-drinking behavior. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been investigated as a potential pharmacotherapeutic due to its ability to attenuate ethanol intake, particularly when administered into the CeA. Previous research suggests, though the evidence is somewhat conflicting, that the efficacy of NPY is contingent upon genetic background and/or prior history of ethanol dependence in rats. However, studies looking at the effects of NPY in nonselected animals lacking a history of ethanol dependence have two factors that could impact the interpretation of the results: ethanol history/selection AND relatively low baseline ethanol intakes as compared to ethanol-dependent and/or genetically selected controls. The purpose of the present study was to generate higher baseline ethanol intakes upon which to examine the effects of NPY on ethanol and sucrose drinking in nonselected rats using a binge drinking model. Long Evans rats were trained to complete a single response requirement resulting in access to either 2% sucrose (Sucrose Group) or 2% sucrose/10% ethanol (Ethanol Group) for a 20-min drinking session. On treatment days, rats were bilaterally microinjected into the CeA with aCSF or one of three doses of NPY (0.25μg, 0.50μg, or 1.00μg/.5μL). Subjects in the Ethanol Group were consuming an average of 1.2g/kg of ethanol (yielding BELs of ~90mg%) during the 20min access period following aCSF treatments. The results revealed that NPY had no effect on either sucrose or ethanol consumption or on appetitive responding (latency to respond). Overall, the findings indicate that even a history of binge-like ethanol consumption is not sufficient to recruit CeA NPY activity, and are consistent with previous studies showing that the role of NPY in regulating ethanol reinforcement in the CeA may be contingent upon a prior history of ethanol dependence.

  14. Synaptogenesis and Myelination in the Nucleus/Tractus Solitarius: Potential Role in Apnea of Prematurity, Congenital Central Hypoventilation, and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sarnat, Harvey B; Flores-Sarnat, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Fetuses as early as 15 weeks' gestation exhibit rhythmical respiratory movements shown by real-time ultrasonography. The nucleus/tractus solitarius is the principal brainstem respiratory center; other medullary nuclei also participate. The purpose was to determine temporal maturation of synaptogenesis. Delayed synaptic maturation may explain neurogenic apnea or hypoventilation of prematurity and some cases of sudden infant death syndrome. Sections of medulla oblongata were studied from 30 human fetal and neonatal brains 9 to 41 weeks' gestation. Synaptophysin demonstrated the immunocytochemical sequence of synaptogenesis. Other neuronal markers and myelin stain also were applied. The nucleus/tractus solitarius was similarly studied in fetuses with chromosomopathies, metabolic encephalopathies, and brain malformations. Synapse formation in the nucleus solitarius begins at about 12 weeks' gestation and matures by 15 weeks; myelination initiated at 33 weeks. Synaptogenesis was delayed in 3 fetuses with different conditions, but was not specific for only nucleus solitarius. Delayed synaptogenesis or myelination in the nucleus solitarius may play a role in neonatal hypoventilation, especially in preterm infants and in some sudden infant death syndrome cases.

  15. Origin of cerebellar projections to the region of the oculomotor complex, medial pontine reticular formation, and superior colliculus in New World monkeys: a retrograde horseradish peroxidase study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo-Ruiz, A; Leichnetz, G R; Smith, D J

    1988-02-22

    . Tegmental cases also contained a few labeled cells in cell group Y. Group C monkeys had injections into the parvicellular red nucleus (PRN) and had their heaviest labeling in the DN, although the AIN and PIN also contained labeled cells. The FN, BIN, and cell group Y, on the other hand, contained almost no labeling. Group D consisted of monkeys which had injections into the intermediate and deep superior colliculus (SC). These cases contained the largest numbers of labeled cells in the PIN and a lesser number in the ventrolateral FN. The DN, AIN, BIN, and cell group Y lacked labeled neurons in these cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  16. Activation of the serotonin 1A receptor alters the temporal characteristics of auditory responses in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M

    2007-11-21

    Serotonin, like other neuromodulators, acts on a range of receptor types, but its effects also depend on the functional characteristics of the neurons responding to receptor activation. In the inferior colliculus (IC), an auditory midbrain nucleus, activation of a common serotonin (5-HT) receptor type, the 5-HT 1A receptor, depresses auditory-evoked responses in many neurons. Whether these effects occur differentially in different types of neurons is unknown. In the current study, the effects of iontophoretic application of the 5-HT 1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT on auditory responses were compared with the characteristic frequencies (CFs), recording depths, and control first-spike latencies of the same group of IC neurons. The 8-OH-DPAT-evoked change in response significantly correlated with first-spike latency across the population, so that response depressions were more prevalent in longer-latency neurons. The 8-OH-DPAT-evoked change in response did not correlate with CF or with recording depth. 8-OH-DPAT also altered the temporal characteristics of spike trains in a subset of neurons that fired multiple spikes in response to brief stimuli. For these neurons, activation of the 5-HT 1A receptor suppressed lagging spikes proportionally more than initial spikes. These results suggest that the 5-HT 1A receptor, by affecting the timing of the responses of both individual neurons and the neuron population, shifts the temporal profile of evoked activity within the IC. PMID:17916336

  17. Activation of the serotonin 1A receptor alters the temporal characteristics of auditory responses in the inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Laura M.

    2008-01-01

    Serotonin, like other neuromodulators, acts on a range of receptor types, but its effects also depend on the functional characteristics of the neurons responding to receptor activation. In the inferior colliculus (IC), an auditory midbrain nucleus, activation of a common serotonin (5-HT) receptor type, the 5-HT1A receptor, depresses auditory-evoked responses in many neurons. Whether these effects occur differentially in different types of neurons is unknown. In the current study, the effects of iontophoretic application of the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT on auditory responses were compared with the characteristic frequencies (CFs), recording depths, and control first-spike latencies of the same group of IC neurons. The 8-OH-DPAT-evoked change in response significantly correlated with first-spike latency across the population, so that response depressions were more prevalent in longer-latency neurons. The 8-OH-DPAT-evoked change in response did not correlate with CF or with recording depth. 8-OH-DPAT also altered the temporal characteristics of spike trains in a subset of neurons that fired multiple spikes in response to brief stimuli. For these neurons, activation of the 5-HT1A receptor suppressed lagging spikes proportionally more than initial spikes. These results suggest that the 5-HT1A receptor, by affecting the timing of the responses of both individual neurons and the neuron population, shifts the temporal profile of evoked activity within the IC. PMID:17916336

  18. Similarity of superior colliculus involvement in microsaccade and saccade generation

    PubMed Central

    Krauzlis, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of microsaccades, or small fixational saccades, and their influence on visual function have been studied extensively. However, the detailed mechanisms for generating these movements are less understood. We recently found that the superior colliculus (SC), a midbrain structure involved in saccade generation, also plays a role in microsaccade generation. Here we compared the dynamics of neuronal activity in the SC associated with microsaccades to those observed in this structure in association with larger voluntary saccades. We found that microsaccade-related activity in the SC is characterized by a gradual increase in firing rate starting ∼100 ms prior to microsaccade onset, a peak of neuronal discharge just after movement onset, and a subsequent gradual decrease in firing rate until ∼100 ms after movement onset. These properties were shared with saccade-related SC neurons, recorded from the same monkeys but preferring larger eye movements, suggesting that at the level of the SC the neuronal control of microsaccades is similar to that for larger voluntary saccades. We also found that neurons exhibiting microsaccade-related activity often also exhibited saccade-related activity for slightly larger movements of similar direction, suggesting a continuity of the spatial representation in the SC, in both amplitude and direction, down to the smallest movements. Our results indicate that the mechanisms controlling microsaccades may be fundamentally the same as those for larger saccades, and thus shed new light on the functional role of these eye movements and their possible influence on sensory and sensory-motor processes. PMID:22236714

  19. Spectral integration in the inferior colliculus of the mustached bat.

    PubMed

    Leroy, S A; Wenstrup, J J

    2000-11-15

    Acoustic behaviors including orientation and social communication depend on neural integration of information across the sound spectrum. In many species, spectral integration is performed by combination-sensitive neurons, responding best when distinct spectral elements in sounds are combined. These are generally considered a feature of information processing in the auditory forebrain. In the mustached bat's inferior colliculus (IC), they are common in frequency representations associated with sonar signals but have not been reported elsewhere in this bat's IC or the IC of other species. We examined the presence of combination-sensitive neurons in frequency representations of the mustached bat's IC not associated with biosonar. Seventy-five single-unit responses were recorded with the best frequencies in 10-23 or 32-47 kHz bands. Twenty-six displayed single excitatory tuning curves in one band with no additional responsiveness to a second signal in another band. The remaining 49 responded to sounds in both 10-23 and 32-47 kHz bands, but response types varied. Sounds in the higher band were usually excitatory, whereas sounds in the lower band either facilitated or inhibited responses to the higher frequency signal. Interactions were usually strongest when the higher and lower frequency stimuli were presented simultaneously, but the strength of interactions varied. Over one-third of the neurons formed a distinct subset; they responded most sensitively to bandpass noise, and all were combination sensitive. We suggest that these combination-sensitive interactions are activated by elements of mustached bat social vocalizations. If so, neuronal integration characterizing analysis of social vocalizations in many species occurs in the IC.

  20. Erratum to "Noise-induced changes of neuronal spontaneous activity in mice inferior colliculus brain slices".

    PubMed

    Basta, Dietmar; Ernst, Arne

    2005-02-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) in vivo is reportedly subject to a noise-induced decrease of GABA-related inhibitory synaptic transmission accompanied by an amplitude increase of auditory evoked responses, a widening of tuning curves and a higher neuronal discharge rate at suprathreshold levels. However, other in vivo experiments which demonstrated constant neuronal auditory thresholds or unchanged spontaneous activity in the IC after noise exposure did not confirm those findings. Perhaps this can be the result of complex noise-induced interactions between different central auditory structures. It was, therefore, the aim of the present study to investigate the effects of noise exposure on the spontaneous electrical activity of single neurons in a slice preparation of the isolated mouse IC. Normal hearing mice were exposed to noise (10 kHz center frequency at 115 dB SPL for 3 h) at the age of 21 days under anesthesia (Ketamin/Rompun 10:1). After one week, auditory brainstem response (ABR) recordings and extracellular single-unit recordings from spontaneously active neurons within the IC slice were performed in noise-exposed and in normal hearing control mice. Noise-exposed animals showed a significant ABR threshold shift in the whole tested frequency range and a significant lower neuronal spontaneous activity in all investigated isofrequency laminae compared to controls. In both groups, the firing rate of 80% of IC neurons (approximately) increased significantly during the application of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist Bicucullin (10 microM). The present findings demonstrate a noise-related modulation of spontaneous activity in the IC, which possibly contribute to the generation of noise-induced tinnitus and hearing loss.

  1. Noise-induced changes of neuronal spontaneous activity in mice inferior colliculus brain slices.

    PubMed

    Basta, Dietmar; Ernest, Arne

    2004-09-30

    The inferior colliculus (IC) in vivo is reportedly subject to a noise-induced decrease of GABA-related inhibitory synaptic transmission accompanied by an amplitude increase of auditory evoked responses, a widening of tuning curves and a higher neuronal discharge rate at suprathreshold levels. However, other in vivo experiments which demonstrated constant neuronal auditory thresholds or unchanged spontaneous activity in the IC after noise exposure did not confirm those findings. Perhaps this can be the result of complex noise-induced interactions between different central auditory structures. It was, therefore, the aim of the present study to investigate the effects of noise exposure on the spontaneous electrical activity of single neurons in a slice preparation of the isolated mouse IC. Normal hearing mice were exposed to noise (10 kHz center frequency at 115 dB SPL for 3 h) at the age of 21 days under anesthesia (Ketamin/Rompun 10:1). After one week, auditory brainstem response (ABR) recordings and extracellular single-unit recordings from spontaneously active neurons within the IC slice were performed in noise-exposed and in normal hearing control mice. Noise-exposed animals showed a significant ABR threshold shift in the whole tested frequency range and a significant lower neuronal spontaneous activity in all investigated isofrequency laminae compared to controls. In both groups, the firing rate of 80% of IC neurons (approximately) increased significantly during the application of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist Bicucullin (10 microM). The present findings demonstrate a noise-related modulation of spontaneous activity in the IC, which possibly contribute to the generation of noise-induced tinnitus and hearing loss.

  2. [Involvement of cross interaction between central cholinergic and histaminergic systems in the nucleus tractus solitarius in regulating carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex].

    PubMed

    Hu, Li-Xun; Zhang, Guo-Xing; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Zhao, Hong-Fen; Yu, Kang-Ying; Wang, Guo-Qing

    2013-12-25

    The carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex (CSR) is an important approach for regulating arterial blood pressure homeostasis instantaneously and physiologically. Activation of the central histaminergic or cholinergic systems results in CSR functional inhibitory resetting. However, it is unclear whether two systems at the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) level display cross interaction to regulate the CSR or not. In the present study, the left or right carotid sinus region was isolated from the systemic circulation in Sprague-Dawley rats (sinus nerve was reserved) anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. Respective intubation was conducted into one side isolated carotid sinus and into the femoral artery for recording the intracarotid sinus pressure (ISP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) simultaneously with pressure transducers connection in vivo. ISP was set at the level of 0 mmHg to eliminate the effect of initial internal pressure of the carotid sinus on the CSR function. To trigger CSR, the ISP was quickly elevated from 0 mmHg to 280 mmHg in a stepwise manner (40 mmHg) which was added at every step for over 4 s, and then ISP returned to 0 mmHg in similar steps. The original data of ISP and corresponding MAP were fitted to a modified logistic equation with five parameters to obtain the ISP-MAP, ISP-Gain relationship curves and the CSR characteristic parameters, which were statistically compared and analyzed separately. Under the precondition of no influence on the basic levels of the artery blood pressure, the effects and potential regulatory mechanism of preceding microinjection with different cholinoceptor antagonists, the selective cholinergic M1 receptor antagonist, i.e., pirenzepine (PRZ), the M2 receptor antagonist, i.e., methoctramine (MTR) or the N1 receptor antagonist, i.e., hexamethonium (HEX) into the NTS on the changes in function of CSR induced by intracerebroventricular injection (i.c.v.) of histamine (HA) in rats were observed. Meanwhile, the actions and

  3. Cytoarchitectural and Functional Abnormalities of the Inferior Colliculus in Sudden Unexplained Perinatal Death

    PubMed Central

    Lavezzi, Anna M.; Pusiol, Teresa; Matturri, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The inferior colliculus is a mesencephalic structure endowed with serotonergic fibers that plays an important role in the processing of acoustic information. The implication of the neuromodulator serotonin also in the aetiology of sudden unexplained fetal and infant death syndromes and the demonstration in these pathologies of developmental alterations of the superior olivary complex (SOC), a group of pontine nuclei likewise involved in hearing, prompted us to investigate whether the inferior colliculus may somehow contribute to the pathogenetic mechanism of unexplained perinatal death. Therefore, we performed in a wide set of fetuses and infants, aged from 33 gestational weeks to 7 postnatal months and died of both known and unknown cause, an in-depth anatomopathological analysis of the brainstem, particularly of the midbrain. Peculiar neuroanatomical and functional abnormalities of the inferior colliculus, such as hypoplasia/structural disarrangement and immunonegativity or poor positivity of serotonin, were exclusively found in sudden death victims, and not in controls. In addition, these alterations were frequently related to dysgenesis of connected structures, precisely the raphé nuclei and the superior olivary complex, and to nicotine absorption in pregnancy. We propose, on the basis of these results, the involvement of the inferior colliculus in more important functions than those related to hearing, as breathing and, more extensively, all the vital activities, and then in pathological conditions underlying a sudden death in vulnerable periods of the autonomic nervous system development, particularly associated to harmful risk factors as cigarette smoking. PMID:25674737

  4. Sensibility of grey particle production system to energy and centrality in 60A and 200A GeV 16O-Nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, A.; El–Nagdy, M. S.; Badawy, B. M.; Osman, W.; Fayed, M.

    2016-06-01

    The grey particle production following 60 A and 200A GeV 16O interactions with emulsion nuclei is investigated at different centralities. The evaporated target fragment multiplicity is voted as a centrality parameter. The target size effect is examined over a wide range, where the C, N and O nuclei present the light target group while the Br and Ag nuclei are the heavy group. In the framework of the nuclear limiting fragmentation hypothesis, the grey particle multiplicity characteristics depend only on the target size and centrality while the projectile size and energy are not effective. The grey particle is suggested to be a multisource production system. The emission direction in the 4π space depends upon the production source. Either the exponential decay or the Poisson’s peaking curves are the usual characteristic shapes of the grey particle multiplicity distributions. The decay shape is suggested to be a characteristic feature of the source singularity while the peaking shape is a multisource super-position. The sensibility to the centrality varies from a source to other. The distribution shape is identified at each centrality region according to the associated source contribution. In general, the multiplicity characteristics seem to be limited w.r.t. the collision system centrality using light target nuclei. The selection of the black particle multiplicity as a centrality parameter is successful through the collision with the heavy target nuclei. In the collision with the light target nuclei it may be qualitatively better to vote another centrality parameter.

  5. Central CRF neurons are not created equal: phenotypic differences in CRF-containing neurons of the rat paraventricular hypothalamus and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowska, Joanna; Hazra, Rimi; Guo, Ji-Dong; DeWitt, Sarah; Rainnie, Donald G.

    2013-01-01

    Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) plays a key role in initiating many of the endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses to stress. CRF-containing neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) are classically involved in regulating endocrine function through activation of the stress axis. However, CRF is also thought to play a critical role in mediating anxiety-like responses to environmental stressors, and dysfunction of the CRF system in extra-hypothalamic brain regions, like the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST), has been linked to the etiology of many psychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression. Thus, although CRF neurons of the PVN and BNST share a common neuropeptide phenotype, they may represent two functionally diverse neuronal populations. Here, we employed dual-immunofluorescence, single-cell RT-PCR, and electrophysiological techniques to further examine this question and report that CRF neurons of the PVN and BNST are fundamentally different such that PVN CRF neurons are glutamatergic, whereas BNST CRF neurons are GABAergic. Moreover, these two neuronal populations can be further distinguished based on their electrophysiological properties, their co-expression of peptide neurotransmitters such as oxytocin and arginine-vasopressin, and their cognate receptors. Our results suggest that CRF neurons in the PVN and the BNST would not only differ in their response to local neurotransmitter release, but also in their action on downstream target structures. PMID:24009552

  6. [The role of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus in sound signal processing and auditory ascending transmission].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Hua; Luo, Feng; Wang, Xin

    2014-06-25

    The ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VNLL) is an important nucleus in the central auditory pathway which connects the lower brainstem and the midbrain inferior colliculus (IC). Previous studies have demonstrated that neurons in the VNLL could respond to sound signal parameters. Frequency tuning curves (FTCs) of VNLL neurons are generally wider than FTCs of IC neurons, suggesting that the VNLL does not enhance abilities of frequency discrimination and coding. Two types of rate-intensity functions (RIFs) are found in the VNLL: monotonic and non-monotonic RIFs. Intensity-tuning of VNLL neurons are affected by the temporal firing patterns during processing and encoding intensity. There are multiple temporal firing patterns in VNLL neurons. Onset pattern has a precise timing characteristic which is well suited to encode temporal features of stimuli, and also very important to animal behavior including bat's echolocation. The VNLL accepts inputs from lower nuclei, uploads glycine inhibitory outputs to IC, and modulates response characteristics generating and acoustic signal processing of IC neurons. Recent research suggests that fast inhibitory projection from the VNLL may delay the first spike latency of IC neurons, and the delayed inhibitory projection from the VNLL may mediate the temporal firing patterns of IC neurons. But how inhibitory inputs from the VNLL integrate in IC, and how inhibitory inputs from the VNLL enhance the ability of detecting sound signal of IC neurons are not very clear and need more direct evidence at the level of neurons. These questions will help further understand the role of upload during IC processes acoustic signal, which are our research target in the future. This article reviews the current literature regarding the roles of the VNLL in sound signal processing and the auditory ascending transmission, including advances in the relevant research in our laboratory.

  7. Correlation of transverse momentum and multiplicity in a superposition model of nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2006-04-15

    In p-p collisions the average transverse momentum is known to be correlated with the multiplicity of produced particles. The correlation is shown to survive in a superposition model of nucleus-nucleus collisions. When properly parametrized, the correlation strength appears to be independent of the collision centrality--it is the same in p-p and central A-A collisions. However, the correlation is strongly suppressed by the centrality fluctuations.

  8. Auditory Responses to Electric and Infrared Neural Stimulation of the Rat Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rohit; Guex, Amelie A.; Hancock, Kenneth E.; Durakovic, Nedim; McKay, Colette M.; Slama, Michaël C. C.; Brown, M. Christian; Lee, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve the auditory brainstem implant, a prosthesis in which user outcomes are modest, we applied electric and infrared neural stimulation (INS) to the cochlear nucleus in a rat animal model. Electric stimulation evoked regions of neural activation in the inferior colliculus and short-latency, multipeaked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). Pulsed INS, delivered to the surface of the cochlear nucleus via an optical fiber, evoked broad neural activation in the inferior colliculus. Strongest responses were recorded when the fiber was placed at lateral positions on the cochlear nucleus, close to the temporal bone. INS-evoked ABRs were multipeaked but longer in latency than those for electric stimulation; they resembled the responses to acoustic stimulation. After deafening, responses to electric stimulation persisted, whereas those to INS disappeared, consistent with a reported “optophonic” effect, a laser-induced acoustic artifact. Thus, for deaf individuals who use the auditory brainstem implant, INS alone did not appear promising as a new approach. PMID:24508368

  9. Demonstration of prosthetic activation of central auditory pathways using ( sup 14 C)-2-deoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.A.; Niparko, J.K.; Altschuler, R.A.; Frey, K.A.; Miller, J.M. )

    1990-02-01

    The cochlear prosthesis is not applicable to patients who lack an implantable cochlea or an intact vestibulocochlear nerve. Direct electrical stimulation of the cochlear nucleus (CN) of the brain stem might provide a method for auditory rehabilitation of these patients. A penetrating CN electrode has been developed and tissue tolerance to this device demonstrated. This study was undertaken to evaluate metabolic activation of central nervous system (CNS) auditory tracts produced by such implants. Regional cerebral glucose use resulting from CN stimulation was estimated in a series of chronically implanted guinea pigs with the use of ({sup 14}C)-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). Enhanced 2-DG uptake was observed in structures of the auditory tract. The activation of central auditory structures achieved with CN stimulation was similar to that produced by acoustic stimulation and by electrical stimulation of the modiolar portion of the auditory nerve in control groups. An interesting banding pattern was observed in the inferior colliculus following CN stimulation, as previously described with acoustic stimulation. This study demonstrates that functional metabolic activation of central auditory pathways can be achieved with a penetrating CNS auditory prosthesis.

  10. Responses to Social Vocalizations in the Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Patrick D.; Portfors, Christine V.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying sounds is critical for an animal to make appropriate behavioral responses to environmental stimuli, including vocalizations from conspecifics. Identification of vocalizations may be supported by neuronal selectivity in the auditory pathway. The first place in the ascending auditory pathway where neuronal selectivity to vocalizations has been found is in the inferior colliculus (IC), but very few brainstem nuclei have been evaluated. Here, we tested whether selectivity to vocalizations is present in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN). We recorded extracellular neural responses in the DCN of mice and found that fusiform cells responded in a heterogeneous and selective manner to mouse ultrasonic vocalizations. Most fusiform cells responded to vocalizations that contained spectral energy at much higher frequencies than the characteristic frequencies of the cells. To understand this mismatch of stimulus properties and frequency tuning of the cells, we developed a dynamic, nonlinear model of the cochlea that simulates cochlear distortion products on the basilar membrane. We preprocessed the vocalization stimuli through this model and compared responses to these distorted vocalizations with responses to the original vocalizations. We found that fusiform cells in the DCN respond in a heterogeneous manner to vocalizations, and that these neurons can use distortion products as a mechanism for encoding ultrasonic vocalizations. In addition, the selective neuronal responses were dependent on the presence of inhibitory sidebands that modulated the response depending on the temporal structure of the distortion product. These findings suggest that important processing of complex sounds occurs at a very early stage of central auditory processing and is not strictly a function of the cortex. PMID:26733824

  11. CTR1 phosphorylates the central regulator EIN2 to control ethylene hormone signaling from the ER membrane to the nucleus in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Chuanli; Yoon, Gyeong Mee; Shemansky, Jennifer Marie; Lin, David Y.; Ying, Z. Irene; Chang, Jianhong; Garrett, Wesley M.; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Groth, Georg; Tucker, Mark L.; Cooper, Bret; Kieber, Joseph J.; Chang, Caren

    2012-01-01

    The gaseous phytohormone ethylene C2H4 mediates numerous aspects of growth and development. Genetic analysis has identified a number of critical elements in ethylene signaling, but how these elements interact biochemically to transduce the signal from the ethylene receptor complex at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane to transcription factors in the nucleus is unknown. To close this gap in our understanding of the ethylene signaling pathway, the challenge has been to identify the target of the CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 (CTR1) Raf-like protein kinase, as well as the molecular events surrounding ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2), an ER membrane-localized Nramp homolog that positively regulates ethylene responses. Here we demonstrate that CTR1 interacts with and directly phosphorylates the cytosolic C-terminal domain of EIN2. Mutations that block the EIN2 phosphorylation sites result in constitutive nuclear localization of the EIN2 C terminus, concomitant with constitutive activation of ethylene responses in Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that phosphorylation of EIN2 by CTR1 prevents EIN2 from signaling in the absence of ethylene, whereas inhibition of CTR1 upon ethylene perception is a signal for cleavage and nuclear localization of the EIN2 C terminus, allowing the ethylene signal to reach the downstream transcription factors. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying ethylene signal transduction. PMID:23132950

  12. GABA and NMDA receptors in CRF neurons have opposing effects in fear acquisition and anxiety in central amygdala vs. bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    PubMed

    Gafford, Georgette M; Ressler, Kerry J

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Beginning with Vale and Colleagues in 1981, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) also called corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) has repeatedly been identified as an important contributor to fear and anxiety behavior. These findings have proven useful to further our understanding of disorders that have significant fear-dysregulation, such as post-traumatic stress, as well as other stress- and anxiety-related disorders. Unfortunately, the data are not all in agreement. In particular the role of CRF in fear learning is controversial, with studies pointing to contradictory effects from CRF manipulation even within the same brain structure. Further, very few studies address the potentially promising role of CRF manipulation in fear extinction behavior. Here, we briefly review the role of CRF in anxiety, fear learning and extinction, focusing on recent cell-type and neurotransmitter-specific studies in the amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) that may help to synthesize the available data on the role of CRF in fear and anxiety-related behaviors.

  13. Neuroanatomical approaches of the tectum-reticular pathways and immunohistochemical evidence for serotonin-positive perikarya on neuronal substrates of the superior colliculus and periaqueductal gray matter involved in the elaboration of the defensive behavior and fear-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, N C; De Oliveira, R; Freitas, R L; Ribeiro, S J; Borelli, K G; Pacagnella, R C; Moreira, J E; da Silva, L A; Melo, L L; Lunardi, L O; Brandão, M L

    2006-01-01

    Deep layers of the superior colliculus, the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter and the inferior colliculus are midbrain structures involved in the generation of defensive behavior and fear-induced anti-nociception. Local injections of the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline into these structures have been used to produce this defense reaction. Serotonin is thought to be the main neurotransmitter to modulate such defense reaction in mammals. This study is the first attempt to employ immunohistochemical techniques to locate serotonergic cells in the same midbrain sites from where defense reaction is evoked by chemical stimulation with bicuculline. The blockade of GABA(A) receptors in the neural substrates of the dorsal mesencephalon was followed by vigorous defensive reactions and increased nociceptive thresholds. Light microscopy immunocytochemistry with streptavidin method was used for the localization of the putative cells of defensive behavior with antibodies to serotonin in the rat's midbrain. Neurons positive to serotonin were found in the midbrain sites where defensive reactions were evoked by microinjection of bicuculline. Serotonin was localized to somata and projections of the neural networks of the mesencephalic tectum. Immunohistochemical studies showed that the sites in which neuronal perikarya positive to serotonin were identified in intermediate and deep layers of the superior colliculus, and in the dorsal and ventral columns of the periaqueductal gray matter are the same which were activated during the generation of defense behaviors, such as alertness, freezing, and escape reactions, induced by bicuculline. These findings support the contention that serotonin and GABAergic neurons may act in concert in the modulation of defense reaction in the midbrain tectum. Our neuroanatomical findings indicate a direct neural pathway connecting the dorsal midbrain and monoaminergic nuclei of the descending pain inhibitory system, with profuse synaptic terminals mainly

  14. The dissimilar time course of temporary threshold shifts and reduction of inhibition in the inferior colliculus following intense sound exposure.

    PubMed

    Heeringa, A N; van Dijk, P

    2014-06-01

    Excessive noise exposure is known to produce an auditory threshold shift, which can be permanent or transient in nature. Recent studies showed that noise-induced temporary threshold shifts are associated with loss of synaptic connections to the inner hair cells and with cochlear nerve degeneration, which is reflected in a decreased amplitude of wave I of the auditory brainstem response (ABR). This suggests that, despite normal auditory thresholds, central auditory processing may be abnormal. We recorded changes in central auditory processing following a sound-induced temporary threshold shift. Anesthetized guinea pigs were exposed for 1 h to a pure tone of 11 kHz (124 dB sound pressure level). Hearing thresholds, amplitudes of ABR waves I and IV, and spontaneous and tone-evoked firing rates in the inferior colliculus (IC) were assessed immediately, one week, two weeks, and four weeks post exposure. Hearing thresholds were elevated immediately following overexposure, but recovered within one week. The amplitude of the ABR wave I was decreased in all sound-exposed animals for all test periods. In contrast, the ABR wave IV amplitude was only decreased immediately after overexposure and recovered within a week. The proportion of IC units that show inhibitory responses to pure tones decreased substantially up to two weeks after overexposure, especially when stimulated with high frequencies. The proportion of excitatory responses to low frequencies was increased. Spontaneous activity was unaffected by the overexposure. Despite rapid normalization of auditory thresholds, our results suggest an increased central gain following sound exposure and an abnormal balance between excitatory and inhibitory responses in the midbrain up to two weeks after overexposure. These findings may be associated with hyperacusis after a sound-induced temporary threshold shift.

  15. Effects of focal inactivation of dorsal or ventral layers of the lateral geniculate nucleus on cats' ability to see and fixate small targets.

    PubMed

    Tate, A K; Malpeli, J G

    1998-10-01

    To reveal contributions of different subdivisions of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) to visuomotor behavior, segments of either layer A or the C layers were inactivated with microinjections of gamma-aminobutyric acid while cats made saccades to retinally stabilized spots of light placed either in affected regions of visual space or mirror-symmetric locations in the opposite hemifield. Inactivating layer A reduced the success rate for saccades to targets presented in affected locations from 82.4 to 26.8% while having no effect on saccades to the control hemifield. Saccades to affected sites had reduced accuracy and longer initiation latency and tended to be hypometric. In contrast, inactivating C layers did not affect performance. Data from all conditions fell along the same saccade velocity/amplitude function ("main sequence"), suggesting that LGN inactivations cause localization deficits, but do not interfere with saccade dynamics. Cerebral cortex is the only target of the A layers, so behavioral decrements caused by inactivating layer A must be related to changes in cortical activity. Inactivating layer A substantially reduces the activity of large subsets of corticotectal cells in areas 17 and 18, whereas few corticotectal cells depend on C layers for visually driven activity. The parallels between these behavioral and electrophysiological data along with the central role of the superior colliculus in saccadic eye movements suggests that the corticotectal pathway is involved in both deficits and remaining capacities resulting from blockade of layer A. PMID:9772272

  16. Neuropeptide Y conjugated to saporin alters anxiety-like behavior when injected into the central nucleus of the amygdala or basomedial hypothalamus in BALB/cJ mice.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Angela M; Thiele, Todd E

    2010-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36-amino-acid neuromodulator that is distributed throughout the central nervous system and has been implicated in a wide range of neurobiological responses including the integration of emotional behavior. The anxiolytic properties of NPY are modulated by NPY signaling in the hippocampus and in the central (CeA) and basolateral (BLA) nuclei of the amygdala. Recently, the neurotoxin saporin, when conjugated to NPY (NPY-SAP), was shown to selectively kill NPY receptor-expressing neurons and has been used as a tool to study the central NPY neurocircuitry involved with feeding behaviors. Here we determined if NPY-SAP can be used as a tool to study the central NPY neurocircuitry that modulates anxiety-like behaviors. BALB/cJ mice were given injection of either NPY-SAP or a control blank saporin (B-SAP) into the CeA or the basomedial hypothalamus (BMH) as a control injection site. The elevated zero maze test was used to assess anxiety-like behavior and NPY-SAP-induced lesions were verified using NPY Y1 receptor (Y1R) immunoreactivity (IR). Results showed that injection of NPY-SAP into the CeA site-specifically blunted Y1R IR in the CeA which was associated with a significant increase in anxiety-like behavior. Injection of NPY-SAP into the BMH, while locally blunting Y1R IR, promoted a compensatory increase of Y1R IR in the BLA and the CA3 region of the hippocampus which was associated with a significant reduction of anxiety-like behavior. The present set of experiments suggest that the NPY-SAP neurotoxin may be a useful tool for studying the NPY neurocircuitry that modulates anxiety-like behaviors.

  17. Neurofilament proteins are preferentially expressed in descending output neurons of the cat the superior colliculus: a study using SMI-32.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Santamaria, V; Stein, B E; McHaffie, J G

    2006-01-01

    Physiological studies indicate that the output neurons in the multisensory (i.e. intermediate and deep) laminae of the cat superior colliculus receive converging information from widespread regions of the neuraxis, integrate this information, and then relay the product to regions of the brainstem involved in the control of head and eye movements. Yet, an understanding of the neuroanatomy of these converging afferents has been hampered because many terminals contact distal dendrites that are difficult to label with the neurochemical markers generally used to visualize superior colliculus output neurons. Here we show that the SMI-32 antibody, directed at the non-phosphorylated epitopes of high molecular weight neurofilament proteins, is an effective marker for these superior colliculus output neurons. It is also one that can label their distal dendrites. Superior colliculus sections processed for SMI-32 revealed numerous labeled neurons with varying morphologies within the deep laminae. In contrast, few labeled neurons were observed in the superficial laminae. Neurons with large somata in the lateral aspects of the deep superior colliculus were particularly well labeled, and many of their secondary and tertiary dendrites were clearly visible. Injections of the fluorescent biotinylated dextran amine into the pontine reticular formation revealed that approximately 80% of the SMI-32 immunostained neurons also contained retrogradely transported biotinylated dextran amine, indicating that SMI-32 is a common cytoskeletal component expressed in descending output neurons. Superior colliculus output neurons also are known to express the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, and many SMI-32 immunostained neurons also proved to be parvalbumin immunostained. These studies suggest that SMI-32 can serve as a useful immunohistochemical marker for detailing the somatic and dendritic morphology of superior colliculus output neurons and for facilitating evaluations of their input

  18. Dorsal raphe nucleus projecting retinal ganglion cells: Why Y cells?

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Gary E.; So, Kwok-Fai; Pu, Mingliang

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion Y (alpha) cells are found in retinas ranging from frogs to mice to primates. The highly conserved nature of the large, fast conducting retinal Y cell is a testament to its fundamental task, although precisely what this task is remained ill-defined. The recent discovery that Y-alpha retinal ganglion cells send axon collaterals to the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in addition to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), medial interlaminar nucleus (MIN), pretectum and the superior colliculus (SC) has offered new insights into the important survival tasks performed by these cells with highly branched axons. We propose that in addition to its role in visual perception, the Y-alpha retinal ganglion cell provides concurrent signals via axon collaterals to the DRN, the major source of serotonergic afferents to the forebrain, to dramatically inhibit 5-HT activity during orientation or alerting/escape responses, which dis-facilitates ongoing tonic motor activity while dis-inhibiting sensory information processing throughout the visual system. The new data provide a fresh view of these evolutionarily old retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26363667

  19. Orienting responses and vocalizations produced by microstimulation in the superior colliculus of the echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Doreen E; Sinha, Shiva R; Moss, Cynthia F

    2002-03-01

    An echolocating bat actively controls the spatial acoustic information that drives its behavior by directing its head and ears and by modulating the spectro-temporal structure of its outgoing sonar emissions. The superior colliculus may function in the coordination of these orienting components of the bat's echolocation system. To test this hypothesis, chemical and electrical microstimulation experiments were carried out in the superior colliculus of the echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus, a species that uses frequency modulated sonar signals. Microstimulation elicited pinna and head movements, similar to those reported in other vertebrate species, and the direction of the evoked behaviors corresponded to the site of stimulation, yielding a map of orienting movements in the superior colliculus. Microstimulation of the bat superior colliculus also elicited sonar vocalizations, a motor behavior specific to the bat's acoustic orientation by echolocation. Electrical stimulation of the adjacent periaqueductal gray, shown to be involved in vocal production in other mammalian species, elicited vocal signals resembling acoustic communication calls of E. fuscus. The control of vocal signals in the bat is an integral part of its acoustic orienting system, and our findings suggest that the superior colliculus supports diverse and species-relevant sensorimotor behaviors, including those used for echolocation.

  20. The Foxb1-expressing neurons of the ventrolateral hypothalamic parvafox nucleus project to defensive circuits.

    PubMed

    Bilella, Alessandro; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Celio, Marco R

    2016-10-15

    The parvafox nucleus is an elongated structure that is lodged within the ventrolateral hypothalamus and lies along the optic tract. It comprises axially located parvalbumin (Parv)-positive neurons and a peripheral cuff of Foxb1-expressing ones. In the present study, injections of Cre-dependent adenoviral constructs were targeted to the ventrolateral hypothalamus of Foxb1/Cre mice to label specifically and map the efferent connections of the Foxb1-expressing subpopulation of neurons of the parvafox nucleus. These neurons project more widely than do the Parv-positive ones and implicate a part of the axons known to emanate from the lateral hypothalamus. High labeling densities were found in the dorsolateral and the upper lateral portion of the periaqueductal gray (PAG), the Su3 and PV2 nuclei of the ventrolateral PAG, the cuneiform nucleus, the mesencephalic reticular formation, and the superior colliculus. Intermediate densities of terminals were encountered in the septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, substantia innominata, various thalamic and hypothalamic nuclei, pedunculopontine nucleus, Barrington's nucleus, retrofacial nucleus, and retroambigual nucleus. Scattered terminals were observed in the olfactory bulbs, the prefrontal cortex and the lamina X of the cervical spinal cord. Because the terminals were demonstrated to express the glutamate transporter VGlut2, the projections are presumed to be excitatory. A common denominator of the main target sites of the Foxb1-positive axons of the parvafox nucleus appears to be an involvement in the defensive reactions to life-threatening situations. The hypothalamic parvafox nucleus may contribute to the autonomic manifestations that accompany the expression of emotions. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2955-2981, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27292133

  1. The Foxb1-expressing neurons of the ventrolateral hypothalamic parvafox nucleus project to defensive circuits.

    PubMed

    Bilella, Alessandro; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Celio, Marco R

    2016-10-15

    The parvafox nucleus is an elongated structure that is lodged within the ventrolateral hypothalamus and lies along the optic tract. It comprises axially located parvalbumin (Parv)-positive neurons and a peripheral cuff of Foxb1-expressing ones. In the present study, injections of Cre-dependent adenoviral constructs were targeted to the ventrolateral hypothalamus of Foxb1/Cre mice to label specifically and map the efferent connections of the Foxb1-expressing subpopulation of neurons of the parvafox nucleus. These neurons project more widely than do the Parv-positive ones and implicate a part of the axons known to emanate from the lateral hypothalamus. High labeling densities were found in the dorsolateral and the upper lateral portion of the periaqueductal gray (PAG), the Su3 and PV2 nuclei of the ventrolateral PAG, the cuneiform nucleus, the mesencephalic reticular formation, and the superior colliculus. Intermediate densities of terminals were encountered in the septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, substantia innominata, various thalamic and hypothalamic nuclei, pedunculopontine nucleus, Barrington's nucleus, retrofacial nucleus, and retroambigual nucleus. Scattered terminals were observed in the olfactory bulbs, the prefrontal cortex and the lamina X of the cervical spinal cord. Because the terminals were demonstrated to express the glutamate transporter VGlut2, the projections are presumed to be excitatory. A common denominator of the main target sites of the Foxb1-positive axons of the parvafox nucleus appears to be an involvement in the defensive reactions to life-threatening situations. The hypothalamic parvafox nucleus may contribute to the autonomic manifestations that accompany the expression of emotions. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2955-2981, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Regional and laminar distribution of cortical neurons projecting to either superior or inferior colliculus in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H

    1995-01-01

    Retrograde tracer substances were injected into either the inferior or the superior colliculus in the Madagascan hedgehog tenrec, Echinops telfairi (Insectivora), to reveal the laminar and regional distribution of corticotectal cells and to correlate the labeled areas with architectural data. The tenrecs, taken from our breeding colony, have one of the least differentiated cerebral cortices among mammals, and experimental investigations of such brains are important for the understanding of the evolution and intrinsic organization of the more highly differentiated cerebral cortex in other placental mammals. Following injections into the inferior colliculus, cortical neurons were labeled bilaterally, with an ipsilateral predominance. Most labeled cells were found in the caudolateral hemisphere, area 4 as defined by Rehkämper (1981); some were in the somatosensorimotor cortex, as defined in a previous study. The labeled neurons in area 4 were located in layers V and VI, forming two bands of cells separated from each other by a poorly labeled interspace. A further subdivision of this presumed auditory region could not be achieved. This entire area was also weakly labeled following tracer injections into the superior colliculus. The labeled cells, however, were restricted to layer V of the ipsilateral side. The most consistent sites of labeled cells following injections into the superior colliculus were found in layer V of the ipsilateral caudomedial hemisphere, Rehkämper's caudal area 3, and the transitional zone adjacent to the retrosplenial cortex. This area is small in comparison to the entire region that was found in this study to project to the superior colliculus. The superior colliculus also receives projections from the ipsilateral sensorimotor and cingulate cortices. The latter projections are particularly striking in comparison to other mammals because they originate from along the entire rostrocaudal extent of the cingulate/retrosplenial region.

  3. Defective response inhibition and collicular noradrenaline enrichment in mice with duplicated retinotopic map in the superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Chantal; Savier, Elise; Bott, Jean-Bastien; Clesse, Daniel; Bevins, Nicholas; Sage-Ciocca, Dominique; Geiger, Karin; Gillet, Anaïs; Laux-Biehlmann, Alexis; Goumon, Yannick; Lacaud, Adrien; Lelièvre, Vincent; Kelche, Christian; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Pfrieger, Frank W; Reber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The superior colliculus is a hub for multisensory integration necessary for visuo-spatial orientation, control of gaze movements and attention. The multiple functions of the superior colliculus have prompted hypotheses about its involvement in neuropsychiatric conditions, but to date, this topic has not been addressed experimentally. We describe experiments on genetically modified mice, the Isl2-EphA3 knock-in line, that show a well-characterized duplication of the retino-collicular and cortico-collicular axonal projections leading to hyperstimulation of the superior colliculus. To explore the functional impact of collicular hyperstimulation, we compared the performance of homozygous knock-in, heterozygous knock-in and wild-type mice in several behavioral tasks requiring collicular activity. The light/dark box test and Go/No-Go conditioning task revealed that homozygous mutant mice exhibit defective response inhibition, a form of impulsivity. This defect was specific to attention as other tests showed no differences in visually driven behavior, motivation, visuo-spatial learning and sensorimotor abilities among the different groups of mice. Monoamine quantification and gene expression profiling demonstrated a specific enrichment of noradrenaline only in the superficial layers of the superior colliculus of Isl2-EphA3 knock-in mice, where the retinotopy is duplicated, whereas transcript levels of receptors, transporters and metabolic enzymes of the monoaminergic pathway were not affected. We demonstrate that the defect in response inhibition is a consequence of noradrenaline imbalance in the superficial layers of the superior colliculus caused by retinotopic map duplication. Our results suggest that structural abnormalities in the superior colliculus can cause defective response inhibition, a key feature of attention-deficit disorders.

  4. Defective response inhibition and collicular noradrenaline enrichment in mice with duplicated retinotopic map in the superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Chantal; Savier, Elise; Bott, Jean-Bastien; Clesse, Daniel; Bevins, Nicholas; Sage-Ciocca, Dominique; Geiger, Karin; Gillet, Anaïs; Laux-Biehlmann, Alexis; Goumon, Yannick; Lacaud, Adrien; Lelièvre, Vincent; Kelche, Christian; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Pfrieger, Frank W; Reber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The superior colliculus is a hub for multisensory integration necessary for visuo-spatial orientation, control of gaze movements and attention. The multiple functions of the superior colliculus have prompted hypotheses about its involvement in neuropsychiatric conditions, but to date, this topic has not been addressed experimentally. We describe experiments on genetically modified mice, the Isl2-EphA3 knock-in line, that show a well-characterized duplication of the retino-collicular and cortico-collicular axonal projections leading to hyperstimulation of the superior colliculus. To explore the functional impact of collicular hyperstimulation, we compared the performance of homozygous knock-in, heterozygous knock-in and wild-type mice in several behavioral tasks requiring collicular activity. The light/dark box test and Go/No-Go conditioning task revealed that homozygous mutant mice exhibit defective response inhibition, a form of impulsivity. This defect was specific to attention as other tests showed no differences in visually driven behavior, motivation, visuo-spatial learning and sensorimotor abilities among the different groups of mice. Monoamine quantification and gene expression profiling demonstrated a specific enrichment of noradrenaline only in the superficial layers of the superior colliculus of Isl2-EphA3 knock-in mice, where the retinotopy is duplicated, whereas transcript levels of receptors, transporters and metabolic enzymes of the monoaminergic pathway were not affected. We demonstrate that the defect in response inhibition is a consequence of noradrenaline imbalance in the superficial layers of the superior colliculus caused by retinotopic map duplication. Our results suggest that structural abnormalities in the superior colliculus can cause defective response inhibition, a key feature of attention-deficit disorders. PMID:24647754

  5. Retinal ganglion cell projections to the hamster suprachiasmatic nucleus, intergeniculate leaflet, and visual midbrain: bifurcation and melanopsin immunoreactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lawrence P.; Blanchard, Jane H.; Provencio, Ignacio

    2003-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) receives direct retinal input via the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT), and the retinal ganglion cells contributing to this projection may be specialized with respect to direct regulation of the circadian clock. However, some ganglion cells forming the RHT bifurcate, sending axon collaterals to the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) through which light has secondary access to the circadian clock. The present studies provide a more extensive examination of ganglion cell bifurcation and evaluate whether ganglion cells projecting to several subcortical visual nuclei contain melanopsin, a putative ganglion cell photopigment. The results showed that retinal ganglion cells projecting to the SCN send collaterals to the IGL, olivary pretectal nucleus, and superior colliculus, among other places. Melanopsin-immunoreactive (IR) ganglion cells are present in the hamster retina, and some of these cells project to the SCN, IGL, olivary pretectal nucleus, or superior colliculus. Triple-label analysis showed that melanopsin-IR cells bifurcate and project bilaterally to each SCN, but not to the other visual nuclei evaluated. The melanopsin-IR cells have photoreceptive characteristics optimal for circadian rhythm regulation. However, the presence of moderately widespread bifurcation among ganglion cells projecting to the SCN, and projection by melanopsin-IR cells to locations distinct from the SCN and without known rhythm function, suggest that this ganglion cell type is generalized, rather than specialized, with respect to the conveyance of photic information to the brain. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Serotonin modulates responses to species-specific vocalizations in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Laura M; Pollak, George D

    2005-06-01

    Neuromodulators such as serotonin are capable of altering the neural processing of stimuli across many sensory modalities. In the inferior colliculus, a major midbrain auditory gateway, serotonin alters the way that individual neurons respond to simple tone bursts and linear frequency modulated sweeps. The effects of serotonin are complex, and vary among neurons. How serotonin transforms the responses to spectrotemporally complex sounds of the type normally heard in natural settings has been poorly examined. To explore this issue further, the effects of iontophoretically applied serotonin on the responses of individual inferior colliculus neurons to a variety of recorded species-specific vocalizations were examined. These experiments were performed in the Mexican free-tailed bat, a species that uses a rich repertoire of vocalizations for the purposes of communication as well as echolocation. Serotonin frequently changed the number of recorded calls that were capable of evoking a response from individual neurons, sometimes increasing (15% of serotonin-responsive neurons), but usually decreasing (62% of serotonin-responsive neurons), this number. A functional consequence of these serotonin-evoked changes would be to change the population response to species-specific vocalizations. PMID:15830241

  7. Modeling the Minimal Newborn's Intersubjective Mind: The Visuotopic-Somatotopic Alignment Hypothesis in the Superior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Pitti, Alexandre; Kuniyoshi, Yasuo; Quoy, Mathias; Gaussier, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The question whether newborns possess inborn social skills is a long debate in developmental psychology. Fetal behavioral and anatomical observations show evidences for the control of eye movements and facial behaviors during the third trimester of pregnancy whereas specific sub-cortical areas, like the superior colliculus (SC) and the striatum appear to be functionally mature to support these behaviors. These observations suggest that the newborn is potentially mature for developing minimal social skills. In this manuscript, we propose that the mechanism of sensory alignment observed in SC is particularly important for enabling the social skills observed at birth such as facial preference and facial mimicry. In a computational simulation of the maturing superior colliculus connected to a simulated facial tissue of a fetus, we model how the incoming tactile information is used to direct visual attention toward faces. We suggest that the unisensory superficial visual layer (eye-centered) and the deep somatopic layer (face-centered) in SC are combined into an intermediate layer for visuo-tactile integration and that multimodal alignment in this third layer allows newborns to have a sensitivity to configuration of eyes and mouth. We show that the visual and tactile maps align through a Hebbian learning stage and and strengthen their synaptic links from each other into the intermediate layer. It results that the global network produces some emergent properties such as sensitivity toward the spatial configuration of face-like patterns and the detection of eyes and mouth movement. PMID:23922718

  8. Spatial synchronization of visual stimulus-evoked gamma frequency oscillations in the rat superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Baranauskas, Gytis; Svirskis, Gytis; Tkatch, Tatiana

    2016-02-10

    In the superior colliculus, visual stimuli can induce gamma frequency oscillations of neuronal activity. It has been shown that in cats, these oscillations are synchronized over distances of greater than 300 μm that may contribute toward visual information processing. We investigated the spatial properties of such oscillations in a rodent because the availability of molecular tools could enable future studies on the role of these oscillations in visual information processing. Using extracellular electrode array recordings in anesthetized rats, we found that visual stimuli-induced gamma and eta frequency (30-115 Hz) oscillations of the local field potential that were synchronized over distances of ∼ 600 μm. Multiple-unit events were phase locked to the local field potential signal and showed prominent oscillations during OFF responses. The rate of lower than 5 ms cross-electrode coincidences was in line with the response-corrected predictions for each electrode. These data suggest that the synchronized superior colliculus neuronal activity is largely network driven, whereas common synaptic inputs play a minor role. PMID:26735701

  9. Visual receptive field properties of neurons in the superficial superior colliculus of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lupeng; Sarnaik, Rashmi; Rangarajan, Krsna; Liu, Xiaorong; Cang, Jianhua

    2010-12-01

    The mouse is a promising model in the study of visual system function and development because of available genetic tools. However, a quantitative analysis of visual receptive field properties had not been performed in the mouse superior colliculus (SC) despite its importance in mouse vision and its usefulness in developmental studies. We have made single-unit extracellular recordings from superficial layers of the SC in urethane-anesthetized C57BL/6 mice. We first map receptive fields with flashing spot stimuli and show that most SC neurons have spatially overlapped ON and OFF subfields. With drifting sinusoidal gratings, we then determine the tuning properties of individual SC neurons, including selectivity for stimulus direction and orientation, spatial frequency tuning, temporal frequency tuning, response linearity, and size preference. A wide range of receptive field sizes and selectivity are observed across the population and in various subtypes of SC neurons identified morphologically. In particular, orientation-selective responses are discovered in the mouse SC, and they are not affected by cortical lesion or long-term visual deprivation. However, ON/OFF characteristics and spatial frequency tuning of SC neurons are influenced by cortical inputs and require visual experience during development. Together, our results provide essential information for future investigations on the functional development of the superior colliculus. PMID:21147997

  10. Spectral integration in the inferior colliculus: role of glycinergic inhibition in response facilitation.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, J; Leroy, S A

    2001-02-01

    This study examined the contribution of glycinergic inhibition to the time-sensitive spectral integration performed by neurons in the inferior colliculus of the mustached bat (Pteronotus parnellii). These neurons are sometimes called combination-sensitive because they display facilitatory (or inhibitory) responses to the combination of distinct spectral elements in sonar or social vocalizations. Present in a wide range of vertebrates, their temporally and spectrally selective integration is thought to endow them with the ability to discriminate among social vocalizations or to analyze particular cues concerning sonar targets. The mechanisms that underlie these responses or the sites in the auditory system where they are created are not known. We examined combination-sensitive neurons that are facilitated by the presentation of two different harmonic elements of the bat's sonar call and echo. Responses of 24 single units were recorded before and during local application of strychnine, an antagonist of glycinergic inhibition. For each of the 24 units, strychnine application eliminated or greatly reduced temporally sensitive facilitation. There was no difference in this effect for neurons tuned to frequencies associated with the frequency-modulated or the constant-frequency sonar components. These results are unusual because glycine is considered to be an inhibitory neurotransmitter, but here it appears to be essential for the expression of combination-sensitive facilitation. The findings provide strong evidence that facilitatory combination-sensitive response properties present throughout the mustached bat's auditory midbrain, thalamus, and cortex originate through neural interactions in the inferior colliculus.

  11. External rotation views in the diagnosis of posterior colliculus fracture of the medial malleolus.

    PubMed

    Ebraheim, N A; Wong, F Y

    1996-05-01

    A 25-year-old white man sustained a fracture dislocation of the right ankle with a displaced fracture of the lateral malleolus while playing basketball. He also sustained a fracture of the medial aspect of the distal tibia, in addition to an apparent deltoid ligament injury. The patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation of the lateral malleolus and insertion of a syndesmotic screw. Intraoperatively, external rotation radiographs of the ankle were obtained to determine the origin of the fracture of the medial side of the ankle joint. The radiographs clearly showed a minimally displaced fracture of the posterior colliculus. Posterior colliculus fracture can be occult. This fracture may not be clearly visible on plain antero-posterior or mortise-view radiographs and external rotation is necessary for its diagnosis. This fracture is usually minimally displaced and can be satisfactorily treated conservatively. The patient's leg was placed in a short-leg cast for 6 weeks. Follow-up radiographs revealed healing of the fracture.

  12. Restoration of quinine-stimulated Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala and gustatory cortex following reinnervation or cross-reinnervation of the lingual taste nerves in rats.

    PubMed

    King, Camille Tessitore; Garcea, Mircea; Spector, Alan C

    2014-08-01

    Remarkably, when lingual gustatory nerves are surgically rerouted to inappropriate taste fields in the tongue, some taste functions recover. We previously demonstrated that quinine-stimulated oromotor rejection reflexes and neural activity (assessed by Fos immunoreactivity) in subregions of hindbrain gustatory nuclei were restored if the posterior tongue, which contains receptor cells that respond strongly to bitter compounds, was cross-reinnervated by the chorda tympani nerve. Such functional recovery was not seen if instead, the anterior tongue, where receptor cells are less responsive to bitter compounds, was cross-reinnervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve, even though this nerve typically responds robustly to bitter substances. Thus, recovery depended more on the taste field being reinnervated than on the nerve itself. Here, the distribution of quinine-stimulated Fos-immunoreactive neurons in two taste-associated forebrain areas was examined in these same rats. In the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a rostrocaudal gradient characterized the normal quinine-stimulated Fos response, with the greatest number of labeled cells situated rostrally. Quinine-stimulated neurons were found throughout the gustatory cortex, but a "hot spot" was observed in its anterior-posterior center in subregions approximating the dysgranular/agranular layers. Fos neurons here and in the rostral CeA were highly correlated with quinine-elicited gapes. Denervation of the posterior tongue eliminated, and its reinnervation by either nerve restored, numbers of quinine-stimulated labeled cells in the rostralmost CeA and in the subregion approximating the dysgranular gustatory cortex. These results underscore the remarkable plasticity of the gustatory system and also help clarify the functional anatomy of neural circuits activated by bitter taste stimulation.

  13. Dilation of the inferior colliculus and hypersensitivity to sound in Wnt1-cre and Wnt1-GAL4 double-transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Mitsunari; Nishikawa, Chisa; Miyasaka, Yuki; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Mori, Hisamichi; Tsuruta, Momoko; Okuyama, Satoshi; Furukawa, Yoshiko

    2014-04-30

    The processing of sound information is mediated by the cochlea and the central auditory system. Among the central auditory system, the inferior colliculus (IC) has leading roles in the acoustic processing. In a previous study, we demonstrated psychiatric disorder-related behavioral abnormalities in a genetically modified animal of Wnt1-cre and Wnt1-GAL4 double-transgenic (dTg) mouse. Here we report an abnormal morphology of the IC and dysacusis in the dTg mice. The IC in the brain of the dTg mice is dilated in appearance and histologic analysis revealed a high cell-density in the IC. Also, the dTg mice showed high scores in a startle response test using a click box that emits a 20-kHz sound. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) test revealed lower ABR thresholds of the dTg mice at a test-stimulus frequency of 32kHz, but not at 4-16kHz. These findings suggest that the dTg mice could be a useful animal model for studying the physiologic function of the IC and the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorder-related dysacusis. PMID:24607930

  14. GABAA-Mediated Inhibition Modulates Stimulus-Specific Adaptation in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-González, David; Hernández, Olga; Covey, Ellen; Malmierca, Manuel S.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to detect novel sounds in a complex acoustic context is crucial for survival. Neurons from midbrain through cortical levels adapt to repetitive stimuli, while maintaining responsiveness to rare stimuli, a phenomenon called stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA). The site of origin and mechanism of SSA are currently unknown. We used microiontophoretic application of gabazine to examine the role of GABAA-mediated inhibition in SSA in the inferior colliculus, the midbrain center for auditory processing. We found that gabazine slowed down the process of adaptation to high probability stimuli but did not abolish it, with response magnitude and latency still depending on the probability of the stimulus. Blocking GABAA receptors increased the firing rate to high and low probability stimuli, but did not completely equalize the responses. Together, these findings suggest that GABAA-mediated inhibition acts as a gain control mechanism that enhances SSA by modifying the responsiveness of the neuron. PMID:22479591

  15. Neurons and glia in cat superior colliculus accumulate [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    PubMed

    Mize, R R; Spencer, R F; Sterling, P

    1981-11-01

    We have examined by autoradiography the labeling pattern in the cat superior colliculus following injection of tritiated gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Silver grains were heavily distributed within the zonal layer and the upper 200 micrometer of the superficial gray. Fewer grains were observed deeper within the superficial gray, and still fewer were found within the optic and intermediate gray layers. The accumulation of label was restricted to certain classes of neuron and glia. Densely labeled neurons were small (8-12 micrometer in diameter) and located primarily within the upper 200 micrometer. Dark oligodendrocytes and astrocytes showed a moderate accumulation of label while pale oligodendrocytes and microglia were unlabeled. Label was also selectively accumulated over several other types of profile within the neuropil, including presynaptic dendrites, axons, and axon terminals.

  16. Role of the superior colliculus in choosing mixed-strategy saccades.

    PubMed

    Thevarajah, Dhushan; Mikulić, Areh; Dorris, Michael C

    2009-02-18

    Game theory outlines optimal response strategies during mixed-strategy competitions. The neural processes involved in choosing individual strategic actions, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we tested whether the superior colliculus (SC), a brain region critical for generating sensory-guided saccades, is also involved in choosing saccades under strategic conditions. Monkeys were free to choose either of two saccade targets as they competed against a computer opponent during the mixed-strategy game "matching pennies." The accuracy with which presaccadic SC activity predicted upcoming choice gradually increased in the time leading up to the saccade. Probing the SC with suprathreshold stimulation demonstrated that these evolving signals were functionally involved in preparing strategic saccades. Finally, subthreshold stimulation of the SC increased the likelihood that contralateral saccades were selected. Together, our results suggest that motor regions of the brain play an active role in choosing strategic actions rather than passively executing those prespecified by upstream executive regions.

  17. Reduction of glutamate content in rat superior colliculus after retino-tectal denervation.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, T; Miyamoto, T; Okada, Y

    1990-02-16

    The effect of afferent lesions on glutamate content was measured in the lamina of the superior colliculus (SC) in the rat. The analysis was performed 12 days after unilateral enucleation (left eye), or ablation of visual cortex (right), or both enucleation and ablation. The glutamate contained in the superficial grey layer (SGL) and deep layer was measured in the sectioned freeze-dried sample using an enzymatic cycling method of NAD-NADH. The upper layer of SGL contralateral to enucleation exhibited a significant reduction (23%) in glutamate content. Combining enucleation and ablation further decreased (35%) glutamate content. Additionally, the synaptic potential evoked in the SGL of SC slices after stimulation of optic layer was blocked by the application of kynurenic acid (3 mM) or DNQX (30 microM). These results indicate that the retino-tectal pathway in the rat can be glutamatergic in nature.

  18. Neural interactions in unilateral colliculus and between bilateral colliculi modulate auditory signal processing.

    PubMed

    Mei, Hui-Xian; Cheng, Liang; Chen, Qi-Cai

    2013-01-01

    In the auditory pathway, the inferior colliculus (IC) is a major center for temporal and spectral integration of auditory information. There are widespread neural interactions in unilateral (one) IC and between bilateral (two) ICs that could modulate auditory signal processing such as the amplitude and frequency selectivity of IC neurons. These neural interactions are either inhibitory or excitatory, and are mostly mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate, respectively. However, the majority of interactions are inhibitory while excitatory interactions are in the minority. Such unbalanced properties between excitatory and inhibitory projections have an important role in the formation of unilateral auditory dominance and sound location, and the neural interaction in one IC and between two ICs provide an adjustable and plastic modulation pattern for auditory signal processing.

  19. Neural interactions in unilateral colliculus and between bilateral colliculi modulate auditory signal processing

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Hui-Xian; Cheng, Liang; Chen, Qi-Cai

    2013-01-01

    In the auditory pathway, the inferior colliculus (IC) is a major center for temporal and spectral integration of auditory information. There are widespread neural interactions in unilateral (one) IC and between bilateral (two) ICs that could modulate auditory signal processing such as the amplitude and frequency selectivity of IC neurons. These neural interactions are either inhibitory or excitatory, and are mostly mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate, respectively. However, the majority of interactions are inhibitory while excitatory interactions are in the minority. Such unbalanced properties between excitatory and inhibitory projections have an important role in the formation of unilateral auditory dominance and sound location, and the neural interaction in one IC and between two ICs provide an adjustable and plastic modulation pattern for auditory signal processing. PMID:23626523

  20. Visual responses of neurones in cat superior colliculus in relation to fixation of targets.

    PubMed Central

    Peck, C K

    1989-01-01

    1. Visually elicited discharges were recorded from single cells in the intermediate and deep layers of the superior colliculus of alert, trained cats. With the behavioural protocols used, vigorous and consistent visual responses to the onset and offset of small, stationary targets were encountered in all layers of the colliculus. In addition, the responses of many cells depended on the behavioural context in which the response occurred. Specifically, thirty-nine cells were encountered in which discharge was contingent upon prolonged fixation of the visual stimulus. Thirty of these were located in the intermediate and deep layers and comprised 22% of the 134 isolated cells which were not related to saccadic eye movement. 2. Fixation-related cells showed sustained increases or decreases in firing during fixation of a visual target. Responses to presentation of a visual target at the same retinal location, without active fixation by the animal, were either absent, much weaker, or had extremely variable latencies. 3. Changes in activity were well established by the end of the fixation saccade. The neuronal response was sustained if fixation was sustained. Moreover, the neuronal response began to decrease before the onset of the saccade which broke fixation even though the receptive field location of the target had not yet changed. 4. In these neurones, the discharge rate was not a function of the position of the eye in the orbit. 5. Neurones in which the discharge rate was suppressed during fixation had larger receptive fields than cells in which the discharge rate was enhanced during fixation. There were fewer fixation-suppressed cells (n = 7, 5%) than fixation-activated cells (n = 23, 17%). PMID:2607434

  1. Deactivation of the inferior colliculus by cooling demonstrates intercollicular modulation of neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Orton, Llwyd D; Poon, Paul W F; Rees, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    The auditory pathways coursing through the brainstem are organized bilaterally in mirror image about the midline and at several levels the two sides are interconnected. One of the most prominent points of interconnection is the commissure of the inferior colliculus (CoIC). Anatomical studies have revealed that these fibers make reciprocal connections which follow the tonotopic organization of the inferior colliculus (IC), and that the commissure contains both excitatory and, albeit fewer, inhibitory fibers. The role of these connections in sound processing is largely unknown. Here we describe a method to address this question in the anaesthetized guinea pig. We used a cryoloop placed on one IC to produce reversible deactivation while recording electrophysiological responses to sounds in both ICs. We recorded single units, multi-unit clusters and local field potentials (LFPs) before, during and after cooling. The degree and spread of cooling was measured with a thermocouple placed in the IC and other auditory structures. Cooling sufficient to eliminate firing was restricted to the IC contacted by the cryoloop. The temperature of other auditory brainstem structures, including the contralateral IC and the cochlea were minimally affected. Cooling below 20°C reduced or eliminated the firing of action potentials in frequency laminae at depths corresponding to characteristic frequencies up to ~8 kHz. Modulation of neural activity also occurred in the un-cooled IC with changes in single unit firing and LFPs. Components of LFPs signaling lemniscal afferent input to the IC showed little change in amplitude or latency with cooling, whereas the later components, which likely reflect inter- and intra-collicular processing, showed marked changes in form and amplitude. We conclude that the cryoloop is an effective method of selectively deactivating one IC in guinea pig, and demonstrate that auditory processing in the IC is strongly influenced by the other. PMID:23248587

  2. Deactivation of the inferior colliculus by cooling demonstrates intercollicular modulation of neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Orton, Llwyd D.; Poon, Paul W. F.; Rees, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    The auditory pathways coursing through the brainstem are organized bilaterally in mirror image about the midline and at several levels the two sides are interconnected. One of the most prominent points of interconnection is the commissure of the inferior colliculus (CoIC). Anatomical studies have revealed that these fibers make reciprocal connections which follow the tonotopic organization of the inferior colliculus (IC), and that the commissure contains both excitatory and, albeit fewer, inhibitory fibers. The role of these connections in sound processing is largely unknown. Here we describe a method to address this question in the anaesthetized guinea pig. We used a cryoloop placed on one IC to produce reversible deactivation while recording electrophysiological responses to sounds in both ICs. We recorded single units, multi-unit clusters and local field potentials (LFPs) before, during and after cooling. The degree and spread of cooling was measured with a thermocouple placed in the IC and other auditory structures. Cooling sufficient to eliminate firing was restricted to the IC contacted by the cryoloop. The temperature of other auditory brainstem structures, including the contralateral IC and the cochlea were minimally affected. Cooling below 20°C reduced or eliminated the firing of action potentials in frequency laminae at depths corresponding to characteristic frequencies up to ~8 kHz. Modulation of neural activity also occurred in the un-cooled IC with changes in single unit firing and LFPs. Components of LFPs signaling lemniscal afferent input to the IC showed little change in amplitude or latency with cooling, whereas the later components, which likely reflect inter- and intra-collicular processing, showed marked changes in form and amplitude. We conclude that the cryoloop is an effective method of selectively deactivating one IC in guinea pig, and demonstrate that auditory processing in the IC is strongly influenced by the other. PMID:23248587

  3. The Nucleus Introduced

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru

    2011-01-01

    Now is an opportune moment to address the confluence of cell biological form and function that is the nucleus. Its arrival is especially timely because the recognition that the nucleus is extremely dynamic has now been solidly established as a paradigm shift over the past two decades, and also because we now see on the horizon numerous ways in which organization itself, including gene location and possibly self-organizing bodies, underlies nuclear functions. PMID:20660024

  4. Volumes of cochlear nucleus regions in rodents.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Donald A; Lee, Augustine C; Hamilton, Walter D; Benjamin, Louis C; Vishwanath, Shilpa; Simo, Hermann; Godfrey, Lynn M; Mustapha, Abdurrahman I A A; Heffner, Rickye S

    2016-09-01

    The cochlear nucleus receives all the coded information about sound from the cochlea and is the source of auditory information for the rest of the central auditory system. As such, it is a critical auditory nucleus. The sizes of the cochlear nucleus as a whole and its three major subdivisions - anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN), posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN), and dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) - have been measured in a large number of mammals, but measurements of its subregions at a more detailed level for a variety of species have not previously been made. Size measurements are reported here for the summed granular regions, DCN layers, AVCN, PVCN, and interstitial nucleus in 15 different rodent species, as well as a lagomorph, carnivore, and small primate. This further refinement of measurements is important because the granular regions and superficial layers of the DCN appear to have some different functions than the other cochlear nucleus regions. Except for DCN layers in the mountain beaver, all regions were clearly identifiable in all the animals studied. Relative regional size differences among most of the rodents, and even the 3 non-rodents, were not large and did not show a consistent relation to their wide range of lifestyles and hearing parameters. However, the mountain beaver, and to a lesser extent the pocket gopher, two rodents that live in tunnel systems, had relative sizes of summed granular regions and DCN molecular layer distinctly larger than those of the other mammals. Among all the mammals studied, there was a high correlation between the size per body weight of summed granular regions and that of the DCN molecular layer, consistent with other evidence for a close relationship between granule cells and superficial DCN neurons. PMID:27435005

  5. Hyperon-nucleus potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dover, C. B.; Gal, A.

    We review models for the interaction of baryons ( N, Λ, Σ and Ξ) with nuclei, emphasizing the underlying meson exchange picture. Starting from a phenomenological one boson exchange model (the Nijmegen potential, as an example) which accounts for the available NN, ΛN and ΣN two-body scattering data, we show how to construct the effective baryon-nucleon interaction ( G-matrix). Employing the folding model, we then obtain the many-body potentials for bound states in terms of the nuclear density and the appropriate spin-isospin weighted G-matrices. The models we emphasize most impose SU(3) constraints on baryon-baryon coupling constants SU(3) is broken through the use of physical masses), although we also compare with rough estimates based on quark model relations between coupling constants. We stress the essential unity and economy of such models, in which nucleon and hyperon-nucleus potentials are intimately related via SU(3), and the connection between the two-body and many-body potentials is preserved. We decompose the nuclear potentials into central and spin-orbit parts, each of which is isospin dependent. For nucleons, the microscopic origin of the isospin dependent Lane potential V1 N is clarified. For Λ and Σ hyperons, the one boson exchange model with SU(3) constraints leads to one-body spin-orbit strengths VLSB which are relatively weak ( VLSΛ ≈ 1.5-2 MeV, VLSΣ ≈ 2.5-;3 MeV, compared to VLSN ≈ 7-9 MeV). We demonstrate the interplay between symmetric and antisymmetric two-body spin-orbit forces which give rise to these results, as well as the special role of K and K ∗ exchange for hyperons. We contrast these results with predictions based on the naive quark model. From S and P-wave two-body interactions, a Lane potential for the Σ of depth V1 Σ ≈ 50-60 MeV is predicted although this result is somewhat uncertain. For the Ξ, the nuclear potential is very different in various models for the two-body interaction based on SU(3) or the quark

  6. UNCOVERING THE NUCLEUS CANDIDATE FOR NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Günthardt, G. I.; Camperi, J. A.; Agüero, M. P.; Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Schirmer, M.; Bosch, G. E-mail: camperi@oac.uncor.edu E-mail: rdiaz@gemini.edu E-mail: mschirmer@gemini.edu

    2015-11-15

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H{sub 2} rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  7. Uncovering the Nucleus Candidate for NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günthardt, G. I.; Agüero, M. P.; Camperi, J. A.; Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Bosch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2015-11-01

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H2 rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  8. Distribution of SMI-32-immunoreactive neurons in the central auditory system of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ouda, Ladislav; Druga, Rastislav; Syka, Josef

    2012-01-01

    SMI-32 antibody recognizes a non-phosphorylated epitope of neurofilament proteins, which are thought to be necessary for the maintenance of large neurons with highly myelinated processes. We investigated the distribution and quantity of SMI-32-immunoreactive(-ir) neurons in individual parts of the rat auditory system. SMI-32-ir neurons were present in all auditory structures; however, in most regions they constituted only a minority of all neurons (10-30%). In the cochlear nuclei, a higher occurrence of SMI-32-ir neurons was found in the ventral cochlear nucleus. Within the superior olivary complex, SMI-32-ir cells were particularly abundant in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB), the only auditory region where SMI-32-ir neurons constituted an absolute majority of all neurons. In the inferior colliculus, a region with the highest total number of neurons among the rat auditory subcortical structures, the percentage of SMI-32-ir cells was, in contrast to the MNTB, very low. In the medial geniculate body, SMI-32-ir neurons were prevalent in the ventral division. At the cortical level, SMI-32-ir neurons were found mainly in layers III, V and VI. Within the auditory cortex, it was possible to distinguish the Te1, Te2 and Te3 areas on the basis of the variable numerical density and volumes of SMI-32-ir neurons, especially when the pyramidal cells of layer V were taken into account. SMI-32-ir neurons apparently form a representative subpopulation of neurons in all parts of the rat central auditory system and may belong to both the inhibitory and excitatory systems, depending on the particular brain region.

  9. The immediate effects of acoustic trauma on excitation and inhibition in the inferior colliculus: A Wiener-kernel analysis.

    PubMed

    Heeringa, Amarins Nieske; van Dijk, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Noise-induced tinnitus and hyperacusis are thought to correspond to a disrupted balance between excitation and inhibition in the central auditory system. Excitation and inhibition are often studied using pure tones; however, these responses do not reveal inhibition within the excitatory pass band. Therefore, we used a Wiener-kernel analysis, complemented with singular value decomposition (SVD), to investigate the immediate effects of acoustic trauma on excitation and inhibition in the inferior colliculus (IC). Neural responses were recorded from the IC of three anesthetized albino guinea pigs before and immediately after a one-hour bilateral exposure to an 11-kHz tone of 124 dB SPL. Neural activity was recorded during the presentation of a 1-h continuous 70 dB SPL Gaussian-noise stimulus. Spike trains were subjected to Wiener-kernel analysis in which the second-order kernel was decomposed into excitatory and inhibitory components using SVD. Hearing thresholds between 3 and 22 kHz were elevated (13-47 dB) immediately after acoustic trauma. The presence and frequency tuning of excitation and inhibition in units with a low characteristic frequency (CF; < 3 kHz) was not affected, inhibition disappeared whereas excitation was not affected in mid-CF units (3 < CF < 11 kHz), and both excitation and inhibition disappeared in high-CF units (CF > 11 kHz). This specific differentiation could not be identified by tone-evoked receptive-field analysis, in which inhibitory responses disappeared in all units, along with excitatory responses in high-CF units. This study is the first to apply Wiener-kernel analysis, complemented with SVD, to study the effects of acoustic trauma on spike trains derived from the IC. With this analysis, a reduction of inhibition and preservation of good response thresholds was shown in mid-CF units immediately after acoustic trauma. These neurons may mediate noise-induced tinnitus and/or hyperacusis. Moreover, an immediate profound high

  10. Mu-opioid and corticotropin-releasing-factor receptors show largely postsynaptic co-expression, and separate presynaptic distributions, in the mouse central amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Jaferi, Azra; Pickel, Virginia M.

    2009-01-01

    The anxiolytic effects of opiates active at the mu-opioid receptor (μ-OR) may be ascribed, in part, to suppression of neurons that are responsive to the stress-associated peptide, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), in the central amygdala (CeA) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST). The CRF receptor (CRFr) and μ-OR are expressed in both the CeA and BNST, but their subcellular relationship to each other is not known in either region. To address this question, we used dual electron microscopic immunolabeling of μ-OR and CRFr in the mouse lateral CeA and anterolateral BNST. Immunolabeling for each receptor was detected in the same as well as in separate somatic, dendritic and axonal profiles of neurons in each region. CRFr had a plasmalemmal or cytoplasmic distribution in many dendrites, including those co-expressing μ-OR. The co-expression of CRFr and μ-OR also was seen near excitatory-type synapses on dendritic spines. In both the CeA and BNST, over 50% of the CRFr-labeled dendritic profiles (dendrites and spines) contained immunoreactivity for the μ-OR. However, less than 25% of the dendritic profiles containing the μ-OR were labeled for CRFr in either region, suggesting that opiate activation of the μ-OR affects many neurons in addition to those responsive to CRF. The dendritic profiles containing CRFr and/or μ-OR received asymmetric, excitatory-type synapses from unlabeled or CRFr-labeled axon terminals. In contrast, the μ-OR was identified in terminals forming symmetric, inhibitory-type synapses. Thus, in both the CeA and BNST, μ-OR and CRFr have strategic locations for mediation of CRF and opioid effects on the postsynaptic excitability of single neurons, and on the respective presynaptic release of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. The commonalities in the synaptic location of both receptors in the CeA and BNST suggest that this is a fundamental cellular association of relevance to both drug addiction and stress

  11. Experience-dependent plasticity in the inferior colliculus: a site for visual calibration of the neural representation of auditory space in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Brainard, M S; Knudsen, E I

    1993-11-01

    The optic tectum (homolog of the superior colliculus) contains mutually aligned neural maps of auditory and visual space. During development, the organization of the auditory map is guided by spatial information provided by vision: barn owls raised wearing prismatic spectacles, which optically shift the visual field and the visual map in the optic tectum, develop an auditory map that is shifted by an approximately equivalent amount, such that alignment between the two maps is preserved (Knudsen and Brainard, 1991). In this study we investigated whether this shift in the auditory map is intrinsic to the optic tectum or whether it reflects plasticity at an earlier stage in the auditory pathway. Owls were raised wearing prismatic spectacles that displaced the visual field by 23 degrees to the left or right. This manipulation alters the normal correspondence between locations in the visual field and interaural time difference (ITD), the primary cue for the azimuth of a sound source. In normal owls and in owls with at least 150 d of prism experience, extracellular unit recordings were used to assess the representations of ITD at anatomically and physiologically defined sites in the optic tectum and in the two prior stages of the auditory pathway, the external and central nuclei of the inferior colliculus (ICx and ICc). In the optic tectum of normal owls, the values of ITD to which units responded most strongly (best ITDs) varied systematically with the azimuths of unit visual receptive fields (VRFs). In the prism-reared owls, best ITDs were shifted from normal toward the values of ITD produced by sounds at the locations of the units' optically displaced VRFs. In the ICx of prism-reared owls, the representation of ITD also was shifted from normal, by an amount and in a direction that could completely account for the shift in ITD measured in the optic tectum. At some sites in the ICx, the shift in ITD tuning was apparent within the first 7-8 msec of the response; shifted

  12. Capsaicin-evoked brain activation and central sensitization in anaesthetised rats: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Moylan Governo, Ricardo Jose; Morris, Peter Gordon; Prior, Malcolm John William; Marsden, Charles Alexander; Chapman, Victoria

    2006-12-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) haemodynamic responses was used to study the effects of the noxious substance capsaicin on whole brain activation in isofluorane anaesthetised rats. Rats (n=8) received intradermal injection of capsaicin (30 microg/5 microl), or topical cream (0.1%) capsaicin and BOLD responses were acquired for up to 120 min. Effects of capsaicin versus placebo cream treatment on the BOLD response to a 15 g mechanical stimulus applied adjacent to the site of cream application were also studied. Both injection and cream application of capsaicin activated brain areas involved in pain processing, including the thalamus and periaqueductal grey (PAG) (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). Capsaicin also produced increases in BOLD signal intensity in other regions that contribute to pain processing, such as the parabrachial nucleus and superior colliculus. Mechanical stimulation in capsaicin-treated rats, but not placebo-treated rats, induced a significant decrease in BOLD signal intensity in the PAG (p<0.001). These data demonstrate that the noxious substance capsaicin produces brain activation in the midbrain regions and reveals the importance of the PAG in central sensitization. PMID:16843597

  13. A quantitative comparison of the hemispheric, areal, and laminar origins of sensory and motor cortical projections to the superior colliculus of the cat.

    PubMed

    Butler, Blake E; Chabot, Nicole; Lomber, Stephen G

    2016-09-01

    The superior colliculus (SC) is a midbrain structure central to orienting behaviors. The organization of descending projections from sensory cortices to the SC has garnered much attention; however, rarely have projections from multiple modalities been quantified and contrasted, allowing for meaningful conclusions within a single species. Here, we examine corticotectal projections from visual, auditory, somatosensory, motor, and limbic cortices via retrograde pathway tracers injected throughout the superficial and deep layers of the cat SC. As anticipated, the majority of cortical inputs to the SC originate in the visual cortex. In fact, each field implicated in visual orienting behavior makes a substantial projection. Conversely, only one area of the auditory orienting system, the auditory field of the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (fAES), and no area involved in somatosensory orienting, shows significant corticotectal inputs. Although small relative to visual inputs, the projection from the fAES is of particular interest, as it represents the only bilateral cortical input to the SC. This detailed, quantitative study allows for comparison across modalities in an animal that serves as a useful model for both auditory and visual perception. Moreover, the differences in patterns of corticotectal projections between modalities inform the ways in which orienting systems are modulated by cortical feedback. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2623-2642, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A quantitative comparison of the hemispheric, areal, and laminar origins of sensory and motor cortical projections to the superior colliculus of the cat.

    PubMed

    Butler, Blake E; Chabot, Nicole; Lomber, Stephen G

    2016-09-01

    The superior colliculus (SC) is a midbrain structure central to orienting behaviors. The organization of descending projections from sensory cortices to the SC has garnered much attention; however, rarely have projections from multiple modalities been quantified and contrasted, allowing for meaningful conclusions within a single species. Here, we examine corticotectal projections from visual, auditory, somatosensory, motor, and limbic cortices via retrograde pathway tracers injected throughout the superficial and deep layers of the cat SC. As anticipated, the majority of cortical inputs to the SC originate in the visual cortex. In fact, each field implicated in visual orienting behavior makes a substantial projection. Conversely, only one area of the auditory orienting system, the auditory field of the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (fAES), and no area involved in somatosensory orienting, shows significant corticotectal inputs. Although small relative to visual inputs, the projection from the fAES is of particular interest, as it represents the only bilateral cortical input to the SC. This detailed, quantitative study allows for comparison across modalities in an animal that serves as a useful model for both auditory and visual perception. Moreover, the differences in patterns of corticotectal projections between modalities inform the ways in which orienting systems are modulated by cortical feedback. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2623-2642, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26850989

  15. The adaptation of visual and auditory integration in the barn owl superior colliculus with Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Huo, Juan; Murray, Alan

    2009-09-01

    To localize a seen object, the superior colliculus of the barn owl integrates the visual and auditory localization cues which are accessed from the sensory system of the brain. These cues are formed as visual and auditory maps. The alignment between visual and auditory maps is very important for accurate localization in prey behavior. Blindness or prism wearing may interfere this alignment. The juvenile barn owl could adapt its auditory map to this mismatch after several weeks training. Here we investigate this process by building a computational model of auditory and visual integration in deep Superior Colliculus (SC). The adaptation of the map alignment is based on activity dependent axon developing in Inferior Colliculus (IC). This axon growing process is instructed by an inhibitory network in SC while the strength of the inhibition is adjusted by Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP). The simulation results of this model are in line with the biological experiment and support the idea that STDP is involved in the alignment of sensory maps. This model also provides a new spiking neuron based mechanism capable of eliminating the disparity in visual and auditory map integration. PMID:19084371

  16. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Buck, Warren W.; Maung, Khin M.

    1989-01-01

    Two kinds of number density distributions of the nucleus, harmonic well and Woods-Saxon models, are used with the t-matrix that is taken from the scattering experiments to find a simple optical potential. The parameterized two body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are shown. The eikonal approximation was chosen as the solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  17. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Maung, Khin Maung; Wilson, John W.; Buck, Warren W.

    1989-01-01

    The derivations of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and Watson multiple scattering are given. A simple optical potential is found to be the first term of that series. The number density distribution models of the nucleus, harmonic well, and Woods-Saxon are used without t-matrix taken from the scattering experiments. The parameterized two-body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are presented. The eikonal approximation was chosen as our solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  18. Convergence of the nucleus-nucleus Glauber multiple scattering series

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, A.A.; Ahmad, I. )

    1991-05-01

    The Glauber {ital S}-matrix operator for nucleus-nucleus scattering is expressed as a finite series of matrix elements involving Bell's polynomials. Analyzing {alpha}{sup 4}He elastic-scattering data at the incident momentum of 4.32 GeV/{ital c}, we infer that our expansion is appreciably converging. Further, by applying closure over target and projectile states and neglecting a certain class of terms involving intermediate excitations, we arrive at a recurrence relation for nucleus-nucleus multiple scattering series terms, which invites further study as it seems to provide a simple method for calculating the nucleus-nucleus elastic-scattering cross section.

  19. Visual Experience Is Required for the Development of Eye Movement Maps in the Mouse Superior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lupeng; Liu, Mingna

    2015-01-01

    Topographic maps are a fundamental feature of the brain's representations of the sensory environment as well as an efficient way to organize motor control networks. Although great progress has been made in our understanding of sensory map development, very little is known about how topographic representations for motor control develop and interface with sensory maps. Here we map the representation for eye movements in the superior colliculus (SC) in awake mice. As stimulation sites were sampled along the anterior–posterior axis, small amplitude, nasally directed (ipsiversive) saccadic eye movements were evoked by microstimulation in anterior SC, followed by a smooth progression to large, temporally directed (contraversive) movements in posterior SC. This progressive change of movement amplitude and direction is consistent with the global polarity of the retinotopic map in the superficial SC, just as in primates and cats. We then investigated the role of visual experience in the development of eye movement map by studying mice reared in complete darkness. Saccades evoked by SC stimulation as well as spontaneous saccadic eye movements were larger in the dark-reared mice, indicating that visual experience is required to fine-tune the gain of saccades and to establish normal eye movement maps in the SC. Our experiments provide a foundation for future studies to investigate the synaptic organization and developmental mechanisms of sensorimotor transformations in mice. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The superior colliculus (SC) is a midbrain structure important for multisensory integration and sensorimotor transformation. Here we have studied eye movement representations in the SC of mice, a species that has become a popular model in vision research because of available genetic tools. Our studies show mice make saccadic eye movements spontaneously and in response to SC stimulation. The mouse SC contains an eye movement map that has the same global polarity as the overlaying

  20. [Response characteristics of neurons to tone in dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus of the mouse].

    PubMed

    Si, Wen-Juan; Cheng, Yan-Ling; Yang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Xin

    2016-02-25

    The dorsal nucleus of lateral lemniscus (DNLL) is a nucleus in the auditory ascending pathway, and casts inhibitory efferent projections to the inferior colliculus. Studies on the DNLL are less than studies on the auditory brain stem and inferior colliculus. To date, there is no information about response characteristics of neurons in DNLL of albino mouse. Under free field conditions, we used extracellular single unit recording to study the acoustic signal characteristics of DNLL neurons in Kunming mice (Mus musculus). Transient (36%) and ongoing (64%) firing patterns were found in 96 DNLL neurons. Neurons with different firing patterns have significant differences in characteristic frequency and minimal threshold. We recorded frequency tuning curves (FTCs) of 87 DNLL neurons. All of the FTCs exhibit an open "V" shape. There is no significant difference in FTCs between transient and ongoing neurons, but among the ongoing neurons, the FTCs of sustained neurons are sharper than those of onset plus sustained neurons and pauser neurons. Our results showed that the characteristic frequency of DNLL neurons of mice was not correlated with depth, supporting the view that the DNLL of mouse has no frequency topological organization through dorsal-ventral plane, which is different from cats and some other animals. Furthermore, by using rate-intensity function (RIF) analysis the mouse DNLL neurons can be classified as monotonic (60%), saturated (31%) and non-monotonic (8%) types. Each RIF type includes transient and ongoing firing patterns. Dynamic range of the transient firing pattern is smaller than that of ongoing firing ones (P < 0.01), suggesting that the inhibitory inputs may underlie the formation of transient firing pattern. Multiple firing patterns and intensity coding of DNLL neurons may derive from the projections from multiple auditory nuclei, and play different roles in auditory information processing. PMID:26915316

  1. [Response characteristics of neurons to tone in dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus of the mouse].

    PubMed

    Si, Wen-Juan; Cheng, Yan-Ling; Yang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Xin

    2016-02-25

    The dorsal nucleus of lateral lemniscus (DNLL) is a nucleus in the auditory ascending pathway, and casts inhibitory efferent projections to the inferior colliculus. Studies on the DNLL are less than studies on the auditory brain stem and inferior colliculus. To date, there is no information about response characteristics of neurons in DNLL of albino mouse. Under free field conditions, we used extracellular single unit recording to study the acoustic signal characteristics of DNLL neurons in Kunming mice (Mus musculus). Transient (36%) and ongoing (64%) firing patterns were found in 96 DNLL neurons. Neurons with different firing patterns have significant differences in characteristic frequency and minimal threshold. We recorded frequency tuning curves (FTCs) of 87 DNLL neurons. All of the FTCs exhibit an open "V" shape. There is no significant difference in FTCs between transient and ongoing neurons, but among the ongoing neurons, the FTCs of sustained neurons are sharper than those of onset plus sustained neurons and pauser neurons. Our results showed that the characteristic frequency of DNLL neurons of mice was not correlated with depth, supporting the view that the DNLL of mouse has no frequency topological organization through dorsal-ventral plane, which is different from cats and some other animals. Furthermore, by using rate-intensity function (RIF) analysis the mouse DNLL neurons can be classified as monotonic (60%), saturated (31%) and non-monotonic (8%) types. Each RIF type includes transient and ongoing firing patterns. Dynamic range of the transient firing pattern is smaller than that of ongoing firing ones (P < 0.01), suggesting that the inhibitory inputs may underlie the formation of transient firing pattern. Multiple firing patterns and intensity coding of DNLL neurons may derive from the projections from multiple auditory nuclei, and play different roles in auditory information processing.

  2. Activity in the human superior colliculus relating to endogenous saccade preparation and execution

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Michele; Smith, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years a small number of studies have applied functional imaging techniques to investigate visual responses in the human superior colliculus (SC), but few have investigated its oculomotor functions. Here, in two experiments, we examined activity associated with endogenous saccade preparation. We used 3-T fMRI to record the hemodynamic activity in the SC while participants were either preparing or executing saccadic eye movements. Our results showed that not only executing a saccade (as previously shown) but also preparing a saccade produced an increase in the SC hemodynamic activity. The saccade-related activity was observed in the contralateral and to a lesser extent the ipsilateral SC. A second experiment further examined the contralateral mapping of saccade-related activity with a larger range of saccade amplitudes. Increased activity was again observed in both the contralateral and ipsilateral SC that was evident for large as well as small saccades. This suggests that the ipsilateral component of the increase in BOLD is not due simply to small-amplitude saccades producing bilateral activity in the foveal fixation zone. These studies provide the first evidence of presaccadic preparatory activity in the human SC and reveal that fMRI can detect activity consistent with that of buildup neurons found in the deeper layers of the SC in studies of nonhuman primates. PMID:26041830

  3. The serotonin releaser fenfluramine alters the auditory responses of inferior colliculus neurons.

    PubMed

    Hall, Ian C; Hurley, Laura M

    2007-06-01

    Local direct application of the neuromodulator serotonin strongly influences auditory response properties of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC), but endogenous stores of serotonin may be released in a distinct spatial or temporal pattern. To explore this issue, the serotonin releaser fenfluramine was iontophoretically applied to extracellularly recorded neurons in the IC of the Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis). Fenfluramine mimicked the effects of serotonin on spike count and first spike latency in most neurons, and its effects could be blocked by co-application of serotonin receptor antagonists, consistent with fenfluramine-evoked serotonin release. Responses to fenfluramine did not vary during single applications or across multiple applications, suggesting that fenfluramine did not deplete serotonin stores. A predicted gradient in the effects of fenfluramine with serotonin fiber density was not observed, but neurons with fenfluramine-evoked increases in latency occurred at relatively greater recording depths compared to other neurons with similar characteristic frequencies. These findings support the conclusion that there may be spatial differences in the effects of exogenous and endogenous sources of serotonin, but that other factors such as the identities and locations of serotonin receptors are also likely to play a role in determining the dynamics of serotonergic effects. PMID:17339086

  4. Decreased norepinephrine (NE) uptake in cerebral cortex and inferior colliculus of genetically epilepsy prone (GEP) rats

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, R.A.; Rigler-Daugherty, S.K.; Long, G.; Jobe, P.C.; Wade, D.R.

    1986-03-01

    GEP rats are characterized by an enhanced susceptibility to seizures caused by a variety of stimuli, most notably sound. Pharmacological treatments that reduce the synaptic concentration of NE increase seizure severity in GEP rats while elevations in NE have the opposite effect. GEP rats also display a widespread deficit in brain NE concentration suggesting that their increased seizure susceptibility is related to a deficit in noradrenergic transmission. The authors have compared the kinetics of /sup 3/H-NE uptake in the P/sub 2/ synaptosomal fraction isolated from the cerebral cortex of normal and GEP-rats. Although the apparent Kms were not significantly different (Normal +/- SEM:0.37 +/- 0.13..mu..M; GEP +/- SEM: 0.29 +/- 0.07..mu..M), the Vmax for GEP rats was 48% lower than that of normal rats (Normal +/- SEM: 474 +/- 45 fmole/mg/4min; GEP +/- SEM: 248 +/- 16 fmole/mg/4min). Because of the possible role of the inferior colliculus (IC) in the initiation of sound-induced seizures in GEP rats, the authors measured synaptosomal NE uptake in the IC using a NE concentration of 50 nM. The IC synaptosomal NE uptake was found to be 35% lower in GEP than in normal rats. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a deficit in noradrenergic transmission is related to the increased seizure susceptibility of GEP rats.

  5. A sodium afterdepolarization in rat superior colliculus neurons and its contribution to population activity.

    PubMed

    Ghitani, Nima; Bayguinov, Peter O; Basso, Michele A; Jackson, Meyer B

    2016-07-01

    The mammalian superior colliculus (SC) is a midbrain structure that integrates multimodal sensory inputs and computes commands to initiate rapid eye movements. SC neurons burst with the sudden onset of a visual stimulus, followed by persistent activity that may underlie shifts of attention and decision making. Experiments in vitro suggest that circuit reverberations play a role in the burst activity in the SC, but the origin of persistent activity is unclear. In the present study we characterized an afterdepolarization (ADP) that follows action potentials in slices of rat SC. Population responses seen with voltage-sensitive dye imaging consisted of rapid spikes followed immediately by a second distinct depolarization of lower amplitude and longer duration. Patch-clamp recordings showed qualitatively similar behavior: in nearly all neurons throughout the SC, rapid spikes were followed by an ADP. Ionic and pharmacological manipulations along with experiments with current and voltage steps indicated that the ADP of SC neurons arises from Na(+) current that either persists or resurges following Na(+) channel inactivation at the end of an action potential. Comparisons of pharmacological properties and frequency dependence revealed a clear parallel between patch-clamp recordings and voltage imaging experiments, indicating a common underlying membrane mechanism for the ADP in both single neurons and populations. The ADP can initiate repetitive spiking at intervals consistent with the frequency of persistent activity in the SC. These results indicate that SC neurons have intrinsic membrane properties that can contribute to electrical activity that underlies shifts of attention and decision making. PMID:27075543

  6. HEBBIAN MECHANISMS HELP EXPLAIN DEVELOPMENT OF MULTISENSORY INTEGRATION IN THE SUPERIOR COLLICULUS: A NEURAL NETWORK MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Cuppini, C.; Magosso, E.; Rowland, B.; Stein, B.; Ursino, M.

    2013-01-01

    The superior colliculus (SC) integrates relevant sensory information (visual, auditory, somatosensory) from several cortical and subcortical structures, to program orientation responses to external events. However, this capacity is not present at birth, and it is acquired only through interactions with cross-modal events during maturation. Mathematical models provide a quantitative framework, valuable in helping to clarify the specific neural mechanisms underlying the maturation of the multisensory integration in the SC. We extended a neural network model of the adult SC (Cuppini et al. 2010) to describe the development of this phenomenon starting from an immature state, based on known or suspected anatomy and physiology, in which: 1) AES afferents are present but weak, 2) Responses are driven from non-AES afferents, and 3) The visual inputs have a marginal spatial tuning. Sensory experience was modelled by repeatedly presenting modality-specific and cross-modal stimuli. Synapses in the network were modified by simple Hebbian learning rules. As a consequence of this exposure, 1) Receptive fields shrink and come into spatial register, and 2) SC neurons gained the adult characteristic integrative properties: enhancement, depression, and inverse effectiveness. Importantly, the unique architecture of the model guided the development so that integration became dependent on the relationship between the cortical input and the SC. Manipulations of the statistics of the experience during the development changed the integrative profiles of the neurons, and results matched well with the results of physiological studies. PMID:23011260

  7. Adaptive visual and auditory map alignment in barn owl superior colliculus and its neuromorphic implementation.

    PubMed

    Huo, Juan; Murray, Alan; Wei, Dongqing

    2012-09-01

    Adaptation is one of the most important phenomena in biology. A young barn owl can adapt to imposed environmental changes, such as artificial visual distortion caused by wearing a prism. This adjustment process has been modeled mathematically and the model replicates the sensory map realignment of barn owl superior colliculus (SC) through axonogenesis and synaptogenesis. This allows the biological mechanism to be transferred to an artificial computing system and thereby imbue it with a new form of adaptability to the environment. The model is demonstrated in a real-time robot environment. Results of the experiments are compared with and without prism distortion of vision, and show improved adaptability for the robot. However, the computation speed of the embedded system in the robot is slow. A digital and analog mixed signal very-large-scale integration (VLSI) circuit has been fabricated to implement adaptive sensory pathway changes derived from the SC model at higher speed. VLSI experimental results are consistent with simulation results. PMID:24807931

  8. Altered map of visual space in the superior colliculus of mice lacking early retinal waves.

    PubMed

    Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D; Hofer, Sonja B; Creutzfeldt, Claire; Cloëz-Tayarani, Isabelle; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Bonhoeffer, Tobias; Hübener, Mark

    2005-07-20

    During the development of the mammalian retinocollicular projection, a coarse retinotopic map is set up by the graded distribution of axon guidance molecules. Subsequent refinement of the initially diffuse projection has been shown to depend on the spatially correlated firing of retinal ganglion cells. In this scheme, the abolition of patterned retinal activity is not expected to influence overall retinotopic organization, but this has not been investigated. We used optical imaging of intrinsic signals to visualize the complete retinotopic map in the superior colliculus (SC) of mice lacking early retinal waves, caused by the deletion of the beta2 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. As expected from previous anatomical studies in the SC of beta2(-/-) mice, regions activated by individual visual stimuli were much larger and had less sharp borders than those in wild-type mice. Importantly, however, we also found systematic distortions of the entire retinotopic map: the map of visual space was expanded anteriorly and compressed posteriorly. Thus, patterned neuronal activity in the early retina has a substantial influence on the coarse retinotopic organization of the SC. PMID:16033902

  9. Direct projections from the dorsal premotor cortex to the superior colliculus in the macaque (macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Distler, Claudia; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter

    2015-11-01

    The dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) is part of the cortical network for arm movements during reach-related behavior. Here we investigate the neuronal projections from the PMd to the midbrain superior colliculus (SC), which also contains reach-related neurons, to investigate how the SC integrates into a cortico-subcortical network responsible for initiation and modulation of goal-directed arm movements. By using anterograde transport of neuronal tracers, we found that the PMd projects most strongly to the deep layers of the lateral part of the SC and the underlying reticular formation corresponding to locations where reach-related neurons have been recorded, and from where descending tectofugal projections arise. A somewhat weaker projection targets the intermediate layers of the SC. By contrast, terminals originating from prearcuate area 8 mainly project to the intermediate layers of the SC. Thus, this projection pattern strengthens the view that different compartments in the SC are involved in the control of gaze and in the control or modulation of reaching movements. The PMD-SC projection assists in the participation of the SC in the skeletomotor system and provides the PMd with a parallel path to elicit forelimb movements.

  10. Development of hyperactivity after acoustic trauma in the guinea pig inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Mulders, W H A M; Robertson, D

    2013-04-01

    The time of onset of hyperactivity (increased spontaneous firing rates) was investigated by single neuron recording in the inferior colliculus (IC) of guinea pigs subjected to unilateral acoustic trauma (exposure to a loud 10 kHz tone). Hyperactivity was present by 12 h post acoustic trauma whereas data obtained within approximately 4 h of the cessation of acoustic trauma found no evidence of hyperactivity. These data suggest that hyperactivity in the IC begins at some time between 4 and 12 h post trauma and is a relatively rapid plastic event beginning within hours rather than days post cochlear trauma. This is consistent with results reported in the cat auditory cortex (Norena and Eggermont, 2003). Hyperactivity did not show any further systematic increase between 12 h and up to 2 weeks post acoustic trauma. At recovery times of 12 and 24 h hyperactivity was widespread across most regions of the IC but at longer recovery times, it became progressively more restricted to ventral regions corresponding to the regions of the cochlea where there was persistent damage. PMID:23276730

  11. First spike latency code for interaural phase difference discrimination in the guinea pig inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Oran; Shackleton, Trevor M; Nelken, Israel; Palmer, Alan R; Shamir, Maoz

    2011-06-22

    First spike latency has been suggested as a source of the information required for fast discrimination tasks. However, the accuracy of such a mechanism has not been analyzed rigorously. Here, we investigate the utility of first spike latency for encoding information about the location of a sound source, based on the responses of inferior colliculus (IC) neurons in the guinea pig to interaural phase differences (IPDs). First spike latencies of many cells in the guinea pig IC show unimodal tuning to stimulus IPD. We investigated the discrimination accuracy of a simple latency code that estimates stimulus IPD from the preferred IPD of the single cell that fired first. Surprisingly, despite being based on only a single spike, the accuracy of the latency code is comparable to that of a conventional rate code computed over the entire response. We show that spontaneous firing limits the capacity of the latency code to accumulate information from large neural populations. This detrimental effect can be overcome by generalizing the latency code to estimate the stimulus IPD from the preferred IPDs of the population of cells that fired the first n spikes. In addition, we show that a good estimate of the neural response time to the stimulus, which can be obtained from the responses of the cells whose response latency is invariant to stimulus identity, limits the detrimental effect of spontaneous firing. Thus, a latency code may provide great improvement in response speed at a small cost to the accuracy of the decision. PMID:21697370

  12. GATA2 IS REQUIRED FOR MIGRATION AND DIFFERENTIATION OF RETINORECIPIENT NEURONS IN THE SUPERIOR COLLICULUS

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Ryan T.; Greene, Lloyd A.

    2011-01-01

    The superior colliculus (SC)/optic tectum of the dorsal mesencephalon plays a major role in responses to visual input, yet regulation of neuronal differentiation within this layered structure is only partially understood. Here, we show that the zinc finger transcription factor Gata2 is required for normal SC development. Starting at e15 (corresponding to the times at which neurons of the outer and intermediate layers of the SC are generated), Gata2 is transiently expressed in the rat embryonic dorsal mesencephalon within a restricted region between proliferating cells of the ventricular zone and the deepest neuronal layers of the developing SC. The Gata2 positive cells are post-mitotic and lack markers of differentiated neurons, but express markers for immature neuronal precursors including Ascl1 and Pax3/7. In utero electroporation with Gata2 shRNAs at e16 into cells along the dorsal mesencephalic ventricle interferes with their normal migration into the SC and maintains them in a state characterized by retention of Pax3 expression and the absence of mature neuronal markers. Collectively, these findings indicate that Gata2 plays a required role in the transition of post-mitotic neuronal precursor cells of the retinorecipient layers of the SC into mature neurons and that loss of Gata2 arrests them at an intermediate stage of differentiation. PMID:21430145

  13. Brain derived neurotrophic factor keeps pattern electroretinogram from dropping after superior colliculus lesion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin-Bin; Yang, Xu; Ding, Huai-Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine if brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) could offer protention to retinal ganglion cells following a superior colliculus (SC) lesion in mice using pattern electroretinogram (PERG) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a measures of ganglion cell response and retinal health. METHODS Seven C57BL/6J mice with BDNF protection were tested with PERG and OCT before and after SC lesions. RESULTS Compared with baseline PERG, the amplitude of PERG decreased 11.7% after SC lesions, but not significantly (P>0.05). Through fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis of the PERGs before and after SC lesions, it was found that dominant frequency of PERGs stayed unchanged, suggesting that the ganglion cells of the retina remained relatively healthy inspite of damage to the ends of the ganglion cell axons. Also, OCT showed no changes in retinal thickness after lesions. CONCLUSION It was concluded that BDNF is essential component of normal retinal and helps retina keeping normal function. While retina lack of BDNF, ex vivo resource of BDNF provides protection to the sick retina. It implies that BDNF is a kind therapeutic neurotrophic factor to retina neurodegeneration diseases, such as glaucoma, age related macular degeneration. PMID:27158604

  14. Spatio-temporal receptive field properties of cells in the rat superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Prévost, François; Lepore, Franco; Guillemot, Jean-Paul

    2007-04-20

    Although the rat is widely used in neurobehavioural research, the spatio-temporal receptive field properties of neurons in superficial layers of the superior colliculus are relatively unknown. Extracellular recordings were carried out in anesthetized Long Evans rats. Neurons in these layers had simple-like and complex-like receptive fields (RFs). Most cells (67%) had RFs showing band-pass and low-pass spatial frequency (SF) tuning profiles. Spatial band-pass profiles showed low optimal SF (mean=0.03 c/deg), low spatial resolution (mean=0.18 c/deg) and large spatial bandwidths (mean=2.3 octaves). More than two-thirds of the RFs (71%) were selective to orientation and only 11% were clearly direction selective. Nearly two-thirds of cells (68%) had band-pass temporal frequency (TF) tuning profiles with narrow bandwidths (mean=1.7 oct.) whereas the others showed low-pass TF tuning profiles. Temporal band-pass profiles had low optimal TFs (mean=3.5 c/s). Although some cells showed relatively low contrast thresholds (6%), most cells only responded to high contrast values (mean=38.2%). These results show that the spatial resolution of collicular cells is poor and that they respond mainly to highly contrasted moving stimuli.

  15. Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Deactivation in Monkeys Reduces Preparatory Beta and Gamma Power in the Superior Colliculus.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jason L; Koval, Michael J; Womelsdorf, Thilo; Lomber, Stephen G; Everling, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Cognitive control requires the selection and maintenance of task-relevant stimulus-response associations, or rules. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has been implicated by lesion, functional imaging, and neurophysiological studies to be involved in encoding rules, but the mechanisms by which it modulates other brain areas are poorly understood. Here, the functional relationship of the DLPFC with the superior colliculus (SC) was investigated by bilaterally deactivating the DLPFC while recording local field potentials (LFPs) in the SC in monkeys performing an interleaved pro- and antisaccade task. Event-related LFPs showed differences between pro- and antisaccades and responded prominently to stimulus presentation. LFP power after stimulus onset was higher for correct saccades than erroneous saccades. Deactivation of the DLPFC did not affect stimulus onset related LFP activity, but reduced high beta (20-30 Hz) and high gamma (60-150 Hz) power during the preparatory period for both pro- and antisaccades. Spike rate during the preparatory period was positively correlated with gamma power and this relationship was attenuated by DLPFC deactivation. These results suggest that top-down control of the SC by the DLPFC may be mediated by beta oscillations.

  16. Alignment of multimodal sensory input in the superior colliculus through a gradient-matching mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Phan, An; Yamada, Jena; Feldheim, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The superior colliculus (SC) is a midbrain structure that integrates visual, somatosensory and auditory inputs to direct head and eye movements. Each of these modalities is topographically mapped and aligned with the others to ensure precise behavioral responses to multimodal stimuli. While it is clear that neural activity is instructive for topographic alignment of inputs from the visual cortex (V1) and auditory system with retinal axons in the SC, there is also evidence that activity-independent mechanisms are used to establish topographic alignment between modalities. Here, we show that the topography of the projection from primary somatosensory cortex (S1) to the SC is established during the first postnatal week. Unlike V1-SC projections, the S1-SC projection does not bifurcate when confronted with a duplicated retinocollicular map, showing that retinal input in the SC does not influence the topography of the S1-SC projection. However, S1-SC topography is disrupted in mice lacking ephrins-As, which we find are expressed in graded patterns along with their binding partners, the EphA4 and EphA7, in both S1 and the somatosensory recipient layer of the SC. Taken together, these data support a model in which somatosensory inputs into the SC map topographically and establish alignment with visual inputs in the SC using a gradient-matching mechanism. PMID:22496572

  17. Excitatory Synaptic Feedback from the Motor Layer to the Sensory Layers of the Superior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Ghitani, Nima; Bayguinov, Peter O.; Vokoun, Corinne R.; McMahon, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Neural circuits that translate sensory information into motor commands are organized in a feedforward manner converting sensory information into motor output. The superior colliculus (SC) follows this pattern as it plays a role in converting visual information from the retina and visual cortex into motor commands for rapid eye movements (saccades). Feedback from movement to sensory regions is hypothesized to play critical roles in attention, visual image stability, and saccadic suppression, but in contrast to feedforward pathways, motor feedback to sensory regions has received much less attention. The present study used voltage imaging and patch-clamp recording in slices of rat SC to test the hypothesis of an excitatory synaptic pathway from the motor layers of the SC back to the sensory superficial layers. Voltage imaging revealed an extensive depolarization of the superficial layers evoked by electrical stimulation of the motor layers. A pharmacologically isolated excitatory synaptic potential in the superficial layers depended on stimulus strength in the motor layers in a manner consistent with orthodromic excitation. Patch-clamp recording from neurons in the sensory layers revealed excitatory synaptic potentials in response to glutamate application in the motor layers. The location, size, and morphology of responsive neurons indicated they were likely to be narrow-field vertical cells. This excitatory projection from motor to sensory layers adds an important element to the circuitry of the SC and reveals a novel feedback pathway that could play a role in enhancing sensory responses to attended targets as well as visual image stabilization. PMID:24828636

  18. Human inferior colliculus activity relates to individual differences in spoken language learning

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Kraus, Nina

    2012-01-01

    A challenge to learning words of a foreign language is encoding nonnative phonemes, a process typically attributed to cortical circuitry. Using multimodal imaging methods [functional magnetic resonance imaging-adaptation (fMRI-A) and auditory brain stem responses (ABR)], we examined the extent to which pretraining pitch encoding in the inferior colliculus (IC), a primary midbrain structure, related to individual variability in learning to successfully use nonnative pitch patterns to distinguish words in American English-speaking adults. fMRI-A indexed the efficiency of pitch representation localized to the IC, whereas ABR quantified midbrain pitch-related activity with millisecond precision. In line with neural “sharpening” models, we found that efficient IC pitch pattern representation (indexed by fMRI) related to superior neural representation of pitch patterns (indexed by ABR), and consequently more successful word learning following sound-to-meaning training. Our results establish a critical role for the IC in speech-sound representation, consistent with the established role for the IC in the representation of communication signals in other animal models. PMID:22131377

  19. Unilateral eye enucleation in adult rats causes neuronal loss in the contralateral superior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, S. A.; BEDI, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    Several studies have reported the morphological changes induced by unilateral enucleation during early neonatal life on the developing visual system. This study has examined cellular changes in the superior colliculi by removal of a single eye in adult rats. Anaesthetised male hooded rats aged 90 d had their right eyes removed. Groups of nonenucleated control and enucleated rats were killed when aged either 150 or 390 d. The brains were removed and both the right and left superior colliculi dissected out. The volume of the stratum griseum superficiale (SGS) within these colliculi was estimated stereologically by light microscopy, as well as the numerical density and total number of neurons within this cell layer. The volume of the cell layer was reduced by about 40% on the side contralateral to the enucleated eye but not on the ipsilateral side at both survival periods examined. The numerical density of neurons within the SGS was unaffected by the enucleation so that the colliculi contralateral to the enucleated eye showed a substantial loss of neurons within this cell layer. This study demonstrates the importance of the retinal ganglion cell input, even in adult animals, for maintaining the viability of neurons in the SGS layer of the superior colliculus. PMID:9183672

  20. Development of hyperactivity after acoustic trauma in the guinea pig inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Mulders, W H A M; Robertson, D

    2013-04-01

    The time of onset of hyperactivity (increased spontaneous firing rates) was investigated by single neuron recording in the inferior colliculus (IC) of guinea pigs subjected to unilateral acoustic trauma (exposure to a loud 10 kHz tone). Hyperactivity was present by 12 h post acoustic trauma whereas data obtained within approximately 4 h of the cessation of acoustic trauma found no evidence of hyperactivity. These data suggest that hyperactivity in the IC begins at some time between 4 and 12 h post trauma and is a relatively rapid plastic event beginning within hours rather than days post cochlear trauma. This is consistent with results reported in the cat auditory cortex (Norena and Eggermont, 2003). Hyperactivity did not show any further systematic increase between 12 h and up to 2 weeks post acoustic trauma. At recovery times of 12 and 24 h hyperactivity was widespread across most regions of the IC but at longer recovery times, it became progressively more restricted to ventral regions corresponding to the regions of the cochlea where there was persistent damage.

  1. Separate visual signals for saccade initiation during target selection in the primate superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    White, Brian J; Munoz, Douglas P

    2011-02-01

    The primary function of the superior colliculus (SC) is to orient the visual system toward behaviorally relevant stimuli defined by features such as color. However, a longstanding view has held that visual activity in the SC arises exclusively from achromatic pathways. Recently, we reported evidence that the primate SC is highly sensitive to signals originating from chromatic pathways, but these signals are delayed relative to luminance signals (White et al., 2009). Here, we describe a functional consequence of this difference in visual arrival time on the processes leading to target selection and saccade initiation. Two rhesus monkeys performed a simple color-singleton selection task in which stimuli carried a chromatic component only (target and distractors were isoluminant with the background, but differed in chromaticity) or a combined chromatic-achromatic component (36% luminance contrast added equally to all stimuli). Although visual responses were delayed in the chromatic-only relative to the combined chromatic-achromatic condition, SC neurons discriminated the target from distractors at approximately the same time provided stimulus chromaticity was held constant. However, saccades were triggered sooner, and with more errors, with the chromatic-achromatic condition, suggesting that luminance signals associated with these stimuli increased the probability of triggering a saccade before the target color was adequately discriminated. These results suggest that separate mechanisms may independently influence the saccadic command in the SC, one linked to the arrival time of pertinent visual signals, and another linked to the output of the visual selection process. PMID:21289164

  2. Transient Gain Adjustment in the Inferior Colliculus is Serotonin- and Calcium-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Miko, Ilona J.; Sanes, Dan H.

    2009-01-01

    In the inferior colliculus (IC), a brief period of acoustic conditioning can transiently enhance evoked discharge rate. The cellular basis of this phenomenon was assessed with whole cell current-clamp recordings in a gerbil IC brain slice preparation. The current needed to elicit a single action potential was first established for each neuron. A 5s synaptic stimulus train was delivered to the lateral lemniscus (LL), and followed immediately by the initial current pulse to assess a change in postsynaptic gain. The majority of IC neurons (66%) displayed an increase in current-evoked action potentials (positive gain). Despite the blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors, this effect was correlated with membrane depolarization that occurred during the synaptic train. The postsynaptic mechanism for positive gain was examined by selective blockade of specific neurotransmitter receptors. Gain in action potentials was enhanced by antagonists of metabotropic glutamate, acetylcholine, GABAA and glycine receptors. In contrast, the gain was blocked or reduced by an antagonist to ionotropic serotonin receptors (5-HT3R). Blocking voltage-activated calcium channels with verapamil also reduced the effect. These results suggest that 5-HT3R activation, coupled with increased intracellular calcium, can transiently alter postsynaptic excitability in IC neurons. PMID:19232535

  3. Activity in the human superior colliculus relating to endogenous saccade preparation and execution.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Michele; Smith, Andrew T; Walker, Robin

    2015-08-01

    In recent years a small number of studies have applied functional imaging techniques to investigate visual responses in the human superior colliculus (SC), but few have investigated its oculomotor functions. Here, in two experiments, we examined activity associated with endogenous saccade preparation. We used 3-T fMRI to record the hemodynamic activity in the SC while participants were either preparing or executing saccadic eye movements. Our results showed that not only executing a saccade (as previously shown) but also preparing a saccade produced an increase in the SC hemodynamic activity. The saccade-related activity was observed in the contralateral and to a lesser extent the ipsilateral SC. A second experiment further examined the contralateral mapping of saccade-related activity with a larger range of saccade amplitudes. Increased activity was again observed in both the contralateral and ipsilateral SC that was evident for large as well as small saccades. This suggests that the ipsilateral component of the increase in BOLD is not due simply to small-amplitude saccades producing bilateral activity in the foveal fixation zone. These studies provide the first evidence of presaccadic preparatory activity in the human SC and reveal that fMRI can detect activity consistent with that of buildup neurons found in the deeper layers of the SC in studies of nonhuman primates.

  4. Spatially selective auditory responses in the superior colliculus of the echolocating bat.

    PubMed

    Valentine, D E; Moss, C F

    1997-03-01

    When a bat approaches a target, it continuously modifies its echolocation sounds and relies on incoming echo information to shape the characteristics of its subsequent sonar cries. In addition, acoustic information about the azimuth and elevation of a sonar target elicits orienting movements of the head and pinnae toward the sound source. This requires a common sensorimotor interface, where echo information is used to guide motor behaviors. Using single-unit neurophysiological methods and free-field auditory stimulation, we present data on biologically relevant specializations in the superior colliculus (SC) of the bat for orientation by sonar. In the bat's SC, two classes of spatially tuned neurons are distinguished by their sensitivity to echoes. One population shows facilitated, delay-tuned responses to pairs of sounds, simulating sonar emissions and echoes. Delay tuning, related to encoding target range, may play a role in guiding motor responses in echolocation, because the bat adjusts its emissions with changes in target distance. The delay-facilitated response depends on the direction of stimulation and on the temporal relationship between the simulated emission and echo in the sound pair, suggesting that this class of neurons represents the location of a target in three dimensions. A second population encodes the target in two dimensions, azimuth and elevation, and does not show a facilitated response to echoes delivered from any locus. Encoding of azimuth and elevation may be important for directing head aim, and this class may function in transforming auditory spatial information into signals used to guide acoustic orientation.

  5. FM signals produce robust paradoxical latency shifts in the bat's inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinming; Galazyuk, Alexander V; Feng, Albert S

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies in echolocating bats, Myotis lucifugus, showed that paradoxical latency shift (PLS) is essential for neural computation of target range and that a number of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) exhibit unit-specific PLS (characterized by longer first-spike latency at higher sound levels) in response to tone pulses at the unit's best frequency. The present study investigated whether or not frequency-modulated (FM) pulses that mimic the bat's echolocation sonar signals were equally effective in eliciting PLS. For two-thirds of PLS neurons in the IC, both FM and tone pulses could elicit PLS, but only FM pulses consistently produced unit-specific PLS. For the remainder of PLS neurons, only FM pulses effectively elicited PLS; these cells showed either no PLS or no response, to tone pulses. PLS neurons generally showed more pronounced PLS in response to narrow-band FM (each sweeping 20 kHz in 2 ms) pulse that contained the unit's best frequency. In addition, almost all PLS neurons showed duration-independent PLS to FM pulses, but the same units exhibited duration-dependent PLS to tone pulses. Taken together, when compared to tone pulses, FM stimuli can provide more reliable estimates of target range.

  6. Sub-threshold activation of the superior colliculus drives saccade motor learning

    PubMed Central

    Soetedjo, Robijanto; Fuchs, Albert F.; Kojima, Yoshiko

    2010-01-01

    How the brain learns and maintains accurate precision movements is currently unknown. At times throughout life, rapid gaze shifts (saccades) become inaccurate, but the brain makes gradual adjustments so they again stop on target. Previously, we showed that complex spikes (CSs) in Purkinje cells of the oculomotor cerebellum report the direction and amplitude by which saccades are in error. Anatomical studies indicate that this error signal could originate in the superior colliculus (SC). Here we deliver sub-threshold electrical stimulation of the SC after the saccade lands to signal an apparent error. The size of saccades in the same direction as the simulated error gradually increase; those in the opposite direction decrease. The electrically-adapted saccades endure after stimulation is discontinued, exhibit an adaptation field, can undergo changes in direction and depend on error timing. These electrically-induced adaptations were virtually identical to those produced by the visually-induced adaptations that we report here for comparable visual errors in the same monkeys. Therefore, our experiments reveal that an additional role for the SC in the generation of saccades is to provide a vector error signal that drives dysmetric saccades to adapt. Moreover, the characteristics of the electrically-induced adaptation reflect those of error-related CS activity in the oculomotor cerebellum, suggesting that CS activity serves as the learning signal. We speculate that CS activity may serve as the error signal that drives other kinds of motor learning as well. PMID:19955374

  7. Hebbian mechanisms help explain development of multisensory integration in the superior colliculus: a neural network model.

    PubMed

    Cuppini, C; Magosso, E; Rowland, B; Stein, B; Ursino, M

    2012-12-01

    The superior colliculus (SC) integrates relevant sensory information (visual, auditory, somatosensory) from several cortical and subcortical structures, to program orientation responses to external events. However, this capacity is not present at birth, and it is acquired only through interactions with cross-modal events during maturation. Mathematical models provide a quantitative framework, valuable in helping to clarify the specific neural mechanisms underlying the maturation of the multisensory integration in the SC. We extended a neural network model of the adult SC (Cuppini et al., Front Integr Neurosci 4:1-15, 2010) to describe the development of this phenomenon starting from an immature state, based on known or suspected anatomy and physiology, in which: (1) AES afferents are present but weak, (2) Responses are driven from non-AES afferents, and (3) The visual inputs have a marginal spatial tuning. Sensory experience was modeled by repeatedly presenting modality-specific and cross-modal stimuli. Synapses in the network were modified by simple Hebbian learning rules. As a consequence of this exposure, (1) Receptive fields shrink and come into spatial register, and (2) SC neurons gained the adult characteristic integrative properties: enhancement, depression, and inverse effectiveness. Importantly, the unique architecture of the model guided the development so that integration became dependent on the relationship between the cortical input and the SC. Manipulations of the statistics of the experience during the development changed the integrative profiles of the neurons, and results matched well with the results of physiological studies. PMID:23011260

  8. Negative temporal summation of the responses to pairs of tone bursts in albino mice inferior colliculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibikov, Nikolay G.; Cai, Chen Qi; Jie, Tang

    2003-10-01

    The extracellular activities of single units in an inferior colliculus of narcotized albino mice have been studied. As a stimuli pairs of best frequency (BF) tone bursts with different duration have been used and forward masking has been studied. The test tone usually has a 40 ms duration at intensity 5 dB above threshold. The intensity and duration of the masker could be changed. It was shown that the forward masking essentially depends upon the duration of the first burst. In many cases, the negative temporal summation can be seen. The increase in the duration of first burst (or masker) leads to the decrease in the whole response. Moreover, the BF tone burst which did not evoke any spike response could inhibit the response to the second (test) tone in some cases. Therefore in many units the inhibitory threshold was lower than the excitatory threshold even at the best frequency. The local application of bicuculline through a multibarrel-electrode increased the pulse activity considerably. However, the effect of forward masking usually left even after an inhibitory antagonist (bicuculline) application. [Work supported by grants 39970251 from NSFC, T010360056 from the Foreign Expert Bureau of the State Council of China, and 02-04-3900 from RFBR-NSFC.

  9. Inhibition shapes selectivity to vocalizations in the inferior colliculus of awake mice

    PubMed Central

    Mayko, Zachary M.; Roberts, Patrick D.; Portfors, Christine V.

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) is a major center for integration of auditory information as it receives ascending projections from a variety of brainstem nuclei as well as descending projections from the thalamus and auditory cortex. The ascending projections are both excitatory and inhibitory and their convergence at the IC results in a microcircuitry that is important for shaping responses to simple, binaural, and modulated sounds in the IC. Here, we examined the role inhibition plays in shaping selectivity to vocalizations in the IC of awake, normal-hearing adult mice (CBA/CaJ strain). Neurons in the IC of mice show selectivity in their responses to vocalizations, and we hypothesized that this selectivity is created by inhibitory microcircuitry in the IC. We compared single unit responses in the IC to pure tones and a variety of ultrasonic mouse vocalizations before and after iontophoretic application of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and glycine receptor (GlyR) antagonists. The most pronounced effects of blocking GABAAR and GlyR on IC neurons were to increase spike rates and broaden excitatory frequency tuning curves in response to pure tone stimuli, and to decrease selectivity to vocalizations. Thus, inhibition plays an important role in creating selectivity to vocalizations in the IC. PMID:23087616

  10. Periodotopy in the gerbil inferior colliculus: local clustering rather than a gradient map

    PubMed Central

    Schnupp, Jan W. H.; Garcia-Lazaro, Jose A.; Lesica, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Periodicities in sound waveforms are widespread, and shape important perceptual attributes of sound including rhythm and pitch. Previous studies have indicated that, in the inferior colliculus (IC), a key processing stage in the auditory midbrain, neurons tuned to different periodicities might be arranged along a periodotopic axis which runs approximately orthogonal to the tonotopic axis. Here we map out the topography of frequency and periodicity tuning in the IC of gerbils in unprecedented detail, using pure tones and different periodic sounds, including click trains, sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) noise and iterated rippled noise. We found that while the tonotopic map exhibited a clear and highly reproducible gradient across all animals, periodotopic maps varied greatly across different types of periodic sound and from animal to animal. Furthermore, periodotopic gradients typically explained only about 10% of the variance in modulation tuning between recording sites. However, there was a strong local clustering of periodicity tuning at a spatial scale of ca. 0.5 mm, which also differed from animal to animal. PMID:26379508

  11. Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data.

    1993-08-18

    Version 00 The Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data file PNESD contains the numerical data and the related bibliography for the differential elastic cross sections, polarization and integral nonelastic cross sections for elastic proton-nucleus scattering.

  12. SUMOrganization of the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Heun, Patrick

    2007-06-01

    In the eukaryotic nucleus, gene expression and maintenance of genome integrity are tightly controlled at multiple levels, from the molecular details to the higher-order structure of the genome. The nucleus contains spatially and functionally distinct compartments in which these fundamental processes are carried out. While the dynamics and functions of some nuclear subdomains, like the nucleolus, have been well studied, other domains, like the PML-nuclear bodies, remain enigmatic. Recent evidence has now implicated the SUMOylation pathway as an important player in subnuclear architecture, particularly in the assembly of PML-nuclear bodies. Related functions include the organization of chromatin loops and maintenance of rDNA repeat stability. Consequently, complete loss of SUMO modification profoundly affects nuclear organization and cell viability.

  13. Antinucleon-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical results on anti p-nucleus interactions are reviewed. We focus on determinations of the anti p optical potential from elastic scattering, the use of (anti p, anti p') inelastic scattering to reveal aspects of the spin-isospin dependence of N anti N amplitudes, and some puzzling features of (anti p, anti n) charge exchange reactions on nuclei. 47 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Under Pressure: Mechanical Stress Management in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Belaadi, Néjma; Aureille, Julien; Guilluy, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Cells are constantly adjusting to the mechanical properties of their surroundings, operating a complex mechanochemical feedback, which hinges on mechanotransduction mechanisms. Whereas adhesion structures have been shown to play a central role in mechanotransduction, it now emerges that the nucleus may act as a mechanosensitive structure. Here, we review recent advances demonstrating that mechanical stress emanating from the cytoskeleton can activate pathways in the nucleus which eventually impact both its structure and the transcriptional machinery. PMID:27314389

  15. Development of neurotransmitter parameters in lateral geniculate body, superior colliculus and visual cortex of the albino rat.

    PubMed

    Kvale, I; Fosse, V M; Fonnum, F

    1983-04-01

    The postnatal development of some neurotransmitter parameters was measured in lateral geniculate body, superior colliculus and visual cortex of the rat. The following parameters were studied: (i) high-affinity uptake of L-glutamate or D-aspartate as markers for glutamergic neurons; (ii) high-affinity uptake of GABA, which reflects both glial and neuronal uptake of GABA; (iii) HA beta-alanine uptake as a marker for accumulation of GABA in glial structures; (iv) activity of glutamic acid decarboxylase which reflects GABAergic neurons; and (v) activity of choline acetyltransferase as a cholinergic marker. Km and Vmax were determined for high-affinity uptake of glutamate and GABA in newborn and adult animals. The possible glial influence on the uptake during development is discussed. In lateral geniculate body and visual cortex the HA glutamate uptake showed increasing activity from birth to adulthood, whereas in superior colliculus, the uptake was higher at birth, reaching a small significant peak after 12 days of age, and was then reduced to adult level. Km showed no such change between neonatal and adult animals. At birth, high-affinity GABA-uptake was similar to the adult level in superior colliculus and lateral geniculate body. In visual cortex, the uptake of GABA was 50% of adults. However, on day 15, the GABA uptake showed 2 to 3-fold higher activity in all regions when compared to adult level. Km for GABA uptake in neonatals and adults differed only in lateral geniculate body. High affinity uptake of beta-alanine was 50-80% lower in adults than in newborn rats. Glutamate decarboxylase activity, however, increased continuously in all 3 regions examined. This was true also for choline acetyltransferase.

  16. Extracellular Molecular Markers and Soma Size of Inhibitory Neurons: Evidence for Four Subtypes of GABAergic Cells in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Nichole L.; Young, Jesse W.; Mellott, Jeffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition plays an important role in shaping responses to stimuli throughout the CNS, including in the inferior colliculus (IC), a major hub in both ascending and descending auditory pathways. Subdividing GABAergic cells has furthered the understanding of inhibition in many brain areas, most notably in the cerebral cortex. Here, we seek the same understanding of subcortical inhibitory cell types by combining staining for two types of extracellular markers—perineuronal nets (PNs) and perisomatic rings of terminals expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) —to subdivide IC GABAergic cells in adult guinea pigs. We found four distinct groups of GABAergic cells in the IC: (1) those with both a PN and a VGLUT2 ring; (2) those with only a PN; (3) those with only a VGLUT2 ring; and (4) those with neither marker. In addition, these four GABAergic subtypes differ in their soma size and distribution among IC subdivisions. Functionally, the presence or absence of VGLUT2 rings indicates differences in inputs, whereas the presence or absence of PNs indicates different potential for plasticity and temporal processing. We conclude that these markers distinguish four GABAergic subtypes that almost certainly serve different roles in the processing of auditory stimuli within the IC. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT GABAergic inhibition plays a critical role throughout the brain. Identification of subclasses of GABAergic cells (up to 15 in the cerebral cortex) has furthered the understanding of GABAergic roles in circuit modulation. Inhibition is also prominent in the inferior colliculus, a subcortical hub in auditory pathways. Here, we use two extracellular markers to identify four distinct groups of GABAergic cells. Perineuronal nets and perisomatic rings of glutamatergic boutons are present in many subcortical areas and often are associated with inhibitory cells, but they have rarely been used to identify inhibitory subtypes. Our results further the understanding of

  17. Neuronal correlates of attention and its disengagement in the superior colliculus of rat

    PubMed Central

    Ngan, Nguyen H.; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Takamura, Yusaku; Tran, Anh H.; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Orienting attention to a new target requires prior disengagement of attention from the current focus. Previous studies indicate that the superior colliculus (SC) plays an important role in attention. However, recordings of responses of SC neurons during attentional disengagement have not yet been reported. Here, we analyzed rat SC neuronal activity during performance of an attention-shift task with and without disengagement. In this task, conditioned stimuli (CSs; right and/or left light-flash or sound) were sequentially presented. To obtain an intracranial self-stimulation reward, rats were required to lick a spout when an infrequent conditioned stimulus appeared (reward trials). In the disengagement reward trials, configural stimuli consisting of an infrequent stimulus and frequent stimulus in the former trials were presented; in the non-disengagement reward trials, only an infrequent stimulus was presented. Of the 186 SC neurons responding to the CSs, 41 showed stronger responses to the CSs in the disengagement reward trials than in the non-disengagement reward trials (disengagement-related neurons). Furthermore, lick latencies in the disengagement reward trials were negatively correlated with response magnitudes to the CSs in half of the disengagement-related neurons. These disengagement-related neurons were located mainly in the deep layers of the SC. Another 70 SC neurons responded to the CSs in both disengagement and non-disengagement reward trials, suggesting that these neurons were involved in attention engagement. Our results suggest complementary mechanisms of attentional shift based on two subpopulations of neurons in the SC. PMID:25741252

  18. Molecular features distinguish ten neuronal types in the mouse superficial superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Byun, Haewon; Kwon, Soohyun; Ahn, Hee-Jeong; Liu, Hong; Forrest, Douglas; Demb, Jonathan B; Kim, In-Jung

    2016-08-01

    The superior colliculus (SC) is a midbrain center involved in controlling head and eye movements in response to inputs from multiple sensory modalities. Visual inputs arise from both the retina and visual cortex and converge onto the superficial layer of the SC (sSC). Neurons in the sSC send information to deeper layers of the SC and to thalamic nuclei that modulate visually guided behaviors. Presently, our understanding of sSC neurons is impeded by a lack of molecular markers that define specific cell types. To better understand the identity and organization of sSC neurons, we took a systematic approach to investigate gene expression within four molecular families: transcription factors, cell adhesion molecules, neuropeptides, and calcium binding proteins. Our analysis revealed 12 molecules with distinct expression patterns in mouse sSC: cadherin 7, contactin 3, netrin G2, cadherin 6, protocadherin 20, retinoid-related orphan receptor β, brain-specific homeobox/POU domain protein 3b, Ets variant gene 1, substance P, somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, and parvalbumin. Double labeling experiments, by either in situ hybridization or immunostaining, demonstrated that the 12 molecular markers collectively define 10 different sSC neuronal types. The characteristic positions of these cell types divide the sSC into four distinct layers. The 12 markers identified here will serve as valuable tools to examine molecular mechanisms that regulate development of sSC neuronal types. These markers could also be used to examine the connections between specific cell types that form retinocollicular, corticocollicular, or colliculothalamic pathways. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2300-2321, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Neural correlates of target selection for reaching movements in superior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    McPeek, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that inactivation of the primate superior colliculus (SC) causes a deficit in target selection for arm-reaching movements when the reach target is located in the inactivated field (Song JH, Rafal RD, McPeek RM. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108: E1433–E1440, 2011). This is consistent with the notion that the SC is part of a general-purpose target selection network beyond eye movements. To understand better the role of SC activity in reach target selection, we examined how individual SC neurons in the intermediate layers discriminate a reach target from distractors. Monkeys reached to touch a color oddball target among distractors while maintaining fixation. We found that many SC neurons robustly discriminate the goal of the reaching movement before the onset of the reach even though no saccade is made. To identify these cells in the context of conventional SC cell classification schemes, we also recorded visual, delay-period, and saccade-related responses in a delayed saccade task. On average, SC cells that discriminated the reach target from distractors showed significantly higher visual and delay-period activity than nondiscriminating cells, but there was no significant difference in saccade-related activity. Whereas a majority of SC neurons that discriminated the reach target showed significant delay-period activity, all nondiscriminating cells lacked such activity. We also found that some cells without delay-period activity did discriminate the reach target from distractors. We conclude that the majority of intermediate-layer SC cells discriminate a reach target from distractors, consistent with the idea that the SC contains a priority map used for effector-independent target selection. PMID:25505107

  20. Defense-like behaviors evoked by pharmacological disinhibition of the superior colliculus in the primate

    PubMed Central

    DesJardin, Jacqueline T.; Holmes, Angela L.; Forcelli, Patrick A.; Cole, Claire E.; Gale, John T.; Wellman, Laurie L.; Gale, Karen; Malkova, Ludise

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of the intermediate and deep layers of superior colliculus (DLSC) in rodents evokes both tracking/pursuit (approach) and avoidance/flight (defensive) responses (Dean et al., 1989). These two classes of response are subserved by distinct output projections associated with lateral (approach) and medial (defensive) DLSC (Comoli et al., 2012). In nonhuman primates, DLSC has been examined only with respect to orienting/approach behaviors, especially eye movements, however, defense-like behaviors have not been reported. Here we examined the profile of behavioral responses to the activation of DLSC by unilateral intracerebral infusions of the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline methiodide (BIC), in nine freely moving macaques. Across animals, the most consistently evoked behavior was cowering (all animals), followed by increased vocalization and escape-like behaviors (seven animals), and attack of objects (three animals). The effects of BIC were dose-dependent within the range 2.5-14nmol (threshold dose of 4.6nmol). The behaviors and their latency to onset did not vary across different infusion sites within DLSC. Cowering and escape-like behaviors resembled the defense-like responses reported after DLSC stimulation in rats, but in the macaques these responses were evoked from both medial and lateral sites within DLSC. Our findings are unexpected in the context of an earlier theoretical perspective (Dean et al., 1989) that emphasized a preferential role of the primate DLSC for approach rather than defensive responses. Our data provide the first evidence for induction of defense-like behaviors by activation of DLSC in monkeys, suggesting that the role of DLSC in responding to threats is conserved across species. PMID:23283329

  1. Whisker motor cortex reorganization after superior colliculus output suppression in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Carlo; Maggiolini, Emma; Franchi, Gianfranco

    2013-10-01

    The effect of unilateral superior colliculus (SC) output suppression on the ipsilateral whisker motor cortex (WMC) was studied at different time points after tetrodotoxin and quinolinic acid injections, in adult rats. The WMC output was assessed by mapping the movement evoked by intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) and by recording the ICMS-evoked electromyographic (EMG) responses from contralateral whisker muscles. At 1 h after SC injections, the WMC showed: (i) a strong decrease in contralateral whisker sites, (ii) a strong increase in ipsilateral whisker sites and in ineffective sites, and (iii) a strong increase in threshold current values. At 6 h after injections, the WMC size had shrunk to 60% of the control value and forelimb representation had expanded into the lateral part of the normal WMC. Thereafter, the size of the WMC recovered, returning to nearly normal 12 h later (94% of control) and persisted unchanged over time (1-3 weeks). The ICMS-evoked EMG response area decreased at 1 h after SC lesion and had recovered its baseline value 12 h later. Conversely, the latency of ICMS-evoked EMG responses had increased by 1 h and continued to increase for as long as 3 weeks following the lesion. These findings provide physiological evidence that SC output suppression persistently withdrew the direct excitatory drive from whisker motoneurons and induced changes in the WMC. We suggest that the changes in the WMC are a form of reversible short-term reorganization that is induced by SC lesion. The persistent latency increase in the ICMS-evoked EMG response suggested that the recovery of basic WMC excitability did not take place with the recovery of normal explorative behaviour. PMID:23895333

  2. The superior colliculus is sensitive to gestalt-like stimulus configuration in hemispherectomy patients.

    PubMed

    Georgy, Loraine; Celeghin, Alessia; Marzi, Carlo A; Tamietto, Marco; Ptito, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Patients with cortical blindness following a lesion to the primary visual cortex (V1) may retain nonconscious visual abilities (blindsight). One intriguing, though largely unexplored question, is whether nonconscious vision in the blind hemifield of hemianopic patients can be sensitive to higher-order perceptual organization, and which V1-independent structure underlies such effect. To answer this question, we tested two rare hemianopic patients who had undergone hemispherectomy, and in whom the only post-chiasmatic visual structure left intact in the same side of the otherwise damaged hemisphere was the superior colliculus (SC). By using a variant of the redundant target effect (RTE), we presented single dots, patterns composed by the same dots organized in quadruple gestalt-like configurations, or patterns of four dots arranged in random configurations, either singly to the intact visual hemifield or bilaterally to both hemifields. As reported in a number of prior studies on blindsight patients, we found that bilateral stimulation yielded faster reaction times (RTs) than single stimulation of the intact field for all conditions (i.e., there was an implicit RTE). In addition to this effect, both patients showed a further speeding up of RTs when the gestalt-like, but not the random shape, quadruple patterns were projected to their blind hemifield during bilateral stimulation. Because other retino-recipient subcortical and cortical structures in the damaged hemisphere are absent, the SC on the lesioned side seems solely responsible for such an effect. The present results provide initial support to the notion that nonconscious vision might be sensitive to perceptual organization and stimulus configuration through the pivotal contribution of the SC, which can enhance the processing of gestalt-like or structured stimuli over meaningless or randomly assembled ones and translate them into facilitatory motor outputs.

  3. A Computational Model of Inferior Colliculus Responses to Amplitude Modulated Sounds in Young and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rabang, Cal F.; Parthasarathy, Aravindakshan; Venkataraman, Yamini; Fisher, Zachery L.; Gardner, Stephanie M.; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) receives ascending excitatory and inhibitory inputs from multiple sources, but how these auditory inputs converge to generate IC spike patterns is poorly understood. Simulating patterns of in vivo spike train data from cellular and synaptic models creates a powerful framework to identify factors that contribute to changes in IC responses, such as those resulting in age-related loss of temporal processing. A conductance-based single neuron IC model was constructed, and its responses were compared to those observed during in vivo IC recordings in rats. IC spike patterns were evoked using amplitude-modulated tone or noise carriers at 20–40 dB above threshold and were classified as low-pass, band-pass, band-reject, all-pass, or complex based on their rate modulation transfer function tuning shape. Their temporal modulation transfer functions were also measured. These spike patterns provided experimental measures of rate, vector strength, and firing pattern for comparison with model outputs. Patterns of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic convergence to IC neurons were based on anatomical studies and generalized input tuning for modulation frequency. Responses of modeled ascending inputs were derived from experimental data from previous studies. Adapting and sustained IC intrinsic models were created, with adaptation created via calcium-activated potassium currents. Short-term synaptic plasticity was incorporated into the model in the form of synaptic depression, which was shown to have a substantial effect on the magnitude and time course of the IC response. The most commonly observed IC response sub-types were recreated and enabled dissociation of inherited response properties from those that were generated in IC. Furthermore, the model was used to make predictions about the consequences of reduction in inhibition for age-related loss of temporal processing due to a reduction in GABA seen anatomically with age. PMID:23129994

  4. Spatial interactions in the superior colliculus predict saccade behavior in a neural field model.

    PubMed

    Marino, Robert A; Trappenberg, Thomas P; Dorris, Michael; Munoz, Douglas P

    2012-02-01

    During natural vision, eye movements are dynamically controlled by the combinations of goal-related top-down (TD) and stimulus-related bottom-up (BU) neural signals that map onto objects or locations of interest in the visual world. In primates, both BU and TD signals converge in many areas of the brain, including the intermediate layers of the superior colliculus (SCi), a midbrain structure that contains a retinotopically coded map for saccades. How TD and BU signals combine or interact within the SCi map to influence saccades remains poorly understood and actively debated. It has been proposed that winner-take-all competition between these signals occurs dynamically within this map to determine the next location for gaze. Here, we examine how TD and BU signals interact spatially within an artificial two-dimensional dynamic winner-take-all neural field model of the SCi to influence saccadic RT (SRT). We measured point images (spatially organized population activity on the SC map) physiologically to inform the TD and BU model parameters. In this model, TD and BU signals interacted nonlinearly within the SCi map to influence SRT via changes to the (1) spatial size or extent of individual signals, (2) peak magnitude of individual signals, (3) total number of competing signals, and (4) the total spatial separation between signals in the visual field. This model reproduced previous behavioral studies of TD and BU influences on SRT and accounted for multiple inconsistencies between them. This is achieved by demonstrating how, under different experimental conditions, the spatial interactions of TD and BU signals can lead to either increases or decreases in SRT. Our results suggest that dynamic winner-take-all modeling with local excitation and distal inhibition in two dimensions accurately reflects both the physiological activity within the SCi map and the behavioral changes in SRT that result from BU and TD manipulations. PMID:21942761

  5. Adult plasticity in multisensory neurons: Short-term experience-dependent changes in the superior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Liping; Stein, Barry E.; Rowland, Benjamin A.

    2010-01-01

    Multisensory neurons in the superior colliculus (SC) have the capability to integrate signals that belong to the same event, despite being conveyed by different senses. They develop this capability during early life as experience is gained with the statistics of cross-modal events. These adaptations prepare the SC to deal with the cross-modal events that are likely to be encountered throughout life. Here we found that neurons in the adult SC can also adapt to experience with sequentially-ordered cross-modal (visual-auditory or auditory-visual) cues, and that they do so over short periods of time (minutes), as if adapting to a particular stimulus configuration. This short-term plasticity was evident as a rapid increase in the magnitude and duration of responses to the first stimulus, and a shortening of the latency and increase in magnitude of the responses to the second stimulus when they are presented in sequence. The result was that the two responses appeared to merge. These changes were stable in the absence of experience with competing stimulus configurations, outlasted the exposure period, and could not be induced by equivalent experience with sequential within-modal (visual-visual or auditory-auditory) stimuli. A parsimonious interpretation is that the additional SC activity provided by the second stimulus became associated with, and increased the potency of, the afferents responding to the preceding stimulus. This interpretation is consistent with the principle of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), which may provide the basic mechanism for short term or long term plasticity and be operative in both the adult and neonatal SC. PMID:20016107

  6. Monaural and Binaural Inhibition Underlying Duration-Tuned Neurons in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Sayegh, Riziq; Casseday, John H.; Covey, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Duration-tuned neurons (DTNs) in the mammalian inferior colliculus (IC) arise from a combination of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Previous research has shown that the inhibition responsible for creating DTNs has a shorter latency than that of excitation and lasts longer than the stimulus duration. We used monotic and dichotic paired tone stimulation and recorded responses of DTNs from the IC of the bat to assess the relative contributions of each ear in forming duration-tuned circuits. The stimulus consisted of a short best duration (BD) excitatory tone and a longer duration nonexcitatory (NE) tone. In the monotic condition, when the BD and NE tones were presented to the contralateral ear and were sufficiently close in time, the NE tone always suppressed spikes evoked by the BD tone. In the dichotic condition, when the BD tone was presented to the contralateral ear and the NE tone to the ipsilateral ear, half of DTNs no longer showed spike suppression to the NE tone. Of those DTNs with suppression in both conditions, the latency of the inhibition was shorter and the duration of the inhibition was longer in the monotic condition. Therefore, in the monotic condition, DTNs received a contralaterally evoked inhibitory input that preceded the excitatory input to the same neuron. In the dichotic condition, DTNs received an ipsilaterally evoked inhibitory input that was weaker, longer in latency, and shorter in duration than the inputs from the contralateral ear. These findings indicate that the neural mechanisms that create DTNs in the IC are monaural. PMID:24403148

  7. Effect of current focusing on the sensitivity of inferior colliculus neurons to amplitude-modulated stimulation.

    PubMed

    George, Shefin S; Shivdasani, Mohit N; Fallon, James B

    2016-09-01

    In multichannel cochlear implants (CIs), current is delivered to specific electrodes along the cochlea in the form of amplitude-modulated pulse trains, to convey temporal and spectral cues. Our previous studies have shown that focused multipolar (FMP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation produce more restricted neural activation and reduced channel interactions in the inferior colliculus (IC) compared with traditional monopolar (MP) stimulation, suggesting that focusing of stimulation could produce better transmission of spectral information. The present study explored the capability of IC neurons to detect modulated CI stimulation with FMP and TP stimulation compared with MP stimulation. The study examined multiunit responses of IC neurons in acutely deafened guinea pigs by systematically varying the stimulation configuration, modulation depth, and stimulation level. Stimuli were sinusoidal amplitude-modulated pulse trains (carrier rate of 120 pulses/s). Modulation sensitivity was quantified by measuring modulation detection thresholds (MDTs), defined as the lowest modulation depth required to differentiate the response of a modulated stimulus from an unmodulated one. Whereas MP stimulation showed significantly lower MDTs than FMP and TP stimulation (P values <0.05) at stimulation ≤2 dB above threshold, all stimulation configurations were found to have similar modulation sensitivities at 4 dB above threshold. There was no difference found in modulation sensitivity between FMP and TP stimulation. The present study demonstrates that current focusing techniques such as FMP and TP can adequately convey amplitude modulation and are comparable to MP stimulation, especially at higher stimulation levels, although there may be some trade-off between spectral and temporal fidelity with current focusing stimulation. PMID:27306672

  8. Effect of background noise on neuronal coding of interaural level difference cues in rat inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Mokri, Yasamin; Worland, Kate; Ford, Mark; Rajan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Humans can accurately localize sounds even in unfavourable signal-to-noise conditions. To investigate the neural mechanisms underlying this, we studied the effect of background wide-band noise on neural sensitivity to variations in interaural level difference (ILD), the predominant cue for sound localization in azimuth for high-frequency sounds, at the characteristic frequency of cells in rat inferior colliculus (IC). Binaural noise at high levels generally resulted in suppression of responses (55.8%), but at lower levels resulted in enhancement (34.8%) as well as suppression (30.3%). When recording conditions permitted, we then examined if any binaural noise effects were related to selective noise effects at each of the two ears, which we interpreted in light of well-known differences in input type (excitation and inhibition) from each ear shaping particular forms of ILD sensitivity in the IC. At high signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), in most ILD functions (41%), the effect of background noise appeared to be due to effects on inputs from both ears, while for a large percentage (35.8%) appeared to be accounted for by effects on excitatory input. However, as SNR decreased, change in excitation became the dominant contributor to the change due to binaural background noise (63.6%). These novel findings shed light on the IC neural mechanisms for sound localization in the presence of continuous background noise. They also suggest that some effects of background noise on encoding of sound location reported to be emergent in upstream auditory areas can also be observed at the level of the midbrain. PMID:25865218

  9. Temporal features of spectral integration in the inferior colliculus: effects of stimulus duration and rise time.

    PubMed

    Gans, Donald; Sheykholeslami, Kianoush; Peterson, Diana Coomes; Wenstrup, Jeffrey

    2009-07-01

    This report examines temporal features of facilitation and suppression that underlie spectrally integrative responses to complex vocal signals. Auditory responses were recorded from 160 neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of awake mustached bats. Sixty-two neurons showed combination-sensitive facilitation: responses to best frequency (BF) signals were facilitated by well-timed signals at least an octave lower in frequency, in the range 16-31 kHz. Temporal features and strength of facilitation were generally unaffected by changes in duration of facilitating signals from 4 to 31 ms. Changes in stimulus rise time from 0.5 to 5.0 ms had little effect on facilitatory strength. These results suggest that low frequency facilitating inputs to high BF neurons have phasic-on temporal patterns and are responsive to stimulus rise times over the tested range. We also recorded from 98 neurons showing low-frequency (11-32 kHz) suppression of higher BF responses. Effects of changing duration were related to the frequency of suppressive signals. Signals<23 kHz usually evoked suppression sustained throughout signal duration. This and other features of such suppression are consistent with a cochlear origin that results in masking of responses to higher, near-BF signal frequencies. Signals in the 23- to 30-kHz range-frequencies in the first sonar harmonic-generally evoked phasic suppression of BF responses. This may result from neural inhibitory interactions within and below IC. In many neurons, we observed two or more forms of the spectral interactions described here. Thus IC neurons display temporally and spectrally complex responses to sound that result from multiple spectral interactions at different levels of the ascending auditory pathway.

  10. Neuronal responses to face-like and facial stimuli in the monkey superior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh Nui; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Hori, Etsuro; Maior, Rafael Souto; Tomaz, Carlos; Tran, Anh H.; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2014-01-01

    The superficial layers of the superior colliculus (sSC) appear to function as a subcortical visual pathway that bypasses the striate cortex for the rapid processing of coarse facial information. We investigated the responses of neurons in the monkey sSC during a delayed non-matching-to-sample (DNMS) task in which monkeys were required to discriminate among five categories of visual stimuli [photos of faces with different gaze directions, line drawings of faces, face-like patterns (three dark blobs on a bright oval), eye-like patterns, and simple geometric patterns]. Of the 605 sSC neurons recorded, 216 neurons responded to the visual stimuli. Among the stimuli, face-like patterns elicited responses with the shortest latencies. Low-pass filtering of the images did not influence the responses. However, scrambling of the images increased the responses in the late phase, and this was consistent with a feedback influence from upstream areas. A multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis of the population data indicated that the sSC neurons could separately encode face-like patterns during the first 25-ms period after stimulus onset, and stimulus categorization developed in the next three 25-ms periods. The amount of stimulus information conveyed by the sSC neurons and the number of stimulus-differentiating neurons were consistently higher during the 2nd to 4th 25-ms periods than during the first 25-ms period. These results suggested that population activity of the sSC neurons preferentially filtered face-like patterns with short latencies to allow for the rapid processing of coarse facial information and developed categorization of the stimuli in later phases through feedback from upstream areas. PMID:24672448

  11. Sharper, Stronger, Faster Upper Visual Field Representation in Primate Superior Colliculus.

    PubMed

    Hafed, Ziad M; Chen, Chih-Yang

    2016-07-11

    Visually guided behavior in three-dimensional environments entails handling immensely different sensory and motor conditions across retinotopic visual field locations: peri-personal ("near") space is predominantly viewed through the lower retinotopic visual field (LVF), whereas extra-personal ("far") space encompasses the upper visual field (UVF). Thus, when, say, driving a car, orienting toward the instrument cluster below eye level is different from scanning an upcoming intersection, even with similarly sized eye movements. However, an overwhelming assumption about visuomotor circuits for eye-movement exploration, like those in the primate superior colliculus (SC), is that they represent visual space in a purely symmetric fashion across the horizontal meridian. Motivated by ecological constraints on visual exploration of far space, containing small UVF retinal-image features, here we found a large, multi-faceted difference in the SC's representation of the UVF versus LVF. Receptive fields are smaller, more finely tuned to image spatial structure, and more sensitive to image contrast for neurons representing the UVF. Stronger UVF responses also occur faster. Analysis of putative synaptic activity revealed a particularly categorical change when the horizontal meridian is crossed, and our observations correctly predicted novel eye-movement effects. Despite its appearance as a continuous layered sheet of neural tissue, the SC contains functional discontinuities between UVF and LVF representations, paralleling a physical discontinuity present in cortical visual areas. Our results motivate the recasting of structure-function relationships in the visual system from an ecological perspective, and also exemplify strong coherence between brain-circuit organization for visually guided exploration and the nature of the three-dimensional environment in which we function. PMID:27291052

  12. Intralaminar stimulation of the inferior colliculus facilitates frequency-specific activation in the auditory cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allitt, B. J.; Benjaminsen, C.; Morgan, S. J.; Paolini, A. G.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Auditory midbrain implants (AMI) provide inadequate frequency discrimination for open set speech perception. AMIs that can take advantage of the tonotopic laminar of the midbrain may be able to better deliver frequency specific perception and lead to enhanced performance. Stimulation strategies that best elicit frequency specific activity need to be identified. This research examined the characteristic frequency (CF) relationship between regions of the auditory cortex (AC), in response to stimulated regions of the inferior colliculus (IC), comparing monopolar, and intralaminar bipolar electrical stimulation. Approach. Electrical stimulation using multi-channel micro-electrode arrays in the IC was used to elicit AC responses in anaesthetized male hooded Wistar rats. The rate of activity in AC regions with CFs within 3 kHz (CF-aligned) and unaligned CFs was used to assess the frequency specificity of responses. Main results. Both monopolar and bipolar IC stimulation led to CF-aligned neural activity in the AC. Altering the distance between the stimulation and reference electrodes in the IC led to changes in both threshold and dynamic range, with bipolar stimulation with 400 µm spacing evoking the lowest AC threshold and widest dynamic range. At saturation, bipolar stimulation elicited a significantly higher mean spike count in the AC at CF-aligned areas than at CF-unaligned areas when electrode spacing was 400 µm or less. Bipolar stimulation using electrode spacing of 400 µm or less also elicited a higher rate of elicited activity in the AC in both CF-aligned and CF-unaligned regions than monopolar stimulation. When electrodes were spaced 600 µm apart no benefit over monopolar stimulation was observed. Furthermore, monopolar stimulation of the external cortex of the IC resulted in more localized frequency responses than bipolar stimulation when stimulation and reference sites were 200 µm apart. Significance. These findings have implications for the

  13. Modulation of audiogenic seizures by histamine and adenosine receptors in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Feng, H J; Faingold, C L

    2000-05-01

    Susceptibility to behaviorally similar audiogenic seizures (AGS) occurs genetically and is inducible during ethanol withdrawal (ETX). Comparisons between AGS mechanisms of genetically epilepsy-prone rats (GEPR-9s) and ethanol-withdrawn rats (ETX-Rs) are yielding information about general pathophysiological mechanisms of epileptogenesis. The inferior colliculus (IC) is the AGS initiation site. Excitatory amino acid (EAA) abnormalities in the IC are implicated in AGS, and histamine and adenosine receptor activation each reduce EAA release and inhibit several seizure types. Previous studies indicate that focal infusion of an adenosine receptor agonist into the IC blocked AGS in GEPR-9s, but the effects of adenosine receptor activation in the IC on AGS in ETX-Rs are unknown. The effects of histamine receptor activation on either form of AGS are also unexamined. The present study evaluated effects of histamine or a nonselective adenosine A(1) agonist, 2-chloroadenosine, on AGS by focal microinjection into the IC. Ethanol dependence and AGS susceptibility were induced in normal rats by intragastric ethanol. Histamine (40 or 60 nmol/side) significantly reduced AGS in GEPR-9s, but histamine in doses up to 120 nmol/side did not affect AGS in ETX-Rs. 2-Chloroadenosine (5 or 10 nmol/side) did not affect AGS in ETX-Rs, despite the effectiveness of lower doses of this agent in GEPR-9s reported previously. Thus, histamine and adenosine receptors in the IC modulate AGS of GEPR-9s, but do not modulate ETX-induced AGS. The reasons for this difference may involve the chronicity of AGS susceptibility in GEPR-9s, which may lead to more extensive neuromodulation as compensatory mechanisms to limit the seizures compared to the acute AGS of ETX-Rs.

  14. The morphology of optic tract axons arborizing in the superior colliculus of the hamster.

    PubMed

    Sachs, G M; Schneider, G E

    1984-12-01

    Single axons innervating the superficial layers of the hamster's superior colliculus (SC) were visualized using an HRP-filling technique. Five types of axons were distinguished. Experiments involving the removal of retinal and/or cortical input showed that three of these axon types originated in the contralateral retina with the fourth type most likely originating in the visual cortex. The origin of the fifth type, a widely branched varicose axon, is apparently subcortical. The two major types of presumed retinotectal axons (types U and L1) project to the stratum griseum superficiale (SGS) in a bilaminar pattern. Type U axons take relatively direct paths from the layer of optic fibers to form dense terminal arbors in the upper half of the SGS. Terminal fields for type U fibers showed fairly consistent dimensions. Their rostrocaudal extent ranged from 90 micron to 190 micron, averaging about 120 micron. Type L1 axons were thicker than type U axons and terminated in deeper regions of the SGS and in the stratum opticum (SO). Single axons of this type often gave rise to multiple branches which took separate, circuitous paths to a common terminal field. Terminal fields for type L1 axons varied more in extent than did type U fields, but 58% of them had fields 90-150 micron in extent. Each of the axon types found can be related to previous studies of populations of tectal afferents. The two major types of retinofugal axons fit a scheme of parallel ascending pathways. The findings also have interesting implications for the study of axonal development.

  15. Effect of current focusing on the sensitivity of inferior colliculus neurons to amplitude-modulated stimulation.

    PubMed

    George, Shefin S; Shivdasani, Mohit N; Fallon, James B

    2016-09-01

    In multichannel cochlear implants (CIs), current is delivered to specific electrodes along the cochlea in the form of amplitude-modulated pulse trains, to convey temporal and spectral cues. Our previous studies have shown that focused multipolar (FMP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation produce more restricted neural activation and reduced channel interactions in the inferior colliculus (IC) compared with traditional monopolar (MP) stimulation, suggesting that focusing of stimulation could produce better transmission of spectral information. The present study explored the capability of IC neurons to detect modulated CI stimulation with FMP and TP stimulation compared with MP stimulation. The study examined multiunit responses of IC neurons in acutely deafened guinea pigs by systematically varying the stimulation configuration, modulation depth, and stimulation level. Stimuli were sinusoidal amplitude-modulated pulse trains (carrier rate of 120 pulses/s). Modulation sensitivity was quantified by measuring modulation detection thresholds (MDTs), defined as the lowest modulation depth required to differentiate the response of a modulated stimulus from an unmodulated one. Whereas MP stimulation showed significantly lower MDTs than FMP and TP stimulation (P values <0.05) at stimulation ≤2 dB above threshold, all stimulation configurations were found to have similar modulation sensitivities at 4 dB above threshold. There was no difference found in modulation sensitivity between FMP and TP stimulation. The present study demonstrates that current focusing techniques such as FMP and TP can adequately convey amplitude modulation and are comparable to MP stimulation, especially at higher stimulation levels, although there may be some trade-off between spectral and temporal fidelity with current focusing stimulation.

  16. Axon terminals from the nucleus isthmi pars parvocellularis control the ascending retinotectofugal output through direct synaptic contact with tectal ganglion cell dendrites.

    PubMed

    González-Cabrera, Cristian; Garrido-Charad, Florencia; Mpodozis, Jorge; Bolam, J Paul; Marín, Gonzalo J

    2016-02-01

    The optic tectum in birds and its homologue the superior colliculus in mammals both send major bilateral, nontopographic projections to the nucleus rotundus and caudal pulvinar, respectively. These projections originate from widefield tectal ganglion cells (TGCs) located in layer 13 in the avian tectum and in the lower superficial layers in the mammalian colliculus. The TGCs characteristically have monostratified arrays of brush-like dendritic terminations and respond mostly to bidimensional motion or looming features. In birds, this TGC-mediated tectofugal output is controlled by feedback signals from the nucleus isthmi pars parvocellularis (Ipc). The Ipc neurons display topographically organized axons that densely ramify in restricted columnar terminal fields overlapping various neural elements that could mediate this tectofugal control, including the retinal terminals and the TGC dendrites themselves. Whether the Ipc axons make synaptic contact with these or other tectal neural elements remains undetermined. We double labeled Ipc axons and their presumptive postsynaptic targets in the tectum of chickens (Gallus gallus) with neural tracers and performed an ultrastructural analysis. We found that the Ipc terminal boutons form glomerulus-like structures in the superficial and intermediate tectal layers, establishing asymmetric synapses with several dendritic profiles. In these glomeruli, at least two of the postsynaptic dendrites originated from TGCs. We also found synaptic contacts between retinal terminals and TGC dendrites. These findings suggest that, in birds, Ipc axons control the ascending tectal outflow of retinal signals through direct synaptic contacts with the TGCs.

  17. Comparison of Gain-Like Properties of Eye Position Signals in Inferior Colliculus Versus Auditory Cortex of Primates

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Joost X.; Groh, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated to what extent the influence of eye position in the auditory pathway of primates can be described as a gain field. We compared single unit activity in the inferior colliculus (IC), core auditory cortex (A1) and the caudomedial belt (CM) region of auditory cortex (AC) in primates, and found stronger evidence for gain field-like interactions in the IC than in AC. In the IC, eye position signals showed both multiplicative and additive interactions with auditory responses, whereas in AC the effects were not as well predicted by a gain field model. PMID:20838470

  18. Analytic optical potentials for nucleon-nucleus nucleus-nucleus collisions involving light and medium nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidasaria, H. B.; Townsend, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Utilizing an optical model potential approximation to the exact nucleus-nucleus multiple-scattering series, optical potentials for nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are analytically derived. These expressions are applicable to light and medium cosmic ray nuclei as their single-particle density distributions are analytically determined, without approximation, from their actual harmonic well charge density distributions. Pauli correlation effects are included through the use of a simple Gaussian function to replace the usual expression obtained in the infinite nuclear matter approximation.

  19. Organization and trade-off of spectro-temporal tuning properties of duration-tuned neurons in the mammalian inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Morrison, James A; Farzan, Faranak; Fremouw, Thane; Sayegh, Riziq; Covey, Ellen; Faure, Paul A

    2014-05-01

    Neurons throughout the mammalian central auditory pathway respond selectively to stimulus frequency and amplitude, and some are also selective for stimulus duration. First found in the auditory midbrain or inferior colliculus (IC), these duration-tuned neurons (DTNs) provide a potential neural mechanism for encoding temporal features of sound. In this study, we investigated how having an additional neural response filter, one selective to the duration of an auditory stimulus, influences frequency tuning and neural organization by recording single-unit responses and measuring the dorsal-ventral position and spectral-temporal tuning properties of auditory DTNs from the IC of the awake big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus). Like other IC neurons, DTNs were tonotopically organized and had either V-shaped, U-shaped, or O-shaped frequency tuning curves (excitatory frequency response areas). We hypothesized there would be an interaction between frequency and duration tuning in DTNs, as electrical engineering theory for resonant filters dictates a trade-off in spectral-temporal resolution: sharp tuning in the frequency domain results in poorer resolution in the time domain and vice versa. While the IC is a more complex signal analyzer than an electrical filter, a similar operational trade-off could exist in the responses of DTNs. Our data revealed two patterns of spectro-temporal sensitivity and spatial organization within the IC: DTNs with sharp frequency tuning and broad duration tuning were located in the dorsal IC, whereas cells with wide spectral tuning and narrow temporal tuning were found in the ventral IC.

  20. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, H.; Garvey, G.; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  1. Nucleus from string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Morita, Takeshi

    2011-08-01

    In generic holographic QCD, we find that baryons are bound to form a nucleus, and that its radius obeys the empirically-known mass-number (A) dependence r∝A1/3 for large A. Our result is robust, since we use only a generic property of D-brane actions in string theory. We also show that nucleons are bound completely in a finite volume. Furthermore, employing a concrete holographic model (derived by Hashimoto, Iizuka, and Yi, describing a multibaryon system in the Sakai-Sugimoto model), the nuclear radius is evaluated as O(1)×A1/3[fm], which is consistent with experiments.

  2. Projections of nucleus caudalis and spinal cord to brainstem and diencephalon in the hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus and Paraechinus aethiopicus): a degeneration study.

    PubMed

    Ring, G; Ganchrow, D

    1983-05-10

    In the light of hypotheses related to the evolution of pain-carrying systems in mammals, terminal projection fields in brainstem and diencephalon of efferents of nucleus caudalis (NC) of the spinal trigeminal complex and spinal cord were determined in hedgehog by using Nauta-Gygax and Fink-Heimer silver techniques for degeneration. Unilateral NC lesions resulted in medullary degeneration in the ventral portion of NC contralaterally and bilaterally in cuneate nucleus (CU) and reticular formation. Pontine degeneration was noted ipsilaterally in medial (PBM) and lateral (PBL) parabrachial, facial motor (VII), and interpolar, oral, and main sensory trigeminal nuclei; degeneration in reticular formation was bilateral. Midbrain degeneration was seen bilaterally in caudal superior colliculus (SC), inferior colliculus (IC), periaqueductal gray, and tegmentum. In thalamus, projections to ventroposterior nucleus (VP) were contralateral and concentrated in a crescent extending along the lateral one-third-to-one-half and ventral border of the nucleus. Bilateral degeneration fields were noted in a dorsomedial sector of the "ventral nuclear field," posterior complex (PO), and mediodorsal nucleus (MD), the degeneration always heavier contralaterally in these nuclei. Sparse degeneration was noted in the medial most portions of the medial geniculate nuclei bordering PO and VP. In rostral diencephalon, bilateral degeneration was traced from the inferior thalamic peduncle to the lateral hypothalamic area (LH). Unilateral spinal cord lesions made between C7 and T1 vertebrae resulted in medullary degeneration in NC contralaterally, ipsilaterally in CU and lateral cuneate nucleus, and bilaterally in gracile nucleus, inferior olivary complex, and reticular formation. Pontine degeneration was limited to ipsilateral PBL and bilaterally to VII. Midbrain degeneration was found bilaterally in IC, SC, nucleus sagulum, and tegmentum; a minor projection was noted in interpeduncular nucleus. In

  3. TOR-in(g) the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Chi Kwan; Zheng, X F Steven

    2007-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) is a central component of the eukaryotic growth regulatory network. TOR controls the expression of diverse genes by all three RNA polymerases, including ribosome biogenesis, utilization and transport of nutrients, and stress-related genes. Until recently, TOR was thought to be a classical signaling kinase that regulates transcription factors in the cytoplasm. However, our recent study shows that in yeast, TOR dynamically shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus, and binds to 35S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) promoter. Importantly, nuclear localization and promoter-binding is crucial for TOR to control RNA polymerase (Pol) I-dependent 35S rDNA transcription. In contrast, either cytoplasmic or nuclear TOR is sufficient to regulate Pol II-dependent transcription. These observations suggest that TOR in the nucleus plays an important role in gene regulation, and that TOR takes a multifaceted approach to control expression of different genes.

  4. Core-nucleus distortation in hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1995-08-01

    We are completing a study of the effects of the spherical distortion of the {open_quotes}core{close_quotes} nucleus by the {Lambda} in a hypernucleus. The response of the core was determined by an appropriately chosen energy-density functional which depends, in particular, on the nuclear compressibility. The forcing action of the A is determined by the nuclear density dependence of the {Lambda} binding in nuclear matter which is obtained from our work on the {Lambda} single-particle energies. Because of the strongly repulsive {Lambda}NN forces, this {Lambda} binding {open_quotes}saturates{close_quotes} at a density close to the central density of nuclei, and results in a reduced core-nucleus distortion much less than would otherwise be obtained. The effects of the core distortion then turn out to be very small even for quite light hypernuclei. This result justifies the assumption that spherical core nuclei are effectively undistorted in a hypernucleus.

  5. Higgs-boson production in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Cross-section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two-photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two-photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  6. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  7. Anatomical differences in the human inferior colliculus relate to the perceived valence of musical consonance and dissonance.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Thomas Hans; Renders, Wiske; Müller, Karsten; Schmude, Paul; Leman, Marc; Turner, Robert; Villringer, Arno

    2013-10-01

    Helmholtz himself speculated about a role of the cochlea in the perception of musical dissonance. Here we indirectly investigated this issue, assessing the valence judgment of musical stimuli with variable consonance/dissonance and presented diotically (exactly the same dissonant signal was presented to both ears) or dichotically (a consonant signal was presented to each ear--both consonant signals were rhythmically identical but differed by a semitone in pitch). Differences in brain organisation underlying inter-subject differences in the percept of dichotically presented dissonance were determined with voxel-based morphometry. Behavioral results showed that diotic dissonant stimuli were perceived as more unpleasant than dichotically presented dissonance, indicating that interactions within the cochlea modulated the valence percept during dissonance. However, the behavioral data also suggested that the dissonance percept did not depend crucially on the cochlea, but also occurred as a result of binaural integration when listening to dichotic dissonance. These results also showed substantial between-participant variations in the valence response to dichotic dissonance. These differences were in a voxel-based morphometry analysis related to differences in gray matter density in the inferior colliculus, which strongly substantiated a key role of the inferior colliculus in consonance/dissonance representation in humans.

  8. Do growth-stimulated retinal ganglion cell axons find their central targets after optic nerve injury? New insights by three-dimensional imaging of the visual pathway.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Heike; Leibinger, Marco; Fischer, Dietmar

    2013-10-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) do not normally regenerate injured axons. However, several strategies to transform RGCs into a potent regenerative state have been developed in recent years. Intravitreal CNTF application combined with conditional PTEN and SOCS3 deletion or zymosan-induced inflammatory stimulation together with cAMP analogue injection and PTEN-deletion in RGCs induce long-distance regeneration into the optic nerve of adult mice. A recent paper by the Benowitz group (de Lima et al.) claimed that the latter treatment enables full-length regeneration, with axons correctly navigating to their central target zones and partial recovery of visual behaviors. To gain a more detailed view of the extent and the trajectories of regenerating axons, Luo et al. applied a tissue clearing method and fluorescent microscopy to allow the tracing of naïve and regenerating RGC axons in whole ON and all the way to their brain targets. Using this approach, the authors found comparable axon regeneration in the optic nerve after both above-mentioned experimental treatments. Regeneration was accompanied by prevalent aberrant axon growth in the optic nerve and significant axonal misguidance at the optic chiasm. Less than 120 axons per animal reached the optic chiasm and only few entered the correct optic tract. Importantly, no axons reached visual targets in the olivary pretectal nucleus, the lateral geniculate nucleus or the superior colliculus, thereby contradicting and challenging previous claims by the Benowitz group. The data provided by Luo et al. rather suggest that potent stimulation of axonal growth per se is insufficient to achieve functional recovery and underscore the need to investigate regeneration-relevant axon guidance mechanisms in the mature visual system. PMID:23816572

  9. Linking express saccade occurance to stimulus properties and sensorimotor integration in the superior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Ron; Munoz, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    Express saccades represent the fastest possible eye movements to visual targets with reaction times that approach minimum sensory-motor conduction delays. Previous work in monkeys has identified two specific neural signals in the superior colliculus (SC: a midbrain sensorimotor integration structure involved in gaze control) that are required to execute express saccades: 1) previsual activity consisting of a low-frequency increase in action potentials in sensory-motor neurons immediately before the arrival of a visual response; and 2) a transient visual-sensory response consisting of a high-frequency burst of action potentials in visually responsive neurons resulting from the appearance of a visual target stimulus. To better understand how these two neural signals interact to produce express saccades, we manipulated the arrival time and magnitude of visual responses in the SC by altering target luminance and we examined the corresponding influences on SC activity and express saccade generation. We recorded from saccade neurons with visual-, motor-, and previsual-related activity in the SC of monkeys performing the gap saccade task while target luminance was systematically varied between 0.001 and 42.5 cd/m2 against a black background (∼0.0001 cd/m2). Our results demonstrated that 1) express saccade latencies were linked directly to the arrival time in the SC of visual responses produced by abruptly appearing visual stimuli; 2) express saccades were generated toward both dim and bright targets whenever sufficient previsual activity was present; and 3) target luminance altered the likelihood of producing an express saccade. When an express saccade was generated, visuomotor neurons increased their activity immediately before the arrival of the visual response in the SC and saccade initiation. Furthermore, the visual and motor responses of visuomotor neurons merged into a single burst of action potentials, while the visual response of visual-only neurons was

  10. Linking express saccade occurance to stimulus properties and sensorimotor integration in the superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Marino, Robert A; Levy, Ron; Munoz, Douglas P

    2015-08-01

    Express saccades represent the fastest possible eye movements to visual targets with reaction times that approach minimum sensory-motor conduction delays. Previous work in monkeys has identified two specific neural signals in the superior colliculus (SC: a midbrain sensorimotor integration structure involved in gaze control) that are required to execute express saccades: 1) previsual activity consisting of a low-frequency increase in action potentials in sensory-motor neurons immediately before the arrival of a visual response; and 2) a transient visual-sensory response consisting of a high-frequency burst of action potentials in visually responsive neurons resulting from the appearance of a visual target stimulus. To better understand how these two neural signals interact to produce express saccades, we manipulated the arrival time and magnitude of visual responses in the SC by altering target luminance and we examined the corresponding influences on SC activity and express saccade generation. We recorded from saccade neurons with visual-, motor-, and previsual-related activity in the SC of monkeys performing the gap saccade task while target luminance was systematically varied between 0.001 and 42.5 cd/m(2) against a black background (∼0.0001 cd/m(2)). Our results demonstrated that 1) express saccade latencies were linked directly to the arrival time in the SC of visual responses produced by abruptly appearing visual stimuli; 2) express saccades were generated toward both dim and bright targets whenever sufficient previsual activity was present; and 3) target luminance altered the likelihood of producing an express saccade. When an express saccade was generated, visuomotor neurons increased their activity immediately before the arrival of the visual response in the SC and saccade initiation. Furthermore, the visual and motor responses of visuomotor neurons merged into a single burst of action potentials, while the visual response of visual-only neurons was

  11. Comparison of visual receptive field properties of the superior colliculus and primary visual cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Sun, Chaokui; Shi, Li

    2015-08-01

    The rat visual system comprises cortical and subcortical pathways. The receptive field properties of cells in the visual cortex have been extensively studied; however, the fundamental roles of the two circuits in visual information processing are not well understood. To address this question, we have applied quantitative methods to compare and characterize the spatiotemporal receptive field (RF) properties of neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) cells and superficial layers of the superior colliculus (SC) in rats by means of extracellular recordings. An analysis of visual stimulus processing revealed distinct functional characteristics of the two visual circuits. RF diameters of SC neurons were significantly larger than those of V1 cells. Most cells in both regions had high orientation selectivity, but the mean orientation bandwidth of the SC was broader than that of V1 cells (101.5° vs. 60.2°). The mean optimal spatial frequency (SF) of SC cells was lower but had a broader bandwidth than that of V1 cells (0.03 vs. 0.068 cpd). The majority of SC and V1 cells (70% and 68%, respectively) had RFs with band-pass temporal frequency (TF) tuning profiles and similar optimal TFs. However, temporal band-pass profiles of the SC showed narrower mean temporal bandwidths than those of V1 cells (1.42 vs. 2.36 octaves). The majority of neurons in visual cortical and subcortical structures were activated in response to high-contrast, drifting gratings in the preferred orientation. The percentage of V1 neurons with a low-contrast threshold was larger than the proportion of SC neurons (45.6% vs. 30%), indicating that the former adapt better to contrast. The substantial overlap in latency distributions between SC and V1 areas suggests that the two visual systems process and analyze visual signals in parallel. However, the two areas use different neural encoding mechanisms based on different latency distribution trends. These results indicate that SC cells have poor spatial acuity

  12. BOLD fMRI study of ultrahigh frequency encoding in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Patrick P; Zhang, Jevin W; Chan, Russell W; Leong, Alex T L; Wu, Ed X

    2015-07-01

    Many vertebrates communicate with ultrahigh frequency (UHF) vocalizations to limit auditory detection by predators. The mechanisms underlying the neural encoding of such UHF sounds may provide important insights for understanding neural processing of other complex sounds (e.g. human speeches). In the auditory system, sound frequency is normally encoded topographically as tonotopy, which, however, contains very limited representation of UHFs in many species. Instead, electrophysiological studies suggested that two neural mechanisms, both exploiting the interactions between frequencies, may contribute to UHF processing. Neurons can exhibit excitatory or inhibitory responses to a tone when another UHF tone is presented simultaneously (combination sensitivity). They can also respond to such stimulation if they are tuned to the frequency of the cochlear-generated distortion products of the two tones, e.g. their difference frequency (cochlear distortion). Both mechanisms are present in an early station of the auditory pathway, the midbrain inferior colliculus (IC). Currently, it is unclear how prevalent the two mechanisms are and how they are functionally integrated in encoding UHFs. This study investigated these issues with large-view BOLD fMRI in rat auditory system, particularly the IC. UHF vocalizations (above 40kHz), but not pure tones at similar frequencies (45, 55, 65, 75kHz), evoked robust BOLD responses in multiple auditory nuclei, including the IC, reinforcing the sensitivity of the auditory system to UHFs despite limited representation in tonotopy. Furthermore, BOLD responses were detected in the IC when a pair of UHF pure tones was presented simultaneously (45 & 55kHz, 55 & 65kHz, 45 & 65kHz, 45 & 75kHz). For all four pairs, a cluster of voxels in the ventromedial side always showed the strongest responses, displaying combination sensitivity. Meanwhile, voxels in the dorsolateral side that showed strongest secondary responses to each pair of UHF pure tones

  13. Spatial selectivity and binaural responses in the inferior colliculus of the great horned owl.

    PubMed

    Volman, S F; Konishi, M

    1989-09-01

    In this study we have investigated the processing of auditory cues for sound localization in the great horned owl (Bubo virginianus). Previous studies have shown that the barn owl, whose ears are asymmetrically oriented in the vertical plane, has a 2-dimensional, topographic representation of auditory space in the external division of the inferior colliculus (ICx). As in the barn owl, the great horned owl's ICx is anatomically distinct and projects to the optic tectum. Neurons in ICx respond over only a small range of azimuths (mean = 32 degrees), and azimuth is topographically mapped. In contrast to the barn owl, the great horned owl has bilaterally symmetrical ears and its receptive fields are not restricted in elevation. The binaural cues available for sound localization were measured both with cochlear microphonic recordings and with a microphone attached to a probe tube in the auditory canal. Interaural time disparity (ITD) varied monotonically with azimuth. Interaural intensity differences (IID) also changed with azimuth, but the largest IIDs were less than 15 dB, and the variation was not monotonic. Neither ITD nor IID varied systematically with changes in the vertical position of a sound source. We used dichotic stimulation to determine the sensitivity of ICx neurons to these binaural cues. Best ITD of ICx units was topographically mapped and strongly correlated with receptive-field azimuth. The width of ITD tuning curves, measured at 50% of the maximum response, averaged 72 microseconds. All ICx neurons responded only to binaural stimulation and had nonmonotonic IID tuning curves. Best IID was weakly, but significantly, correlated with best ITD (r = 0.39, p less than 0.05). The IID tuning curves, however, were broad (mean 50% width = 24 dB), and 67% of the units had best IIDs within 5 dB of 0 dB IID. ITD tuning was sensitive to variations in IID in the direction opposite to that expected for time-intensity trading, but the magnitude of this effect was only

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging confirms forward suppression for rapidly alternating sounds in human auditory cortex but not in the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Christian Harm; Dykstra, Andrew R; Gutschalk, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Forward suppression at the level of the auditory cortex has been suggested to subserve auditory stream segregation. Recent results in non-streaming stimulation contexts have indicated that forward suppression can also be observed in the inferior colliculus; whether this holds for streaming-related contexts remains unclear. Here, we used cardiac-gated fMRI to examine forward suppression in the inferior colliculus (and the rest of the human auditory pathway) in response to canonical streaming stimuli (rapid tone sequences comprised of either one repetitive tone or two alternating tones). The first stimulus is typically perceived as a single stream, the second as two interleaved streams. In different experiments using either pure tones differing in frequency or bandpass-filtered noise differing in inter-aural time differences, we observed stronger auditory cortex activation in response to alternating vs. repetitive stimulation, consistent with the presence of forward suppression. In contrast, activity in the inferior colliculus and other subcortical nuclei did not significantly differ between alternating and monotonic stimuli. This finding could be explained by active amplification of forward suppression in auditory cortex, by a low rate (or absence) of cells showing forward suppression in inferior colliculus, or both.

  15. Meson multiplicity versus energy in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, T. W.; Freier, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic study of meson multiplicity as a function of energy at energies up to 100 GeV/u in nucleus-nucleus collisions has been made, using cosmic-ray data in nuclear emulsion. The data are consistent with simple nucleon-nucleon superposition models. Multiplicity per interacting nucleon in AA collisions does not appear to differ significantly from pp collisions.

  16. Scaling phenomenon in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C. Y.; Blankenbecler, R.

    1980-01-01

    New scaling variables for proton and pion production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are introduced which are the generalizations of the Feynmann scaling variable. They allow a simple description of the cross sections at forward and backward angles. 2 figures.

  17. Angiotensin receptor binding and pressor effects in cat subretrofacial nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, A.M.; Dampney, R.A.L.; Mendelsohn, F.A.O. Univ. of Sydney )

    1988-11-01

    Central administration of angiotensin II (ANG II) increases arterial blood pressure via increased sympathetic activity. The authors have examined the possibility that one site of action of ANG II is the subretrofacial (SRF) nucleus in the rostral ventrolateral medulla, since this nucleus is known to play a critical role in the tonic and phasic control of arterial pressure. In vitro autoradiography, employing {sup 125}I-labeled (Sar{sup 1}, Ile{sup 8})ANG II as radioligand, was used to localize binding sites for ANG-II in the cat ventrolateral medulla. A high density of ANG II-receptor binding sites was found confined to the SRF nucleus. In a second group of experiments in anesthetized cats, microinjections of ANG II, in doses ranging from 10 to 50 pmol, were made into histologically identified sites within and outside the SRF nucleus. Microinjections into the nucleus resulted in a dose-dependent increase in arterial pressure, which was abolished by systemic administration of the ganglion-blocking drug hexamethonium bromide. In contrast, microinjections just outside the SRF nucleus had no effect on arterial pressure. It is concluded that activation of ANG II-receptor binding sites within the SRF nucleus leads to an increase in arterial pressure via increased sympathetic efferent activity.

  18. The multiple functions of T stellate/multipolar/chopper cells in the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Oertel, Donata; Wright, Samantha; Cao, Xiao-Jie; Ferragamo, Michael; Bal, Ramazan

    2011-06-01

    Acoustic information is brought to the brain by auditory nerve fibers, all of which terminate in the cochlear nuclei, and is passed up the auditory pathway through the principal cells of the cochlear nuclei. A population of neurons variously known as T stellate, type I multipolar, planar multipolar, or chopper cells forms one of the major ascending auditory pathways through the brainstem. T Stellate cells are sharply tuned; as a population they encode the spectrum of sounds. In these neurons, phasic excitation from the auditory nerve is made more tonic by feedforward excitation, coactivation of inhibitory with excitatory inputs, relatively large excitatory currents through NMDA receptors, and relatively little synaptic depression. The mechanisms that make firing tonic also obscure the fine structure of sounds that is represented in the excitatory inputs from the auditory nerve and account for the characteristic chopping response patterns with which T stellate cells respond to tones. In contrast with other principal cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), T stellate cells lack a low-voltage-activated potassium conductance and are therefore sensitive to small, steady, neuromodulating currents. The presence of cholinergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors allows the excitability of these cells to be modulated by medial olivocochlear efferent neurons and by neuronal circuits associated with arousal. T Stellate cells deliver acoustic information to the ipsilateral dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body (VNTB), periolivary regions around the lateral superior olivary nucleus (LSO), and to the contralateral ventral lemniscal nuclei (VNLL) and inferior colliculus (IC). It is likely that T stellate cells participate in feedback loops through both medial and lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons and they may be a source of ipsilateral excitation of the LSO.

  19. The Multiple Functions of T Stellate/Multipolar/Chopper Cells in the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Donata; Wright, Samantha; Cao, Xiao-Jie; Ferragamo, Michael; Bal, Ramazan

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic information is brought to the brain by auditory nerve fibers, all of which terminate in the cochlear nuclei, and is passed up the auditory pathway through the principal cells of the cochlear nuclei. A population of neurons variously known as T stellate, type I multipolar, planar multipolar, or chopper cells forms one of the major ascending auditory pathways through the brain stem. T Stellate cells are sharply tuned; as a population they encode the spectrum of sounds. In these neurons, phasic excitation from the auditory nerve is made more tonic by feed forward excitation, coactivation of inhibitory with excitatory inputs, relatively large excitatory currents through NMDA receptors, and relatively little synaptic depression. The mechanisms that make firing tonic also obscure the fine structure of sounds that is represented in the excitatory inputs from the auditory nerve and account for the characteristic chopping response patterns with which T stellate cells respond to tones. In contrast with other principal cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), T stellate cells lack a low-voltage-activated potassium conductance and are therefore sensitive to small, steady, neuromodulating currents. The presence of cholinergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors allows the excitability of these cells to be modulated by medial olivocochlear efferent neurons and by neuronal circuits associated with arousal. T Stellate cells deliver acoustic information to the ipsilateral dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body (VNTB), periolivary regions around the lateral superior olivary nucleus (LSO), and to the contralateral ventral lemniscal nuclei (VNLL) and inferior colliculus (IC). It is likely that T stellate cells participate in feedback loops through both medial and lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons and they may be a source of ipsilateral excitation of the LSO. PMID:21056098

  20. Active diffusion positions the nucleus in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Maria; Ahmed, Wylie W; Bussonnier, Matthias; Mailly, Philippe; Betz, Timo; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2015-04-01

    In somatic cells, the position of the cell centroid is dictated by the centrosome. The centrosome is instrumental in nucleus positioning, the two structures being physically connected. Mouse oocytes have no centrosomes, yet harbour centrally located nuclei. We demonstrate how oocytes define their geometric centre in the absence of centrosomes. Using live imaging of oocytes, knockout for the formin 2 actin nucleator, with off-centred nuclei, together with optical trapping and modelling, we discover an unprecedented mode of nucleus positioning. We document how active diffusion of actin-coated vesicles, driven by myosin Vb, generates a pressure gradient and a propulsion force sufficient to move the oocyte nucleus. It promotes fluidization of the cytoplasm, contributing to nucleus directional movement towards the centre. Our results highlight the potential of active diffusion, a prominent source of intracellular transport, able to move large organelles such as nuclei, providing in vivo evidence of its biological function.

  1. Nuclear mechanotransduction: forcing the nucleus to respond.

    PubMed

    Guilluy, Christophe; Burridge, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Cell phenotype and fate are driven by the mechanical properties of their surrounding environment. Changes in matrix rigidity or application of force have been shown to impact profoundly cell behavior and phenotype, demonstrating that the molecular mechanisms which "sense" and transduce these signals into biochemical pathways are central in cell biology. In this commentary, we discuss recent evidence showing that mechanotransduction mechanisms occur in the nucleus, allowing dynamic regulation of the nucleoskeleton in response to mechanical stress. We will review this nucleoskeletal response and its impact on both nuclear structure and function.

  2. Regional connections of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bay, Hüsniye Hacıoğlu; Cavdar, Safiye

    2013-06-01

    Thalamic nuclei are classified as first- and higher-order relays. The first-order relays receive their driving afferents from ascending pathways and transmit messages to cortex that cortex has not seen before. The higher-order relays receive driver messages from layer-5 cortical cells for transmission from one cortical area to another. The present study used the retrograde tracer, fluoro-gold, to define the afferents to the three regions of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, to distinguish which parts contain first- or higher-order relays. The results show that the main inputs to the medial region of the nucleus come from olfactory and visceral structures, those to the central region come from limbic structures and those to the lateral region come from motor centers of the central nervous system. The medial and central regions receive both modulatory (layer 6) and driver (layer 5) afferent inputs from the orbitofrontal and medial frontal areas of the prefrontal cortex whereas the lateral region receives no layer-5 inputs from its cortical connections. Further, the inhibitory modulation of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus shows regional differences. The medial region receives inhibitory afferents from the striatum (globus pallidus, caudate-putamen), the lateral region from the substantia nigra pars reticulata and the zona incerta, and all segments of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus receive inhibitory afferents from the thalamic reticular nucleus. The results of the present study show that each region of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus has distinct afferent connections allowing each region of mediodorsal thalamic nucleus to be considered relatively independent subnuclei that may subserve independent functions. PMID:23869861

  3. [Venous vascularization of the lentiform nucleus].

    PubMed

    Wolfram-Gabel, R; Maillot, C

    The venous vascularization of the nucleus lentiformis in man is studied in 30 brains by injecting the vascular system with gelatinous Indian ink. The venous vascularization of the nucleus lentiformis is drained towards the deep venous system of the brain by two ways, one ascending, the other descending. The first one is formed by superior lenticular veins which drain into the thalamo-striate vein, principal tributary of the internal cerebral vein. The second one is formed by inferior lenticular veins which depend from the deep middle cerebral vein, another tributary of the internal cerebral vein. The veins of the nucleus lentiformis, especially the veins of the putamen, present many similarities with these one of the cerebral cortex. They form the center of venous units surrounded by an arterial ring formed by the branches of ramification of the central arteries. The principal vein of the unit is surrounded by a capillary-free space. This similarities may be explained by the common origin of the cerebral cortex and of the putamen, both belong to the neocortical system.

  4. Revisiting the supratrigeminal nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fujio, T; Sato, F; Tachibana, Y; Kato, T; Tomita, A; Higashiyama, K; Ono, T; Maeda, Y; Yoshida, A

    2016-06-01

    The supratrigeminal nucleus (Vsup), originally proposed as a premotoneuron pool in the trigeminal reflex arc, is a key structure of jaw movement control. Surprisingly, however, the location of the rat Vsup has not precisely been defined. In light of our previous cat studies, we made two hypotheses regarding the rat Vsup: (1) the Vsup is cytoarchitectonically distinguishable from its surrounding structures; (2) the Vsup receives central axon terminals of the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) neurons which are primary afferents innervating muscle spindles of jaw-closing muscles and periodontal ligaments around the teeth. To test the first hypothesis, we examined the cytoarchitecture of the rat Vsup. The Vsup was identified as an area medially adjacent to the dorsomedial part of trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (Vp), and extended from the level just rostral to the caudal two-thirds of the trigeminal motor nucleus (Vmo) to the level approximately 150 μm caudal to the Vmo. Our rat Vsup was much smaller and its location was considerably different in comparison to the Vsup reported previously. To evaluate the second hypothesis, we tested the distribution patterns of Vmes primary afferent terminals in the cytoarchitectonically identified Vsup. After transganglionic tracer applications to the masseter, deep temporal, and medial pterygoid nerves, a large number of axon terminals were observed in all parts of Vsup (especially in its medial part). After applications to the inferior alveolar, infraorbital, and lingual nerves, a small number of axon terminals were labeled in the caudolateral Vsup. The Vsup could also be identified electrophysiologically. After electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, evoked potentials with slow negative component were isolated only in the Vsup. The present findings suggest that the rat Vsup can be cytoarchitectonically and electrophysiologically identified, receives somatotopic termination of the trigeminal primary afferents, and

  5. Mechanics of the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lammerding, Jan

    2011-04-01

    The nucleus is the distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells. Until recently, it was often considered simply as a unique compartment containing the genetic information of the cell and associated machinery, without much attention to its structure and mechanical properties. This article provides compelling examples that illustrate how specific nuclear structures are associated with important cellular functions, and how defects in nuclear mechanics can cause a multitude of human diseases. During differentiation, embryonic stem cells modify their nuclear envelope composition and chromatin structure, resulting in stiffer nuclei that reflect decreased transcriptional plasticity. In contrast, neutrophils have evolved characteristic lobulated nuclei that increase their physical plasticity, enabling passage through narrow tissue spaces in their response to inflammation. Research on diverse cell types further demonstrates how induced nuclear deformations during cellular compression or stretch can modulate cellular function. Pathological examples of disturbed nuclear mechanics include the many diseases caused by mutations in the nuclear envelope proteins lamin A/C and associated proteins, as well as cancer cells that are often characterized by abnormal nuclear morphology. In this article, we will focus on determining the functional relationship between nuclear mechanics and cellular (dys-)function, describing the molecular changes associated with physiological and pathological examples, the resulting defects in nuclear mechanics, and the effects on cellular function. New insights into the close relationship between nuclear mechanics and cellular organization and function will yield a better understanding of normal biology and will offer new clues into therapeutic approaches to the various diseases associated with defective nuclear mechanics.

  6. Neurons in the primate superior colliculus coding for arm movements in gaze-related coordinates.

    PubMed

    Stuphorn, V; Bauswein, E; Hoffmann, K P

    2000-03-01

    In the intermediate and deep layers of the superior colliculus (SC), a well-established oculomotor structure, a substantial population of cells is involved in the control of arm movements. To examine the reference frame of these neurons, we recorded in two rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) the discharges of 331 neurons in the SC and the underlying mesencephalic reticular formation (MRF) while monkeys reached to the same target location during different gaze orientations. For 65 reach-related cells with sufficient data and for simultaneously recorded electromyograms (EMGs) of 11 arm muscles, we calculated an ANOVA (factors: target position, gaze angle) and a gaze-dependency (GD) index. EMGs and the activity of many (60%) of the reach-related neurons were not influenced by the target representation on the retina or eye position. We refer to these as "gaze-independent" reach neurons. For 40%, however, the GD fell outside the range of the muscle modulation, and the ANOVA showed a significant influence of gaze. These "gaze-related" reach neurons discharge only when the monkey reaches for targets having specific coordinates in relation to the gaze axis, i.e., for targets in a gaze-related "reach movement field" (RMF). Neuronal activity was not modulated by the specific path of the arm movement, the muscle pattern that is necessary for its realization or the arm that was used for the reach. In each SC we found gaze-related neurons with RMFs both in the contralateral and in the ipsilateral hemifield. The topographical organization of the gaze-related reach neurons in the SC could not be matched with the well-known visual and oculomotor maps. Gaze-related neurons were more modulated in their strength of activity with different directions of arm movements than were gaze-independent reach neurons. Gaze-related reach neurons were recorded at a median depth of 2.03 mm below SC surface in the intermediate layers, where they overlap with saccade-related burst neurons (median depth

  7. Two kinetically distinct components of hyperpolarization-activated current in rat superior colliculus-projecting neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, J S; Nerbonne, J M

    1993-01-01

    1. Whole-cell and perforated patch recording techniques were used to examine the activation, deactivation and inactivation of the time-dependent hyperpolarization-activated inward currents (Ih) in isolated superior colliculus-projecting (SCP) neurons from rat primary visual cortex. 2. Examination of inward current waveforms revealed the presence of two kinetically distinct components of Ih: one that activates with a time constant of the order of hundreds of milliseconds, and one that activates with a time constant of the order of seconds. We have termed these Ih,f and Ih,s, to denote the fast and slow components, respectively, of current activation. The time constants of activation of both Ih,f and Ih,s decrease with increasing membrane hyperpolarization. 3. Following the onset of hyperpolarizing voltage steps, a delay is evident prior to time-dependent inward current activation. This delay is voltage dependent and decreases with increasing membrane hyperpolarization. 4. The sigmoidal inward current waveforms are well fitted by the sum of two exponentials in which the faster term, corresponding to the activation of Ih,f, is raised to the power 1.34 +/- 0.26 (mean +/- S.D.). The non-integral exponent suggests that Ih,f activation involves at least two energetically non-equivalent gating transitions prior to channel opening. 5. Over a limited voltage range, tail currents could also be resolved into two distinct components. The faster component, which corresponds to the deactivation of Ih,f, decayed over a single exponential time course with a mean (+/- S.D.) time constant of 355 +/- 161 ms at -70 mV. Ih,s decay also followed a single exponential time course with a mean (+/- S.D.) time constant of 2428 +/- 1285 ms at -70 mV. Both deactivation time constants decreased with increasing depolarization. 6. The separation of inward current activation and deactivation into two distinct components and the lack of correlation between the relative amplitudes of these components

  8. Modeling inhibition of return as short-term depression of early sensory input to the superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Satel, J; Wang, Z; Trappenberg, T P; Klein, R M

    2011-05-11

    Inhibition of return (IOR) is an orienting phenomenon characterized by slower behavioral responses to spatially cued, relative to uncued targets, when the cue-target onset asynchronies (CTOAs) are long enough that cue-elicited attentional capture has dispersed. Here, we implement a short-term depression (STD) account of IOR within a neuroscientifically based dynamic neural field model (DNF) of the superior colliculus (SC). In addition to the prototypical findings in the cue-target paradigm (i.e., the biphasic pattern of behavioral enhancement at short CTOAs and behavioral costs at long CTOAs), a variety of findings in the literature are generated with this model, including IOR in averaging saccades and the co-existence of IOR and endogenous orienting at the same location. Many findings that cannot be accommodated by this model could be accounted for by incorporating cortical contributions.

  9. Increased functional connectivity between superior colliculus and brain regions implicated in bodily self-consciousness during the rubber hand illusion.

    PubMed

    Olivé, Isadora; Tempelmann, Claus; Berthoz, Alain; Heinze, Hans-Joachim

    2015-02-01

    Bodily self-consciousness refers to bodily processes operating at personal, peripersonal, and extrapersonal spatial dimensions. Although the neural underpinnings of representations of personal and peripersonal space associated with bodily self-consciousness were thoroughly investigated, relatively few is known about the neural underpinnings of representations of extrapersonal space relevant for bodily self-consciousness. In the search to unravel brain structures generating a representation of the extrapersonal space relevant for bodily self-consciousness, we developed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study to investigate the implication of the superior colliculus (SC) in bodily illusions, and more specifically in the rubber hand illusion (RHi), which constitutes an established paradigm to study the neural underpinnings of bodily self-consciousness. We observed activation of the colliculus ipsilateral to the manipulated hand associated with eliciting of RHi. A generalized form of context-dependent psychophysiological interaction analysis unravelled increased illusion-dependent functional connectivity between the SC and some of the main brain areas previously involved in bodily self-consciousness: right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ), bilateral ventral premotor cortex (vPM), and bilateral postcentral gyrus. We hypothesize that the collicular map of the extrapersonal space interacts with maps of the peripersonal and personal space generated at rTPJ, vPM and the postcentral gyrus, producing a unified representation of space that is relevant for bodily self-consciousness. We suggest that processes of multisensory integration of bodily-related sensory inputs located in this unified representation of space constitute one main factor underpinning emergence of bodily self-consciousness.

  10. The nucleus is an intracellular propagator of tensile forces in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Alam, Samer G; Lovett, David; Kim, Dae In; Roux, Kyle J; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2015-05-15

    Nuclear positioning is a crucial cell function, but how a migrating cell positions its nucleus is not understood. Using traction-force microscopy, we found that the position of the nucleus in migrating fibroblasts closely coincided with the center point of the traction-force balance, called the point of maximum tension (PMT). Positioning of the nucleus close to the PMT required nucleus-cytoskeleton connections through linker of nucleoskeleton-to-cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes. Although the nucleus briefly lagged behind the PMT following spontaneous detachment of the uropod during migration, the nucleus quickly repositioned to the PMT within a few minutes. Moreover, traction-generating spontaneous protrusions deformed the nearby nucleus surface to pull the nuclear centroid toward the new PMT, and subsequent retraction of these protrusions relaxed the nuclear deformation and restored the nucleus to its original position. We propose that the protruding or retracting cell boundary transmits a force to the surface of the nucleus through the intervening cytoskeletal network connected by the LINC complexes, and that these forces help to position the nucleus centrally and allow the nucleus to efficiently propagate traction forces across the length of the cell during migration.

  11. Dynamical and Statistical Aspects in Nucleus--Nucleus Collisions Around the Fermi Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamain, B.; Assenard, M.; Auger, G.; Bacri, C. O.; Benlliure, J.; Bisquer, E.; Bocage, F.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Buchet, P.; Charvet, J. L.; Chbihi, A.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Dayras, R.; Demeyer, A.; Dore, D.; Durand, D.; Eudes, P.; Frankland, J.; Galichet, E.; Genouin-Duhamel, E.; Gerlic, E.; Germain, M.; Gourio, D.; Guinet, D.; Gulminelli, F.; Lautesse, P.; Laville, J. L.; Lebrun, C.; Lecolley, J. F.; Lefevre, A.; Lefort, T.; Legrain, R.; Le Neindre, N.; Lopez, O.; Louvel, M.; Lukasik, J.; Marie, N.; Maskay, M.; Metivier, V.; Nalpas, L.; Nguyen, A.; Parlog, M.; Peter, J.; Plagnol, E.; Rahmani, A.; Reposeur, T.; Rivet, M. F.; Rosato, E.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Salou, S.; Squalli, M.; Steckmeyer, J. C.; Stern, M.; Tabacaru, T.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tirel, O.; Vient, E.; Volan, C.; Wieleczko, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    This contribution is devoted to two important aspects of intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions: the competition of dynamical and statistical features, and the origin of the multifragmentation process. These two questions are discussed in focusing on Indra data. It turns out that most of collisions are binary and reminiscent of deep inelastic collisions observed at low energy. However, intermediate velocity emission is a clear signature of dynamical emission and establishes a link with the participant-spectator picture which applies at high bombarding energies. Multifragmentation is observed when the dissipated energy is large and it turns out that expansion occurs at least for central collisions, as it is expected if this phenomenum has a dynamical origin.

  12. Caudal topographic nucleus isthmi and the rostral nontopographic nucleus isthmi in the turtle, Pseudemys scripta.

    PubMed

    Sereno, M I; Ulinski, P S

    1987-07-15

    Isthmotectal projections in turtles were examined by making serial section reconstructions of axonal and dendritic arborizations that were anterogradely or retrogradely filled with HRP. Two prominent tectal-recipient isthmic nuclei--the caudal magnocellular nucleus isthmi (Imc) and the rostral magnocellular nucleus isthmi (Imr)--exhibited strikingly different patterns of organization. Imc cells have flattened, bipolar dendritic fields that cover a few percent of the area of the cell plate constituting the nucleus and they project topographically to the ipsilateral tectum without local axon branches. The topography was examined explicitly at the single-cell level by using cases with two injections at widely separated tectal loci. Each Imc axon terminates as a compact swarm of several thousand boutons placed mainly in the upper central gray and superficial gray layers. One Imc terminal spans less that 1% of the tectal surface. Imr cells, by contrast, have large, sparsely branched dendritic fields overlapped by local axon collaterals while distally, their axons nontopographically innervate not only the deeper layers of the ipsilateral tectum but also ipsilateral Imc. Imr receives a nontopographic tectal input that contrasts with the topographic tectal input to Imc. Previous work on nucleus isthmi emphasized the role of the contralateral isthmotectal projection (which originates from a third isthmic nucleus in turtles) in mediating binocular interactions in the tectum. The present results on the two different but overlapping ipsilateral tecto-isthmo-tectal circuits set up by Imc and Imr are discussed in the light of physiological evidence for selective attention effects and local-global interactions in the tectum.

  13. Unexpected doubly-magic nucleus.

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, R. V. F.; Physics

    2009-01-01

    Nuclei with a 'magic' number of both protons and neutrons, dubbed doubly magic, are particularly stable. The oxygen isotope {sup 24}O has been found to be one such nucleus - yet it lies just at the limit of stability.

  14. Effects of location and timing of co-activated neurons in the auditory midbrain on cortical activity: implications for a new central auditory prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Małgorzata M.; McMahon, Melissa; Markovitz, Craig D.; Lim, Hubert H.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. An increasing number of deaf individuals are being implanted with central auditory prostheses, but their performance has generally been poorer than for cochlear implant users. The goal of this study is to investigate stimulation strategies for improving hearing performance with a new auditory midbrain implant (AMI). Previous studies have shown that repeated electrical stimulation of a single site in each isofrequency lamina of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) causes strong suppressive effects in elicited responses within the primary auditory cortex (A1). Here we investigate if improved cortical activity can be achieved by co-activating neurons with different timing and locations across an ICC lamina and if this cortical activity varies across A1. Approach. We electrically stimulated two sites at different locations across an isofrequency ICC lamina using varying delays in ketamine-anesthetized guinea pigs. We recorded and analyzed spike activity and local field potentials across different layers and locations of A1. Results. Co-activating two sites within an isofrequency lamina with short inter-pulse intervals (<5 ms) could elicit cortical activity that is enhanced beyond a linear summation of activity elicited by the individual sites. A significantly greater extent of normalized cortical activity was observed for stimulation of the rostral-lateral region of an ICC lamina compared to the caudal-medial region. We did not identify any location trends across A1, but the most cortical enhancement was observed in supragranular layers, suggesting further integration of the stimuli through the cortical layers. Significance. The topographic organization identified by this study provides further evidence for the presence of functional zones across an ICC lamina with locations consistent with those identified by previous studies. Clinically, these results suggest that co-activating different neural populations in the rostral-lateral ICC rather

  15. Sensitivity of cross sections for elastic nucleus-nucleus scattering to halo nucleus density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Sarantsev, V. V.

    2012-12-15

    In order to clear up the sensitivity of the nucleus-nucleus scattering to the nuclear matter distributions in exotic halo nuclei, we have calculated differential cross sections for elastic scattering of the {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li nuclei on several nuclear targets at the energy of 0.8 GeV/nucleon with different assumed nuclear density distributions in {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li.

  16. Hadron multiplicities and chemical freeze-out conditions in proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovchenko, V.; Begun, V. V.; Gorenstein, M. I.

    2016-06-01

    New results of the NA61/SHINE Collaboration at the CERN SPS on mean hadron multiplicities in proton-proton (p+p) interactions are analyzed within the transport models and the hadron resonance gas (HRG) statistical model. The chemical freeze-out parameters in p+p interactions and central Pb+Pb (or Au+Au) collisions are found and compared with each other in the range of the center-of-mass energy of the nucleon pair √{sN N}=3.2 -17.3 GeV. The canonical ensemble formulation of the HRG model is used to describe mean hadron multiplicities in p+p interactions and the grand canonical ensemble in central Pb+Pb and Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperatures in p+p interactions are found to be larger than the corresponding temperatures in central nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  17. Afferent projections to the ventral tegmental area of Tsai and interfascicular nucleus: a horseradish peroxidase study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Phillipson, O T

    1979-09-01

    Using the retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), a study has been made of projections to the ventral tegmental area of Tsai (VTA) and related dopaminergic cell groups (A 10). In order to minimise the possibility of damage to fibres of passage, a technique was evolved for the microiontophoresis of HRP such that minimal current strengths and durations were applied. In addition to a sham injection, control injections were also made to the medial lemnisuc, red nucleus, deep tegmental decussations, mesencephalic reticular formation and brachium conjunctivum. Following HRP injections confined to the areas of the VTA containing the dopamine cell groups, labelled neurons appeared in prefrontal cortex, dorsal bank of rhinal sulcus, nucleus accumbens, bed nucleus of stria terminalis, amygdala, diagonal band of Broca, substantis innominata, magnocellular preoptic area, medial and lateral preoptic areas, anterior, lateral and postero-dorsal hypothalamus, lateral habenular, nucleus parafascicular nucleus of thalamus, superior colliculus, nucleus raphe dorsalis, nucleus raphe nagnus and pontis, dorsal and ventral parabrachial nuclei, locus coeruleus and deep cerebellar nuclei. Regions containing catecholamine groups A 1, A 5, A 6, A 7, A 9, A 13 and the serotonin group B 7 corresponded to the topography of labeled cell groups. Injections of HRP to the interfascicular nucleus resulted in labeling predominantly confined to the medial habenular and median raphe nuclei. The results are discussed in relation to the known connections of these regions. Other regions of the brain labelled by VTA injections are assessed in relation to control injections and the limitations of the HRP technique. A review of the organisation of some of these afferents in relation to the known cortical-subcortical-mesencephalic projection systems, suggests that the VTA is in a position to recieve information from a massively convergent system derived ultimately from the entire archi-, paleo

  18. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  19. Cometary nucleus and active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of the icy conglomerate model of cometary nuclei, various observations demonstrate the spotted nature of many or most nuclei, i.e., regions of unusual activity, either high or low. Rotation periods, spin axes and even precession of the axes are determined. The observational evidence for variations in activity over the surfaces of cometary nuclei are listed and discussed. On June 11 the comet IRAS-ARAKI-ALCOCK approached the Earth to a distance of 0.031 AU, the nearest since C/Lexell, 1770 I, providing a unique opportunity for near-nucleus observations. Preliminary analysis of these images establishes the spin axis of the nucleus, with an oblioquity to the orbit plane of approximately 50 deg, and a lag angle of sublimation approximately 35 deg from the solar meridian on the nucleus. Asymmetries of the inner coma suggests a crazy-quilt distribution of ices with differing volatility over the surface of the nucleus. The observations of Comet P/Homes 1892 III, exhibiting two 8-10 magnitude bursts, are carefully analyzed. The grazing encounter produced, besides the first great burst, an active area on the nucleus, which was rotating retrograde with a period of 16.3hr and inclination nearly 180 deg. After the first burst the total magnitude fell less than two magnitudes from November 7 to November 30 (barely naked eye) while the nuclear region remained diffuse or complex, rarely if ever showing a stellar appearance. The fading was much more rapid after the second burst. The grazing encounter distributed a volume of large chunks in the neighborhood of the nucleus, maintaining activity for weeks.

  20. The midbrain precommand nucleus of the mormyrid electromotor network.

    PubMed

    von der Emde, G; Sena, L G; Niso, R; Grant, K

    2000-07-15

    The functional role of the midbrain precommand nucleus (PCN) of the electromotor system was explored in the weakly electric mormyrid fish Gnathonemus petersii, using extracellular recording of field potentials, single unit activity, and microstimulation in vivo. Electromotor-related field potentials in PCN are linked in a one-to-one manner and with a fixed time relationship to the electric organ discharge (EOD) command cycle, but occur later than EOD command activity in the medulla. It is suggested that PCN electromotor-related field potentials arise from two sources: (1) antidromically, by backpropagation across electrotonic synapses between PCN axons and command nucleus neurons, and (2) as corollary discharge-driven feedback arriving from the command nucleus indirectly, via multisynaptic pathways. PCN neurons can be activated by electrosensory input, but this does not necessarily activate the whole motor command chain. Microstimulation of PCN modulates the endogenous pattern of electromotor command in a way that can mimic the structure of certain stereotyped behavioral patterns. PCN activity is regulated, and to a certain extent synchronized, by corollary discharge feedback inhibition. However, PCN does not generally function as a synchronized pacemaker driving the electromotor command chain. We propose that PCN neurons integrate information of various origins and individually relay this to the command nucleus in the medulla. Some may also have intrinsic, although normally nonsynchronized, pacemaker properties. This descending activity, integrated in the electromotor command nucleus, will play an important modulatory role in the central pattern generator decision process.

  1. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner.

  2. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  3. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus (PPN) Influences Visual Contrast Sensitivity in Human Observers

    PubMed Central

    Strumpf, Hendrik; Noesselt, Toemme; Schoenfeld, Mircea Ariel; Voges, Jürgen; Panther, Patricia; Kaufmann, Joern; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Hopf, Jens-Max

    2016-01-01

    The parapontine nucleus of the thalamus (PPN) is a neuromodulatory midbrain structure with widespread connectivity to cortical and subcortical motor structures, as well as the spinal cord. The PPN also projects to the thalamus, including visual relay nuclei like the LGN and the pulvinar. Moreover, there is intense connectivity with sensory structures of the tegmentum in particular with the superior colliculus (SC). Given the existence and abundance of projections to visual sensory structures, it is likely that activity in the PPN has some modulatory influence on visual sensory selection. Here we address this possibility by measuring the visual discrimination performance (luminance contrast thresholds) in a group of patients with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) treated with deep-brain stimulation (DBS) of the PPN to control gait and postural motor deficits. In each patient we measured the luminance-contrast threshold of being able to discriminate an orientation-target (Gabor-grating) as a function of stimulation frequency (high 60Hz, low 8/10, no stimulation). Thresholds were determined using a standard staircase-protocol that is based on parameter estimation by sequential testing (PEST). We observed that under low frequency stimulation thresholds increased relative to no and high frequency stimulation in five out of six patients, suggesting that DBS of the PPN has a frequency-dependent impact on visual selection processes at a rather elementary perceptual level. PMID:27167979

  4. Connectivity of the Primate Superior Colliculus Mapped by Concurrent Microstimulation and Event-Related fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Field, Courtney B.; Johnston, Kevin; Gati, Joseph S.; Menon, Ravi S.; Everling, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Background Neuroanatomical studies investigating the connectivity of brain areas have heretofore employed procedures in which chemical or viral tracers are injected into an area of interest, and connected areas are subsequently identified using histological techniques. Such experiments require the sacrifice of the animals and do not allow for subsequent electrophysiological studies in the same subjects, rendering a direct investigation of the functional properties of anatomically identified areas impossible. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we used a combination of microstimulation and fMRI in an anesthetized monkey preparation to study the connectivity of the superior colliculus (SC). Microstimulation of the SC resulted in changes in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the SC and in several cortical and subcortical areas consistent with the known connectivity of the SC in primates. Conclusions/Significance These findings demonstrates that the concurrent use of microstimulation and fMRI can be used to identify brain networks for further electrophysiological or fMRI investigation. PMID:19079541

  5. Retinal Afferent Ingrowth to Neocortical Transplants in the Adult Rat Superior Colliculus is due to the Regeneration of Damaged Axons

    PubMed Central

    Ross, D. T.; Das, G. D.

    1994-01-01

    Retinal afferent ingrowth to embryonic neural transplants in the adult rat superior colliculus may represent either sprouting of intact axons or the regeneration of transected axons. If ingrowth represents regeneration of damaged retinofugai axons, then lesions that axotomize more retinofugal axons at the transplantation site should induce greater retinal afferent ingrowth. Alternately, if ingrowth represents terminal or collateral sprouting of intact retinofugal axons at or near the transplant/host optic layer interface, then the magnitude of retinal afferent ingrowth should be directly related to the total area of this interface. To test between these two hypotheses surgical knife wounds were made either parallel (in the sagittal plane) or perpendicular (in the transverse plane) to the course of axons in the stratum opticum, embryonic neocortical tissue was transplanted at the coordinates of these tectal slits, and retinal afferent ingrowth visualized 1-90 days after surgery using anterogradely transported HRP. A zone of traumatic reaction (ztr) in the optic layers was seen in every case, characterized by hypertrophied axons and swollen terminal clubs at 1 day. Between 30 and 90 days the damaged retinofugal axons in the zone formed dense fascicles and neuroma-like tangles. Retinal afferent ingrowth occurred only across transplant interface regions with the ztr. The magnitude of ingrowth was directly related to the area of the ztr interface and not the total optic layer interface area. Retinal afferent ingrowth appears to reflect the intrinsic regenerative capacity of adult mammalian retinal ganglion cells and not sprouting of undamaged axons. PMID:7703292

  6. Neurons in the inferior colliculus of the rat show stimulus-specific adaptation for frequency, but not for intensity.

    PubMed

    Duque, Daniel; Wang, Xin; Nieto-Diego, Javier; Krumbholz, Katrin; Malmierca, Manuel S

    2016-04-12

    Electrophysiological and psychophysical responses to a low-intensity probe sound tend to be suppressed by a preceding high-intensity adaptor sound. Nevertheless, rare low-intensity deviant sounds presented among frequent high-intensity standard sounds in an intensity oddball paradigm can elicit an electroencephalographic mismatch negativity (MMN) response. This has been taken to suggest that the MMN is a correlate of true change or "deviance" detection. A key question is where in the ascending auditory pathway true deviance sensitivity first emerges. Here, we addressed this question by measuring low-intensity deviant responses from single units in the inferior colliculus (IC) of anesthetized rats. If the IC exhibits true deviance sensitivity to intensity, IC neurons should show enhanced responses to low-intensity deviant sounds presented among high-intensity standards. Contrary to this prediction, deviant responses were only enhanced when the standards and deviants differed in frequency. The results could be explained with a model assuming that IC neurons integrate over multiple frequency-tuned channels and that adaptation occurs within each channel independently. We used an adaptation paradigm with multiple repeated adaptors to measure the tuning widths of these adaption channels in relation to the neurons' overall tuning widths.

  7. Neurons in the inferior colliculus of the rat show stimulus-specific adaptation for frequency, but not for intensity

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Daniel; Wang, Xin; Nieto-Diego, Javier; Krumbholz, Katrin; Malmierca, Manuel S.

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiological and psychophysical responses to a low-intensity probe sound tend to be suppressed by a preceding high-intensity adaptor sound. Nevertheless, rare low-intensity deviant sounds presented among frequent high-intensity standard sounds in an intensity oddball paradigm can elicit an electroencephalographic mismatch negativity (MMN) response. This has been taken to suggest that the MMN is a correlate of true change or “deviance” detection. A key question is where in the ascending auditory pathway true deviance sensitivity first emerges. Here, we addressed this question by measuring low-intensity deviant responses from single units in the inferior colliculus (IC) of anesthetized rats. If the IC exhibits true deviance sensitivity to intensity, IC neurons should show enhanced responses to low-intensity deviant sounds presented among high-intensity standards. Contrary to this prediction, deviant responses were only enhanced when the standards and deviants differed in frequency. The results could be explained with a model assuming that IC neurons integrate over multiple frequency-tuned channels and that adaptation occurs within each channel independently. We used an adaptation paradigm with multiple repeated adaptors to measure the tuning widths of these adaption channels in relation to the neurons’ overall tuning widths. PMID:27066835

  8. Maturation of multisensory integration in the superior colliculus: expression of nitric oxide synthase and neurofilament SMI-32.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Santamaria, Veronica; McHaffie, John G; Stein, Barry E

    2008-11-25

    Nitric oxide (NO) containing (nitrergic) interneurons are well-positioned to convey the cortical influences that are crucial for multisensory integration in superior colliculus (SC) output neurons. However, it is not known whether nitrergic interneurons are in this position early in life, and might, therefore, also play a role in the functional maturation of this circuit. In the present study, we investigated the postnatal developmental relationship between these two populations of neurons using Beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH) histochemistry and SMI-32 immunocytochemistry to label presumptive interneurons and output neurons, respectively. SMI-32 immunostained neurons were proved to mature and retained immature anatomical features until approximately 8 postnatal weeks. In contrast, nitrergic interneurons developed more rapidly. They had achieved their adult-like anatomy by 4 postnatal weeks and were in a position to influence the dendritic elaboration of output neurons. It is this dendritic substrate through which much of the cortico-collicular influence is expressed. Double-labeling experiments showed that the dendritic and axonal processes of nitrergic interneurons already apposed the somata and dendrites of SMI-32 labeled neurons even at the earliest age examined. The results suggest that nitrergic interneurons play a role in refining the cortico-collicular projection patterns that are believed to be essential for SC output neurons to engage in multisensory integration and to support normal orientation responses to cross-modal stimuli.

  9. The locus of motor activity in the superior colliculus of the rhesus monkey is unaltered during saccadic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Quessy, Stephan; Quinet, Julie; Freedman, Edward G

    2010-10-20

    The location of motor-related activity in the deeper layers of the superior colliculus (SC) is thought to generate a desired displacement command specifying the amplitude and direction of saccadic eye movements. However, the amplitude of saccadic eye movements made to visual targets can be systematically altered by surreptitiously moving the target location after the saccade has been initiated. Depending on whether the target is moved closer to or further from the fixation location, adaptation of saccade amplitude results in movements that are either smaller or larger than control movements. It remains an open question whether the SC specifies the desired movement to the original target location or whether SC activity specifies the vector of the amplitude-altered movement that is observed as adaptation progresses. We investigated this question by recording the activity of saccade-related burst neurons in the SC of head-restrained rhesus monkeys during both backward and forward saccadic adaptation. During adaptation in each direction, we find no evidence that is consistent with a change in the locus of SC activity despite changes in saccade amplitude; the location of SC motor-related activity does not appear to be remapped during either forward or backward saccadic adaptation. These data are inconsistent with hypotheses that propose a key role for the SC in mediating the changes in saccade amplitude observed during adaptation.

  10. Target representation of naturalistic echolocation sequences in single unit responses from the inferior colliculus of big brown bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, Mark I.; Simmons, James A.

    2005-11-01

    Echolocating big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) emit trains of frequency-modulated (FM) biosonar signals whose duration, repetition rate, and sweep structure change systematically during interception of prey. When stimulated with a 2.5-s sequence of 54 FM pulse-echo pairs that mimic sounds received during search, approach, and terminal stages of pursuit, single neurons (N=116) in the bat's inferior colliculus (IC) register the occurrence of a pulse or echo with an average of <1 spike/sound. Individual IC neurons typically respond to only a segment of the search or approach stage of pursuit, with fewer neurons persisting to respond in the terminal stage. Composite peristimulus-time-histogram plots of responses assembled across the whole recorded population of IC neurons depict the delay of echoes and, hence, the existence and distance of the simulated biosonar target, entirely as on-response latencies distributed across time. Correlated changes in pulse duration, repetition rate, and pulse or echo amplitude do modulate the strength of responses (probability of the single spike actually occurring for each sound), but registration of the target itself remains confined exclusively to the latencies of single spikes across cells. Modeling of echo processing in FM biosonar should emphasize spike-time algorithms to explain the content of biosonar images.

  11. Response Normalization in the Superficial Layers of the Superior Colliculus as a Possible Mechanism for Saccadic Averaging

    PubMed Central

    Vokoun, Corinne R.; Huang, Xin; Jackson, Meyer B.

    2014-01-01

    How does the brain decide where to look? Neuronal networks within the superior colliculus (SC) encode locations of intended eye movements. When faced with multiple targets, the relative activities of neuronal populations compete for the selection of a saccade. However, the computational principles underlying saccadic choices remain poorly understood. We used voltage imaging of slices of rat SC to record circuit dynamics of population responses to single- and dual-site electrical stimulation to begin to reveal some of the principles of how populations of neurons interact. Stimulation of two distant sites simultaneously within the SC produced two distinct peaks of activity, whereas stimulation of two nearby sites simultaneously exhibited a single, merged peak centered between the two sites. The distances required to produce merged peaks of activity corresponded to target separations that evoked averaging saccades in humans performing a corresponding dual target task. The merged activity was well accounted for by a linear weighed summation and a divisive normalization of the responses evoked by the single-site stimulations. Interestingly, the merging of activity occurred within the superficial SC, suggesting a novel pathway for saccadic eye movement choice. PMID:24899719

  12. Response properties and location of neurons selective for sinusoidal frequency modulations in the inferior colliculus of the big brown bat.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qi; Casseday, John H; Covey, Ellen

    2007-09-01

    Most animal vocalizations, including echolocation signals used by bats, contain frequency-modulated (FM) components. Previous studies have described a class of neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of the big brown bat that respond exclusively to sinusoidally frequency modulated (SFM) signals and fail to respond to pure tones, noise, amplitude-modulated tones, or single FM sweeps. The aims of this study were to further characterize these neurons' response properties and to determine whether they are localized within a specific area of the IC. We recorded extracellularly from 214 neurons throughout the IC. Of these, 47 (22%) responded exclusively to SFM. SFM-selective cells were tuned to relatively low carrier frequencies (9-50 kHz), low modulation rates (20-210 Hz), and shallow modulation depths (3-10 kHz). Most had extremely low thresholds, with an average of 16.5 +/- 7.6 dB SPL, and 89% had upper thresholds and closed response areas. For SFM-selective cells with spontaneous activity, the spontaneous activity was eliminated when sound amplitude exceeded their upper threshold and resumed after the stimulus was over. These findings suggest that SFM-selective cells receive low-threshold excitatory inputs and high-threshold inhibitory inputs. SFM-selective cells were clustered in the rostrodorsal part of the IC. Within this area, best modulation rate appeared to be correlated with best carrier frequency and depth within the IC.

  13. Ontogenesis of auditory fovea representation in the inferior colliculus of the Sri Lankan rufous horseshoe bat, Rhinolophus rouxi.

    PubMed

    Rübsamen, R; Schäfer, M

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the ontogenesis of tonotopy in the inferior colliculus (IC) of the rufous horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus rouxi). Horseshoe bats are deaf at birth, but consistent tonotopy with a low-to-high frequency gradient from dorsolateral to ventromedial develops from the 2nd up to the 5th week. The representation of the auditory fovea is established in ventro-medio-caudal parts of the IC during the 3rd postnatal week (Fig. 3). Then, a narrow frequency band 5 kHz in width, comprising 16% of the bat's auditory range, captures 50-60 vol% of the IC (Fig. 3c). However, foveal tuning is 10-12 kHz (1/3 octave) lower than in adults; foveal tuning in females (65-68 kHz) is 2-3 kHz higher than in males (62-65 Khz). Thereafter, foveal tuning increases by 1-1.5 kHz per day up to the 5th postnatal week, when the adult hearing range is established (Figs. 4, 5). The increase of sensitivity and of tuning sharpness of single units also follows a low-to-high frequency gradient (Fig. 6). Throughout this development the foveal tuning matches the second harmonic of the echolocation pulses vocalised by these young bats. The results confirm the hypothesis of developmental shifts in the frequency-place code for the foveal high frequency representation in the IC.

  14. Distractor Evoked Deviations of Saccade Trajectory Are Modulated by Fixation Activity in the Superior Colliculus: Computational and Behavioral Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiguo; Theeuwes, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that saccades may deviate towards or away from task irrelevant visual distractors. This observation has been attributed to active suppression (inhibition) of the distractor location unfolding over time: early in time inhibition at the distractor location is incomplete causing deviation towards the distractor, while later in time when inhibition is complete the eyes deviate away from the distractor. In a recent computational study, Wang, Kruijne and Theeuwes proposed an alternative theory that the lateral interactions in the superior colliculus (SC), which are characterized by short-distance excitation and long-distance inhibition, are sufficient for generating both deviations towards and away from distractors. In the present study, we performed a meta-analysis of the literature, ran model simulations and conducted two behavioral experiments to further explore this unconventional theory. Confirming predictions generated by the model simulations, the behavioral experiments show that a) saccades deviate towards close distractors and away from remote distractors, and b) the amount of deviation depends on the strength of fixation activity in the SC, which can be manipulated by turning off the fixation stimulus before or after target onset (Experiment 1), or by varying the eccentricity of the target and distractor (Experiment 2). PMID:25551552

  15. Neuroanatomical and psychopharmacological evidence for interaction between opioid and GABAergic neural pathways in the modulation of fear and defense elicited by electrical and chemical stimulation of the deep layers of the superior colliculus and dorsal periaqueductal gray matter.

    PubMed

    Eichenberger, G C D; Ribeiro, S J; Osaki, M Y; Maruoka, R Y; Resende, G C C; Castellan-Baldan, L; Corrêa, S A L; Da Silva, L A; Coimbra, N C

    2002-01-01

    The effects of central administration of opioid antagonists on the aversive responses elicited by electrical (at the freezing and escape thresholds) or chemical stimulation (crossings, rearings, turnings and jumps, induced by microinjections of bicuculline) of the midbrain tectum were determined. Central microinjections of naloxone and naltrexone in the mesencephalic tectum caused a significant increase in the freezing and escape thresholds elicited by electrical midbrain tectum stimulation. Furthermore, both opioid antagonists caused a significant decrease in the mean incidence of aversive behavioral responses induced by microinjections of bicuculline in the deep layers of the superior colliculus (DLSC) and in dorsal aspects of the periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG), as compared with controls. These findings suggest an opioid modulation of the GABAergic inhibitory inputs controlling the aversive behavior elicited by midbrain tectum stimulation. In fact, immunohistochemical evidence suggests that the dorsal mesencephalon is rich in beta-endorphin-containing neurons and fibers with varicosities. Iontophoretical microinjections of the neurotracer biodextran in the substantia nigra, pars reticulata (SNpr), show nigro-tectal pathways connecting SNpr with the same neural substrate of the DPAG rich in neuronal cells immunoreactive for opioid peptides. Labeled neurons of the DLSC and periaqueductal gray matter send inputs with varsicosities to ipsi- and contralateral DPAG and ipsilateral SNpr. These findings, in addition to the psychopharmacological evidence for the interaction between opioid and GABAergic mechanisms, offer a neuroanatomical basis of a possible presynaptic opioid inhibition of GABAergic nigro-tectal neurons modulating the fear in aversive structures of the cranial mesencephalon, in a short link, and maybe through a major neural circuit, also in GABA-containing perikarya of nigro-tectal neurons.

  16. Structure in the nucleus of NGC 1068 at 10 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tresch-Fienberg, R.; Fazio, G. G.; Gezari, D. Y.; Lamb, G. M.; Shu, P. K.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Mccreight, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    New 8-13 micron array camera images of the central kiloparsec of Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 resolve structure that is similar to that observed at visible and radio wavelengths. The images reveal an infrared source which is extended and asymmetric, with its long axis oriented at P.A. 33 deg. Maps of the spatial distribution of 8-13 micron color temperature and warm dust opacity are derived from the multiwavelength infrared images. The results suggest that there exist two pointlike luminosity sources in the central region of NGC 1068, with the brighter source at the nucleus and the fainter one some 100 pc to the northeast. This geometry strengthens the possibility that the 10 micron emission observed from grains in the nucleus is powered by a nonthermal source. In the context of earlier visible and radio studies, these results considerably strengthen the case for jet-induced star formation in NGC 1068.

  17. Structure in the nucleus of NGC 1068 at 10 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tresch-Fienberg, R.; Fazio, G. G.; Gezari, D. Y.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Lamb, G. M.; Shu, P. K.; Mccreight, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    New 8 to 13 micron array camera images of the central kiloparsec of Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 resolve structure that is similar to that observed at visible and radio wavelengths. The images reveal an infrared source which is extended and asymmetric, with its long axis oriented at P.A. 33 deg. Maps of the spatial distribution of 8 to 13 micron color temperature and warm dust opacity are derived from the multiwavelength infrared images. The results suggest that there exist two pointlike luminosity sources in the central regions of NGC 1068, with the brighter source at the nucleus and the fainter one some 100 pc to the northeast. This geometry strengthens the possibility that the 10 micron emission observed from grains in the nucleus is powered by a nonthermal source. In the context of earlier visible and radio studies, these results considerably strengthen the case for jet induced star formation in NGC 1068.

  18. Higgs and Particle Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe

    We apply a diagrammatic approach to study Higgs boson, a color-neutral heavy particle, pro- duction in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the saturation framework without quantum evolution. We assume the strong coupling constant much smaller than one. Due to the heavy mass and colorless nature of Higgs particle, final state interactions are absent in our calculation. In order to treat the two nuclei dynamically symmetric, we use the Coulomb gauge which gives the appropriate light cone gauge for each nucleus. To further eliminate initial state interactions we choose specific prescriptions in the light cone propagators. We start the calculation from only two nucleons in each nucleus and then demonstrate how to generalize the calculation to higher orders diagrammatically. We simplify the diagrams by the Slavnov-Taylor-Ward identities. The resulting cross section is factorized into a product of two Weizsacker-Williams gluon distributions of the two nuclei when the transverse momentum of the produced scalar particle is around the saturation momentum. To our knowledge this is the first process where an exact analytic formula has been formed for a physical process, involving momenta on the order of the saturation momentum, in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the quasi-classical approximation. Since we have performed the calculation in an unconventional gauge choice, we further confirm our results in Feynman gauge where the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution is interpreted as a transverse momentum broadening of a hard gluons traversing a nuclear medium. The transverse momentum factorization manifests itself in light cone gauge but not so clearly in Feynman gauge. In saturation physics there are two different unintegrated gluon distributions usually encountered in the literature: the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution and the dipole gluon distribution. The first gluon distribution is constructed by solving classical Yang-Mills equation of motion in the Mc

  19. Analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a computer-assisted method is reported for the determination of the angular distribution data for secondary particles produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsions. The method is applied to emulsion detectors that were placed in a constant, uniform magnetic field and exposed to beams of 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon O-16 ions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) of the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Linear regression analysis is used to determine the azimuthal and polar emission angles from measured track coordinate data. The software, written in BASIC, is designed to be machine independent, and adaptable to an automated system for acquiring the track coordinates. The fitting algorithm is deterministic, and takes into account the experimental uncertainty in the measured points. Further, a procedure for using the track data to estimate the linear momenta of the charged particles observed in the detectors is included.

  20. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential at short distances

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yongying; Wang Ning; Li Zhuxia; Scheid, Werner

    2010-04-15

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for fusion reactions {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca, {sup 48}Ca+{sup 208}Pb, and {sup 126}Sn+{sup 130}Te are studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics model together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation for the kinetic energies of nuclei. The obtained fusion barrier for {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca is in good agreement with the extracted fusion barrier from the measured fusion excitation function, and the depths of the fusion pockets are close to the results of time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations. The energy dependence of the fusion barrier is also investigated. The fusion pocket becomes shallow for a heavy fusion system and almost disappears for heavy nearly symmetric systems, and the obtained potential at short distances is higher than the adiabatic potential.

  1. Azimuthal correlation and collective behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A. Sarkar, S.; Singh, G.

    2015-03-15

    Various flow effects of nuclear and hadronic origin are investigated in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Nuclear emulsion data collected from {sup 84}Kr + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 1.52 GeV per nucleon and from {sup 28}Si + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 14.5 GeV per nucleon are used in the investigation. The transverse momentum distribution and the flow angle analysis show that collective behavior, like a bounce-off effect of the projectile spectators and a sidesplash effect of the target spectators, are present in our event samples. From an azimuthal angle analysis of the data we also see a direct flow of the projectile fragments and of the produced charged particles. On the other hand, for both data samples the target fragments exhibit a reverse flow, while the projectile fragments exhibit an elliptic flow. Relevant flow parameters are measured.

  2. Single nucleon emission in relativistic nucleus-nucleus reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1992-01-01

    Significant discrepancies between theory and experiment have previously been noted for nucleon emission via electromagnetic processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The present work investigates the hypothesis that these discrepancies have arisen due to uncertainties about how to deduce the experimental electromagnetic cross section from the total measured cross section. An optical-model calculation of single neutron removal is added to electromagnetic cross sections and compared to the total experimental cross sections. Good agreement is found thereby resolving some of the earlier noted discrepancies. A detailed comparison to the recent work of Benesh, Cook, and Vary is made for both the impact parameter and the nuclear cross section. Good agreement is obtained giving an independent confirmation of the parameterized formulas developed by those authors.

  3. The representation of periodic sounds in simulated sustained chopper units of the ventral cochlear nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegrebe, Lutz; Meddis, Ray

    2004-03-01

    The nature of the neural processing underlying the extraction of pitch information from harmonic complex sounds is still unclear. Electrophysiological studies in the auditory nerve and many psychophysical and modeling studies suggest that pitch might be extracted successfully by applying a mechanism like autocorrelation to the temporal discharge patterns of auditory-nerve fibers. The current modeling study investigates the possible role of populations of sustained chopper (Chop-S) units located in the mammalian ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) in this process. First, it is shown that computer simulations can predict responses to periodic and quasiperiodic sounds of individual Chop-S units recorded in the guinea-pig VCN. Second, it is shown that the fundamental period of a periodic or quasiperiodic sound is represented in the first-order, interspike interval statistics of a population of simulated Chop-S units. This is true across a wide range of characteristic frequencies when the chopping rate is equal to the f0 of the sound. The model was able to simulate the results of psychophysical studies involving the pitch height and pitch strength of iterated ripple noise, the dominance region of pitch, the effect of phase on pitch height and pitch strength, pitch of inharmonic stimuli, and of sinusoidally amplitude modulated noise. Simulation results indicate that changes in the interspike interval statistics of populations of Chop-S units compare well with changes in the pitch perceived by humans. It is proposed that Chop-S units in the ventral cochlear nucleus may play an important role in pitch extraction: They can convert a purely temporal pitch code as observed in the auditory nerve into a temporal place code of pitch in populations of cochlear-nucleus, Chop-S with different characteristic frequencies, and chopping rates. Thus, populations of cochlear-nucleus Chop-S units, together with their target units presumably located in the inferior colliculus, may serve to

  4. Hummingbird Comet Nucleus Analysis Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel; Carle, Glenn C.; Lasher, Larry E.

    2000-01-01

    Hummingbird is a highly focused scientific mission, proposed to NASA s Discovery Program, designed to address the highest priority questions in cometary science-that of the chemical composition of the cometary nucleus. After rendezvous with the comet, Hummingbird would first methodically image and map the comet, then collect and analyze dust, ice and gases from the cometary atmosphere to enrich characterization of the comet and support landing site selection. Then, like its namesake, Hummingbird would carefully descend to a pre-selected surface site obtaining a high-resolution image, gather a surface material sample, acquire surface temperature and then immediately return to orbit for detailed chemical and elemental analyses followed by a high resolution post-sampling image of the site. Hummingbird s analytical laboratory contains instrumentation for a comprehensive molecular and elemental analysis of the cometary nucleus as well as an innovative surface sample acquisition device.

  5. FM velocity selectivity in the inferior colliculus is inherited from velocity-selective inputs and enhanced by spike threshold.

    PubMed

    Gittelman, Joshua X; Li, Na

    2011-11-01

    Frequency modulation (FM) is computed from the temporal sequence of activated auditory nerve fibers representing different frequencies. Most studies in the inferior colliculus (IC) have inferred from extracellular recordings that the precise timing of nonselective inputs creates selectivity for FM direction and velocity (Andoni S, Li N, Pollak GD. J Neurosci 27: 4882-4893, 2007; Fuzessery ZM, Richardson MD, Coburn MS. J Neurophysiol 96: 1320-1336, 2006; Gordon M, O'Neill WE. Hear Res 122: 97-108, 1998). We recently reported that two additional mechanisms were more important than input timing for directional selectivity in some IC cells: spike threshold and inputs that were already selective (Gittelman JX, Li N, Pollak GD. J Neurosci 29: 13030-13041, 2009). Here, we show that these same mechanisms, selective inputs and spike threshold, underlie selectivity for FM velocity and intensity. From whole cell recordings in awake bats, we recorded spikes and postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) evoked by downward and upward FMs that swept identical frequencies at different velocities and intensities. To determine the synaptic mechanisms underlying PSP selectivity (relative PSP height), we derived sweep-evoked synaptic conductances. Changing FM velocity or intensity changed conductance timing and size. Modeling indicated that excitatory conductance size contributed more to PSP selectivity than conductance timing, indicating that the number of afferent spikes carried more FM information to the IC than precise spike timing. However, excitation alone produced mostly suprathreshold PSPs. Inhibition reduced absolute PSP heights, without necessarily altering PSP selectivity, thereby rendering some PSPs subthreshold. Spike threshold then sharpened selectivity in the spikes by rectifying the smaller PSPs. This indicates the importance of spike threshold, and that inhibition enhances selectivity via a different mechanism than previously proposed.

  6. The effect of correlated neuronal firing and neuronal heterogeneity on population coding accuracy in guinea pig inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Oran; Shackleton, Trevor M; Palmer, Alan R; Shamir, Maoz

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the considerable noise in single-cell responses to a stimulus can be overcome by pooling information from a large population. Theoretical studies indicated that correlations in trial-to-trial fluctuations in the responses of different neurons may limit the improvement due to pooling. Subsequent theoretical studies have suggested that inherent neuronal diversity, i.e., the heterogeneity of tuning curves and other response properties of neurons preferentially tuned to the same stimulus, can provide a means to overcome this limit. Here we study the effect of spike-count correlations and the inherent neuronal heterogeneity on the ability to extract information from large neural populations. We use electrophysiological data from the guinea pig Inferior-Colliculus to capture inherent neuronal heterogeneity and single cell statistics, and introduce response correlations artificially. To this end, we generate pseudo-population responses, based on single-cell recording of neurons responding to auditory stimuli with varying binaural correlations. Typically, when pseudo-populations are generated from single cell data, the responses within the population are statistically independent. As a result, the information content of the population will increase indefinitely with its size. In contrast, here we apply a simple algorithm that enables us to generate pseudo-population responses with variable spike-count correlations. This enables us to study the effect of neuronal correlations on the accuracy of conventional rate codes. We show that in a homogenous population, in the presence of even low-level correlations, information content is bounded. In contrast, utilizing a simple linear readout, that takes into account the natural heterogeneity, even of neurons preferentially tuned to the same stimulus, within the neural population, one can overcome the correlated noise and obtain a readout whose accuracy grows linearly with the size of the population. PMID

  7. Contribution of GABAergic inhibition to synaptic responses and LTD early in postnatal development in the rat superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Mize, R Ranney; Salt, Thomas E

    2004-09-01

    We studied the development of optic tract evoked field potentials (FP) in the rodent superior colliculus (SC) and the effect of GABA antagonists upon their development and upon induction of long-term depression (LTD). Brain slices were cut from Lister Hooded rats. The optic tract was stimulated while recording from the superficial grey layer. GABAergic inhibition was assessed by adding 100 microm picrotoxin and 3 microm CGP55845 antagonists to block GABA A,B,C receptors. LTD was induced with a 50 Hz, 20 s tetanus. At age P2, the FP consisted only of a presynaptic spike. The GABA antagonists had no effect. By P4, the FP consisted of a presynaptic spike, a longer latency population spike, and a field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP). The fEPSP was slightly prolonged by the GABA antagonists at this age. By P7-P14, a prominent FP with trailing fEPSP was recorded. The GABA antagonists usually had a large effect, with the fEPSP increasing in both amplitude and duration. A mature FP was usually recorded in P15-P23 slices where the GABA antagonist effect remained substantial. LTD could be induced in 17 of 30 control slices from rats aged P4-P26. The average fEPSP amplitude after tetanus was 77.9% of control. Pre-treatment with GABA antagonists produced a short-term potentiation (average 114.0%), rather than LTD, in 14 of 19 cases. This STP was followed by a more prolonged potentiation in 12 of the 14 cases. We conclude that GABAergic inhibitory circuits mature before eye opening and that GABA contributes to induction of LTD in the developing SC.

  8. Recovery cycle times of inferior colliculus neurons in the awake bat measured with spike counts and latencies

    PubMed Central

    Sayegh, Riziq; Aubie, Brandon; Fazel-Pour, Siavosh; Faure, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Neural responses in the mammalian auditory midbrain (inferior colliculus; IC) arise from complex interactions of synaptic excitation, inhibition, and intrinsic properties of the cell. Temporally selective duration-tuned neurons (DTNs) in the IC are hypothesized to arise through the convergence of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs offset in time. Synaptic inhibition can be inferred from extracellular recordings by presenting pairs of pulses (paired tone stimulation) and comparing the evoked responses of the cell to each pulse. We obtained single unit recordings from the IC of the awake big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) and used paired tone stimulation to measure the recovery cycle times of DTNs and non-temporally selective auditory neurons. By systematically varying the interpulse interval (IPI) of the paired tone stimulus, we determined the minimum IPI required for a neuron's spike count or its spike latency (first- or last-spike latency) in response to the second tone to recover to within ≥50% of the cell's baseline count or to within 1 SD of it's baseline latency in response to the first tone. Recovery times of shortpass DTNs were significantly shorter than those of bandpass DTNs, and recovery times of bandpass DTNs were longer than allpass neurons not selective for stimulus duration. Recovery times measured with spike counts were positively correlated with those measured with spike latencies. Recovery times were also correlated with first-spike latency (FSL). These findings, combined with previous studies on duration tuning in the IC, suggest that persistent inhibition is a defining characteristic of DTNs. Herein, we discuss measuring recovery times of neurons with spike counts and latencies. We also highlight how persistent inhibition could determine neural recovery times and serve as a potential mechanism underlying the precedence effect in humans. Finally, we explore implications of recovery times for DTNs in the context of bat hearing and

  9. Group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors contribute to different aspects of visual response processing in the rat superior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Cirone, Jennifer; Salt, Thomas E

    2001-01-01

    Neurones in the superior colliculus (SC) respond to novel sensory stimuli and response habituation is a key feature of this. It is known that both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors participate in visual responses of superficial SC neurones. A feature of Group II and Group III mGlu receptors is that they may modulate specific neural pathways, possibly via presynaptic mechanisms. However, less is known about how this may relate to functions of systems in whole animals. We have therefore investigated whether these receptors affect specific attributes of visual responses in the superficial SC. Recordings were made from visually responsive neurones in anaesthetised rats, and agonists and antagonists of Group II and III mGlu receptors were applied iontophoretically at the recording site. We found that application of the Group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist l-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4) produced an increase in visual response habituation, whilst Group III antagonists decreased habituation. These effects were independent of the response habituation mediated via GABAB receptors. In contrast, modulation of Group II mGlu receptors with the specific agonist LY354740 or the antagonist LY341495 did not affect response habituation, although these compounds did modulate visual responses. This suggests a specific role for Group III mGlu receptors in visual response habituation. The magnitude of Group II effects was smaller during presentation of low contrast stimuli compared with high contrast stimuli. This suggests that activation of Group II receptors may be activity dependent and that these receptors can translate this into a functional effect in adapting to high contrast stimuli. PMID:11433000

  10. Roles of inhibition in creating complex auditory responses in the inferior colliculus: facilitated combination-sensitive neurons.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, Kiran; Wenstrup, Jeffrey J

    2005-06-01

    We studied roles of inhibition on temporally sensitive facilitation in combination-sensitive neurons from the mustached bat's inferior colliculus (IC). In these integrative neurons, excitatory responses to best frequency (BF) tones are enhanced by much lower frequency signals presented in a specific temporal relationship. Most facilitated neurons (76%) showed inhibition at delays earlier than or later than the delays causing facilitation. The timing of inhibition at earlier delays was closely related to the best delay of facilitation, but the inhibition had little influence on the duration or strength of the facilitatory interaction. Local iontophoretic application of antagonists to receptors for glycine (strychnine, STRY) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) (bicuculline, BIC) showed that STRY abolished facilitation in 96% of tested units, but BIC eliminated facilitation in only 28%. This suggests that facilitatory interactions are created in IC and reveals a differential role for these neurotransmitters. The facilitation may be created by coincidence of a postinhibitory rebound excitation activated by the low-frequency signal with the BF-evoked excitation. Unlike facilitation, inhibition at earlier delays was not eliminated by application of antagonists, suggesting an origin in lower brain stem nuclei. However, inhibition at delays later than facilitation, like facilitation itself, appears to originate within IC and to be more dependent on glycinergic than GABAergic mechanisms. Facilitatory and inhibitory interactions displayed by these combination-sensitive neurons encode information within sonar echoes and social vocalizations. The results indicate that these complex response properties arise through a series of neural interactions in the auditory brain stem and midbrain.

  11. Selective changes in GABAergic transmission in substantia nigra and superior colliculus caused by ethanol and ethanol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Peris, J; Coleman-Hardee, M; Burry, J; Pecins-Thompson, M

    1992-04-01

    One of ethanol's actions after acute exposure is anticonvulsant activity whereas withdrawal from chronic ethanol exposure increases convulsant activity. An increase in neuronal transmission in the GABAergic pathways from striatum to the substantia nigra (SN) and a decrease in GABAergic transmission from SN to superior colliculus (SC) both appear to play a major role in inhibiting seizure propagation. If this is the case, then the changes in seizure sensitivity caused by ethanol may be expected to affect GABAergic transmission in opposite ways in SN and SC. We measured the effects of in vitro ethanol on pre- and postsynaptic indices of GABA transmission using SN and SC tissue from both ethanol-naive rats and rats given ethanol in their drinking water for 24 days and then withdrawn for 24 hr, a treatment that decreases seizure latency. While ethanol inhibited 3H-GABA release from slices of SC at low concentrations (20-100 nM), much higher concentrations were required to inhibit release from SN (100-500 mM). In fact, release from SN was increased by low concentrations of ethanol. Ethanol in vitro (20-1000 mM) also inhibited specific binding of 35S-TBPS to the GABAA receptor but this effect was similar in both potency and efficacy in SC and SN. Next, the in vitro effects of ethanol were measured in rats that had consumed an average of 9.8 g ethanol/kg body weight/day and were then withdrawn for 24 hr. Ethanol inhibition of 3H-GABA release from SC was significantly less in ethanol-treated rats compared to controls whereas the inhibitory effect of ethanol was increased in SN from ethanol-treated rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Distribution of interaural time difference in the barn owl's inferior colliculus in the low- and high-frequency ranges.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Hermann; Asadollahi, Ali; Bremen, Peter; Endler, Frank; Vonderschen, Katrin; von Campenhausen, Mark

    2007-04-11

    Interaural time differences are an important cue for azimuthal sound localization. It is still unclear whether the same neuronal mechanisms underlie the representation in the brain of interaural time difference in different vertebrates and whether these mechanisms are driven by common constraints, such as optimal coding. Current sound localization models may be discriminated by studying the spectral distribution of response peaks in tuning curves that measure the sensitivity to interaural time difference. The sound localization system of the barn owl has been studied intensively, but data that would allow discrimination between currently discussed models are missing from this animal. We have therefore obtained extracellular recordings from the time-sensitive subnuclei of the barn owl's inferior colliculus. Response peaks were broadly scattered over the physiological range of interaural time differences. A change in the representation of the interaural phase differences with frequency was not observed. In some neurons, response peaks fell outside the physiological range of interaural time differences. For a considerable number of neurons, the peak closest to zero interaural time difference was not the behaviorally relevant peak. The data are in best accordance with models suggesting that a place code underlies the representation of interaural time difference. The data from the high-frequency range, but not from the low-frequency range, are consistent with predictions of optimal coding. We speculate that the deviation of the representation of interaural time difference from optimal-coding models in the low-frequency range is attributable to the diminished importance of low frequencies for catching prey in this species. PMID:17428997

  13. Age-related structural and functional changes in the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Frisina, Robert D; Walton, Joseph P

    2006-01-01

    Presbycusis - age-related hearing loss - is a key communication disorder and chronic medical condition of our aged population. The cochlear nucleus is the major site of projections from the auditory portion of the inner ear. Relative to other levels of the peripheral and central auditory systems, relatively few studies have been conducted examining age-related changes in the cochlear nucleus. The neurophysiological investigations suggest declines in glycine-mediated inhibition, reflected in increased firing rates in cochlear nucleus neurons from old animals relative to young adults. Biochemical investigations of glycine inhibition in the cochlear nucleus are consistent with the functional aging declines of this inhibitory neurotransmitter system that affect complex sound processing. Anatomical reductions in neurons of the cochlear nucleus and their output pathways can occur due to aging changes in the brain, as well as due to age-dependent plasticity of the cochlear nucleus in response to the age-related loss of inputs from the cochlea, particularly from the basal, high-frequency regions. Novel preventative and curative biomedical interventions in the future aimed at alleviating the hearing loss that comes with age, will likely emanate from increasing our knowledge and understanding of its neural and molecular bases. To the extent that this sensory deficit resides in the central auditory system, including the cochlear nucleus, future neural therapies will be able to improve hearing in the elderly.

  14. Central respiratory chemoreception.

    PubMed

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Stornetta, Ruth L; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2010-10-01

    By definition central respiratory chemoreceptors (CRCs) are cells that are sensitive to changes in brain PCO(2) or pH and contribute to the stimulation of breathing elicited by hypercapnia or metabolic acidosis. CO(2) most likely works by lowering pH. The pertinent proton receptors have not been identified and may be ion channels. CRCs are probably neurons but may also include acid-sensitive glia and vascular cells that communicate with neurons via paracrine mechanisms. Retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) neurons are the most completely characterized CRCs. Their high sensitivity to CO(2) in vivo presumably relies on their intrinsic acid sensitivity, excitatory inputs from the carotid bodies and brain regions such as raphe and hypothalamus, and facilitating influences from neighboring astrocytes. RTN neurons are necessary for the respiratory network to respond to CO(2) during the perinatal period and under anesthesia. In conscious adults, RTN neurons contribute to an unknown degree to the pH-dependent regulation of breathing rate, inspiratory, and expiratory activity. The abnormal prenatal development of RTN neurons probably contributes to the congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. Other CRCs presumably exist, but the supportive evidence is less complete. The proposed locations of these CRCs are the medullary raphe, the nucleus tractus solitarius, the ventrolateral medulla, the fastigial nucleus, and the hypothalamus. Several wake-promoting systems (serotonergic and catecholaminergic neurons, orexinergic neurons) are also putative CRCs. Their contribution to central respiratory chemoreception may be behavior dependent or vary according to the state of vigilance. PMID:20737591

  15. Spatiotemporal profiles of receptive fields of neurons in the lateral posterior nucleus of the cat LP-pulvinar complex

    PubMed Central

    Piché, Marilyse; Thomas, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The pulvinar is the largest extrageniculate thalamic visual nucleus in mammals. It establishes reciprocal connections with virtually all visual cortexes and likely plays a role in transthalamic cortico-cortical communication. In cats, the lateral posterior nucleus (LP) of the LP-pulvinar complex can be subdivided in two subregions, the lateral (LPl) and medial (LPm) parts, which receive a predominant input from the striate cortex and the superior colliculus, respectively. Here, we revisit the receptive field structure of LPl and LPm cells in anesthetized cats by determining their first-order spatiotemporal profiles through reverse correlation analysis following sparse noise stimulation. Our data reveal the existence of previously unidentified receptive field profiles in the LP nucleus both in space and time domains. While some cells responded to only one stimulus polarity, the majority of neurons had receptive fields comprised of bright and dark responsive subfields. For these neurons, dark subfields' size was larger than that of bright subfields. A variety of receptive field spatial organization types were identified, ranging from totally overlapped to segregated bright and dark subfields. In the time domain, a large spectrum of activity overlap was found, from cells with temporally coinciding subfield activity to neurons with distinct, time-dissociated subfield peak activity windows. We also found LP neurons with space-time inseparable receptive fields and neurons with multiple activity periods. Finally, a substantial degree of homology was found between LPl and LPm first-order receptive field spatiotemporal profiles, suggesting a high integration of cortical and subcortical inputs within the LP-pulvinar complex. PMID:26289469

  16. Photoproduction of lepton pairs in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, B. D.; Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T.

    2013-03-25

    In this contribution we study coherent interactions as a probe of the nonlinear effects in the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). In particular, we study the multiphoton effects in the production of leptons pairs for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions for heavy nuclei. In the proton-nucleus we assume the ultrarelativistic proton as a source of photons and estimate the photoproduction of lepton pairs on nuclei at RHIC and LHC energies considering the multiphoton effects associated to multiple rescattering of the projectile photon on the proton of the nucleus. In nucleus - nucleus colllisions we consider the two nuclei as a source of photons. As each scattering contributes with a factor {alpha}Z to the cross section, this contribution must be taken into account for heavy nuclei. We consider the Coulomb corrections to calculate themultiple scatterings and estimate the total cross section for muon and tau pair production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

  17. Turbulent mixing condensation nucleus counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavliev, Rashid

    The construction and operating principles of the Turbulent Mixing Condensation Nucleus Counter (TM CNC) are described. Estimations based on the semiempirical theory of turbulent jets and the classical theory of nucleation and growth show the possibility of detecting particles as small as 2.5 nm without the interference of homogeneous nucleation. This conclusion was confirmed experimentally during the International Workshop on Intercomparison of Condensation Nuclei and Aerosol Particle Counters (Vienna, Austria). Number concentration, measured by the Turbulent Mixing CNC and other participating instruments, is found to be essentially equal.

  18. The cellular mastermind(?) – Mechanotransduction and the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Ashley; Fedorchak, Gregory R.; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimulation by activation of specific signaling pathways and genes that allow the cell to adapt to its dynamic physical environment. How cells sense the various mechanical inputs and translate them into biochemical signals remains an area of active investigation. Recent reports suggest that the cell nucleus may be directly implicated in this cellular mechanotransduction process. In this chapter, we discuss how forces applied to the cell surface and cytoplasm induce changes in nuclear structure and organization, which could directly affect gene expression, while also highlighting the complex interplay between nuclear structural proteins and transcriptional regulators that may further modulate mechanotransduction signaling. Taken together, these findings paint a picture of the nucleus as a central hub in cellular mechanotransduction—both structurally and biochemically—with important implications in physiology and disease. PMID:25081618

  19. GAS ACCRETION IN THE M32 NUCLEUS: PAST AND PRESENT

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, Anil C.

    2010-12-10

    Using adaptive optics assisted Gemini/NIFS data, I study the present and past gas accretion in the central 3'' of the M32 nucleus. From changes in the spectral slope and CO line depths near the center, I find evidence for unresolved dust emission resulting from black hole (BH) accretion. With a luminosity of {approx}2 x 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}, this dust emission appears to be the most luminous tracer of current BH accretion, 2 orders of magnitude more luminous than previously detected X-ray emission. These observations suggest that using high-resolution infrared data to search for dust emission may be an effective way to detect other nearby, low-luminosity BHs, such as those in globular clusters. I also examine the fossil evidence of gas accretion contained in the kinematics of the stars in the nucleus. The higher order moments (h3 and h4) of the line-of-sight velocity distribution show patterns that are remarkably similar to those seen on larger scales in elliptical galaxies and in gas-rich merger simulations. The kinematics suggests the presence of two components in the M32 nucleus, a dominant disk overlying a pressure supported component. I discuss possible formation scenarios for the M32 nucleus in the context of the kinematic data as well as previous stellar population studies. The kinematic measurements presented here are the highest quality available for the nucleus of M32, and may be useful for any future dynamical models of this benchmark system.

  20. Comet nucleus sample return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A comet nucleus sample return mission in terms of its relevant science objectives, candidate mission concepts, key design/technology requirements, and programmatic issues is discussed. The primary objective was to collect a sample of undisturbed comet material from beneath the surface of an active comet and to preserve its chemical and, if possible, its physical integrity and return it to Earth in a minimally altered state. The secondary objectives are to: (1) characterize the comet to a level consistent with a rendezvous mission; (2) monitor the comet dynamics through perihelion and aphelion with a long lived lander; and (3) determine the subsurface properties of the nucleus in an area local to the sampled core. A set of candidate comets is discussed. The hazards which the spacecraft would encounter in the vicinity of the comet are also discussed. The encounter strategy, the sampling hardware, the thermal control of the pristine comet material during the return to Earth, and the flight performance of various spacecraft systems and the cost estimates of such a mission are presented.

  1. Theoretical antideuteron-nucleus absorptive cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, W. W.; Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Antideuteron-nucleus absorptive cross sections for intermediate to high energies are calculated using an ion-ion optical model. Good agreement with experiment (within 15 percent) is obtained in this same model for (bar p)-nucleus cross sections at laboratory energies up to 15 GeV. We describe a technique for estimating antinucleus-nucleus cross sections from NN data and suggest that further cosmic ray studies to search for antideuterons and other antinuclei be undertaken.

  2. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Abel, John H; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St John, Peter C; Wang, Thomas J; Bales, Benjamin B; Doyle, Francis J; Herzog, Erik D; Petzold, Linda R

    2016-04-19

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure.

  3. Functional network inference of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Abel, John H; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; St John, Peter C; Wang, Thomas J; Bales, Benjamin B; Doyle, Francis J; Herzog, Erik D; Petzold, Linda R

    2016-04-19

    In the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), noisy cellular oscillators communicate within a neuronal network to generate precise system-wide circadian rhythms. Although the intracellular genetic oscillator and intercellular biochemical coupling mechanisms have been examined previously, the network topology driving synchronization of the SCN has not been elucidated. This network has been particularly challenging to probe, due to its oscillatory components and slow coupling timescale. In this work, we investigated the SCN network at a single-cell resolution through a chemically induced desynchronization. We then inferred functional connections in the SCN by applying the maximal information coefficient statistic to bioluminescence reporter data from individual neurons while they resynchronized their circadian cycling. Our results demonstrate that the functional network of circadian cells associated with resynchronization has small-world characteristics, with a node degree distribution that is exponential. We show that hubs of this small-world network are preferentially located in the central SCN, with sparsely connected shells surrounding these cores. Finally, we used two computational models of circadian neurons to validate our predictions of network structure. PMID:27044085

  4. Squish and squeeze-the nucleus as a physical barrier during migration in confined environments.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alexandra Lynn; Hsia, Chieh-Ren; Lammerding, Jan

    2016-06-01

    From embryonic development to cancer metastasis, cell migration plays a central role in health and disease. It is increasingly becoming apparent that cells migrating in three-dimensional (3-D) environments exhibit some striking differences compared with their well-established 2-D counterparts. One key finding is the significant role the nucleus plays during 3-D migration: when cells move in confined spaces, the cell body and nucleus must deform to squeeze through available spaces, and the deformability of the large and relatively rigid nucleus can become rate-limiting. In this review, we highlight recent findings regarding the role of nuclear mechanics in 3-D migration, including factors that govern nuclear deformability, and emerging mechanisms by which cells apply cytoskeletal forces to the nucleus to facilitate nuclear translocation. Intriguingly, the 'physical barrier' imposed by the nucleus also impacts cytoplasmic dynamics that affect cell migration and signaling, and changes in nuclear structure resulting from the mechanical forces acting on the nucleus during 3-D migration could further alter cellular function. These findings have broad relevance to the migration of both normal and cancerous cells inside living tissues, and motivate further research into the molecular details by which cells move their nuclei, as well as the consequences of the mechanical stress on the nucleus.

  5. Projections from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and the nucleus of the solitary tract to prechoroidal neurons in the superior salivatory nucleus: Pathways controlling rodent choroidal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E C; Ledoux, Mark S; Gong, Suzhen; Ryan, Patrick; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2010-10-28

    Using intrachoroidal injection of the transneuronal retrograde tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) in rats, we previously localized preganglionic neurons in the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) that regulate choroidal blood flow (ChBF) via projections to the pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG). In the present study, we used higher-order transneuronal retrograde labeling following intrachoroidal PRV injection to identify central neuronal cell groups involved in parasympathetic regulation of ChBF via input to the SSN. These prominently included the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both of which are responsive to systemic BP and are involved in systemic sympathetic vasoconstriction. Conventional pathway tracing methods were then used to determine if the PVN and/or NTS project directly to the choroidal subdivision of the SSN. Following retrograde tracer injection into SSN (biotinylated dextran amine 3K or Fluorogold), labeled perikarya were found in PVN and NTS. Injection of the anterograde tracer, biotinylated dextran amine 10K (BDA10K), into PVN or NTS resulted in densely packed BDA10K+terminals in prechoroidal SSN (as defined by its enrichment in nitric oxide synthase-containing perikarya). Double-label studies showed these inputs ended directly on prechoroidal nitric oxide synthase-containing neurons of SSN. Our study thus establishes that PVN and NTS project directly to the part of SSN involved in parasympathetic vasodilatory control of the choroid via the PPG. These results suggest that control of ChBF may be linked to systemic blood pressure and central control of the systemic vasculature.

  6. Projections from the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus and the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract to Prechoroidal Neurons in the Superior Salivatory Nucleus: Pathways Controlling Rodent Choroidal Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E.C.; LeDoux, Mark S.; Gong, Suzhen; Ryan, Patrick; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Using intrachoroidal injection of the transneuronal retrograde tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) in rats, we previously localized preganglionic neurons in the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) that regulate choroidal blood flow (ChBF) via projections to the pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG). In the present study, we used higher order transneuronal retrograde labeling following intrachoroidal PRV injection to identify central neuronal cell groups involved in parasympathetic regulation of ChBF via input to the SSN. These prominently included the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both of which are responsive to systemic BP, and are involved in systemic sympathetic vasoconstriction. Conventional pathway tracing methods were then used to determine if the PVN and/or NTS project directly to the choroidal subdivision of the SSN. Following retrograde tracer injection into SSN (biotinylated dextran amine 3K or Fluorogold), labeled perikarya were found in PVN and NTS. Injection of the anterograde tracer, biotinylated dextran amine 10K (BDA10K) into PVN or NTS resulted in densely packed BDA10K+ terminals in prechoroidal SSN (as defined by its enrichment in nitric oxide synthase-containing perikarya). Double-label studies showed these inputs ended directly on prechoroidal nitric oxide synthase-containing neurons of SSN. Our study thus establishes that PVN and NTS project directly to the part of SSN involved in parasympathetic vasodilatory control of the choroid via the PPG. These results suggest that control of ChBF may be linked to systemic blood pressure and central control of the systemic vasculature. PMID:20801105

  7. Activation of the central nervous system induced by micro-magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Joo; Bonmassar, Giorgio; Kaltenbach, James A.; Machado, Andre G.; Manzoor, Nauman F.; Gale, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Electrical and transcranial magnetic stimulation have proven to be therapeutically beneficial for patients suffering from neurological disorders. Moreover, these stimulation technologies have provided invaluable tools for investigating nervous system functions. Despite this success, these technologies have technical and practical limitations impeding the maximization of their full clinical and preclinical potential. Recently, micro-magnetic stimulation, which may offer advantages over electrical and transcranial magnetic stimulation, has proven effective in activating the neuronal circuitry of the retina in vitro. Here we demonstrate that this technology is also capable of activating neuronal circuitry on a systems level using an in vivo preparation. Specifically, the application of micro-magnetic fields to the dorsal cochlear nucleus activates inferior colliculus neurons. Additionally, we demonstrate the efficacy and characteristics of activation using different magnetic stimulation parameters. These findings provide a rationale for further exploration of micro-magnetic stimulation as a prospective tool for clinical and preclinical applications. PMID:24030203

  8. Elucidation of the anatomy of a satiety network: Focus on connectivity of the parabrachial nucleus in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Zséli, Györgyi; Vida, Barbara; Martinez, Anais; Lechan, Ronald M; Khan, Arshad M; Fekete, Csaba

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesized that brain regions showing neuronal activation after refeeding comprise major nodes in a satiety network, and tested this hypothesis with two sets of experiments. Detailed c-Fos mapping comparing fasted and refed rats was performed to identify candidate nodes of the satiety network. In addition to well-known feeding-related brain regions such as the arcuate, dorsomedial, and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei, lateral hypothalamic area, parabrachial nucleus (PB), nucleus of the solitary tract and central amygdalar nucleus, other refeeding activated regions were also identified, such as the parastrial and parasubthalamic nuclei. To begin to understand the connectivity of the satiety network, the interconnectivity of PB with other refeeding-activated neuronal groups was studied following administration of anterograde or retrograde tracers into the PB. After allowing for tracer transport time, the animals were fasted and then refed before sacrifice. Refeeding-activated neurons that project to the PB were found in the agranular insular area; bed nuclei of terminal stria; anterior hypothalamic area; arcuate, paraventricular, and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei; lateral hypothalamic area; parasubthalamic nucleus; central amygdalar nucleus; area postrema; and nucleus of the solitary tract. Axons originating from the PB were observed to closely associate with refeeding-activated neurons in the agranular insular area; bed nuclei of terminal stria; anterior hypothalamus; paraventricular, arcuate, and dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei; lateral hypothalamic area; central amygdalar nucleus; parasubthalamic nucleus; ventral posterior thalamic nucleus; area postrema; and nucleus of the solitary tract. These data indicate that the PB has bidirectional connections with most refeeding-activated neuronal groups, suggesting that short-loop feedback circuits exist in this satiety network. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2803-2827, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26918800

  9. Efferent connections of the rostral linear nucleus of the ventral tegmental area in the rat.

    PubMed

    Del-Fava, F; Hasue, R H; Ferreira, J G P; Shammah-Lagnado, S J

    2007-03-30

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is crucially involved in brain reward, motivated behaviors, and drug addiction. This district is functionally heterogeneous, and studying the connections of its different parts may contribute to clarify the structural basis of intra-VTA functional specializations. Here, the efferents of the rostral linear nucleus (RLi), a midline VTA component, were traced in rats with the Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHA-L) technique. The results show that the RLi heavily innervates the olfactory tubercle (mainly the polymorph layer) and the ventrolateral part of the ventral pallidum, but largely avoids the accumbens. The RLi also sends substantial projections to the magnocellular preoptic nucleus, lateral hypothalamus, central division of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, lateral part of the lateral habenula and supraoculomotor region, and light projections to the prefrontal cortex, basolateral amygdala, and dorsal raphe nucleus. A similar set of projections was observed after injections in rostromedial VTA districts adjacent to RLi, but these districts also send major outputs to the lateral ventral striatum. Overall, the data suggest that the RLi is a distinct VTA component in that it projects primarily to pallidal regions of the olfactory tubercle and to their diencephalic targets, the central division of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus and the lateral part of the lateral habenula. Because the rat RLi reportedly contains a lower density of dopaminergic neurons as compared with most of the VTA, its unusual projections may reflect a non-dopaminergic, putative GABAergic, phenotype, and this distinctive cell population seemingly extends beyond RLi boundaries into the laterally adjacent VTA. By being connected to the central division of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus (directly and via ventral striatopallidal system) and to the magnocellular preoptic nucleus, the RLi and its surroundings may play a role in olfactory-guided behaviors, which

  10. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G V

    2014-01-21

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells.

  11. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells. PMID:24445418

  12. Post eye-opening maturation of visual receptive field diameters in the superior colliculus of normal- and dark-reared rats.

    PubMed

    Binns, K E; Salt, T E

    1997-04-18

    When the rat's eyes open (P14) the retino-collicular projection is largely mature but the cortico-collicular afferents are naive and mature considerably in the following week. At P14, single units in the superior colliculus' superficial grey layer (SGS) had discrete receptive fields (RFs) (diameter = 15 +/- 1.6 degrees) which expanded with age, reaching 30 +/- 2.6 degrees at P21, possibly reflecting the increasing influence of the visual cortex, whose RFs are known to be enlarged at P21. Subsequently SGS RFs retracted to 13 +/- 1.3 degrees by P23. Dark-reared (DR) rats followed a similar but delayed developmental pattern, such that RFs were still large (27 +/- 3.4 degrees) at P24. By P30 however the RFs of DR rats were the same as those of normal adults. Thus visual experience accelerates the emergence of normal RFs in the SGS.

  13. Resonant Cholinergic Dynamics in Cognitive and Motor Decision-Making: Attention, Category Learning, and Choice in Neocortex, Superior Colliculus, and Optic Tectum.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, Stephen; Palma, Jesse; Versace, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Freely behaving organisms need to rapidly calibrate their perceptual, cognitive, and motor decisions based on continuously changing environmental conditions. These plastic changes include sharpening or broadening of cognitive and motor attention and learning to match the behavioral demands that are imposed by changing environmental statistics. This article proposes that a shared circuit design for such flexible decision-making is used in specific cognitive and motor circuits, and that both types of circuits use acetylcholine to modulate choice selectivity. Such task-sensitive control is proposed to control thalamocortical choice of the critical features that are cognitively attended and that are incorporated through learning into prototypes of visual recognition categories. A cholinergically-modulated process of vigilance control determines if a recognition category and its attended features are abstract (low vigilance) or concrete (high vigilance). Homologous neural mechanisms of cholinergic modulation are proposed to focus attention and learn a multimodal map within the deeper layers of superior colliculus. This map enables visual, auditory, and planned movement commands to compete for attention, leading to selection of a winning position that controls where the next saccadic eye movement will go. Such map learning may be viewed as a kind of attentive motor category learning. The article hereby explicates a link between attention, learning, and cholinergic modulation during decision making within both cognitive and motor systems. Homologs between the mammalian superior colliculus and the avian optic tectum lead to predictions about how multimodal map learning may occur in the mammalian and avian brain and how such learning may be modulated by acetycholine. PMID:26834535

  14. Resonant Cholinergic Dynamics in Cognitive and Motor Decision-Making: Attention, Category Learning, and Choice in Neocortex, Superior Colliculus, and Optic Tectum

    PubMed Central

    Grossberg, Stephen; Palma, Jesse; Versace, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Freely behaving organisms need to rapidly calibrate their perceptual, cognitive, and motor decisions based on continuously changing environmental conditions. These plastic changes include sharpening or broadening of cognitive and motor attention and learning to match the behavioral demands that are imposed by changing environmental statistics. This article proposes that a shared circuit design for such flexible decision-making is used in specific cognitive and motor circuits, and that both types of circuits use acetylcholine to modulate choice selectivity. Such task-sensitive control is proposed to control thalamocortical choice of the critical features that are cognitively attended and that are incorporated through learning into prototypes of visual recognition categories. A cholinergically-modulated process of vigilance control determines if a recognition category and its attended features are abstract (low vigilance) or concrete (high vigilance). Homologous neural mechanisms of cholinergic modulation are proposed to focus attention and learn a multimodal map within the deeper layers of superior colliculus. This map enables visual, auditory, and planned movement commands to compete for attention, leading to selection of a winning position that controls where the next saccadic eye movement will go. Such map learning may be viewed as a kind of attentive motor category learning. The article hereby explicates a link between attention, learning, and cholinergic modulation during decision making within both cognitive and motor systems. Homologs between the mammalian superior colliculus and the avian optic tectum lead to predictions about how multimodal map learning may occur in the mammalian and avian brain and how such learning may be modulated by acetycholine. PMID:26834535

  15. Resonant Cholinergic Dynamics in Cognitive and Motor Decision-Making: Attention, Category Learning, and Choice in Neocortex, Superior Colliculus, and Optic Tectum.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, Stephen; Palma, Jesse; Versace, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Freely behaving organisms need to rapidly calibrate their perceptual, cognitive, and motor decisions based on continuously changing environmental conditions. These plastic changes include sharpening or broadening of cognitive and motor attention and learning to match the behavioral demands that are imposed by changing environmental statistics. This article proposes that a shared circuit design for such flexible decision-making is used in specific cognitive and motor circuits, and that both types of circuits use acetylcholine to modulate choice selectivity. Such task-sensitive control is proposed to control thalamocortical choice of the critical features that are cognitively attended and that are incorporated through learning into prototypes of visual recognition categories. A cholinergically-modulated process of vigilance control determines if a recognition category and its attended features are abstract (low vigilance) or concrete (high vigilance). Homologous neural mechanisms of cholinergic modulation are proposed to focus attention and learn a multimodal map within the deeper layers of superior colliculus. This map enables visual, auditory, and planned movement commands to compete for attention, leading to selection of a winning position that controls where the next saccadic eye movement will go. Such map learning may be viewed as a kind of attentive motor category learning. The article hereby explicates a link between attention, learning, and cholinergic modulation during decision making within both cognitive and motor systems. Homologs between the mammalian superior colliculus and the avian optic tectum lead to predictions about how multimodal map learning may occur in the mammalian and avian brain and how such learning may be modulated by acetycholine.

  16. The multifunctional lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Weyand, Theodore G

    2016-02-01

    Providing the critical link between the retina and visual cortex, the well-studied lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) has stood out as a structure in search of a function exceeding the mundane 'relay'. For many mammals, it is structurally impressive: Exquisite lamination, sophisticated microcircuits, and blending of multiple inputs suggest some fundamental transform. This impression is bolstered by the fact that numerically, the retina accounts for a small fraction of its input. Despite such promise, the extent to which an LGN neuron separates itself from its retinal brethren has proven difficult to appreciate. Here, I argue that whereas retinogeniculate coupling is strong, what occurs in the LGN is judicious pruning of a retinal drive by nonretinal inputs. These nonretinal inputs reshape a receptive field that under the right conditions departs significantly from its retinal drive, even if transiently. I first review design features of the LGN and follow with evidence for 10 putative functions. Only two of these tend to surface in textbooks: parsing retinal axons by eye and functional group and gating by state. Among the remaining putative functions, implementation of the principle of graceful degradation and temporal decorrelation are at least as interesting but much less promoted. The retina solves formidable problems imposed by physics to yield multiple efficient and sensitive representations of the world. The LGN applies context, increasing content, and gates several of these representations. Even if the basic concentric receptive field remains, information transmitted for each LGN spike relative to each retinal spike is measurably increased. PMID:26479339

  17. Music and the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Mavridis, Ioannis N

    2015-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies over time, mainly because it allows expression and regulation of strong emotions, thus influencing moods and evoking pleasure. The nucleus accumbens (NA), the most important pleasure center of the human brain (dominates the reward system), is the 'king of neurosciences' and dopamine (DA) can be rightfully considered as its 'crown' due to the fundamental role that this neurotransmitter plays in the brain's reward system. Purpose of this article was to review the existing literature regarding the relation between music and the NA. Studies have shown that reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the NA, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. Listening to music strongly modulates activity in a network of mesolimbic structures involved in reward processing including the NA. The functional connectivity between brain regions mediating reward, autonomic and cognitive processing provides insight into understanding why listening to music is one of the most rewarding and pleasurable human experiences. Musical stimuli can significantly increase extracellular DA levels in the NA. NA DA and serotonin were found significantly higher in animals exposed to music. Finally, passive listening to unfamiliar although liked music showed activations in the NA.

  18. Smallest Black Hole in Galactic Nucleus Detected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    A team of astronomers have reported the detection of the smallest black hole (BH) ever observed in a galactic nucleus. The BH is hosted in the center of dwarf galaxy RGG 118, and it weighs in at 50,000 solar masses, according to observations made by Vivienne Baldassare of University of Michigan and her collaborators. Small Discoveries: Why is the discovery of a small nuclear BH important? Some open questions that this could help answer are: - Do the very smallest dwarf galaxies have BHs at their centers too? Though we believe that there's a giant BH at the center of every galaxy, we aren't sure how far down the size scale this holds true. - What is the formation mechanism for BHs at the center of galaxies? - What's the behavior of the M-sigma relation at the low-mass end? The M-sigma relation is an observed correlation between the mass of a galaxy's central BH and the velocity dispersion of the stars in the galaxy. This relation is incredibly useful for determining properties of distant BHs and their galaxies empirically, but little data is available to constrain the low-mass end of the relation. M-sigma relation, plotting systems with dynamically-measured black hole masses. RGG 118 is plotted as the pink star. The solid and dashed lines represent various determinations of scaling relations. Credit: Baldassare et al. 2015. Identifying a Black Hole: RGG 118 was identified as a candidate host for an accreting, nuclear BH from the catalog of dwarf galaxies observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Baldassare and her team followed up with high-resolution spectroscopy from the Clay telescope in Chile and Chandra x-ray observations. Using these observations, the team determined that RGG 118 plays host to a massive BH at its center based on three clues: 1) narrow emission line ratios, which is a signature of accretion onto a massive BH, 2) the presence of broad emission lines, indicating that gas is rotating around a central BH, and 3) the existence of an X-ray point

  19. Neuronal Correlates of Fear Conditioning in the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haufler, Darrell; Nagy, Frank Z.; Pare, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Lesion and inactivation studies indicate that the central amygdala (CeA) participates in the expression of cued and contextual fear, whereas the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is only involved in the latter. The basis for this functional dissociation is unclear because CeA and BNST form similar connections with the amygdala and…

  20. Nucleus accumbens invulnerability to methamphetamine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Donald M; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Thomas, David M

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages neurons and nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. Emerging studies of human Meth addicts using both postmortem analyses of brain tissue and noninvasive imaging studies of intact brains have confirmed that Meth causes persistent structural abnormalities. Animal and human studies have also defined a number of significant functional problems and comorbid psychiatric disorders associated with long-term Meth abuse. This review summarizes the salient features of Meth-induced neurotoxicity with a focus on the dopamine (DA) neuronal system. DA nerve endings in the caudate-putamen (CPu) are damaged by Meth in a highly delimited manner. Even within the CPu, damage is remarkably heterogeneous, with ventral and lateral aspects showing the greatest deficits. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is largely spared the damage that accompanies binge Meth intoxication, but relatively subtle changes in the disposition of DA in its nerve endings can lead to dramatic increases in Meth-induced toxicity in the CPu and overcome the normal resistance of the NAc to damage. In contrast to the CPu, where DA neuronal deficiencies are persistent, alterations in the NAc show a partial recovery. Animal models have been indispensable in studies of the causes and consequences of Meth neurotoxicity and in the development of new therapies. This research has shown that increases in cytoplasmic DA dramatically broaden the neurotoxic profile of Meth to include brain structures not normally targeted for damage. The resistance of the NAc to Meth-induced neurotoxicity and its ability to recover reveal a fundamentally different neuroplasticity by comparison to the CPu. Recruitment of the NAc as a target of Meth neurotoxicity by alterations in DA homeostasis is significant in light of the numerous important roles played by this brain structure.

  1. Nucleus accumbens stimulation in pathological obesity.

    PubMed

    Harat, Marek; Rudaś, Marcin; Zieliński, Piotr; Birska, Julita; Sokal, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    One of the potential treatment methods of obesity is deep brain stimulation (DBS) of nucleus accumbens. We describe the case of 19 years old woman with hypothalamic obesity. She weighted 151.4 kg before DBS and the non-surgical methods proved to be inefficient. She was treated with implantation of DBS electrode to nucleus accumbens bilaterally. Results were measured with body mass index and neuropsychological tests. Follow-up was 14 months. Fourteen months after surgery weight was 138 kg, BMI was 48.3. Neuropsychological test results were intact. The presented case supports the thesis of treatment of obesity with nucleus accumbens stimulation. PMID:27154450

  2. Formation of the avian nucleus magnocellularis from the auditory anlage.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Susan J; Rubel, Edwin W; Nishi, Rae

    2006-10-01

    In the avian auditory system, the neural network for computing the localization of sound in space begins with bilateral innervation of nucleus laminaris (NL) by nucleus magnocellularis (NM) neurons. We used antibodies against the neural specific markers Hu C/D, neurofilament, and SV2 together with retrograde fluorescent dextran labeling from the contralateral hindbrain to identify NM neurons within the anlage and follow their development. NM neurons could be identified by retrograde labeling as early as embryonic day (E) 6. While the auditory anlage organized itself into NM and NL in a rostral-to-caudal fashion between E6 and E8, labeled NM neurons were visible throughout the extent of the anlage at E6. By observing the pattern of neuronal rearrangements together with the pattern of contralaterally projecting NM fibers, we could identify NL in the ventral anlage. Ipsilateral NM fibers contacted the developing NL at E8, well after NM collaterals had projected contralaterally. Furthermore, the formation of ipsilateral connections between NM and NL neurons appeared to coincide with the arrival of VIIIth nerve fibers in NM. By E10, immunoreactivity for SV2 was heavily concentrated in the dorsal and ventral neuropils of NL. Thus, extensive pathfinding and morphological rearrangement of central auditory nuclei occurs well before the arrival of cochlear afferents. Our results suggest that NM neurons may play a central role in formation of tonotopic connections in the auditory system.

  3. Directional selectivity for FM sweeps in the suprageniculate nucleus of the mustached bat medial geniculate body.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, William E; Brimijoin, W Owen

    2002-07-01

    Mustached bats emit echolocation and communication calls containing both constant frequency (CF) and frequency-modulated (FM) components. Previously we found that 86% of neurons in the ventral division of the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICXv) were directionally selective for linear FM sweeps and that selectivity was dependent on sweep rate. The ICXv projects to the suprageniculate nucleus (Sg) of the medial geniculate body. In this study, we isolated 37 single units in the Sg and measured their responses to best excitatory frequency (BEF) tones and linear 12-kHz upward and downward FM sweeps centered on the BEF. Sweeps were presented at durations of 30, 12, and 4 ms, yielding modulation rates of 400, 1,000, and 3,000 kHz/s. Spike count versus level functions were obtained at each modulation rate and compared with BEF controls. Sg units responded well to both tones and FM sweeps. BEFs clustered at 58 kHz, corresponding to the dominant CF component of the sonar signal. Spike count functions for both tones and sweeps were predominantly non-monotonic. FM directional selectivity was significant in 53-78% of the units, depending on modulation rate and level. Units were classified as up-selective (52%), down-selective (24%), or bi-directional (non-selective, 16%); a few units (8%) showed preferences that were either rate- or level-dependent. Most units showed consistent directional preferences at all SPLs and modulation rates tested, but typically showed stronger selectivity at lower sweep rates. Directional preferences were attributable to suppression of activity by sweeps in the non-preferred direction (~80% of units) and/or facilitation by sweeps in the preferred direction (~20-30%). Latencies for BEF tones ranged from 4.9 to 25.7 ms. Latencies for FM sweeps typically varied linearly with sweep duration. Most FM latency-duration functions had slopes ranging from 0.4 to 0.6, suggesting that the responses were triggered by the BEF. Latencies for BEF

  4. Convergence of limb, visceral, and vertical semicircular canal or otolith inputs onto vestibular nucleus neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jian, B. J.; Shintani, T.; Emanuel, B. A.; Yates, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to determine the patterns of convergence of non-labyrinthine inputs from the limbs and viscera onto vestibular nucleus neurons receiving signals from vertical semicircular canals or otolith organs. A secondary aim was to ascertain whether the effects of non-labyrinthine inputs on the activity of vestibular nucleus neurons is affected by bilateral peripheral vestibular lesions. The majority (72%) of vestibular nucleus neurons in labyrinth-intact animals whose firing was modulated by vertical rotations responded to electrical stimulation of limb and/or visceral nerves. The activity of even more vestibular nucleus neurons (93%) was affected by limb or visceral nerve stimulation in chronically labyrinthectomized preparations. Some neurons received non-labyrinthine inputs from a variety of peripheral sources, including antagonist muscles acting at the same joint, whereas others received inputs from more limited sources. There was no apparent relationship between the spatial and dynamic properties of a neuron's responses to tilts in vertical planes and the non-labyrinthine inputs that it received. These data suggest that non-labyrinthine inputs elicited during movement will modulate the processing of information by the central vestibular system, and may contribute to the recovery of spontaneous activity of vestibular nucleus neurons following peripheral vestibular lesions. Furthermore, some vestibular nucleus neurons with non-labyrinthine inputs may be activated only during particular behaviors that elicit a specific combination of limb and visceral inputs.

  5. Projections from inspiratory neurons of the ventral respiratory group to the subretrofacial nucleus of the cat.

    PubMed

    Pilowsky, P; Llewellyn-Smith, I J; Lipski, J; Minson, J; Arnolda, L; Chalmers, J

    1994-01-01

    Arterial blood pressure and the activity of many sympathetic nerves are known to be affected by changes in central respiratory activity. The central neurons responsible for this respiratory modulation are unknown. In the present study we have labelled inspiratory neurons (n = 24) in the rostral ventral respiratory group and Bötzinger complex in the medulla oblongata of the cat using intracellular injection of biocytin. The filled neurons were examined to see if they had axonal projections to the subretrofacial nucleus, an important brainstem nucleus in the tonic and reflex control of blood pressure. The subretrofacial nucleus was identified histologically as a cluster of neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla, some of which are tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive. Varicose axons arising from labelled inspiratory neurons were mostly found dorsal to this cluster, within the area corresponding to the Bötzinger complex. A small number of axon varicosities were seen in the subretrofacial nucleus. The results suggest that a part of the respiratory modulation of sympathetic nerve activity may be due to a direct synaptic input from inspiratory neurons of the ventral respiratory group to neurons of the subretrofacial nucleus. PMID:7907937

  6. Neurotensin: immunohistochemical localization in rat central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, G R; Kuhar, M J; Snyder, S H

    1977-01-01

    Neurotensin immunofluorescence was examined in the rat central nervous system using a well-characterized antiserum directed against this tridecapeptide. Morphological characteristics of the fluorescence indicate its association with neuronal cell bodies and processes in the brain and with cells of the anterior pituitary. Fluorescence is seen in many brain areas, with notable densities in the substantia gelatinosa zones of the spinal cord and trigeminal nucleus, central amygdaloid nucleus, anterior pituitary, median eminence, and preoptic and basal hypothalamic areas. Images PMID:333458

  7. Dynamic risk control by human nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Sosa, Fernando; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier Jesus; Galarza, Ana; Avecillas, Josue; Pineda-Pardo, Jose Angel; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Reneses, Blanca; Barcia, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Real-world decisions about reward often involve a complex counterbalance of risk and value. Although the nucleus accumbens has been implicated in the underlying neural substrate, its criticality to human behaviour remains an open question, best addressed with interventional methodology that probes the behavioural consequences of focal neural modulation. Combining a psychometric index of risky decision-making with transient electrical modulation of the nucleus accumbens, here we reveal profound, highly dynamic alteration of the relation between probability of reward and choice during therapeutic deep brain stimulation in four patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric disease. Short-lived phasic electrical stimulation of the region of the nucleus accumbens dynamically altered risk behaviour, transiently shifting the psychometric function towards more risky decisions only for the duration of stimulation. A critical, on-line role of human nucleus accumbens in dynamic risk control is thereby established. PMID:26428667

  8. Microtubules move the nucleus to quiescence.

    PubMed

    Laporte, Damien; Sagot, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus is a cellular compartment that hosts several macro-molecular machines displaying a highly complex spatial organization. This tight architectural orchestration determines not only DNA replication and repair but also regulates gene expression. In budding yeast microtubules play a key role in structuring the nucleus since they condition the Rabl arrangement in G1 and chromosome partitioning during mitosis through their attachment to centromeres via the kinetochore proteins. Recently, we have shown that upon quiescence entry, intranuclear microtubules emanating from the spindle pole body elongate to form a highly stable bundle that spans the entire nucleus. Here, we examine some molecular mechanisms that may underlie the formation of this structure. As the intranuclear microtubule bundle causes a profound re-organization of the yeast nucleus and is required for cell survival during quiescence, we discuss the possibility that the assembly of such a structure participates in quiescence establishment.

  9. Order and disorder in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Wallace F

    2002-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with three-dimensional microscopy has shown that chromosomes are not randomly strewn throughout the nucleus but are in fact fairly well organized, with different loci reproducibly found in different regions of the nucleus. At the same time, increasingly sophisticated methods to track and analyze the movements of specific chromosomal loci in vivo using four-dimensional microscopy have revealed that chromatin undergoes extensive Brownian motion. However, the diffusion of interphase chromatin is constrained, implying that chromosomes are physically anchored within the nucleus. This constraint on diffusion is the result of interactions between chromatin and structural elements within the nucleus, such as nuclear pores or the nuclear lamina. The combination of defined positioning with constrained diffusion has a strong impact on interactions between chromosomal loci, and appears to explain the tendency of certain chromosome rearrangements to occur during the development of cancer.

  10. Dynamic risk control by human nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Nachev, Parashkev; Lopez-Sosa, Fernando; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier Jesus; Galarza, Ana; Avecillas, Josue; Pineda-Pardo, Jose Angel; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Reneses, Blanca; Barcia, Juan Antonio; Strange, Bryan

    2015-12-01

    Real-world decisions about reward often involve a complex counterbalance of risk and value. Although the nucleus accumbens has been implicated in the underlying neural substrate, its criticality to human behaviour remains an open question, best addressed with interventional methodology that probes the behavioural consequences of focal neural modulation. Combining a psychometric index of risky decision-making with transient electrical modulation of the nucleus accumbens, here we reveal profound, highly dynamic alteration of the relation between probability of reward and choice during therapeutic deep brain stimulation in four patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric disease. Short-lived phasic electrical stimulation of the region of the nucleus accumbens dynamically altered risk behaviour, transiently shifting the psychometric function towards more risky decisions only for the duration of stimulation. A critical, on-line role of human nucleus accumbens in dynamic risk control is thereby established. PMID:26428667

  11. Comet encke: radar detection of nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, P G; Campbell, D B; Ostro, S J; Pettengill, G H; Shapiro, I I

    1982-04-16

    The nucleus of the periodic comet Encke was detected in November 1980 with the Arecibo Observatory's radar system (wavelength, 12.6 centimeters). The echoes in the one sense of circular polarization received imply a radar cross section of 1.1 +/- 0.7 square kilometers. The estimated bandwidth of these echoes combined with an estimate of the rotation vector of Encke yields a radius for the nucleus of l.5(+2.3)(-1.0) kilometers. The uncertainties given are dependent primarily on the range of models considered for the comet and for the manner in which its nucleus backscatters radio waves. Should this range prove inadequate, the true value of the radius of the nucleus might lie outside the limits given.

  12. Signs of interaction of the NGC 1275 nucleus with the high-velocity system according to 0.7 sec seeing observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudinov, V. N.; Tsvetkova, V. S.; Novikov, S. B.; Pronik, I. I.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1275 was observed in the B system on 1 December 1989 with seeing 0, 7 seconds using the Zeiss-1000 telescope on Mount Majdanak in Central Asia. Special methods of processing reveal low-contrast details. The nucleus and circumnucleus are stretched in NW-SE direction. There are two narrow filaments near the nucleus in position angles roughly 340 degrees and 320 degrees. The first is directed near the radio jet of the nucleus, the second has broken details curved to the NW or toward the high-velocity system of NGC 1275.

  13. Functional architecture in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Dundr, M; Misteli, T

    2001-01-01

    The major functions of the cell nucleus, including transcription, pre-mRNA splicing and ribosome assembly, have been studied extensively by biochemical, genetic and molecular methods. An overwhelming amount of information about their molecular mechanisms is available. In stark contrast, very little is known about how these processes are integrated into the structural framework of the cell nucleus and how they are spatially and temporally co-ordinated within the three-dimensional confines of the nucleus. It is also largely unknown how nuclear architecture affects gene expression. In order to understand how genomes are organized, and how they function, the basic principles that govern nuclear architecture and function must be uncovered. Recent work combining molecular, biochemical and cell biological methods is beginning to shed light on how the nucleus functions and how genes are expressed in vivo. It has become clear that the nucleus contains distinct compartments and that many nuclear components are highly dynamic. Here we describe the major structural compartments of the cell nucleus and discuss their established and proposed functions. We summarize recent observations regarding the dynamic properties of chromatin, mRNA and nuclear proteins, and we consider the implications these findings have for the organization of nuclear processes and gene expression. Finally, we speculate that self-organization might play a substantial role in establishing and maintaining nuclear organization. PMID:11368755

  14. Mass dependence of critical behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T.; Bauer, W.; Craig, D.; Gualtieri, E.; Hannuschke, S.; Pak, R.; Vander Molen, A.M.; Westfall, G.D.; Winfield, J.S.; Yee, J.; Yennello, S.J.; Lacey, R.; Nadasen, A.; Tickle, R.S.; Norbeck, E.

    1994-03-01

    The {ital Z} distributions of fragments emitted from central collisions of {sup 40}Ar+{sup 45}Sc at beam energies from 15 to 115 MeV/nucleon have been fitted to power laws {sigma}({ital Z}){proportional_to}{ital Z}{sup {minus}{lambda}}. The {lambda} parameter reaches a minimum at a beam energy of 23.9{plus_minus}0.7 MeV/nucleon. A percolation model calculation reproduces the observed {ital Z} distributions for all beam energies, using the mean excitation energy as extracted from proton kinetic energy spectra. We extract the critical value of the deposited excitation energy for our system and make predictions for the dependence of this quantity on the size of the fragmenting system.

  15. Improved Cloud Condensation Nucleus Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2010-01-01

    An improved thermal-gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNS) has been designed to provide several enhancements over prior thermal- gradient counters, including fast response and high-sensitivity detection covering a wide range of supersaturations. CCNSs are used in laboratory research on the relationships among aerosols, supersaturation of air, and the formation of clouds. The operational characteristics of prior counters are such that it takes long times to determine aerosol critical supersaturations. Hence, there is a need for a CCNS capable of rapid scanning through a wide range of supersaturations. The present improved CCNS satisfies this need. The improved thermal-gradient CCNS (see Figure 1) incorporates the following notable features: a) The main chamber is bounded on the top and bottom by parallel thick copper plates, which are joined by a thermally conductive vertical wall on one side and a thermally nonconductive wall on the opposite side. b) To establish a temperature gradient needed to establish a supersaturation gradient, water at two different regulated temperatures is pumped through tubes along the edges of the copper plates at the thermally-nonconductive-wall side. Figure 2 presents an example of temperature and supersaturation gradients for one combination of regulated temperatures at the thermally-nonconductive-wall edges of the copper plates. c) To enable measurement of the temperature gradient, ten thermocouples are cemented to the external surfaces of the copper plates (five on the top plate and five on the bottom plate), spaced at equal intervals along the width axis of the main chamber near the outlet end. d) Pieces of filter paper or cotton felt are cemented onto the interior surfaces of the copper plates and, prior to each experimental run, are saturated with water to establish a supersaturation field inside the main chamber. e) A flow of monodisperse aerosol and a dilution flow of humid air are introduced into the main

  16. Subthalamic nucleus involvement in children: a neuroimaging pattern-recognition approach.

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Anghelescu, Cristina; Boltshauser, Eugen; Hoon, Alexander H; Pearl, Phillip L; Craiu, Dana; Johnston, Michael V; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    A neuroimaging-based pattern-recognition approach has been shown to be very helpful in the diagnosis of a wide range of pediatric central nervous system diseases. Few disorders may selectively affect the subthalamic nucleus in children including Leigh syndrome, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, kernicterus, chronic end-stage liver failure and near total hypoxic-ischemic injury in the full-term neonates. The consideration of the constellation of clinical history and findings as well as additional neuroimaging findings should allow planning the appropriate diagnostic tests to make the correct diagnosis in children with involvement of the subthalamic nucleus.

  17. Neonatal handling reduces angiotensin II receptor density in the medial preoptic area and paraventricular nucleus but not in arcuate nucleus and locus coeruleus of female rats.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cármen Marilei; Donadio, Márcio Vinícius Fagundes; Franskoviaki, Inélia; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A; Franci, Celso Rodrigues; Lucion, Aldo Bolten; Sanvitto, Gilberto Luiz

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal handling alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonads axis (HPG) in adult animals, and angiotensin II (Ang II) modulates the functions in these axes. We tested whether neonatal handling could change the density of Ang II receptors in some central areas in female rats. Results showed decreased density of the Ang II receptors in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the neonatal handled group.

  18. 3200 Phaethon, Asteroid or Comet Nucleus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Benkhoff, Johannes

    2015-08-01

    Physico-chemical modeling is central to understand the important physical processes in small solar system bodies. We have developed a computer simulation, SUISEI, that includes the physico-chemical processes relevant to comets within a global modeling framework. Our goals are to gain valuable insights into the intrinsic properties of cometary nuclei so we can better understand observations and in situ measurements. SUISEI includes a 3-D model of gas and heat transport in porous sub-surface layers in the interior of the nucleus.We present results on the application of SUISEI to the near-Sun object, Phaethon. Discovered in 1983 and classified as an asteroid, it has recently exhibited an active dust coma. Phaethon has long been associated as the source of the Geminids meteor shower so the dust activity provides a clear link to the meteor shower. The observed dust activity would traditionally lead to Phaethon being also classified as a comet (e.g., 2060-95P/Chiron, 133P/Elst-Pizarro). This is unusual since the orbit of Phaethon has a perihelion of 0.14 AU, resulting in surface temperatures of more than 1025K, much too hot for water ice or other volatiles to exist near the surface and drive the activity. This situation and others such as the “Active Asteroids” necessitates a revision of how we understand and classify these small asteroid-comet transition objects.We conclude the following for Phaethon:1. It is likely to contain relatively pristine volatiles in its interior despite repeated near perihelion passages of 0.14 AU during its history in its present orbit,2. Steady water gas fluxes at perihelion and throughout its orbit are insufficient to entrain the currently observed dust production,3. Thermal gradients into the surface as well as those caused by diurnal rotation are consistent with the mechanism of dust release due to thermal fracture,4. The initial large gas release during the first perihelion passage may be sufficient to produce enough dust to explain

  19. Learning to see the trees before the forest: reversible deactivation of the superior colliculus during learning of local and global visual features.

    PubMed

    Lomber, Stephen G

    2002-03-19

    Previous studies have established that deactivation of the superior colliculus severely retards the normally rapid learning of pattern discriminations in the mature cat. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the midbrain plays an important role in the learning of simple pattern discriminations and that the contribution of this pathway is to the perception of global, rather than local, features of a figure. To answer this question, pattern discrimination learning was studied in three intact cats and in three experimental cats during bilateral reversible deactivation of the superficial layers of the superior colliculus (SC). The animals concurrently learned to discriminate three pairs of compound visual patterns composed of small (local element) Ts or 7s. Congruent and incongruent stimulus pairs were large (global) Ts vs. 7s comprising the same or different local elements, respectively. The random stimulus pair consisted of randomly scattered local elements (Ts vs. 7s). The animals were trained to respond to the large Ts in the congruent and incongruent pairs and the small Ts in the random pair. In the normal cats, learning of the random pair was much slower than the learning of the congruent and incongruent pairs. This finding demonstrated the theory of global precedence, because the animals learned the global features of the congruent and incongruent pairs much more quickly than the local features of the random pair. In contrast, during bilateral deactivation of the superficial layers of the SC, the learning of the incongruent pair was significantly retarded and took longer to learn than the random pair. Congruent and random pair learning rates were unchanged. The specific deficit in learning the incongruent pair indicates that the learning of global, but not local, elements of the visual pattern is impaired during deactivation of the SC. The unimpaired use of local features permitted the animals to learn the congruent and random pairs at normal

  20. Changes in parvalbumin immunoreactivity with aging in the central auditory system of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ouda, Ladislav; Druga, Rastislav; Syka, Josef

    2008-08-01

    Changes in the levels of calcium binding proteins are known to occur in different parts of the brain during aging. In our study we attempted to define the effect that aging has on the parvalbumin-expressing system of neurons in the higher parts of the central auditory system. Age-related changes in parvalbumin immunoreactivity were investigated in the inferior colliculus (IC), medial geniculate body (MGB) and auditory cortex (AC) in two rat strains, normally aging Long-Evans (LE) and fast aging Fischer 344 (F344). The results demonstrate that the changes in PV-immunoreactivity are strain-dependent with an increase in the number of PV-immunoreactive (PV-ir) neurons occurring in the inferior colliculus of old LE rats and a pronounced decline in the number of PV-ir neurons appearing in the auditory cortex of aged F344 animals. In some parts of the AC of old F344 animals no PV-ir neurons were present at all. The number of PV-ir neurons in the MGB in all examined animals was very low independent of the strain and age. The loss of PV-ir neurons in the auditory cortex of Fischer 344 rats with aging may contribute to the substantial deterioration of hearing function in this strain. PMID:18486384

  1. Dynamics of hadron-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, S.J.

    1981-07-01

    Recent progress in diffraction theory shows that proton-nucleus scattering at nonforward angles is dominated by the interference of waves from two or more bright spots. Analytic formulas based on asymptotic theories of diffraction yield valuable new insights into the scattering and these formulas can be readily extended to illuminate the role of dynamical ingredients, i.e., the nucleon-nucleon amplitudes. The governing parameters of the diffraction and some direct connections between the observed cross sections and the input dynamics are reviewed. New information regarding the nucleon-nucleon parameters based on recent phase shift analyses show some systematic differences from the effective NN amplitudes which produce fits to proton-nucleus diffraction data. Recent progress in understanding the role of ..delta..-isobars in proton-nucleus dynamics is reviewed. 126 references.

  2. The dynamic landscape of the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher M; Bellini, Michel

    2010-01-01

    While the cell nucleus was described for the first time almost two centuries ago, our modern view of the nuclear architecture is primarily based on studies from the last two decades. This surprising late start coincides with the development of new, powerful strategies to probe for the spatial organization of nuclear activities in both fixed and live cells. As a result, three major principles have emerged: first, the nucleus is not just a bag filled with nucleic acids and proteins. Rather, many distinct functional domains, including the chromosomes, resides within the confines of the nuclear envelope. Second, all these nuclear domains are highly dynamic, with molecules exchanging rapidly between them and the surrounding nucleoplasm. Finally, the motion of molecules within the nucleoplasm appears to be mostly driven by random diffusion. Here, the emerging roles of several subnuclear domains are discussed in the context of the dynamic functions of the cell nucleus.

  3. The nucleus: a black box being opened.

    PubMed

    van Driel, R; Humbel, B; de Jong, L

    1991-12-01

    Until recently our knowledge about the structural and functional organization of the cell nucleus was very limited. Recent technical developments in the field of ultrastructural analysis, combined with ongoing research on the properties of the nuclear matrix, give new insight into how the nucleus is structured. Two types of observations shape our ideas about nuclear organization. First, most nuclear functions (replication, transcription, RNA processing, and RNA transport) are highly localized within the nucleus, rather than diffusely distributed. Moreover, they are associated with the nuclear matrix. Second, chromatin is organized in discrete loops, bordered by nuclear matrix attachment sequences (MARs). Each loop may contain one or several genes. The arrangement of chromatin in loops has profound consequences for the regulation of gene expression.

  4. Interpretive monitoring in the caudate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Yanike, Marianna; Ferrera, Vincent P

    2014-01-01

    In a dynamic environment an organism has to constantly adjust ongoing behavior to adapt to a given context. This process requires continuous monitoring of ongoing behavior to provide its meaningful interpretation. The caudate nucleus is known to have a role in behavioral monitoring, but the nature of these signals during dynamic behavior is still unclear. We recorded neuronal activity in the caudate nucleus in monkeys during categorization behavior that changed rapidly across contexts. We found that neuronal activity maintained representation of the identity and context of a recently categorized stimulus, as well as interpreted the behavioral meaningfulness of the maintained trace. The accuracy of this cognitive monitoring signal was highest for behavior for which subjects were prone to make errors. Thus, the caudate nucleus provides interpretive monitoring of ongoing behavior, which is necessary for contextually specific decisions to adapt to rapidly changing conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03727.001 PMID:25415238

  5. Urocortin 3 elevates cytosolic calcium in nucleus ambiguus neurons.

    PubMed

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Tica, Andrei A; Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2012-09-01

    Urocortin 3 (also known as stresscopin) is an endogenous ligand for the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 (CRF(2)). Despite predominant G(s) coupling of CRF(2), promiscuous coupling with other G proteins has been also associated with the activation of this receptor. As urocortin 3 has been involved in central cardiovascular regulation at hypothalamic and medullary sites, we examined its cellular effects on cardiac vagal neurons of nucleus ambiguus, a key area for the autonomic control of heart rate. Urocortin 3 (1 nM-1000 nM) induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration that was blocked by the CRF(2) antagonist K41498. In the case of two consecutive treatments with urocortin 3, the second urocortin 3-induced Ca(2+) response was reduced, indicating receptor desensitization. The effect of urocortin 3 was abolished by pre-treatment with pertussis toxin and by inhibition of phospolipase C with U-73122. Urocortin 3 activated Ca(2+) influx via voltage-gated P/Q-type channels as well as Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum. Urocortin 3 promoted Ca(2+) release via inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate receptors, but not ryanodine receptors. Our results indicate a novel Ca(2+) -mobilizing effect of urocortin 3 in vagal pre-ganglionic neurons of nucleus ambiguus, providing a cellular mechanism for a previously reported role for this peptide in parasympathetic cardiac regulation.

  6. Near-infrared imaging of Markarian 231: Evidence for a double nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armus, L.; Surace, J. A.; Soifer, B. T.; Matthews, K.; Graham, J. R.; Larkin, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    Near-infrared (1.2-2.4 micrometers) images are presented for the central 10 arcsec of the Seyfert 1 galaxy Markarian 231. We find a faint, but intrinsically luminous (M(sub k) approximately -20.7) secondary peak in the near-infrared light distribution approximately 3.5 arcsec (2.7 kpc) south of the primary Seyfert 1 nucleus. Since there is no optical or infrared evidence for ongoing star formation at the location of this secondary peak, and its near-infrared luminosity and color are comparable to slightly reddened spiral bulges or elliptical nuclei, we identify this peak with the stripped nucleus of the companion galaxy involved in the Mrk 231 merger event. Depending upon the exact ratio of the masses of the primary and secondary nucleus in the Mrk 231 system we estimate a merger time scale of less than or equal to 10(exp 9) yr. The morphology of the southern nucleus suggests that it may have recently survived a close passage (r less than 200 pc) with the Seyfert 1 nucleus on a highly elliptical orbit, in which case the merger time scale may be significantly shorter (approximately 10(exp 7) yr. We re-calculate the average merger time scale for the seven ultraluminous infrared galaxies with double nuclei in the Bright Galaxy Sample (the BGS) of Soifer et al. (AJ, 98, 766 (1989)) and derive a value of approximately 10(exp 8) yr. Since seven of ten of the ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the BGS are now known to be double, we estimate the ultraluminous 'phase' may be close to this value. Along with Arp 220 and Mrk 273, Mrk 231 is the third member of the class to possess a high brightness temperature non-thermal radio core and a double nucleus, suggesting the time scale for the generation or fueling of the active nucleus can be much less than the dynamical time scale for the merger of the progenitor nuclei.

  7. Hydrated nucleus pulposus herniation in seven dogs.

    PubMed

    Manunta, M L; Evangelisti, M A; Bergknut, N; Grinwis, G C M; Ballocco, I; Meij, B P

    2015-03-01

    The clinical signs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, treatment and follow-up in seven dogs with hydrated nucleus pulposus extrusion (HNPE) are reported. All dogs had tetraparesis or tetraplegia. T2-weighted MRI revealed extradural hyperintense homogeneous material compressing the cervical spinal cord. After conservative treatment (five dogs) or surgical decompression (two dogs), all dogs returned to ambulatory function within 1 month. Follow-up MRI in conservatively treated dogs revealed complete disappearance of the extruded material. Histopathological examination of surgical specimens confirmed that the retrieved material was extruded nucleus pulposus with evidence of early degeneration. PMID:25599897

  8. Nucleus model for periodic Comet Tempel 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1991-01-01

    Observational data obtained primarily during 1988 are analyzed and synthesized to develop a comprehensive physical model for the nucleus of Periodic Comet Tempel 2, one of the best studied members of Jupiter's family of short-period comets. It is confirmed that a previous investigation provided reliable information on the comet's spin-axis orientation, which implies and obliquity of 54 degrees of the orbit plane to the equatorial plane and which appears to have varied little - if at all - with time. This conclusion is critical for fitting a triaxial ellipsoid to approximate the figure of the nucleus.

  9. Compound Nucleus Contributions to the Optical Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, I J; Dietrich, F S; Escher, J E; Dupuis, M

    2008-01-28

    An ab-initio calculation of the optical potential for neutron-nucleus scattering has been performed by explicitly coupling the elastic channel to all the particle-hole (p-h) excitation states in the target. These p-h states may be regarded as doorway states through which the flux flows to more complicated configurations, and (in the end) to long-lived compound nucleus resonances. The random-phase approximation (RPA) provides the linear combinations of p-h states that include the residual interactions within the target, and we show preliminary results for elastic flux loss using both p-h and RPA descriptions of target excitations.

  10. An fMRI Investigation of Preparatory Set in the Human Cerebral Cortex and Superior Colliculus for Pro- and Anti-Saccades

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Michele; Smith, Andrew T.; Walker, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have identified several cortical regions that show larger BOLD responses during preparation and execution of anti-saccades than pro-saccades. We confirmed this finding with a greater BOLD response for anti-saccades than pro-saccades during the preparation phase in the FEF, IPS and DLPFC and in the FEF and IPS in the execution phase. We then applied multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) to establish whether different neural populations are involved in the two types of saccade. Pro-saccades and anti-saccades were reliably decoded during saccade execution in all three cortical regions (FEF, DLPFC and IPS) and in IPS during saccade preparation. This indicates neural specialization, for programming the desired response depending on the task rule, in these regions. In a further study tailored for imaging the superior colliculus in the midbrain a similar magnitude BOLD response was observed for pro-saccades and anti-saccades and the two saccade types could not be decoded with MVPA. This was the case both for activity related to the preparation phase and also for that elicited during the execution phase. We conclude that separate cortical neural populations are involved in the task-specific programming of a saccade while in contrast, the SC has a role in response preparation but may be less involved in high-level, task-specific aspects of the control of saccades. PMID:27391390

  11. Cortical Auditory Deafferentation Induces Long-Term Plasticity in the Inferior Colliculus of Adult Rats: Microarray and qPCR Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Cheryl; Herrero-Turrión, M. Javier; Merchán, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    The cortico-collicular pathway is a bilateral excitatory projection from the cortex to the inferior colliculus (IC). It is asymmetric and predominantly ipsilateral. Using microarrays and RT-qPCR we analyzed changes in gene expression in the IC after unilateral lesions of the auditory cortex, comparing the ICs ipsi- and contralateral to the lesioned side. At 15 days after surgery there were mainly changes in gene expression in the IC ipsilateral to the lesion. Regulation primarily involved inflammatory cascade genes, suggesting a direct effect of degeneration rather than a neuronal plastic reorganization. Ninety days after the cortical lesion the ipsilateral IC showed a significant up-regulation of genes involved in apoptosis and axonal regeneration combined with a down-regulation of genes involved in neurotransmission, synaptic growth, and gap junction assembly. In contrast, the contralateral IC at 90 days post-lesion showed an up-regulation in genes primarily related to neurotransmission, cell proliferation, and synaptic growth. There was also a down-regulation in autophagy and neuroprotection genes. These findings suggest that the reorganization in the IC after descending pathway deafferentation is a long-term process involving extensive changes in gene expression regulation. Regulated genes are involved in many different neuronal functions, and the number and gene rearrangement profile seems to depend on the density of loss of the auditory cortical inputs. PMID:23233834

  12. Visual Cortex Modulates the Magnitude but Not the Selectivity of Looming-Evoked Responses in the Superior Colliculus of Awake Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyu; Liu, Mingna; Cang, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neural circuits in the brain often receive inputs from multiple sources, such as the bottom-up input from early processing stages and the top-down input from higher-order areas. Here, we study the function of top-down input in the mouse Superior Colliculus (SC), which receives convergent inputs from the retina and visual cortex. Neurons in the superficial SC display robust responses and speed tuning to looming stimuli that mimic approaching objects. The looming-evoked responses are reduced by almost half when the visual cortex is optogenetically silenced in awake, but not in anesthetized mice. Silencing the cortex does not change the looming speed tuning of SC neurons, or the response time course except at the lowest tested speed. Furthermore, the regulation of SC responses by the corticotectal input is organized retinotopically. This effect we revealed may thus provide a potential substrate for the cortex, an evolutionarily new structure, to modulate SC-mediated visual behaviors. PMID:25220812

  13. The suprachiasmatic nucleus: age-related decline in biological rhythms.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takahiro J; Takasu, Nana N; Nakamura, Wataru

    2016-09-01

    Aging is associated with changes in sleep duration and quality, as well as increased rates of pathologic/disordered sleep. While several factors contribute to these changes, emerging research suggests that age-related changes in the mammalian central circadian clock within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) may be a key factor. Prior work from our group suggests that circadian output from the SCN declines because of aging. Furthermore, we have previously observed age-related infertility in female mice, caused by a mismatch between environmental light-dark cycles and the intrinsic, internal biological clocks. In this review, we address regulatory mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in mammals and summarize recent literature describing the effects of aging on the circadian system.

  14. Integral-Field Spectroscopy of the Centaurus A Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajnović, Davor; Sharp, Rob; Thatte, Niranjan

    We report integral-field spectroscopic observations with the Cambridge Infra-Red Panoramic Survey Spectrograph (CIRPASS) mounted on the GEMINI South telescope of the nucleus of the nearby elliptical NGC 5128 (Centaurus A). We detect 2-dimensional distributions of the following emission-lines: [P II], [Fe II] and Paschen β and extract spatially resolved 2D kinematics of Paβ and [Fe II] emission- lines only. The kinematics of the two emission-lines are similar, but the Paβvelocity gradient is steeper in the centre while the velocity dispersion is low everywhere. Assuming simple disk geometry we estimate the mass of the central black hole. We obtain M_• = 8.25+2.25 -4.25 × 107 M⊙, for PA = -3ˆ and i=25ˆ, excluding the M_• - σ relation prediction at a 3σ confidence level, which is in good agreement with previous studies.

  15. The supermassive black hole and double nucleus of the core elliptical NGC 5419

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzalay, Ximena; Thomas, Jens; Saglia, Roberto P.; Wegner, Gary A.; Bender, Ralf; Erwin, Peter; Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Rusli, Stephanie P.

    2016-11-01

    We obtained adaptive-optics assisted SINFONI observations of the central regions of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 5419 with a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec (≈55 pc). NGC 5419 has a large depleted stellar core with a radius of 1.58 arcsec (430 pc). HST and SINFONI images show a point source located at the galaxy's photocentre, which is likely associated with the low-luminosity AGN previously detected in NGC 5419. Both the HST and SINFONI images also show a second nucleus, off-centred by 0.25 arcsec (≈70 pc). Outside of the central double nucleus, we measure an almost constant velocity dispersion of σ ˜ 350 km s-1. In the region where the double nucleus is located, the dispersion rises steeply to a peak value of ˜420 km s-1. In addition to the SINFONI data, we also obtained stellar kinematics at larger radii from the South African Large Telescope. While NGC 5419 shows low rotation (v < 50 km s-1), the central regions (inside ˜4 rb) clearly rotate in the opposite direction to the galaxy's outer parts. We use orbit-based dynamical models to measure the black hole mass of NGC 5419 from the kinematical data outside of the double nuclear structure. The models imply M_BH=7.2^{+2.7}_{-1.9} × 10^9 M⊙. The enhanced velocity dispersion in the region of the double nucleus suggests that NGC 5419 possibly hosts two supermassive black holes at its centre, separated by only ≈70 pc. Yet our measured MBH is consistent with the black hole mass expected from the size of the galaxy's depleted stellar core. This suggests, that systematic uncertainties in MBH related to the secondary nucleus are small.

  16. A Relativistic Multiple Scattering Theory for Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions with Delta Resonance Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werneth, Charles; Maung Maung, Khin; Norbury, John

    2012-10-01

    Non-relativistic multiple scattering theories (NRMST) are formulated by separating the unperturbed Hamiltonian from the interaction and writing the Lippmann-Schwinger equation as an infinite series in the multiple sums of pseudo two-body operators, known as the Watson tau-operators. The advantage of using the multiple scattering theory (MST) is that the pseudo two-body operators are often well approximated by free two-body nucleon-nucleon operators, which are obtained from parameterizations of experimental data. Relativistic theories are needed to properly describe the production of new particles, such as pions, from nucleus-nucleus collisions. Relativistic multiple scattering theories (RMST) have been developed for nucleon-nucleus scattering; however, no RMST for nucleus-nucleus scattering has yet been derived.footnotetextMaung K M, Norbury J W, and Coleman T 2007 J. Phys. G 34 1861. The purpose of this research is to derive an RMST for nucleus-nucleus scattering and to include delta degrees of freedom in the interaction, the minimum requirement for pion production.

  17. A new F-actin structure in fungi: actin ring formation around the cell nucleus of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Kopecká, Marie; Kawamoto, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Masashi

    2013-04-01

    The F-actin cytoskeleton of Cryptococcus neoformans is known to comprise actin cables, cortical patches and cytokinetic ring. Here, we describe a new F-actin structure in fungi, a perinuclear F-actin collar ring around the cell nucleus, by fluorescent microscopic imaging of rhodamine phalloidin-stained F-actin. Perinuclear F-actin rings form in Cryptococcus neoformans treated with the microtubule inhibitor Nocodazole or with the drug solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or grown in yeast extract peptone dextrose (YEPD) medium, but they are absent in cells treated with Latrunculin A. Perinuclear F-actin rings may function as 'funicular cabin' for the cell nucleus, and actin cables as intracellular 'funicular' suspending nucleus in the central position in the cell and moving nucleus along the polarity axis along actin cables.

  18. Plasma corticosterone responses to lesions and stimulations of the limbic thalami nuclei, medial mammillary nucleus and cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Suárez, M; Perassi, N I

    1988-06-01

    The influence of extrahypothalamic limbic structures on adrenocortical activity was investigated in female adult rats. Bilateral lesions on the anteromedial thalami nucleus (AMTN), anteroventral thalami nucleus (AVTN) or the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) all elicited a significant decrease on plasma corticosterone, while their electrochemical stimulation produced a significant increase with respect to animals with sham lesions or sham stimulation. In contrast, after lesions of the dorsomedial thalami nucleus (DMTN), medial mammillary nucleus (pars lateralis) (MMN) or retrosplenial cortex (RC), values of plasma corticosterone were significantly higher than those found in controls, whereas following their stimulation plasma corticosterone levels were lower than in controls. Bilateral lesions or stimulations of anterior cingulate cortex had no significant effect upon corticosterone secretion. These findings may be interpreted as indicative of the existence of excitatory (AMTN, AVTN, and PCC) and inhibitory (DMTN, MMN and RC) central nervous structures for the control of corticoadrenal secretion besides those already known.

  19. TWO-PHOTON PHYSICS IN NUCLEUS-NUCLEUS COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    NYSTRAND,J.

    1998-09-10

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ions carry strong electromagnetic and nuclear fields. Interactions between these fields in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions can probe many interesting physics topics. This presentation will focus on coherent two-photon and photonuclear processes at RHIC. The rates for these interactions will be high. The coherent coupling of all the protons in the nucleus enhances the equivalent photon flux by a factor Z{sup 2} up to an energy of {approx} 3 GeV. The plans for studying coherent interactions with the STAR experiment will be discussed. Experimental techniques for separating signal from background will be presented.

  20. An organism arises from every nucleus.

    PubMed

    Keklikoglu, Nurullah

    2009-01-01

    The fact that, cloning using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) method has been performed, opened new horizons for cloning, and changed the way of our understanding and approach to cell and nucleus. The progress in cloning technology, brought the anticipation of the ability to clone an organism from each somatic cell nucleus. Therefore, the 'Cell Theory' is about to take the additional statement as "An organism arises from every nucleus". The development of gene targeting procedures which can be applied with SCNT, showed us that it may be possible to obtain different versions of the original genetic constitution of a cell. Because of this opportunity which is provided by SCNT, in reproductive cloning, it would be possible to clone enhanced organisms which can adapt to different environmental conditions and survive. Furthermore, regaining the genetic characteristics of ancestors or reverse herediter variations would be possible. On the other hand, in therapeutic cloning, more precise and easily obtainable alternatives for cell replacement therapy could be presented. However, while producing healthier or different organisms from a nucleus, it is hard to foresee the side effects influencing natural processes in long term is rather difficult.

  1. The Checkerboard Model of the Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2015-04-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) of the nucleus and the associated extended standard model predicts that nature has 5 generations of quarks not 3 and that Nucleus is 2 dimensional. The CBM theory began with an insight into the structure of the He nucleus around the year 1989. Details of how this theory evolved which took many years, and is found on my web site (http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net) or in the following references One independent check of this model is that the wavelength of the ``up'' quark orbiting inside the proton at 84.8123% the speed of light (around the ``dn'' quark in the center of the proton) turns out to be exactly one de Broglie wavelength something determined after the mass and speed of the up quark were determined by other means. This theory explains the mass of the proton and neutron and their magnetic moments and this along with the beautiful symmetric 2D structure of the He nucleus led to the evolution of this theory. When this theory was first presented at Argonne in 1996, it was the first time that anyone had predicted the quarks orbited inside the proton at relativistic speeds and it was met with skepticism.

  2. The Nucleus and the Simple Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Brian J.

    1982-01-01

    The 150th anniversary of the naming of the nucleus by Robert Brown in 1831 was commemorated by re-creating some of his most important observations using two of his microscopes. Comments on Brown's career and the microtechnique employed during his time are provided. (Author/JN)

  3. Responses of neurons in the rat's ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus to amplitude-modulated tones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiming; Kelly, Jack B

    2006-12-01

    Recordings were made from single neurons in the rat's ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VNLL) to determine responses to amplitude-modulated (AM) tones. The neurons were first characterized on the basis of their response to tone bursts presented to the contralateral ear and a distinction was made between those with transient onset responses and those with sustained responses. Sinusoidal AM tones were then presented to the contralateral ear with a carrier that matched the neuron's characteristic frequency (CF). Modulation transfer functions were generated on the basis of firing rate (MTF(FR)) and vector strength (MTF(VS)). Ninety-two percent of onset neurons that responded continuously to AM tones had band-pass MTF(FR)s with best modulation frequencies from 10 to 300 Hz. Fifty-four percent of sustained neurons had band-pass MTF(FR)s with best modulation frequencies from 10 to 500 Hz; other neurons had band-suppressed, all-pass, low-pass, or high-pass functions. Most neurons showed either band-pass or low-pass MTF(VS). Responses were well synchronized to the modulation cycle with maximum vector strengths ranging from 0.37 to 0.98 for sustained neurons and 0.78 to 0.99 for onset neurons. The upper frequency limit for response synchrony was higher than that reported for inferior colliculus, but lower than that seen in more peripheral structures. Results suggest that VNLL neurons, especially those with onset responses to tone bursts, are sensitive to temporal features of sounds and narrowly tuned to different modulation rates. However, there was no evidence of a topographic relation between dorsoventral position along the length of VNLL and best modulation frequency as determined by either firing rate or vector strength. PMID:16928797

  4. Auditory responses in the cochlear nucleus of awake mustached bats: precursors to spectral integration in the auditory midbrain.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Robert A; Nataraj, Kiran; Gans, Donald; Portfors, Christine V; Wenstrup, Jeffrey J

    2006-01-01

    In the cochlear nucleus (CN) of awake mustached bats, single- and two-tone stimuli were used to examine how responses in major CN subdivisions contribute to spectrotemporal integrative features in the inferior colliculus (IC). Across CN subdivisions, the proportional representation of frequencies differed. A striking result was the substantial number of units tuned to frequencies <23 kHz. Across frequency bands, temporal response patterns, latency, and spontaneous discharge differed. For example, the 23- to 30-kHz representation, which comprises the fundamental of the sonar call, had an unusually high proportion of units with onset responses (39%) and low spontaneous rates (53%). Units tuned to 58-59 kHz, corresponding to the sharply tuned cochlear resonance, had slightly but significantly longer latencies than other bands. In units tuned to frequencies >30 kHz, 31% displayed a secondary excitatory peak, usually between 10 and 22 kHz. The secondary peak may originate in cochlear mechanisms for some units, but in others it may result from convergent input onto CN neurons. In 20% of units tested with two-tone stimuli, suppression of best frequency (BF) responses was tuned at least an octave below BF. These properties may underlie similar IC responses. However, other forms of spectral interaction present in IC were absent in CN: we found no facilitatory combination-sensitive interactions and very few combination-sensitive inhibitory interactions of the dominant IC type in which inhibition was tuned to 23-30 kHz. Such interactions arise above CN. Distinct forms of spectral integration thus originate at different levels of the ascending auditory pathway.

  5. Selective contributions of the medial preoptic nucleus to testosterone-dependant regulation of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the HPA axis.

    PubMed