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Sample records for colliding hypersonic flows

  1. Technical Seminar: Exploring Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Aeronautics is developing a method for 2D and 3D imaging of hypersonic flows, called Nitric Oxide Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (NO-PLIF). NO-PLIF has been used to study basic transition f...

  2. Proximal bodies in hypersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf; Laurence, Stuart J; Hornung, Hans G

    2007-01-01

    Hypersonic flows involving two or more bodies travelling in close proximity to one another are encountered in several important situations, both natural and man-made. The present work seeks to investigate one aspect of the resulting flow problem by exploring the forces experienced by a secondary body when it is within the domain of influence of a primary body travelling at hypersonic speeds. An analytical methodology based on the blast wave analogy is developed and used to predict the secondary force coefficients for simple geometries in both two and three dimensions. When the secondary body is entirely inside the primary shocked region, the nature of the lateral force coefficient is found to depend strongly on the relative size of the two bodies. For two spheres, the methodology predicts that the secondary body will experience an exclusively attractive lateral force if the secondary diameter is larger than one-sixth the primary diameter. The analytical results are compared with those from numerical simulations and reasonable agreement is observed if an appropriate normalization for the lateral displacement is used. Results from a series of experiments in the T5 hypervelocity shock tunnel are also presented and compared with perfect-gas numerical simulations, with good agreement. A new force-measurement technique for short-duration hypersonic facilities, enabling the experimental simulation of the proximal bodies problem, is described. This technique provides two independent means of measurement, and the agreement observed between the two gives a further degree of confidence in the results obtained.

  3. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows is described and discussed. Starting with the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, methods of statistical averaging are described by means of which the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are developed. Unknown averages in these equations are approximated using various closure concepts. Zero-, one-, and two-equation eddy viscosity models, algebraic stress models and Reynolds stress transport models are discussed. Computations of supersonic and hypersonic flows obtained using several of the models are discussed and compared with experimental results. Specific examples include attached boundary layer flows, shock wave boundary layer interactions and compressible shear layers. From these examples, conclusions regarding the status of modeling and recommendations for future studies are discussed.

  4. Speeding Convergence In Simulations Of Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J.; Cheung, S.; Cheer, A.; Hafez, M.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes study aimed at accelerating rates of convergence of iterative schemes for numerical integration of equations of hypersonic flow of viscous and inviscid fluids. Richardson-type overrelaxation method applied.

  5. Vibrational relaxation in hypersonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Willard E.; Miner, Gilda A.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical formulations of vibrational relaxation are derived from first principles for application to fluid dynamic computations of hypersonic flow fields. Relaxation within and immediately behind shock waves is shown to be substantially faster than that described in current numerical codes. The result should be a significant reduction in nonequilibrium radiation overshoot in shock layers and in radiative heating of hypersonic vehicles; these results are precisely the trends needed to bring theoretical predictions more in line with flight data. Errors in existing formulations are identified and qualitative comparisons are made.

  6. Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. Subba

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

  7. CFD on hypersonic flow geometries with aeroheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohail, Muhammad Amjad; Chao, Yan; Hui, Zhang Hui; Ullah, Rizwan

    2012-11-01

    The hypersonic flowfield around a blunted cone and cone-flare exhibits some of the major features of the flows around space vehicles, e.g. a detached bow shock in the stagnation region and the oblique shock wave/boundary layer interaction at the cone-flare junction. The shock wave/boundary layer interaction can produce a region of separated flow. This phenomenon may occur, for example, at the upstream-facing corner formed by a deflected control surface on a hypersonic entry vehicle, where the length of separation has implications for control effectiveness. Computational fluid-dynamics results are presented to show the flowfield around a blunted cone and cone-flare configurations in hypersonic flow with separation. This problem is of particular interest since it features most of the aspects of the hypersonic flow around planetary entry vehicles. The region between the cone and the flare is particularly critical with respect to the evaluation of the surface pressure and heat flux with aeroheating. Indeed, flow separation is induced by the shock wave boundary layer interaction, with subsequent flow reattachment, that can dramatically enhance the surface heat transfer. The exact determination of the extension of the recirculation zone is a particularly delicate task for numerical codes. Laminar flow and turbulent computations have been carried out using a full Navier-Stokes solver, with freestream conditions provided by the experimental data obtained at Mach 6, 8, and 16.34 wind tunnel. The numerical results are compared with the measured pressure and surface heat flux distributions in the wind tunnel and a good agreement is found, especially on the length of the recirculation region and location of shock waves. The critical physics of entropy layer, boundary layers, boundary layers and shock wave interaction and flow behind shock are properly captured and elaborated.. Hypersonic flows are characterized by high Mach number and high total enthalpy. An elevated

  8. Tandem spheres in hypersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, Stuart J; Deiterding, Ralf; Hornung, Hans G

    2009-01-01

    The problem of determining the forces acting on a secondary body when it is travelling at some point within the shocked region created by a hypersonic primary body is of interest in such situations as store or stage separation, re-entry of multiple vehicles, and atmospheric meteoroid fragmentation. The current work is concerned with a special case of this problem, namely that in which both bodies are spheres and are stationary with respect to one another. We first present an approximate analytical model of the problem; subsequently, numerical simulations are described and results are compared with those from the analytical model. Finally, results are presented from a series of experiments in the T5 hypervelocity shock tunnel in which a newly-developed force-measurement technique was employed.

  9. Hypersonic Flow Computations on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, K. L.; Riley, C. J.; Peraire, J.

    1997-01-01

    A method for computing inviscid hypersonic flow over complex configurations using unstructured meshes is presented. The unstructured grid solver uses an edge{based finite{volume formulation. Fluxes are computed using a flux vector splitting scheme that is capable of representing constant enthalpy solutions. Second{order accuracy in smooth flow regions is obtained by linearly reconstructing the solution, and stability near discontinuities is maintained by locally forcing the scheme to reduce to first-order accuracy. The implementation of the algorithm to parallel computers is described. Computations using the proposed method are presented for a sphere-cone configuration at Mach numbers of 5.25 and 10.6, and a complex hypersonic re-entry vehicle at Mach numbers of 4.5 and 9.8. Results are compared to experimental data and computations made with established structured grid methods. The use of the solver as a screening tool for rapid aerodynamic assessment of proposed vehicles is described.

  10. Algorithm For Hypersonic Flow In Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant

    1989-01-01

    Implicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing algorithm calculates inviscid, hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium. Implicit formulation chosen because overcomes limitation on mathematical stability encountered in explicit formulations. For dynamical portion of problem, Euler equations written in conservation-law form in Cartesian coordinate system for two-dimensional or axisymmetric flow. For chemical portion of problem, equilibrium state of gas at each point in computational grid determined by minimizing local Gibbs free energy, subject to local conservation of molecules, atoms, ions, and total enthalpy. Major advantage: resulting algorithm naturally stable and captures strong shocks without help of artificial-dissipation terms to damp out spurious numerical oscillations.

  11. Multi-Scale Modeling of Hypersonic Gas Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Iain D.

    On March 27, 2004, NASA successfully flew the X-43A hypersonic test flight vehicle at a velocity of 5000 mph to break the aeronautics speed record that had stood for over 35 years. The final flight of the X-43A on November 16, 2004 further increased the speed record to 6,600 mph which is almost ten times the speed of sound. The very high speed attainable by hypersonic airplanes could revolutionize air travel by dramatically reducing inter-continental flight times. For example, a hypersonic flight from New York to Sydney, Australia, a distance of 10,000 miles, would take less than 2 h. Reusable hypersonic vehicles are also being researched to significantly reduce the cost of access to space. Computer modeling of the gas flows around hypersonic vehicles will play a critical part in their development. This article discusses the conditions that can prevail in certain hypersonic gas flows that require a multi-scale modeling approach.

  12. Downstream Effects on Orbiter Leeside Flow Separation for Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Pulsonetti, Maria V.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    2005-01-01

    Discrepancies between experiment and computation for shuttle leeside flow separation, which came to light in the Columbia accident investigation, are resolved. Tests were run in the Langley Research Center 20-Inch Hypersonic CF4 Tunnel with a baseline orbiter model and two extended trailing edge models. The extended trailing edges altered the wing leeside separation lines, moving the lines toward the fuselage, proving that wing trailing edge modeling does affect the orbiter leeside flow. Computations were then made with a wake grid. These calculations more closely matched baseline experiments. Thus, the present findings demonstrate that it is imperative to include the wake flow domain in CFD calculations in order to accurately predict leeside flow separation for hypersonic vehicles at high angles of attack.

  13. Development of an aerodynamic measurement system for hypersonic rarefied flows.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, T; Fujita, K; Suzuki, T

    2015-01-01

    A hypersonic rarefied wind tunnel (HRWT) has lately been developed at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency in order to improve the prediction of rarefied aerodynamics. Flow characteristics of hypersonic rarefied flows have been investigated experimentally and numerically. By conducting dynamic pressure measurements with pendulous models and pitot pressure measurements, we have probed flow characteristics in the test section. We have also improved understandings of hypersonic rarefied flows by integrating a numerical approach with the HRWT measurement. The development of the integration scheme between HRWT and numerical approach enables us to estimate the hypersonic rarefied flow characteristics as well as the direct measurement of rarefied aerodynamics. Consequently, this wind tunnel is capable of generating 25 mm-core flows with the free stream Mach number greater than 10 and Knudsen number greater than 0.1.

  14. CFD Validation Studies for Hypersonic Flow Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of experiments to measure pressure and heating for code validation involving hypersonic, laminar, separated flows was conducted at the Calspan-University at Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) in the Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel. The experimental data serves as a focus for a code validation session but are not available to the authors until the conclusion of this session. The first set of experiments considered here involve Mach 9.5 and Mach 11.3 N2 flow over a hollow cylinder-flare with 30 degree flare angle at several Reynolds numbers sustaining laminar, separated flow. Truncated and extended flare configurations are considered. The second set of experiments, at similar conditions, involves flow over a sharp, double cone with fore-cone angle of 25 degrees and aft-cone angle of 55 degrees. Both sets of experiments involve 30 degree compressions. Location of the separation point in the numerical simulation is extremely sensitive to the level of grid refinement in the numerical predictions. The numerical simulations also show a significant influence of Reynolds number on extent of separation. Flow unsteadiness was easily introduced into the double cone simulations using aggressive relaxation parameters that normally promote convergence.

  15. CFD Validation Studies for Hypersonic Flow Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of experiments to measure pressure and heating for code validation involving hypersonic, laminar, separated flows was conducted at the Calspan-University at Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) in the Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel. The experimental data serves as a focus for a code validation session but are not available to the authors until the conclusion of this session. The first set of experiments considered here involve Mach 9.5 and Mach 11.3 N, flow over a hollow cylinder-flare with 30 deg flare angle at several Reynolds numbers sustaining laminar, separated flow. Truncated and extended flare configurations are considered. The second set of experiments, at similar conditions, involves flow over a sharp, double cone with fore-cone angle of 25 deg and aft-cone angle of 55 deg. Both sets of experiments involve 30 deg compressions. Location of the separation point in the numerical simulation is extremely sensitive to the level of grid refinement in the numerical predictions. The numerical simulations also show a significant influence of Reynolds number on extent of separation. Flow unsteadiness was easily introduced into the double cone simulations using aggressive relaxation parameters that normally promote convergence.

  16. Hypersonic viscous flow over large roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2011-06-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  17. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  18. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers of the boundary layers, absolute instability resulting in vortex shedding downstream, is likely to weaken at supersonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for a rectangular or cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation is present.

  19. Scaled Rocket Testing in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrene, Aaron; MacLean, Matthew; Carr, Zakary; Parker, Ron; Holden, Michael; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) uses four clustered liquid rocket engines along with two solid rocket boosters. The interaction between all six rocket exhaust plumes will produce a complex and severe thermal environment in the base of the vehicle. This work focuses on a recent 2% scale, hot-fire SLS base heating test. These base heating tests are short-duration tests executed with chamber pressures near the full-scale values with gaseous hydrogen/oxygen engines and RSRMV analogous solid propellant motors. The LENS II shock tunnel/Ludwieg tube tunnel was used at or near flight duplicated conditions up to Mach 5. Model development was strongly based on the Space Shuttle base heating tests with several improvements including doubling of the maximum chamber pressures and duplication of freestream conditions. Detailed base heating results are outside of the scope of the current work, rather test methodology and techniques are presented along with broader applicability toward scaled rocket testing in supersonic and hypersonic flow.

  20. Direct simulation of rarefied hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.

    1989-01-01

    As the capability of the space transportation vehicles (STV's) expand to meet the requirements for future space exploration and utilization, the effects of rarefied hypersonic flows will play a more significant role in defining the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic performance of STV's. This is particularly true of the low lift/drag aeroassisted STV's where aerobraking occurs at relatively high altitudes and high velocity. Because of the limitations of the continuum description as expressed by the Navier-Stokes equations and the difficulties of solving the Boltzmann equation, the particle of molecular approach has been developed over the last three decades for modeling rarefied gas effects. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird is the most used method today for simulating rarefied flows. The DSMC method provides a direct physical simulation as opposed to a numerical solution of a set of model equations. This is accomplished by developing phenomenological models of the relevant physical events. The DSMC method accounts for translational, thermal, chemical, and radiative nonequilibrium effects. The general features of the DSMC method, the numerical requirements for obtaining meaningful results, the modeling used to simulate high temperature gas effects, and applications of the method to calculate the flow about an aeroassist flight experiment vehicle (AFE) are reviewed. The AFE simulates a geosynchronous return while entering the Earth's upper atmosphere at approximately 10 km/s. Results obtained using a general 3-D code are presented for the more rarefied portion of the atmospheric encounter (altitudes of 200 to 100 km) emphasizing surface, flowfield, and aerodynamic characteristics of the AFE. Finally, results obtained using axisymmetric and 1-D versions of the code are presented for lower altitude conditions.

  1. Electron-Beam Diagnostic Methods for Hypersonic Flow Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this work was the evaluation of the use of electron-bean fluorescence for flow measurements during hypersonic flight. Both analytical and numerical models were developed in this investigation to evaluate quantitatively flow field imaging concepts based upon the electron beam fluorescence technique for use in flight research and wind tunnel applications. Specific models were developed for: (1) fluorescence excitation/emission for nitrogen, (2) rotational fluorescence spectrum for nitrogen, (3) single and multiple scattering of electrons in a variable density medium, (4) spatial and spectral distribution of fluorescence, (5) measurement of rotational temperature and density, (6) optical filter design for fluorescence imaging, and (7) temperature accuracy and signal acquisition time requirements. Application of these models to a typical hypersonic wind tunnel flow is presented. In particular, the capability of simulating the fluorescence resulting from electron impact ionization in a variable density nitrogen or air flow provides the capability to evaluate the design of imaging instruments for flow field mapping. The result of this analysis is a recommendation that quantitative measurements of hypersonic flow fields using electron-bean fluorescence is a tractable method with electron beam energies of 100 keV. With lower electron energies, electron scattering increases with significant beam divergence which makes quantitative imaging difficult. The potential application of the analytical and numerical models developed in this work is in the design of a flow field imaging instrument for use in hypersonic wind tunnels or onboard a flight research vehicle.

  2. Experimental results for a hypersonic nozzle/afterbody flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaid, Frank W.; Keener, Earl R.; Hui, Frank C. L.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to experimentally characterize the flow field created by the interaction of a single-expansion ramp-nozzle (SERN) flow with a hypersonic external stream. Data were obtained from a generic nozzle/afterbody model in the 3.5 Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center, in a cooperative experimental program involving Ames and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The model design and test planning were performed in close cooperation with members of the Ames computational fluid dynamics (CFD) team for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program. This paper presents experimental results consisting of oil-flow and shadow graph flow-visualization photographs, afterbody surface-pressure distributions, rake boundary-layer measurements, Preston-tube skin-friction measurements, and flow field surveys with five-hole and thermocouple probes. The probe data consist of impact pressure, flow direction, and total temperature profiles in the interaction flow field.

  3. Control jets in interaction with hypersonic rarefied flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegre, J.; Raffin, M.

    1993-11-01

    Control jets are used on space vehicles in order to replace or complement mechanical aerodynamic controls at high altitudes. As a matter of fact, the efficiency of mechanical controls decreases drastically with higher rarefaction levels of external flow. Control jets were experimentally investigated in wind-tunnels. The jets interact with external hypersonic rarefied flows. Jet efficiency and associated interaction mechanisms were analyzed for two types of configurations. The first configuration is a delta wing with transverse control jets issuing from sonic nozzles located close to the trailing edge. Tests are performed with an external hypersonic air flow characterized by a Mach number of about 8, a Reynolds number of 11,000, and a rarefaction parameter V = 0.077. The second configuration is a corner flow interacting with a transverse jet issuing from one hypersonic nozzle. This nozzle is inserted in one of the two walls which make up the corner model. Tests are made under external hypersonic nitrogen flows characterized by a Mach number of about 20 and dynamic pressures ranging from 20 Pa to 620 Pa covering rarefaction levels associated with reentry conditions.

  4. Investigation of Hypersonic Nozzle Flow Uniformity Using NO Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Byrne, S.; Danehy, P. J.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2005-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence visualisation is used to investigate nonuniformities in the flow of a hypersonic conical nozzle. Possible causes for the nonuniformity are outlined and investigated, and the problem is shown to be due to a small step at the nozzle throat. Entrainment of cold boundary layer gas is postulated as the cause of the signal nonuniformity.

  5. Hot-wire anemometry in hypersonic helium flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Weinstein, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry techniques are described that have been developed and used for hypersonic-helium-flow studies. The short run time available dictated certain innovations in applying conventional hot-wire techniques. Some examples are given to show the application of the techniques used. Modifications to conventional equipment are described, including probe modifications and probe heating controls.

  6. High speed digital holographic interferometry for hypersonic flow visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, G. M.; Jagdeesh, G.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2013-06-01

    Optical imaging techniques have played a major role in understanding the flow dynamics of varieties of fluid flows, particularly in the study of hypersonic flows. Schlieren and shadowgraph techniques have been the flow diagnostic tools for the investigation of compressible flows since more than a century. However these techniques provide only the qualitative information about the flow field. Other optical techniques such as holographic interferometry and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) have been used extensively for extracting quantitative information about the high speed flows. In this paper we present the application of digital holographic interferometry (DHI) technique integrated with short duration hypersonic shock tunnel facility having 1 ms test time, for quantitative flow visualization. Dynamics of the flow fields in hypersonic/supersonic speeds around different test models is visualized with DHI using a high-speed digital camera (0.2 million fps). These visualization results are compared with schlieren visualization and CFD simulation results. Fringe analysis is carried out to estimate the density of the flow field.

  7. An assessment of laser velocimetry in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Although extensive progress has been made in computational fluid mechanics, reliable flight vehicle designs and modifications still cannot be made without recourse to extensive wind tunnel testing. Future progress in the computation of hypersonic flow fields is restricted by the need for a reliable mean flow and turbulence modeling data base which could be used to aid in the development of improved empirical models for use in numerical codes. Currently, there are few compressible flow measurements which could be used for this purpose. In this report, the results of experiments designed to assess the potential for laser velocimeter measurements of mean flow and turbulent fluctuations in hypersonic flow fields are presented. Details of a new laser velocimeter system which was designed and built for this test program are described.

  8. Three-Dimensional Aeroelastic and Aerothermoelastic Behavior in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Jack J.; Friedmann, Peretz P.; Powell, Kenneth G.; Thuruthimattam, Biju J.; Bartels, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    The aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic behavior of three-dimensional configurations in hypersonic flow regime are studied. The aeroelastic behavior of a low aspect ratio wing, representative of a fin or control surface on a generic hypersonic vehicle, is examined using third order piston theory, Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics. The sensitivity of the aeroelastic behavior generated using Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics to parameters governing temporal accuracy is also examined. Also, a refined aerothermoelastic model, which incorporates the heat transfer between the fluid and structure using CFD generated aerodynamic heating, is used to examine the aerothermoelastic behavior of the low aspect ratio wing in the hypersonic regime. Finally, the hypersonic aeroelastic behavior of a generic hypersonic vehicle with a lifting-body type fuselage and canted fins is studied using piston theory and Euler aerodynamics for the range of 2.5 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 28, at altitudes ranging from 10,000 feet to 80,000 feet. This analysis includes a study on optimal mesh selection for use with Euler aerodynamics. In addition to the aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic results presented, three time domain flutter identification techniques are compared, namely the moving block approach, the least squares curve fitting method, and a system identification technique using an Auto-Regressive model of the aeroelastic system. In general, the three methods agree well. The system identification technique, however, provided quick damping and frequency estimations with minimal response record length, and therefore o ers significant reductions in computational cost. In the present case, the computational cost was reduced by 75%. The aeroelastic and aerothermoelastic results presented illustrate the applicability of the CFL3D code for the hypersonic flight regime.

  9. Hypersonic flows as related to the National Aerospace Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussoy, Marvin; Huang, George; Menter, Florian

    1995-01-01

    The object of Cooperative Agreement NCC2-452 was to identify, develop, and document reliable turbulence models for incorporation into CFD codes, which would then subsequently be incorporated into numerical design procedures for the NASP and any other hypersonic vehicles. In a two-pronged effort, consisting of an experimental and a theoretical approach, several key features of flows over complex vehicles were identified, and test bodies were designed which were composed of simple geometric shapes over which these flow features were measured. The experiments were conducted in the 3.5' Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, at nominal Mach numbers from 7 to 8.3 and Re/m from 4.9 x 10(exp 6) to 5.8 x 10(exp 6). Boundary layers approaching the interaction region were 2.5 to 3.7 cm thick. Surface and flow field measurements were conducted, and the initial boundary conditions were experimentally documented.

  10. Progress with multigrid schemes for hypersonic flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radespiel, R.; Swanson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    Several multigrid schemes are considered for the numerical computation of viscous hypersonic flows. For each scheme, the basic solution algorithm uses upwind spatial discretization with explicit multistage time stepping. Two level versions of the various multigrid algorithms are applied to the two dimensional advection equation, and Fourier analysis is used to determine their damping properties. The capabilities of the multigrid methods are assessed by solving three different hypersonic flow problems. Some new multigrid schemes based on semicoarsening strategies are shown to be quite effective in relieving the stiffness caused by the high aspect ratio cells required to resolve high Reynolds number flows. These schemes exhibit good convergence rates for Reynolds numbers up to 200 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers up to 25.

  11. Portable Fluorescence Imaging System for Hypersonic Flow Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, J. A.; Alderfer, D. W.; Jones, S. B.; Danehy, P. M.

    2003-01-01

    A portable fluorescence imaging system has been developed for use in NASA Langley s hypersonic wind tunnels. The system has been applied to a small-scale free jet flow. Two-dimensional images were taken of the flow out of a nozzle into a low-pressure test section using the portable planar laser-induced fluorescence system. Images were taken from the center of the jet at various test section pressures, showing the formation of a barrel shock at low pressures, transitioning to a turbulent jet at high pressures. A spanwise scan through the jet at constant pressure reveals the three-dimensional structure of the flow. Future capabilities of the system for making measurements in large-scale hypersonic wind tunnel facilities are discussed.

  12. Progress with multigrid schemes for hypersonic flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Radespiel, R.; Swanson, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    Several multigrid schemes are considered for the numerical computation of viscous hypersonic flows. For each scheme, the basic solution algorithm employs upwind spatial discretization with explicit multistage time stepping. Two-level versions of the various multigrid algorithms are applied to the two-dimensional advection equation, and Fourier analysis is used to determine their damping properties. The capabilities of the multigrid methods are assessed by solving three different hypersonic flow problems. Some new multigrid schemes based on semicoarsening strategies are shown to be quite effective in relieving the stiffness caused by the high-aspect-ratio cells required to resolve high Reynolds number flows. These schemes exhibit good convergence rates for Reynolds numbers up to 200 X 10{sup 6} and Mach numbers up to 25. 32 refs., 31 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Perspectives on hypersonic viscous and nonequilibrium flow research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, H. K.

    1992-01-01

    An attempt is made to reflect on current focuses in certain areas of hypersonic flow research by examining recent works and their issues. Aspects of viscous interaction, flow instability, and nonequilibrium aerothermodynamics pertaining to theoretical interest are focused upon. The field is a diverse one, and many exciting works may have either escaped the writer's notice or been abandoned for the sake of space. Students of hypersonic viscous flow must face the transition problems towards the two opposite ends of the Reynolds or Knudsen number range, which represents two regimes where unresolved fluid/gas dynamic problems abound. Central to the hypersonic flow studies is high-temperature physical gas dynamics; here, a number of issues on modelling the intermolecular potentials and inelastic collisions remain the obstacles to quantitative predictions. Research in combustion and scramjet propulsion will certainly be benefitted by advances in turbulent mixing and new computational fluid dynamics (CFD) strategies on multi-scaled complex reactions. Even for the sake of theoretical development, the lack of pertinent experimental data in the right energy and density ranges is believed to be among the major obstacles to progress in aerothermodynamic research for hypersonic flight. To enable laboratory simulation of nonequilibrium effects anticipated for transatmospheric flight, facilities capable of generating high enthalpy flow at density levels higher than in existing laboratories are needed (Hornung 1988). A new free-piston shock tunnel capable of realizing a test-section stagnation temperature of 10(exp 5) at Reynolds number 50 x 10(exp 6)/cm is being completed and preliminary tests has begun (H. Hornung et al. 1992). Another laboratory study worthy of note as well as theoretical support is the nonequilibrium flow experiment of iodine vapor which has low activation energies for vibrational excitation and dissociation, and can be studied in a laboratory with modest

  14. Computational study of generic hypersonic vehicle flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Johnny R.

    1994-01-01

    The geometric data of the generic hypersonic vehicle configuration included body definitions and preliminary grids for the forebody (nose cone excluded), midsection (propulsion system excluded), and afterbody sections. This data was to be augmented by the nose section geometry (blunt conical section mated with the noncircular cross section of the forebody initial plane) along with a grid and a detailed supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) geometry (inlet and combustor) which should be merged with the nozzle portion of the afterbody geometry. The solutions were to be obtained by using a Navier-Stokes (NS) code such as TUFF for the nose portion, a parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) solver such as the UPS and STUFF codes for the forebody, a NS solver with finite rate hydrogen-air chemistry capability such as TUFF and SPARK for the scramjet and a suitable solver (NS or PNS) for the afterbody and external nozzle flows. The numerical simulation of the hypersonic propulsion system for the generic hypersonic vehicle is the major focus of this entire work. Supersonic combustion ramjet is such a propulsion system, hence the main thrust of the present task has been to establish a solution procedure for the scramjet flow. The scramjet flow is compressible, turbulent, and reacting. The fuel used is hydrogen and the combustion process proceeds at a finite rate. As a result, the solution procedure must be capable of addressing such flows.

  15. Computation of Hypersonic Flow about Maneuvering Vehicles with Changing Shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Ferencz, R M; Felker, F F; Castillo, V M

    2004-02-23

    Vehicles moving at hypersonic speeds have great importance to the National Security. Ballistic missile re-entry vehicles (RV's) travel at hypersonic speeds, as do missile defense intercept vehicles. Despite the importance of the problem, no computational analysis method is available to predict the aerodynamic environment of maneuvering hypersonic vehicles, and no analysis is available to predict the transient effects of their shape changes. The present state-of-the-art for hypersonic flow calculations typically still considers steady flow about fixed shapes. Additionally, with present computational methods, it is not possible to compute the entire transient structural and thermal loads for a re-entry vehicle. The objective of this research is to provide the required theoretical development and a computational analysis tool for calculating the hypersonic flow about maneuvering, deforming RV's. This key enabling technology will allow the development of a complete multi-mechanics simulation of the entire RV flight sequence, including important transient effects such as complex flight dynamics. This will allow the computation of the as-delivered state of the payload in both normal and unusual operational environments. This new analysis capability could also provide the ability to predict the nonlinear, transient behavior of endo-atmospheric missile interceptor vehicles to the input of advanced control systems. Due to the computational intensity of fluid dynamics for hypersonics, the usual approach for calculating the flow about a vehicle that is changing shape is to complete a series of steady calculations, each with a fixed shape. However, this quasi-steady approach is not adequate to resolve the frequencies characteristic of a vehicle's structural dynamics. Our approach is to include the effects of the unsteady body shape changes in the finite-volume method by allowing for arbitrary translation and deformation of the control volumes. Furthermore, because the Eulerian

  16. Computational analysis of hypersonic flows past elliptic-cone waveriders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Bok-Hyun; Rasmussen, Maurice L.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive study for the inviscid numerical calculation of the hypersonic flow past a class of elliptic-cone derived waveriders is presented. The theoretical background associated with hypersonic small-disturbance theory (HSDT) is reviewed. Several approximation formulas for the waverider compression surface are established. A CFD algorithm is used to calculate flow fields for the on-design case and a variety of off-design cases. The results are compared with HSDT, experiment, and other available CFD results. For the waverider shape used in previous investigations, the bow shock for the on-design condition stands off from the leading-edge tip of the waverider. It was found that this occurs because the tip was too thick according to the approximating shape formula that was used to describe the compression surface. When this was corrected, the bow shock became closer to attached as it should be. At Mach numbers greater than the design condition, a lambda-shock configuration develops near the tip of the compression surface. At negative angles of attack, other complicated shock patterns occur near the leading-edge tip. These heretofore unknown flow patterns show the power and utility of CFD for investigating novel hypersonic configurations such as waveriders.

  17. Porous coatings for hypersonic laminar flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inkman, Matthew; Bres, Guillaume; Colonius, Tim; Fedorov, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    We present the results of linear and nonlinear simulations of hypersonic boundary layers over ultrasonic absorptive coatings consisting of uniform arrays of rectangular pores. Through direct numerical simulation of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, we explore the effects of coatings of various porosities and pore aspect ratios on the growth rate of the second mode instability. The performance of deep pores operating in the attenuative regime, in which acoustic waves are attenuated by viscous effects within the pores, is contrasted with more shallow pores operating in the cancellation/reinforcement regime. The results of linear simulations in many cases match the results of linear stability theory and confirm the ability of such coatings to stabilize the second mode. At certain conditions such as high porosity and large acoustic Reynolds numbers, the porous layer leads to instability of slow waves, introducing a new instability due to coupled resonant forcing of the cavity array. We confirm the observed instability arises in the linear stability theory, and suggest constraints on cavity size and spacing. Finally, nonlinear simulations of the same geometries confirm the results of our linear analysis; in particular, we did not observe and "tripping" of the boundary layer due to small scale disturbances associated with individual pores.

  18. Hypersonic flows as related to the national aerospace plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussoy, Marvin; Menter, F.; Huang, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    The study in the last 6 months has observed a clear evidence that the current two-equation models tend to under-predict flow separation and over-predict heat transfer rate near flow re-attachment regions. In hypersonic flow calculations, these model deficiencies appear to be even more pronounced. This is particularly true in the incapability of the model to predict the extent of the flow separation. Two major deficiencies of the current two-equation models in predicting complex hypersonic flows have been reported, i.e., under-prediction of flow separation and over-prediction of peak heat transfer rate. Two modifications to the k - epsilon model were reported and tested over a range of flows. Based on our limited study, the modified models have been found to give better agreements in both surface pressure and heat transfer predictions for several complex shock-wave boundary-layer interaction flows. However, in order to confirm our observation, more calculations will be performed in the future study covering a wider range of flows and conditions than reported here.

  19. Computation of hypersonic vortex flows with an Euler model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneau, Charles-Henri; Laminie, Jacques; Chattot, Jean-Jacques

    The variational approach of the steady Euler equations presented at the loth ICNMFD [1] is extended to the treatment of supersonic and hypersonic flows by introducing the energy equation inthe least-squares formulation. The approximation is made with cubic or prismatic linear finite elements and the results are presented for flows around a rectangular flat plate or a thin delta wing for various Mach numbers and angles of attack. They show the occurrence of vortical flows on the upper surface of the wings due to the sharp edges.

  20. Hypersonic flows as related to the National Aerospace plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussoy, Marvin; Levy, Lionel; Menter, F.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental data for a series of 2-D and 3-D shock wave/boundary layer interaction flows at Mach 8.2 are presented. The test bodies, composed of simple geometric shapes fastened to a flat plate test bed, were designed to generate flows with varying degrees of pressure gradient, boundary layer separation, and turning angle. The data include surface pressure and heat transfer distributions as well as limited mean flowfield surveys both in the undisturbed and interaction regimes. The data are presented in a convenient form to be used to validate existing or future computational models of these hypersonic flows.

  1. Surface pressure measurements for CFD code validation in hypersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Henfling, J.F.; Larson, D.E.

    1995-07-01

    Extensive surface pressure measurements were obtained on a hypersonic vehicle configuration at Mach 8. All of the experimental results were obtained in the Sandia National Laboratories Mach 8 hypersonic wind tunnel for laminar boundary layer conditions. The basic vehicle configuration is a spherically blunted 10{degrees} half-angle cone with a slice parallel with the axis of the vehicle. The bluntness ratio of the geometry is 10% and the slice begins at 70% of the length of the vehicle. Surface pressure measurements were obtained for angles of attack from {minus}10 to + 18{degrees}, for various roll angles, at 96 locations on the body surface. A new and innovative uncertainty analysis was devised to estimate the contributors to surface pressure measurement uncertainty. Quantitative estimates were computed for the uncertainty contributions due to the complete instrumentation system, nonuniformity of flow in the test section of the wind tunnel, and variations in the wind tunnel model. This extensive set of high-quality surface pressure measurements is recommended for use in the calibration and validation of computational fluid dynamics codes for hypersonic flow conditions.

  2. Unstructured Mesh Methods for the Simulation of Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, Jaime; Bibb, K. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the research work undertaken at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The aim of this research is to identify effective algorithms and methodologies for the efficient and routine solution of hypersonic viscous flows about re-entry vehicles. For over ten years we have received support from NASA to develop unstructured mesh methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics. As a result of this effort a methodology based on the use, of unstructured adapted meshes of tetrahedra and finite volume flow solvers has been developed. A number of gridding algorithms flow solvers, and adaptive strategies have been proposed. The most successful algorithms developed from the basis of the unstructured mesh system FELISA. The FELISA system has been extensively for the analysis of transonic and hypersonic flows about complete vehicle configurations. The system is highly automatic and allows for the routine aerodynamic analysis of complex configurations starting from CAD data. The code has been parallelized and utilizes efficient solution algorithms. For hypersonic flows, a version of the, code which incorporates real gas effects, has been produced. One of the latest developments before the start of this grant was to extend the system to include viscous effects. This required the development of viscous generators, capable of generating the anisotropic grids required to represent boundary layers, and viscous flow solvers. In figures I and 2, we show some sample hypersonic viscous computations using the developed viscous generators and solvers. Although these initial results were encouraging, it became apparent that in order to develop a fully functional capability for viscous flows, several advances in gridding, solution accuracy, robustness and efficiency were required. As part of this research we have developed: 1) automatic meshing techniques and the corresponding computer codes have been delivered to NASA and implemented into the GridEx system, 2) a finite

  3. On the instability of hypersonic flow past a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackaby, Nicholas; Cowley, Stephen; Hall, Philip

    1990-01-01

    The instability of hypersonic boundary-layer flows over flat plates is considered. The viscosity of the fluid is taken to be governed by Sutherland's law, which gives a much more accurate representation of the temperature dependence of fluid viscosity at hypersonic speeds than Chapman's approximate linear law; although at lower speeds the temperature variation of the mean state is less pronounced so that the Chapman law can be used with some confidence. Attention is focussed on the so-called (vorticity) mode of instability of the viscous hypersonic boundary layer. This is thought to be the fastest growing inviscid disturbance at hypersonic speeds; it is also believed to have an asymptotically larger growth rate than any viscous or centrifugal instability. As a starting point the instability of the hypersonic boundary layer which exists far downstream from the leading edge of the plate is investigated. In this regime the shock that is attached to the leading edge of the plate plays no role, so that the basic boundary layer is non-interactive. It is shown that the vorticity mode of instability of this flow operates on a significantly different lengthscale than that obtained if a Chapman viscosity law is assumed. In particular, it is found that the growth rate predicted by a linear viscosity law overestimates the size of the growth rate by O(M(exp 2). Next, the development of the vorticity mode as the wavenumber decreases is described, and it is shown that acoustic modes emerge when the wavenumber has decreased from it's O(1) initial value to O(M (exp -3/2). Finally, the inviscid instability of the boundary layer near the leading edge in the interaction zone is discussed and particular attention is focussed on the strong interaction region which occurs sufficiently close to the leading edge. It is found that the vorticity mode in this regime is again unstable, and that it is concentrated in the transition layer at the edge of the boundary layer where the temperature

  4. Nonintrusive Temperature and Velocity Measurements in a Hypersonic Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OByrne, S.; Danehy, P. M.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of nitric oxide vibrational temperature, rotational temperature and velocity have been measured in the hypersonic freestream at the exit of a conical nozzle, using planar laser-induced fluorescence. Particular attention has been devoted to reducing the major sources of systematic error that can affect fluorescence tempera- ture measurements, including beam attenuation, transition saturation effects, laser mode fluctuations and transition choice. Visualization experiments have been performed to improve the uniformity of the nozzle flow. Comparisons of measured quantities with a simple one-dimensional computation are made, showing good agreement between measurements and theory given the uncertainty of the nozzle reservoir conditions and the vibrational relaxation rate.

  5. Similitude requirements for hypersonic, rarefied, nonequilibrium flow. [over space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    Similitude requirements for hypersonic, rarefied flow with nonequilibrium chemistry and vibration are presented. The full Navier-Stokes equations with catalytic or noncatalytic walls and with or without slip conditions are nondimensionalized. The heat transfer coefficient is written in terms of fourteen dimensionless parameters and reduced to four by making the binary scaling assumption. Duplication of blunt and sharp nose heat transfer requires the use of air over a geometrically similar model with the same free stream velocity, wall temperature and product of free stream density and characteristic length. Estimates of this heat transfer coefficient are also presented.

  6. Sonic injection through diamond orifices into a hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Huaiguo

    The objective for the present study was to experimentally characterize the performance of diamond shaped injectors for hypersonic flow applications. First, an extensive literature review was performed. Second, a small scale Mach 5.0 wind tunnel facility was installed. Third, a detailed experimental parametric investigation of sonic injection through a diamond orifice (five incidence angles and three momentum ratios) and a circular injector (three momentum ratios) into the Mach 5.0 freestream was performed. Also, the use of downstream plume vorticity control ramps was investigated. Fourth, a detailed analysis of the experimental data to characterize and model the flow for the present range of conditions was achieved. The experimental techniques include surface oil flow visualization, Mie-Scattering flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), shadowgraph photograph, and a five-hole mean flow probe. The results show that the diamond injectors have the potential to produce attached shock depending on the incidence angle and jet momentum ratio. For example, the incidence angles less than or equal to 45° at J = 0.43 generated attached interaction shocks. The attached shock produced reduced total pressure loss (drag for scramjet) and eliminated potential hot spots, associated with the upstream flow separation. The jet interaction shock angle increased with jet incidence angle and momentum ratio due to increased penetration and flow disturbances. The plume penetration and cross-sectional area increased with incidence angle and momentum ratio. The increased jet interaction shock angle and strength produced increased total pressure loss, jet interaction force and total normal force. The characteristic kidney bean shaped plume was not discernable from the diamond injectors indicating increased effectiveness for film cooling applications. A vorticity generation ramp increased the penetration of the plume and the plume shape was indicative of higher levels of

  7. Flow-Tagging Velocimetry for Hypersonic Flows Using Fluorescence of Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; OByrne, S.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate a new type of flow-tagging velocimetry technique for hypersonic flows. The technique involves exciting a thin line of nitric oxide molecules with a laser beam and then, after some delay, acquiring an image of the displaced line. One component of velocity is determined from the time of flight. This method is applied to measure the velocity profile in a Mach 8.5 laminar, hypersonic boundary layer in the Australian National Universities T2 free-piston shock tunnel. The velocity is measured with an uncertainty of approximately 2%. Comparison with a CFD simulation of the flow shows reasonable agreement.

  8. High enthalpy hypersonic boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanow, G.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of an ionizing laminar boundary layer formed by a very high enthalpy flow (in excess of 12 eV per atom or 7000 cal/gm) with allowance for the presence of helium driver gas is described. The theoretical investigation has shown that the use of variable transport properties and their respective derivatives is very important in the solution of equilibrium boundary layer equations of high enthalpy flow. The effect of low level helium contamination on the surface heat transfer rate is minimal. The variation of ionization is much smaller in a chemically frozen boundary layer solution than in an equilibrium boundary layer calculation and consequently, the variation of the transport properties in the case of the former was not essential in the integration. The experiments have been conducted in a free piston shock tunnel, and a detailed study of its nozzle operation, including the effects of low levels of helium driver gas contamination has been made. Neither the extreme solutions of an equilibrium nor of a frozen boundary layer will adequately predict surface heat transfer rate in very high enthalpy flows.

  9. A hybrid particle/continuum approach for nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Lan

    A hybrid particle-continuum computational framework is developed and presented for simulating nonequilibrium hypersonic flows, aimed to be more accurate than conventional continuum methods and faster than particle methods. The frame work consists of the direct simulation Monte Carlo-Information Preservation (DSMC-IP) method coupled with a Navier-Stokes solver. Since the DSMC-IP method provides the macroscopic information at each time step, determination of the continuum fluxes across the interface between the particle and continuum domains becomes straightforward. Buffer and reservoir calls are introduced in the continuum domain and work as an extension of the particle domain. At the end of the particle movement phase, particles in either particle or buffer cells are retained. All simulated particles in the reservoir cells are first deleted for each time, step and re-generated based on the local cell values. The microscopic velocities for the newly generated particles are initialized to the Chapman-Enskog distribution using an acceptance-rejection scheme. Continuum breakdown in a flow is defined as when the continuum solution departs from the particle solution to at least 5%. Numerical investigations show that a Knudsen-number-like parameter can best predict the continuum breakdown in the flows of interest. Numerical experiments of hypersonic flows over a simple blunted cone and a much more complex hollow cylinder/flare are conducted. The solutions for the two geometries considered from the hybrid framework are compared with experimental data and pure particle solutions. Generally speaking, it is concluded that the hybrid approach works quite well. In the blunted cone flow, numerical accuracy is improved when 10 layers of buffer cells are employed and the continuum breakdown cut-off value is set to be 0.03. In the hollow cylinder/flare hybrid simulation, the size of the separation zone near the conjunction of the cylinder and flare is improved from the initial

  10. Experimental Aspects of Code Validation in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanetz, Bruno; Délery, Jean

    2005-05-01

    In spite of the spectacular progress in CFD there is still a strong need to validate the computer codes by comparison with experiments. The first validation step is the assessment of the code numerical safety and the physical models accuracy. This validation step requires carefully made building block experiments. To be calculable, such experiments must satisfy conditions such as the precise definition of the test set-up geometry, the absence of uncontrolled parasitic effects, a complete information on the flow conditions and indication on the uncertainty margins. Under these conditions, the experiment can be put into a data bank which will be precious to help in the development of reliable and accurate codes. The paper provides an overview of modern measurement techniques for hypersonic flows analysis. The demonstration is illustrated by laminar experiments used to assess the numerical accuracy of codes run in high Mach number flows.

  11. Experimental and computational surface and flow-field results for an all-body hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockman, William K.; Lawrence, Scott L.; Cleary, Joseph W.

    1990-01-01

    Personnel from NASA Ames Research Center presented a paper on establishing a benchmark experimental data base for generic hypersonic vehicle shape for validation and/or calibration of advanced computational fluid dynamics computer codes. The need for this capability is based on a requirement for extensive hypersonic data to fully validate CFD codes to be used for NASP and other hypersonic vehicles. The use of wind tunnel models in the Ames 3.5-ft Hypersonic Wind Tunnel to obtain pertinent surface and flow-field data over a broad range of test conditions is described.

  12. Numerical analysis of hypersonic turbulent film cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Chen, C. P.; Wei, H.

    1992-01-01

    As a building block, numerical capabilities for predicting heat flux and turbulent flowfields of hypersonic vehicles require extensive model validations. Computational procedures for calculating turbulent flows and heat fluxes for supersonic film cooling with parallel slot injections are described in this study. Two injectant mass flow rates with matched and unmatched pressure conditions using the database of Holden et al. (1990) are considered. To avoid uncertainties associated with the boundary conditions in testing turbulence models, detailed three-dimensional flowfields of the injection nozzle were calculated. Two computational fluid dynamics codes, GASP and FDNS, with the algebraic Baldwin-Lomax and k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections were used. It was found that the B-L model which resolves near-wall viscous sublayer is very sensitive to the inlet boundary conditions at the nozzle exit face. The k-epsilon models with improved wall functions are less sensitive to the inlet boundary conditions. The testings show that compressibility corrections are necessary for the k-epsilon model to realistically predict the heat fluxes of the hypersonic film cooling problems.

  13. Convergence acceleration of viscous and inviscid hypersonic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheer, A.; Hafez, M.; Cheung, S.; Flores, J.

    1989-01-01

    The convergence of inviscid and viscous hypersonic flow calculations using a two-dimensional flux-splitting code is accelerated by applying a Richardson-type overrelaxation method. Successful results are presented for various cases; and a 50 percent savings in computer time is usually achieved. An analytical formula for the overrelaxation factor is derived, and the performance of this scheme is confirmed numerically. Moreover, application of this overrelaxation scheme produces a favorable preconditioning for Wynn's epsilon-algorithm. Both techniques have been extended to viscous three-dimensional flows and applied to accelerate the convergence of the compressible Navier-Stokes code. A savings of 40 percent in computer time is achieved in this case.

  14. The computation of radiation from nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham; Park, Chul

    1988-01-01

    The results of the solution of the equations that describe a hypersonic ionized flow about an elliptically blunted cone are presented. The flow conditions correspond to those of the proposed Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle at altitudes between the perigee at 78 km and the approximate limit of the continuum regime at 90 km. For the free-stream velocities of interest, about 9 km/sec, the flowfield is out of thermo-chemical equilibrium, electronically excited, ionized and radiating. The gas consists of eight-chemical species including free electrons. The thermal state of the gas is modeled with a translational-rotational temperature, four vibrational temperatures for the diatomic species and an electron-electronic temperature. The electronic excitation of molecules is included. The nonequilibrium air radiation from each fluid element is computed and the radiative heat flux at the body surface is determined. The stagnation point radiative heating result agrees with previous calculations.

  15. Vibrational Energy Transfer of Diatomic Gases in Hypersonic Expanding Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Stephen Merrick

    In high temperature flows related to vehicles at hypersonic speeds significant excitation of the vibrational energy modes of the gas can occur. Accurate predictions of the vibrational state of the gas and the rates of vibrational energy transfer are essential to achieve optimum engine performance, for design of heat shields, and for studies of ground based hypersonic test facilities. The Landau -Teller relaxation model is widely used because it has been shown to give accurate predictions in vibrationally heating flows such as behind forebody shocks. However, a number of experiments in nozzles have indicated that it fails to accurately predict the rate of energy transfer in expanding, or cooling, flow regions and fails to predict the distribution of energy in the vibrational quantum levels. The present study examines the range of applicability of the Landau -Teller model in expanding flows and develops techniques which provide accurate predictions in expanding flows. In the present study, detailed calculations of the vibrational relaxation process of N_2 and CO in cooling flows are conducted. A coupled set of vibrational transition rate equations and quasi one-dimensional fluid dynamic equations is solved. Rapid anharmonic Vibration-Translation transition rates and Vibration -Vibration exchange collisions are found to be responsible for vibrational relaxation acceleration in situations of high vibrational temperature and low translational temperature. The predictions of the detailed master equation solver are in excellent agreement with experimental results. The exact degree of acceleration is cataloged in this study for N_2 and is found to be a function of both the translational temperature (T) and the ratio of vibrational to translational temperatures (T_{vib}/T). Non-Boltzmann population distributions are observed for values of T _{vib}/T as low as 2.0. The local energy transfer rate is shown to be an order of magnitude or more faster than the Landau-Teller model

  16. Engineering calculations of three-dimensional inviscid hypersonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; Dejarnette, Fred R.

    1991-01-01

    An approximate solution technique has been developed for three-dimensional, inviscid, hypersonic flows. The method uses Maslen's explicit pressure equation and the assumption of approximate stream surfaces in the shock layer. This approximation represents a simplification of Maslen's asymmetric method. The solution procedure involves iteratively changing the shock shape in the subsonic-transonic region until the correct body shape is obtained. Beyond this region, the shock surface is determined by using a marching procedure. Results are presented herein for a paraboloid and elliptic cone at angle of attack. Calculated surface pressure distributions, shock shapes, and property profiles are compared with experimental data and finite-difference solutions of the Euler equations. Comparisons of the results of the present method with experimental data and detailed predictions are very good. Since the present method provides a very rapid computational procedure, it can be used for parametric or preliminary design applications. One useful application would be to incorporate a heating procedure for aerothermal studies.

  17. Numerical Solutions of Supersonic and Hypersonic Laminar Compression Corner Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. M.; MacCormack, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    An efficient time-splitting, second-order accurate, numerical scheme is used to solve the complete Navier-Stokes equations for supersonic and hypersonic laminar flow over a two-dimensional compression corner. A fine, exponentially stretched mesh spacing is used in the region near the wall for resolving the viscous layer. Good agreement is obtained between the present computed results and experimental measurement for a Mach number of 14.1 and a Reynolds number of 1.04 x 10(exp 5) with wedge angles of 15 deg, 18 deg, and 24 deg. The details of the pressure variation across the boundary layer are given, and a correlation between the leading edge shock and the peaks in surface pressure and heat transfer is observed.

  18. High-resolution shock-capturing schemes for inviscid and viscous hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Klopfer, G. H.; Montagne, J.-L.

    1988-01-01

    A class of implicit Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) type algorithms suitable for transonic and supersonic multidimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations was extended to hypersonic computations. The improved conservative shock-capturing schemes are spatially second- and third-order, and are fully implicit. They can be first- or second-order accurate in time and are suitable for either steady or unsteady calculations. Enhancement of stability and convergence rate for hypersonic flows is discussed. With the proper choice of the temporal discretization and suitable implicit linearization, these schemes are fairly efficient and accurate for very complex two-dimensional hypersonic inviscid and viscous shock interactions. This study is complimented by a variety of steady and unsteady viscous and inviscid hypersonic blunt-body flow computations. Due to the inherent stiffness of viscous flow problems, numerical experiments indicated that the convergence rate is in general slower for viscous flows than for inviscid steady flows.

  19. Experimental and computational surface and flow-field results for an all-body hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockman, William K.; Lawrence, Scott L.; Cleary, Joseph W.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation is to establish a benchmark experimental data base for a generic hypersonic vehicle shape for validation and/or calibration of advanced computational fluid dynamics computer codes. This paper includes results from the comprehensive test program conducted in the NASA/Ames 3.5-foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel for a generic all-body hypersonic aircraft model. Experimental and computational results on flow visualization, surface pressures, surface convective heat transfer, and pitot-pressure flow-field surveys are presented. Comparisons of the experimental results with computational results from an upwind parabolized Navier-Stokes code developed at Ames demonstrate the capabilities of this code.

  20. Mutual effect of thermochemical surface decomposition and viscous interaction during hypersonic flow past a sharp cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limanskiy, A. V.; Timoshenko, V. I.

    1986-01-01

    Numerical results on the hypersonic gas flow in viscous interaction regime past sharp circular cones with thermally destructible Teflon surface are presented. Characteristics of the mutual influence between the thermochemical decomposition of the surface and the viscous interaction are revealed.

  1. Pressure Gradient Effects on Hypersonic Cavity Flow Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.; Prabhu, Ramdas K.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated in support of the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program. Two blunted-nose test surface geometries were developed, including an expansion plate test surface with nearly constant negative pressure gradient and a flat plate surface with nearly zero pressure gradient. The test surface designs and flow characterizations were performed using two-dimensional laminar computational methods, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process. Both open-flow and closed-flow cavities were tested on each test surface. The cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary conclusions based on an analysis of only the cavity centerline data indicate that the presence of the pressure gradient did not alter the open cavity heating for laminar-entry/laminar-exit flows, but did raise the average floor heating for closed cavities. The results of these risk-reduction studies will be used to formulate a heating assessment of potential damage scenarios occurring during future Space Shuttle flights.

  2. Pressure Gradient Effects on Hypersonic Cavity Flow Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated in support of the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program. Two blunted-nose test surface geometries were developed, including an expansion plate test surface with nearly constant negative pressure gradient and a flat plate surface with nearly zero pressure gradient. The test surface designs and flow characterizations were performed using two-dimensional laminar computational methods, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process. Both open-flow and closed-flow cavities were tested on each test surface. The cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary conclusions based on an analysis of only the cavity centerline data indicate that the presence of the pressure gradient did not alter the open cavity heating for laminar-entry/laminar-exit flows, but did raise the average floor heating for closed cavities. The results of these risk-reduction studies will be used to formulate a heating assessment of potential damage scenarios occurring during future Space Shuttle flights.

  3. Development and validation of CNS (compressible Navier-Stokes) for hypersonic external flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Jolen; Chow, Chuen-Yen; Ryan, James S.

    1989-01-01

    CNS, a new computational fluid dynamics procedure, has been developed to aid in hypersonic vehicle design. The code can be used to model the entire external flow around hypersonic vehicle shapes, from the captured shock at the nose to the beginning of the wake. Unlike space-marching codes, the technique allows axially separated flow regions to be modeled. Validation trials using sphere-cone data reveal good solution accuracy for the surface pressure and flowfield temperature.

  4. Vectorization of a particle simulation method for hypersonic rarefied flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Jeffrey D.; Baganoff, Donald

    1988-01-01

    An efficient particle simulation technique for hypersonic rarefied flows is presented at an algorithmic and implementation level. The implementation is for a vector computer architecture, specifically the Cray-2. The method models an ideal diatomic Maxwell molecule with three translational and two rotational degrees of freedom. Algorithms are designed specifically for compatibility with fine grain parallelism by reducing the number of data dependencies in the computation. By insisting on this compatibility, the method is capable of performing simulation on a much larger scale than previously possible. A two-dimensional simulation of supersonic flow over a wedge is carried out for the near-continuum limit where the gas is in equilibrium and the ideal solution can be used as a check on the accuracy of the gas model employed in the method. Also, a three-dimensional, Mach 8, rarefied flow about a finite-span flat plate at a 45 degree angle of attack was simulated. It utilized over 10 to the 7th particles carried through 400 discrete time steps in less than one hour of Cray-2 CPU time. This problem was chosen to exhibit the capability of the method in handling a large number of particles and a true three-dimensional geometry.

  5. Analysis of hypersonic aircraft inlets using flow adaptive mesh algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neaves, Michael Dean

    The numerical investigation into the dynamics of unsteady inlet flowfields is applied to a three-dimensional scramjet inlet-isolator-diffuser geometry designed for hypersonic type applications. The Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations are integrated in time using a subiterating, time-accurate implicit algorithm. Inviscid fluxes are calculated using the Low Diffusion Flux Splitting Scheme of Edwards. A modified version of the dynamic solution-adaptive point movement algorithm of Benson and McRae is used in a coupled mode to dynamically resolve the features of the flow by enhancing the spatial accuracy of the simulations. The unsteady mesh terms are incorporated into the flow solver via the inviscid fluxes. The dynamic solution-adaptive grid algorithm of Benson and McRae is modified to improve orthogonality at the boundaries to ensure accurate application of boundary conditions and properly resolve turbulent boundary layers. Shock tube simulations are performed to ascertain the effectiveness of the algorithm for unsteady flow situations on fixed and moving grids. Unstarts due to a combustor and freestream angle of attack perturbations are simulated in a three-dimensional inlet-isolator-diffuser configuration.

  6. Computations of Axisymmetric Flows in Hypersonic Shock Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Wilson, Gregory J.

    1995-01-01

    A time-accurate two-dimensional fluid code is used to compute test times in shock tubes operated at supersonic speeds. Unlike previous studies, this investigation resolves the finer temporal details of the shock-tube flow by making use of modern supercomputers and state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamic solution techniques. The code, besides solving the time-dependent fluid equations, also accounts for the finite rate chemistry in the hypersonic environment. The flowfield solutions are used to estimate relevant shock-tube parameters for laminar flow, such as test times, and to predict density and velocity profiles. Boundary-layer parameters such as bar-delta(sub u), bar-delta(sup *), and bar-tau(sub w), and test time parameters such as bar-tau and particle time of flight t(sub f), are computed and compared with those evaluated by using Mirels' correlations. This article then discusses in detail the effects of flow nonuniformities on particle time-of-flight behind the normal shock and, consequently, on the interpretation of shock-tube data. This article concludes that for accurate interpretation of shock-tube data, a detailed analysis of flowfield parameters, using a computer code such as used in this study, must be performed.

  7. Wind Instability and Interaction of Vibrations of a Thin Plate with a Magnetohydrodynamic Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestrin, S. G.; Gorbatenko, B. B.; Mezhonnova, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that the resonance effect of a magnetohydrodynamic hypersonic shear flow on an elastic plate placed in it causes the development of wind instability. Plate bending oscillations propagating along the flow are stabilized in the hypersonic flow regime, whereas waves running at an angle to the flow remain unstable. Expression derived for the instability increment allows conclusions about the effect of the magnetic field on the interaction of waves with the flow to be drawn as well as about the feasibility of its suppression in an unstable flow regime.

  8. Numerical simulation of supersonic and hypersonic inlet flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcrae, D. Scott; Kontinos, Dean A.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the research performed by North Carolina State University and NASA Ames Research Center under Cooperative Agreement NCA2-719, 'Numerical Simulation of Supersonic and Hypersonic Inlet Flow Fields". Four distinct rotated upwind schemes were developed and investigated to determine accuracy and practicality. The scheme found to have the best combination of attributes, including reduction to grid alignment with no rotation, was the cell centered non-orthogonal (CCNO) scheme. In 2D, the CCNO scheme improved rotation when flux interpolation was extended to second order. In 3D, improvements were less dramatic in all cases, with second order flux interpolation showing the least improvement over grid aligned upwinding. The reduction in improvement is attributed to uncertainty in determining optimum rotation angle and difficulty in performing accurate and efficient interpolation of the angle in 3D. The CCNO rotational technique will prove very useful for increasing accuracy when second order interpolation is not appropriate and will materially improve inlet flow solutions.

  9. Direct simulation of hypersonic flows over blunt slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.; Cuda, V., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Results of a numerical study of low-density hypersonic flow about cylindrically blunted wedges and spherically blunted cones with body half angles of 0, 5, and 10 deg are presented. Most of the transitional flow regime encountered during entry between the free molecule and continuum regimes is simulated for a reentry velocity of 7.5 km/s by including freestream conditions of 70 to 100 km. The bodies are at zero angle of incidence and have diffuse and finite catalytic surfaces. Translational, thermodynamic, and chemical nonequilibrium effects are considered in the numerical simulation by utilizing the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The numerical simulations show that noncontinuum effects such as surface temperature jump, and velocity slip are evident for all cases considered. The onset of chemical dissociation occurs at a simulated altitude of 96 km for the two-dimensional configurations. Comparisons between the DSMC and continuum viscous shock-layer calculations highlight the significant difference in flowfield structure predicted by the two methods.

  10. Reattachment heating upstream of short compression ramps in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estruch-Samper, David

    2016-05-01

    Hypersonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions with separation induce unsteady thermal loads of particularly high intensity in flow reattachment regions. Building on earlier semi-empirical correlations, the maximum heat transfer rates upstream of short compression ramp obstacles of angles 15° ⩽ θ ⩽ 135° are here discretised based on time-dependent experimental measurements to develop insight into their transient nature (Me = 8.2-12.3, Re_h= 0.17× 105-0.47× 105). Interactions with an incoming laminar boundary layer experience transition at separation, with heat transfer oscillating between laminar and turbulent levels exceeding slightly those in fully turbulent interactions. Peak heat transfer rates are strongly influenced by the stagnation of the flow upon reattachment close ahead of obstacles and increase with ramp angle all the way up to θ =135°, whereby rates well over two orders of magnitude above the undisturbed laminar levels are intermittently measured (q'_max>10^2q_{u,L}). Bearing in mind the varying degrees of strength in the competing effect between the inviscid and viscous terms—namely the square of the hypersonic similarity parameter (Mθ )^2 for strong interactions and the viscous interaction parameter bar{χ } (primarily a function of Re and M)—the two physical factors that appear to most globally encompass the effects of peak heating for blunt ramps (θ ⩾ 45°) are deflection angle and stagnation heat transfer, so that this may be fundamentally expressed as q'_max∝ {q_{o,2D}} θ ^2 with further parameters in turn influencing the interaction to a lesser extent. The dominant effect of deflection angle is restricted to short obstacle heights, where the rapid expansion at the top edge of the obstacle influences the relaxation region just downstream of reattachment and leads to an upstream displacement of the separation front. The extreme heating rates result from the strengthening of the reattaching shear layer with the increase in

  11. Computation of hypersonic flows with finite rate condensation and evaporation of water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrell, Eric R.; Candler, Graham V.; Erickson, Wayne D.; Wieting, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    A computer program for modelling 2D hypersonic flows of gases containing water vapor and liquid water droplets is presented. The effects of interphase mass, momentum and energy transfer are studied. Computations are compared with existing quasi-1D calculations on the nozzle of the NASA Langley Eight Foot High Temperature Tunnel, a hypersonic wind tunnel driven by combustion of natural gas in oxygen enriched air.

  12. Blunt Body Aerodynamics for Hypersonic Low Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Glass, Christopher E.; Greene, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed for the Apollo capsule from the hypersonic rarefied to the continuum regimes. The focus is on flow conditions similar to those experienced by the Apollo 6 Command Module during the high altitude portion of its reentry. The present focus is to highlight some of the current activities that serve as a precursor for computational tool assessments that will be used to support the development of aerodynamic data bases for future capsule flight environments, particularly those for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Results for aerodynamic forces and moments are presented that demonstrate their sensitivity to rarefaction; that is, free molecular to continuum conditions. Also, aerodynamic data are presented that shows their sensitivity to a range of reentry velocities, encompassing conditions that include reentry from low Earth orbit, lunar return, and Mars return velocities (7.7 to 15 km/s). The rarefied results obtained with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) codes are anchored in the continuum regime with data from Navier-Stokes simulations.

  13. Comparative study of various approaches for modeling transitional hypersonic rarefied gas flows over blunt bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brykina, I. G.; Rogov, B. V.; Tirskiy, G. A.; Titarev, V. A.; Utyuzhnikov, S. V.

    2012-11-01

    The hypersonic rarefied gas flow over blunt bodies in the transitional flow regime, typical of the reentry flight of space vehicles at altitudes higher 90-100 km, is investigated. As an example, the problem of hypersonic flows over long blunt wings and axisymmetric bodies is considered. It is analyzed in a wide range of the free stream Knudsen number by using various approaches: the continuum approach - numerical and analytical solutions, the direct simulation Monte Carlo method and the direct numerical solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation with the S-model collision integral. The efficiency, domain of applicability, advantages and disadvantages of various approaches in the transitional flow regime are considered.

  14. The computation of thermo-chemical nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham

    1989-01-01

    Several conceptual designs for vehicles that would fly in the atmosphere at hypersonic speeds have been developed recently. For the proposed flight conditions the air in the shock layer that envelops the body is at a sufficiently high temperature to cause chemical reaction, vibrational excitation, and ionization. However, these processes occur at finite rates which, when coupled with large convection speeds, cause the gas to be removed from thermo-chemical equilibrium. This non-ideal behavior affects the aerothermal loading on the vehicle and has ramifications in its design. A numerical method to solve the equations that describe these types of flows in 2-D was developed. The state of the gas is represented with seven chemical species, a separate vibrational temperature for each diatomic species, an electron translational temperature, and a mass-average translational-rotational temperature for the heavy particles. The equations for this gas model are solved numerically in a fully coupled fashion using an implicit finite volume time-marching technique. Gauss-Seidel line-relaxation is used to reduce the cost of the solution and flux-dependent differencing is employed to maintain stability. The numerical method was tested against several experiments. The calculated bow shock wave detachment on a sphere and two cones was compared to those measured in ground testing facilities. The computed peak electron number density on a sphere-cone was compared to that measured in a flight test. In each case the results from the numerical method were in excellent agreement with experiment. The technique was used to predict the aerothermal loads on an Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle including radiative heating. These results indicate that the current physical model of high temperature air is appropriate and that the numerical algorithm is capable of treating this class of flows.

  15. STAR FORMATION IN TURBULENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS WITH COLLIDING FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi

    2015-03-10

    Using self-gravitational hydrodynamical numerical simulations, we investigated the evolution of high-density turbulent molecular clouds swept by a colliding flow. The interaction of shock waves due to turbulence produces networks of thin filamentary clouds with a sub-parsec width. The colliding flow accumulates the filamentary clouds into a sheet cloud and promotes active star formation for initially high-density clouds. Clouds with a colliding flow exhibit a finer filamentary network than clouds without a colliding flow. The probability distribution functions (PDFs) for the density and column density can be fitted by lognormal functions for clouds without colliding flow. When the initial turbulence is weak, the column density PDF has a power-law wing at high column densities. The colliding flow considerably deforms the PDF, such that the PDF exhibits a double peak. The stellar mass distributions reproduced here are consistent with the classical initial mass function with a power-law index of –1.35 when the initial clouds have a high density. The distribution of stellar velocities agrees with the gas velocity distribution, which can be fitted by Gaussian functions for clouds without colliding flow. For clouds with colliding flow, the velocity dispersion of gas tends to be larger than the stellar velocity dispersion. The signatures of colliding flows and turbulence appear in channel maps reconstructed from the simulation data. Clouds without colliding flow exhibit a cloud-scale velocity shear due to the turbulence. In contrast, clouds with colliding flow show a prominent anti-correlated distribution of thin filaments between the different velocity channels, suggesting collisions between the filamentary clouds.

  16. Simulation of 3D flows past hypersonic vehicles in FlowVision software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, A. A.; Zhluktov, S. V.; Savitskiy, D. V.; Bartenev, G. Y.; Pokhilko, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    A new implicit velocity-pressure split method is discussed in the given presentation. The method implies using conservative velocities, obtained at the given time step, for integration of the momentum equation and other convection-diffusion equations. This enables simulation of super- and hypersonic flows with account of motion of solid boundaries. Calculations of known test cases performed in the FlowVision software are demonstrated. It is shown that the method allows one to carry out calculations at high Mach numbers with integration step essentially exceeding the explicit time step.

  17. Three-dimensional thermochemical nonequilibrium flow modeling for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, L. T.; Li, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional thermochemical nonequilibrium model has been developed and applied to the study of entry flows surrounding space vehicles. The model accounts for both chemical and vibrational nonequilibrium phenomena behind the bow shock. The thermodynamic state of a real gas is modeled with a translational-rotational temperature and a electron-vibrational temperature. Their internal energies are averaged to determine the temperature used in the reaction rates calculation. In order to establish the validity of the selected models, both one- and two-temperature models with seven and/or eleven species were investigated. Several numerical experiments that include a sphere, the RAMC vehicle and 3D AFE forebody flows were performed. Preliminary results were compared with RAMC-II experimental data. Good agreement was obtained after a two-temperature model with eleven species and thirty reactions was incorporated into the study.

  18. N-S/DSMC hybrid simulation of hypersonic flow over blunt body including wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhonghua; Li, Zhihui; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Yanguang; Jiang, Xinyu

    2014-12-01

    A hybrid N-S/DSMC method is presented and applied to solve the three-dimensional hypersonic transitional flows by employing the MPC (modular Particle-Continuum) technique based on the N-S and the DSMC method. A sub-relax technique is adopted to deal with information transfer between the N-S and the DSMC. The hypersonic flows over a 70-deg spherically blunted cone under different Kn numbers are simulated using the CFD, DSMC and hybrid N-S/DSMC method. The present computations are found in good agreement with DSMC and experimental results. The present method provides an efficient way to predict the hypersonic aerodynamics in near-continuum transitional flow regime.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Compression Corners and Hypersonic Inlet Flows Using the RPLUS2D Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional computational code, PRLUS2D, which was developed for the reactive propulsive flows of ramjets and scramjets, was validated for two-dimensional shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions. The problem of compression corners at supersonic speeds was solved using the RPLUS2D code. To validate the RPLUS2D code for hypersonic speeds, it was applied to a realistic hypersonic inlet geometry. Both the Baldwin-Lomax and the Chien two-equation turbulence models were used. Computational results showed that the RPLUS2D code compared very well with experimentally obtained data for supersonic compression corner flows, except in the case of large separated flows resulting from the interactions between the shock wave and turbulent boundary layer. The computational results compared well with the experiment results in a hypersonic NASA P8 inlet case, with the Chien two-equation turbulence model performing better than the Baldwin-Lomax model.

  20. Tests of Hypersonic Inlet Oscillatory Flows in a Shock Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhufei; Gao, Wenzhi; Jiang, Hongliang; Yang, Jiming

    For efficient operation, hypersonic air breathing engine requires the inlet to operate in a starting mode [1]. High backpressure induced by the combustion may cause the inlet to unstart in the engine actual operation [2].When unstarted, shock wave oscillations are typically observed in the inlet, a phenomenon known as buzz.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of laminar-turbulent flow over a flat plate at hypersonic flow speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, I. V.; Novikov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    A method for direct numerical simulation of a laminar-turbulent flow around bodies at hypersonic flow speeds is proposed. The simulation is performed by solving the full three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The method of calculation is oriented to application of supercomputers and is based on implicit monotonic approximation schemes and a modified Newton-Raphson method for solving nonlinear difference equations. By this method, the development of three-dimensional perturbations in the boundary layer over a flat plate and in a near-wall flow in a compression corner is studied at the Mach numbers of the free-stream of M = 5.37. In addition to pulsation characteristic, distributions of the mean coefficients of the viscous flow in the transient section of the streamlined surface are obtained, which enables one to determine the beginning of the laminar-turbulent transition and estimate the characteristics of the turbulent flow in the boundary layer.

  2. Flow-Tagging Velocimetry for Hypersonic Flows Using Fluorescence of Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; OByrne, Sean; Houwing, A. Frank P.; Fox, Jodie S.; Smith, Daniel R.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a new variation of molecular-tagging velocimetry for hypersonic flows based on laser-induced fluorescence. A thin line of nitric-oxide molecules is excited with a laser beam and then, after a time delay, a fluorescence image of the displaced line is acquired. One component of velocity is determined from the time of flight. This method is applied to measure the velocity profile in a Mach 8.5 laminar, hypersonic boundary layer in the Australian National University s T2 free-piston shock tunnel. The single-shot velocity measurement uncertainty in the freestream was found to be 3.5%, based on 90% confidence. The method is also demonstrated in the separated flow region forward of a blunt fin attached to a flat plate in a Mach 7.4 flow produced by the Australian National University s T3 free-piston shock tunnel. The measurement uncertainty in the blunt fin experiment is approximately 30%, owing mainly to low fluorescence intensities, which could be improved significantly in future experiments. This velocimetry method is applicable to very high-speed flows that have low collisional quenching of the fluorescing species. It is particularly convenient in facilities where planar laser-induced fluorescence is already being performed.

  3. Aero-Heating of Shallow Cavities in Hypersonic Freestream Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Berger, Karen T.; Merski, N. R., Jr.; Woods, William A.; Hollingsworth, Kevin E.; Hyatt, Andrew; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of these experiments and analysis was to augment the heating database and tools used for assessment of impact-induced shallow-cavity damage to the thermal protection system of the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The effect of length and depth on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These rapid-response experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated immediately prior to the launch of STS-114, the initial flight in the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program, and continued during the first week of the mission. Previously-designed and numerically-characterized blunted-nose baseline flat plates were used as the test surfaces. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process and the two-dimensional flow assumptions used for the data analysis. The experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions on a no-cavity test article. Two test plates were developed, each containing 4 equally-spaced spanwise-distributed cavities. The first test plate contained cavities with a constant length-to-depth ratio of 8 with design point depth-to-boundary-layer-thickness ratios of 0.1, 0.2, 0.35, and 0.5. The second test plate contained cavities with a constant design point depth-to-boundary-layer-thickness ratio of 0.35 with length-to-depth ratios of 8, 12, 16, and 20. Cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary results indicate that the floor-averaged Bump Factor (local heating rate nondimensionalized by upstream reference) at the tested conditions is approximately 0.3 with a standard deviation of 0.04 for laminar-in/laminar-out conditions when the cavity length-to-boundary-layer thickness is between 2.5 and 10 and for

  4. Atomistic Simulation of Non-Equilibrium Phenomena in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Paul Erik

    The goal of this work is to model the heterogeneous recombination of atomic oxygen on silica surfaces, which is of interest for accurately predicting the heating on vehicles traveling at hypersonic speeds. This is accomplished by creating a finite rate catalytic model, which describes recombination with a set of elementary gas-surface reactions. Fundamental to a description of surface catalytic reactions are the in situ chemical structures on the surface where recombination can occur. Using molecular dynamics simulations with the Reax GSISiO potential, we find that the chemical sites active in direct gas-phase reactions on silica surfaces consist of a small number of specific structures (or defects). The existence of these defects on real silica surfaces is supported by experimental results and the structure and energetics of these defects have been verified with quantum chemical calculations. The reactions in the finite rate catalytic model are based on the interaction of molecular and atomic oxygen with these defects. Trajectory calculations are used to find the parameters in the forward rate equations, while a combination of detailed balance and transition state theory are used to find the parameters in the reverse rate equations. The rate model predicts that the oxygen recombination coefficient is relatively constant at T (300-1000 K), in agreement with experimental results. At T > 1000 K the rate model predicts a drop off in the oxygen recombination coefficient, in disagreement with experimental results, which predict that the oxygen recombination coefficient increases with temperature. A discussion of the possible reasons for this disagreement, including non-adiabatic collision dynamics, variable surface site concentrations, and additional recombination mechanisms is presented. This thesis also describes atomistic simulations with Classical Trajectory Calculation Direction Simulation Monte Carlo (CTC-DSMC), a particle based method for modeling non

  5. DSMC simulation of hypersonic flows using an improved SBT-TAS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goshayeshi, Bijan; Roohi, Ehsan; Stefanov, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    The current paper examines a new DSMC approach to hypersonic flow simulation consisting of a combination between the Simplified Bernoulli Trials (SBT) collision algorithm and the transient adaptive subcell (TAS) selection procedure. The SBT collision algorithm has already been introduced as a scheme that provides accurate results with a quite small number of particles per cells and its combination with the transient adaptive subcell (TAS) technique will enable SBT to have coarser grid sizes as well. In the current research, the no-time-counter (NTC) collision algorithm and nearest neighbor (NN) pair selection procedure of Bird DS2V code are substituted by the SBT-TAS and comparisons between the new algorithm and NTC-NN are made considering appropriate test cases including hypersonic cylinder flow and axisymmetric biconic flow. Hypersonic cylinder flow is a well-known benchmark problem with a wide collision frequency range while the biconic flow exhibits laminar shock/shock and shock/boundary-layer interactions. Improvements implemented in the SBT-TAS technique, including subcell volume estimation, surface properties filter, and time controller, are discussed in detail. The simulations of these hypersonic test cases demonstrated that from the viewpoint of consumed sample-size, SBT-TAS is an efficient collision technique.

  6. Multi Laser Pulse Investigation of the DEAS Concept in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Minucci, M.A.S.; Toro, P.G.P.; Oliveira, A.C.; Chanes, J.B. Jr.; Ramos, A.G.; Nagamatsu, H.T.; Myrabo, L.N.

    2004-03-30

    The present paper presents recent experimental results on the Laser-Supported Directed Energy 'Air Spike' - DEAS in hypersonic flow achieved by the Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics - LAH, Brazil. Two CO2 TEA lasers, sharing the same optical cavity, have been used in conjunction with the IEAv 0.3m Hypersonic Shock Tunnel - HST to demonstrate the Laser-Supported DEAS concept. A single and double laser pulse, generated during the tunnel useful test time, were focused through a NaCl lens upstream of a Double Apollo Disc model fitted with seven piezoelectric pressure transducers and six platinum thin film heat transfer gauges. The objective being to corroborate previous results as well as to obtain additional pressure and heat flux distributions information when two laser pulses are used.

  7. Effect of volumetric electromagnetic forces on shock wave structure of hypersonic air flow near plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomichev, Vladislav; Yadrenkin, Mikhail; Shipko, Evgeny

    2016-10-01

    Summarizing of experimental studies results of the local MHD-interaction at hypersonic air flow near the plate is presented. Pulsed and radiofrequency discharge have been used for the flow ionization. It is shown that MHD-effect on the shock-wave structure of the flow is significant at test conditions. Using of MHD-interaction parameter enabled to defining characteristic modes of MHD-interaction by the force effect: weak, moderate and strong.

  8. Wall catalytic recombination and boundary conditions in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows - With applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.

    1992-01-01

    The meaning of catalysis and its relation to aerodynamic heating in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows are discussed. The species equations are described and boundary conditions for them are derived for a multicomponent gas and for a binary gas. Slip effects are included for application of continuum methods to low-density flows. Measurement techniques for determining catalytic wall recombination rates are discussed. Among them are experiments carried out in arc jets as well as flow reactors. Diagnostic methods for determining the atom or molecule concentrations in the flow are included. Results are given for a number of materials of interest to the aerospace community, including glassy coatings such as the RCG coating of the Space Shuttle and for high temperature refractory metals such as coated niobium. Methods of calculating the heat flux to space vehicles in nonequilibrium flows are described. These methods are applied to the Space Shuttle, the planned Aeroassist Flight Experiment, and a hypersonic slender vehicle such as a transatmospheric vehicle.

  9. Multiscale Computational Analysis of Nitrogen and Oxygen Gas-Phase Thermochemistry in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Jason D.

    Understanding hypersonic aerodynamics is important for the design of next-generation aerospace vehicles for space exploration, national security, and other applications. Ground-level experimental studies of hypersonic flows are difficult and expensive; thus, computational science plays a crucial role in this field. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of extremely high-speed flows require models of chemical and thermal nonequilibrium processes, such as dissociation of diatomic molecules and vibrational energy relaxation. Current models are outdated and inadequate for advanced applications. We describe a multiscale computational study of gas-phase thermochemical processes in hypersonic flows, starting at the atomic scale and building systematically up to the continuum scale. The project was part of a larger effort centered on collaborations between aerospace scientists and computational chemists. We discuss the construction of potential energy surfaces for the N4, N2O2, and O4 systems, focusing especially on the multi-dimensional fitting problem. A new local fitting method named L-IMLS-G2 is presented and compared with a global fitting method. Then, we describe the theory of the quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) approach for modeling molecular collisions. We explain how we implemented the approach in a new parallel code for high-performance computing platforms. Results from billions of QCT simulations of high-energy N2 + N2, N2 + N, and N2 + O2 collisions are reported and analyzed. Reaction rate constants are calculated and sets of reactive trajectories are characterized at both thermal equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. The data shed light on fundamental mechanisms of dissociation and exchange reactions -- and their coupling to internal energy transfer processes -- in thermal environments typical of hypersonic flows. We discuss how the outcomes of this investigation and other related studies lay a rigorous foundation for new macroscopic models for

  10. Hypersonic Nozzle/Afterbody Experiment: Flow Visualization and Boundary Layer Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, Earl R.; Spaid, Frank W.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This study was conducted to experimentally characterize the flow field created by the interaction of a single-expansion-ramp-nozzle (SERN) flow with a hypersonic external stream Data were obtained from a generic nozzle/afterbody model in the 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel of the NASA Ames Research Center in a cooperative experimental program involving Ames and the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The model design and test planning were performed in close cooperation with members of the Ames computational fluid dynamics (CFD) team for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program. This paper presents experimental results consisting of oil-flow and shadowgraph flow-visualization photographs, afterbody surface-pressure distributions, boundary-layer rake measurements, and Preston-tube skin-friction measurements.

  11. Use of arc-jet hypersonic blunted wedge flows for evaluating performance of Orbiter TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochelle, W. C.; Battley, H. H.; Gallegos, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    Arc-jet tests at NASA/JSC have been conducted recently to evaluate the performance of the Orbiter Thermal Protection System (TPS) on three critical areas of the side and top of the Orbiter fuselage: (1) cargo bay door, (2) crew access door, and (3) LRSI/FRSI joint regions. Test articles corresponding to these three areas on the Orbiter were mounted in an arc-jet test chamber in a blunted-wedge holder and exposed to hypersonic flow at various angles of attack. The effects of flow direction, heating load, and overtemperature were investigated. In addition, the reuse capability of the TPS materials was evaluated, along with the protection of the pressure seals within the test articles. Thermal match model predictions correlated well with primary structure thermocouple data. Heating rate and pressure predictions based on a nonequilibrium flow field computer program showed good agreement with arc-jet test data and existing hypersonic flow theories.

  12. Application of the Galerkin/least-squares formulation to the analysis of hypersonic flows. II - Flow past a double ellipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalot, F.; Hughes, T. J. R.; Johan, Z.; Shakib, F.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is introduced. The discretization is based on entropy variables. The methodology is developed within the framework of a Galerkin/least-squares formulation to which a discontinuity-capturing operator is added. Results for four test cases selected among those of the Workshop on Hypersonic Flows for Reentry Problems are presented.

  13. Evaluation of thermochemical models for particle and continuum simulations of hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain D.; Gokcen, Tahir

    1992-01-01

    Computations are presented for one-dimensional, strong shock waves that are typical of those that form in front of a reentering spacecraft. The fluid mechanics and thermochemistry are modeled using two different approaches. The first employs traditional continuum techniques in solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The second approach employs a particle simulation technique (the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, DSMC). The thermochemical models employed in these two techniques are quite different. The present investigation presents an evaluation of thermochemical models for nitrogen under hypersonic flow conditions. Four separate cases are considered that are dominated in turn by vibrational relaxation, weak dissociation, strong dissociation and weak ionization. In near-continuum, hypersonic flow, the nonequilibrium thermochemical models employed in continuum and particle simulations produce nearly identical solutions. Further, the two approaches are evaluated successfully against available experimental data for weakly and strongly dissociating flows.

  14. Numerical simulation of flow over a hypersonic aircraft using an explicit upwind PNS solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, John J.; Mcrae, D. Scott

    1989-01-01

    A hypersonic flow field over a generic airplane configuration is simulated by solving the Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) equations. The finite difference solution of the PNS equations is calculated using a noniterative space marching, explicit, upwind scheme recently developed by the authors. Special gridding techniques are used which allowed the sharp changes in surface geometry of the airplane configuration to be modelled without smoothing of corners. Comparisons of the PNS results to a solution of the Navier-Stokes equations demonstrates a good agreement of the numerical results in approximately 1/6 of the cpu time. This paper demonstrates that the explicit upwind algorithm for solving the PNS equations is an efficient method for simulating hypersonic flow fields about complete airplane configurations and should be considered as an alternative to solving the Navier-Stokes equations for flow fields where the PNS equations are valid.

  15. Comparative study of turbulence models in predicting hypersonic inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to analyze the performance of different turbulence models when applied to the hypersonic NASA P8 inlet. Computational results from the PARC2D code, which solves the full two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation, were compared with experimental data. The zero-equation models considered for the study were the Baldwin-Lomax model, the Thomas model, and a combination of the Baldwin-Lomax and Thomas models; the two-equation models considered were the Chien model, the Speziale model (both low Reynolds number), and the Launder and Spalding model (high Reynolds number). The Thomas model performed best among the zero-equation models, and predicted good pressure distributions. The Chien and Speziale models compared very well with the experimental data, and performed better than the Thomas model near the walls.

  16. Comparative study of turbulence models in predicting hypersonic inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh; Anderson, Bernhard H.; Shaw, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to analyze the performance of different turbulence models when applied to the hypersonic NASA P8 inlet. Computational results from the PARC2D code, which solves the full two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation, were compared with experimental data. The zero-equation models considered for the study were the Baldwin-Lomax model, the Thomas model, and a combination of the Baldwin-Lomax and Thomas models; the two-equation models considered were the Chien model, the Speziale model (both low Reynolds number), and the Launder and Spalding model (high Reynolds number). The Thomas model performed best among the zero-equation models, and predicted good pressure distributions. The Chien and Speziale models compared wery well with the experimental data, and performed better than the Thomas model near the walls.

  17. Three-dimensional hypersonic rarefied flow calculations using direct simulation Monte Carlo method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celenligil, M. Cevdet; Moss, James N.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of three-dimensional simulations on the hypersonic rarefied flows in an effort to understand the highly nonequilibrium flows about space vehicles entering the Earth's atmosphere for a realistic estimation of the aerothermal loads is presented. Calculations are performed using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method with a five-species reacting gas model, which accounts for rotational and vibrational internal energies. Results are obtained for the external flows about various bodies in the transitional flow regime. For the cases considered, convective heating, flowfield structure and overall aerodynamic coefficients are presented and comparisons are made with the available experimental data. The agreement between the calculated and measured results are very good.

  18. Review of blunt body wake flows at hypersonic low density conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.; Price, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Recent results of experimental and computational studies concerning hypersonic flows about blunted cones including their near wake are reviewed. Attention is focused on conditions where rarefaction effects are present, particularly in the wake. The experiments have been performed for a common model configuration (70 deg spherically-blunted cone) in five hypersonic facilities that encompass a significant range of rarefaction and nonequilibrium effects. Computational studies using direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Navier-Stokes solvers have been applied to selected experiments performed in each of the facilities. In addition, computations have been made for typical flight conditions in both Earth and Mars atmospheres, hence more energetic flows than produced in the ground-based tests. Also, comparisons of DSMC calculations and forebody measurements made for the Japanese Orbital Reentry Experiment (OREX) vehicle (a 50 deg spherically-blunted cone) are presented to bridge the spectrum of ground to flight conditions.

  19. Spatially resolved excitation temperature measurements in a hypersonic flow using the hook method.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, R J; Ebrahim, N A

    1977-05-01

    The extension of the hook method to include spatial resolution of nonuniformities in the test plane as suggested by Huber (1971) and Sandeman (1971) is demonstrated experimentally by measurements of the variation of the integrated line density of ground state sodium in a flame. Experiments are also described in which the variations in the flow of CO(2) in a hypersonic shock tunnel are spatially resolved along the spectrometer slit. The variations in the hook separations of the 425.4-nm Cr1 resonance and the 434.4-nm CrI 1-eV lower state line are simultaneously measured. The chromium exists as an impurity in the hypersonic flow of CO(2) over a cylinder in a shock tunnel. The populations of the levels so obtained have enabled the comparison of the excitation temperature of the Cr 1-eV level with the calculated gas temperature.

  20. Real-Gas Correction Factors for Hypersonic Flow Parameters in Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Wayne D.

    1960-01-01

    The real-gas hypersonic flow parameters for helium have been calculated for stagnation temperatures from 0 F to 600 F and stagnation pressures up to 6,000 pounds per square inch absolute. The results of these calculations are presented in the form of simple correction factors which must be applied to the tabulated ideal-gas parameters. It has been shown that the deviations from the ideal-gas law which exist at high pressures may cause a corresponding significant error in the hypersonic flow parameters when calculated as an ideal gas. For example the ratio of the free-stream static to stagnation pressure as calculated from the thermodynamic properties of helium for a stagnation temperature of 80 F and pressure of 4,000 pounds per square inch absolute was found to be approximately 13 percent greater than that determined from the ideal-gas tabulation with a specific heat ratio of 5/3.

  1. Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Myrabo, L. N.

    2008-04-28

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed.

  2. Approximate Analytical Solutions for Hypersonic Flow Over Slender Power Law Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirels, Harold

    1959-01-01

    Approximate analytical solutions are presented for two-dimensional and axisymmetric hypersonic flow over slender power law bodies. Both zero order (M approaches infinity) and first order (small but nonvanishing values of 1/(M(Delta)(sup 2) solutions are presented, where M is free-stream Mach number and Delta is a characteristic slope. These solutions are compared with exact numerical integration of the equations of motion and appear to be accurate particularly when the shock is relatively close to the body.

  3. Surface Characterization of LMMS Molybdenum Disilicide Coated HTP-8 Using Arc- Jet Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Surface properties for an advanced Lockheed Martin Missile and Space (LMMS) molybdenum disilicide coated insulation (HTP-8) were determined using arc-jet flow to simulate Earth entry at hypersonic speeds. The catalytic efficiency (atom recombination coefficients) for this advanced thermal protection system was determined from arc-jet data taken in both oxygen and nitrogen streams at temperatures ranging from 1255 K to roughly 1600 K. In addition, optical and chemical stability data were obtained from these test samples.

  4. On the boundary conditions on a shock wave for hypersonic flow around a descent vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golomazov, M. M.; Ivankov, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Stationary hypersonic flow around a descent vehicle is examined by considering equilibrium and nonequilibrium reactions. We study how physical-chemical processes and shock wave conditions for gas species influence the shock-layer structure. It is shown that conservation conditions of species on the shock wave cause high-temperature and concentration gradients in the shock layer when we calculate spacecraft deceleration trajectory in the atmosphere at 75 km altitude.

  5. Modeling study of rarefied gas effects on hypersonic reacting stagnation flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihui; Bao, Lin

    2014-12-01

    Recent development of the near space hypersonic sharp leading vehicles has raised a necessity to fast and accurately predict the aeroheating in hypersonic rarefied flows, which challenges our understanding of the aerothermodynamics and aerothermochemistry. The present flow and heat transfer problem involves complex rarefied gas effects and nonequilibrium real gas effects which are beyond the scope of the traditional prediction theory based on the continuum hypothesis and equilibrium assumption. As a typical example, it has been found that the classical Fay-Riddell equation fails to predict the stagnation point heat flux, when the flow is either rarefied or chemical nonequilibrium. In order to design a more general theory covering the rarefied reacting flow cases, an intuitive model is proposed in this paper to describe the nonequilibrium dissociation-recombination flow along the stagnation streamline towards a slightly blunted nose in hypersonic rarefied flows. Some characteristic flow parameters are introduced, and based on these parameters, an explicitly analytical bridging function is established to correct the traditional theory to accurately predict the actual aeroheating performance. It is shown that for a small size nose in medium density flows, the flow at the outer edge of the stagnation point boundary layer could be highly nonequilibrium, and the aeroheating performance is distinguished from that of the big blunt body reentry flows at high altitudes. As a result, when the rarefied gas effects and the nonequilibrium real gas effects are both significant, the classical similarity law could be questionable, and it is inadequate to directly analogize results from the classical blunt body reentry problems to the present new generation sharp-leading vehicles. In addition, the direct simulation Monte Carlo method is also employed to validate the conclusion.

  6. Simulation of Stagnation Region Heating in Hypersonic Flow on Tetrahedral Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Hypersonic flow simulations using the node based, unstructured grid code FUN3D are presented. Applications include simple (cylinder) and complex (towed ballute) configurations. Emphasis throughout is on computation of stagnation region heating in hypersonic flow on tetrahedral grids. Hypersonic flow over a cylinder provides a simple test problem for exposing any flaws in a simulation algorithm with regard to its ability to compute accurate heating on such grids. Such flaws predominantly derive from the quality of the captured shock. The importance of pure tetrahedral formulations are discussed. Algorithm adjustments for the baseline Roe / Symmetric, Total-Variation-Diminishing (STVD) formulation to deal with simulation accuracy are presented. Formulations of surface normal gradients to compute heating and diffusion to the surface as needed for a radiative equilibrium wall boundary condition and finite catalytic wall boundary in the node-based unstructured environment are developed. A satisfactory resolution of the heating problem on tetrahedral grids is not realized here; however, a definition of a test problem, and discussion of observed algorithm behaviors to date are presented in order to promote further research on this important problem.

  7. DSMC Simulation and Experimental Validation of Shock Interaction in Hypersonic Low Density Flow

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) of shock interaction in hypersonic low density flow is developed. Three collision molecular models, including hard sphere (HS), variable hard sphere (VHS), and variable soft sphere (VSS), are employed in the DSMC study. The simulations of double-cone and Edney's type IV hypersonic shock interactions in low density flow are performed. Comparisons between DSMC and experimental data are conducted. Investigation of the double-cone hypersonic flow shows that three collision molecular models can predict the trend of pressure coefficient and the Stanton number. HS model shows the best agreement between DSMC simulation and experiment among three collision molecular models. Also, it shows that the agreement between DSMC and experiment is generally good for HS and VHS models in Edney's type IV shock interaction. However, it fails in the VSS model. Both double-cone and Edney's type IV shock interaction simulations show that the DSMC errors depend on the Knudsen number and the models employed for intermolecular interaction. With the increase in the Knudsen number, the DSMC error is decreased. The error is the smallest in HS compared with those in the VHS and VSS models. When the Knudsen number is in the level of 10−4, the DSMC errors, for pressure coefficient, the Stanton number, and the scale of interaction region, are controlled within 10%. PMID:24672360

  8. DSMC simulation and experimental validation of shock interaction in hypersonic low density flow.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hong; Shang, Yuhe; Wu, Di

    2014-01-01

    Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) of shock interaction in hypersonic low density flow is developed. Three collision molecular models, including hard sphere (HS), variable hard sphere (VHS), and variable soft sphere (VSS), are employed in the DSMC study. The simulations of double-cone and Edney's type IV hypersonic shock interactions in low density flow are performed. Comparisons between DSMC and experimental data are conducted. Investigation of the double-cone hypersonic flow shows that three collision molecular models can predict the trend of pressure coefficient and the Stanton number. HS model shows the best agreement between DSMC simulation and experiment among three collision molecular models. Also, it shows that the agreement between DSMC and experiment is generally good for HS and VHS models in Edney's type IV shock interaction. However, it fails in the VSS model. Both double-cone and Edney's type IV shock interaction simulations show that the DSMC errors depend on the Knudsen number and the models employed for intermolecular interaction. With the increase in the Knudsen number, the DSMC error is decreased. The error is the smallest in HS compared with those in the VHS and VSS models. When the Knudsen number is in the level of 10(-4), the DSMC errors, for pressure coefficient, the Stanton number, and the scale of interaction region, are controlled within 10%.

  9. DSMC simulation and experimental validation of shock interaction in hypersonic low density flow.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hong; Shang, Yuhe; Wu, Di

    2014-01-01

    Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) of shock interaction in hypersonic low density flow is developed. Three collision molecular models, including hard sphere (HS), variable hard sphere (VHS), and variable soft sphere (VSS), are employed in the DSMC study. The simulations of double-cone and Edney's type IV hypersonic shock interactions in low density flow are performed. Comparisons between DSMC and experimental data are conducted. Investigation of the double-cone hypersonic flow shows that three collision molecular models can predict the trend of pressure coefficient and the Stanton number. HS model shows the best agreement between DSMC simulation and experiment among three collision molecular models. Also, it shows that the agreement between DSMC and experiment is generally good for HS and VHS models in Edney's type IV shock interaction. However, it fails in the VSS model. Both double-cone and Edney's type IV shock interaction simulations show that the DSMC errors depend on the Knudsen number and the models employed for intermolecular interaction. With the increase in the Knudsen number, the DSMC error is decreased. The error is the smallest in HS compared with those in the VHS and VSS models. When the Knudsen number is in the level of 10(-4), the DSMC errors, for pressure coefficient, the Stanton number, and the scale of interaction region, are controlled within 10%. PMID:24672360

  10. Computational Study of Flow Establishment in Hypersonic Pulse Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, S.; Radhakrishnan, K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the temporal evolution of the combustion flowfield established by the interaction of ram-accelerator-type projectiles with an explosive gas mixture accelerated to hypersonic speeds in an expansion tube. The Navier-Stokes equations for a chemically reacting gas are solved in a fully coupled manner using an implicit, time accurate algorithm. The solution procedure is based on a spatially second order, total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme and a temporally second order, variable-step, backward differentiation formula method. The hydrogen-oxygen chemistry is modeled with a 9-species, 19-step mechanism. The accuracy of the solution method is first demonstrated by several benchmark calculations. Numerical simulations of expansion tube flowfields are then presented for two different configurations. In particular, the development of the shock-induced combustion process is followed. In one case, designed to ensure ignition only in the boundary layer, the lateral extent of the combustion front during the initial transient phase was surprisingly large. The time histories of the calculated thrust and drag forces on the ram accelerator projectile are also presented.

  11. Navier-Stokes simulation of 3-D hypersonic equilibrium air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaraj, N.; Lombard, C. K.; Bardina, J.

    1988-01-01

    A computationally efficient three-dimensional conservative supracharacteristic Navier-Stokes method has been extended to simulate complex external chemically reacting flows of hypersonic reentry vehicles at angle-of-attack. Numerical simulation results of the flow around a sphere-cone-cone-flare reentry vehicle at 10 deg angle-of-attack are presented, in addition to the results of a well-validated two-dimensional code with which the 0-deg axisymmetric flow has been computed. A method for obtaining compositions of species in equilibrium ionized air is proposed.

  12. Hypersonic Laminar Viscous Flow Past Spinning Cones at Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh; Rakich, John V.

    1982-01-01

    Computational results are presented for hypersonic viscous flow past spinning sharp and blunt cones of angle of attack, obtained with a parabolic Navier-Stokes marching code. The code takes into account the asymmetries in the flowfield resulting from spinning motion and computes the asymmetric shock shape, cross-flow and streamwise shear, heat transfer, cross-flow separation, and vortex structure. The Magnus force and moments are also computed. Comparisons are made with other theoretical analyses based on boundary-layer and boundary-region equations, and an anomaly is discovered in the displacement thickness contribution to the Magnus force when compared with boundary-layer results.

  13. Line-shape flattening resulting from hypersonic nozzle wedge flow in low-pressure chemical lasers.

    PubMed

    Livingston, P M; Bullock, D L

    1980-07-01

    The new hypersonic wedge nozzle (HYWN) supersonic wedge nozzle design produces a significant component of directed gas flow along the optical axis of a laser cavity comparable to thermal speeds. The gain-line-shape function is broadened and the refractive-index line shape is also spread as a function of wedge-flow half-angle. An analytical treatment as well as a numerical study is presented that evaluates the Doppler-directed-flow impact on the number of longitudinal modes and their frequencies as well as on gain and refractive-index saturation of those that lase in a Fabry-Perot cavity.

  14. New method of asymmetric flow field measurement in hypersonic shock tunnel.

    PubMed

    Yan, D P; He, A Z; Ni, X W

    1991-03-01

    In this paper a method of large aperture (?500 mm) high sensitivity moire deflectometry is used to obtain multidirectional deflectograms of the asymmetric flow field in hypersonic (M = 10.29) shock tunnel. At the same time, a 3-D reconstructive method of the asymmetric flow field is presented which is based on the integration of the moire deflective angle and the double-cubic many-knot interpolating splines; it is used to calculate the 3-D density distribution of the asymmetric flow field.

  15. The application of laser Rayleigh scattering to gas density measurements in hypersonic helium flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, J. C.; Honaker, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the mean static free-stream gas density have been made in two Langley Research Center helium facilities, the 3-inch leg of the high-Reynolds-number helium complex and the 22-inch hypersonic helium tunnel. Rayleigh scattering of a CW argon ion laser beam at 514.5 nm provided the basic physical mechanism. The behavior of the scattered signal was linear, confirmed by a preliminary laboratory study. That study also revealed the need to introduce baffles to reduce stray light. A relatively simple optical system and associated photon-counting electronics were utilized to obtain data for densities from 10 to the 23rd to 10 to the 25th per cu m. The major purpose, to confirm the applicability of this technique in the hypersonic helium flow, was accomplished.

  16. DSMC Simulation of Separated Flows About Flared Bodies at Hypersonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a numerical study of interacting hypersonic flows at conditions that can be produced in ground-based test facilities. The computations are made with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird. The focus is on Mach 10 flows about flared axisymmetric configurations, both hollow cylinder flares and double cones. The flow conditions are those for which experiments have been or will be performed in the ONERA R5Ch low-density wind tunnel and the Calspan-University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC) Large Energy National Shock (LENS) tunnel. The range of flow conditions, model configurations, and model sizes provides a significant range of shock/shock and shock/boundary layer interactions at low Reynolds number conditions. Results presented will highlight the sensitivity of the calculations to grid resolution, contrast the differences in flow structure for hypersonic cold flows and those of more energetic but still low enthalpy flows, and compare the present results with experimental measurements for surface heating, pressure, and extent of separation.

  17. Effects of nose bluntness and shock-shock interactions on blunt bodies in viscous hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D. J.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical study was conducted to investigate the effects of blunt leading edges on the viscous flow field around a hypersonic vehicle such as the proposed National Aero-Space Plane. Attention is focused on two specific regions of the flow field. In the first region, effects of nose bluntness on the forebody flow field are investigated. The second region of the flow considered is around the leading edges of the scramjet inlet. In this region, the interaction of the forebody shock with the shock produced by the blunt leading edges of the inlet compression surfaces is analyzed. Analysis of these flow regions is required to accurately predict the overall flow field as well as to get necessary information on localized zones of high pressure and intense heating. The results for the forebody flow field are discussed first, followed by the results for the shock interaction in the inlet leading edge region.

  18. A Numerical Simulation of a Normal Sonic Jet into a Hypersonic Cross-Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffries, Damon K.; Krishnamurthy, Ramesh; Chandra, Suresh

    1997-01-01

    This study involves numerical modeling of a normal sonic jet injection into a hypersonic cross-flow. The numerical code used for simulation is GASP (General Aerodynamic Simulation Program.) First the numerical predictions are compared with well established solutions for compressible laminar flow. Then comparisons are made with non-injection test case measurements of surface pressure distributions. Good agreement with the measurements is observed. Currently comparisons are underway with the injection case. All the experimental data were generated at the Southampton University Light Piston Isentropic Compression Tube.

  19. The hypersonic Mach number independence principle in the case of viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliche, D.; Mundt, Ch.; Hirschel, E. H.

    2011-08-01

    The hypersonic Mach number independence principle of Oswatitsch is important for hypersonic vehicle design. It explains why, above a certain flight Mach number ( M ∞ ≈ 4-6, depending on the body shape), some aerodynamic properties become independent of the flight Mach number. For ground test facilities this means that it is sufficient for the Mach number in the test section to be high enough, that Mach number independence exists. However, the principle was derived for calorically perfect gas and inviscid flow only. In this paper a theoretical study for blunt bodies in the case of viscous flow is presented. We provide numerical results which give insight into how attached viscous flow behaves at high Mach numbers. The flow past an axisymmetric configuration is analysed by applying a coupled Euler/second-order boundary-layer method. Wall boundaries are treated by assuming an adiabatic or radiation-adiabatic wall for laminar flow. Calorically perfect or equilibrium air is accounted for. Lift, drag, and moment coefficients, and lift-to-drag ratios are given for several combinations of flight Mach number and altitude, i.e. Reynolds number. For blunt bodies considered here, which are pressure dominated, Mach number independence occurs for the adiabatic wall, but not for the radiation-adiabatic wall assumption.

  20. Nonequilibrium hypersonic flows simulations with asymptotic-preserving Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Liu, Hong; Jin, Shi

    2014-12-01

    In the rarefied gas dynamics, the DSMC method is one of the most popular numerical tools. It performs satisfactorily in simulating hypersonic flows surrounding re-entry vehicles and micro-/nano- flows. However, the computational cost is expensive, especially when Kn → 0. Even for flows in the near-continuum regime, pure DSMC simulations require a number of computational efforts for most cases. Albeit several DSMC/NS hybrid methods are proposed to deal with this, those methods still suffer from the boundary treatment, which may cause nonphysical solutions. Filbet and Jin [1] proposed a framework of new numerical methods of Boltzmann equation, called asymptotic preserving schemes, whose computational costs are affordable as Kn → 0. Recently, Ren et al. [2] realized the AP schemes with Monte Carlo methods (AP-DSMC), which have better performance than counterpart methods. In this paper, AP-DSMC is applied in simulating nonequilibrium hypersonic flows. Several numerical results are computed and analyzed to study the efficiency and capability of capturing complicated flow characteristics.

  1. A Computational and Experimental Investigation of a Three-Dimensional Hypersonic Scramjet Inlet Flow Field. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott Douglas

    1991-01-01

    A combined computational and experimental parametric study of the internal aerodynamics of a generic three dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlet configuration was performed. The study was designed to demonstrate the utility of computational fluid dynamics as a design tool in hypersonic inlet flow fields, to provide a detailed account of the nature and structure of the internal flow interactions, and to provide a comprehensive surface property and flow field database to determine the effects of contraction ratio, cowl position, and Reynolds number on the performance of a hypersonic scramjet inlet configuration.

  2. Flow analysis and design optimization methods for nozzle afterbody of a hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the methods developed for the aerodynamic analysis and the shape optimization of the nozzle-afterbody section of a hypersonic vehicle. Initially, exhaust gases were assumed to be air. Internal-external flows around a single scramjet module were analyzed by solving the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Then, exhaust gases were simulated by a cold mixture of Freon and Argon. Two different models were used to compute these multispecies flows as they mixed with the hypersonic airflow. Surface and off-surface properties were successfully compared with the experimental data. In the second phase of this project, the Aerodynamic Design Optimization with Sensitivity analysis (ADOS) was developed. Pre and post optimization sensitivity coefficients were derived and used in this quasi-analytical method. These coefficients were also used to predict inexpensively the flow field around a changed shape when the flow field of an unchanged shape was given. Starting with totally arbitrary initial afterbody shapes, independent computations were converged to the same optimum shape, which rendered the maximum axial thrust.

  3. Fluid dynamic modeling and numerical simulation of low-density hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, H. K.; Wong, Eric Y.

    1988-01-01

    The concept of a viscous shock-layer and several related versions of continuum theories/methods are examined for their adequacy as a viable framework to study flow physics and aerothermodynamics of relevance to sustained hypersonic flights. Considering the flat plate at angle of attack, or the wedge, as a generic example for the major aerodynamic component of a hypersonic vehicle, the relative importance of the molecular-transport effects behind the shock (in the form of the 'shock slip') and the wall-slip effects are studied. In the flow regime where the shock-transition-zone thickness remains small compared to the shock radius of curvature, a quasi-one-dimensional shock structure under the Burnett/thirteen-moment approximation, as well as particulate/collisional models, can be consistently developed. The fully viscous version of the shock-layer model is shown to provide the crucial boundary condition downstream the shock in this case. The gas-kinetic basis of the continuum description for the flow behind the bow shock, and certain features affecting the non-equilibrium flow chemistry, are also discussed.

  4. Method for obtaining aerodynamic data on hypersonic configurations with scramjet exhaust flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartill, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    A hypersonic wind tunnel test method for obtaining credible aerodynamic data on a complete hypersonic vehicle (generic X-24c) with scramjet exhaust flow simulation is described. The general problems of simulating the scramjet exhaust as well as accounting for scramjet inlet flow and vehicle forces are analyzed, and candidate test methods are described and compared. The method selected as most useful makes use of a thrust-minus-drag flow-through balance with a completely metric model. Inlet flow is diverted by a fairing. The incremental effect of the fairing is determined in the testing of two reference models. The net thrust of the scramjet module is an input to be determined in large-scale module tests with scramjet combustion. Force accounting is described, and examples of force component levels are predicted. Compatibility of the test method with candidate wind tunnel facilities is described, and a preliminary model mechanical arrangement drawing is presented. The balance design and performance requirements are described in a detailed specification. Calibration procedures, model instrumentation, and a test plan for the model are outlined.

  5. Fluid dynamic modeling and numerical simulation of low-density hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H. K.; Wong, Eric Y.

    1988-06-01

    The concept of a viscous shock-layer and several related versions of continuum theories/methods are examined for their adequacy as a viable framework to study flow physics and aerothermodynamics of relevance to sustained hypersonic flights. Considering the flat plate at angle of attack, or the wedge, as a generic example for the major aerodynamic component of a hypersonic vehicle, the relative importance of the molecular-transport effects behind the shock (in the form of the 'shock slip') and the wall-slip effects are studied. In the flow regime where the shock-transition-zone thickness remains small compared to the shock radius of curvature, a quasi-one-dimensional shock structure under the Burnett/thirteen-moment approximation, as well as particulate/collisional models, can be consistently developed. The fully viscous version of the shock-layer model is shown to provide the crucial boundary condition downstream the shock in this case. The gas-kinetic basis of the continuum description for the flow behind the bow shock, and certain features affecting the non-equilibrium flow chemistry, are also discussed.

  6. Schlieren Visualization Technique Applied to the Study of Laser-Induced Breakdown in Low Density Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Salvador, I. I.; Myrabo, L. N.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    2006-05-02

    Experimental results on the visualization of the time evolution of the laser-plasma induced breakdown produced in low density hypersonic flow using the Schlieren technique are presented. The plasma was generated by focusing the high power laser pulse of a CO2 TEA laser in the test section of the IEAv 0.3m Hypersonic Shock Tunnel. An ultra-high speed electronic tube camera was used to register the event. The photographs reveal the expansion of the shock wave produced by the laser generated hot plasma and the convection of the plasma kernel by the hypersonic flow. It is also observed the interaction between the plasma disturbed region and the shock established by the flow around an hemisphere-cylinder model. A strong change in the shock wave structure near the model was observed, corroborating the DEAS concept.

  7. Translation-vibration-dissociation coupling in nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham

    1989-01-01

    A new simple and computationally efficient model was developed, describing the evolution of vibrational states during relaxation and dissociation. The model is based on dividing the nitrogen molecules into two types, those in the vibrational states at a lower level, whose vibrational energy is below a cutoff energy, and those in an upper level, with vibrational energy above the cutoff. Dissociation occurs at the upper level, and recombination returns molecules to the lower level. The model was applied to two flows of engineering interest, the flow through a normal Mach 15 shock wave at 60 km, and a supersonic quasi-one-dimensional flow in a nozzle. Results are compared to those obtained by existing translation-vibration-dissociation coupling models, with results indicating significant differences between the models.

  8. A Structured-Grid Quality Measure for Simulated Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    A structured-grid quality measure is proposed, combining three traditional measurements: intersection angles, stretching, and curvature. Quality assesses whether the grid generated provides the best possible tradeoffs in grid stretching and skewness that enable accurate flow predictions, whereas the grid density is assumed to be a constraint imposed by the available computational resources and the desired resolution of the flow field. The usefulness of this quality measure is assessed by comparing heat transfer predictions from grid convergence studies for grids of varying quality in the range of [0.6-0.8] on an 8'half-angle sphere-cone, at laminar, perfect gas, Mach 10 wind tunnel conditions.

  9. Shock wave induced by a high-intensity power source in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Gimelshein, S. F.; Raizer, Yu. P.

    2010-04-01

    An upstream structure of a parabolic shock wave induced in a hypersonic flow by a steady-state high-intensity heat source is examined. A similarity analysis is used to derive a simple analytic expression that allows one to predict the shock wave upstream stand-off distance. The solution of Navier-Stokes is obtained to provide basis for the validation of the analytic expression; a reasonable agreement is obtained between the analytic and numerical results for a number of power source intensities.

  10. Temperature measurements in hypersonic air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is reported of the use of laser-induced fluorescence on oxygen for the measurement of air temperature and its fluctuations owing to turbulence in hypersonic wind tunnel flows. The results show that for temperatures higher than 60 K and densities higher than 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature measurement can be less than 2 percent if it is limited by photon-statistical noise. The measurement is unaffected by collisional quenching and, if the laser fluence is kept below 1.5 J/sq cm, it is also unaffected by nonlinear effects which are associated with depletion of the absorbing states.

  11. Development of braided rope seals for hypersonic engine applications. Part 2: Flow modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutharasan, Rajakkannu; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Tao, Xiaoming; Ko, Frank

    1991-01-01

    Two models based on the Kozeny-Carmen equation were developed to analyze the fluid flow through a new class of braided rope seals under development for advanced hypersonic engines. A hybrid seal geometry consisting of a braided sleeve and a substantial amount of longitudinal fibers with high packing density was selected for development based on its low leakage rates. The models developed allow prediction of the gas leakage rate as a function of fiber diameter, fiber packing density, gas properties, and pressure drop across the seal.

  12. An iodine hypersonic wind tunnel for the study of nonequilibrium reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham-Van-diep, G. C.; Muntz, E. P.; Weaver, D. P.; Dewitt, T. G.; Bradley, M. K.; Erwin, D. A.; Kunc, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A pilot scale hypersonic wind tunnel operating on pure iodine vapor has been designed and tested. The wind tunnel operates intermittently with a run phase lasting approximately 20 minutes. Successful recirculation of the iodine used during the run phase has been achieved but can be improved. Relevant issues regarding the full scale facility's design and operation, and the use of iodine as a working gas are discussed. Continuous wave laser induced fluorescence was used to monitor number densities within the plume flowfield, while pulsed laser induced fluorescence was used in an initial attempt to measure vibrational energy state population distributions. Preliminary nozzle flow calculations based on finite rate chemistry are presented.

  13. Hypersonic stagnation line merged layer flow on blunt axisymmetric bodies of arbitrary shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Amolak S.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of hypersonic stagnation line merged-layer flow of variously shaped blunt asisymmetric bodies is here formulated in such a way as to allow analytical calculations for bodies generated by a conic section. The governing equations encompass, apart from the usual parameters, the eccentricity of the conic section that generates the body-of-revolution for the effect of body shape on the solution obtained. The stagnation-point surface pressure increases as the favorable pressure gradient decreases, in the course of a change of body shape from spherical to hyperboloid.

  14. Aerodynamic Modeling of Oscillating Wing in Hypersonic Flow: a Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Hou, Ying-Yu; Ji, Chen; Liu, Zi-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Various approximations to unsteady aerodynamics are examined for the unsteady aerodynamic force of a pitching thin double wedge airfoil in hypersonic flow. Results of piston theory, Van Dyke’s second-order theory, Newtonian impact theory, and CFD method are compared in the same motion and Mach number effects. The results indicate that, for this thin double wedge airfoil, Newtonian impact theory is not suitable for these Mach number, while piston theory and Van Dyke’s second-order theory are in good agreement with CFD method for Ma<7.

  15. Aerothermodynamics of Pyrolizing Surfaces in Hypersonic Rarefied Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Brian L.; Milos, Frank S.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) calculations of rarefied flows about entry bodies typically employ a fixed surface temperature or a radiative-equilibrium energy balance to compute that temperature. Such boundary conditions neglect any effects of heat capacitance and heat conduction in the spacecraft heat shield and, therefore, provide an upper bound for the surface temperature. Such calculations also neglect pyrolysis from the heat shield which can be significant for a high-energy incident flow at very low densities. Accurate prediction of both heating and aerodynamic forces requires including pyrolysis and surface heat transfer in the models for gas-surface interaction employed in DSMC methods. Although these physical models have long appeared in various continuum flow calculation codes, they have only recently appeared in DSMC codes which are required to simulate rarefied flows during entry at high altitudes. In the current implementation, routines from the widely distributed Charring Material Thermal Response and Ablation (CMA) program are coupled into a DSMC code to calculate the one-dimensional heat transfer into the carbon phenolic heat shield at each point on a vehicle surface. Temperature-dependent material properties, surface re-radiation, and in-depth pyrolysis were included in the calculation, but surface ablation was neglected. Sample calculations for entry of the Galileo probe into the atmosphere of Jupiter demonstrate that including pyrolysis in the model leads to significant differences in predicted aerodynamics. Granted, the drag coefficient does not depend strongly on the surface temperature which can itself be significantly below the radiative equilibrium value during entry. However, the surface mass flux due to pyrolysis of the material is significant once the probe drops to altitudes characterized by transition flow. This leads to a noticeable increase in drag and a decrease in heating compared to a body without pyrolysis.

  16. Gas-kinetic unified algorithm for hypersonic flows covering various flow regimes solving Boltzmann model equation in nonequilibrium effect

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhihui; Ma, Qiang; Wu, Junlin; Jiang, Xinyu; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-12-09

    Based on the Gas-Kinetic Unified Algorithm (GKUA) directly solving the Boltzmann model equation, the effect of rotational non-equilibrium is investigated recurring to the kinetic Rykov model with relaxation property of rotational degrees of freedom. The spin movement of diatomic molecule is described by moment of inertia, and the conservation of total angle momentum is taken as a new Boltzmann collision invariant. The molecular velocity distribution function is integrated by the weight factor on the internal energy, and the closed system of two kinetic controlling equations is obtained with inelastic and elastic collisions. The optimization selection technique of discrete velocity ordinate points and numerical quadrature rules for macroscopic flow variables with dynamic updating evolvement are developed to simulate hypersonic flows, and the gas-kinetic numerical scheme is constructed to capture the time evolution of the discretized velocity distribution functions. The gas-kinetic boundary conditions in thermodynamic non-equilibrium and numerical procedures are studied and implemented by directly acting on the velocity distribution function, and then the unified algorithm of Boltzmann model equation involving non-equilibrium effect is presented for the whole range of flow regimes. The hypersonic flows involving non-equilibrium effect are numerically simulated including the inner flows of shock wave structures in nitrogen with different Mach numbers of 1.5-Ma-25, the planar ramp flow with the whole range of Knudsen numbers of 0.0009-Kn-10 and the three-dimensional re-entering flows around tine double-cone body.

  17. Gas-kinetic unified algorithm for hypersonic flows covering various flow regimes solving Boltzmann model equation in nonequilibrium effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhihui; Wu, Junlin; Ma, Qiang; Jiang, Xinyu; Zhang, Hanxin

    2014-12-01

    Based on the Gas-Kinetic Unified Algorithm (GKUA) directly solving the Boltzmann model equation, the effect of rotational non-equilibrium is investigated recurring to the kinetic Rykov model with relaxation property of rotational degrees of freedom. The spin movement of diatomic molecule is described by moment of inertia, and the conservation of total angle momentum is taken as a new Boltzmann collision invariant. The molecular velocity distribution function is integrated by the weight factor on the internal energy, and the closed system of two kinetic controlling equations is obtained with inelastic and elastic collisions. The optimization selection technique of discrete velocity ordinate points and numerical quadrature rules for macroscopic flow variables with dynamic updating evolvement are developed to simulate hypersonic flows, and the gas-kinetic numerical scheme is constructed to capture the time evolution of the discretized velocity distribution functions. The gas-kinetic boundary conditions in thermodynamic non-equilibrium and numerical procedures are studied and implemented by directly acting on the velocity distribution function, and then the unified algorithm of Boltzmann model equation involving non-equilibrium effect is presented for the whole range of flow regimes. The hypersonic flows involving non-equilibrium effect are numerically simulated including the inner flows of shock wave structures in nitrogen with different Mach numbers of 1.5-Ma-25, the planar ramp flow with the whole range of Knudsen numbers of 0.0009-Kn-10 and the three-dimensional re-entering flows around tine double-cone body.

  18. Flow separation in shock wave boundary layer interactions at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is presented for the experimental data on separated flow in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions at hypersonic and supersonic speeds. The data base consists mainly of two dimensional and axisymmetric interactions in compression corners or cylinder-flares, and externally generated oblique shock interactions with boundary layers over flat plates or cylindrical surfaces. The conditions leading to flow separation and the subsequent changes in the flow empirical correlations for incipient separation are reviewed. The effects of the Mach number, Reynolds number, surface cooling and the methods of detecting separation are discussed. The pertinent experimental data for the separated flow characteristics in separated turbulent boundary layer shock interaction are also presented and discussed.

  19. An approximate method for calculating three-dimensional inviscid hypersonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; Dejarnette, Fred R.

    1990-01-01

    An approximate solution technique was developed for 3-D inviscid, hypersonic flows. The method employs Maslen's explicit pressure equation in addition to the assumption of approximate stream surfaces in the shock layer. This approximation represents a simplification to Maslen's asymmetric method. The present method presents a tractable procedure for computing the inviscid flow over 3-D surfaces at angle of attack. The solution procedure involves iteratively changing the shock shape in the subsonic-transonic region until the correct body shape is obtained. Beyond this region, the shock surface is determined using a marching procedure. Results are presented for a spherically blunted cone, paraboloid, and elliptic cone at angle of attack. The calculated surface pressures are compared with experimental data and finite difference solutions of the Euler equations. Shock shapes and profiles of pressure are also examined. Comparisons indicate the method adequately predicts shock layer properties on blunt bodies in hypersonic flow. The speed of the calculations makes the procedure attractive for engineering design applications.

  20. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  1. Conservation equations and physical models for hypersonic air flows over the aeroassist flight experiment vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    The code development and application program for the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA), with emphasis directed toward support of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) in the near term and Aeroassisted Space Transfer Vehicle (ASTV) design in the long term is reviewed. LAURA is an upwind-biased, point-implicit relaxation algorithm for obtaining the numerical solution to the governing equations for 3-D, viscous, hypersonic flows in chemical and thermal nonequilibrium. The algorithm is derived using a finite volume formulation in which the inviscid components of flux across cell walls are described with Roe's averaging and Harten's entropy fix with second-order corrections based on Yee's Symmetric Total Variation Diminishing scheme. Because of the point-implicit relaxation strategy, the algorithm remains stable at large Courant numbers without the necessity of solving large, block tri-diagonal systems. A single relaxation step depends only on information from nearest neighbors. Predictions for pressure distributions, surface heating, and aerodynamic coefficients compare well with experimental data for Mach 10 flow over an AFE wind tunnel model. Predictions for the hypersonic flow of air in chemical and thermal nonequilibrium over the full scale AFE configuration obtained on a multi-domain grid are discussed.

  2. Consistent Modeling of Hypersonic Nonequilibrium Flows using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chonglin

    Hypersonic flows involve strong thermal and chemical nonequilibrium due to steep gradients in gas properties in the shock layer, wake, and next to vehicle surfaces. Accurate simulation of hypersonic nonequilibrium flows requires consideration of the molecular nature of the gas including internal energy excitation (translational, rotational, and vibrational energy modes) as well as chemical reaction processes such as dissociation. Both continuum and particle simulation methods are available to simulate such complex flow phenomena. Specifically, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is widely used to model such complex nonequilibrium phenomena within a particle-based numerical method. This thesis describes in detail how the different types of DSMC thermochemical models should be implemented in a rigorous and consistent manner. In the process, new algorithms are developed including a new framework for phenomenological models able to incorporate results from computational chemistry. Using this framework, a new DSMC model for rotational energy exchange is constructed. General algorithms are developed for the various types of methods that inherently satisfy microscopic reversibility, detailed balance, and equipartition of energy in equilibrium. Furthermore, a new framework for developing rovibrational state-to-state DSMC collision models is proposed, and a vibrational state-to-state model is developed along the course. The overall result of this thesis is a rigorous and consistent approach to bridge molecular physics and computational chemistry through stochastic molecular simulation to continuum models for gases in strong thermochemical nonequilibrium.

  3. Aerodynamic Performance and Flow-Field Characteristics of Two Waverider-Derived Hypersonic Cruise Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; Finley, Dennis B.

    1995-01-01

    The component integration of a class of hypersonic high-lift configurations known as waveriders into hypersonic cruise vehicles was evaluated. A wind-tunnel model was developed which integrates realistic vehicle components with two waverider shapes, referred to as the straight-wing and cranked-wing shapes. Both shapes were conical-flow-derived waveriders for a design Mach number of 4.0. Experimental data and limited computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions were obtained over a Mach number range of 1.6 to 4.63 at a Reynolds number of 2.0 x 10(exp 6) per foot. The CFD predictions and flow visualization data confirmed the shock attachment characteristics of the baseline waverider shapes and illustrated the waverider flow-field properties. Experimental data showed that no significant performance degradations, in terms of maximum lift-to-drag ratios, occur at off-design Mach numbers for the waverider shapes and the integrated configurations. A comparison of the fully-integrated waverider vehicles to the baseline shapes showed that the performance was significantly degraded when all of the components were added to the waveriders, with the most significant degradation resulting from aftbody closure and the addition of control surfaces. Both fully-integrated configurations were longitudinally unstable over the Mach number range studied with the selected center of gravity location and for unpowered conditions. The cranked-wing configuration provided better lateral-directional stability characteristics than the straight-wing configuration.

  4. Molecular cloud formation in high-shear, magnetized colliding flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogerty, E.; Frank, A.; Heitsch, F.; Carroll-Nellenback, J.; Haig, C.; Adams, M.

    2016-08-01

    The colliding flows (CF) model is a well-supported mechanism for generating molecular clouds. However, to-date most CF simulations have focused on the formation of clouds in the normal-shock layer between head-on colliding flows. We performed simulations of magnetized colliding flows that instead meet at an oblique-shock layer. Oblique shocks generate shear in the post-shock environment, and this shear creates inhospitable environments for star formation. As the degree of shear increases (i.e. the obliquity of the shock increases), we find that it takes longer for sink particles to form, they form in lower numbers, and they tend to be less massive. With regard to magnetic fields, we find that even a weak field stalls gravitational collapse within forming clouds. Additionally, an initially oblique collision interface tends to reorient over time in the presence of a magnetic field, so that it becomes normal to the oncoming flows. This was demonstrated by our most oblique shock interface, which became fully normal by the end of the simulation.

  5. Kinetic simulation of rarefied and weakly ionized hypersonic flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farbar, Erin D.

    When a vehicle enters the Earth's atmosphere at the very large velocities associated with Lunar and Mars return, a strong bow shock is formed in front of the vehicle. The shock heats the air to very high temperatures, causing collisions that are sufficiently energetic to produce ionized particles. As a result, a weakly ionized plasma is formed in the region between the bow shock and the vehicle surface. The presence of this plasma impedes the transport of radio frequency waves to the vehicle, causing the phenomenon known as "communications black out". The plasma also interacts with the neutral particles in the flow field, and contributes to the heat flux at the vehicle surface. Since it is difficult to characterize these flow fields using flight or ground based experiments, computational tools play an important role in the design of reentry vehicles. It is important to include the physical phenomena associated with the presence of the plasma in the computational analysis of the flow fields about these vehicles. Physical models for the plasma phenomena are investigated using a state of the art, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code. Models for collisions between charged particles, plasma chemistry, and the self-induced electric field that currently exist in the literature are implemented. Using these baseline models, steady state flow field solutions are computed for the FIRE II reentry vehicle at two different trajectory points. The accuracy of each baseline plasma model is assessed in a systematic fashion, using one flight condition of the FIRE II vehicle as the test case. Experimental collision cross section data is implemented to model collisions of electrons with neutral particles. Theoretical and experimental reaction cross section data are implemented to model chemical reactions that involve electron impact, and an associative ionization reaction. One-dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) routines are developed and coupled to the DSMC code, to assess the

  6. Optimum shape of a blunt forebody in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Ting, L.

    1989-01-01

    The optimum shape of a blunt forebody attached to a symmetric wedge or cone is determined. The length of the forebody, its semi-thickness or base radius, the nose radius and the radius of the fillet joining the forebody to the wedge or cone are specified. The optimum shape is composed of simple curves. Thus experimental models can be built readily to investigate the utilization of aerodynamic heating for boundary layer control. The optimum shape based on the modified Newtonian theory can also serve as the preliminary shape for the numerical solution of the optimum shape using the governing equations for a compressible inviscid or viscous flow.

  7. Development of a New Hypersonic Shock Tunnel Facility to Investigate Electromagnetic Energy Addition for Flow Control and Basic Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro, P. G. P.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Chanes, J. B.; Pereira, A. L.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    2006-05-01

    A new 0.6-m. diameter Hypersonic Shock Tunnel is been designed, fabricated and will be installed at the Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics IEAv-CTA, Brazil. The brand new hypersonic facility, designated as T3, is primarily intended to be used as an important tool in the investigation of supersonic combustion management and of electromagnetic energy addition for flow control. The design of the runnel enables relatively long test times, 2-10 milliseconds, suitable for basic supersonic combustion and energy addition by laser experiments. Free stream Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 25 can be produced and stagnation pressures and temperatures of 200 atm. and 5,500 K, respectively, can be generated. Shadowgraph and schlieren optical techniques will be used for flow visualization and the new facility is expected to be commissioned by the end of 2006.

  8. Improved chemistry models for DSMC simulations of ionized rarefied hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Takashi

    This thesis describes research in modeling rarefied, nonequilibrium hypersonic flows using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Modeling of chemical reactions and ionization processes in highly nonequilibrium flows is an important aspect in the simulation of flow fields and radiation of high-speed reentry vehicles. To develop a physically accurate chemical reaction model for use in DSMC, the molecular dynamics/quasi-classical trajectory (MD/QCT) method was utilized. For modeling rarefied, ionized hypersonic flows, a charge neutrality approach was followed, and an improved chemistry model involving electron collision and energy exchange mechanisms was developed. The MD/QCT chemical reaction model was applied for the O+HCl → OH+Cl reaction, which is an important exchange reaction in atmospheric-side jet interaction flows. It was found that the MD/QCT model using a recent state-of-the-art potential energy surface predicted good agreement with the total collision energy model because this reaction is a low enthalpy reaction and does not show strong favoring of internal modes. For strong favoring reactions, one should verify both reaction and collision cross sections using the MD/QCT method if an accurate potential energy surface is available. Ionized hypersonic flows for the Stardust blunt body were simulated in DSMC between 68.9 and 100 km altitudes for a free stream velocity higher than 10 km/s. The flow modeling included ionization processes and energy exchange assuming that charge neutrality exists in the bow-shock region. Accurate modeling of electron scattering collision processes and electron-vibration energy exchange using Lee's relaxation time for the first time in DSMC is presented and was found to significantly influence the vibrational and electron temperatures. For further analysis, the DSMC Stardust simulations were compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results at 68.9 and 80 km altitudes. Breakdown effects were investigated, and

  9. An Engineering Aerodynamic Heating Method for Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; DeJarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  10. An engineering aerodynamic heating method for hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; Dejarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  11. Hypersonic flows generated by parabolic and paraboloidal shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    A computer algorithm has been developed to determine the blunt-body flowfields supporting symmetric parabolic and paraboloidal shock waves at infinite free-stream Mach number. Solutions are expressed in an analytic form as high-order power series, in the coordinate normal to the shock, whose coefficients can be determined exactly. Analytic continuation is provided by the use of Pade approximations. Test cases provide solutions of very high accuracy. In the axisymmetric case for gamma equals 715 the solution has been found far downstream, where it agrees with the modified blast-wave results. For plane flow, on the other hand, a limit line appears within the shock layer, a short distance past the sonic line, suggesting the presence of an imbedded shock. Local solutions in the downstream limit are discussed.

  12. On the Numerical Convergence to Steady State of Hypersonic Flows Over Bodies with Concavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    Two recent numerical studies of hypersonic flows over bodies with concavities revealed problems with convergence to a steady state with an oft-used application of local-time-stepping. Both simulated flows showed a time-like, periodic shedding of vortices in a subsonic domain bounded by supersonic external flow although the simulations, using local-time-stepping, were not time accurate. Simple modifications to the numerical algorithm were implemented to enable implicit, first-order accurate in time simulations. Subsequent time-accurate simulations of the two test problems converged to a steady state. The baseline algorithm and modifications for temporal accuracy are described. The requirement for sub-iterations to achieve convergence is demonstrated. Failure to achieve convergence without time accuracy is conjectured to arise from temporal errors being continuously refocused into a subsonic domain.

  13. Engine panel seals for hypersonic engine applications: High temperature leakage assessments and flow modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Mutharasan, Rajakkannu; Du, Guang-Wu; Miller, Jeffrey H.; Ko, Frank

    1992-01-01

    A critical mechanical system in advanced hypersonic engines is the panel-edge seal system that seals gaps between the articulating horizontal engine panels and the adjacent engine splitter walls. Significant advancements in seal technology are required to meet the extreme demands placed on the seals, including the simultaneous requirements of low leakage, conformable, high temperature, high pressure, sliding operation. In this investigation, the seal concept design and development of two new seal classes that show promise of meeting these demands will be presented. These seals include the ceramic wafer seal and the braided ceramic rope seal. Presented are key elements of leakage flow models for each of these seal types. Flow models such as these help designers to predict performance-robbing parasitic losses past the seals, and estimate purge coolant flow rates. Comparisons are made between measured and predicted leakage rates over a wide range of engine simulated temperatures and pressures, showing good agreement.

  14. Schlieren Visualization of the Energy Addition by Multi Laser Pulse in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Myrabo, L. N.

    2008-04-28

    The experimental results of the energy addition by multi laser pulse in Mach 7 hypersonic flow are presented. Two high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA lasers (TEA1 5.5 J, TEA2 3.9 J) were assembled sharing the same optical cavity to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The lasers can be triggered with a selectable time delay and in the present report the results obtained with delay between 30 {mu}s and 80 {mu}s are shown. The schlieren technique associated with a high speed camera was used to accomplish the influence of the energy addition in the mitigation of the shock wave formed on the model surface by the hypersonic flow. A piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to obtain the time history of the impact pressure at stagnation point of the model and the pressure reduction could be measured. The total recovery of the shock wave between pulses as well as the prolonged effect of the mitigation without recovery was observed by changing the delay.

  15. Planar Laser-Induced Iodine Fluorescence Measurements in Rarefied Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Eric; McDaniel, James C.

    2005-01-01

    A planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique is discussed and applied to measurement of time-averaged values of velocity and temperature in an I(sub 2)-seeded N(sub 2) hypersonic free jet facility. Using this technique, a low temperature, non-reacting, hypersonic flow over a simplified model of a reaction control system (RCS) was investigated. Data are presented of rarefied Mach 12 flow over a sharp leading edge flat plate at zero incidence, both with and without an interacting jet issuing from a nozzle built into the plate. The velocity profile in the boundary layer on the plate was resolved. The slip velocity along the plate, extrapolated from the velocity profile data, varied from nearly 100% down to 10% of the freestream value. These measurements are compared with results of a DSMC solution. The velocity variation along the centerline of a jet issuing from the plate was measured and found to match closely with the correlation of Ashkenas and Sherman. The velocity variation in the oblique shock terminating the jet was resolved sufficiently to measure the shock wave thickness.

  16. Multiple Velocity Profile Measurements in Hypersonic Flows Using Sequentially-Imaged Fluorescence Tagging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Ivey,Christopher b.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) was used to perform velocity measurements in hypersonic flows by generating multiple tagged lines which fluoresce as they convect downstream. For each laser pulse, a single interline, progressive scan intensified CCD (charge-coupled device) camera was used to obtain two sequential images of the NO molecules that had been tagged by the laser. The CCD configuration allowed for sub-microsecond acquisition of both images, resulting in sub-microsecond temporal resolution as well as sub-mm spatial resolution (0.5-mm horizontal, 0.7-mm vertical). Determination of axial velocity was made by application of a cross-correlation analysis of the horizontal shift of individual tagged lines. A numerical study of measured velocity error due to a uniform and linearly-varying collisional rate distribution was performed. Quantification of systematic errors, the contribution of gating/exposure duration errors, and the influence of collision rate on temporal uncertainty were made. Quantification of the spatial uncertainty depended upon the signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired profiles. This velocity measurement technique has been demonstrated for two hypersonic flow experiments: (1) a reaction control system (RCS) jet on an Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) wind tunnel model and (2) a 10-degree half-angle wedge containing a 2-mm tall, 4-mm wide cylindrical boundary layer trip. The experiments were performed at the NASA Langley Research Center's 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel.

  17. Multiple Velocity Profile Measurements in Hypersonic Flows using Sequentially-Imaged Fluorescence Tagging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inmian, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Ivey, Christopher B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) was used to perform velocity measurements in hypersonic flows by generating multiple tagged lines which fluoresce as they convect downstream. For each laser pulse, a single interline, progressive scan intensified CCD camera was used to obtain separate images of the initial undelayed and delayed NO molecules that had been tagged by the laser. The CCD configuration allowed for sub-microsecond acquisition of both images, resulting in sub-microsecond temporal resolution as well as sub-mm spatial resolution (0.5-mm x 0.7-mm). Determination of axial velocity was made by application of a cross-correlation analysis of the horizontal shift of individual tagged lines. Quantification of systematic errors, the contribution of gating/exposure duration errors, and influence of collision rate on fluorescence to temporal uncertainty were made. Quantification of the spatial uncertainty depended upon the analysis technique and signal-to-noise of the acquired profiles. This investigation focused on two hypersonic flow experiments: (1) a reaction control system (RCS) jet on an Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) wind tunnel model and (2) a 10-degree half-angle wedge containing a 2-mm tall, 4-mm wide cylindrical boundary layer trip. The experiments were performed at the NASA Langley Research Center's 31-inch Mach 10 wind tunnel.

  18. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Hypersonic Flow Features in Dilute Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzentruber, Thomas; Valentini, Paolo

    2009-11-01

    Accurate simulation of high-altitude hypersonic flows requires advanced physical models capable of predicting the transfer of energy between translational, rotational, vibrational, and chemical modes of a gas in strong thermochemical non-equilibrium. A combined Event-Driven / Time-Driven (ED/TD) Molecular Dynamics (MD) algorithm is presented that greatly accelerates the MD simulation of dilute gases. The goal of this research is to utilize advances in computational chemistry to study thermochemical non-equilibrium processes in hypersonic flows. The ED/TD MD method identifies impending collisions (including multi-body collisions) and advances molecules directly to their next interaction, however, then integrates each interaction accurately using an arbitrary interatomic potential via conventional MD with small timesteps. First, the ED/TD MD algorithm and efficiency will be detailed. Next, ED/TD MD simulations of normal shock waves in dilute argon will be validated with experiment and direct simulation Monte Carlo simulations employing the variable-hard-sphere collision model. Profiling of the code reveals that the relative computational time required for the MD integration of collisions is extremely low and the potential for incorporating advanced classical and first-principles interatomic potentials within the ED/TD MD method will be discussed.

  19. Numerical simulation of hypersonic flow with ionized argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urita, Akira; Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Jonouchi, Tadamasa

    1992-12-01

    Shock layer in front of re-entering spacecraft has extremely high temperature and high pressure, so that gas becomes ionized plasma. In such shock layer, current is produced at ionization surface by thermoelectric effect and as a result magnetic field is generated. One of possible reasons for the generation of magnetic field is existence of a temperature gradient along a curved reaction surface. By a simple calculation in which chemical and thermal equilibrium is assumed, the magnitude of the magnetic field at re-entry field is about 100 Gausses, which is not negligible. The flow field around a spacecraft like AOTV (Automatic Orbit Transfer Vehicle) which will go at an altitude of about 80 km and at a velocity of 8 to 10 km/s is chemically and thermally in nonequilibrium. Therefore more detailed numerical analyses are required. Influence of thermoelectric effect was calculated using a two-dimensional code, which was later extended to axisymmetric one. These results were compared with each other.

  20. Design, Validation, and Testing of a Hot-Film Anemometer for Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheplak, Mark

    The application of constant-temperature hot-film anemometry to hypersonic flow has been reviewed and extended in this thesis. The objective of this investigation was to develop a measurement tool capable of yielding continuous, high-bandwidth, quantitative, normal mass-flux and total -temperature measurements in moderate-enthalpy environments. This research has produced a probe design that represents a significant advancement over existing designs, offering the following improvements: (1) a five-fold increase in bandwidth; (2) true stagnation-line sensor placement; (3) a two order-of-magnitude decrease in sensor volume; and (4) over a 70% increase in maximum film temperature. These improvements were achieved through substrate design, sensor placement, the use of high-temperature materials, and state -of-the-art microphotolithographic fabrication techniques. The experimental study to characterize the probe was performed in four different hypersonic wind tunnels at NASA-Langley Research Center. The initial test consisted of traversing the hot film through a Mach 6, flat-plate, turbulent boundary layer in air. The detailed static-calibration measurements that followed were performed in two different hypersonic flows: a Mach 11 helium flow and Mach 6 air flow. The final test of this thesis consisted of traversing the probe through the Mach 6 wake of a 70^ circ blunt body. The goal of this test was to determine the state (i.e., laminar or turbulent) of the wake. These studies indicate that substrate conduction effects result in instrumentation characteristics that prevent the hot-film anemometer from being used as a quantitative tool. The extension of this technique to providing quantitative information is dependent upon the development of lower thermal-conductivity substrate materials. However, the probe durability, absence of strain gauging, and high bandwidth represent significant improvements over the hot-wire technique for making qualitative measurements. Potential

  1. Hypersonic Separated Flows About "Tick" Configurations With Sensitivity to Model Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, J. N.; O'Byrne, S.; Gai, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents computational results obtained by applying the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for hypersonic nonequilibrium flow about "tick-shaped" model configurations. These test models produces a complex flow where the nonequilibrium and rarefied aspects of the flow are initially enhanced as the flow passes over an expansion surface, and then the flow encounters a compression surface that can induce flow separation. The resulting flow is such that meaningful numerical simulations must have the capability to account for a significant range of rarefaction effects; hence the application of the DSMC method in the current study as the flow spans several flow regimes, including transitional, slip, and continuum. The current focus is to examine the sensitivity of both the model surface response (heating, friction and pressure) and flowfield structure to assumptions regarding surface boundary conditions and more extensively the impact of model design as influenced by leading edge configuration as well as the geometrical features of the expansion and compression surfaces. Numerical results indicate a strong sensitivity to both the extent of the leading edge sharpness and the magnitude of the leading edge bevel angle. Also, the length of the expansion surface for a fixed compression surface has a significant impact on the extent of separated flow.

  2. Assessment of a flow-through balance for hypersonic wind tunnel models with scramjet exhaust flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, Lawrence D.; Kniskern, Marc W.; Monta, William J.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation were twofold: first, to determine whether accurate force and moment data could be obtained during hypersonic wind tunnel tests of a model with a scramjet exhaust flow simulation that uses a representative nonwatercooled, flow-through balance; second, to analyze temperature time histories on various parts of the balance to address thermal effects on force and moment data. The tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Wind Tunnel at free-stream Reynolds numbers ranging from 0.5 to 7.4 x 10(exp 6)/ft and nominal angles of attack of -3.5 deg, 0 deg, and 5 deg. The simulant exhaust gases were cold air, hot air, and a mixture of 50 percent Argon and 50 percent Freon by volume, which reached stagnation temperatures within the balance of 111, 214, and 283 F, respectively. All force and moment values were unaffected by the balance thermal response from exhaust gas simulation and external aerodynamic heating except for axial-force measurements, which were significantly affected by balance heating. This investigation showed that for this model at the conditions tested, a nonwatercooled, flow-through balance is not suitable for axial-force measurements during scramjet exhaust flow simulation tests at hypersonic speeds. In general, heated exhaust gas may produce unacceptable force and moment uncertainties when used with thermally sensitive balances.

  3. Implementation of Radiation, Ablation, and Free Energy Minimization Modules for Coupled Simulations of Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Johnston, Christopher O.; Thompson, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A description of models and boundary conditions required for coupling radiation and ablation physics to a hypersonic flow simulation is provided. Chemical equilibrium routines for varying elemental mass fraction are required in the flow solver to integrate with the equilibrium chemistry assumption employed in the ablation models. The capability also enables an equilibrium catalytic wall boundary condition in the non-ablating case. The paper focuses on numerical implementation issues using FIRE II, Mars return, and Apollo 4 applications to provide context for discussion. Variable relaxation factors applied to the Jacobian elements of partial equilibrium relations required for convergence are defined. Challenges of strong radiation coupling in a shock capturing algorithm are addressed. Results are presented to show how the current suite of models responds to a wide variety of conditions involving coupled radiation and ablation.

  4. An improved flux-split algorithm applied to hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant

    1988-01-01

    An explicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing numerical algorithm is presented and applied to hypersonic flows assumed to be in thermochemical equilibrium. Real-gas chemistry is either loosely coupled to the gasdynamics by way of a Gibbs free energy minimization package or fully coupled using species mass conservation equations with finite-rate chemical reactions. A scheme is developed that maintains stability in the explicit, finite-rate formulation while allowing relatively high time steps. The codes use flux vector splitting to difference the inviscid fluxes and employ real-gas corrections to viscosity and thermal conductivity. Numerical results are compared against existing ballistic range and flight data. Flows about complex geometries are also computed.

  5. Mean flow field and surface heating produced by unequal shock interactions at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birch, S. F.; Rudy, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Mean velocity profiles were measured in a free shear layer produced by the interaction of two unequal strength shock waves at hypersonic free-stream Mach numbers. Measurements were made over a unit Reynolds number range of 3,770,000 per meter to 17,400,000 per meter based on the flow on the high velocity side of the shear layer. The variation in measured spreading parameters with Mach number for the fully developed flows is consistent with the trend of the available zero velocity ratio data when the Mach numbers for the data given in this study are taken to be characteristic Mach numbers based on the velocity difference across the mixing layer. Surface measurements in the shear-layer attachment region of the blunt-body model indicate peak local heating and static pressure consistent with other published data. Transition Reynolds numbers were found to be significantly lower than those found in previous data.

  6. Local and overall aerodynamic coefficients for bodies in hypersonic, rarefied flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. Leith; Peterson, Steven W.

    1991-01-01

    A computational method is given for the prediction of local pressure and viscous shear stress on windward surfaces of bluff, convex, axisymmetric or quasi-axisymmetric, hypersonic bodies in the transitional, rarefied flow regime. Overall aerodynamic forces and moments are computed by integration of the local quantities. The method is based upon a correlation of local pressure and shear stress computed by the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) numerical technique for cold wall, real gas conditions and some supplemental data from low-density, hypersonic wind tunnels. The relative simplicity of the method makes it feasible to do the necessary calculations with a personal computer. Two-dimensional shapes and leeward surfaces are not included in the scope of the method as it is presented here. Results are compared with DSMC computations for both local and overall coefficients. The latter includes sphere and blunt cone drag as well as lift and pitching moment coefficients for the NASA AFE vehicle at various angles of attack. Very satisfactory agreement is shown.

  7. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  8. Computational analysis of a rarefied hypersonic flow over combined gap/step geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, P. H. M.; Santos, W. F. N.

    2015-06-01

    This work describes a computational analysis of a hypersonic flow over a combined gap/step configuration at zero degree angle of attack, in chemical equilibrium and thermal nonequilibrium. Effects on the flowfield structure due to changes on the step frontal-face height have been investigated by employing the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The work focuses the attention of designers of hypersonic configurations on the fundamental parameter of surface discontinuity, which can have an important impact on even initial designs. The results highlight the sensitivity of the primary flowfield properties, velocity, density, pressure, and temperature due to changes on the step frontal-face height. The analysis showed that the upstream disturbance in the gap/step configuration increased with increasing the frontal-face height. In addition, it was observed that the separation region for the gap/step configuration increased with increasing the step frontal-face height. It was found that density and pressure for the gap/step configuration dramatically increased inside the gap as compared to those observed for the gap configuration, i. e., a gap without a step.

  9. Transient analysis of counterflowing jet over highly blunt cone in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Bishehsari, Shervin; Hosseinalipour, S. M.; Sedighi, K.

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the characteristics of various Counterflowing jets exiting from a nose cone is crucial for determining heat load reduction and usage of this device in various conditions. Such jets can undergo several flow regimes during venting, from initial supersonic flow, to transonic, to subsonic flow regimes as the pressure of jet decreases. A bow shock wave is a characteristic flow structure during the initial stage of the jet development, and this paper focuses on the development of the bow shock wave and the jet structure behind it. The transient behavior of a sonic counterflow jet is investigated using unsteady, axisymmetric Navier-Stokes solved with SST turbulence model at free stream Mach number of 5.75. The coolant gas (Carbon Dioxide and Helium) is chosen to inject into the hypersonic air flow at the nose of the model. The gases are considered to be ideal, and the computational domain is axisymmetric. The jet structure, including the shock wave and flow separation due to an adverse pressure gradient at the nose is investigated with a focus on the differences between high diffusivity coolant jet (Helium) and low diffusivity coolant jet (CO2) flow scenarios.

  10. Rarefied hypersonic flow simulations using the Navier-Stokes equations with non-equilibrium boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenshields, Christopher J.; Reese, Jason M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the use of Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations with non-equilibrium boundary conditions (BCs) for simulation of rarefied hypersonic flows. It revisits a largely forgotten derivation of velocity slip and temperature jump by Patterson, based on Grad's moment method. Mach 10 flow around a cylinder and Mach 12.7 flow over a flat plate are simulated using both computational fluid dynamics using the temperature jump BCs of Patterson and Smoluchowski and the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) method. These flows exhibit such strongly non-equilibrium behaviour that, following Patterson's analysis, they are strictly beyond the range of applicability of the BCs. Nevertheless, the results using Patterson's temperature jump BC compare quite well with the DSMC and are consistently better than those using the standard Smoluchowski temperature jump BC. One explanation for this better performance is that an assumption made by Patterson, based on the flow being only slightly non-equilibrium, introduces an additional constraint to the resulting BC model in the case of highly non-equilibrium flows.

  11. Exhausted Plume Flow Field Prediction Near the Afterbody of Hypersonic Flight Vehicles in High Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Lynn Chen; Mach, Kervyn D.; Deng, Zheng-Tao; Liaw, Goang-Shin

    1995-01-01

    A two-dimensional computer code to solve the Burnett equations has been developed which computes the flow interaction between an exhausted plume and hypersonic external flow near the afterbody of a flight vehicle. This Burnett-2D code extends the capability of Navier-Stokes solver (RPLUS2D code) to include high-order Burnett source terms and slip-wall conditions for velocity and temperature. Higher-order Burnett viscous stress and heat flux terms are discretized using central-differencing and treated as source terms. Blocking logic is adopted in order to overcome the difficulty of grid generation. The computation of exhaust plume flow field is divided into two steps. In the first step, the thruster nozzle exit conditions are computed which generates inflow conditions in the base area near the afterbody. Results demonstrated that at high altitudes, the computations of nozzle exit conditions must include the effects of base flow since significant expansion exists in the base region. In the second step, Burnett equations were solved for exhaust plume flow field near the afterbody. The free stream conditions are set at an altitude equal to 80km and the Mach number is equal to 5.0. The preliminary results show that the plume expansion, as altitude increases, will eventually cause upstream flow separation.

  12. Experimental studies of shock wave/wall jet interaction in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen M.; Nowak, Robert; Olsen, George

    1990-01-01

    The interaction between a planar shock wave and a wall jet produced by slot cooling in turbulent hypersonic flow was experimentally studied. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure are obtained in the incident shock/wall jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for two nozzle heights. The major result is that the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks such that the peak heating in the recompression region was not significantly reduced by even the largest levels of film cooling. Regions of boundary layer separation were induced in the film cooling layer, the size of which first increased and then decreased with increasing film cooling. The size of the separated regions and magnitude of the recompression heating were not strongly influenced by the thickness of the cooling film or point of shock impingement relative to the exit plane of the nozzles.

  13. Asynchronous, macrotasked relaxation strategies for the solution of viscous, hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1991-01-01

    A point-implicit, asynchronous macrotasked relaxation of the steady, thin-layer, Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The method employs multidirectional, single-level storage Gauss-Seidel relaxation sweeps, which effectively communicate perturbations across the entire domain in 2n sweeps, where n is the dimension of the domain. In order to enhance convergence the application of relaxation factors to specific components of the Jacobian is examined using a stability analysis of the advection and diffusion equations. Attention is also given to the complications associated with asynchronous multitasking. Solutions are generated for hypersonic flows over blunt bodies in two and three dimensions with chemical reactions, utilizing single-tasked and multitasked relaxation strategies.

  14. Similar solutions for viscous hypersonic flow over a slender three-fourths-power body of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin-Shun

    1987-01-01

    For hypersonic flow with a shock wave, there is a similar solution consistent throughout the viscous and inviscid layers along a very slender three-fourths-power body of revolution The strong pressure interaction problem can then be treated by the method of similarity. Numerical calculations are performed in the viscous region with the edge pressure distribution known from the inviscid similar solutions. The compressible laminar boundary-layer equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations. The resulting two-point boundary value problem is then solved by the Runge-Kutta method with a modified Newton's method for the corresponding boundary conditions. The effects of wall temperature, mass bleeding, and body transverse curvature are investigated. The induced pressure, displacement thickness, skin friction, and heat transfer due to the previously mentioned parameters are estimated and analyzed.

  15. Conservation equations and physical models for hypersonic air flows in thermal and chemical nonequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Gupta, Roop N.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1989-01-01

    The conservation equations for simulating hypersonic flows in thermal and chemical nonequilibrium and details of the associated physical models are presented. These details include the curve fits used for defining thermodynamic properties of the 11 species air model, curve fits for collision cross sections, expressions for transport properties, the chemical kinetics models, and the vibrational and electronic energy relaxation models. The expressions are formulated in the context of either a two or three temperature model. Greater emphasis is placed on the two temperature model in which it is assumed that the translational and rotational energy models are in equilibrium at the translational temperature, T, and the vibrational, electronic, and electron translational energy modes are in equilibrium at the vibrational temperature, T sub v. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors associated with the Jacobian of the flux vector are also presented in order to accommodate the upwind based numerical solutions of the complete equation set.

  16. Chemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes solutions for hypersonic flow over an ablating graphite nosetip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. K.; Henline, W. D.

    1993-01-01

    The general boundary conditions including mass and energy balances of chemically equilibrated or nonequilibrated gas adjacent to ablating surfaces have been derived. A computer procedure based on these conditions was developed and interfaced with the Navier-Stokes solver for predictions of the flow field, surface temperature, and surface ablation rates over re-entry space vehicles with ablating Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). The Navier-Stokes solver with general surface thermochemistry boundary conditions can predict more realistic solutions and provide useful information for the design of TPS. A test case with a proposed hypersonic test vehicle configuration and associated free stream conditions was developed. Solutions with various surface boundary conditions were obtained, and the effect of nonequilibrium gas as well as surface chemistry on surface heating and ablation rate were examined. The solutions of the GASP code with complete ablating surface conditions were compared with those of the ASC code. The direction of future work is also discussed.

  17. Applications of Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Scattering to Problems in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, F. Bary

    1995-01-01

    The general status of a grant to investigate the applications of quantum theory in atomic and molecular scattering problems in hypersonic flow is summarized. Abstracts of five articles and eleven full-length articles published or submitted for publication are included as attachments. The following topics are addressed in these articles: fragmentation of heavy ions (HZE particles); parameterization of absorption cross sections; light ion transport; emission of light fragments as an indicator of equilibrated populations; quantum mechanical, optical model methods for calculating cross sections for particle fragmentation by hydrogen; evaluation of NUCFRG2, the semi-empirical nuclear fragmentation database; investigation of the single- and double-ionization of He by proton and anti-proton collisions; Bose-Einstein condensation of nuclei; and a liquid drop model in HZE particle fragmentation by hydrogen.

  18. A fast sorting algorithm for a hypersonic rarefied flow particle simulation on the connection machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, Leonardo

    1989-01-01

    The data parallel implementation of a particle simulation for hypersonic rarefied flow described by Dagum associates a single parallel data element with each particle in the simulation. The simulated space is divided into discrete regions called cells containing a variable and constantly changing number of particles. The implementation requires a global sort of the parallel data elements so as to arrange them in an order that allows immediate access to the information associated with cells in the simulation. Described here is a very fast algorithm for performing the necessary ranking of the parallel data elements. The performance of the new algorithm is compared with that of the microcoded instruction for ranking on the Connection Machine.

  19. DSMC Grid Methodologies for Computing Low-Density, Hypersonic Flows About Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmoth, Richard G.; LeBeau, Gerald J.; Carlson, Ann B.

    1996-01-01

    Two different grid methodologies are studied for application to DSMC simulations about reusable launch vehicles. One method uses an unstructured, tetrahedral grid while the other uses a structured, variable-resolution Cartesian grid. The relative merits of each method are discussed in terms of accuracy, computational efficiency, and overall ease of use. Both methods are applied to the computation of a low-density, hypersonic flow about a winged single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle concept at conditions corresponding to an altitude of 120 km. Both methods are shown to give comparable results for both surface and flowfield quantities as well as for the overall aerodynamic behavior. For the conditions simulated, the flowfield about the vehicle is very rarefied but the DSMC simulations show significant departure from free-molecular predictions for the surface friction and heat transfer as well as certain aerodynamic quantities.

  20. Prediction of Drag Reduction in Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows with Counterflow Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daso, Endwell O.; Beaulieu, Warren; Hager, James O.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics solutions of the flowfield of a truncated cone-cylinder with and without counterflow jets have been obtained for the short penetration mode (SPM) and long penetration mode (LPM) of the freestream-counterflow jet interaction flowfield. For the case without the counterflow jet, the comparison of the normalized surface pressures showed very good agreement with experimental data. For the case with the SPM jet, the predicted surface pressures did not compare as well with the experimental data upstream of the expansion corner, while aft of the expansion corner, the comparison of the solution and the data is seen to give much better agreement. The difference in the prediction and the data could be due to the transient character of the jet penetration modes, possible effects of the plasma physics that are not accounted for here, or even the less likely effect of flow turbulence, etc. For the LPM jet computations, one-dimensional isentropic relations were used to derived the jet exit conditions in order to obtain the LPM solutions. The solution for the jet exit Mach number of 3 shows a jet penetration several times longer than that of the SPM, and therefore much weaker bow shock, with an attendant reduction in wave drag. The LPM jet is, in essence, seen to be a "pencil" of fluid, with much higher dynamic pressure, embedded in the oncoming supersonic or hypersonic freestream. The methodology for determining the conditions for the LPM jet could enable a practical approach for the design and application of counterflow LPM jets for the reduction of wave drag and heat flux, thus significantly enhancing the aerodynamic characteristics and aerothermal performance of supersonic and hypersonic vehicles. The solutions show that the qualitative flow structure is very well captured. The obtained results, therefore, suggest that counterflowing jets are viable candidate technology concepts that can be employed to give significant reductions in wave drag, heat

  1. Application of computational fluid dynamics to three-dimensional bodies in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, James Stevenson

    Hypersonic aircraft are now being designed. For that work to be completed, improved computational tools are required. The flow simulation capabilities which are needed are being sought. In order to accomplish this, features of several existing codes were combined and enhanced. The Compressible Navier-Stokes (CNS) computer code solves the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations in three dimensions for arbitrary vehicle shapes. The solver can capture strong or weak shocks, and can model separated flow. Boundary-layer turbulence is accounted for empirically by use of the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. The code uses ideal gas assumptions or an equilibrium real gas model. Geometries are gridded in a zonal fashion, allowing for flexible convergence strategies and use of the best available equation set for each zone. The grid on which the computations are performed is critical to the efficient generation of accurate solutions. Some of the criteria for grid quality are discussed, and a simple method of adapting grids to supersonic flow fields is presented. The code was tested against analytical, experimental, and numerical results, and shows excellent agreement for critical quantities such as heat transfer and skin friction. The zonal approach of the code and its modular structure allow for future inclusion of internal flow options, more complex geometrical models, nonequilibrium air chemistry, combustion chemistry, and other improvements.

  2. Characterization of CO2 flow in a hypersonic impulse facility using DLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, J. M.; Paris, S.; Fletcher, D. G.

    2016-02-01

    This work documents diode laser absorption measurements of CO2 flow in the free stream of the Longshot hypersonic impulse facility at Mach numbers ranging from 10 to 12. The diode laser sensor was designed to measure absorption of the P12 (30013) ← (00001) transition near 1.6 \\upmum, which yields relatively weak direct absorption levels (3.5 % per meter at peak Longshot free-stream conditions). Despite this weak absorption, measurements yielded valuable flow property information during the first 20 ms of facility runs. Simultaneous measurements of static temperature, pressure, and velocity were acquired in the inviscid core flow region using a laser wavelength scanning frequency of 600 Hz. The free-stream values obtained from DLAS measurements were then compared to Longshot probe-derived values determined from settling chamber and probe measurements. This comparison enabled an assessment of the traditional method of flow characterization in the facility, which indicated negligible influence from possible vibrational freezing of reservoir gases.

  3. Modeling of electronic excitation and radiation in non-continuum hypersonic reentry flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Ozawa, Takashi; Sohn, Ilyoup; Levin, Deborah A.

    2011-06-01

    The modeling of hypersonic radiation in non-equilibrium, non-continuum flows is considered in the framework of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) approach. The study explores the influence of electronic states on the flow chemistry and degree of ionization as well as the assumption that the electronic states can be described by a steady state solution to a system of rate equations of excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transfer processes. The work implements selected excited levels of atomic nitrogen and oxygen and the corresponding electron impact excitation/de-excitation and ionization processes in DSMC. The simulations show that when excitation models are included, the degree of ionization in the Stardust transitional re-entry flow increases due to additional intermediate steps to ionization. The extra ionization reactions consume the electron energy to reduce the electron temperature. The DSMC predicted excited state level populations are lower than those predicted by a quasi steady state calculation, but the differences can be understood in terms of the flow distribution functions.

  4. Application of a Modular Particle-Continuum Method to Partially Rarefied, Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschenes, Timothy R.; Boyd, Iain D.

    2011-05-01

    The Modular Particle-Continuum (MPC) method is used to simulate partially-rarefied, hypersonic flow over a sting-mounted planetary probe configuration. This hybrid method uses computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to solve the Navier-Stokes equations in regions that are continuum, while using direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) in portions of the flow that are rarefied. The MPC method uses state-based coupling to pass information between the two flow solvers and decouples both time-step and mesh densities required by each solver. It is parallelized for distributed memory systems using dynamic domain decomposition and internal energy modes can be consistently modeled to be out of equilibrium with the translational mode in both solvers. The MPC results are compared to both full DSMC and CFD predictions and available experimental measurements. By using DSMC in only regions where the flow is nonequilibrium, the MPC method is able to reproduce full DSMC results down to the level of velocity and rotational energy probability density functions while requiring a fraction of the computational time.

  5. A database of aerothermal measurements in hypersonic flow for CFD validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, M. S.; Moselle, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental database selected and compiled from aerothermal measurements obtained on basic model configurations on which fundamental flow phenomena could be most easily examined. The experimental studies were conducted in hypersonic flows in 48-inch, 96-inch, and 6-foot shock tunnels. A special computer program was constructed to provide easy access to the measurements in the database as well as the means to plot the measurements and compare them with imported data. The database contains tabulations of model configurations, freestream conditions, and measurements of heat transfer, pressure, and skin friction for each of the studies selected for inclusion. The first segment contains measurements in laminar flow emphasizing shock-wave boundary-layer interaction. In the second segment, measurements in transitional flows over flat plates and cones are given. The third segment comprises measurements in regions of shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions. Studies of the effects of surface roughness of nosetips and conical afterbodies are presented in the fourth segment of the database. Detailed measurements in regions of shock/shock boundary layer interaction are contained in the fifth segment. Measurements in regions of wall jet and transpiration cooling are presented in the final two segments.

  6. Fluorescence Visualization of Hypersonic Flow Past Triangular and Rectangular Boundary-layer Trips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Garcia, A. P.; Borg, Stephen E.; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Berry, Scott A.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization has been used to investigate the hypersonic flow of air over surface protrusions that are sized to force laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition. These trips were selected to simulate protruding Space Shuttle Orbiter heat shield gap-filler material. Experiments were performed in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Wind Tunnel, which is an electrically-heated, blowdown facility. Two-mm high by 8-mm wide triangular and rectangular trips were attached to a flat plate and were oriented at an angle of 45 degrees with respect to the oncoming flow. Upstream of these trips, nitric oxide (NO) was seeded into the boundary layer. PLIF visualization of this NO allowed observation of both laminar and turbulent boundary layer flow downstream of the trips for varying flow conditions as the flat plate angle of attack was varied. By varying the angle of attack, the Mach number above the boundary layer was varied between 4.2 and 9.8, according to analytical oblique-shock calculations. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the flowfield with a laminar boundary layer were also performed to better understand the flow environment. The PLIF images of the tripped boundary layer flow were compared to a case with no trip for which the flow remained laminar over the entire angle-of-attack range studied. Qualitative agreement is found between the present observed transition measurements and a previous experimental roughness-induced transition database determined by other means, which is used by the shuttle return-to-flight program.

  7. Modeling and simulation of radiation from hypersonic flows with Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Ilyoup

    During extreme-Mach number reentry into Earth's atmosphere, spacecraft experience hypersonic non-equilibrium flow conditions that dissociate molecules and ionize atoms. Such situations occur behind a shock wave leading to high temperatures, which have an adverse effect on the thermal protection system and radar communications. Since the electronic energy levels of gaseous species are strongly excited for high Mach number conditions, the radiative contribution to the total heat load can be significant. In addition, radiative heat source within the shock layer may affect the internal energy distribution of dissociated and weakly ionized gas species and the number density of ablative species released from the surface of vehicles. Due to the radiation total heat load to the heat shield surface of the vehicle may be altered beyond mission tolerances. Therefore, in the design process of spacecrafts the effect of radiation must be considered and radiation analyses coupled with flow solvers have to be implemented to improve the reliability during the vehicle design stage. To perform the first stage for radiation analyses coupled with gas-dynamics, efficient databasing schemes for emission and absorption coefficients were developed to model radiation from hypersonic, non-equilibrium flows. For bound-bound transitions, spectral information including the line-center wavelength and assembled parameters for efficient calculations of emission and absorption coefficients are stored for typical air plasma species. Since the flow is non-equilibrium, a rate equation approach including both collisional and radiatively induced transitions was used to calculate the electronic state populations, assuming quasi-steady-state (QSS). The Voigt line shape function was assumed for modeling the line broadening effect. The accuracy and efficiency of the databasing scheme was examined by comparing results of the databasing scheme with those of NEQAIR for the Stardust flowfield. An accuracy of

  8. NAL's research for hypersonic flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Tatsuo

    NAL's hypersonic flight-related research activities, which began in 1966 with the construction of a hypersonic wind tunnel and have encompassed CFD investigations into hypersonic flows, were in 1987 expanded to undertake the conceptual development of aerospaceplanes. Efforts are simultaneously being made toward the development of hypersonic airframes and airbreathing powerplants, with a view to their integration at a more advanced design stage. An unmanned hypersonic experimental aircraft will in due course be built and flight tested to verify the materials, structures, control system, etc., technologies chosen during the current development program.

  9. Comparative study on aerodynamic heating under perfect and nonequilibrium hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiu; Li, JinPing; Zhao, Wei; Jiang, ZongLin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, comparative heat flux measurements for a sharp cone model were conducted by utilizing a high enthalpy shock tunnel JF-10 and a large-scale shock tunnel JF-12, responsible for providing nonequilibrium and perfect gas flows, respectively. Experiments were performed at the Key Laboratory of High Temperature Gas Dynamics (LHD), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Corresponding numerical simulations were also conducted in effort to better understand the phenomena accompanying in these experiments. By assessing the consistency and accuracy of all the data gathered during this study, a detailed comparison of sharp cone heat transfer under a totally different kind of freestream conditions was build and analyzed. One specific parameter, defined as the product of the Stanton number and the square root of the Reynold number, was found to be more characteristic for the aerodynamic heating phenomena encountered in hypersonic flight. Adequate use of said parameter practically eliminates the variability caused by the deferent flow conditions, regardless of whether the flow is in dissociation or the boundary condition is catalytic. Essentially, the parameter identified in this study reduces the amount of ground experimental data necessary and eases data extrapolation to flight.

  10. Computation of axisymmetric and ionized hypersonic flows using particle and continuum methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain D.; Gokcen, Tahir

    1994-01-01

    Comparisons between particle and continuum simulations of hypersonic near-continuum flows are presented. The particle approach employs the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, and the continuum approach solves the appropriate equations of fluid flow. Both simulations have thermochemistry models for air implemented including ionization. A new axisymmetric DSMC code that is efficiently vectorized is developed for this study. In this DSMC code, particular attention is paid to matching the relaxation rates employed in the continuum approach. This investigation represents a continuum of a previous study that considered thermochemical relaxation in one-dimensional shock waves of nitrogen. Comparison of the particle and continuum methods is first made for an axisymmetric blunt-body flow of air at 7 km/s. Very good agreement is obtained for the two solutions. The two techniques also compare well for a one-dimensional shock wave in air at 10 km/s. In both applications, the results are found to be sensitive to various aspects of the chemistry model employed.

  11. Viscous-shock-layer analysis of hypersonic flows over long slender vehicles. Ph.D. Thesis, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kam-Pui; Gupta, Roop N.

    1992-01-01

    An efficient and accurate method for solving the viscous shock layer equations for hypersonic flows over long slender bodies is presented. The two first order equations, continuity and normal momentum, are solved simultaneously as a coupled set. The flow conditions included are from high Reynolds numbers at low altitudes to low Reynolds numbers at high altitudes. For high Reynolds number flows, both chemical nonequilibrium and perfect gas cases are analyzed with surface catalytic effects and different turbulence models, respectively. At low Reynolds number flow conditions, corrected slip models are implemented with perfect gas case. Detailed comparisons are included with other predictions and experimental data.

  12. Application of the Galerkin/least-squares formulation to the analysis of hypersonic flows. I - Flow over a two-dimensional ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalot, F.; Hughes, T. J. R.; Johan, Z.; Shakib, F.

    1991-01-01

    An FEM for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is introduced. The discretization is based on entropy variables. The methodology is developed within the framework of a Galerkin/least-squares formulation to which a discontinuity-capturing operator is added. Results for three test cases selected among those of the Workshop on Hypersonic Flows for Reentry Problems are presented.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow over a cylinder using axial- and transverse-oriented magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Guarendi, Andrew N; Chandy, Abhilash J

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hypersonic flow over a cylinder are presented for axial- and transverse-oriented dipoles with different strengths. ANSYS CFX is used to carry out calculations for steady, laminar flows at a Mach number of 6.1, with a model for electrical conductivity as a function of temperature and pressure. The low magnetic Reynolds number (<1) calculated based on the velocity and length scales in this problem justifies the quasistatic approximation, which assumes negligible effect of velocity on magnetic fields. Therefore, the governing equations employed in the simulations are the compressible Navier-Stokes and the energy equations with MHD-related source terms such as Lorentz force and Joule dissipation. The results demonstrate the ability of the magnetic field to affect the flowfield around the cylinder, which results in an increase in shock stand-off distance and reduction in overall temperature. Also, it is observed that there is a noticeable decrease in drag with the addition of the magnetic field. PMID:24307870

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow over a cylinder using axial- and transverse-oriented magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Guarendi, Andrew N; Chandy, Abhilash J

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hypersonic flow over a cylinder are presented for axial- and transverse-oriented dipoles with different strengths. ANSYS CFX is used to carry out calculations for steady, laminar flows at a Mach number of 6.1, with a model for electrical conductivity as a function of temperature and pressure. The low magnetic Reynolds number (<1) calculated based on the velocity and length scales in this problem justifies the quasistatic approximation, which assumes negligible effect of velocity on magnetic fields. Therefore, the governing equations employed in the simulations are the compressible Navier-Stokes and the energy equations with MHD-related source terms such as Lorentz force and Joule dissipation. The results demonstrate the ability of the magnetic field to affect the flowfield around the cylinder, which results in an increase in shock stand-off distance and reduction in overall temperature. Also, it is observed that there is a noticeable decrease in drag with the addition of the magnetic field.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Hypersonic Flow over a Cylinder Using Axial- and Transverse-Oriented Magnetic Dipoles

    PubMed Central

    Guarendi, Andrew N.; Chandy, Abhilash J.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hypersonic flow over a cylinder are presented for axial- and transverse-oriented dipoles with different strengths. ANSYS CFX is used to carry out calculations for steady, laminar flows at a Mach number of 6.1, with a model for electrical conductivity as a function of temperature and pressure. The low magnetic Reynolds number (≪1) calculated based on the velocity and length scales in this problem justifies the quasistatic approximation, which assumes negligible effect of velocity on magnetic fields. Therefore, the governing equations employed in the simulations are the compressible Navier-Stokes and the energy equations with MHD-related source terms such as Lorentz force and Joule dissipation. The results demonstrate the ability of the magnetic field to affect the flowfield around the cylinder, which results in an increase in shock stand-off distance and reduction in overall temperature. Also, it is observed that there is a noticeable decrease in drag with the addition of the magnetic field. PMID:24307870

  16. Investigations on the turbulent wake of a generic space launcher geometry in the hypersonic flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saile, D.; Gülhan, A.; Henckels, A.; Glatzer, C.; Statnikov, V.; Meinke, M.

    2013-06-01

    The turbulent wake flow of generic rocket configurations is investigated experimentally and numerically at a freestream Mach number of 6.0 and a unit Reynolds number of 10·106 m-1. The flow condition is based on the trajectory of Ariane V-like launcher at an altitude of 50 km, which is used as the baseline to address the overarching tasks of wake flows in the hypersonic regime like fluid-structural coupling, reverse hot jets and base heating. Experimental results using pressure transducers and the high-speed Schlieren measurement technique are shown to gain insight into the local pressure fluctuations on the base and the oscillations of the recompression shock. This experimental configuration features a wedgeprofiled strut orthogonally mounted to the main body. Additionally, the influence of cylindrical dummy nozzles attached to the base of the rocket is investigated, which is the link to the numerical investigations. Here, the axisymmetric model possesses a cylindrical sting support of the same diameter as the dummy nozzles. The sting support allows investigations for an undisturbed wake flow. A time-accurate zonal Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes/Large Eddy Simulation (RANS/LES) approach is applied to identify shocks, expansion waves, and the highly unsteady recompression region numerically. Subsequently, experimental and numerical results in the strut-averted region are compared with regard to the wall pressure and recompression shock frequency spectra. For the compared configurations, experimental pressure spectra exhibit dominant Strouhal numbers at about SrD = 0.03 and 0.27, and the recompression shock oscillates at 0.2. In general, the pressure and recompression shock fluctuations numerically calculated agree reasonably with the experimental results. The experiments with a blunt base reveal base-pressure spectra with dominant Strouhal numbers at 0.08 at the center position and 0.145, 0.21-0.22, and 0.31-0.33 at the outskirts of the base.

  17. Aerodynamic Design of a Dual-Flow Mach 7 Hypersonic Inlet System for a Turbine-Based Combined-Cycle Hypersonic Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Bobby W.; Weir, Lois J.

    2008-01-01

    A new hypersonic inlet for a turbine-based combined-cycle (TBCC) engine has been designed. This split-flow inlet is designed to provide flow to an over-under propulsion system with turbofan and dual-mode scramjet engines for flight from takeoff to Mach 7. It utilizes a variable-geometry ramp, high-speed cowl lip rotation, and a rotating low-speed cowl that serves as a splitter to divide the flow between the low-speed turbofan and the high-speed scramjet and to isolate the turbofan at high Mach numbers. The low-speed inlet was designed for Mach 4, the maximum mode transition Mach number. Integration of the Mach 4 inlet into the Mach 7 inlet imposed significant constraints on the low-speed inlet design, including a large amount of internal compression. The inlet design was used to develop mechanical designs for two inlet mode transition test models: small-scale (IMX) and large-scale (LIMX) research models. The large-scale model is designed to facilitate multi-phase testing including inlet mode transition and inlet performance assessment, controls development, and integrated systems testing with turbofan and scramjet engines.

  18. Preliminary Experiment of the Drag Force Measurement by Using Strain Gauge in the Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Y.; Udagawa, S.; Niwa, R.; Inage, T.; Ota, M.; Maeno, K.

    Recently, the space development project and the development of the hypersonic aircraft become more active in the world. In Japan the development facilities which compare favorably with the aerospace developing countries are needed.

  19. A study of boundary layer transition on outgassing cones in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalmach, C. J., Jr.; Bertin, J. J.; Pope, T. C.; Mccloskey, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    Surface heat-transfer rates and pressures were measured at hypersonic speeds on sharp cones at zero angle of attack with and without gas injection. Using the non-injection results for reference data the effects on heating and transition location of surface roughness and injectant rate, distribution and composition were determined. The transition location was sensitive to the injectant distribution. The transition Reynolds numbers were significantly greater when the injectant distribution was constant than with a variable distribution. The measured heat-transfer distribution were also strongly dependent upon the injectant distribution. Transition Reynolds number results obtained during this program with a variable injectant distribution were correlated with a limited amount of data available for a degrading model tested in a different facility. Transitional data with constant injectant distribution were correlated with earlier results. An empirical correlation of heat-transfer reduction due to gas injection in turbulent flow was developed for both distributions tested. Several effects of mass addition on heating and transition, which have been earlier reported, were observed.

  20. Numerical study of hypersonic flows over reentry configurations with different chemical nonequilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jiaao; Wang, Jingying; Lee, Chunhian

    2016-09-01

    Effects of two different 11-species chemical reaction models on hypersonic reentry flow simulations are numerically investigated. These two models were proposed by Gupta (1990) and Park (1990) [12,15], respectively. In this study, two typical configurations, the RAM-C II vehicle and FIRE II capsule, are selected as test cases, whose thermo-chemical nonequilibrium flowfields are computed by a multi-block finite volume code using a two-temperature model (a translational-rotational temperature and a vibrational-electron-electronic temperature). In the RAM-C II case, it is indicated that although electron number density distributions of the two reaction models appear in a similar trend, their values are distinctively different. Results of the Gupta's model show a better agreement with the electrostatic probe data, while those of the Park's model are more consistent with the reflectometers data. Both models give similar temperature distributions. In the FIRE II case, the two models yield significantly different distribution profiles of ions and electrons, whose differences could reach an order of magnitude. In addition, an abnormal nonequilibrium relaxation process in the shock layer is found in the FIRE II flowfield simulated by the Gupta's model, which proves to be a consequence of electron impact ionization reactions.

  1. Velocity Field Measurements in Rarefied, Hypersonic Flows of Nitrogen Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Eric

    Velocity fields are measured in the shock layer and boundary layer on a plate with a cylindrical fin immersed in a hypersonic, free jet of nitrogen, using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of iodine. A sheet beam from a single-mode argon laser at 514 nm is used to excite hyperfine components of the P(13), R(15) and P(48), P(103) blended rotational-vibrational lines in the B-X electronic transition for iodine seeded in the flow. The Doppler broadening and shift of these lines, and the relative rotational line strengths are determined for excitation spectra recorded in a planar grid. Using this measurement technique, estimates for iodine of the mass velocity component and kinetic temperature of translation in the direction of laser propagation, rotational temperature, and relative number density are determined at each point. Sectional planes of the flow over the body are investigated at a spatial resolution on the scale of the molecular mean-free-path in the free jet near the plate leading edge. Two directions within each plane are examined, to determine the velocity vector and to investigate translational non-equilibrium. Predictions from two direct simulation Monte Carlo computations of the flow are compared with the measurements. Large values of slip velocity and temperature jump at the plate surface are observed for iodine. Measurements and DSMC predictions indicate strong translational non-equilibrium effects for the iodine in the shock wave and the thick boundary layer on the plate, and are qualitatively consistent with a bimodal velocity distribution function. As a consequence of the ratio of molecular masses, the translational non-equilibrium of iodine is much greater than for nitrogen.

  2. High Enthalpy Effects on Two Boundary Layer Disturbances in Supersonic and Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagnild, Ross Martin

    The fluid flow phenomenon of boundary layer transition is a complicated and difficult process to model and predict. The importance of the state of the boundary layer with regard to vehicle design cannot be understated. The high enthalpy environment in which high speed vehicles operate in further complicates the transition process by adding several more degrees of freedom. In this environment, the internal properties of the gas can stabilize or destabilize the boundary layer as well as modify the disturbances that cause transition. In the current work, the interaction of two types of disturbances with the high enthalpy flow environment are analyzed. The first is known as a second mode disturbance, which is acoustic in nature. The second type is known as a transient growth disturbance and is associated with flows behind roughness elements. Theoretical analyses, linear stability analyses, and computation fluid dynamics (CFD) are used to determine the ways in which these disturbances interact with the high enthalpy environment as well as the consequences of these interactions. First, acoustic wave are directly studied in order to gain a basic understanding of the response of second mode disturbances in the high enthalpy boundary layer. Next, this understanding is used in interpreting the results of several computations attempting to simulate the flow through a high enthalpy flow facility as well as experiments attempting to take advantage of the acoustic interaction with the high enthalpy environment. Because of the difficulty in modeling these experiments, direct simulations of acoustic waves in a hypersonic flow of a gas with molecular vibration are performed. Lastly, compressible transient growth disturbances are simulated using a linear optimal disturbance solver as well as a CFD solver. The effect of an internal molecular process on this type of disturbance is tested through the use of a vibrational mode. It is the goal of the current work to reinforce the

  3. Scientific Transactions No. 11 of the Institute of Mechanics, Moscow State University. [supersonic and hypersonic gas flow and the movement of gas with exothermic reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonor, A. L. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The results of flow around wings, the determination of the optimal form, and the interaction of the wake with the accompanying flow at supersonic and hypersonic speeds of the free-stream flow are given. Methods of numerical and analytical calculation of one dimensional unsteady and two dimensional steady motions of fuel-gas mixtures with exothermic reactions are also considered.

  4. On the solution of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for hypersonic flow about axially-symmetric blunt bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warsi, Z. U. A.; Weed, R. A.; Thompson, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    A formulation of the complete Navier-Stokes problem for a viscous hypersonic flow in general curvilinear coordinates is presented. This formulation is applicable to both the axially symmetric and three dimensional flows past bodies of revolution. The equations for the case of zero angle of attack were solved past a circular cylinder with hemispherical caps by point SOR finite difference approximation. The free stream Mach number and the Reynolds number for the test case are respectively 22.04 and 168883. The whole algorithm is presented in detail along with the preliminary results for pressure, temperature, density and velocity distributions along the stagnation line.

  5. Modeling and simulation of radiation from hypersonic flows with Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Ilyoup

    During extreme-Mach number reentry into Earth's atmosphere, spacecraft experience hypersonic non-equilibrium flow conditions that dissociate molecules and ionize atoms. Such situations occur behind a shock wave leading to high temperatures, which have an adverse effect on the thermal protection system and radar communications. Since the electronic energy levels of gaseous species are strongly excited for high Mach number conditions, the radiative contribution to the total heat load can be significant. In addition, radiative heat source within the shock layer may affect the internal energy distribution of dissociated and weakly ionized gas species and the number density of ablative species released from the surface of vehicles. Due to the radiation total heat load to the heat shield surface of the vehicle may be altered beyond mission tolerances. Therefore, in the design process of spacecrafts the effect of radiation must be considered and radiation analyses coupled with flow solvers have to be implemented to improve the reliability during the vehicle design stage. To perform the first stage for radiation analyses coupled with gas-dynamics, efficient databasing schemes for emission and absorption coefficients were developed to model radiation from hypersonic, non-equilibrium flows. For bound-bound transitions, spectral information including the line-center wavelength and assembled parameters for efficient calculations of emission and absorption coefficients are stored for typical air plasma species. Since the flow is non-equilibrium, a rate equation approach including both collisional and radiatively induced transitions was used to calculate the electronic state populations, assuming quasi-steady-state (QSS). The Voigt line shape function was assumed for modeling the line broadening effect. The accuracy and efficiency of the databasing scheme was examined by comparing results of the databasing scheme with those of NEQAIR for the Stardust flowfield. An accuracy of

  6. Determination of the hypersonic-continuum/rarefied-flow drag coefficient of the Viking lander capsule 1 aeroshell from flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Walberg, G. D.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an investigation to determine the full scale drag coefficient in the high speed, low density regime of the Viking lander capsule 1 entry vehicle are presented. The principal flight data used in the study were from onboard pressure, mass spectrometer, and accelerometer instrumentation. The hypersonic continuum flow drag coefficient was unambiguously obtained from pressure and accelerometer data; the free molecule flow drag coefficient was indirectly estimated from accelerometer and mass spectrometer data; the slip flow drag coefficient variation was obtained from an appropriate scaling of existing experimental sphere data. Comparison of the flight derived drag hypersonic continuum flow regime except for Reynolds numbers from 1000 to 100,000, for which an unaccountable difference between flight and ground test data of about 8% existed. The flight derived drag coefficients in the free molecule flow regime were considerably larger than those previously calculated with classical theory. The general character of the previously determined temperature profile was not changed appreciably by the results of this investigation; however, a slightly more symmetrical temperature variation at the highest altitudes was obtained.

  7. Experimental and computational flow-field results for an all-body hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleary, Joseph W.

    1989-01-01

    A comprehensive test program is defined which is being implemented in the NASA/Ames 3.5 foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel for obtaining data on a generic all-body hypersonic vehicle for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code validation. Computational methods (approximate inviscid methods and an upwind parabolized Navier-Stokes code) currently being applied to the all-body model are outlined. Experimental and computational results on surface pressure distributions and Pitot-pressure surveys for the basic sharp-nose model (without control surfaces) at a free-stream Mach number of 7 are presented.

  8. NASA Ames's electric arc-driven shock tube facility and research on nonequilibrium phenomena in low density hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.

    1992-01-01

    Basic requirements for a ground test facility simulating low density hypersonic flows are discussed. Such facilities should be able to produce shock velocities in the range of 10-17 km/sec in an initial pressure of 0.010 to 0.050 Torr. The facility should be equipped with diagnostics systems to be able to measure the emitted radiation, characteristic temperatures and populations in various energy levels. In the light of these requirements, NASA Ames's electric arc-driven low density shock tube facility is described and available experimental diagnostics systems and computational tools are discussed.

  9. Second-order small disturbance theory for hypersonic flow over power-law bodies. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical method for determining the flow field about power-law bodies in hypersonic flow conditions is developed. The second-order solutions, which reflect the effects of the second-order terms in the equations, are obtained by applying the method of small perturbations in terms of body slenderness parameter to the zeroth-order solutions. The method is applied by writing each flow variable as the sum of a zeroth-order and a perturbation function, each multiplied by the axial variable raised to a power. The similarity solutions are developed for infinite Mach number. All results obtained are for no flow through the body surface (as a boundary condition), but the derivation indicates that small amounts of blowing or suction through the wall can be accommodated.

  10. Development of a computer code for calculating the steady super/hypersonic inviscid flow around real configurations. Volume 1: Computational technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marconi, F.; Salas, M.; Yaeger, L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed to compute the inviscid super/hypersonic flow field about complex vehicle geometries accurately and efficiently. A second order accurate finite difference scheme is used to integrate the three dimensional Euler equations in regions of continuous flow, while all shock waves are computed as discontinuities via the Rankine Hugoniot jump conditions. Conformal mappings are used to develop a computational grid. The effects of blunt nose entropy layers are computed in detail. Real gas effects for equilibrium air are included using curve fits of Mollier charts. Typical calculated results for shuttle orbiter, hypersonic transport, and supersonic aircraft configurations are included to demonstrate the usefulness of this tool.

  11. Experimental studies of shock-wave/wall-jet interaction in hypersonic flow, part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have been conducted to examine slot film cooling effectiveness and the interaction between the cooling film and an incident planar shock wave in turbulent hypersonic flow. The experimental studies were conducted in the 48-inch shock tunnel at Calspan at a freestream Mach number of close to 6.4 and at a Reynolds number of 35 x 10(exp 6) based on the length of the model at the injection point. The Mach 2.3 planar wall jet was generated from 40 transverse nozzles (with heights of both 0.080 inch and 0.120 inch), producing a film that extended the full width of the model. The nozzles were operated at pressures and velocities close to matching the freestream, as well as at conditions where the nozzle flows were over- and under-expanded. A two-dimensional shock generator was used to generate oblique shocks that deflected the flow through total turnings of 11, 16, and 21 degrees; the flows impinged downstream of the nozzle exits. Detailed measurements of heat transfer and pressure were made both ahead and downstream of the injection station, with the greatest concentration of measurements in the regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction. The major objectives of these experimental studies were to explore the effectiveness of film cooling in the presence of regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction and, more specifically, to determine how boundary layer separation and the large recompression heating rates were modified by film cooling. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure were obtained in the incident-shock/wall-jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for each of the two nozzle heights. Measurements were also made to examine the effects of nozzle lip thickness on cooling effectiveness. The major conclusion from these studies was that the effect of the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks, so the peak heating in the recompression region was not

  12. Experimental studies of shock-wave/wall-jet interaction in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Rodriguez, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Experimental studies have been conducted to examine slot film cooling effectiveness and the interaction between the cooling film and an incident planar shock wave in turbulent hypersonic flow. The experimental studies were conducted in the 48-inch shock tunnel at Calspan at a freestream Mach number of close to 6.4 and at a Reynolds number of 35 x 10(exp 6) based on the length of the model at the injection point. The Mach 2.3 planar wall jet was generated from 40 transverse nozzles (with heights of both 0.080 inch and 0.120 inch), producing a film that extended the full width of the model. The nozzles were operated at pressures and velocities close to matching the freestream, as well as at conditions where the nozzle flows were over- and under-expanded. A two-dimensional shock generator was used to generate oblique shocks that deflected the flow through total turnings of 11, 16, and 21 degrees; the flows impinged downstream of the nozzle exits. Detailed measurements of heat transfer and pressure were made both ahead and downstream of the injection station, with the greatest concentration of measurements in the regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction. The major objectives of these experimental studies were to explore the effectiveness of film cooling in the presence of regions of shock-wave/boundary layer interaction and, more specifically, to determine how boundary layer separation and the large recompression heating rates were modified by film cooling. Detailed distributions of heat transfer and pressure were obtained in the incident shock/wall-jet interaction region for a series of shock strengths and impingement positions for each of the two nozzle heights. Measurements were also made to examine the effects of nozzle lip thickness on cooling effectiveness. The major conclusion from these studies was that the effect of the cooling film could be readily dispersed by relatively weak incident shocks, so the peak heating in the recompression region was not

  13. Computation of hypersonic laminar viscous flow past spinning sharp and blunt cones at high angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, R.; Rakich, J. V.

    1978-01-01

    Computational results, obtained with a parabolic Navier-Stokes marching code, are presented for hypersonic viscous flow past spinning sharp and blunt cones at angle of attack. The code takes into account the asymmetries in the flow field resulting from spinning motion and computes the asymmetric shock shape, crossflow and streamwise shear, heat transfer, crossflow separation, and vortex structure. The Magnus force and moments are also computed. Comparisons are made with other theoretical analyses based on boundary-layer and boundary-region equations, and an anomaly is discovered in the displacement thickness contribution to the Magnus force when compared with boundary-layer results. In addition, a new criterion for defining crossflow separation behind spinning bodies is introduced which generalizes the Moore-Rott-Sears criterion for two-dimensional unsteady separation. A condition which characterizes the onset of separation in the flow field is defined.

  14. Aero-thermal analysis of lifting body configurations in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sachin; Mahulikar, Shripad P.

    2016-09-01

    The aero-thermal analysis of a hypersonic vehicle is of fundamental interest for designing its thermal protection system. The aero-thermal environment predictions over several critical regions of the hypothesized lifting body vehicle, including the stagnation region of the nose-cap, cylindrically swept leading edges, fuselage-upper, and fuselage-lower surfaces, are discussed. The drag (Λ=70°) and temperature (Λ=80°) minimized sweepback angles are considered in the configuration design of the two hypothesized lifting body shape hypersonic vehicles. The main aim of the present study is to analyze and compare the aero-thermal characteristics of these two lifting body configurations at same heat capacity. Accordingly, a Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation has been carried out at Mach number (M∞=7), H=35 km altitude with zero Angle of Attack. Finally, the material selection for thermal protection system based on these predictions and current methodology is described.

  15. Plasma parameters and electromagnetic forces induced by the magneto hydro dynamic interaction in a hypersonic argon flow experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofolini, Andrea; Neretti, Gabriele; Borghi, Carlo A.

    2012-08-01

    This work proposes an experimental analysis on the magneto hydro dynamic (MHD) interaction induced by a magnetic test body immersed into a hypersonic argon flow. The characteristic plasma parameters are measured. They are related to the voltages arising in the Hall direction and to the variation of the fluid dynamic properties induced by the interaction. The tests have been performed in a hypersonic wind tunnel at Mach 6 and Mach 15. The plasma parameters are measured in the stagnation region in front of the nozzle of the wind tunnel and in the free stream region at the nozzle exit. The test body has a conical shape with the cone axis in the gas flow direction and the cone vertex against the flow. It is placed at the nozzle exit and is equipped with three permanent magnets. In the configuration adopted, the Faraday current flows in a closed loop completely immersed into the plasma of the shock layer. The electric field and the pressure variation due to MHD interaction have been measured on the test body walls. Microwave adsorption measurements have been used for the determination of the electron number density and the electron collision frequency. Continuum recombination radiation and line radiation emissions have been detected. The electron temperature has been determined by means of the spectroscopic data by using different methods. The electron number density has been also determined by means of the Stark broadening of Hα and the Hβ lines. Optical imaging has been utilized to visualize the pattern of the electric current distribution in the shock layer around the test body. The experiments show a considerable effect of the electromagnetic forces produced by the MHD interaction acting on the plasma flow around the test body. A comparison of the experimental data with simulation results shows a good agreement.

  16. Plasma parameters and electromagnetic forces induced by the magneto hydro dynamic interaction in a hypersonic argon flow experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cristofolini, Andrea; Neretti, Gabriele; Borghi, Carlo A.

    2012-08-01

    This work proposes an experimental analysis on the magneto hydro dynamic (MHD) interaction induced by a magnetic test body immersed into a hypersonic argon flow. The characteristic plasma parameters are measured. They are related to the voltages arising in the Hall direction and to the variation of the fluid dynamic properties induced by the interaction. The tests have been performed in a hypersonic wind tunnel at Mach 6 and Mach 15. The plasma parameters are measured in the stagnation region in front of the nozzle of the wind tunnel and in the free stream region at the nozzle exit. The test body has a conical shape with the cone axis in the gas flow direction and the cone vertex against the flow. It is placed at the nozzle exit and is equipped with three permanent magnets. In the configuration adopted, the Faraday current flows in a closed loop completely immersed into the plasma of the shock layer. The electric field and the pressure variation due to MHD interaction have been measured on the test body walls. Microwave adsorption measurements have been used for the determination of the electron number density and the electron collision frequency. Continuum recombination radiation and line radiation emissions have been detected. The electron temperature has been determined by means of the spectroscopic data by using different methods. The electron number density has been also determined by means of the Stark broadening of H{sub {alpha}} and the H{sub {beta}} lines. Optical imaging has been utilized to visualize the pattern of the electric current distribution in the shock layer around the test body. The experiments show a considerable effect of the electromagnetic forces produced by the MHD interaction acting on the plasma flow around the test body. A comparison of the experimental data with simulation results shows a good agreement.

  17. Experimental studies of transpiration cooling with shock interaction in hypersonic flow, part B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the result of experimental studies conducted to examine the effects of the impingement of an oblique shock on the flowfield and surface characteristics of a transpiration-cooled wall in turbulent hypersonic flow. The principal objective of this work was to determine whether the interaction between the oblique shock and the low-momentum region of the transpiration-cooled boundary layer created a highly distorted flowfield and resulted in a significant reduction in the cooling effectiveness of the transpiration-cooled surface. As a part of this program, we also sought to determine the effectiveness of transpiration cooling with nitrogen and helium injectants for a wide range of blowing rates under constant-pressure conditions in the absence of shock interaction. This experimental program was conducted in the Calspan 48-Inch Shock Tunnel at nominal Mach numbers of 6 and 8, for a Reynolds number of 7.5 x 10(exp 6). For these test conditions, we obtained fully turbulent boundary layers upstream of the interaction regions over the transpiration-cooled segment of the flat plate. The experimental program was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, we examined the effects of mass-addition level and coolant properties on the cooling effectiveness of transpiration-cooled surfaces in the absence of shock interaction. In the second phase of the program, we examined the effects of oblique shock impingement on the flowfield and surface characteristics of a transpiration-cooled surface. The studies were conducted for a range of shock strengths with nitrogen and helium coolants to examine how the distribution of heat transfer and pressure and the characteristics of the flowfield in the interaction region varied with shock strength and the level of mass addition from the transpiration-cooled section of the model. The effects of the distribution of the blowing rate along the interaction regions were also examined for a range of blowing rates through the

  18. Simulation of the influence high-frequency (2 MHz) capacitive gas discharge and magnetic field on the plasma sheath near a surface in hypersonic gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, I. V.

    2012-08-01

    The plasma sheath near the surface of a hypersonic aircraft formed under associative ionization behind the shock front shields the transmission and reception of radio signals. Using two-dimensional kinetic particle-in-cell simulations, we consider the change in plasma-sheath parameters near a flat surface in a hypersonic flow under the action of electrical and magnetic fields. The combined action of a high-frequency 2-MHz capacitive discharge, a constant voltage, and a magnetic field on the plasma sheath allows the local electron density to be reduced manyfold.

  19. Simulation of the influence high-frequency (2 MHz) capacitive gas discharge and magnetic field on the plasma sheath near a surface in hypersonic gas flow

    SciTech Connect

    Schweigert, I. V.

    2012-08-15

    The plasma sheath near the surface of a hypersonic aircraft formed under associative ionization behind the shock front shields the transmission and reception of radio signals. Using two-dimensional kinetic particle-in-cell simulations, we consider the change in plasma-sheath parameters near a flat surface in a hypersonic flow under the action of electrical and magnetic fields. The combined action of a high-frequency 2-MHz capacitive discharge, a constant voltage, and a magnetic field on the plasma sheath allows the local electron density to be reduced manyfold.

  20. Experimental investigations on the magneto-hydro-dynamic interaction around a blunt body in a hypersonic unseeded air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofolini, Andrea; Borghi, Carlo A.; Neretti, Gabriele; Schettino, Antonio; Trifoni, Eduardo; Battista, Francesco; Passaro, Andrea; Baccarella, Damiano

    2012-11-01

    This paper deals with the experimental investigation on the MHD (magneto-hydro-dynamic or magneto-fluid-dynamic) interaction around a test body immersed into a hypersonic unseeded air flow. The experiments have been carried out in the CIRA plasma wind tunnel SCIROCCO. Two test conditions have been utilized for the experiments with a total pressure of 2.5 and 2.3 bar respectively, a total specific enthalpy of 16 and 12.1 MJ/kg respectively. The air flow was accelerated in the nozzle up to Mach 10. The magnetic induction field is generated by an electromagnet enclosed in the test body and reaches a 0.8 T maximum value in the interaction region.

  1. Transition at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, Mark V.

    1987-01-01

    Certain conjectures on the physics of instabilities in high-speed flows are discussed and the state of knowledge of hypersonic transition summarized. The case is made for an unpressured systematic research program in this area consisting of controlled microscopic experiments, theory, and numerical simulations.

  2. Hypersonic research at Stanford University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Candler, Graham; Maccormack, Robert

    1988-01-01

    The status of the hypersonic research program at Stanford University is discussed and recent results are highlighted. The main areas of interest in the program are the numerical simulation of radiating, reacting and thermally excited flows, the investigation and numerical solution of hypersonic shock wave physics, the extension of the continuum fluid dynamic equations to the transition regime between continuum and free-molecule flow, and the development of novel numerical algorithms for efficient particulate simulations of flowfields.

  3. A parametric study of effect of forebody shape on flow angularity at Mach 8. [for hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.; Marcum, D. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Flow angularity and static pressure measurements have been made on the lower surface of nine forebody models that simulate the bottom forward surface of a hypersonic aircraft. Measurements were made in an area of the forebody that represents the location of an inlet of a scramjet engine. A parametric variation of the forebody surface investigated the effect of: (1) spanwise curvature; (2) longitudinal curvature; and (3) planform shape on both flow angularity and static pressure distribution. Results of each of the three parametric variations of geometry were compared to those for the same flat delta forebody. Spanwise curvature results showed that a concave shape and the flat delta had the lowest flow angularity and lowest rate of increase in flow angularity with angle of attack. Longitudinal curvature results showed a convex surface to give the better flow at the higher angles of attack. The better of the two planform shapes tested was a convex elliptical shape. Limited flow field calculations were made at angles of attack using a three dimensional, method-of-characteristics program. In general, at all angles of attack there was agreement between data and theory.

  4. PLIF Temperature and Velocity Distributions in Laminar Hypersonic Flat-plate Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OByrne, S.; Danehy, P. M.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2003-01-01

    Rotational temperature and velocity distributions have been measured across a hypersonic laminar flat-plate boundary layer, using planar laser-induced fluorescence. The measurements are compared to a finite-volume computation and a first-order boundary layer computation, assuming local similarity. Both computations produced similar temperature distributions and nearly identical velocity distributions. The disagreement between calculations is ascribed to the similarity solution not accounting for leading-edge displacement effects. The velocity measurements agreed to within the measurement uncertainty of 2 % with both calculated distributions. The peak measured temperature was 200 K lower than the computed values. This discrepancy is tentatively ascribed to vibrational relaxation in the boundary layer.

  5. Flat plate at incidence as a waverider in rarefied hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, H. K.; Wong, E. Y.; Hoover, L. N.; Dogra, V. K.

    1990-01-01

    The physical validity of continuum models and their ability to predict the critical aerothermodynamic properties of a waverider at high altitudes are examined using a flat plate at angle of attack as a generic hypersonic lifting vehicle. For a shock layer far from local translational equilibrium, a theoretical study based on Grad's thirteen-moment equations shows that the Navier-Stokes based solutions can correctly predict the drag, lift, and surface heat transfer rate, with the prediction error comparable to that of the standard shock-layer theory. The conclusion is supported by a comparison with direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations.

  6. Variation character of stagnation point heat flux for hypersonic pointed bodies from continuum to rarefied flow states and its bridge function study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihui; Bao, Lin; Tong, Binggang

    2009-12-01

    This paper is a research on the variation character of stagnation point heat flux for hypersonic pointed bodies from continuum to rarefied flow states by using theoretical analysis and numerical simulation methods. The newly developed near space hypersonic cruise vehicles have sharp noses and wingtips, which desires exact and relatively simple methods to estimate the stagnation point heat flux. With the decrease of the curvature radius of the leading edge, the flow becomes rarefied gradually, and viscous interaction effects and rarefied gas effects come forth successively, which results in that the classical Fay-Riddell equation under continuum hypothesis will become invalid and the variation of stagnation point heat flux is characterized by a new trend. The heat flux approaches the free molecular flow limit instead of an infinite value when the curvature radius of the leading edge tends to 0. The physical mechanism behind this phenomenon remains in need of theoretical study. Firstly, due to the fact that the whole flow regime can be described by Boltzmann equation, the continuum and rarefied flow are analyzed under a uniform framework. A relationship is established between the molecular collision insufficiency in rarefied flow and the failure of Fourier’s heat conduction law along with the increasing significance of the nonlinear heat flux. Then based on an inspiration drew from Burnett approximation, control factors are grasped and a specific heat flux expression containing the nonlinear term is designed in the stagnation region of hypersonic leading edge. Together with flow pattern analysis, the ratio of nonlinear to linear heat flux W r is theoretically obtained as a parameter which reflects the influence of nonlinear factors, i.e. a criterion to classify the hypersonic rarefied flows. Ultimately, based on the characteristic parameter W r , a bridge function with physical background is constructed, which predicts comparative reasonable results in coincidence

  7. Heat-transfer distributions on biconics at incidence in hypersonic-hypervelocity He, N2, air, and CO2 flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Micol, J. R.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Wilder, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    Laminar heat-transfer rates were measured on spherically blunted, 13 degrees/F degrees on-axis and bent biconics (fore cone bent 7 degrees upward relative to aft cone) at hypersonic-hypervelocity flow conditions in the Langley Expansion Tube. Freestream velocities from 4.5 to 6.9 km/sec and Mach numbers from 6 to 9 were generated using helium, nitrogen, air, and carbon dioxide test gases, resulting in normal shock density ratios from 4 to 19. Angle of attack, referenced to the axis of the aft cone, was varied from zero to 20 degrees in 4 degree increments. The effect of nose bend, angle of attack, and real-gas phenomena on heating distributions are presented along with comparisons of measurement to prediction from a code which solves the three-dimensional 'parabolized Navier-Stokes' equations.

  8. Method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.; Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high-speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainties in the temperature and density measurements can be less than 2 percent, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  9. A method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Fletcher, Douglas G.; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations due to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high-speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature and density measurements can be less than 2 and 3 percent, respectively, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon-statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  10. A kinetic-theory approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    PubMed

    Gallis, Michael A; Bond, Ryan B; Torczynski, John R

    2009-09-28

    Recently proposed molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction-rate information) are investigated for chemical reactions occurring in upper-atmosphere hypersonic flows. The new models are in good agreement with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions and with both measured rates and other theoretical models for far-from-equilibrium conditions. Additionally, the new models are applied to representative combustion and ionization reactions and are in good agreement with available measurements and theoretical models. Thus, molecular-level chemistry modeling provides an accurate method for predicting equilibrium and nonequilibrium chemical-reaction rates in gases.

  11. Method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O(2) fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Laufer, G; McKenzie, R L; Fletcher, D G

    1990-11-20

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainties in the temperature and density measurements can be <2%, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  12. A thin-shock-layer solution for nonequilibrium, inviscid hypersonic flows in earth, Martian, and Venusian atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grose, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    An approximate inverse solution is presented for the nonequilibrium flow in the inviscid shock layer about a vehicle in hypersonic flight. The method is based upon a thin-shock-layer approximation and has the advantage of being applicable to both subsonic and supersonic regions of the shock layer. The relative simplicity of the method makes it ideally suited for programming on a digital computer with a significant reduction in storage capacity and computing time required by other more exact methods. Comparison of nonequilibrium solutions for an air mixture obtained by the present method is made with solutions obtained by two other methods. Additional cases are presented for entry of spherical nose cones into representative Venusian and Martian atmospheres. A digital computer program written in FORTRAN language is presented that permits an arbitrary gas mixture to be employed in the solution. The effects of vibration, dissociation, recombination, electronic excitation, and ionization are included in the program.

  13. Heat-transfer distributions on biconics at incidence in hypersonic-hypervelocity He, N2, air, and CO2 flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Micol, J. R.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Wilder, S. E.

    1983-01-01

    Laminar heat transfer rates were measured on spherically blunted, 13 deg/7 deg on axis and bent biconics (fore cone bent 7 deg upward relative to aft cone) at hypersonic hypervelocity flow conditions in the Langley Expansion Tube. Freestream velocities from 4.5 to 6.9 km/sec and Mach numbers from 6 to 9 were generated using helium, nitrogen, air, and carbon dioxide test gases, resulting in normal shock density ratios from 4 to 19. Angle of attack, referenced to the axis of the aft cone, was varied from 0 to 20 deg in 4 deg increments. The effect of nose bend, angle of attack, and real gas phenomena on heating distributions are presented along with comparisons of measurement to prediction from a code which solves the three dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes equations.

  14. A Compact Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer to Monitor CO2 at 2.7 μm Wavelength in Hypersonic Flows

    PubMed Central

    Vallon, Raphäel; Soutadé, Jacques; Vérant, Jean-Luc; Meyers, Jason; Paris, Sébastien; Mohamed, Ajmal

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Mars planet exploration, the characterization of carbon dioxide hypersonic flows to simulate a spaceship’s Mars atmosphere entry conditions has been an important issue. We have developed a Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer with a new room-temperature operating antimony-based distributed feedback laser (DFB) diode laser to characterize the velocity, the temperature and the density of such flows. This instrument has been tested during two measurement campaigns in a free piston tunnel cold hypersonic facility and in a high enthalpy arc jet wind tunnel. These tests also demonstrate the feasibility of mid-infrared fiber optics coupling of the spectrometer to a wind tunnel for integrated or local flow characterization with an optical probe placed in the flow. PMID:22219703

  15. A compact tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer to monitor CO2 at 2.7 μm wavelength in hypersonic flows.

    PubMed

    Vallon, Raphäel; Soutadé, Jacques; Vérant, Jean-Luc; Meyers, Jason; Paris, Sébastien; Mohamed, Ajmal

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Mars planet exploration, the characterization of carbon dioxide hypersonic flows to simulate a spaceship's Mars atmosphere entry conditions has been an important issue. We have developed a Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer with a new room-temperature operating antimony-based distributed feedback laser (DFB) diode laser to characterize the velocity, the temperature and the density of such flows. This instrument has been tested during two measurement campaigns in a free piston tunnel cold hypersonic facility and in a high enthalpy arc jet wind tunnel. These tests also demonstrate the feasibility of mid-infrared fiber optics coupling of the spectrometer to a wind tunnel for integrated or local flow characterization with an optical probe placed in the flow.

  16. A Hot Dynamic Seal Rig for Measuring Hypersonic Engine Seal Durability and Flow Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jeffrey H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.; Kren, Lawrence A.

    1993-01-01

    A test fixture for measuring the dynamic performance of candidate high-temperature engine seal concepts was installed at NASA Lewis Research Center. The test fixture was designed to evaluate seal concepts under development for advanced hypersonic engines, such as those being considered for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). The fixture can measure dynamic seal leakage performance from room temperature up to 840 C (1550 F) and air pressure differentials up to 690 kPa (100 psi). Performance of the seals can be measured while sealing against flat or distorted walls. In the fixture two seals are preloaded against the sides of a 30 cm (1 ft) long saber that slides transverse to the axis of the seals, simulating the scrubbing motion anticipated in these engines. The capabilities of this test fixture along with preliminary data showing the dependence of seal leakage performance on high temperature cycling are addressed.

  17. A comparative study of turbulence models in predicting hypersonic inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, Kamlesh

    1993-01-01

    A computational study has been conducted to evaluate the performance of various turbulence models. The NASA P8 inlet, which represents cruise condition of a typical hypersonic air-breathing vehicle, was selected as a test case for the study; the PARC2D code, which solves the full two dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, was used. Results are presented for a total of six versions of zero- and two-equation turbulence models. Zero-equation models tested are the Baldwin-Lomax model, the Thomas model, and a combination of the two. Two-equation models tested are low-Reynolds number models (the Chien model and the Speziale model) and a high-Reynolds number model (the Launder and Spalding model).

  18. Hot dynamic test rig for measuring hypersonic engine seal flow and durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jeffrey H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.; Kren, Lawrence A.

    1994-01-01

    A test fixture for measuring the dynamic performance of candidate high-temperature engine seal concepts was developed. The test fixture was developed to evaluate seal concepts under development for advanced hypersonic engines, such as those being considered for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). The fixture can measure dynamic seal leakage performance from room temperature up to 840 C and air pressure differentials of to 0.7 MPa. Performance of the seals can be measured while sealing against flat or engine-simulated distorted walls. In the fixture, two seals are preloaded against the sides of a 0.3 m long saber that slides transverse to the axis of the seals, simulating the scrubbing motion anticipated in these engines. The capabilities of this text fixture along with preliminary data showing the dependence of seal leakage performance on high temperature cycling are covered.

  19. Real-air data reduction procedures based on flow parameters measured in the test section of supersonic and hypersonic facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1972-01-01

    Data-reduction procedures for determining free stream and post-normal shock kinetic and thermodynamic quantities are derived. These procedures are applicable to imperfect real air flows in thermochemical equilibrium for temperatures to 15 000 K and a range of pressures from 0.25 N/sq m to 1 GN/sq m. Although derived primarily to meet the immediate needs of the 6-inch expansion tube, these procedures are applicable to any supersonic or hypersonic test facility where combinations of three of the following flow parameters are measured in the test section: (1) Stagnation pressure behind normal shock; (2) freestream static pressure; (3) stagnation point heat transfer rate; (4) free stream velocity; (5) stagnation density behind normal shock; and (6) free stream density. Limitations of the nine procedures and uncertainties in calculated flow quantities corresponding to uncertainties in measured input data are discussed. A listing of the computer program is presented, along with a description of the inputs required and a sample of the data printout.

  20. Development of a computer code for calculating the steady super/hypersonic inviscid flow around real configurations. Volume 2: Code description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marconi, F.; Yaeger, L.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed to compute the inviscid super/hypersonic flow field about complex vehicle geometries accurately and efficiently. A second-order accurate finite difference scheme is used to integrate the three-dimensional Euler equations in regions of continuous flow, while all shock waves are computed as discontinuities via the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. Conformal mappings are used to develop a computational grid. The effects of blunt nose entropy layers are computed in detail. Real gas effects for equilibrium air are included using curve fits of Mollier charts. Typical calculated results for shuttle orbiter, hypersonic transport, and supersonic aircraft configurations are included to demonstrate the usefulness of this tool.

  1. Aerothermodynamic heating due to shock wave/laminar boundary-layer interactions in high-enthalpy hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    The interaction between a swept shock wave and a laminar boundary layer was investigated experimentally in high-enthalpy hypersonic flow. The effect of high-temperature, real gas physics on the interaction was examined by conducting tests in air and helium. Heat transfer measurements were made on the surface of a flat plate and a shock-generating fin using thin-film resistance sensors for fin incidence angles of 0, 5, and 10 deg at Mach numbers of 6.9 in air and 7.2 in helium. The experiments were conducted in the NASA HYPULSE expansion tube, an impulse-type facility capable of generating high-enthalpy, high-velocity flow with freestream levels of dissociated species that are particularly low. The measurements indicate that the swept shock wave creates high local heat transfer levels in the interaction region, with the highest heating found in the strongest interaction. The maximum measured heating rates in the interaction are order of magnitude greater than laminar flat plate boundary layer heating levels at the same location.

  2. Fluorescence Imaging and Streamline Visualization of Hypersonic Flow over Rapid Prototype Wind-Tunnel Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Berger, Karen T.; Buck, Gregory M.; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Reentry models for use in hypersonic wind tunnel tests were fabricated using a stereolithography apparatus. These models were produced in one day or less, which is a significant time savings compared to the manufacture of ceramic or metal models. The models were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel. Only a few of the models survived repeated tests in the tunnel, and several failure modes of the models were identified. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of nitric oxide (NO) was used to visualize the flowfields in the wakes of these models. Pure NO was either seeded through tubes plumbed into the model or via a tube attached to the strut holding the model, which provided localized addition of NO into the model s wake through a porous metal cylinder attached to the end of the tube. Models included several 2- inch diameter Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) models and 5-inch diameter Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) models. Various model configurations and NO seeding methods were used, including a new streamwise visualization method based on PLIF. Virtual Diagnostics Interface (ViDI) technology, developed at NASA Langley Research Center, was used to visualize the data sets in post processing. The use of calibration "dotcards" was investigated to correct for camera perspective and lens distortions in the PLIF images.

  3. Nonlinear development and secondary instability of Gortler vortices in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Yibin B.; Hall, Philip

    1991-01-01

    In a hypersonic boundary layer over a wall of variable curvature, the region most susceptible to Goertler vortices is the temperature adjustment layer over which the basic state temperature decreases monotonically to its free stream value. Except for a special wall curvature distribution, the evolution of Goertler vortices trapped in the temperature adjustment layer will in general be strongly affected by the boundary layer growth through the O(M sup 3/2) curvature of the basic state, where M is the free stream Mach number. Only when the local wavenumber becomes as large as of order M sup 3/8, do nonparallel effects become negligible in the determination of stability properties. In the latter case, Goertler vortices will be trapped in a thin layer of O(epsilon sup 1/2) thickness which is embedded in the temperature adjustment layer; here epsilon is the inverse of the local wavenumber. A weakly nonlinear theory is presented in which the initial nonlinear development of Goertler vortices in the neighborhood of the neutral position is studied and two coupled evolution equations are derived. From these, it can be determined whether the vortices are decaying or growing depending on the sign of a constant which is related to wall curvature and the basic state temperature.

  4. Thermal And Chemical Non-Equilibrium Effects In The Wake Of A Boundary-Layer Sized Object In Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrer, Marcel; Stemmer, Christian; Adams, Nikolaus N.

    2011-05-01

    Investigations of hypersonic boundary-layer flows around a cubical obstacle with a height in the order of half the boundary layer thickness were carried out in this work. Special interest was laid on the influence of chemical non-equilibrium effects on the wake flow of the obstacle. Direct numerical simulations were conducted using three different gas models, a caloric perfect, an equilibrium and a chemical non-equilibrium gas model. The geometry was chosen as a wedge with a six degree half angle, according to the aborted NASA HyBoLT free flight experiment. At 0.5 m downstream of the leading edge, a surface trip was positioned. The free-stream flow was set to Mach 8.5 with air conditions taken from the 1976 standard atmosphere at an altitude of 42 km according to the predicted flight path. The simulations were done in three steps for all models. First, two-dimensional calculations of the whole configuration including the leading edge and the obstacle were conducted. These provide constant span-wise profiles for detailed, steady three-dimensional simulations around the close vicinity of the obstacle. A free-stream Mach number of about 6.3 occurs behind the shock. A cross-section in the wake of the object then delivers the steady inflow for detailed unsteady simulations of the wake. Perturbations at unstable frequencies, obtained from a bi-global secondary stability analysis, were added to these profiles. The solutions are time-Fourier transformed to investigate the unsteady downstream development of the different modes due to the interaction with the base-flow containing two counter-rotating vortices. Results will be presented that show the influence of the presence of chemical non-equilibrium on the instability in the wake of the object leading to a laminar or a turbulent wake.

  5. Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence applied to low-pressure hypersonic flow fields for the imaging of mixture fraction.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Tobias; Mungal, M Godfrey; Hanson, Ronald K

    2003-11-20

    The scalar-field imaging of a hypersonic mixing flow is performed in a mixing facility that is shock tunnel driven. The instantaneous mixture-fraction field of a hypersonic two-dimensional mixing layer (M1 = 5.1, M2 = 0.3) is determined with a temperature-insensitive planar laser-induced fluorescence technique with nitric oxide (NO) as the tracer species. Single-shot images are obtained with the broadband excitation of a reduced temperature-sensitivity transition in the A2 sigma+ <-- X2 II(1/2) (0, 0) band of NO near 226 nm. The instantaneous mixture-fraction field at a convective Mach number of 2.64 is shown to be nearly identical to a typical diffusive process, supporting the notion of gradient-transport mixing models for highly compressible mixing layers.

  6. Predictive and reinforcement learning for magneto-hydrodynamic control of hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Nilesh Vijay

    Increasing needs for autonomy in future aerospace systems and immense progress in computing technology have motivated the development of on-line adaptive control techniques to account for modeling errors, changes in system dynamics, and faults occurring during system operation. After extensive treatment of the inner-loop adaptive control dealing mainly with stable adaptation towards desired transient behavior, adaptive optimal control has started receiving attention in literature. Motivated by the problem of optimal control of the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) generator at the inlet of the scramjet engine of a hypersonic flight vehicle, this thesis treats the general problem of efficiently combining off-line and on-line optimal control methods. The predictive control approach is chosen as the off-line method for designing optimal controllers using all the existing system knowledge. This controller is then adapted on-line using policy-iteration-based Q-learning, which is a stable model-free reinforcement learning approach. The combined approach is first illustrated in the optimal control of linear systems, which helps in the analysis as well as the validation of the method. A novel neural-networks-based parametric predictive control approach is then designed for the off-line optimal control of non-linear systems. The off-line approach is illustrated by applications to aircraft and spacecraft systems. This is followed by an extensive treatment of the off-line optimal control of the MHD generator using this neuro-control approach. On-line adaptation of the controller is implemented using several novel schemes derived from the policy-iteration-based Q-learning. The implementation results demonstrate the success of these on-line algorithms for adapting towards modeling errors in the off-line design.

  7. Fluorescence Visualization of Hypersonic Flow over Rapid Prototype Wind-Tunnel Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alderfer, D. W.; Danehy, P. M.; Inma, J. A.; Berger, K. T.; Buck, G. M.; Schwartz, R J.

    2007-01-01

    Reentry models for use in hypersonic wind tunnel tests were fabricated using a stereolithography apparatus. These models were produced in one day or less, which is a significant time savings compared to the manufacture of ceramic or metal models. The models were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel. Most of the models did not survive repeated tests in the tunnel, and several failure modes of the models were identified. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of nitric oxide (NO) was used to visualize the flowfields in the wakes of these models. Pure NO was either seeded through tubes plumbed into the model or via a tube attached to the strut holding the model, which provided localized addition of NO into the model s wake through a porous metal cylinder attached to the end of the tube. Models included several 2-inch diameter Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) models and 5-inch diameter Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) models. Various configurations were studied including different sting placements relative to the models, different model orientations and attachment angles, and different NO seeding methods. The angle of attack of the models was also varied and the location of the laser sheet was scanned to provide three-dimensional flowfield information. Virtual Diagnostics Interface technology, developed at NASA Langley, was used to visualize the data sets in post processing. The use of calibration "dotcards" was investigated to correct for camera perspective and lens distortions in the PLIF images. Lessons learned and recommendations for future experiments are discussed.

  8. An approximate viscous shock layer technique for calculating chemically reacting hypersonic flows about blunt-nosed bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. Mcneil; Dejarnette, Fred R.

    1991-01-01

    An approximate axisymmetric method was developed which can reliably calculate fully viscous hypersonic flows over blunt nosed bodies. By substituting Maslen's second order pressure expression for the normal momentum equation, a simplified form of the viscous shock layer (VSL) equations is obtained. This approach can solve both the subsonic and supersonic regions of the shock layer without a starting solution for the shock shape. The approach is applicable to perfect gas, equilibrium, and nonequilibrium flowfields. Since the method is fully viscous, the problems associated with a boundary layer solution with an inviscid layer solution are avoided. This procedure is significantly faster than the parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) or VSL solvers and would be useful in a preliminary design environment. Problems associated with a previously developed approximate VSL technique are addressed before extending the method to nonequilibrium calculations. Perfect gas (laminar and turbulent), equilibrium, and nonequilibrium solutions were generated for airflows over several analytic body shapes. Surface heat transfer, skin friction, and pressure predictions are comparable to VSL results. In addition, computed heating rates are in good agreement with experimental data. The present technique generates its own shock shape as part of its solution, and therefore could be used to provide more accurate initial shock shapes for higher order procedures which require starting solutions.

  9. Algebraic iterative algorithm for deflection tomography and its application to density flow fields in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Zhang, Bin; He, Anzhi

    2006-11-01

    A novel algebraic iterative algorithm based on deflection tomography is presented. This algorithm is derived from the essentials of deflection tomography with a linear expansion of the local basis functions. By use of this algorithm the tomographic problem is finally reduced to the solution of a set of linear equations. The algorithm is demonstrated by mapping a three-peak Gaussian simulative temperature field. Compared with reconstruction results obtained by other traditional deflection algorithms, its reconstruction results provide a significant improvement in reconstruction accuracy, especially in cases with noisy data added. In the density diagnosis of a hypersonic wind tunnel, this algorithm is adopted to reconstruct density distributions of an axial symmetry flow field. One cross section of the reconstruction results is selected to be compared with the inverse Abel transform algorithm. Results show that the novel algorithm can achieve an accuracy equivalent to the inverse Abel transform algorithm. However, the novel algorithm is more versatile because it is applicable to arbitrary kinds of distribution.

  10. Drag and heat reduction mechanism induced by a combinational novel cavity and counterflowing jet concept in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xi-wan; Guo, Zhen-yun; Huang, Wei; Li, Shi-bin; Yan, Li

    2016-09-01

    The drag and heat reduction problem of hypersonic reentry vehicles has always attracted the attention worldwide, and many novel schemes have been proposed recently. In the current study, the research progress of the combinational configuration of the forward-facing cavity and the counterflowing jet has been reviewed, and the conventional cavity configuration has been substituted by an approximate maximum thrust nozzle contour for better heat and surface pressure reduction efficiency. The Reynolds-average of Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations coupled with the SST k-ω turbulence model have been employed to calculate its surrounding flow fields. A validation metric and the grid convergence index (GCI) have been employed to conduct the turbulence model assessment and the grid independence analysis respectively. The axisymmetric assumption has been verified by three-dimensional computational results as well. The obtained results show that the SST k-ω model is more suitable for the novel drag and heat flux reduction scheme proposed in this article, and the axisymmetric assumption is approximately reasonable. After investigating the influence of jet pressure ratio, the novel combinational configuration has been verified to be more effective in heat and surface pressure reduction, and this is because the approximate maximum thrust nozzle contour contributes to better expansion and avoids total pressure loss of the jet.

  11. Numerical solution of the hypersonic viscous-shock-layer equations for laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows of a perfect gas over blunt axially symmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Moss, J. N.

    1975-01-01

    The viscous shock layer equations applicable to hypersonic laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows of a perfect gas over two-dimensional plane or axially symmetric blunt bodies are presented. The equations are solved by means of an implicit finite difference scheme, and the results are compared with a turbulent boundary layer analysis. The agreement between the two solution procedures is satisfactory for the region of flow where streamline swallowing effects are negligible. For the downstream regions, where streamline swallowing effects are present, the expected differences in the two solution procedures are evident.

  12. Experimental And Numerical Study Of CMC Leading Edges In Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Markus; Esser, Burkard; Gulhan, Ali; Dalenbring, Mats; Cavagna, Luca

    2011-05-01

    Future transportation concepts aim at high supersonic or hypersonic speeds, where the formerly sharp boundaries between aeronautic and aerospace applications become blurred. One of the major issues involved to high speed flight are extremely high aerothermal loads, which especially appear at the leading edges of the plane’s wings and at sharp edged air intake components of the propulsion system. As classical materials like metals or simple ceramics would thermally and structurally fail here, new materials have to be applied. In this context, lightweight ceramic matrix composites (CMC) seem to be prospective candidates as they are high-temperature resistant and offer low thermal expansion along with high specific strength at elevated temperature levels. A generic leading edge model with a ceramic wing assembly with a sweep back angle of 53° was designed, which allowed for easy leading edge sample integration of different CMC materials. The samples consisted of the materials C/C-SiC (non-oxide), OXIPOL and WHIPOX (both oxide) with a nose radius of 2 mm. In addition, a sharp edged C/C-SiC sample was prepared to investigate the nose radius influence. Overall, 13 thermocouples were installed inside the entire model to measure the temperature evolution at specific locations, whereby 5 thermocouples were placed inside the leading edge sample itself. In addition, non-intrusive techniques were applied for surface temperature measurements: An infrared camera was used to measure the surface temperature distribution and at specific spots, the surface temperature was also measured by pyrometers. Following, the model was investigated in DLR’s arc-heated facility L3K at a total enthalpy of 8.5 MJ/kg, Mach number of 7.8, different angles of attack and varying wing inclination angles. These experiments provide a sound basis for the simulation of aerothermally loaded CMC leading edge structures. Such fluid-structure coupled approaches have been performed by FOI, basing on a

  13. On the Goertler instability in hypersonic flows: Sutherland law fluids and real gas effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Yibin B.; Hall, Philip; Blackaby, Nicholas D.

    1990-01-01

    The Goertler vortex instability mechanism in a hypersonic boundary layer on a curved wall is investigated. The precise roles of the effects of boundary layer growth, wall cooling, and gas dissociation is clarified in the determination of stability properties. It is first assumed that the fluid is an ideal gas with viscosity given by Sutherland's law. It is shown that when the free stream Mach number M is large, the boundary layer divides into two sublayers: a wall layer of O(M sup 3/2) thickness over which the basic state temperature is O(M squared) and a temperature adjustment layer of O(1) thickness over which the basic state temperature decreases monotonically to its free stream value. Goertler vortices which have wavelengths comparable with the boundary layer thickness are referred to as wall modes. It is shown that their downstream evolution is governed by a set of parabolic partial differential equations and that they have the usual features of Goertler vortices in incompressible boundary layers. As the local wavenumber increases, the neutral Goertler number decreases and the center of vortex activity moves towards the temperature adjustment layer. Goertler vortices with wavenumbers of order one or larger must necessarily be trapped in the temperature adjustment layer and it is this mode which is most dangerous. For this mode, it was found that the leading order term in the Goertler number expansion is independent of the wavenumber and is due to the curvature of the basic state. This term is also the asymptotic limit of the neutral Goertler numbers of the wall mode. To determine the higher order corrections terms in the Goertler number expansion, two wall curvature cases are distinguished. Real gas effects were investigated by assuming that the fluid is an ideal dissociating gas. It was found that both gas dissociation and wall cooling are destabilizing for the mode trapped in the temperature adjustment layer, but for the wall mode trapped near the wall the

  14. Heat transfer measurements on biconics at incidence in hypersonic high enthalpy air and nitrogen flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gai, S. L.; Cain, T.; Joe, W. S.; Sandeman, R. J.; Miller, C. G.

    1988-01-01

    Heat transfer rate measurements have been obtained at 0, 5, 15, and 21 deg angles-of-attack for a straight biconic scale model of an aeroassisted orbital vehicle proposed for planetary probe missions. Heat-transfer distributions were measured using palladium thin-film resistance gauges deposited on a glass-ceramic substrate. The windward heat transfer correlations were based on equilibrium flow in the shock layer of the model, although the flow may depart from equilibrium in the flow-field.

  15. Laser-spectroscopic measurement techniques for hypersonic, turbulent wind tunnel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.; Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of the nature, present status, and capabilities of two laser spectroscopic methods for the simultaneous measurement of temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence in high speed wind tunnel flows. One method is based on the two frequency excitation of nitric oxide seeded into a nitrogen flow, using tunable dye lasers. The second, more recent method relies on the excitation of oxygen in air flows using a tunable, ArF excimer laser. Signal are obtained from both the laser induced fluorescence and from Raman scattering of the same laser pulse. Measurements are demonstrated in the turbulent boundary layer of a Mach-2 channel flow.

  16. Issues and approach to develop validated analysis tools for hypersonic flows: One perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.

    1992-01-01

    Critical issues concerning the modeling of low-density hypervelocity flows where thermochemical nonequilibrium effects are pronounced are discussed. Emphasis is on the development of validated analysis tools. A description of the activity in the Ames Research Center's Aerothermodynamics Branch is also given. Inherent in the process is a strong synergism between ground test and real-gas computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Approaches to develop and/or enhance phenomenological models and incorporate them into computational flow-field simulation codes are discussed. These models have been partially validated with experimental data for flows where the gas temperature is raised (compressive flows). Expanding flows, where temperatures drop, however, exhibit somewhat different behavior. Experimental data for these expanding flow conditions are sparse; reliance must be made on intuition and guidance from computational chemistry to model transport processes under these conditions. Ground-based experimental studies used to provide necessary data for model development and validation are described. Included are the performance characteristics of high-enthalpy flow facilities, such as shock tubes and ballistic ranges.

  17. A comparison of measured and predicted sphere shock shapes in hypersonic flows with density ratios from 4 to 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1975-01-01

    Measured shock shapes are presented for sphere and hemisphere models in helium, air, CF4, C2F6, and CO2 test gases, corresponding to normal-shock density ratios (primary factor governing shock detachment distance of blunt bodies at hypersonic speeds) from 4 to 19. These shock shapes were obtained in three facilities capable of generating the high density ratios experienced during planetary entry at hypersonic conditions; namely, the 6-inch expansion tube, with hypersonic CF4 tunnel, and pilot CF4 Mach 6 tunnel (with CF4 replaced by C2F6). Measured results are compared with several inviscid perfect-gas shock shape predictions, in which an effective ratio of specific heats is used as input, and with real-gas predictions which include effects of a laminar viscous layer and thermochemical nonequilibrium.

  18. Experimental investigation of the magnetohydrodynamic parachute effect in a hypersonic air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomichev, V. P.; Yadrenkin, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    New data on experimental implementation of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) parachute configuration in an air flow with Mach number M = 6 about a flat plate are considered. It is shown that MHD interaction near a flat plate may transform an attached oblique shock wave into a normal detached one, which considerably extends the area of body-incoming flow interaction. This effect can be employed in optimizing return space vehicle deceleration conditions in the upper atmosphere.

  19. A vectorized code for calculating laminar and turbulent hypersonic flows about blunt axisymmetric bodies at zero and small angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A user's guide is provided for a computer code which calculates the laminar and turbulent hypersonic flows about blunt axisymmetric bodies, such as spherically blunted cones, hyperboloids, etc., at zero and small angles of attack. The code is written in STAR FORTRAN language for the CDC-STAR-100 computer. Time-dependent, viscous-shock-layer-type equations are used to describe the flow field. These equations are solved by an explicit, two-step, time asymptotic, finite-difference method. For the turbulent flow, a two-layer, eddy-viscosity model is used. The code provides complete flow-field properties including shock location, surface pressure distribution, surface heating rates, and skin-friction coefficients. This report contains descriptions of the input and output, the listing of the program, and a sample flow-field solution.

  20. Issues and approach to develop validated analysis tools for hypersonic flows: One perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.

    1993-01-01

    Critical issues concerning the modeling of low density hypervelocity flows where thermochemical nonequilibrium effects are pronounced are discussed. Emphasis is on the development of validated analysis tools, and the activity in the NASA Ames Research Center's Aerothermodynamics Branch is described. Inherent in the process is a strong synergism between ground test and real gas computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Approaches to develop and/or enhance phenomenological models and incorporate them into computational flowfield simulation codes are discussed. These models were partially validated with experimental data for flows where the gas temperature is raised (compressive flows). Expanding flows, where temperatures drop, however, exhibit somewhat different behavior. Experimental data for these expanding flow conditions is sparse and reliance must be made on intuition and guidance from computational chemistry to model transport processes under these conditions. Ground based experimental studies used to provide necessary data for model development and validation are described. Included are the performance characteristics of high enthalpy flow facilities, such as shock tubes and ballistic ranges.

  1. Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interactions in Hypersonic Low Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Olejniczak, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Results of numerical simulations of Mach 10 air flow over a hollow cylinder-flare and a double-cone are presented where viscous effects are significant. The flow phenomena include shock-shock and shock- boundary-layer interactions with accompanying flow separation, recirculation, and reattachment. The purpose of this study is to promote an understanding of the fundamental gas dynamics resulting from such complex interactions and to clarify the requirements for meaningful simulations of such flows when using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Particular emphasis is placed on the sensitivity of computed results to grid resolution. Comparisons of the DSMC results for the hollow cylinder-flare (30 deg.) configuration are made with the results of experimental measurements conducted in the ONERA RSCh wind tunnel for heating, pressure, and the extent of separation. Agreement between computations and measurements for various quantities is good except that for pressure. For the same flow conditions, the double- cone geometry (25 deg.- 65 deg.) produces much stronger interactions, and these interactions are investigated numerically using both DSMC and Navier-Stokes codes. For the double-cone computations, a two orders of magnitude variation in free-stream density (with Reynolds numbers from 247 to 24,7 19) is investigated using both computational methods. For this range of flow conditions, the computational results are in qualitative agreement for the extent of separation with the DSMC method always predicting a smaller separation region. Results from the Navier-Stokes calculations suggest that the flow for the highest density double-cone case may be unsteady; however, the DSMC solution does not show evidence of unsteadiness.

  2. Influence of leading edge bluntness on hypersonic flow in a generic internal-compression inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovoy, V.; Egorov, I.; Mosharov, V.; Radchenko, V.; Skuratov, A.; Struminskaya, I.

    2015-06-01

    Flow and heat transfer inside a generic inlet are investigated experimentally. The cross section of the inlet is rectangular. The inlet is installed on a flat plat at a significant distance from the leading edge. The experiments are performed in TsAGI wind tunnel UT-1M working in the Ludwieg tube mode at Mach number M∞ = 5 and Reynolds numbers (based on the plate length L = 320 mm) Re∞L = 23 · 106 and 13 · 106. Steady flow duration is 40 ms. Optical panoramic methods are used for investigation of flow outside and inside the inlet as well. For this purpose, the cowl and one of two compressing wedges are made of a transparent material. Heat flux distribution is measured by thin luminescent Temperature Sensitive Paint (TSP). Surface flow and shear stress visualization is performed by viscous oil containing luminophor particles. The investigation shows that at high contraction ratio of the inlet, an increase of plate or cowl bluntness to some critical value leads to sudden change of the flow structure.

  3. Analytical comparison of hypersonic flight and wind tunnel viscous/inviscid flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fivel, H. J.; Masek, R. V.; Mockapetris, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    Flow fields were computed about blunted, 0.524 and 0.698 radians, cone configurations to assess the effects of nonequilibrium chemistry on the flow field geometry, boundary layer edge conditions, boundary layer profiles, and heat transfer and skin friction. Analyses were conducted at typical space shuttle entry conditions for both laminar and turbulent boundary layer flow. In these calculations, a wall temperature of 1365 K (2000 F) was assumed. The viscous computer program used in this investigation was a modification of the Blottner non-similar viscous code which incorporated a turbulent eddy viscosity model after Cebeci. The results were compared with equivalent calculations for similar (scaled) configurations at typical wind tunnel conditions. Wind tunnel test gases included air, nitrogen, CF4 and helium. The viscous computer program used for wind tunnel conditions was the Cebeci turbulent non-similar computer code.

  4. Experimental Investigation of a Hypersonic Inlet with Variable Sidewall for Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolim, T. C.; Lu, F. K.

    The main function of a scramjet inlet is to decelerate and compress the air for subsequent reaction with the fuel inside the combustor and, of course, contribute toward meeting the thrust requirement for the entire mission by providing adequate mass flow. It is desirable that the inlet be lightweight and that its geometry be capable of producing a uniform flow in an appropriate state to permit efficient mixing and subsequent combustion. Engine cycle analysis indicates that high contraction ratios CR are desirable for achieving high overall engine efficiency.

  5. Shock-wave flow regimes at entry into the diffuser of a hypersonic ramjet engine: Influence of physical properties of the gas medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnavskii, G. A.

    2006-07-01

    The physical aspects of the effective-adiabatic-exponent model making it possible to decompose the total problem on modeling of high-velocity gas flows into individual subproblems (“physicochemical processes” and “ aeromechanics”), which ensures the creation of a universal and efficient computer complex divided into a number of independent units, have been analyzed. Shock-wave structures appearing at entry into the duct of a hypersonic aircraft have been investigated based on this methodology, and the influence of the physical properties of the gas medium in a wide range of variations of the effective adiabatic exponent has been studied.

  6. Flow establishment behind blunt bodies at hypersonic speeds in a shock tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G.; Hruschka, R.; Gai, S. L.; Neely, A. J.

    2008-11-01

    An investigation of flow establishment behind two blunt bodies, a circular cylinder and a 45° half-angle blunted-cone was conducted. Unlike previous studies which relied solely on surface measurements, the present study combines these with unique high-speed visualisation to image the establishment of the flow structure in the base region. Test flows were generated using a free-piston shock tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 10. The freestream unit Reynolds numbers considered were 3.02x105/m and 1.17x106/m at total enthalpies of 13.35MJ/kg and 3.94MJ/kg, respectively. In general, the experiments showed that it takes longer to establish steady heat flux than pressure. The circular cylinder data showed that the near wake had a slight Reynolds number effect, where the size of the near wake was smaller for the high enthalpy flow condition. The blunted-cone data showed that the heat flux and pressures reached steady states in the near wake at similar times for both high and low enthalpy conditions.

  7. Second-order small-disturbance solutions for hypersonic flow over power-law bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Similarity solutions were found which give the adiabatic flow of an ideal gas about two-dimensional and axisymmetric power-law bodies at infinite Mach number to second order in the body slenderness parameter. The flow variables were expressed as a sum of zero-order and perturbation similarity functions for which the axial variations in the flow equations separated out. The resulting similarity equations were integrated numerically. The solutions, which are universal functions, are presented in graphic and tabular form. To avoid a singularity in the calculations, the results are limited to body power-law exponents greater than about 0.85 for the two-dimensional case and 0.75 for the axisymmetric case. Because of the entropy layer induced by the nose bluntness (for power-law bodies other than cones and wedges), only the pressure function is valid at the body surface. The similarity results give excellent agreement with the exact solutions for inviscid flow over wedges and cones having half-angles up to about 20 deg. They give good agreement with experimental shock-wave shapes and surface-pressure distributions for 3/4-power axisymmetric bodies, considering that Mach number and boundary-layer displacement effects are not included in the theory.

  8. Assessment of One- and Two-Equation Turbulence Models for Hypersonic Transitional Flows

    SciTech Connect

    ROY,CHRISTOPHER J.; BLOTTNER,FREDERICK G.

    2000-01-14

    Many Navier-Stokes codes require that the governing equations be written in conservation form with a source term. The Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model was originally developed in substantial derivative form and when rewritten in conservation form, a density gradient term appears in the source term. This density gradient term causes numerical problems and has a small influence on the numerical predictions. Further work has been performed to understand and to justify the neglect of this term. The transition trip term has been included in the one-equation eddy viscosity model of Spalart-Allmaras. Several problems with this model have been discovered when applied to high-speed flows. For the Mach 8 flat plate boundary layer flow with the standard transition method, the Baldwin-Barth and both k-{omega} models gave transition at the specified location. The Spalart-Allmaras and low Reynolds number k-{var_epsilon} models required an increase in the freestream turbulence levels in order to give transition at the desired location. All models predicted the correct skin friction levels in both the laminar and turbulent flow regions. For Mach 8 flat plate case, the transition location could not be controlled with the trip terms as given in the Spalart-Allmaras model. Several other approaches have been investigated to allow the specification of the transition location. The approach that appears most appropriate is to vary the coefficient that multiplies the turbulent production term in the governing partial differential equation for the eddy viscosity (Method 2). When this coefficient is zero, the flow remains laminar. The coefficient is increased to its normal value over a specified distance to crudely model the transition region and obtain fully turbulent flow. While this approach provides a reasonable interim solution, a separate effort should be initiated to address the proper transition procedure associated with the turbulent production term. Also, the transition process

  9. A multi-temperature TVD algorithm for relaxing hypersonic flows. [Total Variation Diminishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Menees, Gene P.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, the extension of a multispecies TVD algorithm, second-order accurate for real-gas flows to a multitemperature formulation is described. The convection algorithm is coupled to internal relaxation processes, and the features of the coupling are examined. The first version consists of a three-temperature model, where translational-rotational, vibrational, and electronic energy modes are separately convected. Although several species are present, there is only one vibrational temperature in this model. The second version generalizes to a vibrational temperature for each molecular specie, with additional couplings between species. The algorithms are applied to a generic two-dimensional flow field, and results are compared with experimental observations.

  10. Inferring temperature uniformity from gas composition measurements in a hydrogen combustion-heated hypersonic flow stream

    SciTech Connect

    Olstad, S.J.

    1995-08-01

    The application of a method for determining the temperature of an oxygen-replenished air stream heated to 2600 K by a hydrogen burner is reviewed and discussed. The purpose of the measurements is to determine the spatial uniformity of the temperature in the core flow of a ramjet test facility. The technique involves sampling the product gases at the exit of the test section nozzle to infer the makeup of the reactant gases entering the burner. Knowing also the temperature of the inlet gases and assuming the flow is at chemical equilibrium, the adiabatic flame temperature is determined using an industry accepted chemical equilibrium computer code. Local temperature depressions are estimated from heat loss calculations. A description of the method, hardware and procedures is presented, along with local heat loss estimates and uncertainty assessments. The uncertainty of the method is estimated at {+-}31 K, and the spatial uniformity was measured within {+-}35 K.

  11. Numerical Investigation of PLIF Gas Seeding for Hypersonic Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johanson, Craig T.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of gas-seeding strategies required for planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in a Mach 10 air flow were performed. The work was performed to understand and quantify adverse effects associated with gas seeding and to compare different flow rates and different types of seed gas. The gas was injected through a slot near the leading edge of a flat plate wedge model used in NASA Langley Research Center's 31- Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel facility. Nitric oxide, krypton, and iodine gases were simulated at various injection rates. Simulation results showing the deflection of the velocity field for each of the cases are presented. Streamwise distributions of velocity and concentration boundary layer thicknesses as well as vertical distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass distributions are presented for each of the cases. Relative merits of the different seeding strategies are discussed.

  12. Apparatus and method for generating large mass flow of high temperature air at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabol, A. P.; Stewart, R. B. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    High temperature, high mass air flow and a high Reynolds number test air flow in the Mach number 8-10 regime of adequate test flow duration is attained by pressurizing a ceramic-lined storage tank with air to a pressure of about 100 to 200 atmospheres. The air is heated to temperatures of 7,000 to 8,000 R prior to introduction into the tank by passing the air over an electric arc heater means. The air cools to 5,500 to 6,000 R while in the tank. A decomposable gas such as nitrous oxide or a combustible gas such as propane is injected into the tank after pressurization and the heated pressurized air in the tank is rapidly released through a Mach number 8-10 nozzle. The injected gas medium upon contact with the heated pressurized air effects an exothermic reaction which maintains the pressure and temperature of the pressurized air during the rapid release.

  13. Plume effects on the flow around a blunted cone at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atcliffe, P.; Kumar, D.; Stollery, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    Tests at M = 8.2 show that a simulated rocket plume at the base of a blunted cone can cause large areas of separated flow, with dramatic effects on the heat transfer rate distribution. The plume was simulated by solid discs of varying sizes or by an annular jet of gas. Flow over the cone without a plume is fully laminar and attached. Using a large disc, the boundary layer is laminar at separation at the test Reynolds number. Transition occurs along the separated shear layer and the boundary layer quickly becomes turbulent. The reduction in heat transfer associated with a laminar separated region is followed by rising values as transition occurs and the heat transfer rates towards the rear of the cone substantially exceed the values obtained without a plume. With the annular jet or a small disc, separation occurs much further aft, so that heat transfer rates at the front of the cone are comparable with those found without a plume. Downstream of separation the shear layer now remains laminar and the heat transfer rates to the surface are significantly lower than the attached flow values.

  14. Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model for internal energy excitation and dissociation in hypersonic flows.

    PubMed

    Munafò, A; Panesi, M; Magin, T E

    2014-02-01

    A Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model is proposed to reduce a detailed kinetic mechanism database developed at NASA Ames Research Center for internal energy transfer and dissociation in N(2)-N interactions. The coarse-grained model is constructed by lumping the rovibrational energy levels of the N(2) molecule into energy bins. The population of the levels within each bin is assumed to follow a Boltzmann distribution at the local translational temperature. Excitation and dissociation rate coefficients for the energy bins are obtained by averaging the elementary rate coefficients. The energy bins are treated as separate species, thus allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. The proposed coarse-grained model is applied to the study of nonequilibrium flows behind normal shock waves and within converging-diverging nozzles. In both cases, the flow is assumed inviscid and steady. Computational results are compared with those obtained by direct solution of the master equation for the rovibrational collisional model and a more conventional multitemperature model. It is found that the proposed coarse-grained model is able to accurately resolve the nonequilibrium dynamics of internal energy excitation and dissociation-recombination processes with only 20 energy bins. Furthermore, the proposed coarse-grained model provides a superior description of the nonequilibrium phenomena occurring in shock heated and nozzle flows when compared with the conventional multitemperature models.

  15. Dual-Code Solution Strategy for Chemically-Reacting Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Eberhardt, Scott

    1995-01-01

    A new procedure seeks to combine the thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver LAURA with the parabolized Navier-Stokes solver UPS for the aerothermodynamic solution of chemically-reacting air flow fields. The interface protocol is presented and the method is applied to two slender, blunted shapes. Both axisymmetric and three-dimensional solutions are included with surface pressure and heat transfer comparisons between the present method and previously published results. The case of Mach 25 flow over an axisymmetric six degree sphere-cone with a non-catalytic wall is considered to 100 nose radii. A stability bound on the marching step size was observed with this case and is attributed to chemistry effects resulting from the non-catalytic wall boundary condition. A second case with Mach 28 flow over a sphere-cone-cylinder-flare configuration is computed at both two and five degree angles of attack with a fully-catalytic wall. Surface pressures are seen to be within five percent with the present method compared to the baseline LAURA solution and heat transfers are within 10 percent. The effect of grid resolution is investigated in both the radial and streamwise directions. The procedure demonstrates significant, order of magnitude reductions in solution time and required memory for the three-dimensional case in comparison to an all thin-layer Navier-Stokes solution.

  16. Influence of the velocity gradient on the stagnation point heating in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, H.

    1995-12-01

    In a number of experimental and numerical publications a deviation has been found between the measured or computed stagnation point heat flux and that given by the theory of Fay and Riddell. Since the formula of Fay and Riddell is used in many applications to yield a reference heat flux for experiments performed in wind tunnels, for flight testing and numerical simulations, it is important that this reference heat flux is as accurate as possible. There are some shortcomings in experiments and numerical simulations which are responsible in some part for the deviations observed. But, as will be shown in the present paper, there is also a shortcoming on the theoretical side which plays a major role in the deviation between the theoretical and experimental/numerical stagnation point heat fluxes. This is caused by the method used so far to determine the tangential velocity gradient at the stagnation point. This value is important for the stagnation point heat flux, which so far has been determined by a simple Newtonian flow model. In the present paper a new expression for the tangential velocity gradient is derived, which is based on a more realistic flow model. An integral method is used to solve the conservation equations and, for the stagnation point, yields an explicit solution of the tangential velocity gradient. The solution achieved is also valid for high temperature flows with real gas effects. A comparison of numerical and experimental results shows good agreement with the stagnation point heat flux according to the theory of Fay and Riddell, if the tangential velocity gradient is determined by the new theory presented in this paper.

  17. Aeroelastic analysis of hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; McNamara, J. J.; Thuruthimattam, B. J.; Nydick, I.

    2004-06-01

    This paper presents a fundamental study of the aeroelastic behavior of hypersonic vehicles. Two separate configurations are examined. First, a typical cross-section analysis of a double-wedge airfoil in hypersonic flow is performed using three different types of unsteady airloads: piston theory and complete Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions based on computational fluid dynamics. The analysis of the double-wedge airfoil is used to justify the usage of the simple aerodynamics for a reusable launch vehicle (RLV). Subsequently, the aeroelastic problem for a complete vehicle that resembles an RLV in trimmed flight is considered, using approximate first-order piston theory aerodynamics. The results provided for these configurations provide guidelines for approximate aeroelastic modelling of hypersonic vehicles.

  18. Infrared thermography of transition due to isolated roughness elements in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avallone, F.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; Cardone, G.

    2016-02-01

    Boundary layer transition in high-speed flows is a phenomenon that despite extensive research over the years is still extremely hard to predict. The presence of protrusions or gaps can lead to an accelerated laminar-to-turbulent transition enhancing the thermal loads and the skin friction coefficient. In the current investigation, inverse heat transfer measurements using infrared thermography are performed on the flow past different roughness geometries in the form of cylinders and diamond at free stream Mach number equal to 7.5, h/δ ranging between 0.5 and 0.9 (where h is the roughness height and δ is the boundary layer thickness), and Reθ ranging between 1305 and 2450. The roughness elements are positioned on a 5° ramp placed at zero angle of attack. The measurements indicate that the roughness geometry influences the transitional pattern while the frontal area influences both the transition location and the maximum value of the Stanton number along the centreline. Moreover, there is a strong connection between the streamwise centreline Stanton number and the spreading of the wake width. In particular, the transition process is characterized by an approximately constant wake width. Differently, the wake width spreads at the location where the streamwise centreline Stanton number reaches the turbulent level. This point corresponds to a local maximum of the wake amplitude defined as one half of the maximum spanwise variation of the Stanton number.

  19. Theoretical investigation of non-equilibrium chemistry and optical radiation in hypersonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, Ellis E.

    1990-01-01

    Future space vehicles returning from distant missions or high earth orbits may enter the upper regions of the atmosphere and use aerodynamic drag to reduce their velocity before they skip out of the atmosphere and enter low earth orbit. The Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) is designed to explore the special problems encountered in such entries. A computer code was developed to calculate the radiative transport along line-or-sight in the general 3-D flow field about an arbitrary entry vehicle, if the temperatures and species concentrations along the line-of-sight are known. The radiative heating calculation at the stagnation point of the AFE vehicle along the entry trajectory was performed, including a detailed line-by-line accounting of the radiative transport in the vacuum ultraviolet (below 200 nm) by the atomic N and O lines. A method was developed for making measurements of the haze particles in the Titan atmosphere above 200 km altitude. Several other tasks of a continuing nature, to improve the technical ability to calculate the nonequilibrium gas dynamic flow field and radiative heating of entry vehicles, were completed or advanced.

  20. Local measurement of temperatures and concentrations: A review for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankert, C.; Cattolica, R.; Sellers, W.

    1993-01-01

    The quality of reentry simulation for Shuttle, HERMES, Sanger, and NASP systematically suffers from the strong non-equilibrium of rotational and vibrational temperature due to the rapid acceleration of the test gas in the nozzle. Therefore the determination of temperatures is necessary and, if possible, preferable by a non-intrusive technique. The specific interests of this review are optical techniques such as electron beam fluorescence, laser-induced fluorescence, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The capabilities available for local measurements with temporal resolution and quantitative accuracy are discussed for velocity, temperature, density, species concentrations, and fluctuations due to turbulence. The applicability of these methods of measurement is presented and discussed for the coming topic in aerothermodynamics: experimental techniques of hot gases in high enthalpy flows.

  1. Application of DSMC Electronic Excitation Modeling to Radiation Calculation of Hypersonic Reentry Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Sohn, Ilyoup; Levin, Deborah A.; Modest, Michael F.

    2011-05-01

    The current work implemented excited levels of atomic N and corresponding electron impact excitation/de-excitation and ionization processes in DSMC. Results show that when excitation models are included, the Stardust 68.9 km re-entry flow has an observable change in the ion number densities and electron temperature. Adding in the excited levels of atoms improves the degree of ionization by providing additional intermediate steps to ionization. The extra ionization reactions consume the electron energy and reduce the electron temperature. The DSMC results of number densities of excited levels are lower than the prediction of quasi steady state calculation. Comparison of radiation calculations using electronic excited populations from DSMC and QSS indicates that, at the stagnation point, there is about 20% difference of the radiative heat flux between DSMC and QSS.

  2. Shock shapes on blunt bodies in hypersonic-hypervelocity helium, air, and CO2 flows, and calibration results in Langley 6-inch expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III

    1975-01-01

    Shock shape results for flat-faced cylinders, spheres, and spherically blunted cones in various test gases, along with preliminary results from a calibration study performed in the Langley 6-inch expansion tube are presented. Free-stream velocities from 5 to 7 km/sec are generated at hypersonic conditions with helium, air, and CO2, resulting in normal shock density ratios from 4 to 19. Ideal-gas shock shape predictions, in which an effective ratio of specific heats is used as input, are compared with the measured results. The effect of model diameter is examined to provide insight to the thermochemical state of the flow in the shock layer. The regime for which equilibrium exists in the shock layer for the present air and CO2 test conditions is defined. Test core flow quality, test repeatability, and comparison of measured and predicted expansion-tube flow quantities are discussed.

  3. International Hypersonic Waverider Symposium, 1st, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, Oct. 17-19, 1990, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John D., Jr. (Editor); Lewis, Mark J. (Editor); Corda, Stephen (Editor); Blankson, Isaiah M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of current theoretical and experimental research in the field of hypersonic waveriders. In particular, attention is given to efficient waveriders from known axisymmetric flow fields, hypersonic waverider design from given shock waves, limitations of waveriders, and aerodynamic stability theory of hypersonic waveriders. The discussion also covers momentum analysis of waverider flow fields, tethered aerothermodynamic research for hypersonic waveriders, simulation of hypersonic waveriders, and an idealized tip-to-tail waverider model.

  4. System-size independence of directed flow measured at the BNL relativistic heavy-ion collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.; STAR Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    We measure directed flow (v{sub 1}) for charged particles in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 and 62.4 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity ({eta}), transverse momentum (p{sub t}), and collision centrality, based on data from the STAR experiment. We find that the directed flow depends on the incident energy but, contrary to all available model implementations, not on the size of the colliding system at a given centrality. We extend the validity of the limiting fragmentation concept to v{sub 1} in different collision systems, and investigate possible explanations for the observed sign change in v{sub 1}(p{sub t}).

  5. System-size independence of directed flow measured at the BNL relativistic heavy-ion collider.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Biritz, B; Bland, L C; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bueltmann, S; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Elnimr, M; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gangadharan, D R; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jin, F; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kajimoto, K; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kumar, A; Kumar, L; Kurnadi, P; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, C; Netrakanti, P K; Ng, M J; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okada, H; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Tram, V N; Trattner, A L; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Videbaek, F; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Y Y; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zuo, J X

    2008-12-19

    We measure directed flow (v_{1}) for charged particles in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200 and 62.4 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity (eta), transverse momentum (p_{t}), and collision centrality, based on data from the STAR experiment. We find that the directed flow depends on the incident energy but, contrary to all available model implementations, not on the size of the colliding system at a given centrality. We extend the validity of the limiting fragmentation concept to v_{1} in different collision systems, and investigate possible explanations for the observed sign change in v_{1}(p_{t}). PMID:19113699

  6. System-size independence of directed flow at the RelativisticHeavy-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Coll

    2008-09-20

    We measure directed flow (v{sub 1}) for charged particles in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and 62.4 GeV, as a function of pseudorapidity ({eta}), transverse momentum (p{sub t}) and collision centrality, based on data from the STAR experiment. We find that the directed flow depends on the incident energy but, contrary to all available model implementations, not on the size of the colliding system at a given centrality. We extend the validity of the limiting fragmentation concept to v{sub 1} in different collision systems, and investigate possible explanations for the observed sign change in v{sub 1}(p{sub t}).

  7. Consistent multi-internal-temperature models for vibrational and electronic nonequilibrium in hypersonic nitrogen plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, Aurélien Bourdon, Anne Perrin, Marie-Yvonne

    2015-04-15

    In this work, a state-to-state vibrational and electronic collisional model is developed to investigate nonequilibrium phenomena behind a shock wave in an ionized nitrogen flow. In the ionization dynamics behind the shock wave, the electron energy budget is of key importance and it is found that the main depletion term corresponds to the electronic excitation of N atoms, and conversely the major creation terms are the electron-vibration term at the beginning, then replaced by the electron ions elastic exchange term. Based on these results, a macroscopic multi-internal-temperature model for the vibration of N{sub 2} and the electronic levels of N atoms is derived with several groups of vibrational levels of N{sub 2} and electronic levels of N with their own internal temperatures to model the shape of the vibrational distribution of N{sub 2} and of the electronic excitation of N, respectively. In this model, energy and chemistry source terms are calculated self-consistently from the rate coefficients of the state-to-state database. For the shock wave condition studied, a good agreement is observed on the ionization dynamics as well as on the atomic bound-bound radiation between the state-to-state model and the macroscopic multi-internal temperature model with only one group of vibrational levels of N{sub 2} and two groups of electronic levels of N.

  8. Condensation in hypersonic nitrogen wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lederer, Melissa A.; Yanta, William J.; Ragsdale, William C.; Hudson, Susan T.; Griffith, Wayland C.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental observations and a theoretical model for the onset and disappearance of condensation are given for hypersonic flows of pure nitrogen at M = 10, 14 and 18. Measurements include Pitot pressures, static pressures and laser light scattering experiments. These measurements coupled with a theoretical model indicate a substantial non-equilibrium supercooling of the vapor phase beyond the saturation line. Typical results are presented with implications for the design of hypersonic wind tunnel nozzles.

  9. An experimental and computational study of moderately underexpanded rocket exhaust plumes in a co-flowing hypersonic free stream

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, N.; Buttsworth, D.; Jones, T.; Brescianini, C. |

    1995-09-01

    Rocket plume exhaust structures are aerodynamically and thermochemically very complex and the prediction of plume properties such as temperature, velocity, pressure, chemical species concentrations and turbulence properties is a formidable task as there are no definitive models for viscous and chemical effects. Contemporary computational techniques are still in their infancy and cannot yet reliably predict plume properties. Only through validation of computer codes using experimental data, can computational models be developed to the point where they can be confidently used as design and predictive tools. The motivation for this study was to acquire well defined data for rocket plumes at low altitude hypersonic flight conditions so that the above issues could be investigated.

  10. Non-thermal radio emission from colliding flows in classical nova V1723 Aql

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Jennifer H. S.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Metzger, Brian D.; Zheng, Yong; Chomiuk, Laura; Krauss, Miriam I.; Linford, Justin D.; Nelson, Thomas; Mioduszewski, Amy J.; Rupen, Michael P.; Finzell, Tom; Mukai, Koji

    2016-03-01

    The importance of shocks in nova explosions has been highlighted by Fermi's discovery of γ-ray-producing novae. Over three years of multiband Very Large Array radio observations of the 2010 nova V1723 Aql show that shocks between fast and slow flows within the ejecta led to the acceleration of particles and the production of synchrotron radiation. Soon after the start of the eruption, shocks in the ejecta produced an unexpected radio flare, resulting in a multipeaked radio light curve. The emission eventually became consistent with an expanding thermal remnant with mass 2 × 10-4 M⊙ and temperature 104 K. However, during the first two months, the ≳106 K brightness temperature at low frequencies was too high to be due to thermal emission from the small amount of X-ray-producing shock-heated gas. Radio imaging showed structures with velocities of 400 km s-1 (d/6 kpc) in the plane of the sky, perpendicular to a more elongated 1500 km s-1 (d/6 kpc) flow. The morpho-kinematic structure of the ejecta from V1723 Aql appears similar to nova V959 Mon, where collisions between a slow torus and a faster flow collimated the fast flow and gave rise to γ-ray-producing shocks. Optical spectroscopy and X-ray observations of V1723 Aql during the radio flare are consistent with this picture. Our observations support the idea that shocks in novae occur when a fast flow collides with a slow collimating torus. Such shocks could be responsible for hard X-ray emission, γ-ray production, and double-peaked radio light curves from some classical novae.

  11. New Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at the Laboratory of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics Prof. Henry T. Nagamatsu

    SciTech Connect

    Toro, P. G. P.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Oliveira, A. C.; Gomes, F. A. A.; Myrabo, L. N.; Nagamatsu, Henry T.

    2008-04-28

    The new 0.60-m. nozzle exit diameter hypersonic shock tunnel was designed to study advanced air-breathing propulsion system such as supersonic combustion and/or laser technologies. In addition, it may be used for hypersonic flow studies and investigations of the electromagnetic (laser) energy addition for flow control. This new hypersonic shock tunnel was designed and installed at the Laboratory for of Aerothermodynamics and Hypersonics Prof. Henry T. Nagamatsu, IEAv-CTA, Brazil. The design of the tunnel enables relatively long test times, 2-10 milliseconds, suitable for the experiments performed at the laboratory. Free stream Mach numbers ranging from 6 to 25 can be produced and stagnation pressures and temperatures up to 360 atm. and up to 9,000 K, respectively, can be generated. Shadowgraph and schlieren optical techniques will be used for flow visualization.

  12. Calculation of Flow Fields from Bow-Wave Profiles for the Downstream Region of Blunt-Nosed Circular Cylinders in Axial Hypersonic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiff, Alvin; Whiting, Ellis E.

    1961-01-01

    A method by which known bow-wave profiles may be analyzed to give the flow fields around blunt-nosed cylinders in axial hypersonic flow is presented. In the method, the assumption is made that the pressure distribution curve in a transverse plane is similar to that given by blast- wave theory. Numerical analysis based on the one-dimensional energy and continuity equations then leads to distributions of all the flow variables in the cross section, for either a perfect gas or a real gas. The entire flow field need not be solved. Attention can be confined to any desired station. The critical question is the validity of the above assumption. It is tested for the case of a hemisphere cylinder in flight at 20,000 ft/sec. The flow is analyzed for three stations along the cylindrical afterbody, and found to compare very closely with the results of an exact (inviscid) solution. The assumed form of the pressure distribution occurs at stations as close as 1.2 diameters to the body nose. However, it is suggested that the assumption may not apply this far forward in general, particularly when bodies of nonsmooth contour are considered.

  13. Hypersonic gasdynamic laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Foreman, K.M.; Maciulaitis, A.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a visible, or near to mid infra-red, hypersonic gas dynamic laser system. It comprises: a hypersonic vehicle for carrying the hypersonic gas dynamic laser system, and also providing high energy ram air for thermodynamic excitation and supply of the laser gas; a laser cavity defined within the hypersonic vehicle and having a laser cavity inlet for the laser cavity formed by an opening in the hypersonic vehicle, such that ram air directed through the laser cavity opening supports gas dynamic lasing operations at wavelengths less than 10.6{mu} meters in the laser cavity; and an optical train for collecting the laser radiation from the laser cavity and directing it as a substantially collimated laser beam to an output aperture defined by an opening in the hypersonic vehicle to allow the laser beam to be directed against a target.

  14. Unstart coupling mechanism analysis of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jichao; Chang, Juntao; Wang, Lei; Cao, Shibin; Bao, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The combination of multiplemodules in parallel manner is an important way to achieve the much higher thrust of scramjet engine. For the multiple-modules scramjet engine, when inlet unstarted oscillatory flow appears in a single-module engine due to high backpressure, how to interact with each module by massflow spillage, and whether inlet unstart occurs in other modules are important issues. The unstarted flowfield and coupling characteristic for a three-module hypersonic inlet caused by center module II and side module III were, conducted respectively. The results indicate that the other two hypersonic inlets are forced into unstarted flow when unstarted phenomenon appears on a single-module hypersonic inlet due to high backpressure, and the reversed flow in the isolator dominates the formation, expansion, shrinkage, and disappearance of the vortexes, and thus, it is the major factor of unstart coupling of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet. The coupling effect among multiple modules makes hypersonic inlet be more likely unstarted.

  15. From the analytical theory to hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlen, A.

    Hypersonic flows around axisymmetrical power-law slender bodies are calculated for high, but finite, Mach numbers, and for low angles of attack. This is done by a small-perturbation expansion of self-similar solutions using the equivalence principle. The stream functions are found and a solidification principle is used in order to define hypersonic aircrafts.

  16. Recent advances in hypersonic technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, Douglas L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will focus on recent advances in hypersonic aerodynamic prediction techniques. Current capabilities of existing numerical methods for predicting high Mach number flows will be discussed and shortcomings will be identified. Physical models available for inclusion into modern codes for predicting the effects of transition and turbulence will also be outlined and their limitations identified. Chemical reaction models appropriate to high-speed flows will be addressed, and the impact of their inclusion in computational fluid dynamics codes will be discussed. Finally, the problem of validating predictive techniques for high Mach number flows will be addressed.

  17. The optimum hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimmer, L. L.; Cary, A., Jr.; Voisinet, R. L. P.

    1986-01-01

    The capabilities of existing hypersonic wind tunnels in the U.S. are assessed to form a basis for recommendations for a new, costly facility which would provide data for modeling the hypervelocity aerodynamics envisioned for the new generation of aerospace vehicles now undergoing early studies. Attention is given to the regimes, both entry and aerodynamic, which the new vehicles will encounter, and the shortcomings of data generated for the Orbiter before flight are discussed. The features of foreign-gas, impulse, aeroballistic range, arc-heated and combustion-heated facilities are examined, noting that in any hypersonic wind tunnel the flow must be preheated to prevent liquefaction upon expansion in the test channel. The limitations of the existing facilities and the identification of the regimes which must be studied lead to a description of the characteristics of an optimum hypersonic wind tunnel, including the operations and productivity, the instrumentation, the nozzle design and the flow quality. Three different design approaches are described, each costing at least $100 million to achieve workability.

  18. Investigation of the separated region ahead of three-dimensional protuberances on plates and cones in hypersonic flows with laminar boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, C. S.; Singh, T.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Heat transfer rate and pressure measurements were made upstream of surface protuberances on a flat plate and a sharp cone subjected to hypersonic flow in a conventional shock tunnel. Heat flux was measured using platinum thin-film sensors deposited on macor substrate and the pressure measurements were made using fast acting piezoelectric sensors. A distinctive hot spot with highest heat flux was obtained near the foot of the protuberance due to heavy vortex activity in the recirculating region. Schlieren flow visualization was used to capture the shock structures and the separation distance ahead of the protrusions was quantitatively measured for varying protuberance heights. A computational analysis was conducted on the flat plate model using commercial computational fluid dynamics software and the obtained trends of heat flux and pressure were compared with the experimental observation. Experiments were also conducted by physically disturbing the laminar boundary layer to check its effect on the magnitude of the hot spot heat flux. In addition to air, argon was also used as test gas so that the Reynolds number can be varied.

  19. Heat transfer on a flat plate in continuum to rarefied hypersonic flows at Mach numbers of 19.2 and 25.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagamatsu, H. T.; Sheer, R. E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Local heat transfer rates were measured on a flat steel plate (10 in. wide and 16 in. long) with sharp and blunt leading edges (0.001 and 0.010 in.) in the transition from the strong interaction boundary layer regime with no slip at the surface to the free molecule regime. The tests were conducted in a combustion driven hypersonic shock tunnel, with the nominal free stream Mach numbers of 19.2 and 25.4, and a reflected stagnation temperature of approximately 2340 R. The twelve heat transfer gages were made of platinum sputtered on a Pyrex backing to a thickness of approximately 350 A, insulated by a silicone dioxide film. For both Mach numbers the heat transfer data agreed reasonably well with the strong interaction prediction of Li and Nagamatsu (1953, 1955) for unit Reynolds numbers greater than approximately 100,000 and leading edge Knudsen numbers less than approximately 4. At lower density conditions the rarefied flow effects began to dominate the flow phenomena near the leading edge region of the sharp flat plate. A systematic reduction in the heat transfer rate close to the leading edge was observed for both Mach number tests as the leading edge density was reduced and the mean free path was increased.

  20. Hypersonic missile propulsion system

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmar, R.R.

    1998-11-01

    Pratt and Whitney is developing the technology for hypersonic components and engines. A supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) database was developed using hydrogen fueled propulsion systems for space access vehicles and serves as a point of departure for the current development of hydrocarbon scramjets. The Air Force Hypersonic Technology (HyTech) Program has put programs in place to develop the technologies necessary to demonstrate the operability, performance and structural durability of an expendable, liquid hydrocarbon fueled scramjet system that operates from Mach 4 to 8. This program will culminate in a flight type engine test at representative flight conditions. The hypersonic technology base that will be developed and demonstrated under HyTech will establish the foundation to enable hypersonic propulsion systems for a broad range of air vehicle applications from missiles to space access vehicles. A hypersonic missile flight demonstration is planned in the DARPA Affordable Rapid Response Missile Demonstrator (ARRMD) program in 2001.

  1. Research and educational initiatives at the Syracuse University Center for Hypersonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spina, E.; Lagraff, J.; Davidson, B.; Bogucz, E.; Dang, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Manufacturing Engineering and the Northeast Parallel Architectures Center of Syracuse University have been funded by NASA to establish a program to educate young engineers in the hypersonic disciplines. This goal is being achieved through a comprehensive five-year program that includes elements of undergraduate instruction, advanced graduate coursework, undergraduate research, and leading-edge hypersonics research. The research foci of the Syracuse Center for Hypersonics are three-fold; high-temperature composite materials, measurements in turbulent hypersonic flows, and the application of high-performance computing to hypersonic fluid dynamics.

  2. Hypersonic phononic crystals.

    PubMed

    Gorishnyy, T; Ullal, C K; Maldovan, M; Fytas, G; Thomas, E L

    2005-03-25

    In this Letter we propose the use of hypersonic phononic crystals to control the emission and propagation of high frequency phonons. We report the fabrication of high quality, single crystalline hypersonic crystals using interference lithography and show that direct measurement of their phononic band structure is possible with Brillouin light scattering. Numerical calculations are employed to explain the nature of the observed propagation modes. This work lays the foundation for experimental studies of hypersonic crystals and, more generally, phonon-dependent processes in nanostructures.

  3. A Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin Finite Element Scheme for Non-Ionized Hypersonic Flows in Thermochemical Nonequilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Benjamin S.; Bova, Stephen W.; Bond, Ryan B.

    2011-01-01

    Presentation topics include background and motivation; physical modeling including governing equations and thermochemistry; finite element formulation; results of inviscid thermal nonequilibrium chemically reacting flow and viscous thermal equilibrium chemical reacting flow; and near-term effort.

  4. Hysteresis phenomenon of hypersonic inlet at high Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Xiaoliang; Chang, Juntao; Wang, Zhongqi; Yu, Daren

    2016-11-01

    When the hypersonic inlet works at a Mach number higher than the design value, the hypersonic inlet is started with a regular reflection of the external compression shock at the cowl, whereas a Mach reflection will result in the shock propagating forwards to cause a shock detachment at the cowl lip, which is called "local unstart of inlet". As there are two operation modes of hypersonic inlet at high Mach number, the mode transition may occur with the operation condition of hypersonic inlet changing. A cowl-angle-variation-induced hysteresis and a downstream-pressure-variation-induced hysteresis in the hypersonic inlet start↔local unstart transition are obtained by viscous numerical simulations in this paper. The interaction of the external compression shock and boundary layer on the cowl plays a key role in the hysteresis phenomenon. Affected by the transition of external compression shock reflection at the cowl and the transition between separated and attached flow on the cowl, a hysteresis exists in the hypersonic inlet start↔local unstart transition. The hysteresis makes the operation of a hypersonic inlet very difficult to control. In order to avoid hysteresis phenomenon and keep the hypersonic inlet operating in a started mode, the control route should never pass through the local unstarted boundary.

  5. Numerical Study of Rarefied Hypersonic Flow Interacting with a Continuum Jet. Degree awarded by Pennsylvania State Univ., Aug. 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    2000-01-01

    An uncoupled Computational Fluid Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (CFD-DSMC) technique is developed and applied to provide solutions for continuum jets interacting with rarefied external flows. The technique is based on a correlation of the appropriate Bird breakdown parameter for a transitional-rarefied condition that defines a surface within which the continuum solution is unaffected by the external flow-jet interaction. The method is applied to two problems to assess and demonstrate its validity; one of a jet interaction in the transitional-rarefied flow regime and the other in the moderately rarefied regime. Results show that the appropriate Bird breakdown surface for uncoupling the continuum and non-continuum solutions is a function of a non-dimensional parameter relating the momentum flux and collisionality between the two interacting flows. The correlation is exploited for the simulation of a jet interaction modeled for an experimental condition in the transitional-rarefied flow regime and the validity of the correlation is demonstrated. The uncoupled technique is also applied to an aerobraking flight condition for the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with attitude control system jet interaction. Aerodynamic yawing moment coefficients for cases without and with jet interaction at various angles-of-attack were predicted, and results from the present method compare well with values published previously. The flow field and surface properties are analyzed in some detail to describe the mechanism by which the jet interaction affects the aerodynamics.

  6. Uncertainty Propagation in Hypersonic Vehicle Aerothermoelastic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamorte, Nicolas Etienne

    Hypersonic vehicles face a challenging flight environment. The aerothermoelastic analysis of its components requires numerous simplifying approximations. Identifying and quantifying the effect of uncertainties pushes the limits of the existing deterministic models, and is pursued in this work. An uncertainty quantification framework is used to propagate the effects of identified uncertainties on the stability margins and performance of the different systems considered. First, the aeroelastic stability of a typical section representative of a control surface on a hypersonic vehicle is examined. Variability in the uncoupled natural frequencies of the system is modeled to mimic the effect of aerodynamic heating. Next, the stability of an aerodynamically heated panel representing a component of the skin of a generic hypersonic vehicle is considered. Uncertainty in the location of transition from laminar to turbulent flow and the heat flux prediction is quantified using CFD. In both cases significant reductions of the stability margins are observed. A loosely coupled airframe--integrated scramjet engine is considered next. The elongated body and cowl of the engine flow path are subject to harsh aerothermodynamic loading which causes it to deform. Uncertainty associated with deformation prediction is propagated to the engine performance analysis. The cowl deformation is the main contributor to the sensitivity of the propulsion system performance. Finally, a framework for aerothermoelastic stability boundary calculation for hypersonic vehicles using CFD is developed. The usage of CFD enables one to consider different turbulence conditions, laminar or turbulent, and different models of the air mixture, in particular real gas model which accounts for dissociation of molecules at high temperature. The system is found to be sensitive to turbulence modeling as well as the location of the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Real gas effects play a minor role in the

  7. Pegasus hypersonic flight research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Robert E.; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.; Budd, Gerald D.

    1992-01-01

    Hypersonic aeronautics research using the Pegasus air-launched space booster is described. Two areas are discussed in the paper: previously obtained results from Pegasus flights 1 and 2, and plans for future programs. Proposed future research includes boundary-layer transition studies on the airplane-like first stage and also use of the complete Pegasus launch system to boost a research vehicle to hypersonic speeds. Pegasus flight 1 and 2 measurements were used to evaluate the results of several analytical aerodynamic design tools applied during the development of the vehicle as well as to develop hypersonic flight-test techniques. These data indicated that the aerodynamic design approach for Pegasus was adequate and showed that acceptable margins were available. Additionally, the correlations provide insight into the capabilities of these analytical tools for more complex vehicles in which design margins may be more stringent. Near-term plans to conduct hypersonic boundary-layer transition studies are discussed. These plans involve the use of a smooth metallic glove at about the mid-span of the wing. Longer-term opportunities are proposed which identify advantages of the Pegasus launch system to boost large-scale research vehicles to the real-gas hypersonic flight regime.

  8. Progress Toward Affordable High Fidelity Combustion Simulations Using Filtered Density Functions for Hypersonic Flows in Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Pisciuneri, Patrick H.; Yilmaz, S. Levent

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the development of subgrid scale (SGS) closures based on a filtered density function (FDF) for large eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent reacting flows. The FDF is the counterpart of the probability density function (PDF) method, which has proven effective in Reynolds averaged simulations (RAS). However, while systematic progress is being made advancing the FDF models for relatively simple flows and lab-scale flames, the application of these methods in complex geometries and high speed, wall-bounded flows with shocks remains a challenge. The key difficulties are the significant computational cost associated with solving the FDF transport equation and numerically stiff finite rate chemistry. For LES/FDF methods to make a more significant impact in practical applications a pragmatic approach must be taken that significantly reduces the computational cost while maintaining high modeling fidelity. An example of one such ongoing effort is at the NASA Langley Research Center, where the first generation FDF models, namely the scalar filtered mass density function (SFMDF) are being implemented into VULCAN, a production-quality RAS and LES solver widely used for design of high speed propulsion flowpaths. This effort leverages internal and external collaborations to reduce the overall computational cost of high fidelity simulations in VULCAN by: implementing high order methods that allow reduction in the total number of computational cells without loss in accuracy; implementing first generation of high fidelity scalar PDF/FDF models applicable to high-speed compressible flows; coupling RAS/PDF and LES/FDF into a hybrid framework to efficiently and accurately model the effects of combustion in the vicinity of the walls; developing efficient Lagrangian particle tracking algorithms to support robust solutions of the FDF equations for high speed flows; and utilizing finite rate chemistry parametrization, such as flamelet models, to reduce

  9. Model formulation of non-equilibrium gas radiation for hypersonic flight vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Ing

    1989-01-01

    Several radiation models for low density nonequilibrium hypersonic flow are studied. It is proposed that these models should be tested by the 3-D VRFL code developed at NASA/JSC. A modified and optimized radiation model may be obtained from the testing. Then, the current VRFL code could be expanded to solve hypersonic flow problems with nonequilibrium thermal radiation.

  10. Rarefaction Effects in Hypersonic Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    2011-05-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) technique is used for numerical analysis of rarefied-gas hypersonic flows near a blunt plate, wedge, two side-by-side plates, disk, torus, and rotating cylinder. The role of various similarity parameters (Knudsen and Mach numbers, geometrical and temperature factors, specific heat ratios, and others) in aerodynamics of the probes is studied. Important kinetic effects that are specific for the transition flow regime have been found: non-monotonic lift and drag of plates, strong repulsive force between side-by-side plates and cylinders, dependence of drag on torus radii ratio, and the reverse Magnus effect on the lift of a rotating cylinder. The numerical results are in a good agreement with experimental data, which were obtained in a vacuum chamber at low and moderate Knudsen numbers from 0.01 to 10.

  11. Integrated numerical methods for hypersonic aircraft cooling systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petley, Dennis H.; Jones, Stuart C.; Dziedzic, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical methods have been developed for the analysis of hypersonic aircraft cooling systems. A general purpose finite difference thermal analysis code is used to determine areas which must be cooled. Complex cooling networks of series and parallel flow can be analyzed using a finite difference computer program. Both internal fluid flow and heat transfer are analyzed, because increased heat flow causes a decrease in the flow of the coolant. The steady state solution is a successive point iterative method. The transient analysis uses implicit forward-backward differencing. Several examples of the use of the program in studies of hypersonic aircraft and rockets are provided.

  12. Studies of the structure of attached and separated regions of viscous/inviscid interaction and the effects of combined surface roughness and blowing in high-Reynolds-number hypersonic flows. Final report, 1 August 1985-1 June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, M.S.; Bergman, R.; Harvey, J.; Duryea, G.; Moselle, J.

    1988-12-02

    The first of these 2 studies examined the detailed structure of the hypersonic boundary layer over a large cone/flare configuration. Emphasis was on development and use of instrumentation with which to obtain flow-field measurements of the mean and fluctuating properties of the attached and separated shear layers. Development and use of holographic interferometry and electron-beam techniques in the high Mach number and Reynolds number environment developed in the shock tunnel are described. In the second study, detailed measurements of heat transfer, pressure, and skin friction were made on a unique 'blowing and roughness' model constructed to simulate the aerothermal phenomena associated with a rough ablating maneuverable reentry vehicle. In this study emphasis was placed on development and use of unique heat transfer and skin-friction instrumentation to obtain measurements of the combined effects of blowing and roughness and to understand how such effects influence boundary-layer separation in regions of shock wave/boundary layer interaction. Each focused around providing information with which to construct and evaluate the modeling required in time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations to predict the structure of compressible hypersonic boundary layers in regions of strong pressure gradient, shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction and flow separation over smooth, rough, and ablating surfaces.

  13. Effects of momentum conservation and flow on angular correlations observed in experiments at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Scott; Schlichting, Soeren; Gavin, Sean

    2011-08-15

    Correlations of azimuthal angles observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider have gained great attention due to the prospect of identifying fluctuations of parity-odd regions in the field sector of QCD. Whereas the observable of interest related to parity fluctuations involves subtracting opposite-sign from same-sign correlations, the STAR collaboration reported the same-sign and opposite-sign correlations separately. It is shown here how momentum conservation combined with collective elliptic flow contributes significantly to this class of correlations, although not to the difference between the opposite- and same-sign observables. The effects are modeled with a crude simulation of a pion gas. Although the simulation reproduces the scale of the correlation, the centrality dependence is found to be sufficiently different in character to suggest additional considerations beyond those present in the pion gas simulation presented here.

  14. DSMC-CFD Comparison of a High Altitude, Hypersonic Reentry Flow Using the Mott-Smith Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, T.; Nompelis, I.; Levin, D. A.; Barnhardt, M.; Candler, G. V.

    2008-12-01

    Stardust reentry flows have been simulated at 80 km altitude, 12.8 km/s, using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Neutral and ionization processes among neutral air species, as well as five ionic species and electrons were considered in the DSMC flowfield modeling using the ion-averaged velocity model to maintain charge-neutrality. In CFD, two electron temperature models were compared, and it was found that the degree of ionization (DOI) is sensitive to the electron temperature model. At 80 km, the DOI predicted by DSMC was found to be approximately 3%, but in CFD, the DOI is greater than 20% for the case of Te = Ttr and 9% for the case of Te = Tvib. Therefore, compared to the DSMC solution, the assumption of Te = Tvib is preferable in CFD. Using the Mott-Smith (M-S) model, good agreement was obtained between the analytical bimodal distribution functions and DSMC velocity distributions. An effective temperature correction in the relaxation and chemical reaction models using the M-S model was developed in CFD, and the model reduced the continuum breakdown discrepancy between DSMC and CFD inside the shock in terms of DOI and temperatures. With the M-S model, the DOI for the case of Te = Tvib in CFD is decreased by approximately 3%.

  15. Hypersonic Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) and hot structures are required for a range of hypersonic vehicles ranging from ballistic reentry to hypersonic cruise vehicles, both within Earth's atmosphere and non-Earth atmospheres. The focus of this presentation is on air breathing hypersonic vehicles in the Earth's atmosphere. This includes single-stage to orbit (SSTO), two-stage to orbit (TSTO) accelerators, access to space vehicles, and hypersonic cruise vehicles. This paper will start out with a brief discussion of aerodynamic heating and thermal management techniques to address the high heating, followed by an overview of TPS for rocket-launched and air-breathing vehicles. The argument is presented that as we move from rocket-based vehicles to air-breathing vehicles, we need to move away from the insulated airplane approach used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter to a wide range of TPS and hot structure approaches. The primary portion of the paper will discuss issues and design options for CMC TPS and hot structure components, including leading edges, acreage TPS, and control surfaces. The current state-of-the-art will be briefly discussed for some of the components.

  16. Hypersonic propulsion. [supersonic combustion ramjet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, H. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Research on hydrogen fueled scramjet engines for hypersonic flight is reviewed. Component developments, computational methods, and preliminary ground tests of subscale scramjet engine modules at Mach 4 and 7 are emphasized. Airframe integration, structures, and flow diagnostics are also discussed. It is shown that mixed-mode perpendicular and parallel fuel injection controls heat release over a wide Mach range and the fixed geometry inlet gives good performance over a wide range of Mach numbers.

  17. Computational effects of inlet representation on powered hypersonic, airbreathing models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, Lawrence D.; Tatum, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    Computational results are presented to illustrate the powered aftbody effects of representing the scramjet inlet on a generic hypersonic vehicle with a fairing, to divert the external flow, as compared to an operating flow-through scramjet inlet. This study is pertinent to the ground testing of hypersonic, airbreathing models employing scramjet exhaust flow simulation in typical small-scale hypersonic wind tunnels. The comparison of aftbody effects due to inlet representation is well-suited for computational study, since small model size typically precludes the ability to ingest flow into the inlet and perform exhaust simulation at the same time. Two-dimensional analysis indicates that, although flowfield differences exist for the two types of inlet representations, little, if any, difference in surface aftbody characteristics is caused by fairing over the inlet.

  18. Exotic colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1994-11-01

    The motivation, feasibility and potential for two unconventional collider concepts - the Gamma-Gamma Collider and the Muon Collider - are described. The importance of the development of associated technologies such as high average power, high repetition rate lasers and ultrafast phase-space techniques are outlined.

  19. Is hadronic flow produced in p-Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You; Zhu, Xiangrong; Li, Pengfei; Song, Huichao

    2016-05-01

    Using the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) model, we investigate the azimuthal correlations in p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV. It is shown that the simulated hadronic p-Pb system can not generate the collective flow signatures, but mainly behaves as a non-flow dominant system. However, the characteristic υ2(pT) mass-ordering of pions, kaons and protons is observed in UrQMD simulations, which is the consequence of hadronic interactions and not necessarily associated with strong fluid-like expansions.

  20. Hypersonic vehicle design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The design task for the Advanced Aeronautics Design Project at UCLA is to provide a design for a hypersonic trans-atmospheric vehicle capable of horizontal take-off and landing from conventional runways. To accomplish this task, students are developing unclassified, unrestricted generic hypersonic vehicle models. These models include aerodynamic, propulsive, and thermal effects. The models will be used in the 1987-1988 academic year for vehicle design emphasizing the use of trajectory studies to optimize the vehicle design. The design problem is being considered both in terms of conventional issues such as aerodynamics, propulsion, and thermal systems and also in terms of flight systems, flight controls, and flight testing. The goal of this program is to consider testing as an integral part of design.

  1. Experiments in hand-operated, hypersonic shock tunnel facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Experiments were conducted using the newly developed table-top, hand-operated hypersonic shock tunnel, otherwise known as the Reddy hypersonic shock tunnel. This novel instrument uses only manual force to generate the shock wave in the shock tube, and is designed to generate a freestream flow of Mach 6.5 in the test section. The flow was characterized using stagnation point pressure measurements made using fast-acting piezoelectric transducers. Schlieren visualization was also carried out to capture the bow shock in front of a hemispherical body placed in the flow. Freestream Mach numbers estimated at various points in the test section showed that for a minimum diameter of 46 mm within the test section, the value did not vary by more than 3 % along any cross-sectional plane. The results of the experiments presented here indicate that the device may be successfully employed for basic hypersonic research activities at the university level.

  2. Combined LAURA-UPS hypersonic solution procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Thompson, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    A combined solution procedure for hypersonic flowfields around blunted slender bodies was implemented using a thin-layer Navier-Stokes code (LAURA) in the nose region and a parabolized Navier-Stokes code (UPS) on the after body region. Perfect gas, equilibrium air, and non-equilibrium air solutions to sharp cones and a sharp wedge were obtained using UPS alone as a preliminary step. Surface heating rates are presented for two slender bodies with blunted noses, having used LAURA to provide a starting solution to UPS downstream of the sonic line. These are an 8 deg sphere-cone in Mach 5, perfect gas, laminar flow at 0 and 4 deg angles of attack and the Reentry F body at Mach 20, 80,000 ft equilibrium gas conditions for 0 and 0.14 deg angles of attack. The results indicate that this procedure is a timely and accurate method for obtaining aerothermodynamic predictions on slender hypersonic vehicles.

  3. Discrete Particle Simulation Techniques for the Analysis of Colliding and Flowing Particulate Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Debanjan

    Flowing particulate media are ubiquitous in a wide spectrum of applications that include transport systems, fluidized beds, manufacturing and materials processing technologies, energy conversion and propulsion technologies, sprays, jets, slurry flows, and biological flows. The discrete nature of the media, along with their underlying coupled multi-physical interactions can lead to a variety of interesting phenomena, many of which are unique to such media - for example, turbulent diffusion and preferential concentration in particle laden flows, and soliton like excitation patterns in a vibrated pile of granular material. This dissertation explores the utility of numerical simulations based on the discrete element method and collision driven particle dynamics methods for analyzing flowing particulate media. Such methods are well-suited to handle phenomena involving particulate, granular, and discontinuous materials, and often provide abilities to tackle complicated physical phenomena, for which pursuing continuum based approaches might be difficult or sometimes insufficient. A detailed discussion on hierarchically representing coupled, multi-physical phenomena through simple models for underlying physical interactions is presented. Appropriate physical models for mechanical contact, conductive and convective heat exchange, fluid-particle interactions, adhesive and near-field effects, and interaction with applied electromagnetic fields are presented. Algorithmic details on assembling the interaction models into a large-scale simulation framework have been elaborated with illustrations. The assembled frameworks were used to develop a computer simulation library (named `Software Library for Discrete Element Simulations' (SLIDES) for the sake of reference and continued future development efforts) and aspects of the architecture and development of this library have also been addressed. This is an object-oriented discrete particle simulation library developed in Fortran

  4. A Numerical Study of Hypersonic Forebody/Inlet Integration Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay

    1991-01-01

    A numerical study of hypersonic forebody/inlet integration problem is presented in the form of the view-graphs. The following topics are covered: physical/chemical modeling; solution procedure; flow conditions; mass flow rate at inlet face; heating and skin friction loads; 3-D forebogy/inlet integration model; and sensitivity studies.

  5. Hypersonic nozzle design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, Wayland C.

    1989-01-01

    Possible experimental facilities appropriate to a university environment that could make meaningful contributions to the solution of problems in hypersonic aerodynamics are investigated. Needs for the National Aerospace Plane and interplanetary flights with atmospheric aerobraking are used to scope the problem. Relevant events of the past two decades in universities and at the national laboratories are examined for their implications regarding both problems and prospects. Most striking is the emergence of computational fluid dynamics, which is viewed here as an equal partner with laboratory experimentation and flight test in relating theory with reality. Also significant are major advances in instrumentation and data processing methods, especially optical techniques. The direction of the study was guided by the concept of a companion program, i.e., the university effort should complement a major area of endeavor at NASA-Langley. Through this, both faculty and student participants gain a natural and effective working relationship. Existing and proposed major hypersonic aerodynamic facilities in industry and at the national laboratories are examined by type; hypersonic wind tunnels, arc-heated tunnels, shock tubes and tunnels, and ballistic ranges. Of these, the free piston tunnel and shock tube/tunnel are most appropriate for a university.

  6. Survey of Aerothermodynamics Facilities Useful for the Design of Hypersonic Vehicles Using Air-Breathing Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Deiwert, George S.

    1997-01-01

    This paper surveys the use of aerothermodynamic facilities which have been useful in the study of external flows and propulsion aspects of hypersonic, air-breathing vehicles. While the paper is not a survey of all facilities, it covers the utility of shock tunnels and conventional hypersonic blow-down facilities which have been used for hypersonic air-breather studies. The problems confronting researchers in the field of aerothermodynamics are outlined. Results from the T5 GALCIT tunnel for the shock-on lip problem are outlined. Experiments on combustors and short expansion nozzles using the semi-free jet method have been conducted in large shock tunnels. An example which employed the NASA Ames 16-Inch shock tunnel is outlined, and the philosophy of the test technique is described. Conventional blow-down hypersonic wind tunnels are quite useful in hypersonic air-breathing studies. Results from an expansion ramp experiment, simulating the nozzle on a hypersonic air-breather from the NASA Ames 3.5 Foot Hypersonic wind tunnel are summarized. Similar work on expansion nozzles conducted in the NASA Langley hypersonic wind tunnel complex is cited. Free-jet air-frame propulsion integration and configuration stability experiments conducted at Langley in the hypersonic wind tunnel complex on a small generic model are also summarized.

  7. Unstart coupling mechanism analysis of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jichao; Chang, Juntao; Wang, Lei; Cao, Shibin; Bao, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The combination of multiplemodules in parallel manner is an important way to achieve the much higher thrust of scramjet engine. For the multiple-modules scramjet engine, when inlet unstarted oscillatory flow appears in a single-module engine due to high backpressure, how to interact with each module by massflow spillage, and whether inlet unstart occurs in other modules are important issues. The unstarted flowfield and coupling characteristic for a three-module hypersonic inlet caused by center module II and side module III were, conducted respectively. The results indicate that the other two hypersonic inlets are forced into unstarted flow when unstarted phenomenon appears on a single-module hypersonic inlet due to high backpressure, and the reversed flow in the isolator dominates the formation, expansion, shrinkage, and disappearance of the vortexes, and thus, it is the major factor of unstart coupling of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet. The coupling effect among multiple modules makes hypersonic inlet be more likely unstarted. PMID:24348146

  8. Unstart Coupling Mechanism Analysis of Multiple-Modules Hypersonic Inlet

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Cao, Shibin

    2013-01-01

    The combination of multiplemodules in parallel manner is an important way to achieve the much higher thrust of scramjet engine. For the multiple-modules scramjet engine, when inlet unstarted oscillatory flow appears in a single-module engine due to high backpressure, how to interact with each module by massflow spillage, and whether inlet unstart occurs in other modules are important issues. The unstarted flowfield and coupling characteristic for a three-module hypersonic inlet caused by center module II and side module III were, conducted respectively. The results indicate that the other two hypersonic inlets are forced into unstarted flow when unstarted phenomenon appears on a single-module hypersonic inlet due to high backpressure, and the reversed flow in the isolator dominates the formation, expansion, shrinkage, and disappearance of the vortexes, and thus, it is the major factor of unstart coupling of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet. The coupling effect among multiple modules makes hypersonic inlet be more likely unstarted. PMID:24348146

  9. Corrsin Award Talk - Collide and conquer: flow-induced segregation in blood and other multicomponent suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Blood is a suspension of objects of various shapes, sizes and mechanical properties, whose distribution during flow is important in many contexts. Red blood cells tend to migrate toward the center of a blood vessel, leaving a cell-free layer at the vessel wall, while white blood cells and platelets are preferentially found near the walls, a phenomenon called margination that is critical for the physiological responses of inflammation and hemostasis. Additionally, drug delivery particles in the bloodstream will also undergo segregation - the influence of these phenomena on the efficacy of such particles is unknown. This talk describes efforts to gain a systematic understanding of flow-induced segregation phenomena in blood and other complex mixtures, using a combination of theory and direct simulations. Contrasts in size, deformability and shape can all lead to segregation. A kinetic theory model based on pair collisions and wall-induced hydrodynamic migration can capture the key effects observed in direct simulations, including a ``drainage transition'' in which one component is completely depleted from the bulk of the flow. Experiments performed in the laboratory of Wilbur Lam indicate the physiological and clinical importance of these observations. This talk is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. CBET- 1132579 and No. CBET-1436082.

  10. NASA's hypersonic fluid and thermal physics program (Aerothermodynamics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, R. A.; Hunt, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    This survey paper gives an overview of NASA's hypersonic fluid and thermal physics program (recently renamed aerothermodynamics). The purpose is to present the elements of, example results from, and rationale and projection for this program. The program is based on improving the fundamental understanding of aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic flow phenomena over hypersonic vehicles in the continuum, transitional, and rarefied flow regimes. Vehicle design capabilities, computational fluid dynamics, computational chemistry, turbulence modeling, aerothermal loads, orbiter flight data analysis, orbiter experiments, laser photodiagnostics, and facilities are discussed.

  11. Hypersonic Wind Tunnels: Latest Citations from the Aerospace Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, operation, performance, and use of hypersonic wind tunnels. References cover the design of flow nozzles, diffusers, test sections, and ejectors for tunnels driven by compressed air, high-pressure gases, or cryogenic liquids. Methods for flow calibration, boundary layer control, local and freestream turbulence reduction, and force measurement are discussed. Intrusive and non-intrusive instrumentation, sources of measurement error, and measurement corrections are also covered. The citations also include the testing of inlets, nozzles, airfoils, and other components of hypersonic aerospace vehicles. Comprehensive coverage of supersonic and blowdown wind tunnels, and force balance systems for wind tunnels are covered in separate bibliographies.

  12. Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2015-02-01

    An overview of linear collider programs is given. The history and technical challenges are described and the pioneering electron-positron linear collider, the SLC, is first introduced. For future energy frontier linear collider projects, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) are introduced and their technical features are discussed. The ILC is based on superconducting RF technology and the CLIC is based on two-beam acceleration technology. The ILC collaboration completed the Technical Design Report in 2013, and has come to the stage of "Design to Reality." The CLIC collaboration published the Conceptual Design Report in 2012, and the key technology demonstration is in progress. The prospects for further advanced acceleration technology are briefly discussed for possible long-term future linear colliders.

  13. Linear Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    An overview of linear collider programs is given. The history and technical challenges are described and the pioneering electron-positron linear collider, the SLC, is first introduced. For future energy frontier linear collider projects, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) are introduced and their technical features are discussed. The ILC is based on superconducting RF technology and the CLIC is based on two-beam acceleration technology. The ILC collaboration completed the Technical Design Report in 2013, and has come to the stage of "Design to Reality." The CLIC collaboration published the Conceptual Design Report in 2012, and the key technology demonstration is in progress. The prospects for further advanced acceleration technology are briefly discussed for possible long-term future linear colliders.

  14. Numerical methods for aerothermodynamic design of hypersonic space transport vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanie, K. M.; Brenneis, A.; Eberle, A.; Heiss, S.

    1993-04-01

    The requirement of the design process of hypersonic vehicles to predict flow past entire configurations with wings, fins, flaps, and propulsion system represents one of the major challenges for aerothermodynamics. In this context computational fluid dynamics has come up as a powerful tool to support the experimental work. A couple of numerical methods developed at MBB designed to fulfill the needs of the design process are described. The governing equations and fundamental details of the solution methods are shortly reviewed. Results are given for both geometrically simple test cases and realistic hypersonic configurations. Since there is still a considerable lack of experience for hypersonic flow calculations an extensive testing and verification is essential. This verification is done by comparison of results with experimental data and other numerical methods. The results presented prove that the methods used are robust, flexible, and accurate enough to fulfill the strong needs of the design process.

  15. Joint computational and experimental aerodynamics research on a hypersonic vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Walker, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    A closely coupled computational and experimental aerodynamics research program was conducted on a hypersonic vehicle configuration at Mach 8. Aerodynamic force and moment measurements and flow visualization results were obtained in the Sandia National Laboratories hypersonic wind tunnel for laminar boundary layer conditions. Parabolized and iterative Navier-Stokes simulations were used to predict flow fields and forces and moments on the hypersonic configuration. The basic vehicle configuration is a spherically blunted 10{degrees} cone with a slice parallel with the axis of the vehicle. On the slice portion of the vehicle, a flap can be attached so that deflection angles of 10{degrees}, 20{degrees}, and 30{degrees} can be obtained. Comparisons are made between experimental and computational results to evaluate quality of each and to identify areas where improvements are needed. This extensive set of high-quality experimental force and moment measurements is recommended for use in the calibration and validation of computational aerodynamics codes. 22 refs.

  16. Muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B. |; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {micro}{sup +}{micro}{sup {minus}}colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  17. Galactic scale gas flows in colliding galaxies: 3-dimensional, N-body/hydrodynamics experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Susan A.; Gerber, Richard A.; Balsara, Dinshaw S.

    1994-01-01

    We present some results from three dimensional computer simulations of collisions between models of equal mass galaxies, one of which is a rotating, disk galaxy containing both gas and stars and the other is an elliptical containing stars only. We use fully self consistent models in which the halo mass is 2.5 times that of the disk. In the experiments we have varied the impact parameter between zero (head on) and 0.9R (where R is the radius of the disk), for impacts perpendicular to the disk plane. The calculations were performed on a Cray 2 computer using a combined N-body/smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) program. The results show the development of complicated flows and shock structures in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the disk and the propagation outwards of a density wave in both the stars and the gas. The collisional nature of the gas results in a sharper ring than obtained for the star particles, and the development of high volume densities and shocks.

  18. Studies in hypersonic aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nydick, Ira Harvey

    2000-11-01

    This dissertation describes the aeroelastic analysis of a generic hypersonic vehicle, focusing on two specific problems: (1) hypersonic panel flutter, and (2) aeroelastic behavior of a complete unrestrained generic hypersonic vehicle operating at very high Mach numbers. The panels are modeled as shallow shells using Marguerre nonlinear shallow shell theory for orthotropic panels and the aerodynamic loads are obtained from third order piston theory. Two models of curvature, several applied temperature distributions, and the presence of a shock are also included in the model. Results indicate that the flutter speed of the panel is significantly reduced by temperature variations comparable to the buckling temperature and by the presence of a shock. A panel with initial curvature can be more stable than the flat panel but the increase in stability depends in a complex way on the material properties of the panel and the amount of curvature. At values of dynamic pressure above critical, aperiodic motion was observed. The value of dynamic pressure for which this occurs in both heated panels and curved panels is much closer to the critical dynamic pressure than for the flat, unheated panel. A comparison of piston theory aerodynamics and Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics was performed for a two dimensional panel with prescribed motion and the results indicate that while 2nd or higher order piston theory agrees very well with the Euler solution for the frequencies seen in hypersonic panel flutter, it differs substantially from the Navier-Stokes solution. The aeroelastic behavior of the complete vehicle was simulated using the unrestrained equations of motion, utilizing the method of quasi-coordinates. The unrestrained mode shapes of the vehicle were obtained from an equivalent plate analysis using an available code (ELAPS). The effects of flexible trim and rigid body degrees of freedom are carefully incorporated in the mathematical model. This model was applied to a

  19. Hypersonic ramjets for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubert, K. F.

    1970-01-01

    The author briefly describes why he thinks air-breathing propulsion merits serious consideration as an alternative or supplement to rocket propulsion for space shuttle missions. Several aspects of hypersonic ramjet technology are discussed which are indicative of the current state of development and of the compromises which are made in arriving at effective engine configuration concepts. Points of interest in the current NASA Hypersonic Research Engine Project are cited as to exemplify the actual development of a hydrogen-fueled, regeneratively cooled, flight-weight, dual-combustion mode hypersonic ramjet.

  20. Hypersonic transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A hypersonic transport aircraft design project was selected as a result of interactions with NASA Lewis Research Center personnel and fits the Presidential concept of the Orient Express. The Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA) and an undergraduate student worked at the NASA Lewis Research Center during the 1986 summer conducting a literature survey, and relevant literature and useful software were collected. The computer software was implemented in the Computer Aided Design Laboratory of the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department. In addition to the lectures by the three instructors, a series of guest lectures was conducted. The first of these lectures 'Anywhere in the World in Two Hours' was delivered by R. Luidens of NASA Lewis Center. In addition, videotaped copies of relevant seminars obtained from NASA Lewis were also featured. The first assignment was to individually research and develop the mission requirements and to discuss the findings with the class. The class in consultation with the instructors then developed a set of unified mission requirements. Then the class was divided into three design groups (1) Aerodynamics Group, (2) Propulsion Group, and (3) Structures and Thermal Analyses Group. The groups worked on their respective design areas and interacted with each other to finally come up with an integrated conceptual design. The three faculty members and the GTA acted as the resource persons for the three groups and aided in the integration of the individual group designs into the final design of a hypersonic aircraft.

  1. Hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkamhawi, Hani; Greiner, Tom; Fuerst, Gerry; Luich, Shawn; Stonebraker, Bob; Wray, Todd

    1990-01-01

    A hypersonic aircraft is designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and it was decided that the aircraft would use one full scale turbofan-ramjet. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic region. After considering aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, and landing systems, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets are also taken into consideration in the final design. A hypersonic aircraft was designed which uses scramjets to accelerate from Mach 6 to Mach 10 and sustain that speed for two minutes. Different propulsion systems were considered and a full scale turbofan-ramjet was chosen. Two solid rocket boosters were added to save fuel and help the aircraft pass through the transonic reqion. After the aerodynamics, aircraft design, stability and control, cooling systems, mission profile, landing systems, and their physical interactions were considered, a conventional aircraft configuration was chosen over that of a waverider. The conventional design was chosen due to its landing characteristics and the relative expense compared to the waverider. Fuel requirements and the integration of the engine systems and their inlets were also considered in the designing process.

  2. Heat transfer measurements in ONERA supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnels using passive and active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balageas, D.; Boscher, D.; Deom, A.; Gardette, G.

    Over the past few years, a major intellectual and technical investment has been made at ONERA to use data acquisition systems and data reduction procedures using an infrared camera as a detector under routine wind tunnel conditions. This allows a really quantitative mapping of heat transfer rate distributions on models in supersonic and hypersonic flows. Sufficient experience has now been acquired to allow us to give an overview of: (1) the systems and data reduction procedures developed for both passive and active methods; (2) typical results obtained on various configurations such as supersonic axisymmetrical flow around an ogival body (passive and active thermography), heat flux modulation in the reattachment zone of a flap in hypersonic regime, transitional heating on very slightly blunted spheroconical bodies in hypersonic flows, and materials testing in high-enthalpy hypersonic flow (passive thermography).

  3. Condensation shocks in hypersonic nitrogen tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Susan T.; Griffith, Wayland C.; Lederer, Melissa; Ragsdale, William C.; Yanta, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental observations and a theoretical model for the onset and disappearance of condensation are provided for hypersonic flows of pure nitrogen at M = 10, 14, and 18. A method for analyzing the thermodynamic and flow properties of a partially condensed mixture from known supply conditions and measured Pitot pressure yields the local static pressure and temperature, mass fraction of the nitrogen condensed, and the Mach number of the partially condensed flow based on frozen sound speed. The transition between partially condensed-supercooled flow is found to occur at 22-25 K isobaric supercooling with the corresponding mass fraction condensed being 12-14 percent over a range of two orders of magnitude in local static pressure. The heat released and vapor mass removed during condensation ultimately raise the local pressure and temperature and reduce the flow Mach number.

  4. Progress in hypersonic combustion technology with computation and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Griffin Y.; Kumar, Ajay; Erdos, John I.

    1990-01-01

    Design of successful airbreathing engines for operation at near-orbital speeds presents significant challenges in all the disciplines involved, including propulsion. This paper presents a discussion of the important physics of hypersonic combustion and an assessment of the state of the art of ground simulations with pulse facilities and with computational techniques. Recent examples of experimental and computational simulations are presented and discussed. The need for continued application of these tools to establish the credibility and fidelity of engineering design methods for practical hypersonic combustors is emphasized along with the critical need for improved diagnostic methods for hypervelocity reacting flows.

  5. Hypersonic Interceptor Performance Evaluation Center aero-optics performance predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, George W.; Pond, John E.; Snow, Ronald; Hwang, Yanfang

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the Hypersonic Interceptor Performance Evaluation Center's (HIPEC) aerooptics performance predictions capability. It includes code results for three dimensional shapes and comparisons to initial experiments. HIPEC consists of a collection of aerothermal, aerodynamic computational codes which are capable of covering the entire flight regime from subsonic to hypersonic flow and include chemical reactions and turbulence. Heat transfer to the various surfaces is calculated as an input to cooling and ablation processes. HIPEC also has aero-optics codes to determine the effect of the mean flowfield and turbulence on the tracking and imaging capability of on-board optical sensors. The paper concentrates on the latter aspects.

  6. Energy Dependence of Directed Flow over a Wide Range of Pseudorapidity in Au+Au Collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Wuosmaa, A.H.; Baker, M.D.; Barton, D.S.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Gushue, S.; Hauer, M.; Heintzelman, G.A.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Remsberg, L.P.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Stankiewicz, M.A.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M.P.

    2006-07-07

    We report on measurements of directed flow as a function of pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at energies of {radical}(s{sub NN})=19.6, 62.4, 130 and 200 GeV as measured by the PHOBOS detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. These results are particularly valuable because of the extensive, continuous pseudorapidity coverage of the PHOBOS detector. There is no significant indication of structure near midrapidity and the data surprisingly exhibit extended longitudinal scaling similar to that seen for elliptic flow and charged particle pseudorapidity density.

  7. Surface pressure measurements on a hypersonic vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Henfling, J.F.; Larson, D.E.; Payne, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    Extensive surface pressure measurements were obtained on a hypersonic vehicle configuration at Mach 8 for the purpose of computational fluid dynamics code validation. Experiments were conducted in the Sandia National Laboratories hypersonic wind tunnel. All measurements were made for laminar flow conditions at a Reynolds number (based on model length) of 1.81 x 10{sup 6} and perfect gas conditions. The basic vehicle configuration is a spherically blunted, 10{degree} half- angle cone, with a slice parallel to the axis of the vehicle. To the aft portion of the slice could be attached flaps of varying angle; 10, 20, and 30{degree}. Surface pressure measurements were obtained for angles of attack from -10 to +18{degree}, for various roll angles, at 96 locations on the body surface. All three deflected flap angles produced separated flow on the sliced portion of the body in front of the flap. Because of the three-dimensional expansion over the slice, the separated flow on the slice and flap was also highly three- dimensional. The results of the present experiment provide extensive surface pressure measurements for the validation of computational fluid dynamics codes for separated flow caused by an embedded shock wave.

  8. Applications of underexpanded jets in hypersonic aerothermodynamics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    2012-11-01

    A method of underexpanded hypersonic viscous jets has been developed to acquire experimental aerodynamic data for simple-shape bodies (plates, wedges, disks, and others) in the transitional regime between free-molecular and continuum flow regimes. The kinetic, viscous, and nonequilibrium processes in the jets of He, Ar, N2, and CO2 under various experimental conditions have been analyzed by asymptotic methods and numerical techniques. Fundamental laws for the aerodynamic characteristics and similarity parameters are revealed. In the case of hypersonic stabilization, the Reynolds number and temperature factor are the main similarity parameters. This research has discovered those conditions, which allow the significant influence of other parameters (specific heat ratio, viscosity parameter, Mach number). The acquired data could be used effectively for research and prediction of aerodynamic characteristics of vehicles during hypersonic flights under the rarefied atmospheric conditions of Earth, Mars, Venus, and other planets.

  9. Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant-temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spina, Eric F.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective in the two research investigations performed under NASA Langley sponsorship (Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers) has been to increase the understanding of the physics of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. The study began with an extension of constant-temperature thermal anemometry techniques to a Mach 11 helium flow, including careful examinations of hot-wire construction techniques, system response, and system calibration. This was followed by the application of these techniques to the exploration of a Mach 11 helium turbulent boundary layer (To approximately 290 K). The data that was acquired over the course of more than two years consists of instantaneous streamwise mass flux measurements at a frequency response of about 500 kHz. The data are of exceptional quality in both the time and frequency domain and possess a high degree of repeatability. The data analysis that has been performed to date has added significantly to the body of knowledge on hypersonic turbulence, and the data reduction is continuing. An attempt was then made to extend these thermal anemometry techniques to higher enthalpy flows, starting with a Mach 6 air flow with a stagnation temperature just above that needed to prevent liquefaction (To approximately 475 F). Conventional hot-wire anemometry proved to be inadequate for the selected high-temperature, high dynamic pressure flow, with frequent wire breakage and poor system frequency response. The use of hot-film anemometry has since been investigated for these higher-enthalpy, severe environment flows. The difficulty with using hot-film probes for dynamic (turbulence) measurements is associated with construction limitations and conduction of heat into the film substrate. Work continues under a NASA GSRP grant on the development of a hot film probe that overcomes these shortcomings for hypersonic

  10. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  11. Advanced hypersonic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utzinger, Rob; Blank, Hans-Joachim; Cox, Craig; Harvey, Greg; Mckee, Mike; Molnar, Dave; Nagy, Greg; Petersen, Steve

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this design project is to develop the hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft to replace the SR-71 and to complement existing intelligence gathering devices. The initial design considerations were to create a manned vehicle which could complete its mission with at least two airborne refuelings. The aircraft must travel between Mach 4 and Mach 7 at an altitude of 80,000 feet for a maximum range of 12,000 nautical miles. The vehicle should have an air breathing propulsion system at cruise. With a crew of two, the aircraft should be able to take off and land on a 10,000 foot runway, and the yearly operational costs were not to exceed $300 million. Finally, the aircraft should exhibit stealth characteristics, including a minimized radar cross-section (RCS) and a reduced sonic boom. The technology used in this vehicle should allow for production between the years 1993 and 1995.

  12. Hypersonic jet control effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D.; Stollery, J. L.; Smith, A. J.

    The present study aims to identify some of the parameters which determine the upstream extent and the lateral spreading of the separation front around an under-expanded transverse jet on a slender blunted cone. The tests were conducted in the Cranfield hypersonic facility at M∞ = 8.2, Re∞ /cm = 4.5 to 9.0 × 104 and at M∞ = 12.3, Re∞ /cm = 3.3 × 104. Air was used as the working gas for both the freestream and the jet. Schlieren pictures were used for the visualisation of the three-dimensional structures around the jet. Pressure, normal force and pitching moment measurements were conducted to quantitatively study the interaction region and its effects on the vehicle. An analytical algorithm has been developed to predict the shape of the separation front around the body.

  13. NASA's Hypersonic Investment Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; Hutt, John; McClinton, Charles

    2002-01-01

    NASA has established long term goals for access to space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goal for third-generation launch systems represents significant reduction in cost and improved safety over the current first generation system. The Advanced Space Transportation Office (ASTP) at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Hypersonic Investment Area (HIA), third generation technologies are being pursued in the areas of propulsion, airframe, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), avionics, power, operations and system analysis. These technologies are being matured through research and both ground and flight-testing. This paper provides an overview of the HIA program plans and recent accomplishments.

  14. Hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulk, Tim; Chiarini, David; Hill, Kevin; Kunszt, Bob; Odgen, Chris; Truong, Bon

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design of a hypersonic reconnaissance aircraft for the U.S. Navy is discussed. After eighteen weeks of work, a waverider design powered by two augmented turbofans was chosen. The aircraft was designed to be based on an aircraft carrier and to cruise 6,000 nautical miles at Mach 4;80,000 feet and above. As a result the size of the aircraft was only allowed to have a length of eighty feet, fifty-two feet in wingspan, and roughly 2,300 square feet in planform area. Since this is a mainly cruise aircraft, sixty percent of its 100,000 pound take-off weight is JP fuel. At cruise, the highest temperature that it will encounter is roughly 1,100 F, which can be handled through the use of a passive cooling system.

  15. On Challenges for Hypersonic Turbulent Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, H C; Sjogreen, B

    2009-01-14

    This short note discusses some of the challenges for design of suitable spatial numerical schemes for hypersonic turbulent flows, including combustion, and thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flows. Often, hypersonic turbulent flows in re-entry space vehicles and space physics involve mixed steady strong shocks and turbulence with unsteady shocklets. Material mixing in combustion poses additional computational challenges. Proper control of numerical dissipation in numerical methods beyond the standard shock-capturing dissipation at discontinuities is an essential element for accurate and stable simulations of the subject physics. On one hand, the physics of strong steady shocks and unsteady turbulence/shocklet interactions under the nonequilibrium environment is not well understood. On the other hand, standard and newly developed high order accurate (fourth-order or higher) schemes were developed for homogeneous hyperbolic conservation laws and mixed hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs) (without source terms). The majority of finite rate chemistry and thermal nonequilibrium simulations employ methods for homogeneous time-dependent PDEs with a pointwise evaluation of the source terms. The pointwise evaluation of the source term might not be the best choice for stability, accuracy and minimization of spurious numerics for the overall scheme.

  16. Combustion modes around hypersonic projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Michel Roger

    This work provides new experiments which detail the flow field characteristics around a blunt projectile traveling hypersonically in a reactive mixture using simultaneous planar laser-induced fluoresence and schlieren imaging, and stagnation pressure history measurements. The flow fields are generated using an expansion tube facility which accelerates a reactive mixture to supersonic speeds. The physical characteristics and the performance of the expansion tube are discussed. A blunt projectile is fixed at the exit of the tube and laser-based diagnostics are used to image the resulting combustion. Experimental results obtained here as well as results obtained from the literature suggest that for steady combustion to occur in supersonic reactive flow fields two conditions must be satisfied: (1) the post-shock induction time along the stagnation line should be much smaller than the time required for the shocked particles to reach the body; (2) the flow velocity relative to the projectile has to be larger than the mixture's Chapman-Jouget detonation velocity. For the unsteady flows, the measured frequency of oscillations decreases with increasing body diameter, mixture sensitivity, and free stream pressure. Dimensional analysis of the experimental results suggests that the dominant oscillations are due to disturbances reflecting off the cylinder body, in agreement with models proposed previously. Analogies are made between the flow fields observed in these experiments and those of 1-D pulsed detonations, and deflagration to detonation transitions. A theory for prediction of detonation initiation by blunted projectiles traveling at the Chapman-Jouget detonation speeds is modified here to be applicable to projectiles traveling at lower velocities. The modified theory is used to identify the boundaries of the different combustion modes as a function of projectile Mach number and mixture initial pressure. Results from the ballistic range experiments, computational fluid

  17. Homogeneous catalysts in hypersonic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Harradine, D.M.; Lyman, J.L.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Pack, R.T.; Schott, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Density and residence time both become unfavorably small for efficient combustion of hydrogen fuel in ramjet propulsion in air at high altitude and hypersonic speed. Raising the density and increasing the transit time of the air through the engine necessitates stronger contraction of the air flow area. This enhances the kinetic and thermodynamic tendency of H/sub 2/O to form completely, accompanied only by N/sub 2/ and any excess H/sub 2/(or O/sub 2/). The by-products to be avoided are the energetically expensive fragment species H and/or O atoms and OH radicals, and residual (2H/sub 2/ plus O/sub 2/). However, excessive area contraction raises air temperature and consequent combustion-product temperature by adiabatic compression. This counteracts and ultimately overwhelms the thermodynamic benefit by which higher density favors the triatomic product, H/sub 2/O, over its monatomic and diatomic alternatives. For static pressures in the neighborhood of 1 atm, static temperature must be kept or brought below ca. 2400 K for acceptable stability of H/sub 2/O. Another measure, whose requisite chemistry we address here, is to extract propulsive work from the combustion products early in the expansion. The objective is to lower the static temperature of the combustion stream enough for H/sub 2/O to become adequately stable before the exhaust flow is massively expanded and its composition ''frozen.'' We proceed to address this mechanism and its kinetics, and then examine prospects for enhancing its rate by homogeneous catalysts. 9 refs.

  18. Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.

    2009-10-19

    Parameters are given of muon colliders with center of mass energies of 1.5 and 3 TeV. Pion production is from protons on a mercury target. Capture, decay, and phase rotation yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Six dimensional cooling reduces the emittances until the trains are merged into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in 6 dimensions is then applied, followed by final transverse cooling in 50 T solenoids. After acceleration the muons enter the collider ring. Ongoing R&D is discussed.

  19. The critical role of aerodynamic heating effects in the design of hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, Allan R.

    1989-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles operate in a hostile aerothermal environment, which has a significant impact on their aerothermostructural performance. Significant coupling occurs between the aerodynamic flow field, structural heat transfer, and structural response, creating a multidisciplinary interaction. The critical role of aerodynamic heating effects in the design of hypersonic vehicles is identified with an example of high localized heating on an engine-cowl leading edge. Recent advances is integrated fluid-thermal-structural finite-element analyses are presented.

  20. Vorticity interaction effects on blunt bodies. [hypersonic viscous shock layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Wilcox, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the viscous shock layer equations governing laminar and turbulent flows of a perfect gas and radiating and nonradiating mixtures of perfect gases in chemical equilibrium are presented for hypersonic flow over spherically blunted cones and hyperboloids. Turbulent properties are described in terms of the classical mixing length. Results are compared with boundary layer and inviscid flowfield solutions; agreement with inviscid flowfield data is satisfactory. Agreement with boundary layer solutions is good except in regions of strong vorticity interaction; in these flow regions, the viscous shock layer solutions appear to be more satisfactory than the boundary layer solutions. Boundary conditions suitable for hypersonic viscous shock layers are devised for an advanced turbulence theory.

  1. TBCC Discipline Overview. Hypersonics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    The "National Aeronautics Research and Development Policy" document, issued by the National Science and Technology Council in December 2006, stated that one (among several) of the guiding objectives of the federal aeronautics research and development endeavors shall be stable and long-term foundational research efforts. Nearly concurrently, the National Academies issued a more technically focused aeronautics blueprint, entitled: the "Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics - Foundations for the Future." Taken together these documents outline the principles of an aeronautics maturation plan. Thus, in response to these overarching inputs (and others), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) organized the Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), a program within the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD). The FAP initiated foundational research and technology development tasks to enable the capability of future vehicles that operate across a broad range of Mach numbers, inclusive of the subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flight regimes. The FAP Hypersonics Project concentrates on two hypersonic missions: (1) Air-breathing Access to Space (AAS) and (2) the (Planetary Atmospheric) Entry, Decent, and Landing (EDL). The AAS mission focuses on Two-Stage-To-Orbit (TSTO) systems using air-breathing combined-cycle-engine propulsion; whereas, the EDL mission focuses on the challenges associated with delivering large payloads to (and from) Mars. So, the FAP Hypersonic Project investments are aligned to achieve mastery and intellectual stewardship of the core competencies in the hypersonic-flight regime, which ultimately will be required for practical systems with highly integrated aerodynamic/vehicle and propulsion/engine technologies. Within the FAP Hypersonics, the technology management is further divided into disciplines including one targeting Turbine-Based Combine-Cycle (TBCC) propulsion. Additionally, to obtain expertise and support from outside

  2. The Development of High Order Numerical Techniques for Reentry Simulation of Hypersonic Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The primary difficulty encountered when simulating hypersonic flow is that the flow normally includes strong nonlinear discontinuities. These discontinuities fall into three broad classes: shocks, slip-lines, and rarefaction waves. Moreover, in the hypersonic flow regime, the chemistry of hot gases plays a vital role and can not be neglected. These facts combine to make the numerical treatment of spacecraft reentry a most challenging problem. In this work, we develop a class of finite difference schemes that accurately resolve discontinuous solutions to spacecraft reentry flow and are simple to incorporate into existing spacecraft reentry codes.

  3. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will design, build, and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604BOO02G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate the aerodynamic flight database for the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. Al these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  4. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database in the hypersonic regime, The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  5. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database i n the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  6. X-33 Hypersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works, under a cooperative agreement with NASA, will build and fly the X-33, a half-scale prototype of a rocket-based, single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO), reusable launch vehicle (RLV). A 0.007-scale model of the X-33 604B0002G configuration was tested in four hypersonic facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center to examine vehicle stability and control characteristics and to populate an aerodynamic flight database in the hypersonic regime. The vehicle was found to be longitudinally controllable with less than half of the total body flap deflection capability across the angle of attack range at both Mach 6 and Mach 10. At these Mach numbers, the vehicle also was shown to be longitudinally stable or neutrally stable for typical (greater than 20 degrees) hypersonic flight attitudes. This configuration was directionally unstable and the use of reaction control jets (RCS) will be necessary to control the vehicle at high angles of attack in the hypersonic flight regime. Mach number and real gas effects on longitudinal aerodynamics were shown to be small relative to X-33 control authority.

  7. Hypersonic crossing shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussoy, M. I.; Horstman, K. C.; Horstman, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental data for two three-dimensional intersecting shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction flows at Mach 8.3 are presented. The test bodies, composed of two sharp fins fastened to a flat plate test bed, were designed to generate flows with varying degrees of pressure gradient, boundary-layer separation, and turning angle. The data include surface pressure and heat transfer distributions as well as mean flow field surveys both in the undisturbed and interaction regimes. The data are presented in a convenient form to be used to validate existing or future computational models of these hypersonic flows.

  8. A study of hypersonic small-disturbance theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Milton D

    1954-01-01

    A systematic study is made of the approximate inviscid theory of thin bodies moving at such high supersonic speeds that nonlinearity is an essential feature of the equations of flow. The first-order small-disturbance equations are derived for three-dimensional motions involving shock waves, and estimates are obtained for the order of error involved in the approximation. The hypersonic similarity rule of Tsien and Hayes, and Hayes' unsteady analogy appear in the course of the development. It is shown that the hypersonic theory can be interpreted so that it applies also in the range of linearized supersonic flow theory. Several examples are solved according to the small-disturbance theory, and compared with the full solutions when available.

  9. Hypersonic Wake Diagnostics Using Laser Induced Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Jack L.; Sukenik, Charles I.; Balla, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    A review of recent research performed in iodine that involves a two photon absorption of light at 193 nm will be discussed, and it's potential application to velocimetry measurements in a hypersonic flow field will be described. An alternative seed atom, Krypton, will be presented as a good candidate for performing nonintrusive hypersonic flow diagnostics. Krypton has a metastable state with a lifetime of approximately 43 s which would prove useful for time of flight measurement (TOF) and a sensitivity to collisions that can be utilized for density measurements. Calculations using modest laser energies and experimental values show an efficiency of excited state production to be on the order of 10(exp -6) for a two photon absorption at 193 nm.

  10. Application of CFD to a generic hypersonic flight research study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Michael J.; Lawrence, Scott L.; Dilley, Arthur D.; Hawkins, Richard W.; Walker, Mary M.; Oberkampf, William L.

    1993-01-01

    Computational analyses have been performed for the initial assessment of flight research vehicle concepts that satisfy requirements for potential hypersonic experiments. Results were obtained from independent analyses at NASA Ames, NASA Langley, and Sandia National Labs, using sophisticated time-dependent Navier-Stokes and parabolized Navier-Stokes methods. Careful study of a common problem consisting of hypersonic flow past a slightly blunted conical forebody was undertaken to estimate the level of uncertainty in the computed results, and to assess the capabilities of current computational methods for predicting boundary-layer transition onset. Results of this study in terms of surface pressure and heat transfer comparisons, as well as comparisons of boundary-layer edge quantities and flow-field profiles are presented here. Sensitivities to grid and gas model are discussed. Finally, representative results are presented relating to the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics in the vehicle design and the integration/support of potential experiments.

  11. Nonequilibrium molecular motion in a hypersonic shock wave.

    PubMed

    Pham-Van-Diep, G; Erwin, D; Muntz, E P

    1989-08-11

    Molecular velocities have been measured inside a hypersonic, normal shock wave, where the gas experiences rapid changes in its macroscopic properties. As first hypothesized by Mott-Smith, but never directly observed, the molecular velocity distribution exhibits a qualitatively bimodal character that is derived from the distribution functions on either side of the shock. Quantitatively correct forms of the molecular velocity distribution function in highly nonequilibrium flows can be calculated, by means of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo technique.

  12. Boundary Layer Transition Experiments in Support of the Hypersonics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Chen, Fang-Jenq; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.

    2007-01-01

    Two experimental boundary layer transition studies in support of fundamental hypersonics research are reviewed. The two studies are the HyBoLT flight experiment and a new ballistic range effort. Details are provided of the objectives and approach associated with each experimental program. The establishment of experimental databases from ground and flight are to provide better understanding of high-speed flows and data to validate and guide the development of simulation tools.

  13. Airbreathing Hypersonic Systems Focus at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James L.; Rausch, Vincent L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the status of the airbreathing hypersonic airplane and space-access vehicle design matrix, reflects on the synergies and issues, and indicates the thrust of the effort to resolve the design matrix and to focus/advance systems technology maturation. Priority is given to the design of the vision operational vehicles followed by flow-down requirements to flight demonstrator vehicles and their design for eventual consideration in the Future-X Program.

  14. Hypersonic technology-approach to an expanded program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearth, D. P.; Preyss, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    An overview of research, testing, and technology in the hypersonic range. Military and civilian hypersonic flight systems envisaged, ground testing facilities under development, methods for cooling the heated airframe, and use of hydrogen as fuel and coolant are discussed extensively. Air-breathing hypersonic cruise systems are emphasized, the airframe-integrated scramjet configuration is discussed and illustrated, materials proposed for hypersonic vehicles are reviewed, and test results on hypersonic flight (X-15 research aircraft) are indicated. Major advances and major problems in hypersonic flight and hypersonic technology are outlined, and the need for a hypersonic flying-laboratory research craft is stressed.

  15. Development of a two-equation turbulence model for hypersonic flows. Volume 1; Evaluation of a low Reynolds number correction to the Kappa - epsilon two equation compressible turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Doyle D.; Becht, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the current research is the development of an improved k-epsilon two-equation compressible turbulence model for turbulent boundary layer flows experiencing strong viscous-inviscid interactions. The development of an improved model is important in the design of hypersonic vehicles such as the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) and the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Improvements have been made to the low Reynolds number functions in the eddy viscosity and dissipation of solenoidal dissipation of the k-epsilon turbulence mode. These corrections offer easily applicable modifications that may be utilized for more complex geometries. The low Reynolds number corrections are functions of the turbulent Reynolds number and are therefore independent of the coordinate system. The proposed model offers advantages over some current models which are based upon the physical distance from the wall, that modify the constants of the standard model, or that make more corrections than are necessary to the governing equations. The code has been developed to solve the Favre averaged, boundary layer equations for mass, momentum, energy, turbulence kinetic energy, and dissipation of solenoidal dissipation using Keller's box scheme and the Newton spatial marching method. The code has been validated by removing the turbulent terms and comparing the solution with the Blasius solution, and by comparing the turbulent solution with an existing k-epsilon model code using wall function boundary conditions. Excellent agreement is seen between the computed solution and the Blasius solution, and between the two codes. The model has been tested for both subsonic and supersonic flat-plate turbulent boundary layer flow by comparing the computed skin friction with the Van Driest II theory and the experimental data of Weighardt; by comparing the transformed velocity profile with the data of Weighardt, and the Law of the Wall and the Law of the Wake; and by comparing the computed results

  16. Generic hypersonic vehicle performance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavez, Frank R.; Schmidt, David K.

    1993-01-01

    An integrated computational model of a generic hypersonic vehicle was developed for the purpose of determining the vehicle's performance characteristics, which include the lift, drag, thrust, and moment acting on the vehicle at specified altitude, flight condition, and vehicular configuration. The lift, drag, thrust, and moment are developed for the body fixed coordinate system. These forces and moments arise from both aerodynamic and propulsive sources. SCRAMjet engine performance characteristics, such as fuel flow rate, can also be determined. The vehicle is assumed to be a lifting body with a single aerodynamic control surface. The body shape and control surface location are arbitrary and must be defined. The aerodynamics are calculated using either 2-dimensional Newtonian or modified Newtonian theory and approximate high-Mach-number Prandtl-Meyer expansion theory. Skin-friction drag was also accounted for. The skin-friction drag coefficient is a function of the freestream Mach number. The data for the skin-friction drag coefficient values were taken from NASA Technical Memorandum 102610. The modeling of the vehicle's SCRAMjet engine is based on quasi 1-dimensional gas dynamics for the engine diffuser, nozzle, and the combustor with heat addition. The engine has three variable inputs for control: the engine inlet diffuser area ratio, the total temperature rise through the combustor due to combustion of the fuel, and the engine internal expansion nozzle area ratio. The pressure distribution over the vehicle's lower aft body surface, which acts as an external nozzle, is calculated using a combination of quasi 1-dimensional gas dynamic theory and Newtonian or modified Newtonian theory. The exhaust plume shape is determined by matching the pressure inside the plume, calculated from the gas dynamic equations, with the freestream pressure, calculated from Newtonian or Modified Newtonian theory. In this manner, the pressure distribution along the vehicle after body

  17. Modeling of ground-water flow in subsurface Austin Chalk and Taylor marl in Ellis County, Texas, near the superconducting super collider site

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, R.E. . Bureau of Economic Geology)

    1993-02-01

    Numerical models are useful tools for developing an understanding of ground-water flow in sparsely characterized low-permeability aquifers. Finite-difference, cross-sectional models of Cretaceous chalk and marl formations near the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) were constructed using MODFLOW to evaluate ground-water circulation paths and travel times. Weathered and fractured zones with enhanced permeability were included to assess the effect these features had on flow paths and times. Pump tests, slug tests, packer tests, core tests, and estimates were used to define hydraulic properties for model input. The model was calibrated with water-level data from monitor wells and from wire-line piezometers near a test shaft excavated by the SSC project. A ratio of vertical-to-horizontal permeability of 0.0085 was estimated through model calibration. A chalk-to-marl permeability ratio of 18 was needed to reproduce artesian head in a well completed in chalk beneath marl. Hydraulic head distributions and ground-water flow paths reflected local, intermediate, and regional flow systems with recharge beneath upland surface-water divides and discharge in valleys. Most of the flow (99%) occurred in the weathered zone, with average residence times of 5 to 10 years. Residence time in unweathered chalk bedrock was substantially longer, at an average of 1.7 Ma. As expected, the model demonstrated that deep and rapid ground-water circulation might occur in fracture zones. Particle paths calculated using MODPATH showed that ground-water travel times from recharge areas to the SSC subsurface facilities might be 20 to 60 years where flow is through fracture zones.

  18. HIAD-2 (Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) project is a disruptive technology that will accommodate the atmospheric entry of heavy payloads to planetary bodies such as Mars. HIAD over...

  19. Collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This past year our group participated in both the D0 experiment at Fermilab and the SDC experiment at the SSC. Most of our effort was concentrated on the D0 project, where we contributed as much manpower as possible to the commissioning of the detector in preparation for the coming collider run. Our SDC work consisted of the investigation of one of the candidate technologies for the forward calorimeter. On the D0 experiment, our primary responsibilities have been in the areas of electronics commissioning and in the establishment of triggers for the coming collider run. We have also actively participated in the physics studies and have contributed to the upgrade effort as much as time has permitted. Our group has also participated in the cosmic ray run and in the D0 test beam. In view of our contributions, James White was selected as a member of the D0 Trigger board, and Jay Wightman is being trained as one of the global experts'' who are responsible for keeping the detector operational during the run. In addition, Amber Boehnlein has played a major role in the Level-2 trigger commissioning. A more detailed description of these activities is given in this paper.

  20. Hypersonic modes in nanophononic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Hepplestone, S P; Srivastava, G P

    2008-09-01

    Frequency gaps and negative group velocities of hypersonic phonon modes in periodically arranged composite semiconductors are presented. Trends and criteria for phononic gaps are discussed using a variety of atomic-level theoretical approaches. From our calculations, the possibility of achieving semiconductor-based one-dimensional phononic structures is established. We present results of the location and size of gaps, as well as negative group velocities of phonon modes in such structures. In addition to reproducing the results of recent measurements of the locations of the band gaps in the nanosized Si/Si{0.4}Ge{0.6} superlattice, we show that such a system is a true one-dimensional hypersonic phononic crystal.

  1. Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Test of a Flare-type Membrane Aeroshell for Atmospheric Entry Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Koyama, Masashi; Kimura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Kojiro; Abe, Takashi; Koichi Hayashi, A.

    A flexible aeroshell for atmospheric entry vehicles has attracted attention as an innovative space transportation system. In this study, hypersonic wind tunnel tests were carried out to investigate the behavior, aerodynamic characteristics and aerodynamic heating environment in hypersonic flow for a previously developed capsule-type vehicle with a flare-type membrane aeroshell made of ZYLON textile sustained by a rigid torus frame. Two different models with different flare angles (45º and 60º) were tested to experimentally clarify the effect of flare angle. Results indicate that flare angle of aeroshell has significant and complicate effect on flow field and aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flow at Mach 9.45 and the flare angle is very important parameter for vehicle design with the flare-type membrane aeroshell.

  2. Parametric Analysis of a Hypersonic Inlet using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliden, Daniel

    For CFD validation, hypersonic flow fields are simulated and compared with experimental data specifically designed to recreate conditions found by hypersonic vehicles. Simulated flow fields on a cone-ogive with flare at Mach 7.2 are compared with experimental data from NASA Ames Research Center 3.5" hypersonic wind tunnel. A parametric study of turbulence models is presented and concludes that the k-kl-omega transition and SST transition turbulence model have the best correlation. Downstream of the flare's shockwave, good correlation is found for all boundary layer profiles, with some slight discrepancies of the static temperature near the surface. Simulated flow fields on a blunt cone with flare above Mach 10 are compared with experimental data from CUBRC LENS hypervelocity shock tunnel. Lack of vibrational non-equilibrium calculations causes discrepancies in heat flux near the leading edge. Temperature profiles, where non-equilibrium effects are dominant, are compared with the dissociation of molecules to show the effects of dissociation on static temperature. Following the validation studies is a parametric analysis of a hypersonic inlet from Mach 6 to 20. Compressor performance is investigated for numerous cowl leading edge locations up to speeds of Mach 10. The variable cowl study showed positive trends in compressor performance parameters for a range of Mach numbers that arise from maximizing the intake of compressed flow. An interesting phenomenon due to the change in shock wave formation for different Mach numbers developed inside the cowl that had a negative influence on the total pressure recovery. Investigation of the hypersonic inlet at different altitudes is performed to study the effects of Reynolds number, and consequently, turbulent viscous effects on compressor performance. Turbulent boundary layer separation was noted as the cause for a change in compressor performance parameters due to a change in Reynolds number. This effect would not be

  3. Systems Challenges for Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James L.; Laruelle, Gerard; Wagner, Alain

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the system challenges posed by fully reusable hypersonic cruise airplanes and access to space vehicles. Hydrocarbon and hydrogen fueled airplanes are considered with cruise speeds of Mach 5 and 10, respectively. The access to space matrix is examined. Airbreathing and rocket powered, single- and two-stage vehicles are considered. Reference vehicle architectures are presented. Major systems/subsystems challenges are described. Advanced, enhancing systems concepts as well as common system technologies are discussed.

  4. Observation and tuning of hypersonic bandgaps in colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Wang, Jianjun; Jonas, Ulrich; Fytas, George; Stefanou, Nikolaos

    2006-10-01

    Composite materials with periodic variations of density and/or sound velocities, so-called phononic crystals, can exhibit bandgaps where propagation of acoustic waves is forbidden. Phononic crystals are the elastic analogue of the well-established photonic crystals and show potential for manipulating the flow of elastic energy. So far, the experimental realization of phononic crystals has been restricted to macroscopic systems with sonic or ultrasonic bandgaps in the sub-MHz frequency range. In this work, using high-resolution Brillouin spectroscopy we report the first observation of a hypersonic bandgap in face-centred-cubic colloidal crystals formed by self-assembly of polystyrene nanoparticles with subsequent fluid infiltration. Depending on the particle size and the sound velocity in the infiltrated fluid, the frequency and the width of the gap can be tuned. Promising technological applications of hypersonic crystals, ranging from tunable filters and heat management to acousto-optical devices, are anticipated.

  5. Hypersonic trans-Pacific flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Aeronautics Design Program at The Ohio State University was to design a vehicle for hypersonic passenger flight across the Pacific Ocean. The specifications were as follows: (1) hypersonic flight; (2) range of 8000 nm; (3) passenger seating greater than 250; (4) operation from 15000 ft runways Mach number and altitude of operation were at the discretion of the design teams as were the propulsion system and type of fuel. The advanced aeronautics design sequence established specifically for this program consisted of a three quarter sequence as follows: Fall: ME 694 Senior Design Seminar - one quarter hour. Designers and specialists met one hour each week for ten weeks on relevant flight vehicle design topics. Winter: ME 515H Flight Vehicle Design - four quarter hours. Three design teams of six students each performed preliminary design studies of hypersonic configurations and potential propulsion systems. Each team's results were summarized in a final presentation to NASA Lewis Research Center personnel. The presentations resulted in the selection of the most promising design for additional development. Spring: AAE 516H Advanced Flight Vehicle Design - four quarter hrs. The class was reorganized to focus upon the specific design selected from the Winter configuration studies. Detailed analyses of thermal protection systems, costs, mission refinements, etc., completed the design task and final presentations were made to NASA Lewis Research Center staff.

  6. Application of a diode-laser absorption technique with the d(2) transition of atomic rb for hypersonic flow-field measurements.

    PubMed

    Trinks, O; Beck, W H

    1998-10-20

    With a first application of semiconductor lasers to absorption measurements of seeded atomic Rb in high-enthalpy flow fields, a diagnostic technique for time-resolved determination of flow velocity and gas temperature with a line-shape analysis was developed. In our measurements a GaAlAs diode laser was used to scan repetitively at 15 kHz over 1.3 cm(-1) across the D(2) resonance transition (5S(1/2) ? 5P(3/2), 780.2 nm) of seeded atomic Rb to obtain multiple absorption line shapes. The time-dependent signal contains highly resolved spectral line-shape information, which we interpret by fitting the spectrally resolved line shapes to Voigt profiles. Kinetic temperatures in the range 900-1400 K and gas velocities in the range 3900-6200 ms(-1) were obtained from the Doppler-broadened component of the line shape and from the Doppler shift, respectively, of the absorption frequency.

  7. Non-Equilibrium Effects on Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilbum

    Understanding non-equilibrium effects of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers is essential in order to build cost efficient and reliable hypersonic vehicles. It is well known that non-equilibrium effects on the boundary layers are notable, but our understanding of the effects are limited. The overall goal of this study is to improve the understanding of non-equilibrium effects on hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. A new code has been developed for direct numerical simulations of spatially developing hypersonic turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate with finite-rate reactions. A fifth-order hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme with a low dissipation finite-difference scheme is utilized in order to capture stiff gradients while resolving small motions in turbulent boundary layers. The code has been validated by qualitative and quantitative comparisons of two different simulations of a non-equilibrium flow and a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer. With the validated code, direct numerical simulations of four different hypersonic turbulent boundary layers, perfect gas and non-equilibrium flows of pure oxygen and nitrogen, have been performed. In order to rule out uncertainties in comparisons, the same inlet conditions are imposed for each species, and then mean and turbulence statistics as well as near-wall turbulence structures are compared at a downstream location. Based on those comparisons, it is shown that there is no direct energy exchanges between internal and turbulent kinetic energies due to thermal and chemical non-equilibrium processes in the flow field. Instead, these non-equilibria affect turbulent boundary layers by changing the temperature without changing the main characteristics of near-wall turbulence structures. This change in the temperature induces the changes in the density and viscosity and the mean flow fields are then adjusted to satisfy the conservation laws. The perturbation fields are modified according to

  8. Experimental research of the aerodynamics of nozzles and plumes at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, Earl R.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose was to experimentally characterize the flow field created by the interaction of a single expansion ramp nozzle (SERN) flow with a hypersonic external stream. Data were obtained from a generic nozzle/afterbody model in the 3.5 Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel of the NASA Ames Research Center. The model design and test planning were performed in close cooperation with members of the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) computational fluid dynamics (SFD) team, so that the measurements could be used in CFD code validation studies. Presented here is a description of the experiment, the extent of the measurements obtained, and the experimental results.

  9. Hypersonic Navier Stokes Comparisons to Orbiter Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Nompelis, Ioannis; Candler, Graham; Barnhart, Michael; Yoon, Seokkwan

    2009-01-01

    Hypersonic chemical nonequilibrium simulations of low earth orbit entry flow fields are becoming increasingly commonplace as software and computational capabilities become more capable. However, development of robust and accurate software to model these environments will always encounter a significant barrier in developing a suite of high quality calibration cases. The US3D hypersonic nonequilibrium Navier Stokes analysis capability has been favorably compared to a number of wind tunnel test cases. Extension of the calibration basis for this software to Orbiter flight conditions will provide an incremental increase in confidence. As part of the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment and the Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements project, NASA is performing entry flight testing on the Orbiter to provide valuable aerothermodynamic heating data. An increase in interest related to orbiter entry environments is resulting from this activity. With the advent of this new data, comparisons of the US3D software to the new flight testing data is warranted. This paper will provide information regarding the framework of analyses that will be applied with the US3D analysis tool. In addition, comparisons will be made to entry flight testing data provided by the Orbiter BLT Flight Experiment and HYTHIRM projects. If data from digital scans of the Orbiter windward surface become available, simulations will also be performed to characterize the difference in surface heating between the CAD reference OML and the digitized surface provided by the surface scans.

  10. Status of Turbulence Modeling for Hypersonic Propulsion Flowpaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Vyas, Manan A.; Engblom, William A.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of current turbulent flow calculation methods for hypersonic propulsion flowpaths, particularly the scramjet engine. Emphasis is placed on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods, but some discussion of newer meth- ods such as Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is also provided. The report is organized by considering technical issues throughout the scramjet-powered vehicle flowpath including laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition, shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions, scalar transport modeling (specifically the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers) and compressible mixing. Unit problems are primarily used to conduct the assessment. In the combustor, results from calculations of a direct connect supersonic combustion experiment are also used to address the effects of turbulence model selection and in particular settings for the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. It is concluded that RANS turbulence modeling shortfalls are still a major limitation to the accuracy of hypersonic propulsion simulations, whether considering individual components or an overall system. Newer methods such as LES-based techniques may be promising, but are not yet at a maturity to be used routinely by the hypersonic propulsion community. The need for fundamental experiments to provide data for turbulence model development and validation is discussed.

  11. Status of turbulence modeling for hypersonic propulsion flowpaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Vyas, Manan A.; Engblom, William A.

    2014-06-01

    This report provides an assessment of current turbulent flow calculation methods for hypersonic propulsion flowpaths, particularly the scramjet engine. Emphasis is placed on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) methods, but some discussion of newer methods such as large eddy simulation (LES) is also provided. The report is organized by considering technical issues throughout the scramjet-powered vehicle flowpath, including laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition, shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions, scalar transport modeling (specifically the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers), and compressible mixing. Unit problems are primarily used to conduct the assessment. In the combustor, results from calculations of a direct connect supersonic combustion experiment are also used to address the effects of turbulence model selection and in particular settings for the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers. It is concluded that RANS turbulence modeling shortfalls are still a major limitation to the accuracy of hypersonic propulsion simulations, whether considering individual components or an overall system. Newer methods such as LES-based techniques may be promising, but are not yet at a maturity to be used routinely by the hypersonic propulsion community. The need for fundamental experiments to provide data for turbulence model development and validation is discussed.

  12. Airbreathing Hypersonic Technology Vision Vehicles and Development Dreams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClinton, C. R.; Hunt, J. L.; Ricketts, R. H.; Reukauf, P.; Peddie, C. L.

    1999-01-01

    Significant advancements in hypersonic airbreathing vehicle technology have been made in the country's research centers and industry over the past 40 years. Some of that technology is being validated with the X-43 flight tests. This paper presents an overview of hypersonic airbreathing technology status within the US, and a hypersonic technology development plan. This plan builds on the nation's large investment in hypersonics. This affordable, incremental plan focuses technology development on hypersonic systems, which could be operating by the 2020's.

  13. Robust control of hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yong-hua; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Yu-zhuo

    2007-11-01

    Design of a robust controller for the longitudinal dynamics of a hypersonic aircraft by using parameter space method is present. The desirable poles are mapped to the parameter space of the controller using pole placement approach in this method. The intersection of the parameter space is the common controller for the multiple mode system. This controller can meet the need of the different phases of aircraft. It has been proved by simulation that the controller has highly performance of precision and robustness for the disturbance caused by separation, cowl open, fuel on and fuel off and perturbation caused by unknown dynamics.

  14. Transpiration cooling in hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavella, Domingo; Roberts, Leonard

    1989-01-01

    A preliminary numerical study of transpiration cooling applied to a hypersonic configuration is presented. Air transpiration is applied to the NASA all-body configuration flying at an altitude of 30500 m with a Mach number of 10.3. It was found that the amount of heat disposal by convection is determined primarily by the local geometry of the aircraft for moderate rates of transpiration. This property implies that different areas of the aircraft where transpiration occurs interact weakly with each other. A methodology for quick assessments of the transpiration requirements for a given flight configuration is presented.

  15. Novel inlet-airframe integration methodology for hypersonic waverider vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feng; Liu, Jun; Shen, Chi-bing; Huang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    With the aim of integrating a ramjet or scramjet with an airframe, a novel inlet-airframe integration methodology for the hypersonic waverider vehicle is proposed. For this newly proposed design concept and for the specified flight conditions, not only the forebody of the vehicle but also its engine cowl and wings can ride on the bow shock wave, causing the bow shock wave to remain attached to the leading edge for the entire length of the vehicle. Thus, this integrated vehicle can take full advantage of the waverider's high lift-to-drag ratio characteristics and the ideal pre-compression surface for the engine. In this work, a novel inlet-airframe integrated axisymmetric basic flow model that accounts for both external and internal flows is first designed using the method of characteristics and the streamline tracing technique. Subsequently, the design of the inlet-airframe integrated waverider vehicle is generated from the integrated axisymmetric basic flow model using the streamline tracing technique. Then, the design methodologies of both the integrated axisymmetric basic flow model and the integrated waverider vehicle are verified by a computational numerical method. Finally, the viscous effects and performance of both the integrated axisymmetric basic flow model and the integrated waverider vehicle are analysed under the design condition using the numerical computation. The obtained results show that the proposed approach is effective in designing the integrated hypersonic waverider vehicle.

  16. X-43 Hypersonic Vehicle Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voland, Randall T.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; McClinton, Charles R.

    2005-01-01

    NASA recently completed two major programs in Hypersonics: Hyper-X, with the record-breaking flights of the X-43A, and the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program. The X-43A flights, the culmination of the Hyper-X Program, were the first-ever examples of a scramjet engine propelling a hypersonic vehicle and provided unique, convincing, detailed flight data required to validate the design tools needed for design and development of future operational hypersonic airbreathing vehicles. Concurrent with Hyper-X, NASA's NGLT Program focused on technologies needed for future revolutionary launch vehicles. The NGLT was "competed" by NASA in response to the President s redirection of the agency to space exploration, after making significant progress towards maturing technologies required to enable airbreathing hypersonic launch vehicles. NGLT quantified the benefits, identified technology needs, developed airframe and propulsion technology, chartered a broad University base, and developed detailed plans to mature and validate hypersonic airbreathing technology for space access. NASA is currently in the process of defining plans for a new Hypersonic Technology Program. Details of that plan are not currently available. This paper highlights results from the successful Mach 7 and 10 flights of the X-43A, and the current state of hypersonic technology.

  17. Multiphysics Simulation of Active Hypersonic Lip Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Wang, Wen-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the application of the Multidisciplinary Analysis (MDA) solver, Spectrum, in analyzing a hydrogen-cooled hypersonic cowl leading-edge structure. Spectrum, a multiphysics simulation code based on the finite element method, addresses compressible and incompressible fluid flow, structural, and thermal modeling, as well as the interactions between these disciplines. Fluid-solid-thermal interactions in a hydrogen impingement-cooled leading edge are predicted using Spectrum. Two- and semi-three-dimensional models are considered for a leading edge impingement coolant, concept under either specified external heat flux or aerothermodynamic heating from a Mach 5 external flow interaction. The solution accuracy is demonstrated from mesh refinement analysis. With active cooling, the leading edge surface temperature is drastically reduced from 1807 K of the adiabatic condition to 418 K. The internal coolant temperature profile exhibits a sharp gradient near channel/solid interface. Results from two different cooling channel configurations are also presented to illustrate the different behavior of alternative active cooling schemes.

  18. High Energy Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. B.; Gallardo, J. C.

    INTRODUCTION PHYSICS CONSIDERATIONS GENERAL REQUIRED LUMINOSITY FOR LEPTON COLLIDERS THE EFFECTIVE PHYSICS ENERGIES OF HADRON COLLIDERS HADRON-HADRON MACHINES LUMINOSITY SIZE AND COST CIRCULAR e^{+}e^- MACHINES LUMINOSITY SIZE AND COST e^{+}e^- LINEAR COLLIDERS LUMINOSITY CONVENTIONAL RF SUPERCONDUCTING RF AT HIGHER ENERGIES γ - γ COLLIDERS μ ^{+} μ^- COLLIDERS ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES DESIGN STUDIES STATUS AND REQUIRED R AND D COMPARISION OF MACHINES CONCLUSIONS DISCUSSION

  19. Hypersonic transports - Economics and environmental effects.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, R. H.; Waters, M. H.

    1972-01-01

    An economic analysis of hypersonic transports is presented to show projected operating costs (direct and indirect) and return on investment. Important assumptions are varied to determine the probable range of values for operating costs and return on investment. The environmental effects of hypersonic transports are discussed and compared to current supersonic transports. Estimates of sideline and flyover noise are made for a typical hypersonic transport, and the sonic boom problem is analyzed and discussed. Since the exhaust products from liquid hydrogen-fueled engines differ from those of kerosene-fueled aircraft, a qualitative assessment of air pollution effects is made.

  20. Hypersonic transports - Economics and environmental effects.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, R. H.; Waters, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    An economic analysis of hypersonic transports is presented to show projected operating costs (direct and indirect) and return on investment. Important assumptions are varied to determine the probable range of values for operating costs and return on investment. The environmental effects of hypersonic transports are discussed and compared to current supersonic transports. Estimates of sideline and flyover noise are made for a typical hypersonic transport, and the sonic boom problem is analyzed and discussed. Since the exhaust products from liquid hydrogen-fueled engines differ from those of kerosene-fueled aircraft, a qualitative assessment of air pollution effects is made.

  1. Hypersonic transports: Economics and environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, R. H.; Waters, M. H.

    1972-01-01

    An economic analysis of hypersonic transports is presented to show projected operating costs (direct and indirect) and return on investment. Important assumptions are varied to determine the probable range of values for operating costs and return on investment. The environmental effects of hypersonic transports are discussed and compared to current supersonic transports. Estimates of sideline and fly-over noise are made for a typical hypersonic transport, and the sonic boom problem is analyzed and discussed. Since the exhaust products from liquid hydrogen-fueled engines differ from those of kerosene-fueled aircraft, a qualitative assessment of air pollution effects is made.

  2. A methodology for hypersonic transport technology planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repic, E. M.; Olson, G. A.; Milliken, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    A systematic procedure by which the relative economic value of technology factors affecting design, configuration, and operation of a hypersonic cruise transport can be evaluated is discussed. Use of the methodology results in identification of first-order economic gains potentially achievable by projected advances in each of the definable, hypersonic technologies. Starting with a baseline vehicle, the formulas, procedures and forms which are integral parts of this methodology are developed. A demonstration of the methodology is presented for one specific hypersonic vehicle system.

  3. Three dimensional viscous analysis of a hypersonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, D. R.; Smith, G. E.; Liou, M.-F.; Benson, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    The flow fields in supersonic/hypersonic inlets are currently being studied at NASA Lewis Research Center using 2- and 3-D full Navier-Stokes and Parabolized Navier-Stokes solvers. These tools have been used to analyze the flow through the McDonnell Douglas Option 2 inlet which has been tested at Calspan in support of the National Aerospace Plane Program. Comparisons between the computational and experimental results are presented. These comparisons lead to better overall understanding of the complex flows present in this class of inlets. The aspects of the flow field emphasized in this work are the 3-D effects, the transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and the strong nonuniformities generated within the inlet.

  4. Effects of thermochemistry, nonequilibrium, and surface catalysis on the design of hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of the function of physical aspects of a gas on the characteristics of the flow and of the heating associated with hypersonic flight. At the high temperatures encountered, the thermal and chemical characteristics of the air in a hypersonic vehicle's shock layer are altered in ways which depend on the atomic and molecular structure of N and O and their ions; similar effects exist in scramjet propulsion systems. These properties in turn influence the character of shock waves and expansions, and hence the pressure, temperature, and velocity distributions. Transport properties affecting the boundary-layer structure will also affect heat flux and shear stress.

  5. Laminar-turbulent transition calculations of heat transfer at hypersonic Mach numbers over sharp cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, U. K.

    1988-01-01

    Computations of the hypersonic flow around sharp cones were carried out using the PNS code with attention given to the heat transfer predictions around the transition region. Results of calculations performed over 5, 8, and 10 deg half-angle sharp cones in the Mach number range of 7 to 10 are presented. It is noted that calculations of this type have become an integral part of the general design procedure for hypersonic vehicles such as the National Aerospace Plane and the Space Shuttle.

  6. CFD application to supersonic/hypersonic inlet airframe integration. [computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Supersonic external compression inlets are introduced, and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and tests needed to study flow associated with these inlets are outlined. Normal shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction is discussed. Boundary layer control is considered. Glancing sidewall shock interaction is treated. The CFD validation of hypersonic inlet configurations is explained. Scramjet inlet modules are shown.

  7. Molecular Simulation of Nonequilibrium Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzentruber, T. E.; Valentini, P.; Tump, P.

    2011-08-01

    Large-scale conventional time-driven molecular dynam- ics (MD) simulations of normal shock waves are performed for monatomic argon and argon-helium mixtures. For pure argon, near perfect agreement between MD and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) results using the variable-hard-sphere model are found for density and temperature profiles as well as for velocity distribution functions throughout the shock. MD simulation results for argon are also in excellent agreement with experimental shock thickness data. Preliminary MD simulation results for argon-helium mixtures are in qualitative agreement with experimental density and temperature profile data, where separation between argon and helium density profiles due to disparate atomic mass is observed. Since conventional time-driven MD simulation of di- lute gases is computationally inefficient, a combined Event-Driven/Time-Driven MD algorithm is presented. The ED/TD-MD algorithm computes impending collisions and advances molecules directly to their next collision while evaluating the collision using conventional time-driven MD with an arbitrary interatomic potential. The method timestep thus approaches the mean-collision- time in the gas, while also detecting and simulating multi- body collisions with a small approximation. Extension of the method to diatomic and small polyatomic molecules is detailed, where center-of-mass velocities and extended cutoff radii are used to advance molecules to impending collisions. Only atomic positions are integrated during collisions and molecule sorting algorithms are employed to determine if atoms are bound in a molecule after a collision event. Rotational relaxation to equilibrium for a low density diatomic gas is validated by comparison with large-scale conventional time-driven MD simulation, where the final rotational distribution function is verified to be the correct Boltzmann rotational energy distribution.

  8. Requirements for facilities and measurement techniques to support CFD development for hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, William L., III; Dwoyer, Douglas L.

    1992-01-01

    The design of a hypersonic aircraft poses unique challenges to the engineering community. Problems with duplicating flight conditions in ground based facilities have made performance predictions risky. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been proposed as an additional means of providing design data. At the present time, CFD codes are being validated based on sparse experimental data and then used to predict performance at flight conditions with generally unknown levels of uncertainty. This paper will discuss the facility and measurement techniques that are required to support CFD development for the design of hypersonic aircraft. Illustrations are given of recent success in combining experimental and direct numerical simulation in CFD model development and validation for hypersonic perfect gas flows.

  9. Overview of X-38 Hypersonic Aerothermodynamic Wind Tunnel Data and Comparison with Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C.; Caram, J.; Berry, S.; Horvath, T.; Merski, N.; Loomis, M.; Venkatapathy, E.

    2004-01-01

    A NASA team of engineers has been organized to design a crew return vehicle for returning International Space Station crew members from orbit. The hypersonic aerothermodynamic characteristics of the X-23/X-24A derived X-38 crew return vehicle are being evaluated in various wind tunnels in support of this effort. Aerothermodynamic data from two NASA hypersonic tunnels at Mach 6 and Mach 10 has been obtained with cast ceramic models and a thermographic phosphorus digital imaging system. General windward surface heating features are described based on experimental surface heating images and surface oil flow patterns for the nominal hypersonic aerodynamic orientation. Body flap reattachment heating levels are examined. Computational Fluid Dynamics tools have been applied at the appropriate wind tunnel conditions to make comparisons with this data.

  10. Cooling/fuel system for hypersonic flight

    SciTech Connect

    Lander, H.R.; Schnurstein, R.E.

    1993-08-17

    A method is described of simultaneously providing a heat sink and reactive fuel factions production from hydrocarbons having an average molecular weight of between 100 and 1,000 in hypersonic propulsion applications comprising: (i) in a hypersonic vehicle having high heat flux structural regions, causing a hydrocarbon exposure to a high heat flux structural region and imparting a temperature increase to the hydrocarbon; (ii) reducing temperature gradients of the high heat flux structural region by heat transfer from the high flux structural region to the hydrocarbon such that a portion of the hydrocarbon pyrolyzes into olefinic fractions; and (iii) utilizing the olefinic fractions as a fuel in hypersonic propulsion in a hypersonic vehicle.

  11. Hypersonic Interplanetary Flight: Aero Gravity Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Al; Banks, Dan; Randolph, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The use of aero-gravity assist during hypersonic interplanetary flights is highlighted. Specifically, the use of large versus small planet for gravity asssist maneuvers, aero-gravity assist trajectories, launch opportunities and planetary waverider performance are addressed.

  12. Volume interchange factors for hypersonic vehicle wake radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. K.; Babikian, D. S.

    1987-01-01

    Volume interchange factors are shown to be convenient in modeling the radiative processes in the wake of a hypersonic vehicle. Use of the factors facilitates calculating not just the radiative heating rates on afterbody surfaces but also the radiative de-excitation rates from stimulated emission and re-excitation rates from absorption in rarefied nonequilibrium flows. Sample calculations of volume interchange factors are presented for volume configurations modeling wake elements, and the numerical results are compared to limiting approximations to clarify the operation of the emission, transmission, and absorption processes.

  13. Application of the multigrid solution technique to hypersonic entry vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Francis A.

    1993-01-01

    A multigrid solution procedure has been incorporated in a version of the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm. The multigrid scheme is based on the Full Approximation Storage approach and uses Full Multigrid to obtain a well defined fine mesh starting solution. Predictions were obtained using standard transfer operators and a 'V-cycle' was used to control grid sequencing. Computed hypersonic flow solutions compared with experimental data for a 15 degree sphere cone, blended-wing body, and shuttle-like geometries are presented. It is shown that the algorithm accurately predicts heating rates, and when compared with the single grid algorithm computes solutions in one-third the computational time.

  14. A Survey of Hypersonic-Ramjet Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. J.

    1959-01-01

    A brief discussion is presented of the major problem areas involved in the development of a hypersonic ramjet engine. Keeping the structural temperature to an acceptably low level is the severest problem expected. A rapid survey is made of some of the relatively unconventional concepts that may find application in the hypersonic region. These include supersonic combustors, underwing burning, atmospheric-recombination, engine installation, nuclear power, variable geometry, and fuel-rich operation.

  15. Research in robust control for hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The research during the second reporting period has focused on robust control design for hypersonic vehicles. An already existing design for the Hypersonic Winged-Cone Configuration has been enhanced. Uncertainty models for the effects of propulsion system perturbations due to angle of attack variations, structural vibrations, and uncertainty in control effectiveness were developed. Using H(sub infinity) and mu-synthesis techniques, various control designs were performed in order to investigate the impact of these effects on achievable robust performance.

  16. Laboratory modeling of hypersonic flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashurin, Alexey; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Loverich, John; Beilis, Isak; Keidar, Michael

    2012-10-01

    One of the key issues for vehicles in hypersonic flight and during atmospheric reentry is radio blackout due to weakly-ionized air plasma formation. When a spacecraft enters Earth's atmosphere or a vehicle travels through the atmosphere at hypersonic velocities, a shock wave is formed in front of the vehicle. The shock wave converts much of the vehicle's kinetic energy into heat and as a result the air molecules are dissociated and ionized. This plasma layer prevents normal telemetry transmission. This work considers a new approach to model the conditions of hypersonic flight in laboratory environment. The approach utilizes hypersonic plasma jet created by vacuum arc that hits immovable object intended to model a hypersonic vehicle. Heating of the object by the arc causes immediate re-evaporation of the jet's metal ions being deposited on the object's surface. This mimics absence of attachment of the air molecules to the vehicle in hypersonic flight. The plasma parameters and object temperatures are measured using electrostatic Langmuir probes and thermocouples respectively. The results of these experiments can be also used as calibration tool for tuning and debugging of numerical codes intended to predict and mitigate the blackout problem.

  17. Recombination Catalysts for Hypersonic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of commercially-viable access to space will require technologies that reduce propulsion system weight and complexity, while extracting maximum energy from the products of combustion. This work is directed toward developing effective nozzle recombination catalysts for the supersonic and hypersonic aeropropulsion engines used to provide such access to space. Effective nozzle recombination will significantly reduce rk=le length (hence, propulsion system weight) and reduce fuel requirements, further decreasing the vehicle's gross lift-off weight. Two such catalysts have been identified in this work, barium and antimony compounds, by developing chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for these materials and determining the engine performance enhancement for a typical flight trajectory. Significant performance improvements are indicated, using only 2% (mole or mass) of these compounds in the combustor product gas.

  18. Experimental and Computational Investigation of Hypersonic Electric-Arc Airspikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, R. M.; Hartley, C. S.; Mann, G.; Myrabo, L. N.; Nagamatsu, H. T.; Shneider, M. N.; Raizer, Y. P.

    2003-05-01

    Drag reduction effects of an electric arc airspike in a hypersonic flow are currently being studied in the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 24-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel (RPI HST). In tandem these results are being modeled computationally, and compared to existing theory. The arc is driven by a high current lead-acid battery array, producing a maximum of 75-kilowatts into the self-sustaining electrical discharge. The test conditions were for Mach 10, 260 psia stagnation pressure, and 560 K stagnation temperature flow - a low enthalpy, ``ideal gas'' condition. Schlieren photographs are taken of the arc apparatus and downstream blunt body, with a variety of arc powers and source/body distances. Fast-response accelerometers are used to measure drag on the hanging blunt body. These tests are conducted with and without the arc to establish the most efficient placement and power of the airspike. The computational effort employs the Euler gasdynamic equations to represent a heat source in flow conditions and geometries identical to those tested in the RPI HST. The objective of the combined experimental/computational parametric study is to enhance understanding of the drag reduction features inherent to the airspike phenomenon.

  19. Space shuttle orbiter rear mounted reaction control system jet interaction study. [hypersonic wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rausch, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of interaction between the reaction control system (RCS) jets and the flow over the space shuttle orbiter in the atmosphere was investigated in the NASA Langley 31-inch continuous flow hypersonic tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 10.3 and in the AEDC continuous flow hypersonic tunnel B at a nominal Mach number of 6, using 0.01 and .0125 scale force models with aft RCS nozzles mounted both on the model and on the sting of the force model balance. The data show that RCS nozzle exit momentum ratio is the primary correlating parameter for effects where the plume impinges on an adjacent surface and mass flow ratio is the parameter when the plume interaction is primarily with the external stream. An analytic model of aft mounted RCS units was developed in which the total reaction control moments are the sum of thrust, impingement, interaction, and cross-coupling terms.

  20. A quiet tunnel investigation of hypersonic boundary-layer stability over a cooled, flared cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Alan E.; Selby, Gregory V.; Wilkinson, Stephen P.

    1996-01-01

    A flared-cone model under adiabatic and cooled-wall conditions was placed in a calibrated, low-disturbance Mach 6 flow and the stability of the boundary layer was investigated using a prototype constant-voltage anemometer. The results were compared with linear-stability theory predictions and good agreement was found in the prediction of second-mode frequencies and growth. In addition, the same 'N = 10' criterion used to predict boundary-layer transition in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flows under low freestream noise conditions was found to be applicable for the hypersonic flow regime as well. Under cooled-wall conditions, a unique set of spectral data was acquired that documents the linear, nonlinear, and breakdown regions associated with the transition of hypersonic flow under low-noise conditions.

  1. Photon collider Higgs factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, V. I.

    2014-09-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson (and still nothing else) have triggered appearance of many proposals of Higgs factories for precision measurement of the Higgs properties. Among them there are several projects of photon colliders (PC) without e+e- in addition to PLC based on e+e- linear colliders ILC and CLIC. In this paper, following a brief discussion of Higgs factories physics program I give an overview of photon colliders based on linear colliders ILC and CLIC, and of the recently proposed photon-collider Higgs factories with no e+e- collision option based on recirculation linacs in ring tunnels.

  2. Gamma-gamma colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Sessler, A.

    1996-06-01

    Gamma-gamma colliders make intense beams of gamma rays and have them collide so as to make elementary particles. The authors show, in this article, that constructing a gamma-gamma collider as an add-on to an electron-positron linear collider is possible with present technology and that it does not require much additional cost. Furthermore, they show that the resulting capability is very interesting from a particle physics point of view. An overview of a linear collider, with a second interaction region devoted to {gamma}{gamma} collisions is shown.

  3. Wind-Tunnel Balance Characterization for Hypersonic Research Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Commo, Sean A.; Parker, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Wind-tunnel research was recently conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center s 31-Inch Mach 10 Hypersonic Facility in support of the Mars Science Laboratory s aerodynamic program. Researchers were interested in understanding the interaction between the freestream flow and the reaction control system onboard the entry vehicle. A five-component balance, designed for hypersonic testing with pressurized flow-through capability, was used. In addition to the aerodynamic forces, the balance was exposed to both thermal gradients and varying internal cavity pressures. Historically, the effect of these environmental conditions on the response of the balance have not been fully characterized due to the limitations in the calibration facilities. Through statistical design of experiments, thermal and pressure effects were strategically and efficiently integrated into the calibration of the balance. As a result of this new approach, researchers were able to use the balance continuously throughout the wide range of temperatures and pressures and obtain real-time results. Although this work focused on a specific application, the methodology shown can be applied more generally to any force measurement system calibration.

  4. Multi-Dimensional, Inviscid Flux Reconstruction for Simulation of Hypersonic Heating on Tetrahedral Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    The quality of simulated hypersonic stagnation region heating on tetrahedral meshes is investigated by using a three-dimensional, upwind reconstruction algorithm for the inviscid flux vector. Two test problems are investigated: hypersonic flow over a three-dimensional cylinder with special attention to the uniformity of the solution in the spanwise direction and hypersonic flow over a three-dimensional sphere. The tetrahedral cells used in the simulation are derived from a structured grid where cell faces are bisected across the diagonal resulting in a consistent pattern of diagonals running in a biased direction across the otherwise symmetric domain. This grid is known to accentuate problems in both shock capturing and stagnation region heating encountered with conventional, quasi-one-dimensional inviscid flux reconstruction algorithms. Therefore the test problem provides a sensitive test for algorithmic effects on heating. This investigation is believed to be unique in its focus on three-dimensional, rotated upwind schemes for the simulation of hypersonic heating on tetrahedral grids. This study attempts to fill the void left by the inability of conventional (quasi-one-dimensional) approaches to accurately simulate heating in a tetrahedral grid system. Results show significant improvement in spanwise uniformity of heating with some penalty of ringing at the captured shock. Issues with accuracy near the peak shear location are identified and require further study.

  5. Space Shuttle and Hypersonic Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Gerstenmaier, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years of human spaceflight have been characterized by the aerospace operations of the Soyuz, of the Space Shuttle and, more recently, of the Shenzhou. The lessons learned of this past half decade are important and very significant. Particularly interesting is the scenario that is downstream from the retiring of the Space Shuttle. A number of initiatives are, in fact, emerging from in the aftermath of the decision to terminate the Shuttle program. What is more and more evident is that a new era is approaching: the era of the commercial usage and of the commercial exploitation of space. It is probably fair to say, that this is the likely one of the new frontiers of expansion of the world economy. To make a comparison, in the last 30 years our economies have been characterized by the digital technologies, with examples ranging from computers, to cellular phones, to the satellites themselves. Similarly, the next 30 years are likely to be characterized by an exponential increase of usage of extra atmospheric resources, as a result of more economic and efficient way to access space, with aerospace transportation becoming accessible to commercial investments. We are witnessing the first steps of the transportation of future generation that will drastically decrease travel time on our Planet, and significantly enlarge travel envelope including at least the low Earth orbits. The Steve Jobs or the Bill Gates of the past few decades are being replaced by the aggressive and enthusiastic energy of new entrepreneurs. It is also interesting to note that we are now focusing on the aerospace band, that lies on top of the aeronautical shell, and below the low Earth orbits. It would be a mistake to consider this as a known envelope based on the evidences of the flights of Soyuz, Shuttle and Shenzhou. Actually, our comprehension of the possible hypersonic flight regimes is bounded within really limited envelopes. The achievement of a full understanding of the hypersonic flight

  6. Hypersonic Propulsion at Pratt and Whitney: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazmar, Richard R.

    2002-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney (P&W) is developing the technology for hypersonic components and engines. A supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) database was developed during the National Aero Space Plane (NASP) program using hydrogen fueled propulsion systems for space access vehicles and serves as a point of departure for the current emphasis on hydrocarbon scramjets. The Air Force Hypersonic Technology (HyTech) Office has put programs in place to develop the technologies necessary to demonstrate the operability, performance and structural durability of a liquid hydrocarbon fueled scramjet system that operates from Mach 4 to 8. Fuel-cooled superalloys and lightweight structures are being developed to improve thermal protection and durability and to reduce propulsion system weight. The application of scramjet engine technology as part of combined cycle propulsion systems is also being pursued under NASA and U.S. Air Force sponsorship. The combination of scramjet power and solid rocket booster acceleration is applicable to hypersonic cruise missiles. Scramjets that use gas turbines for low speed acceleration and scramjets using rocket power for low speed acceleration are being studied for application to reusable launch systems and hypersonic cruise vehicles. P&W's recent activities and future plans for hypersonic propulsion will be described.

  7. Results of investigations on a 0.010-scale 140A/B configuration space shuttle vehicle orbiter model 72-0 in the NASA/Langley Research Center continuous flow hypersonic tunnel (OA90)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawthorne, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Data are documented which were obtained during wind tunnel tests. The test was conducted beginning 4 March and ending 6 March 1974 for a total of 24 occupancy hours. all test runs were conducted at a Mach number of 10.3 and at Reynolds numbers of 0.65, 1.0 and 1.33 million per foot. Only the complete 140A/B was tested with various elevon, speedbrake, and bodyflap settings at angles of attack from 12 to 37 degrees at 0 and -5 degrees of beta, and from 0 to -9 degrees of beta at 20 and 30 degrees angle of attack. The purpose was to obtain hypersonic longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control characteristics of the updated space shuttle vehicle configuration.

  8. Generic Hypersonic Inlet Module Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Chares E., Jr.; Huebner, Lawrence D.

    2004-01-01

    A computational study associated with an internal inlet drag analysis was performed for a generic hypersonic inlet module. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of computing the internal drag force for a generic scramjet engine module using computational methods. The computational study consisted of obtaining two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solutions using the Euler and parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) equations. The solution accuracy was assessed by comparisons with experimental pitot pressure data. The CFD analysis indicates that the 3D PNS solutions show the best agreement with experimental pitot pressure data. The internal inlet drag analysis consisted of obtaining drag force predictions based on experimental data and 3D CFD solutions. A comparative assessment of each of the drag prediction methods is made and the sensitivity of CFD drag values to computational procedures is documented. The analysis indicates that the CFD drag predictions are highly sensitive to the computational procedure used.

  9. Weakly Ionized Plasmas in Hypersonics: Fundamental Kinetics and Flight Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Macheret, Sergey

    2005-05-16

    The paper reviews some of the recent studies of applications of weakly ionized plasmas to supersonic/hypersonic flight. Plasmas can be used simply as means of delivering energy (heating) to the flow, and also for electromagnetic flow control and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation. Plasma and MHD control can be especially effective in transient off-design flight regimes. In cold air flow, nonequilibrium plasmas must be created, and the ionization power budget determines design, performance envelope, and the very practicality of plasma/MHD devices. The minimum power budget is provided by electron beams and repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulses, and the paper describes theoretical and computational modeling of plasmas created by the beams and repetitive pulses. The models include coupled equations for non-local and unsteady electron energy distribution function (modeled in forward-back approximation), plasma kinetics, and electric field. Recent experimental studies at Princeton University have successfully demonstrated stable diffuse plasmas sustained by repetitive nanosecond pulses in supersonic air flow, and for the first time have demonstrated the existence of MHD effects in such plasmas. Cold-air hypersonic MHD devices are shown to permit optimization of scramjet inlets at Mach numbers higher than the design value, while operating in self-powered regime. Plasma energy addition upstream of the inlet throat can increase the thrust by capturing more air (Virtual Cowl), or it can reduce the flow Mach number and thus eliminate the need for an isolator duct. In the latter two cases, the power that needs to be supplied to the plasma would be generated by an MHD generator downstream of the combustor, thus forming the 'reverse energy bypass' scheme. MHD power generation on board reentry vehicles is also discussed.

  10. CARS Temperature Measurements in a Hypersonic Propulsion Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, Olin, Jr.; Smith, M. W.; Antcliff, R. R.; Northam, G. Burt; Cutler, A. D.; Capriotti, D. P.; Taylor, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Nonintrusive diagnostic measurements were performed in the supersonic reacting flow of the Hypersonic Propulsion Test Cell 2 at NASA-Langley. A Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) system was assembled specifically for the test cell environment. System design considerations were: (1) test cell noise and vibration; (2) contamination from flow field or atmospheric borne dust; (3) unwanted laser or electrically induced combustion (inside or outside the duct); (4) efficient signal collection; (5) signal splitting to span the wide dynamic range present throughout the flow field; (6) movement of the sampling volume in the flow; and (7) modification of the scramjet model duct to permit optical access to the reacting flow with the CARS system. The flow in the duct was a nominal Mach 2 flow with static pressure near one atmosphere. A single perpendicular injector introduced hydrogen into the flow behind a rearward facing step. CARS data was obtained in three planes downstream of the injection region. At least 20 CARS data points were collected at each of the regularly spaced sampling locations in each data plane. Contour plots of scramjet combustor static temperature in a reacting flow region are presented.

  11. Discrete Roughness Transition for Hypersonic Flight Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of discrete roughness and the correlations developed to predict the onset of boundary layer transition on hypersonic flight vehicles are discussed. The paper is organized by hypersonic vehicle applications characterized in a general sense by the boundary layer: slender with hypersonic conditions at the edge of the boundary layer, moderately blunt with supersonic, and blunt with subsonic. This paper is intended to be a review of recent discrete roughness transition work completed at NASA Langley Research Center in support of agency flight test programs. First, a review is provided of discrete roughness wind tunnel data and the resulting correlations that were developed. Then, results obtained from flight vehicles, in particular the recently flown Hyper-X and Shuttle missions, are discussed and compared to the ground-based correlations.

  12. Issues Associated with a Hypersonic Maglev Sled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, Joseph W.; Lenzo, J.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic levitation has been explored for application from motors to transportation. All of these applications have been at velocities where the physics of the air or operating fluids are fairly well known. Application of Maglev to hypersonic velocities (Mach greater than 5) presents many opportunities, but also issues that require understanding and resolution. Use of Maglev to upgrade the High Speed Test Track at Holloman Air Force Base in Alamogordo New Mexico is an actual hypersonic application that provides the opportunity to improve test capabilities. However, there are several design issues that require investigation. This paper presents an overview of the application of Maglev to the test track and the issues associated with developing a hypersonic Maglev sled. The focus of this paper is to address the issues with the Maglev sled design, rather than the issues with the development of superconducting magnets of the sled system.

  13. Inviscid Design of Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Nozzles for a Real Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    A straightforward procedure has been developed to quickly determine an inviscid design of a hypersonic wind tunnel nozzle when the test crash is both calorically and thermally imperfect. This real gas procedure divides the nozzle into four distinct parts: subsonic, throat to conical, conical, and turning flow regions. The design process is greatly simplified by treating the imperfect gas effects only in the source flow region. This simplification can be justified for a large class of hypersonic wind tunnel nozzle design problems. The final nozzle design is obtained either by doing a classical boundary layer correction or by using this inviscid design as the starting point for a viscous design optimization based on computational fluid dynamics. An example of a real gas nozzle design is used to illustrate the method. The accuracy of the real gas design procedure is shown to compare favorably with an ideal gas design based on computed flow field solutions.

  14. Boundary Layer Control for Hypersonic Airbreathing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive methods for tripping hypersonic boundary layers have been examined in NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels using a Hyper-X model. This investigation assessed several concepts for forcing transition, including passive discrete roughness elements and active mass addition (or blowing), in the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air and the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnels. Heat transfer distributions obtained via phosphor thermography, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. The comparisons between the active and passive methods for boundary layer control were conducted at test conditions that nearly match the Hyper-X nominal Mach 7 flight test-point of an angle-of-attack of 2-deg and length Reynolds number of 5.6 million. For passive roughness, the primary parametric variation was a range of trip heights within the calculated boundary layer thickness for several trip concepts. The passive roughness study resulted in a swept ramp configuration, scaled to be roughly 0.6 of the calculated boundary layer thickness, being selected for the Mach 7 flight vehicle. For the active blowing study, the manifold pressure was systematically varied (while monitoring the mass flow) for each configuration to determine the jet penetration height, with schlieren, and transition movement, with the phosphor system, for comparison to the passive results. All the blowing concepts tested, which included various rows of sonic orifices (holes), two- and three-dimensional slots, and random porosity, provided transition onset near the trip location with manifold stagnation pressures on the order of 40 times the model surface static pressure, which is adequate to ensure sonic jets. The present results indicate that the jet penetration height for blowing was roughly half the height required with passive roughness elements for an equivalent amount of transition movement.

  15. The NASA hypersonic research engine program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubert, Kennedy F.; Lopez, Henry J.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is provided of the NASA Hypersonic Research Engine Program. The engine concept is described which was evolved, and the accomplishments of the program are summarized. The program was undertaken as an in-depth program of hypersonic airbreathing propulsion research to provide essential inputs to future prototype engine development and decision making. An airbreathing liquid hydrogen fueled research oriented scramjet was to be developed to certain performance goals. The work was many faceted, required aerodynamic design evaluation, structures development, and development of flight systems such as the fuel and control system, but the main objective was the study of the internal aerothermodynamics of the propulsion system.

  16. Flight testing of airbreathing hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, John W.

    1993-01-01

    Using the scramjet engine as the prime example of a hypersonic airbreathing concept, this paper reviews the history of and addresses the need for hypersonic flight tests. It also describes how such tests can contribute to the development of airbreathing technology. Aspects of captive-carry and free-flight concepts are compared. An incremental flight envelope expansion technique for manned flight vehicles is also described. Such critical issues as required instrumentation technology and proper scaling of experimental devices are addressed. Lastly, examples of international flight test approaches, existing programs, or concepts currently under study, development, or both, are given.

  17. Research in robust control for hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Buschek, H.

    1992-01-01

    During the first reporting period research concentrated on finishing the modeling work required for a representative model of a scramjet propulsion system for hypersonic vehicles. An existing hypersonic propulsion code was adjusted to the winged-cone configuration. In this process the complete force and moment calculation was revised. The advantageous feature of the code to account for angle of attack variations was then used to compute the thrust, lift, and pitching moment contributions of the propulsion system not only for various Mach numbers and fuel equivalence ratios, but also for different angles of attack.

  18. Research in robust control for hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The research during the third reporting period focused on fixed order robust control design for hypersonic vehicles. A new technique was developed to synthesize fixed order H(sub infinity) controllers. A controller canonical form is imposed on the compensator structure and a homotopy algorithm is employed to perform the controller design. Various reduced order controllers are designed for a simplified version of the hypersonic vehicle model used in our previous studies to demonstrate the capabilities of the code. However, further work is needed to investigate the issue of numerical ill-conditioning for large order systems and to make the numerical approach more reliable.

  19. NASP - Waveriders in a hypersonic sky. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, David

    1993-02-01

    A development status and technology readiness evaluation is presented for the X-30, in whose design aggressive use of CFD for investigation of hypersonic aerothermodynamics, and experimental searches for high specific strength refractory materials, have been of central importance. Manufacturing, handling, and assembly factors figure vitally in structural material selection for both airframe and propulsion system components. Attention is given to prospective propulsion cycles capable of efficient operation in several (acceleration, supersonic, hypersonic, exoatmospheric) regimes, such as the rocket/scramjet/ramjet/air-augmented system and the liquid air-cycle engine.

  20. Body weight of hypersonic aircraft, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, Mark D.

    1988-01-01

    The load bearing body weight of wing-body and all-body hypersonic aircraft is estimated for a wide variety of structural materials and geometries. Variations of weight with key design and configuration parameters are presented and discussed. Both hot and cool structure approaches are considered in isotropic, organic composite, and metal matrix composite materials; structural shells are sandwich or skin-stringer. Conformal and pillow-tank designs are investigated for the all-body shape. The results identify the most promising hypersonic aircraft body structure design approaches and their weight trends. Geometric definition of vehicle shapes and structural analysis methods are presented in appendices.

  1. Laser diagnostics on a hypersonic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, David J.; Oldenborg, R. C.; Tiee, J. J.; Northam, G. Burton; Antcliff, Richard R.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Jarrett, O.; Smith, M. W.

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Langley has implemented a laser-based multipoint/multiparameter diagnostics system at its hypersonic direct-connect combustor, in order to measure both temperature and majority species densities in two dimensions, using spatially-scanned CARS; in addition, line-imaged measurements of radical densities are simultaneously generated by LIF at any of several planes downstream of the fuel injector. Initial experimental trials have demonstrated successful detection of one-dimensional images of OH density, as well as CARS N2-temperature measurements, in the turbulent reaction zone of the hypersonic combustor.

  2. Optimal trajectories for hypersonic launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardema, Mark D.; Bowles, Jeffrey V.; Whittaker, Thomas

    1994-10-01

    In this paper, we derive a near-optimal guidance law for the ascent trajectory from earth surface to earth orbit of a hypersonic, dual-mode propulsion, lifting vehicle. Of interest are both the optical flight path and the optimal operation of the propulsion system. The guidance law is developed from the energy-state approximation of the equations of motion. Because liquid hydrogen fueled hypersonic aircraft are volume sensitive, as well as weight sensitive, the cost functional is a weighted sum of fuel mass and volume; the weighting factor is chosen to minimize gross take-off weight for a given payload mass and volume in orbit.

  3. Further analysis of MHD acceleration for a hypersonic wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, M.J.; Schmidt, H.J.; Chapman, J.N.

    1995-12-31

    A previously completed MHD study of the use of an MHD accelerator with seeded air from a state-of-the-art arc heater, was generally hailed as showing that the system studied has some promise of meeting the most critical hypersonic testing requirements. However, some concerns existed about certain aspects of the results. This paper discusses some of these problems and presents analysis of potential solutions. Specifically the problems addressed are; reducing the amount of seed in the flow, reducing test chamber temperatures, and reducing the oxygen dissociation. Modeling techniques are used to study three design variables of the MHD accelerator. The accelerator channel inlet Mach number, the accelerator channel divergence angle, and the magnetic field strength are all studied. These variables are all optimized to meet the goals for seed, temperature, and dissociated oxygen reduction. The results of this paper are encouraging, showing that all three goals can be met. General relationships are observed as to how the design variables affect the performance of the MHD accelerator facility. This paper expands on the results presented in the UTSI report and further supports the feasibility of MHD acceleration as a means to provide hypersonic flight simulation.

  4. Experimental and Computational Analysis of Shuttle Orbiter Hypersonic Trim Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Paulson, John W., Jr.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    1995-01-01

    During the high-Mach-number, high-altitude portion of the first entry of the Shuttle Orbiter, the vehicle exhibited a nose-up pitching moment relative to preflight prediction of approximately Delta Cm = 0.03. This trim anomaly has been postulated to be due to compressibility, viscous, and/or real-gas (lowered specific heat ratio gamma) effects on basic body pitching moment, body-flap effectiveness, or both. In order to assess the relative contribution of each of these effects, an experimental study was undertaken to examine the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and ratio of specific heats. Complementary computational solutions were obtained for wind-tunnel and flight conditions. The primary cause of the anomaly was determined to be lower pressures on the aft windward surface of the Orbiter than deduced from hypersonic wind-tunnel tests with ideal- or near-ideal-gas test flow. The lower pressure levels are a result of the lowering of the flowfield gamma due to high-temperature effects. This phenomenon was accurately simulated in a hypersonic wind tunnel using a heavy gas, which provided a lower, gamma, and was correctly predicted by Navier-Stokes computations using nonequilibrium chemistry.

  5. Lower Hybrid Drift in Simulations of Hypersonic Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehoff, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Niemann, C.; Schriver, D.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Lapenta, G.

    2014-12-01

    It has been shown experimentally that hypersonic plasma (defined as moving with a bulk flow velocity of more than 5 to 10 times the Mach speed) traveling through a magnetic field will create a diamagnetic cavity, or bubble [1]. At the edge of the bubble, opposing field and density gradients can drive the lower hybrid drift instability [2]. We will explore two and a half dimensional (2 space and 3 velocity dimensions) simulations of hypersonic plasma within a parameter regime motivated by the aforementioned diamagnetic bubble experiments, wherein we find oscillations excited near the lower hybrid frequency propagating perpendicular to the bulk motion of the plasma and the background magnetic field. The simulations are run using the implicit PIC code iPIC3D so that we are able to capture dynamics of the plasma below ion scales, but not be forced to resolve all electron scales [3]. [1] Niemann et al, Phys. Plasmas 20, 012108 (2013) [2] Davidson et al, Phys. Fluids, Vol. 20, No. 2, February 1977 [3] S. Markidis et al, Math. Comput. Simul. (2009), doi 10.1016/j.matcom.2009.08.038

  6. Review of convectively cooled structures for hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    Resurgent interest in development of Aerospace Plane and Orient Express type vehicles promises to stretch structural technology for hypersonic flight vehicles to the uppermost limits. Significant portions of the structure may require active cooling of some type to survive hostile environments. Despite a lack of recent research activity for cooled structures, a significant body of unclassified knowledge exists concerning such structures. Contractual and in-house research conducted mainly by NASA's Langley Research Center during the 60's and 70's on vehicles very similar to the proposed Orient Express has provided a substantial data base for convectively cooled hypersonic flight structures. Specifically, results are presented for regeneratively cooled structural concepts which have a relatively high heat flux capability and use the hydrogen fuel directly as a coolant; and for structural concepts which use a secondary coolant loop to absorb incident heating and then transfer the absorbed heat to the liquid hydrogen fuel as it flows to the engines. Results are presented to indicate application regions in terms of heat flux capability for various concepts and benefits for each concept. Experience gained and costs are discussed in terms of heat flux capability for various concepts and benefits for each concept. Additionally, experience gained and cost involved with design, fabrication, and testing of full-scale convectively cooled structures are discussed.

  7. Novel approach for designing a hypersonic gliding-cruising dual waverider vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Ding, Feng; Huang, Wei; Jin, Liang

    2014-09-01

    For a hypersonic gliding-cruising vehicle, the gliding Mach number is larger than the cruising Mach number. It may be useful to design the inlet shroud to act as the compression surface of the waverider, to ensure that the vehicle rides on the shock wave, during both the gliding and cruising phases. A new design concept, namely a gliding-cruising dual waverider, is proposed in the current study. During the gliding phase, the hypersonic vehicle rides on the shock wave at the design gliding Mach number, as the inlet shroud is designed to act as waverider's compression surface. During the cruising phase, when the inlet shroud is cast away or jettisoned, the hypersonic vehicle rides on the shock wave at the design cruising Mach number, as the forebody is designed to act as waverider's compression surface. Thus, the design methodology of the dual-cone-derived waverider is described based on the theory of conical flow. Finally, the numerical methods are utilized to verify the new design method of the aerodynamic configuration. This methodology proposed is useful to design a hypersonic vehicle for two regimes of flight.

  8. Surface Heat Flux and Pressure Distribution on a Hypersonic Blunt Body With DEAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, I. I.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Oliveira, A. C.; Channes, J. B.

    2008-04-01

    With the currently growing interest for advanced technologies to enable hypersonic flight comes the Direct Energy Air Spike concept, where pulsed beamed laser energy is focused upstream of a blunt flight vehicle to disrupt the flow structure creating a virtual, slender body geometry. This allies in the vehicle both advantages of a blunt body (lower thermal stresses) to that of a slender geometry (lower wave drag). The research conducted at the Henry T. Nagamatsu Laboratory for Aerodynamics and Hypersonics focused on the measurement of the surface pressure and heat transfer rates on a blunt model. The hypersonic flight conditions were simulated at the HTN Laboratory's 0.3 m T2 Hypersonic Shock Tunnel. During the tests, the laser energy was focused upstream the model by an infrared telescope to create the DEAS effect, which was supplied by a TEA CO2 laser. Piezoelectric pressure transducers were used for the pressure measurements and fast response coaxial thermocouples were used for the measurement of surface temperature, which was later used for the estimation of the wall heat transfer using the inverse heat conduction theory.

  9. The Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Stephen

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was first suggested (in a documented way) in 1983 [1] as a possible future hadron collider to be installed in the 27 km "LEP" tunnel. More than thirty years later the collider has been operated successfully with beam for three years with spectacular performance and has discovered the long-sought-after Higgs boson. The LHC is the world's largest and most energetic particle collider. It took many years to plan and build this large complex machine which promises exciting, new physics results for many years to come...

  10. The development of colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    During the period of the 50`s and the 60`s colliders were developed. Prior to that time there were no colliders, and by 1965 a number of small devices had worked, good understanding had been achieved, and one could speculate, as Gersh Budker did, that in a few years 20% of high energy physics would come from colliders. His estimate was an under-estimate, for now essentially all of high energy physics comes from colliders. The author presents a brief review of that history: sketching the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological advances which made it all possible.

  11. Study of the coupling between real gas effects and rarefied effects on hypersonic aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Song; Hu, Yuan; Sun, Quanhua

    2012-11-01

    Hypersonic vehicles travel across the atmosphere at very high speed, and the surrounding gas experiences complicated physical and chemical processes. These processes produce real gas effects at high temperature and rarefied gas effects at high altitude where the two effects are coupled through molecular collisions. In this study, we aim to identify the individual real gas and rarefied gas effects by simulating hypersonic flow over a 2D cylinder, a sphere and a blunted cone using a continuum-based CFD approach and the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. It is found that physical processes such as vibrational excitation and chemical reaction will reduce significantly the shock stand-off distance and flow temperature for flows having small Knudsen number. The calculated skin friction and surface heat flux will decrease when the real gas effects are considered in simulations. The trend, however, gets weakened as the Knudsen number increases. It is concluded that the rarefied gas effects weaken the real gas effects on hypersonic flows.

  12. Hypersonic drone design: A multidisciplinary experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Efforts were focused on design problems of an unmanned hypersonic vehicle. It is felt that a scaled hypersonic drone is necessary to bridge the gap between present theory on hypersonics and the future reality of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) for two reasons: to fulfill a need for experimental data in the hypersonic regime, and to provide a testbed for the scramjet engine which is to be the primary mode of propulsion for the NASP. Three areas of great concern to NASP design were examined: propulsion, thermal management, and flight systems. Problem solving in these areas was directed towards design of the drone with the idea that the same design techniques could be applied to the NASP. A seventy degree swept double delta wing configuration, developed in the 70's at NASA Langley, was chosen as the aerodynamic and geometric model for the drone. This vehicle would be air-launched from a B-1 at Mach 0.8 and 48,000 feet, rocket boosted by two internal engines to Mach 10 and 100,000 feet, and allowed to cruise under power of the scramjet engine until burnout. It would then return to base for an unpowered landing. Preliminary energy calculations based upon the flight requirements give the drone a gross launch weight of 134,000 lb. and an overall length of 85 feet.

  13. Hypersonic drone vehicle design: A multidisciplinary experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    UCLA's Advanced Aeronautic Design group focussed their efforts on design problems of an unmanned hypersonic vehicle. It is felt that a scaled hypersonic drone is necesary to bridge the gap between present theory on hypersonics and the future reality of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) for two reasons: (1) to fulfill a need for experimental data in the hypersonic regime, and (2) to provide a testbed for the scramjet engine which is to be the primary mode of propulsion for the NASP. The group concentrated on three areas of great concern to NASP design: propulsion, thermal management, and flight systems. Problem solving in these areas was directed toward design of the drone with the idea that the same design techniques could be applied to the NASP. A 70 deg swept double-delta wing configuration, developed in the 70's at the NASA Langley, was chosen as the aerodynamic and geometric model for the drone. This vehicle would be air launched from a B-1 at Mach 0.8 and 48,000 feet, rocket boosted by two internal engines to Mach 10 and 100,000 feet, and allowed to cruise under power of the scramjet engine until burnout. It would then return to base for an unpowered landing. Preliminary energy calculations based on flight requirements give the drone a gross launch weight of 134,000 pounds and an overall length of 85 feet.

  14. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Hypersonic Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, Uwe; McClinton, Charles; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's has established long term goals for access-to-space. NASA's third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational in approximately 25 years. The goals for third generation launch systems are to reduce cost by a factor of 100 and improve safety by a factor of 10,000 over current conditions. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL has the agency lead to develop third generation space transportation technologies. The Hypersonics Investment Area, part of ASTP, is developing the third generation launch vehicle technologies in two main areas, propulsion and airframes. The program's major investment is in hypersonic airbreathing propulsion since it offers the greatest potential for meeting the third generation launch vehicles. The program will mature the technologies in three key propulsion areas, scramjets, rocket-based combined cycle and turbine-based combination cycle. Ground and flight propulsion tests are being planned for the propulsion technologies. Airframe technologies will be matured primarily through ground testing. This paper describes NASA's activities in hypersonics. Current programs, accomplishments, future plans and technologies that are being pursued by the Hypersonics Investment Area under the Advanced Space Transportation Program Office will be discussed.

  15. Transpiration Cooling Of Hypersonic Blunt Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henline, William D.

    1991-01-01

    Results on analytical approximation and numerical simulation compared. Report presents theoretical study of degree to which transpiration blocks heating of blunt, axisymmetric body by use of injected air. Transpiration cooling proposed to reduce operating temperatures on nose cones of proposed hypersonic aerospace vehicles. Analyses important in design of thermal protection for such vehicles.

  16. SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, B.

    1985-12-01

    A report is given on the goals and progress of the SLAC Linear Collider. The status of the machine and the detectors are discussed and an overview is given of the physics which can be done at this new facility. Some ideas on how (and why) large linear colliders of the future should be built are given.

  17. Hypersonic panel flutter in a rarefied atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resende, Hugo B.

    1993-01-01

    Panel flutter is a form of dynamic aeroelastic instability resulting from the interaction between motion of an aircraft structural panel and the aerodynamic loads exerted on that panel by air flowing past one of the faces. It differs from lifting surface flutter in the sense that it is not usually catastrophic, the panel's motion being limited by nonlinear membrane stresses produced by the transverse displacement. Above some critical airflow condition, the linear instability grows to a limit cycle . The present investigation studies panel flutter in an aerodynamic regime known as 'free molecule flow', wherein intermolecular collisions can be neglected and loads are caused by interactions between individual molecules and the bounding surface. After collision with the panel, molecules may be reflected specularly or reemitted in diffuse fashion. Two parameters characterize this process: the 'momentum accommodation coefficient', which is the fraction of the specularly reflected molecules; and the ratio between the panel temperature and that of the free airstream. This model is relevant to the case of hypersonic flight vehicles traveling at very high altitudes and especially for panels oriented parallel to the airstream or in the vehicle's lee. Under these conditions the aerodynamic shear stress turns out to be considerably larger than the surface pressures, and shear effects must be included in the model. This is accomplished by means of distributed longitudinal and bending loads. The former can cause the panel to buckle. In the example of a simply-supported panel, it turns out that the second mode of free vibration tends to dominate the flutter solution, which is carried out by a Galerkin analysis. Several parametric studies are presented. They include the effects of (1) temperature ratio; (2) momentum accommodation coefficient; (3) spring parameters, which are associated with how the panel is connected to adjacent structures; (4) a parameter which relates compressive

  18. Drag and Total Power Reduction for Artificial Heat Input in Front of Hypersonic Blunt Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Raizer, Yu. P.; Shneider, M. N.

    2005-04-01

    The effect of an air-spike in hypersonic flow is considered in the paper. The similarity laws of shape dependence and shock wave parameters, as a function of the strength of the heat source and characteristics of incident flow, are given. The numerical modeling is performed, based on the Euler gasdynamic equations for conditions identical to those tested in the RPI Hypersonic Shock Tunnel (M=10.1), where heat deposition took place with and without a blunt body in the stream. Good agreement between the individual shock wave shapes given by asymptotic theory, numerical modeling, and experiment is demonstrated. Results of numerical modeling show significant drag reduction and confirm the energy efficiency of the air-spike concept.

  19. An integrated analytical aeropropulsive/aeroelastic model for the dynamic analysis of hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavez, Frank R.; Schmidt, David K.

    1992-01-01

    The development of an approach to the determination of the dynamic characteristics of hypersonic vehicles which is intentionally generic and basic is given. The approach involves a 2D hypersonic aerodynamic analysis utilizing Newtonian theory, coupled with a 1D aero/thermoanalysis of the flow in a scramjet-type propulsion system. In addition, the airframe is considered to be elastic, and the structural dynamics are characterized in terms of a simple lumped-mass model of the invacuo vibration modes. The vibration modes are coupled to the rigid-body modes through the aero/propulsive forces acting on the structure. The control effectors considered on a generic study configuration include aerodynamic pitch-control surfaces, as well as engine fuel flow and diffuser area ratio. The study configuration is shown to be highly statically unstable in pitch, and to exhibit strong airframe/engine/elastic coupling in the aeroelastic and attitude dynamics, as well as the engine responses.

  20. Numerical simulation for the influence of laser-induced plasmas addition on air mass capture of hypersonic inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Dou, Zhiguo; Li, Qian

    2012-03-01

    The theory of laser-induced plasmas addition to hypersonic airflow off a vehicle to increase air mass capture and improve the performance of hypersonic inlets at Mach numbers below the design value is explored. For hypersonic vehicles, when flying at mach numbers lower than the design one, we can increase the mass capture ratio of inlet through laser-induced plasmas injection to the hypersonic flow upstream of cowl lip to form a virtual cowl. Based on the theory, the model of interaction between laser-induced plasmas and hypersonic flow was established. The influence on the effect of increasing mass capture ratio was studied at different positions of laser-induced plasmas region for the external compression hypersonic inlet at Mach 5 while the design value is 6, the power of plasmas was in the range of 1-8mJ. The main results are as follows: 1. the best location of the plasma addition region is near the intersection of the nose shock of the vehicle with the continuation of the cowl line, and slightly below that line. In that case, the shock generated by the heating is close to the shock that is a reflection of the vehicle nose shock off the imaginary solid surface-extension of the cowl. 2. Plasma addition does increase mass capture, and the effect becomes stronger as more energy is added, the peak value appeared when the power of plasma was about 4mJ, when the plasma energy continues to get stronger, the mass capture will decline slowly.

  1. Development and testing of the ACT-1 experimental facility for hypersonic combustion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccarella, D.; Liu, Q.; Passaro, A.; Lee, T.; Do, H.

    2016-04-01

    A new pulsed-arc-heated hypersonic wind tunnel facility, designated as ACT-1 (Arc-heated Combustion Test-rig 1), has been developed and built at the University of Notre Dame in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Alta S.p.A. The aim of the design is to provide a suitable test platform for experimental studies on supersonic and hypersonic turbulent combustion phenomena. ACT-1 is composed of a high temperature gas-generator system and a model scramjet combustor that is installed in an open-type vacuum test section of the wind tunnel facility. The gas-generator is designed to produce high-enthalpy (stagnation temperature  =  2000 K-3500 K) hypersonic flows for a run time up to 1 s. The supersonic combustor section is composed of a compression ramp (scramjet inlet), an internal flow channel of constant cross-section, a fuel jet nozzle, and a flame holder (wall cavity). The facility allows three-way optical accesses (top and sides) into the supersonic combustor to enable various advanced optical and laser diagnostics. In particular, planar laser Rayleigh scattering (PLRS), high-speed schlieren imaging and OH-planar laser induced fluorescence (OH-PLIF) have successfully been implemented to visualize the turbulent flows and flame structures at high speed flight conditions.

  2. Least-squares/parabolized Navier-Stokes procedure for optimizing hypersonic wind tunnel nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, John J.; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, D. J.; Grossman, B.

    1991-01-01

    A new procedure is demonstrated for optimizing hypersonic wind-tunnel-nozzle contours. The procedure couples a CFD computer code to an optimization algorithm, and is applied to both conical and contoured hypersonic nozzles for the purpose of determining an optimal set of parameters to describe the surface geometry. A design-objective function is specified based on the deviation from the desired test-section flow-field conditions. The objective function is minimized by optimizing the parameters used to describe the nozzle contour based on the solution to a nonlinear least-squares problem. The effect of the changes in the nozzle wall parameters are evaluated by computing the nozzle flow using the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. The advantage of the new procedure is that it directly takes into account the displacement effect of the boundary layer on the wall contour. The new procedure provides a method for optimizing hypersonic nozzles of high Mach numbers which have been designed by classical procedures, but are shown to produce poor flow quality due to the large boundary layers present in the test section. The procedure is demonstrated by finding the optimum design parameters for a Mach 10 conical nozzle and a Mach 6 and a Mach 15 contoured nozzle.

  3. Aerodynamic and Aerothermodynamic Layout of the Hypersonic Flight Experiment Shefex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Th.

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of the SHarp Edge Flight EXperiment SHEFEX is the investigation of possible new shapes for future launcher or reentry vehicles [1]. The main focus is the improvement of common space vehicle shapes by application of facetted surfaces and sharp edges. The experiment will enable the time accurate investigation of the flow effects and their structural answer during the hypersonic flight from 90 km down to an altitude of 20 km. The project, being performed under responsibility of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) is scheduled to fly on top of a two-stage solid propellant sounding rocket for the first half of 2005. The paper contains a survey of the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic layout of the experimental vehicle. The results are inputs for the definition of the structural layout, the TPS and the flight instrumentation as well as for the preparation of the flight test performed by the Mobile Rocket Base of DLR.

  4. DSMC Simulations of Apollo Capsule Aerodynamics for Hypersonic Rarefied Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Glass, Christopher E.; Greene, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Direct simulation Monte Carlo DSMC simulations are performed for the Apollo capsule in the hypersonic low density transitional flow regime. The focus is on ow conditions similar to that experienced by the Apollo Command Module during the high altitude portion of its reentry Results for aerodynamic forces and moments are presented that demonstrate their sensitivity to rarefaction that is for free molecular to continuum conditions. Also aerodynamic data are presented that shows their sensitivity to a range of reentry velocity encompasing conditions that include reentry from low Earth orbit lunar return and Mars return velocities to km/s. The rarefied results are anchored in the continuum regime with data from Navier Stokes simulations

  5. Effects of shock on the stability of hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Malik, Mujeeb R.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1990-01-01

    A set of linearized shock boundary conditions is derived, which is then imposed at the shock to account for the interaction of the shock wave with the boundary/shock layer instability wave; these boundary conditions are used to study the effect of shock on hypersonic boundary layer stability under the assumption of quasi-parallel flow. The result show that the shock has little effect on the boundary layer instability (subsonic first and second mode disturbances) when the shock is located outside the boundary layer edge. When the shock is located near the boundary layer edge, it exerts a stabilizing influence on the first and second modes. The shock also induces unstable supersonic modes with oscillatory structure in the shock layer, but these modes grow slower than the subsonic modes.

  6. Hypersonic structures: An aerodynamicist's perspective, or one man's dream is another man's nightmare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, J. D.; Jackson, L. R.; Hunt, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between hypersonic aerodynamic and structural design is reviewed. The evolution of the hypersonic vehicle design is presented. Propulsion systems, structural materials, and fuels are emphasized.

  7. Hypersonic Vehicle Propulsion System Control Model Development Roadmap and Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Le, Dzu K.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Hypersonic project is directed towards fundamental research for two classes of hypersonic vehicles: highly reliable reusable launch systems (HRRLS) and high-mass Mars entry systems (HMMES). The objective of the hypersonic guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) discipline team is to develop advanced guidance and control algorithms to enable efficient and effective operation of these challenging vehicles. The ongoing work at the NASA Glenn Research Center supports the hypersonic GN&C effort in developing tools to aid the design of advanced control algorithms that specifically address the propulsion system of the HRRLSclass vehicles. These tools are being developed in conjunction with complementary research and development activities in hypersonic propulsion at Glenn and elsewhere. This report is focused on obtaining control-relevant dynamic models of an HRRLS-type hypersonic vehicle propulsion system.

  8. Conceptual Study on Hypersonic Turbojet Experimental Vehicle (HYTEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Hideyuki; Murakami, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya; Tsuchiya, Takeshi

    Pre-cooled turbojet engines have been investigated aiming at realization of reusable space transportation systems and hypersonic airplanes. Evaluation methods of these engine performances have been established based on ground tests. There are some plans on the demonstration of hypersonic propulsion systems. JAXA focused on hypersonic propulsion systems as a key technology of hypersonic transport airplane. Demonstrations of Mach 5 class hypersonic technologies are stated as a development target at 2025 in the long term vision. In this study, systems analyses of hypersonic turbojet experiment (HYTEX) with Mach 5 flight capability is performed. Aerodynamic coefficients are obtained by CFD analyses and wind tunnel tests. Small Pre-cooled turbojet is fabricated and tested using liquid hydrogen as fuel. As a result, characteristics of the baseline vehicle shape is clarified, . and effects of pre-cooling are confirmed at the firing test.

  9. The Syracuse University Center for Training and Research in Hypersonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John; Blankson, Isaiah (Technical Monitor); Robinson, Stephen K. (Technical Monitor); Walsh, Michael J. (Technical Monitor); Anderson, Griffin Y. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In Fall 1993, NASA Headquarters established Centers for Hypersonics at the University of Maryland, the University of Texas-Arlington, and Syracuse University. These centers are dedicated to research and education in hypersonic technologies and have the objective of educating the next generation of engineers in this critical field. At the Syracuse University Center for Hypersonics this goal is being realized by focusing resources to: Provide an environment in which promising undergraduate students can learn the fundamental engineering principles of hypersonics so that they may make a seamless transition to graduate study and research in this field; Provide graduate students with advanced training in hypersonics and an opportunity to interact with leading authorities in the field in both research and instructional capacities; and Perform fundamental research in areas that will impact hypersonic vehicle design and development.

  10. Towards future circular colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikt, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) presently provides proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics program will extend through the second half of the 2030's. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ˜100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCCee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3 S n superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly-efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. Following the FCC concept, the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing has initiated a parallel design study for an e + e - Higgs factory in China (CEPC), which is to be succeeded by a high-energy hadron collider (SPPC). At present a tunnel circumference of 54 km and a hadron collider c.m. energy of about 70 TeV are being considered. After a brief look at the LHC, this article reports the motivation and the present status of the FCC study, some of the primary design challenges and R&D subjects, as well as the emerging global collaboration.

  11. Design Study of Wafer Seals for Future Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.

    2005-01-01

    Future hypersonic vehicles require high temperature, dynamic seals in advanced hypersonic engines and on the vehicle airframe to seal the perimeters of movable panels, flaps, and doors. Current seals do not meet the demanding requirements of these applications, so NASA Glenn Research Center is developing improved designs to overcome these shortfalls. An advanced ceramic wafer seal design has shown promise in meeting these needs. Results from a design of experiments study performed on this seal revealed that several installation variables played a role in determining the amount of leakage past the seals. Lower leakage rates were achieved by using a tighter groove width around the seals, a higher seal preload, a tighter wafer height tolerance, and a looser groove length. During flow testing, a seal activating pressure acting behind the wafers combined with simulated vibrations to seat the seals more effectively against the sealing surface and produce lower leakage rates. A seal geometry study revealed comparable leakage for full-scale wafers with 0.125 and 0.25 in. thicknesses. For applications in which lower part counts are desired, fewer 0.25-in.-thick wafers may be able to be used in place of 0.125-in.-thick wafers while achieving similar performance. Tests performed on wafers with a rounded edge (0.5 in. radius) in contact with the sealing surface resulted in flow rates twice as high as those for wafers with a flat edge. Half-size wafers had leakage rates approximately three times higher than those for full-size wafers.

  12. Configuration development study of the OSU 1 hypersonic research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Matthew D.; Frankhauser, Chris; Zee, Warner; Kosanchick, Melvin, III; Nelson, Nick; Hunt, William

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to insure the future development of hypersonic cruise aircraft, the possible vehicle configurations were examined to develop a single-stage-to-orbit hypersonic research vehicle (HRV). Based on the needs of hypersonic research and development, the mission goals and requirements are determined. A body type is chosen. Three modes of propulsion and two liquid rocket fuels are compared, followed by the optimization of the body configuration through aerodynamic, weight, and trajectory studies. A cost analysis is included.

  13. Measurements Of Instability And Transition In Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Katya M.; Schneider, Steven P.; Beresh, Steven J.

    2011-05-01

    Several studies on boundary-layer instability and transition have been conducted in the Boeing/AFOSR-Mach 6 Quiet Tunnel (BAM6QT) and the Sandia Hypersonic Wind Tunnels (HWT) at Mach 5 and 8. The first study looked at the effect of freestream noise on roughness- induced transition on a blunt cone. Temperature-sensitive paints were used to visualize the wake of an isolated roughness element at zero deg angle of attack in the BAM6QT. Transition was always delayed under quiet flow compared to noisy flow, even for an effective trip height. The second study measured transitional surface pressure fluctuations on a seven degree half-angle sharp cone in the HWT under noisy flow and in the BAM6QT under noisy and quiet flow. Fluctuations under laminar boundary layers reflected tunnel noise levels. Transition on the model only occurred under noisy flow, and fluctuations peaked during transition. Measurements of second- mode waves showed the waves started to grow under a laminar boundary layer, saturated, and then broke down near the peak in transitional pressure fluctuations. The third study looked at the development of wave packets and turbulent spots on the BAM6QT nozzle wall. A spark perturber was used to generate controlled disturbances. Measurements of the internal structure of the pressure field of the disturbances were made.

  14. Hypersonic Arbitrary-Body Aerodynamics (HABA) for conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Salguero, D.E.

    1990-03-15

    The Hypersonic Arbitrary-Body Aerodynamics (HABA) computer program predicts static and dynamic aerodynamic derivatives at hypersonic speeds for any vehicle geometry. It is intended to be used during conceptual design studies where fast computational speed is required. It uses the same geometry and hypersonic aerodynamic methods as the Mark IV Supersonic/Hypersonic Arbitrary-Body Program (SHABP) developed under sponsorship of the Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory; however, the input and output formats have been improved to make it easier to use. This program is available as part of the Department 9140 CAE software.

  15. Linear collider: a preview

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  16. Hadron hadron collider group

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.; Peoples, J.; Ankenbrandt, C.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this group was to make a rough assessment of the characteristics of a hadron-hadron collider which could make it possible to study the 1 TeV mass scale. Since there is very little theoretical guidance for the type of experimental measurements which could illuminate this mass scale, we chose to extend the types of experiments which have been done at the ISR, and which are in progress at the SPS collider to these higher energies.

  17. Aerodynamic analysis of hypersonic waverider aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Pessin, David N.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate two existing codes used by the Systems Analysis Branch at NASA ARC, and to modify the codes so they can be used to generate and analyze waverider aircraft at on-design and off-design conditions. To generate waverider configurations and perform the on-design analysis, the appropriately named Waverider code is used. The Waverider code is based on the Taylor-Maccoll equations. Validation is accomplished via a comparison with previously published results. The Waverider code is modified to incorporate a fairing to close off the base area of the waverider configuration. This creates a more realistic waverider. The Hypersonic Aircraft Vehicle Optimization Code (HAVOC) is used to perform the off-design analysis of waverider configurations generated by the Waverider code. Various approximate analysis methods are used by HAVOC to predict the aerodynamic characteristics, which are validated via a comparison with experimental results from a hypersonic test model.

  18. Hypersonic characteristics of an advanced aerospace plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccandless, R. S.; Cruz, C. I.

    1985-01-01

    A series of hypersonic wind-tunnel tests have been conducted in the NASA Langley Hypersonic Facilities Complex to obtain the static longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced aerospace plane. Data were obtained at 0 to 20 deg angles of attack and -3 to 3 deg angles of sideslip at Mach numbers of 6 and 10 in air and 20 in helium. Results show that stable trim capability exists at angles of attack near maximum lift-drag ratio (L/D). Both performance and stability exhibited some Mach number dependency. The vehicle was longitudinally unstable at low angles of attack but stable at angles of attack near and above maximum L/D. It was directionally unstable with positive dihedral effect. The rudder showed an inability to provide lateral-directional control, and removing the vertical tail resulted in increased directional instability. Analytical predictions of the static longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients gave relatively good comparisons with the experimental data.

  19. Hypersonic Vehicle Propulsion System Simplified Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Raitano, Paul; Le, Dzu K.; Ouzts, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This document addresses the modeling task plan for the hypersonic GN&C GRC team members. The overall propulsion system modeling task plan is a multi-step process and the task plan identified in this document addresses the first steps (short term modeling goals). The procedures and tools produced from this effort will be useful for creating simplified dynamic models applicable to a hypersonic vehicle propulsion system. The document continues with the GRC short term modeling goal. Next, a general description of the desired simplified model is presented along with simulations that are available to varying degrees. The simulations may be available in electronic form (FORTRAN, CFD, MatLab,...) or in paper form in published documents. Finally, roadmaps outlining possible avenues towards realizing simplified model are presented.

  20. Thermal protection systems for hypersonic transport vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, G.; Hinger, J.; Huchler, M.

    1990-07-01

    Thermal protection systems (TPS) for hypersonic transport vehicles are described and evaluated. During the flight through the atmosphere moderate to high aerodynamic heating rates with corresponding high surface temperatures are generated. Therefore, a reliable light-weight but effective TPS is required, that limits the heat transfer into the central fuselage with the liquid hydrogen tank and that prevents the penetration of the temperature peak during stage separation to the load carrying structure. The heat transfer modes in the insulation are solid conduction, gas convection and radiation. Thermal protection systems based on different phenomena to reduce the heat transfer, like vacuum shingles, inert gas filled shingles, microporous insulations and multiwall structures, are described. It is demonstrated that microporous and multiwall insulations are efficient, light weight and reliable TPSs for future hypersonic transportation systems.

  1. Photon collider at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-10-01

    High energy photon colliders ( γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e +e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3) Le +e -. Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e +e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e +e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is "an optical storage ring (optical trap)" with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

  2. Fundamental studies in hypersonic aeroelasticity using computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuruthimattam, Biju James

    This dissertation describes the aeroelastic analysis of a generic hypersonic vehicle using methods in computational aeroelasticity. This objective is achieved by first considering the behavior of a representative configuration, namely a two degree-of-freedom typical cross-section, followed by that of a three-dimensional model of the generic vehicle, operating at very high Mach numbers. The typical cross-section of a hypersonic vehicle is represented by a double-wedge cross-section, having pitch and plunge degrees of freedom. The flutter boundaries of the typical cross-section are first generated using third-order piston theory, to serve as a basis for comparison with the refined calculations. Prior to the refined calculations, the time-step requirements for the reliable computation of the unsteady airloads using Euler and Navier-Stokes aerodynamics are identified. Computational aeroelastic response results are used to obtain frequency and damping characteristics, and compared with those from piston theory solutions for a variety of flight conditions. A parametric study of offsets, wedge angles; and static angle of attack is conducted. All the solutions are fairly close below the flutter boundary, and differences between the various models increase when the flutter boundary is approached. For this geometry, differences between viscous and inviscid aeroelastic behavior are not substantial. The effects of aerodynamic heating on the aeroelastic behavior of the typical cross-section are incorporated in an approximate manner, by considering the response of a heated wing. Results indicate that aerodynamic heating reduces aeroelastic stability. This analysis was extended to a generic hypersonic vehicle, restrained such that the rigid-body degrees of freedom are absent. The aeroelastic stability boundaries of the canted fin alone were calculated using third-order piston theory. The stability boundaries for the generic vehicle were calculated at different altitudes using

  3. A guidance concept for hypersonic aerospacecrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Shinji

    In this paper a guidance concept for hypersonic re-entry flights is presented. The method uses a closed-form guidance technique based on a drag acceleration reference profile. A guidance law for range control is developed. It employs a physical relation between vehicle energy and range instead of a prediction-correction technique used for Shuttle entry guidance. Simulation results show that the algorithm provides good performance.

  4. Aeroservoelastic stabilization techniques for hypersonic flight vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Samuel Y.; Cheng, Peter Y.; Pitt, Dale M.; Myers, Thomas T.; Klyde, David H.; Magdaleno, Raymond E.; Mcruer, Duane T.

    1991-01-01

    The potential of Hybrid Phase Stabilization (HPS), particularly for highly unstable aircraft, using a hypersonic flight vehicle (HSV) as a relevant example, is discussed. The development of HPS is presented and the result is compared with that generated using a conventional gain stabilization technique. Since HPS was not addressed in the MIL-spec requirements, a preliminary residual response metric was developed to provide guidance in assessing HPS.

  5. Airbreathing hypersonic vehicle design and analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, Mary Kae; Petley, Dennis H.; Hunt, James L.; Martin, John G.

    1996-01-01

    The design, analysis, and optimization of airbreathing hypersonic vehicles requires analyses involving many highly coupled disciplines at levels of accuracy exceeding those traditionally considered in a conceptual or preliminary-level design. Discipline analysis methods including propulsion, structures, thermal management, geometry, aerodynamics, performance, synthesis, sizing, closure, and cost are discussed. Also, the on-going integration of these methods into a working environment, known as HOLIST, is described.

  6. Prediction of forces and moments for hypersonic flight vehicle control effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughmer, Mark D.; Long, Lyle N.; Pagano, Peter J.

    1991-01-01

    Developing methods of predicting flight control forces and moments for hypersonic vehicles, included a preliminary assessment of subsonic/supersonic panel methods and hypersonic local flow inclination methods for such predictions. While these findings clearly indicate the usefulness of such methods for conceptual design activities, deficiencies exist in some areas. Thus, a second phase of research was proposed in which a better understanding is sought for the reasons of the successes and failures of the methods considered, particularly for the cases at hypersonic Mach numbers. To obtain this additional understanding, a more careful study of the results obtained relative to the methods used was undertaken. In addition, where appropriate and necessary, a more complete modeling of the flow was performed using well proven methods of computational fluid dynamics. As a result, assessments will be made which are more quantitative than those of phase 1 regarding the uncertainty involved in the prediction of the aerodynamic derivatives. In addition, with improved understanding, it is anticipated that improvements resulting in better accuracy will be made to the simple force and moment prediction.

  7. Prediction of forces and moments for hypersonic flight vehicle control effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughmer, Mark D.; Long, Lyle N.; Guilmette, Neal; Pagano, Peter

    1993-01-01

    This research project includes three distinct phases. For completeness, all three phases of the work are briefly described in this report. The goal was to develop methods of predicting flight control forces and moments for hypersonic vehicles which could be used in a preliminary design environment. The first phase included a preliminary assessment of subsonic/supersonic panel methods and hypersonic local flow inclination methods for such predictions. While these findings clearly indicated the usefulness of such methods for conceptual design activities, deficiencies exist in some areas. Thus, a second phase of research was conducted in which a better understanding was sought for the reasons behind the successes and failures of the methods considered, particularly for the cases at hypersonic Mach numbers. This second phase involved using computational fluid dynamics methods to examine the flow fields in detail. Through these detailed predictions, the deficiencies in the simple surface inclination methods were determined. In the third phase of this work, an improvement to the surface inclination methods was developed. This used a novel method for including viscous effects by modifying the geometry to include the viscous/shock layer.

  8. Triangular flow of thermal photons from an event-by-event hydrodynamic model for 2.76 A TeV Pb + Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Rupa; Srivastava, Dinesh K.; Renk, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the triangular flow parameter v3 of thermal photons from an event-by-event ideal hydrodynamic model for 0-40% central collisions of Pb nuclei at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. v3 determined with respect to the participant plane (PP) is found to be nonzero and positive, and its pT dependence is qualitatively similar to the elliptic flow parameter v2(PP) of thermal photons in the range 1 ≤pT≤6 GeV/c . In the range pT≤ 3 GeV/c , v3(PP) is found to be about 50-75% of v2(PP) and for pT> 3 GeV/c the two anisotropy parameters become comparable. The value of v3 is driven by local density fluctuations both directly via the creation of triangular geometry and indirectly via additional flow. As expected, the triangular flow parameter calculated with respect to the reaction plane v3(RP) is found to be close to zero. We show that v3(PP) strongly depends on the spatial size of fluctuations, especially in the higher pT(≥3 GeV /c ) region where a larger value of σ results in a smaller v3(PP ) . In addition, v3(PP ) is found to increase with the assumed formation time of the thermalized system.

  9. Crossflow effects on the growth rate of inviscid Goertler vortices in a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Yibin; Hall, Philip

    1992-01-01

    The effects of crossflow on the growth rate of inviscid Goertler vortices in a hypersonic boundary layer with pressure gradient are studied. Attention is focused on the inviscid mode trapped in the temperature adjustment layer; this mode has greater growth rate than any other mode. The eigenvalue problem which governs the relationship between the growth rate, the crossflow amplitude, and the wavenumber is solved numerically, and the results are then used to clarify the effects of crossflow on the growth rate of inviscid Goertler vortices. It is shown that crossflow effects on Goertler vortices are fundamentally different for incompressible and hypersonic flows. The neutral mode eigenvalue problem is found to have an exact solution, and as a by-product, we have also found the exact solution to a neutral mode eigenvalue problem which was formulated, but unsolved before, by Bassom and Hall (1991).

  10. A large volume 2000 MPA air source for the radiatively driven hypersonic wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Constantino, M

    1999-07-14

    An ultra-high pressure air source for a hypersonic wind tunnel for fluid dynamics and combustion physics and chemistry research and development must provide a 10 kg/s pure air flow for more than 1 s at a specific enthalpy of more than 3000 kJ/kg. The nominal operating pressure and temperature condition for the air source is 2000 MPa and 900 K. A radial array of variable radial support intensifiers connected to an axial manifold provides an arbitrarily large total high pressure volume. This configuration also provides solutions to cross bore stress concentrations and the decrease in material strength with temperature. [hypersonic, high pressure, air, wind tunnel, ground testing

  11. Thermostructural design tools for hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaak, Natasha

    The operating conditions of scramjet engines demand designs that include active cooling by the fuel and the use of lightweight materials capable of withstanding extreme heat fluxes and structural loads. As hypersonic flight is an emerging technology, there is limited ability to evaluate candidate material systems in hypersonic environments. This dissertation addresses the problem by developing an optimization protocol that establishes the capabilities and deficiencies of existing combustor panel designs and directs the development of advanced materials that will outperform existing high temperature alloys and compete with ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). By incorporating models that characterize the key loading and boundary conditions of hypersonic combustors, the optimization protocol is able to rapidly survey the design space and facilitate communication between design variables and material properties. The code determines temperatures and stresses present in panels that line the combustion chamber and optimizes for minimum weight subject to two primary constraints: the stresses induced by thermomechanical loads remain below representative levels of material strength or elasto-plastic design rules; and the maximum temperature in the structure does not exceed the material limit. The results indicate that there are multiple avenues for achieving greater robustness and weight efficiency, including: (i) tailoring properties such as intermediate strength and material softening temperature and (ii) allowing localized plasticity. Design implementation is explored using laser heat flux experiments on convectively-cooled structures. The experiments serve as feedback for the optimization code and highlight benefits and concerns associated with allowing elasto-plastic response.

  12. A hypersonic vehicle approach to planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murbach, Marcus S.

    1993-01-01

    An enhanced Mars network class mission using a lifting hypersonic entry vehicle is proposed. The basic vehicle, derived from a mature hypersonic flight system called SWERVE, offers several advantages over more conventional low L/D or ballistic entry systems. The proposed vehicle has greatly improved lateral and cross range capability (e.g., it is capable of reaching the polar regions during less than optimal mission opportunities), is not limited to surface target areas of low elevation, and is less susceptible to problems caused by Martian dust storms. Further, the integrated vehicle has attractive deployment features and allows for a much improved evolutionary path to larger vehicles with greater science capability. Analysis of the vehicle is aided by the development of a Mars Hypersonic Flight Simulator from which flight trajectories are obtained. Atmospheric entry performance of the baseline vehicle is improved by a deceleration skirt and transpiration cooling system which significantly reduce TPS (Thermal Protection System) and flight battery mass. The use of the vehicle is also attractive in that the maturity of the flight systems make it cost-competitive with the development of a conventional low L/D entry system. Finally, the potential application of similar vehicles to other planetary missions is discussed.

  13. Photon-photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    1996-01-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et al., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention [1]. A 1990 article by V.I. Telnov describes the situation at that time [2]. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held [3]. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons—the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  14. Photon-photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  15. Dynamic interactions between hypersonic vehicle aerodynamics and propulsion system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flandro, G. A.; Roach, R. L.; Buschek, H.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the development of a flexible simulation model for scramjet hypersonic propulsion systems. The primary goal is determination of sensitivity of the thrust vector and other system parameters to angle of attack changes of the vehicle. Such information is crucial in design and analysis of control system performance for hypersonic vehicles. The code is also intended to be a key element in carrying out dynamic interaction studies involving the influence of vehicle vibrations on propulsion system/control system coupling and flight stability. Simple models are employed to represent the various processes comprising the propulsion system. A method of characteristics (MOC) approach is used to solve the forebody and external nozzle flow fields. This results in a very fast computational algorithm capable of carrying out the vast number of simulation computations needed in guidance, stability, and control studies. The three-dimensional fore- and aft body (nozzle) geometry is characterized by the centerline profiles as represented by a series of coordinate points and body cross-section curvature. The engine module geometry is represented by an adjustable vertical grid to accommodate variations of the field parameters throughout the inlet and combustor. The scramjet inlet is modeled as a two-dimensional supersonic flow containing adjustable sidewall wedges and multiple fuel injection struts. The inlet geometry including the sidewall wedge angles, the number of injection struts, their sweepback relative to the vehicle reference line, and strut cross-section are user selectable. Combustion is currently represented by a Rayleigh line calculation including corrections for variable gas properties; improved models are being developed for this important element of the propulsion flow field. The program generates (1) variation of thrust magnitude and direction with angle of attack, (2) pitching moment and line of action of the thrust vector, (3) pressure and temperature

  16. Analytical solutions of hypersonic type IV shock - shock interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frame, Michael John

    An analytical model has been developed to predict the effects of a type IV shock interaction at high Mach numbers. This interaction occurs when an impinging oblique shock wave intersects the most normal portion of a detached bow shock. The flowfield which develops is complicated and contains an embedded jet of supersonic flow, which may be unsteady. The jet impinges on the blunt body surface causing very high pressure and heating loads. Understanding this type of interaction is vital to the designers of cowl lips and leading edges on air- breathing hypersonic vehicles. This analytical model represents the first known attempt at predicting the geometry of the interaction explicitly, without knowing beforehand the jet dimensions, including the length of the transmitted shock where the jet originates. The model uses a hyperbolic equation for the bow shock and by matching mass continuity, flow directions and pressure throughout the flowfield, a prediction of the interaction geometry can be derived. The model has been shown to agree well with the flowfield patterns and properties of experiments and CFD, but the prediction for where the peak pressure is located, and its value, can be significantly in error due to a lack of sophistication in the model of the jet fluid stagnation region. Therefore it is recommended that this region of the flowfield be modeled in more detail and more accurate experimental and CFD measurements be used for validation. However, the analytical model has been shown to be a fast and economic prediction tool, suitable for preliminary design, or for understanding the interactions effects, including the basic physics of the interaction, such as the jet unsteadiness. The model has been used to examine a wide parametric space of possible interactions, including different Mach number, impinging shock strength and location, and cylinder radius. It has also been used to examine the interaction on power-law shaped blunt bodies, a possible candidate for

  17. Preliminary Study on a Transportation Network of a Hypersonic Airliner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    上野, 篤史; 鈴木, 宏二郎

    The commercial success of a hypersonic airliner is discussed from a viewpoint of its operational convenience. In the hypersonic regime, a lift-to-drag ratio is generally small due to a large wave drag, which results not only in small cruising range but also in an operational inconvenience. To overcome this drawback, we propose a transportation network with multiple hypersonic airliners. The analysis of the operation diagram demonstrates that the travel time of passengers can be significantly reduced in the absence of the arrival and departure in late evening or early morning thanks to the combination of the high flight velocity and flexible network operation, even if the range of the hypersonic transport is limited to 7,330km. Consequently, the network operation will greatly enhance the potential of the hypersonic aircraft for future high-speed global transportation system.

  18. The deflection effect of starlight transmission in hypersonic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jing; Yang, Bo

    2014-11-01

    When starlight navigation method is applied in the hypersonic vehicle, the complex turbulence generated around the window of star sensor causes starlight deflection, thus lead to the centroid offset of navigation star in the star-map imaging. Starting from characteristics of the flow field, the deflection effects of starlight transmission are researched to solve. At first, based on Reynolds average, the model of flow around the window was established to obtain the density distribution that can be divided into mean-time and fluctuation flow field to analyze the whole field. On this basis, the starlight is traced by using the Runge-Kutta method, while taking the principle of refraction, the evaluation index for starlight deflection is derived to characterize the deflection effect of the field. Finally, verify the applicability of the evaluation index through comparative analysis and also study the impact on deflection effect with the follow situations: different installation locations of star sensor, different angles of incident ray, different Mach numbers and wavelengths of starlight. The study provides the predictive information for centroid offset of navigation star in star-map pre processing to improve the efficiency of star-map matching, and also provides the best choice for the work of the star sensor.

  19. Investigation of a turbulent boundary layer on a hypersonic aircraft model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetlutsky, V. N.; Houtman, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    An algorithm for calculation of a spatial compressible turbulent boundary layer on the surface of a pointed body is developed. The algorithm is based on the numerical solution of three-dimensional equations and algebraic models of turbulence. The flow around a hypersonic aircraft model is calculated, and the resultant Stanton numbers are compared with experimental data. The influence of the Mach number, the angle of attack, and the Reynolds number on the boundary-layer parameters is studied. It is shown that the change in the location of the transition zone has a weak effect on the skin-friction coefficient in the region of developed turbulent flow.

  20. Stabilization of the hypersonic boundary layer by finite-amplitude streaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jie; Fu, Song; Hanifi, Ardeshir

    2016-02-01

    Stabilization of two-dimensional disturbances in hypersonic boundary layer flows by finite-amplitude streaks is investigated using nonlinear parabolized stability equations. The boundary-layer flows at Mach numbers 4.5 and 6.0 are studied in which both first and second modes are supported. The streaks considered here are driven either by the so-called optimal perturbations (Klebanoff-type) or the centrifugal instability (Görtler-type). When the streak amplitude is in an appropriate range, i.e., large enough to modulate the laminar boundary layer but low enough to not trigger secondary instability, both first and second modes can effectively be suppressed.