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Sample records for collision i2-polymeric liquid

  1. Probing the microscopic corrugation of liquid surfaces with gas-liquid collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Mackenzie E.; Nathanson, Gilbert M.; Hanning-Lee, Mark A.; Minton, Timothy K.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the directions and velocities of Ne, Ar, and Xe atoms scattering from perfluorinated ether and hydrocarbon liquids to probe the relationship between the microscopic roughness of liquid surfaces and gas-liquid collision dynamics. Impulsive energy transfer is governed by the angle of deflection: head-on encounters deposit more energy than grazing collisions. Many atoms scatter in the forward direction, particularly at glancing incidence. These results imply that the incoming atoms recoil locally from protruding C-H and C-F groups in hard spherelike collisions.

  2. Multiscale Simulation of Gas Film Lubrication During Liquid Droplet Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Khare, Prashant; Ma, Dongjun; Yang, Vigor

    2012-02-01

    Droplet collision plays an elementary role in dense spray combustion process. When two droplets approach each other, a gas film forms in between. The pressure generated within the film prevents motion of approaching droplets. This fluid mechanics is fluid film lubrication that occurs when opposing bearing surfaces are completely separated by fluid film. The lubrication flow in gas film decides the collision outcome, coalescence or bouncing. Present study focuses on gas film drainage process over a wide range of Weber numbers during equal- and unequal-sized droplet collision. The formulation is based on complete set of conservation equations for both liquid and surrounding gas phases. An improved volume-of-fluid technique, augmented by an adaptive mesh refinement algorithm, is used to track liquid/gas interfaces. A unique thickness-based refinement algorithm based on topology of interfacial flow is developed and implemented to efficiently resolve the multiscale problem. The grid size on interface is up O(10-4) of droplet size with a max resolution of 0.015 μm. An advanced visualization technique using the Ray-tracing methodology is used to gain direct insights to detailed physics. Theories are established by analyzing the characteristics of shape changing and flow evolution.

  3. Ultrasonic study on organic liquid and binary organic liquid mixtures by using Schaaffs' collision factor theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi-Gang; Dong, Yan-Wu

    2006-09-01

    Based on Schaaffs' collision factor theory (CFT) in liquids, the equations for nonlinear ultrasonic parameters in both organic liquid and binary organic liquid mixtures are deduced. The nonlinear ultrasonic parameters, including pressure coefficient, temperature coefficients of ultrasonic velocity, and nonlinear acoustic parameter B/A in both organic liquid and binary organic liquid mixtures, are evaluated for comparison with the measured results and data from other sources. The equations show that the coefficient of ultrasonic velocity and nonlinear acoustic parameter B/A are closely related to molecular interactions. These nonlinear ultrasonic parameters reflect some information of internal structure and outside status of the medium or mixtures. From the exponent of repulsive forces of the molecules, several thermodynamic parameters, pressure and temperature of the medium, the nonlinear ultrasonic parameters and ultrasonic nature of the medium can be evaluated. When evaluating and studying nonlinear acoustic parameter B/A of binary organic liquid mixtures, there is no need to know the nonlinear acoustic parameter B/A of the components. Obviously, the equation reveals the connection between the nonlinear ultrasonic nature and internal structure and outside status of the mixtures more directly and distinctly than traditional mixture law for B/A, e.g. Apfel's and Sehgal's laws for liquid binary mixtures.

  4. Probing Ion Transfer across Liquid-Liquid Interfaces by Monitoring Collisions of Single Femtoliter Oil Droplets on Ultramicroelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Deng, Haiqiang; Dick, Jeffrey E; Kummer, Sina; Kragl, Udo; Strauss, Steven H; Bard, Allen J

    2016-08-01

    We describe a method of observing collisions of single femtoliter (fL) oil (i.e., toluene) droplets that are dispersed in water on an ultramicroelectrode (UME) to probe the ion transfer across the oil/water interface. The oil-in-water emulsion was stabilized by an ionic liquid, in which the oil droplet trapped a highly hydrophobic redox probe, rubrene. The ionic liquid also functions as the supporting electrolyte in toluene. When the potential of the UME was biased such that rubrene oxidation would be possible when a droplet collided with the electrode, no current spikes were observed. This implies that the rubrene radical cation is not hydrophilic enough to transfer into the aqueous phase. We show that current spikes are observed when tetrabutylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate or tetrahexylammonium hexafluorophosphate are introduced into the toluene phase and when tetrabutylammonium perchlorate is introduced into the water phase, implying that the ion transfer facilitates electron transfer in the droplet collisions. The current (i)-time (t) behavior was evaluated quantitatively, which indicated the ion transfer is fast and reversible. Furthermore, the size of these emulsion droplets can also be calculated from the electrochemical collision. We further investigated the potential dependence on the electrochemical collision response in the presence of tetrabutylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate in toluene to obtain the formal ion transfer potential of tetrabutylammonium across the toluene/water interface, which was determined to be 0.754 V in the inner potential scale. The results yield new physical insights into the charge balance mechanism in emulsion droplet collisions and indicate that the electrochemical collision technique can be used to probe formal ion transfer potentials between water and solvents with very low (ε < 5) dielectric constants. PMID:27387789

  5. A stochastic, local mode study of neon-liquid surface collision dynamics.

    PubMed

    Packwood, Daniel M; Phillips, Leon F

    2011-01-14

    Equations of motion for a fast, light rare gas atom passing over a liquid surface are derived and used to infer the dynamics of neon collisions with squalane and perfluorinated polyether surfaces from experimental data. The equations incorporate the local mode model of a liquid surface via a stochastic process and explicitly account for impulsive collisional energy loss to the surface. The equations predict angular distributions for scattering of neon that are in good quantitative agreement with experimental data. Our key dynamical conclusions are that experimental angular distributions derive mainly from local mode surface topography rather than from structural features of individual surface molecules, and that the available data for these systems can be accounted for almost exclusively by single collisions between neon atoms and the liquid surface.

  6. Coloring Rate of Phenolphthalein by Reaction with Alkaline Solution Observed by Liquid-Droplet Collision.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yuuka; Kikkawa, Shigenori; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kohno, Jun-ya

    2015-06-11

    Many important chemical reactions are induced by mixing two solutions. This paper presents a new way to measure rates of rapid chemical reactions induced by mixing two reactant solutions using a liquid-droplet collision. The coloring reaction of phenolphthalein (H2PP) by a reaction with NaOH is investigated kinetically. Liquid droplets of H2PP/ethanol and NaOH/H2O solutions are made to collide, which induces a reaction that transforms H2PP into a deprotonated form (PP(2-)). The concentration of PP(2-) is evaluated from the RGB values of pixels in the colored droplet images, and is measured as a function of the elapsed time from the collision. The obtained rate constant is (2.2 ± 0.7) × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), which is the rate constant for the rate-determining step of the coloring reaction of H2PP. This method was shown to be applicable to determine rate constants of rapid chemical reactions between two solutions.

  7. Disclination elastica model of loop collision and growth in confined nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Shams, Alireza; Yao, Xuxia; Park, Jung Ok; Srinivasarao, Mohan; Rey, Alejandro D

    2015-07-21

    Theory and modeling are used to characterize disclination loop-loop interactions in nematic liquid crystals under capillary confinement with strong homeotropic anchoring. This defect process arises when a mesogen in the isotropic phase is quenched into the stable nematic state. The texture evolution starts with +1/2 disclination loops that merge into a single loop through a process that involves collision, pinching and relaxation. The process is characterized with a combined Rouse-Frank model that incorporates the tension and bending elasticity of disclinations and the rotational viscosity of nematics. The Frank model of disclinations follows the Euler elastica model, whose non-periodic solution, known as Poleni's curve, is shown to locally describe the loop-loop collision and to shed light on why loop-loop merging results in a disclination intersection angle of approximately 60°. Additional Poleni invariants demonstrate how tension and bending pinch the two loops into a single +1/2 disclination ring. The Rouse model of disclination relaxation yields a Cahn-Hilliard equation whose time constant combines the confinement, tension/bending stiffness ratio and disclination diffusivity. Based on predictions made using this three stage process, a practical procedure is proposed to find viscoelastic parameters from defect geometry and defect dynamics. These findings contribute to the evolving understanding of textural transformations in nematic liquid crystals under confinement using the disclination elastica methodology. PMID:26061721

  8. Collision and coalescence of liquid drops in a dynamically active ambient fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambath, Krishnaraj; Subramani, Hariprasad; Basaran, Osman

    2012-11-01

    The fluid dynamics of the collision and coalescence of liquid drops has intrigued scientists and engineers for more than a century owing to its ubiquitousness in nature, e.g. raindrop coalescence, and industry, e.g. breaking of emulsions in the oil and gas industry. The complexity of the underlying dynamics, e.g. occurrence of hydrodynamic singularities, has required study of the problem at different scales - macroscopic, mesoscopic and molecular - using stochastic and deterministic methods. In this work, we adopt a multiscale, deterministic method to simulate the approach, collision, and eventual coalescence of two drops where the drops as well as the ambient fluid are incompressible, Newtonian fluids. The free boundary problem governing the dynamics consists of the Navier-Stokes system and associated initial and boundary conditions that have been augmented to account for the effects of disjoining pressure as the separation between the drops becomes of the order of a few hundred nanometers. This free boundary problem is solved by a Galerkin finite element-based algorithm. The approach and results to be reported build on earlier work by Leal and coworkers, and are used to identify conditions conducive for coalescence in terms of flow and fluid properties.

  9. Collision Dynamics and Internal Mixing of Droplets of Non-Newtonian Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kai; Zhang, Peng; Law, Chung K.; Wang, Tianyou

    2015-11-01

    The efficient internal mixing of colliding droplets upon coalescence is critical to various technological processes such as color manipulation in ink-jet printing and the initiation of the liquid-phase reaction of gelled hypergolic propellants in rocket engines. Recognizing that such processes can be optimized by varying the impact inertia as well as employing fluids of non-Newtonian rheology, the head-on collision, coalescence, and internal mixing pattern between two impacting equal-sized droplets of non-Newtonian fluids is computationally investigated by using the lattice Boltzmann method. Results show that, with increasing non-Newtonian effects, droplet deformation and separation following coalescence is promoted for shear-thinning fluids, while permanent coalescence allowing an extended duration for mixing is promoted for shear-thickening fluids. Furthermore, large-scale internal mixing is promoted for the colliding droplets with larger shear-thinning disparity, while coalescence and mixing is synergistically facilitated for the collision between a shear-thinning droplet and a shear-thickening droplet. The individual and coupled influences of viscosity on the droplet deformation and impact inertia, internal motion, viscous loss, and merging of the colliding interfaces leading to the observed outcomes are mechanistically identified and described.

  10. Collision dynamics and reactive uptake of OH radicals at liquid surfaces of atmospheric interest.

    PubMed

    Waring, Carla; King, Kerry L; Bagot, Paul A J; Costen, Matthew L; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2011-05-14

    The inelastic scattering of OH radicals from the surfaces of a sequence of potentially reactive organic liquids: squalane (C(30)H(62), 2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane); squalene (C(30)H(50), trans-2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosa-2,6,10,14,18,22-hexaene); and oleic acid (C(18)H(34)O(2), cis-9-octadecanoic acid) was studied experimentally. A liquid long-chain perfluorinated polyether (PFPE, Krytox® 1506) was compared as a chemically inert reference. Gas-phase OH with an average laboratory-frame kinetic energy of 54 kJ mol(-1) was generated by 355-nm photolysis of a low-pressure of HONO a short distance (9 mm) above the liquid surface. Scattered OH was detected at the same distance by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Appearance profiles as a function of photolysis-probe delay were recorded for selected OH v' = 0, N' rotational levels. The efficiency of momentum transfer to the surface is least for PFPE and highest for squalane, with squalene and oleic acid intermediate, but in all cases the speed distributions are markedly too hot to be consistent with a thermal accommodation mechanism. The rotational distribution is found to be a function of scattered OH speed. The generally high rotational temperatures implied by the relative fluxes for N' = 1 and 5 were confirmed by LIF excitation spectra at the peak of the profile for each liquid. The trends in translational-to-rotational energy transfer were broadly consistent with the sequence in surface stiffness inferred from the translational inelasticity. The non-statistical distribution of OH fine-structure and Λ-doublet states produced by HONO photolysis appears to be effectively completely scrambled in collisions with the liquid surfaces. With due account taken of the product rotational distributions, and assuming that 100% of the OH scatters from PFPE, the integrated OH survival probabilities were: squalane (0.70 ± 0.08), squalene (0.61 ± 0.07) and oleic acid (0.76 ± 0.10). The 'missing' OH is presumed to

  11. Ternary drop collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterbichler, Hannes; Planchette, Carole; Brenn, Günter

    2015-10-01

    It has been recently proposed to use drop collisions for producing advanced particles or well-defined capsules, or to perform chemical reactions where the merged drops constitute a micro-reactor. For all these promising applications, it is essential to determine whether the merged drops remain stable after the collision, forming a single entity, or if they break up. This topic, widely investigated for binary drop collisions of miscible and immiscible liquid, is quite unexplored for ternary drop collisions. The current study aims to close this gap by experimentally investigating collisions between three equal-sized drops of the same liquid arranged centri-symmetrically. Three drop generators are simultaneously operated to obtain controlled ternary drop collisions. The collision outcomes are observed via photographs and compared to those of binary collisions. Similar to binary collisions, a regime map is built, showing coalescence and bouncing as well as reflexive and stretching separation. Significant differences are observed in the transitions between these regimes.

  12. Collisions of sodium atoms with liquid glycerol: insights into solvation and ionization.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Justin P; Nathanson, Gilbert M; Alexander, William A; Minton, Timothy K; Lakshmi, Sankaran; Schatz, George C

    2014-02-26

    The reactive uptake and ionization of sodium atoms in glycerol were investigated by gas-liquid scattering experiments and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. A nearly effusive beam of Na atoms at 670 K was directed at liquid glycerol in vacuum, and the scattered Na atoms were detected by a rotatable mass spectrometer. The Na velocity and angular distributions imply that all impinging Na atoms that thermally equilibrate on the surface remain behind, likely ionizing to e(-) and Na(+). The reactive uptake of Na atoms into glycerol was determined to be greater than 75%. Complementary AIMD simulations of Na striking a 17-molecule glycerol cluster indicate that the glycerol hydroxyl groups reorient around the Na atom as it makes contact with the cluster and begins to ionize. Although complete ionization did not occur during the 10 ps simulation, distinct correlations among the extent of ionization, separation between Na(+) and e(-), solvent coordination, and binding energies of the Na atom and electron were observed. The combination of experiments and simulations indicates that Na-atom deposition provides a low-energy pathway for generating solvated electrons in the near-interfacial region of protic liquids.

  13. Recent research directions in Fribourg: nuclear dynamics in resonances revealed by 2-dimensional EEL spectra, electron collisions with ionic liquids and electronic excitation of pyrimidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Michael; Regeta, Khrystyna; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.; Mašín, Zdeněk; Grimme, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    The article briefly reviews three subjects recently investigated in Fribourg: (i) electron collisions with surfaces of ionic liquids, (ii) two-dimensional (2D) electron energy loss spectra and (iii) resonances in absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of unsaturated compounds. Electron energy loss spectra of four ionic liquids revealed a number of excited states, including triplet states. A solution of a dye in an ionic liquid showed an energy-loss band of the solute, but not in all ionic liquids. 2D spectra reveal state-to-state information (given resonance to given final state) and are shown to be an interesting means to gain insight into dynamics of nuclear motion in resonances. Absolute cross sections for pyrimidine are reported as a function of scattering angle and as a function of electron energy. They reveal resonant structure which was reproduced very nicely by R-matrix calculations. The calculation provided an assignment of the resonances which reveals common patterns in compounds containing double bonds.

  14. Tailored noise waveform/collision-induced dissociation of ions stored in a linear ion trap combined with liquid chromatography/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vilkov, Andrey N; Bogdanov, Bogdan; Pasa-Tolić, Ljiljana; Prior, Dave C; Anderson, Gordon A; Masselon, Christophe D; Moore, Ronald J; Smith, Richard D

    2004-01-01

    A new collision-induced dissociation (CID) technique based on broadband tailored noise waveform (TNW) excitation of ions stored in a linear ion trap has been developed. In comparison with the conventional sustained off-resonance irradiation (SORI) CID method commonly used in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS), this MS/MS technique increases throughput by eliminating the long pump-down delay associated with gas introduction into the high vacuum ICR cell region. In addition, the TNW-CID method speeds spectrum acquisition since it does not require Fourier transformation, calculation of resonant frequencies and generation of the excitation waveforms. We demonstrate TNW-CID coupled with on-line capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography separations for the identification of peptides. The experimental results are compared with data obtained using conventional quadrupole ion trap MS/MS and SORI-CID MS/MS in an ICR cell.

  15. A unified model for simulating liquid and gas phase, intermolecular energy transfer: N₂ + C₆F₆ collisions.

    PubMed

    Paul, Amit K; Kohale, Swapnil C; Pratihar, Subha; Sun, Rui; North, Simon W; Hase, William L

    2014-05-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study relaxation of a vibrationally excited C6F6* molecule in a N2 bath. Ab initio calculations were performed to develop N2-N2 and N2-C6F6 intermolecular potentials for the simulations. Energy transfer from "hot" C6F6 is studied versus the bath density (pressure) and number of bath molecules. For the large bath limit, there is no heating of the bath. As C6F6* is relaxed, the average energy of C6F6* is determined versus time, i.e., ⟨E(t)⟩, and for each bath density ⟨E(t)⟩ is energy dependent and cannot be fit by a single exponential. In the long-time limit C6F6 is fully equilibrated with the bath. For a large bath and low pressures, the simulations are in the fixed temperature, independent collision regime and the simulation results may be compared with gas phase experiments of collisional energy transfer. The derivative d[⟨E(t)⟩]/dt divided by the collision frequency ω of the N2 bath gives the average energy transferred from C6F6* per collision ⟨ΔE(c)⟩, which is in excellent agreement with experiment. For the ~100-300 ps simulations reported here, energy transfer from C6F6* is to N2 rotation and translation in accord with the equipartition model, with no energy transfer to N2 vibration. The energy transfer dynamics from C6F6* is not statistically sensitive to fine details of the N2-C6F6 intermolecular potential. Tests, with simulation ensembles of different sizes, show that a relatively modest ensemble of only 24 trajectories gives statistically meaningful results.

  16. 200 A GeV Au+Au Collisions Serve a Nearly Perfect Quark-Gluon Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Song Huichao; Bass, Steffen A.; Heinz, Ulrich; Shen, Chun; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2011-05-13

    A new robust method to extract the specific shear viscosity ({eta}/s){sub QGP} of a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) at temperatures T{sub c}collisions is presented. Coupling viscous fluid dynamics for the QGP with a microscopic transport model for hadronic freeze-out we find for 200 A GeV Au+Au collisions that v{sub 2}/{epsilon} is a universal function of multiplicity density (1/S)(dN{sub ch}/dy) that depends only on the viscosity but not on the model used for computing the initial fireball eccentricity {epsilon}. Comparing with measurements we find 1<4{pi}({eta}/s){sub QGP}<2.5 where the uncertainty range is dominated by model uncertainties for the values of {epsilon} used to normalize the measured v{sub 2}.

  17. Freeze-out temperature and density in heavy-ion collisions at liquid-gas phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Shlomo, Shalom

    2010-08-04

    The study of properties of hot nuclei and the search for liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei have been the subjects of many investigations in recent decades. We present a short and limited review of the theoretical and experimental status of determining the temperature and density of the disassembling nucleus from ratios of the yields of emitted fragments.

  18. Collision tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, M.P.; Ries, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The motions of lithospheric plates have produced most existing mountain ranges, but structures produced as a result of, and following the collision of continental plates need to be distinguished from those produced before by subduction. If subduction is normally only stopped when collision occurs, then most geologically ancient fold belts must be collisional, so it is essential to recognize and understand the effects of the collision process. This book consists of papers that review collision tectonics, covering tectonics, structure, geochemistry, paleomagnetism, metamorphism, and magmatism.

  19. Linear Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkiewicz, T. A.; Newby, N. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of linear collisions between two or three objects is related to a junior-level course in analytical mechanics. The theoretical discussion uses a geometrical approach that treats elastic and inelastic collisions from a unified point of view. Experiments with a linear air track are described. (Author/TS)

  20. Liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet absorbance detection, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation and tandem mass spectrometry on a triple quadrupole for the on-line characterization of polyphenols and methylxanthines in green coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Salces, Rosa Maria; Guillou, Claude; Berrueta, Luis A

    2009-02-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with a photodiode array detector, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-DAD/ESI-CID-MS/MS) on a triple quadrupole (QqQ) has been used to detect and characterize polyphenols and methylxanthines in green coffee beans: three phenolic acids (caffeic acid, ferulic acid and dimethoxycinnamic acid), three isomeric caffeoylquinic acids (M(r) 354), three feruloylquinic acids (M(r) 368), one p-coumaroylquinic acid (M(r) 338), three dicaffeoylquinic acids (M(r) 516), three feruloyl-caffeoylquinic acids (M(r) 530), four p-coumaroyl-caffeoylquinic acids (M(r) 500), three diferuloylquinic acids (M(r) 544), six dimethoxycinnamoyl-caffeoylquinic acids (M(r) 544), three dimethoxycinnamoyl-feruloylquinic acids (M(r) 558), six cinnamoyl-amino acid conjugates, three cinnamoyl glycosides, and three methylxanthines (caffeine, theobromine and theophylline). Dimethoxycinnamic acid, three isomers of dimethoxycinnamoyl-caffeoylquinic acids and another three of dimethoxycinnamoyl-feruloylquinic acids, as well as the three cinnamoyl glycosides, had not previously been reported in coffee beans. Structures have been assigned on the basis of the complementary information obtained from UV-visible spectra, relative hydrophobicity, scan mode MS spectra, and fragmentation patterns in MS(2) spectra (both in the positive and negative ion modes) obtained using a QqQ at different collision energies. A structure diagnosis scheme is provided for the identification of different isomers of polyphenols and methylxanthines.

  1. Separation and identification of phosphatidylcholine regioisomers by combining liquid chromatography with a fusion of collision-and ozone-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Todd; Blanksby, Stephen; Kozlowskia, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The differentiation of closely related lipid isomers is increasingly important to our evolving understanding of lipid biochemistry but it is equally challenging to contemporary chromatographic and mass spectral analyses. Recently, we described a novel ion-activation approach based on combining collision- with ozone-induced dissociation (CID/OzID) for the identification of the relative acyl chain substitution positions in glycerophospholipids. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that CID/OzID can be effectively combined with reversed-phase chromatography to enable the separation and unambiguous identification of regioisomeric pairs of phosphatidylcholines that differ only in the arrangement of acyl chains on the glycerol backbone. PMID:26307699

  2. Reduction of in-source collision-induced dissociation and thermolysis of sulopenem prodrugs for quantitative liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometric analysis by promoting sodium adduct formation.

    PubMed

    Wujcik, Chad E; Kadar, Eugene P

    2008-10-01

    Six chromatographically resolved sulopenem prodrugs were monitored for their potential to undergo both in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID) and thermolysis. Initial Q1 scans for each prodrug revealed the formation of intense [Prodrug2 + H]+, [Prodrug2 + Na]+, [Prodrug + Na]+, and [Sulopenem + Na]+ ions. Non-adduct-associated sulopenem ([Sulopenem + H]+) along with several additional lower mass ions were also observed. Product ion scans of [Prodrug3 + Na]+ showed the retention of the sodium adduct in the collision cell continuing down to opening of the beta-lactam ring. In-source CID and temperature experiments were conducted under chromatographic conditions while monitoring several of the latter ion transitions (i.e., adducts, dimers and degradants/fragments) for a given prodrug. The resulting ion profiles indicated the regions of greatest stability for temperature and declustering potential (DP) that provided the highest signal intensity for each prodrug and minimized in-source degradation. The heightened stability of adduct ions, relative to their appropriate counterpart (i.e., dimer to dimer adduct and prodrug to prodrug adduct ions), was observed under elevated temperature and DP conditions. The addition of 100 microM sodium to the mobile phase further enhanced the formation of these more stable adduct ions, yielding an optimal [Prodrug + Na]+ ion signal at temperatures from 400 to 600 degrees C. A clinical liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) assay for sulopenem prodrug PF-04064900 in buffered whole blood was successfully validated using sodium-fortified mobile phase and the [PF-04064900 + Na]+ ion for quantitation. A conservative five-fold increase in sensitivity from previously validated preclinical assays using the [PF-04064900 + H]+ precursor ion was achieved.

  3. RHIC The Perfect Liquid

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2016-07-12

    Evidence to date suggests that gold-gold collisions the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven are indeed creating a new state of hot, dense matter, but one quite different and even more remarkable than had been predicted. Instead of behaving like a gas of free quarks and gluons, as was expected, the matter created in RHIC's heavy ion collisions appears to be more like a "perfect" liquid.

  4. RHIC The Perfect Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    2008-08-12

    Evidence to date suggests that gold-gold collisions the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven are indeed creating a new state of hot, dense matter, but one quite different and even more remarkable than had been predicted. Instead of behaving like a gas of free quarks and gluons, as was expected, the matter created in RHIC's heavy ion collisions appears to be more like a "perfect" liquid.

  5. Stability and Degradation of Caffeoylquinic Acids under Different Storage Conditions Studied by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Photo Diode Array Detection and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Electrospray Ionization Collision-Induced Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xue, Meng; Shi, Hang; Zhang, Jiao; Liu, Qing-Quan; Guan, Jun; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Ma, Qun

    2016-07-21

    Caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs) are main constituents in many herbal medicines with various biological and pharmacological effects. However, CQAs will degrade or isomerize when affected by temperature, pH, light, etc. In this study, high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (HPLC-PDA) and high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was utilized to study the stability and degradation of CQAs (three mono-acyl CQAs and four di-acyl CQAs) under various ordinary storage conditions (involving different temperatures, solvents, and light irradiation). The results indicated that the stability of CQAs was mainly affected by temperature and light irradiation, while solvents did not affect it in any obvious way under the conditions studied. Mono-acyl CQAs were generally much more stable than di-acyl CQAs under the same conditions. Meanwhile, the chemical structures of 30 degradation products were also characterized by HPLC-MS(n), inferring that isomerization, methylation, and hydrolysis were three major degradation pathways. The result provides a meaningful clue for the storage conditions of CQAs standard substances and samples.

  6. Stability and Degradation of Caffeoylquinic Acids under Different Storage Conditions Studied by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Photo Diode Array Detection and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Electrospray Ionization Collision-Induced Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xue, Meng; Shi, Hang; Zhang, Jiao; Liu, Qing-Quan; Guan, Jun; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Ma, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs) are main constituents in many herbal medicines with various biological and pharmacological effects. However, CQAs will degrade or isomerize when affected by temperature, pH, light, etc. In this study, high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (HPLC-PDA) and high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was utilized to study the stability and degradation of CQAs (three mono-acyl CQAs and four di-acyl CQAs) under various ordinary storage conditions (involving different temperatures, solvents, and light irradiation). The results indicated that the stability of CQAs was mainly affected by temperature and light irradiation, while solvents did not affect it in any obvious way under the conditions studied. Mono-acyl CQAs were generally much more stable than di-acyl CQAs under the same conditions. Meanwhile, the chemical structures of 30 degradation products were also characterized by HPLC-MS(n), inferring that isomerization, methylation, and hydrolysis were three major degradation pathways. The result provides a meaningful clue for the storage conditions of CQAs standard substances and samples. PMID:27455213

  7. Probability of satellite collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarter, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A method is presented for computing the probability of a collision between a particular artificial earth satellite and any one of the total population of earth satellites. The collision hazard incurred by the proposed modular Space Station is assessed using the technique presented. The results of a parametric study to determine what type of satellite orbits produce the greatest contribution to the total collision probability are presented. Collision probability for the Space Station is given as a function of Space Station altitude and inclination. Collision probability was also parameterized over miss distance and mission duration.

  8. Elastic Collisions and Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Steven

    2009-04-01

    Elastic collisions are fascinating demonstrations of conservation principles. The mediating force must be conservative in an elastic collision. Truly elastic collisions take place only when the objects in collision do not touch, e.g. magnetic bumpers on low friction carts. This requires that we define a collision as a momentum transfer. Elastic collisions in 1-D can be solved in general and the implications are quite remarkable. For example, a heavy object moving initially towards a light object followed by an elastic collision results in a final velocity of the light object greater than either initial velocity. This is easily demonstrated with low friction carts. Gravitational elastic collisions involving a light spacecraft and an extremely massive body like a moon or planet can be approximated as 1-D collisions, such as the ``free return'' trajectory of Apollo 13 around the moon. The most fascinating gravitational collisions involve the gravitational slingshot effect used to boost spacecraft velocities. The maximum gravitational slingshot effect occurs when approaching a nearly 1-D collision, revealing that the spacecraft can be boosted to greater than twice the planet velocity, enabling the spacecraft to travel much further away from the Sun.

  9. Disequilibration by Planetary Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Jutzi, M.

    2010-12-01

    Molten planets equilibrate gravitationally, chemically, and thermally. Large scale collisions (a.k.a. giant impacts, similar-sized collisions) can upset the apple cart by bringing core material, late in the game, into mixture with mantle products, and by shredding stratified planets into strands of mantle and clumps of core (c.g. Asphaug et al. Nature 2006). Atmophiles and volatiles come along for the ride, and can find themselves in disequilibrium mixtures not anticipated by one-dimensional models of planetary evolution, or by planet growth models in which planets stick, merge, and mix perfectly in the aftermath of a collision. We present very high resolution case studies of such collisions.

  10. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  11. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  12. Dynamics of bouncing-versus-merging response in jet collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minglei; Saha, Abhishek; Zhu, D. L.; Sun, Chao; Law, Chung K.

    2015-08-01

    A new regime of oblique jet collision, characterized by low impact inertia and jet merging through bridge formation, is observed and thereby completes the entire suite of possible jet collision outcomes of (soft) merging, bouncing, and (hard) merging with increasing inertia. These distinct regimes, together with the observed dependence of the collision outcome on the impact angle and liquid properties, are characterized through scaling analysis by considering the competing effects of impact inertia, surface tension, and viscous thinning of the interfacial air gap leading to merging.

  13. Bubble collision with gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Dong-il; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Yeom, Dong-han E-mail: bhl@sogang.ac.kr E-mail: innocent.yeom@gmail.com

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we study vacuum bubble collisions with various potentials including gravitation, assuming spherical, planar, and hyperbolic symmetry. We use numerical calculations from double-null formalism. Spherical symmetry can mimic the formation of a black hole via multiple bubble collisions. Planar and especially hyperbolic symmetry describes two bubble collisions. We study both cases, when two true vacuum regions have the same field value or different field values, by varying tensions. For the latter case, we also test symmetric and asymmetric bubble collisions, and see details of causal structures. If the colliding energy is sufficient, then the vacuum can be destabilized, and it is also demonstrated. This double-null formalism can be a complementary approach in the context of bubble collisions.

  14. Collision risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Ortiz, N.; Belló Mora, M.; Graziano, M.; Pina Caballero, F.; Sánchez Pérez, J. M.; Klinkrad, H.

    2001-10-01

    Avoidance of near misses or collisions is required for almost all satellites on orbit, but it is of particular interest for manned missions and spacecraft at densely populated regions. In order to avoid these possible collisions, it is needed to determine a possible conjunction and its associated uncertainty. Two main constraints must be taken into account when a tool to forecast the collision risk of an object is being developed: the high number of objects in space and the accuracy of the catalogued object data. The number of objects on Earth orbit makes impossible to propagate all the catalogued objects, thus filtering and parallel processing techniques are presented. The accuracy of the catalogued object data and the propagation of the error over the time identify a position ellipsoid of error, whose behaviour has an important influence on some parameters on the filtering techniques and the way the collision probability is computed. Some collision probability methods are presented.

  15. Cosmic bubble collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleban, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    I briefly review the physics of cosmic bubble collisions in false-vacuum eternal inflation. My purpose is to provide an introduction to the subject for readers unfamiliar with it, focussing on recent work related to the prospects for observing the effects of bubble collisions in cosmology. I will attempt to explain the essential physical points as simply and concisely as possible, leaving most technical details to the references. I make no attempt to be comprehensive or complete. I also present a new solution to Einstein's equations that represents a bubble universe after a collision, containing vacuum energy and ingoing null radiation with an arbitrary density profile.

  16. Newton's Strange Collisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlichson, Herman

    1995-01-01

    Discusses Newton's apparent oversight of the role of energy considerations in collisions between two spherical bodies related to the third corollary of his "Laws of Motion." Investigates several theories that provide solutions to the mysterious oversight. (LZ)

  17. The Sandbag Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xueli

    2006-10-01

    As physics teachers, we all know that many introductory physics students have difficulties in understanding conservation of energy during inelastic collisions where the difficult-to-visualize concept of internal energy is involved. An interesting approach using a pair of model carts1,2 has been developed to help students visualize and understand the concept of internal thermal energy involved during an inelastic collision. This paper will illustrate a sandbag collision experiment that uses visible deformation of the sandbag to help students visualize where the kinetic energy goes during an inelastic collision. This experiment problem (as shown in Fig. 1) can be broken into three small subparts: 1) The pendulum bob swings down until right before hitting the box—a conservation of energy problem; 2) The bob collides with the box—a conservation of momentum problem; 3) The box slides on the table until it comes to a stop—a conservation of energy problem or a dynamics problem.

  18. Effects of hydrogen atom spin exchange collisions on atomic hydrogen maser oscillation frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crampton, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    Frequency shifts due to collisions between hydrogen atoms in an atomic hydrogen maser frequency standard are studied. Investigations of frequency shifts proportional to the spin exchange frequency shift cross section and those proportional to the duration of exchange collisions are discussed. The feasibility of operating a hydrogen frequency standard at liquid helium temperatures is examined.

  19. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  20. Preheating in bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jun; Piao Yunsong

    2010-08-15

    In a landscape with metastable minima, the bubbles will inevitably nucleate. We show that when the bubbles collide, due to the dramatic oscillation of the field at the collision region, the energy deposited in the bubble walls can be efficiently released by the explosive production of the particles. In this sense, the collision of bubbles is actually highly inelastic. The cosmological implications of this result are discussed.

  1. Launch Collision Probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenbacher, Gary; Guptill, James D.

    1999-01-01

    This report analyzes the probability of a launch vehicle colliding with one of the nearly 10,000 tracked objects orbiting the Earth, given that an object on a near-collision course with the launch vehicle has been identified. Knowledge of the probability of collision throughout the launch window can be used to avoid launching at times when the probability of collision is unacceptably high. The analysis in this report assumes that the positions of the orbiting objects and the launch vehicle can be predicted as a function of time and therefore that any tracked object which comes close to the launch vehicle can be identified. The analysis further assumes that the position uncertainty of the launch vehicle and the approaching space object can be described with position covariance matrices. With these and some additional simplifying assumptions, a closed-form solution is developed using two approaches. The solution shows that the probability of collision is a function of position uncertainties, the size of the two potentially colliding objects, and the nominal separation distance at the point of closest approach. ne impact of the simplifying assumptions on the accuracy of the final result is assessed and the application of the results to the Cassini mission, launched in October 1997, is described. Other factors that affect the probability of collision are also discussed. Finally, the report offers alternative approaches that can be used to evaluate the probability of collision.

  2. Visually guided collision avoidance and collision achievement.

    PubMed

    Regan; Gray

    2000-03-01

    To survive on today's highways, a driver must have highly developed skills in visually guided collision avoidance. To play such games as cricket, tennis or baseball demands accurate, precise and reliable collision achievement. This review discusses evidence that some of these tasks are performed by predicting where an object will be at some sharply defined instant, several hundred milliseconds in the future, while other tasks are performed by utilizing the fact that some of our motor actions change what we see in ways that obey lawful relationships, and can therefore be learned. Several monocular and binocular visual correlates of the direction of an object's motion relative to the observer's head have been derived theoretically, along with visual correlates of the time to collision with an approaching object. Although laboratory psychophysics can identify putative neural mechanisms by showing which of the known correlates are processed by the human visual system independently of other visual information, it is only field research on, for example, driving, aviation and sport that can show which visual cues are actually used in these activities. This article reviews this research and describes a general psychophysically based rational approach to the design of such field studies.

  3. Binary droplet collision at high Weber number.

    PubMed

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Chou, Ping-Chung; Tseng, Yu-Jen

    2009-09-01

    By using the techniques developed for generating high-speed droplets, we have systematically investigated binary droplet collision when the Weber number (We) was increased from the range usually tested in previous studies on the order of 10 to a much larger value of about 5100 for water (a droplet at 23 m/s with a diameter of 0.7 mm). Various liquids were also used to explore the effects of viscosity and surface tension. Specifically, beyond the well-known regimes at moderate We's, which exhibited coalescence, separation, and separation followed by satellite droplets, we found different behaviors showing a fingering lamella, separation after fingering, breakup of outer fingers, and prompt splattering into multiple secondary droplets as We was increased. The critical Weber numbers that mark the boundaries between these impact regimes are identified. The specific impact behaviors, such as fingering and prompt splattering or splashing, share essential similarity with those also observed in droplet-surface impacts, whereas substantial variations in the transition boundaries may result from the disparity of the boundary conditions at impacts. To compare the outcomes of both types of collisions, a simple model based on energy conservation was carried out to predict the maximum diameter of an expanding liquid disk for a binary droplet collision. The results oppose the dominance of viscous drag, as proposed by previous studies, as the main deceleration force to effect a Rayleigh-Taylor instability and ensuing periphery fingers, which may further lead to the formations of satellite droplets. PMID:19905206

  4. Binary droplet collision at high Weber number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Chou, Ping-Chung; Tseng, Yu-Jen

    2009-09-01

    By using the techniques developed for generating high-speed droplets, we have systematically investigated binary droplet collision when the Weber number (We) was increased from the range usually tested in previous studies on the order of 10 to a much larger value of about 5100 for water (a droplet at 23 m/s with a diameter of 0.7 mm). Various liquids were also used to explore the effects of viscosity and surface tension. Specifically, beyond the well-known regimes at moderate We’s, which exhibited coalescence, separation, and separation followed by satellite droplets, we found different behaviors showing a fingering lamella, separation after fingering, breakup of outer fingers, and prompt splattering into multiple secondary droplets as We was increased. The critical Weber numbers that mark the boundaries between these impact regimes are identified. The specific impact behaviors, such as fingering and prompt splattering or splashing, share essential similarity with those also observed in droplet-surface impacts, whereas substantial variations in the transition boundaries may result from the disparity of the boundary conditions at impacts. To compare the outcomes of both types of collisions, a simple model based on energy conservation was carried out to predict the maximum diameter of an expanding liquid disk for a binary droplet collision. The results oppose the dominance of viscous drag, as proposed by previous studies, as the main deceleration force to effect a Rayleigh-Taylor instability and ensuing periphery fingers, which may further lead to the formations of satellite droplets.

  5. Ion Collision, Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil K.

    2013-09-11

    The outcome of a collision between an ion and neutral species depends on the chemical and physical properties of the two reactants, their relative velocities, and the impact parameter of their trajectories. These include elastic and inelastic scattering of the colliding particles, charge transfer (including dissociative charge transfer), atom abstraction, complex formation and dissociation of the colliding ion. Each of these reactions may be characterized in terms of their energy-dependent rate coefficients, cross sections and reaction kinetics. A theoretical framework that emphasizes simple models and classical mechanics is presented for these processes. Collision processes are addressed in two categories of low-energy and high-energy collisions. Experiments under thermal or quasi-thermal conditions–swarms, drift tubes, chemical ionization and ion cyclotron resonance are strongly influenced by long-range forces and often involve collisions in which atom exchange and extensive energy exchange are common characteristics. High-energy collisions are typically impulsive, involve short-range intermolecular forces and are direct, fast processes.

  6. Microscope collision protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    DeNure, Charles R.

    2001-10-23

    A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

  7. Collision of cosmic superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Firouzjahi, H.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2008-03-15

    We study the formation of three-string junctions between (p,q)-cosmic superstrings, and collisions between such strings and show that kinematic constraints analogous to those found previously for collisions of Nambu-Goto strings apply here too, with suitable modifications to take account of the additional requirements of flux conservation. We examine in detail several examples involving collisions between strings with low values of p and q, and also examine the rates of growth or shrinkage of strings at a junction. Finally, we briefly discuss the formation of junctions for strings in a warped space, specifically with a Klebanov-Strassler throat, and show that similar constraints still apply with changes to the parameters taking account of the warping and the background flux.

  8. Comprehensive analysis of a multidimensional liquid chromatography mass spectrometry dataset acquired on a quadrupole selecting, quadrupole collision cell, time-of-flight mass spectrometer: I. How much of the data is theoretically interpretable by search engines?

    PubMed

    Chalkley, Robert J; Baker, Peter R; Hansen, Kirk C; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Allen, Nadia P; Rexach, Michael; Burlingame, Alma L

    2005-08-01

    An in-depth analysis of a multidimensional chromatography-mass spectrometry dataset acquired on a quadrupole selecting, quadrupole collision cell, time-of-flight (QqTOF) geometry instrument was carried out. A total of 3269 CID spectra were acquired. Through manual verification of database search results and de novo interpretation of spectra 2368 spectra could be confidently determined as predicted tryptic peptides. A detailed analysis of the non-matching spectra was also carried out, highlighting what the non-matching spectra in a database search typically are composed of. The results of this comprehensive dataset study demonstrate that QqTOF instruments produce information-rich data of which a high percentage of the data is readily interpretable.

  9. Simulation of Droplets Collisions Using Two-Phase Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazloomi Moqaddam, A.; Chikatamarla, S. S.; Karlin, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    The recently introduced entropic lattice Boltzmann model for multiphase flows (Mazloomi et al. in Phys Rev Lett 114:174502, 2015) is used to simulate binary droplet collisions. The entropy-based stabilization, together with a new polynomial equation of state, enhances performance of the model and allow us to simulate droplet collision for various Weber and Reynolds numbers and large liquid to vapor density ratio. Different types of droplet collision outcomes, namely coalescence, stretching separation and reflexive separation are recovered in a range of impact parameter for two equal sized droplets. The results demonstrated the essential role played by the surface tension, kinematic viscosity, impact parameter and relative velocity in the droplet collision dynamics leading to coalescence or separation collision outcomes. Comparison between numerical results and experiments in both coalescence and separation collisions demonstrate viability of the presented model.

  10. Space collision threat mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatezalo, Aleksandar; Stipanović, Dušan; Mehra, Raman K.; Pham, Khanh

    2014-06-01

    Mitigation of possible collision threats to current and future operations in space environments is an important an challenging task considering high nonlinearity of orbital dynamics and discrete measurement updates. Such discrete observations are relatively scarce with respect to space dynamics including possible unintentional or intentional rocket propulsion based maneuvers even in scenarios when measurement collections are focused to a one single target of interest. In our paper, this problem is addressed in terms of multihypothesis and multimodel estimation in conjunction with multi-agent multigoal game theoretic guaranteed evasion strategies. Collision threat estimation is formulated using conditional probabilities of time dependent hypotheses and spacecraft controls which are computed using Liapunov-like approach. Based on this formulation, time dependent functional forms of multi-objective utility functions are derived given threat collision risk levels. For demonstrating developed concepts, numerical methods are developed using nonlinear filtering methodology for updating hypothesis sets and corresponding conditional probabilities. Space platform associated sensor resources are managed using previously developed and demonstrated information-theoretic objective functions and optimization methods. Consequently, estimation and numerical methods are evaluated and demonstrated on a realistic Low Earth Orbit collision encounter.

  11. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  12. Atomic collisions, inelastic indeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Herve; Ferrando, Gwenael; Lehoucq, Roland

    At the turn of the twentieth century, a hot controversy raged about the ability of Boltzmann's framework to take care of irreversibility. The so-called Loschmidt's paradox progressively faded with time during the last hundred years, due to the predictive efficiency of statistical mechanics. However, one detail at the origin of the controversy - the elasticity of atomic collisions - was not completely challenged. A semi-classical treatment of two atoms interacting with the vacuum zero-point field permits to predict a friction force acting against the rotation of the pair of atoms. By its form and its level, the calculated torque is a candidate as a physical cause for diffusion of energy and angular momentum, and consequently for entropy growth. It opens the way to a revision of the standard vision of irreversibility. This presentation will focus on two points. First we will discuss the recent result in a broader context of electromagnetic interactions during microscopic collisions. The predicted friction phenomenon can be compared to and distinguished from Collision-Induced Emission and other types of inelastic collisions. Second we will investigate the consequences of the friction torque on calculated trajectories of colliding atoms, quantifying the generation of dimers linked by dispersion forces.

  13. Fusion, deep-inelastic collisions, and neck formation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, C.E.; Barbosa, V.C.; Canto, L.F.; Donangelo, R.

    1988-07-01

    We use the liquid drop model to calculate the cross section for neck formation in a heavy-ion collision and show that for the recently measured /sup 58/Ni+/sup 124/Sn case this cross section is strongly related to the sum of the fusion and deep-inelastic cross sections. We note that the observation of deep-inelastic collisions at sub-Coulomb barrier energies may be classically understood by the effective barrier lowering obtained when the neck degree of freedom is considered.

  14. Liquid Argon Calorimetry for ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alan

    2008-05-01

    This summer, the largest collaborative physics project since the Manhattan project will go online. One of four experiments for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, ATLAS, employs over 2000 people. Canadians have helped design, construct, and calibrate the liquid argon calorimeters for ATLAS to capture the products of the high energy collisions produced by the LHC. From an undergraduate's perspective, explore how these calorimeters are made to handle their harsh requirement. From nearly a billion proton-proton collisions a second, physicists hope to discover the Higgs boson and other new fundamental particles.

  15. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  16. Collision Avoidance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Ames Research Center teamed with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to study human performance factors associated with the use of the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance system (TCAS II) in an operational environment. TCAS is designed to alert pilots of the presence of other aircraft in their vicinity, to identify and track those who could be a threat, and to recommend action to avoid a collision. Ames conducted three laboratory experiments. The first showed that pilots were able to use the TCAS II correctly in the allowable time. The second tested pilots' response to changes in the avoidance advisories, and the third examined pilots' reactions to alternative displays. After a 1989 congressional mandate, the FAA ruled that TCAS would be required on all passenger carrying aircraft (to be phased in completely by 1995).

  17. Hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions

    PubMed

    Froelich; Jonsell; Saenz; Zygelman; Dalgarno

    2000-05-15

    Matter-antimatter interactions are investigated using hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions as an example. Cross sections for elastic scattering and for the antihydrogen loss (either through the rearrangement reaction, resulting in formation of protonium and positronium according to H+&Hmacr;-->p&pmacr;+e(+)e(-), or via annihilation in flight) are calculated for the first time in a fully quantum mechanical approach. Implications for experiments intending to trap and cool antihydrogen are discussed.

  18. Operational Collision Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guit, Bill

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will describe the early days of the EOS Aqua and Aura operational collision avoidance process. It will highlight EOS debris avoidance maneuvers, EOS high interest event statistic and A-Train systematic conjunctions and conclude with future challenges. This is related to earlier e-DAA (tracking number 21692) that an abstract was submitted to a different conference. Eric Moyer, ESMO Deputy Project Manager has reviewed and approved this presentation on May 6, 2015

  19. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2016-07-12

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  20. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2015-06-16

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  1. Electrochemistry of a single attoliter emulsion droplet in collisions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Kwon; Kim, Jiyeon; Bard, Allen J

    2015-02-18

    We report here the electrochemistry of emulsion droplets by observing single emulsion droplet collisions with selective electrochemical reduction on an ultramicroelectrode (UME). With appropriately applied potentials at an UME, we can observe the electrochemical effects of single collision signals from the complete electrolysis of single emulsion droplets, or selective electrolysis of redox species in single emulsion droplets. This was observed with nitrobenzene (NB), 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), and ionic liquid. The NB, TCNQ, and ionic liquid act as emulsion material, redox specie, and emulsifier (and electrolyte), respectively. NB emulsions and NB (TCNQ) emulsions were made by ultrasonic processing. During the amperometric current-time (i-t) curve measurement with NB/water emulsion at -0.65 V, reduction of NB emulsion droplets was measured. In the case of less negative potentials, e.g., at -0.45 V with a NB (TCNQ) emulsion, selective reduction of TCNQ in NB droplet was measured. Spike-like responses from electrolysis of NB or TCNQ in each experiment were observed. From these single-particle collision results of NB and NB (TCNQ) emulsions, the collision frequency, size distribution, i-t decay behavior of emulsion droplets, and possible mechanisms are discussed.

  2. Heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacak, B.V.

    1994-11-01

    Heavy ion collisions at very high energies provide an opportunity to recreate in the laboratory the conditions which existed very early in the universe, just after the big bang. We prepare matter at very high energy density and search for evidence that the quarks and gluons are deconfined. I describe the kinds of observables that are experimentally accessible to characterize the system and to search for evidence of new physics. A wealth of information is now available from CERN and BNL heavy ion experiments. I discuss recent results on two particle correlations, strangeness production, and dilepton and direct photon distributions.

  3. Hydrogen-Antihydrogen Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, P.; Jonsell, S.; Saenz, A.; Zygelman, B.; Dalgarno, A.

    2000-05-15

    Matter-antimatter interactions are investigated using hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions as an example. Cross sections for elastic scattering and for the antihydrogen loss (either through the rearrangement reaction, resulting in formation of protonium and positronium according to H+H(bar sign){yields}p p(bar sign)+e{sup +}e{sup -} , or via annihilation in flight) are calculated for the first time in a fully quantum mechanical approach. Implications for experiments intending to trap and cool antihydrogen are discussed. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. Experiments on the dynamics of droplet collisions in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, K. D.; Orme, M. E.

    Highly controlled experiments of binary droplet collisions in a vacuum environment are performed in order to study the collision dynamics devoid of aerodynamic effects that could otherwise obstruct the experimental observations by causing distortion or even disintegration of the coalesced mass. Pre-collision droplets are generated from capillary stream break-up at wavelengths much larger than those generated with the typical Rayleigh droplet formation in order to reduce the interactions among the collision products. Experimental results show that the range of droplet Weber number necessary to describe the boundaries between permanent coalescence and coalescence followed by separation is several orders of magnitude higher than has been reported in experiments conducted at standard atmospheric pressures with lower viscosity liquids (i.e. hydrocarbon fuels and water). Additionally, the time periods of both the oblate and prolate portions of the coalesced droplet oscillation have been measured and it is reported for the first time that the time period for the prolate portion of the oscillation grows exponentially with the Weber number. Finally, new pictorial results are presented for droplet collisions between non-spherical droplets.

  5. Geochemical Interpretation of Collision Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Julian

    2014-05-01

    Collision volcanism can be defined as volcanism that takes place during an orogeny from the moment that continental subduction starts to the end of orogenic collapse. Its importance in the Geological Record is greatly underestimated as collision volcanics are easily misinterpreted as being of volcanic arc, extensional or mantle plume origin. There are many types of collision volcanic province: continent-island arc collision (e.g. Banda arc); continent-active margin collision (e.g. Tibet, Turkey-Iran); continent-rear-arc collision (e.g. Bolivia); continent-continent collision (e.g. Tuscany); and island arc-island arc collision (e.g. Taiwan). Superimposed on this variability is the fact that every orogeny is different in detail. Nonetheless, there is a general theme of cyclicity on different time scales. This starts with syn-collision volcanism resulting from the subduction of an ocean-continent transition and continental lithosphere, and continues through post-collision volcanism. The latter can be subdivided into orogenic volcanism, which is related to thickened crust, and post-orogenic, which is related to orogenic collapse. Typically, but not always, collision volcanism is preceded by normal arc volcanism and followed by normal intraplate volcanism. Identification and interpretation of collision volcanism in the Geologic Record is greatly facilitated if a dated stratigraphic sequence is present so that the petrogenic evolution can be traced. In any case, the basis of fingerprinting collision terranes is to use geochemical proxies for mantle and subduction fluxes, slab temperatures, and depths and degrees of melting. For example, syn-collision volcanism is characterized by a high subduction flux relative to mantle flux because of the high input flux of fusible sediment and crust coupled with limited mantle flow, and because of high slab temperatures resulting from the decrease in subduction rate. The resulting geochemical patterns are similar regardless of

  6. Charge transfer during individual collisions in ice growing by riming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avila, Eldo E.; Caranti, Giorgio M.

    1991-01-01

    The charging of a target by riming in the wind was studied in the temperature range of (-10, -18 C). For each temperature, charge transfers of both signs are observed and, according to the environmental conditions, one of them prevails. The charge is more positive as the liquid water concentration is increased at any particular temperature. It is found that even at the low impact velocities used (5 m/s) there is abundant evidence of fragmentation following the collision.

  7. Binary drop coalescence in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungyong

    Experiments on binary drop collisions within an index-matched liquid were conducted for Weber numbers (We) of 1-50 and collision angles of 15-80° below the horizontal. Drop pairs of water/glycerin mixture were injected into silicone oil and, due to gravitational effects, traveled on downward trajectories before colliding. A dual-field high-speed PIV measurement system was employed to quantify drop trajectories and overall collision conditions while simultaneously examining detailed velocity fields near the collision interface. In the We range examined, for equal size drops, both rebounding and coalescing behavior occurred. The drops coalesced for We > 10 and rebounded for We < 10, and this boundary was found to be insensitive to collision angle. Coalescence was found to result from a combination of vortical flow within drops and strong drop deformation characteristic of higher We. Flow through the centers of opposing ring vortices, strengthened by drop deformation, enhanced drainage of the thin film in the impact region, leading to film rupture and coalescence. The collision angle affected the eventual location of film rupture, with the rupture location moving higher in the thin film region as the collision angle increased. The film rupture location correlated closely with the location of maximum downward velocity in the thin film. The time between collision and rupture increases with We until We = 30. For We > 30, the time decreases as We increases. Unequal size drop collisions with drop size ratios (Ds/D L) of 0.7 and 0.5 were also examined. Coalescence occurs above We* = 11 similar to equal size drops. As drop size ratio decreases, the intervening film deforms more. If the velocity ratio uL/u s < 1, the deformed interface becomes flat before coalescence. The rupture location varies due to the asymmetry of the drops. As collision offset increases (B > 0), the film rupture time is shortened and mixing of the fluid from both drops is enhanced after coalescence

  8. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  9. Collision in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    On June 25, 1997, the Russian supply spacecraft Progress 234 collided with the Mir space station, rupturing Mir's pressure hull, throwing it into an uncontrolled attitude drift, and nearly forcing evacuation of the station. Like many high-profile accidents, this collision was the consequence of a chain of events leading to the final piloting errors that were its immediate cause. The discussion in this article does not resolve the relative contributions of the actions and decisions in this chain. Neither does it suggest corrective measures, many of which are straightforward and have already been implemented by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Russian Space Agency. Rather, its purpose is to identify the human factors that played a pervasive role in the incident. Workplace stress, fatigue, and sleep deprivation were identified by NASA as contributory factors in the Mir-Progress collision (Culbertson, 1997; NASA, forthcoming), but other contributing factors, such as requiring crew to perform difficult tasks for which their training is not current, could potentially become important factors in future situations.

  10. Water ball collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimoto, K.

    1986-01-01

    What happens if a stainless steel ball hits a water ball in the weightless space ot the Universe? In other words, it was the objective of our experiments in the Space to observe the surface tension of liquid by means of making a solid collide with a liquid. Place a small volume of water between 2 glass sheets to make a thin water membrane: the 2 glass sheets cannot be separated unless an enormous force is applied. It is obvious from this phenomenom that the surface tension of water is far greater than presumed. On Earth, however, it is impossible in most cases to observe only the surface tension of liquid, because gravity always acts on the surface tension. Water and stainless steel balls were chosen the liquid and solids for the experiments. Because water is the liquid most familiar to us, its properties are well known. And it is also of great interest to compare its properties on the Earth with those in the weightless space.

  11. Recognition of movement object collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiao Tsu; Sun, Geng-tian; Zhang, Yan

    1991-03-01

    The paper explores the collision recognition of two objects in both crisscross and revolution motions A mathematical model has been established based on the continuation theory. The objects of any shape may be regarded as being built of many 3siniplexes or their convex hulls. Therefore the collision problem of two object in motion can be reduced to the collision of two corresponding 3siinplexes on two respective objects accordingly. Thus an optimized algorithm is developed for collision avoidance which is suitable for computer control and eliminating the need for vision aid. With this algorithm computation time has been reduced significantly. This algorithm is applicable to the path planning of mobile robots And also is applicable to collision avoidance of the anthropomorphic arms grasping two complicated shaped objects. The algorithm is realized using LISP language on a VAX8350 minicomputer.

  12. Collision detection for planning collision-free motion of two robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basta, Robert A.; Mehrotra, Rajiv; Varanasi, Murali R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors focus on collision detection for planning collision-free motion of two robot arms in a common workspace. A collision-free motion is obtained by detecting collisions along the straight-line trajectories of the robots using a sphere model for the wrists and then replanning the paths and/or trajectories of one or both of the robots to avoid collisions. A novel approach to collision detection is presented and a discussion on collision avoidance is given.

  13. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  14. Rubidium-Strontium collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, Michaela; Potter, Garrett; Whitehead, Marc; McEntee, Elyse; Koll, Christopher J.

    2010-03-01

    The invention of the magneto-optical trap (MOT) in 1987 - which was awarded the Noble Price in Physics 10 years later - has enabled many new and exciting experiments. Among them are precision measurements of basic atomic properties, ultracold collisions, Bose-Einstein Condensates, atom lasers, etc.. Recent developments in the field of atomic and molecular physics have included the creation of diatomic (homo- and heteronuclear) molecules. These ultracold molecules promise to revolutionize physical chemistry, few-body physics, precision measurements and quantum information processing, similar to how ultracold atoms revolutionized AMO physics several years ago. We will present our first results of a mixed alkaline (rubidium) and alkaline-earth (strontium) magneto-optical trap.

  15. Geosynchronous satellite collision avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, W.

    1985-01-01

    The increases in the number of satellite systems, the growing dependency on these systems, and the potentially hazardous conjunctions in space, dictates careful management of satellite positions. The potential for satellite collision increases as more objects are placed in orbit. At geosynchronous altitudes active satellites maintain fixed longitudinal station-keeping control while inactive satellites and debris generally drift around the globe or oscillate about two geopotential stable points. Portions of the total objects in geosynchronous orbit are tracked by ground stations while a significant number of additional pieces of space debris regularly pass through geosynchronous orbit altitudes. The probability of an operational satellite colliding with another satellite or a piece of space debris will increase in the number of space objects, their sizes, and on-orbit lifetimes.

  16. Collision avoidance sensor skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to totally eliminate the possibility of a robot (or any mechanism for that matter) inducing a collision in space operations. We were particularly concerned that human beings were safe under all circumstances. This was apparently accomplished, and it is shown that GSFC has a system that is ready for space qualification and flight. However, it soon became apparent that much more could be accomplished with this technology. Payloads could be made invulnerable to collision avoidance and the blind spots behind them eliminated. This could be accomplished by a simple, non-imaging set of 'Capaciflector' sensors on each payload. It also is evident that this system could be used to align and dock the system with a wide margin of safety. Throughout, lighting problems could be ignored, and unexpected events and modeling errors taken in stride. At the same time, computational requirements would be reduced. This can be done in a simple, rugged, reliable manner that will not disturb the form factor of space systems. It will be practical for space applications. The lab experiments indicate we are well on the way to accomplishing this. Still, the research trail goes deeper. It now appears that the sensors can be extended to end effectors to provide precontact information and make robot docking (or any docking connection) very smooth, with minimal loads impacted back into the mating structures. This type of ability would be a major step forward in basic control techniques in space. There are, however, baseline and restructuring issues to be tackled. The payloads must get power and signals to them from the robot or from the astronaut servicing tool. This requires a standard electromechanical interface. Any of several could be used. The GSFC prototype shown in this presentation is a good one. Sensors with their attendant electronics must be added to the payloads, end effectors, and robot arms and integrated into the system.

  17. Studying Phase Transitions in Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mishustin, I.N.

    2000-12-31

    Three main topics are discussed concerning the theoretical description and observable signatures of possible phase transitions in nuclear collisions. The first one is related to the multifragmentation of equilibrated sources and its connection to a liquid-gas phase transition in finite systems. The second one deals with the Coulomb excitation of ultrarelativistic heavy ions resulting in their deep disintegration. The third topic is devoted to the description of a first-order phase transition in rapidly expanding matter. The resulting picture is that a strong collective flow of matter will lead to the fragmentation of a metastable phase into droplets. If the transition from quark-gluon plasma to hadron gas is of the first order, it will manifest itself by strong nonstatistical fluctuations in observable hadron distributions.

  18. Collisions in the Oort Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S.A.

    1988-03-01

    The present assessment of the consequentiality of physical collisions between Oort Cloud objects by a first-generation model indicates that natural power-law population structures produce significant numbers of collisions between each comet and smaller objects over the age of the solar system. These collisions are held to constitute a feedback mechanism for small debris production. The impacts yield extensive comet surface evolution in the cloud, in conditions where the number of small orbiting objects conforms to the standard power-law populations. 16 references.

  19. Continental collisions and seismic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, R.; Wever, Th.; Sadowiak, P.

    1991-04-01

    Reflection seismics in compressional belts has revealed the structure of crustal shortening and thickening processes, showing complex patterns of indentation and interfingering of colliding crusts and subcrustal lithospheres. Generally, in the upper crust large zones of detachments develop, often showing duplexes and 'crocodile' structures. The lower crust from zones of active collision (e.g. Alps, Pyrenees) is characterized by strongly dipping reflections. The base of the crust with the Moho must be continuously equilibrating after orogenic collapse as areas of former continental collision exhibit flat Mohos and subhorizontal reflections. The depth to the Moho increases during collision and decreases after the onset of post-orogenic extension, until finally the crustal root disappears completely together with the erosion of the mountains. Processes, active during continental collisions and orogenic collapse, create distinct structures which are imaged by reflection seismic profiling. Examples are shown and discussed.

  20. Milky Way's Head On Collision

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the collision between our Milky Way galaxy and the Andromeda galaxy. Hubble Space Telescope observations indicate that the two galaxies, pulled together by their mutual gravi...

  1. Theoretical studies of molecular collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouri, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) total integral reactive cross sections and vibrationally resolved reaction probabilities for F + H2 = HF + H; (2) a theoretical study of inelastic O + N2 collisions; (3) body frame close coupling wave packet approach to gas phase atom-rigit rotor inelastic collisions; (4) wave packet study of gas phase atom-rigit motor scattering; (5) the application of optical potentials for reactive scattering; (6) time dependent, three dimensional body frame quantal wave packet treatment of the H + H2 exchange reaction; (7) a time dependent wave packet approach to atom-diatom reactive collision probabilities; (8) time dependent wave packet for the complete determination of s-matrix elements for reactive molecular collisions in three dimensions; (9) a comparison of three time dependent wave packet methods for calculating electron-atom elastic scattering cross sections; and (10) a numerically exact full wave packet approach to molecule-surface scattering.

  2. Surface Collisions Involving Particles and Moisture (SCIP'M)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were performed on the collision of a solid sphere with a nearly horizontal flat surface covered with a thin layer of viscous liquid. High-speed collisions were obtained by dropping the ball onto the surface from various heights, using gravitational acceleration. Low-speed collisions were obtained using pendulums with long strings or by launching the balls at low velocities in the reduced-gravity environment of parabolic flight. The sphere bounces only when the impact velocity exceeds a critical value. The coefficient of restitution (ratio of rebound velocity to impact velocity) increases with increasing impact velocity above the critical value, indicating the increasing relative importance of elastic deformation to viscous dissipation. The critical impact velocity increases, and the coefficient of restitution decreases, with increasing viscosity or thickness of the liquid layer and with decreasing density or size of the sphere. The ratio of the wet and dry coefficients is expressed as a function of the Stokes number (ratio of particle inertia and viscous forces), showing good agreement between theory and experiment. Similar experiments were performed with the flat surface inclined at various angles to the approaching sphere. A modified Stokes number, which is a measure of the ratio of inertia of the sphere in the normal direction to the viscous forces exerted by the fluid layer, was used for the analysis of oblique collisions. Even for these oblique collisions, it was found that no rebound of the ball was observed below a certain critical Stokes number. The coefficient of normal restitution, defined as a ratio of normal rebound velocity to normal approach velocity, was found to increase beyond the critical Stokes number and even out as it approaches the value for dry restitution at high Stokes numbers. It was also found that, for smooth spheres like steel, the normal restitution at the same modified Stokes number is independent of the angle of impact

  3. Dynamics of droplet collision and flame-front motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Long

    Three physical phenomena were experimentally and computationally investigated in this research, namely the dynamics of head-on droplet-droplet collision, head-on droplet-film collision, and laminar premixed flames, with emphasis on the transition between bouncing and merging of the liquid surfaces for the droplet collision studies, and on the susceptibility to exhibit hydrodynamic instability for the flame dynamics. All three problems share the common feature of having an active deformable interface separating two flow regions of disparate densities, and as such can be computationally described using the adopted immersed boundary technique. Experimentally, the droplets (˜300 mum diameter) were generated using the ink jet printing technique, and imaged using stroboscopy for the droplet-droplet collision events and high-speed cine-photography for the droplet-film collision events. For the study of droplet-droplet collision, the instant of merging was experimentally determined and then used as an input in the computational simulation of the entire collision event. The simulation identified the differences between collision and merging at small and large Weber numbers, and satisfactorily described the dynamics of the inter-droplet gap including the role of the van der Waals force in effecting surface rupture. For the study of droplet-film collision, extensive experimental mapping showed that the collision dynamics is primarily affected by the droplet Weber number (We) and the film thickness scaled by the droplet radius (H), that while droplet absorption by the film is facilitated with increasing droplet Weber number, the boundary of transition is punctuated by an absorption peninsula, in the We-H space, within which absorption is further facilitated for smaller Weber numbers. Results from computation simulation revealed the essential dependence of the collision dynamics on the restraining nature of the solid surface, the energy exchange between the droplet and the

  4. Analyzing Benzene and Cyclohexane Emulsion Droplet Collisions on Ultramicroelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Deng, Haiqiang; Dick, Jeffrey E; Bard, Allen J

    2015-11-01

    We report the collisions of single emulsion oil droplets with extremely low dielectric constants (e.g., benzene, ε of 2.27, or cyclohexane, ε of 2.02) as studied via emulsion droplet reactor (EDR) on an ultramicroelectrode (UME). By applying appropriate potentials to the UME, we observed the electrochemical effects of single-collision signals from the bulk electrolysis of single emulsion droplets. Different hydrophobic redox species (ferrocene, decamethyl-ferrocene, or metalloporphyrin) were trapped in a mixed benzene (or cyclohexane) oil-in-water emulsion using an ionic liquid as the supporting electrolyte and emulsifier. The emulsions were prepared using ultrasonic processing. Spike-like responses were observed in each i-t response due to the complete electrolysis of all of the above-mentioned redox species within the droplet. On the basis of these single-particle collision results, the collision frequency, size distribution, i-t decay behavior of the emulsion droplets, and possible mechanisms are analyzed and discussed. This work demonstrated that bulk electrolysis can be achieved in a few seconds in these attoliter reactors, suggesting many applications, such as analysis and electrosynthesis in low dielectric constant solvents, which have a much broader potential window.

  5. Dynamics of Bouncing-vs.-Merging Responses in Jet Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minglei; Saha, Abhishek; Zhu, Delin L.; Sun, Chao; Law, Chung K.

    2015-11-01

    Collision of two fluid masses is a common natural and industrial phenomenon. Many kinds of noncoalescence phenomena of collisional fluid masses, such as droplet & droplet, droplet & liquid film, have been studied, and the dynamics of the gas layer between the colliding liquid surfaces was found to play a crucial role. However, many fluid mass collision processes are nonstationary, making it difficult to study this air layer dynamics in detail. Jet bouncing can be in a stationary state with a geometrically simple gas layer, providing an ideal system to investigate the dynamics of the air film between the colliding interfaces. In this work, we observe an entire suite of possible jet collision outcomes of (soft) merging, bouncing and (hard) merging with increasing impact inertia. These transitions between these different regimes are characterized through scaling analysis by considering the competing effects of impact inertia, surface tension and viscous thinning of the interfacial air-gap leading to activate the van der Waals force to effect merging.

  6. Liquid metal nanodroplet dynamics inside nanocontainers

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun Young; Chun, Hyunkyung; Park, Sora; Kang, Seoung-Hun; Ahn, Chi Won; Kwon, Young-Kyun; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Jung, Yung Joon

    2013-01-01

    Here we report direct observations of spatial movements of nanodroplets of Pb metal trapped inside sealed carbon nanocontainers. We find drastic changes in the mobility of the liquid droplets as the particle size increases from a few to a few ten nanometers. In open containers the droplet becomes immobile and readily evaporates to the vacuum environment. The particle mobility strongly depends on confinement, particle size, and wetting on the enclosed surface. The collisions between droplets increase mobility but the tendency is reversed if collisions lead to droplet coalescence. The dynamics of confined nanodroplets could provide new insights into the activity of nanostructures in spatially constrained geometries. PMID:24005021

  7. Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swihart, Donald E.; Skoog, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    This document represents two views of the Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). One viewgraph presentation reviews the development and system design of Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). Two types of ACAT exist: Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance (AGCAS) and Automatic Air Collision Avoidance (AACAS). The AGCAS Uses Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) for mapping functions, and uses Navigation data to place aircraft on map. It then scans DTED in front of and around aircraft and uses future aircraft trajectory (5g) to provide automatic flyup maneuver when required. The AACAS uses data link to determine position and closing rate. It contains several canned maneuvers to avoid collision. Automatic maneuvers can occur at last instant and both aircraft maneuver when using data link. The system can use sensor in place of data link. The second viewgraph presentation reviews the development of a flight test and an evaluation of the test. A review of the operation and comparison of the AGCAS and a pilot's performance are given. The same review is given for the AACAS is given.

  8. Numerical Simulations of Drop Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobari, M. R. H.; Tryggvason, G.

    1994-01-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of the off-axis collisions of two drops are presented. The full Navier-Stokes equations are solved by a Front-Tracking/Finite-Difference method that allows a fully deformable fluid interface and the inclusion of surface tension. The drops are accelerated towards each other by a body force that is turned off before the drops collide. Depending on whether the interface between the drops is ruptured or not, the drops either bounce or coalesce. For drops that coalesce, the impact parameter, which measures how far the drops are off the symmetry line, determines the eventual outcome of the collision. For low impact parameters, the drops coalesce permanently, but for higher impact parameters, a grazing collision, where the drops coalesce and then stretch apart again is observed. The results are in agreement with experimental observations.

  9. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  10. POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC. In 2002, polarized proton beams were first accelerated to 100 GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. Optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limited conditions are reported.

  11. A problem of collision avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, T. L.; Cliff, E. M.; Grantham, W. J.; Peng, W. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Collision avoidance between two vehicles of constant speed with limited turning radii, moving in a horizontal plane is investigated. Collision avoidance is viewed as a game by assuming that the operator of one vehicle has perfect knowledge of the state of the other, whereas the operator of the second vehicle is unaware of any impending danger. The situation envisioned is that of an encounter between a commercial aircraft and a small light aircraft. This worse case situation is examined to determine the conditions under which the commercial aircraft should execute a collision avoidance maneuver. Three different zones of vulnerability are defined and the boundaries, or barriers, between these zones are determined for a typical aircraft encounter. A discussion of the methods used to obtain the results as well as some of the salient features associated with the resultant barriers is included.

  12. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  13. ACAT Ground Collision Avoidance Flight Tests Over

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has concluded flight tests of an Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto GCAS) under the joint U.S. Air Force/NASA F-16D Automatic Collision Avoidance...

  14. Transport theory beyond binary collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Carrington, Margaret E.; Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2005-03-15

    Using the Schwinger-Keldysh technique, we derive the transport equations for a system of quantum scalar fields. We first discuss the general structure of the equations and then their collision terms. Taking into account up to three-loop diagrams in {phi}{sup 3} model and up to four-loop diagrams in {phi}{sup 4} model, we obtain transport equations which include the contributions of multiparticle collisions and particle production processes, in addition to mean-field effects and binary interactions.

  15. Collisions in Chiral Kinetic Theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Yuan; Son, Dam T; Stephanov, Mikhail A

    2015-07-10

    Using a covariant formalism, we construct a chiral kinetic theory Lorentz invariant to order O(ℏ), which includes collisions. We find a new contribution to the particle number current due to the side jumps required by the conservation of angular momentum during collisions. We also find a conserved symmetric stress-energy tensor as well as the H function obeying Boltzmann's H theorem. We demonstrate their use by finding a general equilibrium solution and the values of the anomalous transport coefficients characterizing the chiral vortical effect.

  16. Dissipative heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmeier, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    This report is a compilation of lecture notes of a series of lectures held at Argonne National Laboratory in October and November 1984. The lectures are a discussion of dissipative phenomena as observed in collisions of atomic nuclei. The model is based on a system which has initially zero temperature and the initial energy is kinetic and binding energy. Collisions excite the nuclei, and outgoing fragments or the compound system deexcite before they are detected. Brownian motion is used to introduce the concept of dissipation. The master equation and the Fokker-Planck equation are derived. 73 refs., 59 figs. (WRF)

  17. Electron-electron collisions at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Siegfried; Reyzl, Ingrid

    2001-07-01

    Electron-electron collisions at the future TESLA linear collider is a promising complement to e+e- collisions. A critical issue for the physics potential of this option is the achievable luminosity. For e+e- collisions, the pinch effect enhances the luminosity, while due to the repelling forces for e-e- collisions, the luminosity is significantly reduced and is more sensitive to beam separations. This report discusses the e-e- option for TESLA and the expected luminosity.

  18. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Collision posts. 238.211 Section 238.211... Equipment § 238.211 Collision posts. (a) Except as further specified in this paragraph, paragraphs (b... time on or after September 8, 2000, shall have either: (i) Two full-height collision posts, located...

  19. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Collision posts. 238.211 Section 238.211... Equipment § 238.211 Collision posts. (a) Except as further specified in this paragraph, paragraphs (b... time on or after September 8, 2000, shall have either: (i) Two full-height collision posts, located...

  20. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... structural protection described in paragraph (a) of this section, either: (1) Two forward collision posts... structural protection described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, two forward collision posts... body structure. (3) Prior to or during structural deformation, each collision post acting together...

  1. Probing GPDs in ultraperipheral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, D.Yu.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Wagner, J.

    2015-04-10

    Ultraperipheral collisions in hadron colliders give new opportunities to investigate the hadron structure through exclusive photoproduction processes. We describe the possibility of measuring the Generalized Parton Distributions in the Timelike Compton Scattering process and in the production of heavy vector meson.

  2. Quarkonium production in hadronic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavai, R.; Schuler, G.A.; Sridhar, K.

    1995-07-01

    We summarize the theoretical description of charmonium and bottonium production in hadronic collisions and compare it to the available data from hadron-nucleon interactions. With the parameters of the theory established by these data, we obtain predictions for quarkonium production at RHIC and LHC energies.

  3. Duration of an Elastic Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Izarra, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With a pedagogical goal, this paper deals with a study of the duration of an elastic collision of an inflatable spherical ball on a planar surface suitable for undergraduate studies. First, the force generated by the deformed spherical ball is obtained under assumptions that are discussed. The study of the motion of the spherical ball colliding…

  4. Collisions of ions in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, T. L.

    1982-03-01

    This report is a summary description of research carried out under the ONR Project 'Collisions of Ions in Gases'. The work consisted of experimental studies of collisions of low-energy ions (4 < or = E sub L < or = 500 eV) with atoms and molecules, using the ion-beam gas-target technique, and of theoretical and computational studies done in support of the experiments. Three types of experiments were carried out: (a) measurements of relative differential cross-sections for elastic and inelastic (i.e., charge transfer) scattering in collisions of the He(++) ions with Ne, Ar, and Kr atoms, over the ion energy range 8 < or = E sub L < or = 60 eV; (b) kinematical studies of charge transfer in collisions of 30 < or = E sub L < or = 373 eV Ne(+), Ar(+), and Kr(+) ions with H2, D2, O2, and N2 molecules, in which the KE-distributions of the product H2(+), etc., were measured; and (c) measurements of the absolute total cross-sections for the charge transfer process He(++) + R = He(+) + R(+), where R = Ne, Ar, Kr, over the energy range 4 < or = E sub L < or = 500 eV. The experimental results, and their interpretations in terms of appropriate quantum scattering theory (where the latter was feasible) are discussed briefly. The effects of the thermal motions of collision participants (i.e., thermal broadening) in ion-atom and similar scattering experiments were investigated in computational studies, and a new crossed ion-supersonic atom/molecule beams apparatus, designed to remove the thermal broadening effect and to give high resolution in energy and angle, is discussed.

  5. Liquid Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Tawfic, Qutaiba A.; Kausalya, Rajini

    2011-01-01

    Mammals have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases, as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV) is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen, as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of theoretical advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. The potential for multiple clinical applications for liquid-assisted ventilation will be clarified and optimized in future. PMID:22043370

  6. LIQUID TARGET

    DOEpatents

    Martin, M.D.; Salsig, W.W. Jr.

    1959-01-13

    A liquid handling apparatus is presented for a liquid material which is to be irradiated. The apparatus consists essentially of a reservoir for the liquid, a target element, a drain tank and a drain lock chamber. The target is in the form of a looped tube, the upper end of which is adapted to be disposed in a beam of atomic particles. The lower end of the target tube is in communication with the liquid in the reservoir and a means is provided to continuously circulate the liquid material to be irradiated through the target tube. Means to heat the reservoir tank is provided in the event that a metal is to be used as the target material. The apparatus is provided with suitable valves and shielding to provide maximum safety in operation.

  7. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    Plenary. Electron collisions - past, present and future / J. W. McConkey. Collisions of slow highly charged ions with surfaces / J. Burgdörfer ... [et al.]. Atomic collisions studied with "reaction-microscopes" / R. Moshammer ... [et al.]. Rydberg atoms: a microscale laboratory for studying electron-molecule tnteractions / F. B. Dunning -- Collisions involvintg photons. Quantum control of photochemical reaction dynamics and molecular functions / M. Yamaki ... [et al.]. Manipulating and viewing Rydberg wavepackets / R. R. Jones. Angle-resolved photoelectrons as a probe of strong-field interactions / M. Vrakking. Ultracold Rydberg atoms in a structured environment / I. C. H. Liu and J. M. Rost. Synchrotron-radiation-based recoil ion momentum spectroscopy of laser cooled and trapped cesium atoms / L. H. Coutinho. Reconstruction of attosecond pulse trains / Y. Mairesse ... [et al.]. Selective excitation of metastable atomic states by Femto- and attosecond laser pulses / A. D. Kondorskiy. Accurate calculations of triple differential cross sections for double photoionization of the hygrogen molecule / W. Vanroose ... [et al.]. Double and triple photoionization of Li and Be / J. Colgan, M. S. Pindzola and F. Robicheaux. Few/many body dynamics in strong laser fields / J. Zanghellini and T. Brabec. Rescattering-induced effects in electron-atom scattering in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field / A. V. Flegel ... [et al.]. Multidimensional photoelectron spectroscopy / P. Lablanquie ... [et al.]. Few photon and strongly driven transitions in the XUV and beyond / P. Lambropoulos, L. A. A. Nikolopoulos and S. I. Themelis. Ionization dynamics of atomic clusters in intense laser pulses / U. Saalmann and J. M. Rost. On the second order autocorrelation of an XUV attosecond pulse train / E. P. Benis ... [et al.]. Evidence for rescattering in molecular dissociation / I. D. Williams ... [et al.]. Photoionizing ions using synchrotron radiation / R. Phaneuf. Photo double

  8. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    Plenary. Electron collisions - past, present and future / J. W. McConkey. Collisions of slow highly charged ions with surfaces / J. Burgdörfer ... [et al.]. Atomic collisions studied with "reaction-microscopes" / R. Moshammer ... [et al.]. Rydberg atoms: a microscale laboratory for studying electron-molecule tnteractions / F. B. Dunning -- Collisions involvintg photons. Quantum control of photochemical reaction dynamics and molecular functions / M. Yamaki ... [et al.]. Manipulating and viewing Rydberg wavepackets / R. R. Jones. Angle-resolved photoelectrons as a probe of strong-field interactions / M. Vrakking. Ultracold Rydberg atoms in a structured environment / I. C. H. Liu and J. M. Rost. Synchrotron-radiation-based recoil ion momentum spectroscopy of laser cooled and trapped cesium atoms / L. H. Coutinho. Reconstruction of attosecond pulse trains / Y. Mairesse ... [et al.]. Selective excitation of metastable atomic states by Femto- and attosecond laser pulses / A. D. Kondorskiy. Accurate calculations of triple differential cross sections for double photoionization of the hygrogen molecule / W. Vanroose ... [et al.]. Double and triple photoionization of Li and Be / J. Colgan, M. S. Pindzola and F. Robicheaux. Few/many body dynamics in strong laser fields / J. Zanghellini and T. Brabec. Rescattering-induced effects in electron-atom scattering in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field / A. V. Flegel ... [et al.]. Multidimensional photoelectron spectroscopy / P. Lablanquie ... [et al.]. Few photon and strongly driven transitions in the XUV and beyond / P. Lambropoulos, L. A. A. Nikolopoulos and S. I. Themelis. Ionization dynamics of atomic clusters in intense laser pulses / U. Saalmann and J. M. Rost. On the second order autocorrelation of an XUV attosecond pulse train / E. P. Benis ... [et al.]. Evidence for rescattering in molecular dissociation / I. D. Williams ... [et al.]. Photoionizing ions using synchrotron radiation / R. Phaneuf. Photo double

  9. Triple Collision and Close Triple Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldvogel, Joerg

    In gravitational systems of point masses binary collisions are mathematically simple and well understood. Collisions of three or more particles are much more complicated, i.e. a dramatic increase of complexity occurs when the number N of particles involved in a collision increases from 2 to 3. Collisions of more than three particles seem to be of the same complexity as triple collisions. However, there are still unanswered questions concerning general N-body collisions.The reason for the complexity of triple collision is the inherent sensitivity to initial conditions for solutions passing near triple collision, even after a short time. Specifically, a solution passing near triple collision may change dramatically if the initial conditions prior to the close encounter are modified infinitesimally. In contrast, this is not the case for a binary collision.We use the planar three-body problem as a model in order to discuss the main features of triple collision of point masses and of its realistic counterpart, the close triple encounter. This comparatively simple model allows us to study all important aspects of close encounters of N > 2 gravitationally interacting point masses.In Chapters 1 and 2 we discuss classical results, beginning with the equations of motion, then studying relationships between the total angular momentum and triple collision. C. L. Siegel's famous series for triple collision solutions, one time considered the highlight of the theory of triple collision, conclude the traditional part of these lectures.Chapter 3 is devoted to studying the relationship between solutions engaging in a sharp triple collision and neighbouring solutions. The variational equation gives a rough idea of what is happening. A complete understanding can be achieved by means of R. McGehee's concept of the collision manifold, which arises by introducing special coordinates blowing up all possible states close to triple collision. In this context, possibilities of regularizing

  10. COLLIDE: Collisions into Dust Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, Joshua E.

    1999-01-01

    The Collisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) was completed and flew on STS-90 in April and May of 1998. After the experiment was returned to Earth, the data and experiment were analyzed. Some anomalies occurred during the flight which prevented a complete set of data from being obtained. However, the experiment did meet its criteria for scientific success and returned surprising results on the outcomes of very low energy collisions into powder. The attached publication, "Low Velocity Microgravity Impact Experiments into Simulated Regolith," describes in detail the scientific background, engineering, and scientific results of COLLIDE. Our scientific conclusions, along with a summary of the anomalies which occurred during flight, are contained in that publication. We offer it as our final report on this grant.

  11. Electron collisions in gas switches

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G.

    1989-01-01

    Many technologies rely on the conduction/insulation properties of gaseous matter for their successful operation. Many others (e.g., pulsed power technologies) rely on the rapid change (switching or modulation) of the properties of gaseous matter from an insulator to a conductor and vice versa. Studies of electron collision processes in gases aided the development of pulsed power gas switches, and in this paper we shall briefly illustrate the kind of knowledge on electron collision processes which is needed to optimize the performance of such switching devices. To this end, we shall refer to three types of gas switches: spark gap closing, self-sustained diffuse discharge closing, and externally-sustained diffuse discharge opening. 24 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Continuum and molecular-dynamics simulation of nanodroplet collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardia, Raunak; Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2016-05-01

    The extent to which the continuum treatment holds in binary droplet collisions is examined in the present work by using a continuum-based implicit surface capturing strategy (volume-of-fluid coupled to Navier-Stokes) and a molecular dynamics methodology. The droplet pairs are arranged in a head-on-collision configuration with an initial separation distance of 5.3 nm and a velocity of 3 ms-1. The size of droplets ranges from 10-50 nm. Inspecting the results, the collision process can be described as consisting of two periods: a preimpact phase that ends with the initial contact of both droplets, and a postimpact phase characterized by the merging, deformation, and coalescence of the droplets. The largest difference between the continuum and molecular dynamics (MD) predictions is observed in the preimpact period, where the continuum-based viscous and pressure drag forces significantly overestimate the MD predictions. Due to large value of Knudsen number in the gas (Kngas=1.972 ), this behavior is expected. Besides the differences between continuum and MD, it is also observed that the continuum simulations do not converge for the set of grid sizes considered. This is shown to be directly related to the initial velocity profile and the minute size of the nanodroplets. For instance, for micrometer-size droplets, this numerical sensitivity is not an issue. During the postimpact period, both MD and continuum-based simulations are strikingly similar, with only a moderate difference in the peak kinetic energy recorded during the collision process. With values for the Knudsen number in the liquid (Knliquid=0.01 for D =36 nm ) much closer to the continuum regime, this behavior is expected. The 50 nm droplet case is sufficiently large to be predicted reasonably well with the continuum treatment. However, for droplets smaller than approximately 36 nm, the departure from continuum behavior becomes noticeably pronounced, and becomes drastically different for the 10 nm droplets.

  13. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  14. QCD studies in ep collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F{sub 2}, which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q{sup 2} regimes are discussed. The low Q{sup 2} transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure {alpha}{sub s}, and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs.

  15. PREFACE: Functionalized Liquid Liquid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, Hubert; Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Monroe, Charles W.; Urbakh, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Most natural processes take place at interfaces. For this reason, surface science has been a focal point of modern research. At solid-liquid interfaces one can induce various species to adsorb or react, and thus may study interactions between the substrate and adsorbates, kinetic processes, optical properties, etc. Liquid-liquid interfaces, formed by immiscible liquids such as water and oil, have a number of distinctive features. Both sides of the interface are amenable to detailed physical and chemical analysis. By chemical or electrochemical means, metal or semiconductor nanoparticles can be formed or localised at the interface. Surfactants can be used to tailor surface properties, and also to place organic molecular or supermolecular constructions at the boundary between the liquids. Electric fields can be used to drive ions from one fluid to another, or even change the shape of the interface itself. In many cases, both liquids are optically transparent, making functionalized liquid-liquid interfaces promising for various optical applications based on the transmission or reflection of light. An advantage common to most of these systems is self-assembly; because a liquid-liquid interface is not mechanically constrained like a solid-liquid interface, it can easily access its most stable state, even after it has been driven far from equilibrium. This special issue focuses on four modes of liquid-liquid interfacial functionalization: the controlled adsorption of molecules or nanoparticles, the formation of adlayers or films, electrowetting, and ion transfer or interface-localized reactions. Interfacial adsorption can be driven electrically, chemically, or mechanically. The liquid-liquid interface can be used to study how anisotropic particles orient at a surface under the influence of a field, how surfactants interact with other adsorbates, and how nanoparticles aggregate; the transparency of the interface also makes the chirality of organic adsorbates amenable to

  16. A Collective Collision Operator for DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    GALLIS,MICHAIL A.; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.

    2000-06-21

    A new scheme to simulate elastic collisions in particle simulation codes is presented. The new scheme aims at simulating the collisions in the highly collisional regime, in which particle simulation techniques typically become computationally expensive.The new scheme is based on the concept of a grid-based collision field. According to this scheme, the particles perform a single collision with the background grid during a time step. The properties of the background field are calculated from the moments of the distribution function accumulated on the grid. The collision operator is based on the Langevin equation. Based on comparisons with other methods, it is found that the Langevin method overestimates the collision frequency for dilute gases.

  17. Analyzing Collisions in Terms of Newton's Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, John L.

    2003-02-01

    Although the principle of momentum conservation is a consequence of Newton's second and third laws of motion, as recognized by Newton himself, this principle is typically applied in analyzing collisions as if it is a separate concept of its own. This year I sought to integrate my treatment of collisions with my coverage of Newton's laws by asking students to calculate the effect on the motion of two particles due to the forces they exerted for a specified time interval on each other. For example, "A 50-kg crate slides across the ice at 3 m/s and collides with a 25-kg crate at rest. During the collision process the 50-kg crate exerts a 500 N time-averaged force on the 25 kg for 0.1 s. What are the accelerations of the crates during the collision, and what are their velocities after the collision? What are the momenta of the crates before and after collision?"

  18. Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition: Experimental Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, M.; Bruno, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Cannata, F.; Chomaz, Ph.; Casini, G.; Geraci, E.; Gramegna, F.; Moroni, A.; Vannini, G.

    2005-03-01

    The connection between the thermodynamics of charged finite nuclear systems and the asymptotically measured partitions in heavy ion collisions is discussed. Different independent signals compatible with a liquid-to-gas-like phase transition are reported. In particular abnormally large fluctuations in the measured observables are presented as a strong evidence of a first order phase transition with negative heat capacity.

  19. Experimental Study of the Effects of Collision of Water Droplets in a Flow of High-Temperature Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, D. V.; Volkov, R. S.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Using high-speed video recording and cross-correlation "tracer" visualization, the authors have investigated the regularities of the processes of collision of water droplets (characteristic parameters: radii 0.025-0.25 mm, velocities of motion 0.5-12 m/s, and relative concentration 0.001-0.0012 m3 of liquid droplets in 1 m3 of the gas) in their motion in a flow of high-temperature (about 1100 K) gases. The characteristic effects of collision of two droplets, at which combined droplets are formed (coagulation occurs) and conditions for spreading or fragmentation of the latter are implemented, have been singled out. The values of the Weber and Reynolds numbers for droplets before and after the collisions have been established. The influences of the velocities of motion, the dimensions, and the angles of intersection of mechanical trajectories of droplets on the effects of collisions have been determined.

  20. Flight Tests Validate Collision-Avoidance System

    NASA Video Gallery

    Flights tests of a smartphone-assisted automatic ground collision avoidance system at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center consistently commanded evasive maneuvers when it sensed that the unmanned ...

  1. Telerobotics with whole arm collision avoidance

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, K.; Strenn, S.

    1993-09-01

    The complexity of teleorbotic operations in a cluttered environment is exacerbated by the need to present collision information to the operator in an understandable fashion. In addition to preventing movements which will cause collisions, a system providing some form of virtual force reflection (VFR) is desirable. With this goal in mind, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has installed a kinematically master/slave system and developed a whole arm collision avoidance system which interacts directly with the telerobotic controller. LLNL has also provided a structure to allow for automated upgrades of workcell models and provide collision avoidance even in a dynamically changing workcell.

  2. Integrated Collision Avoidance System for Air Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Collision with ground/water/terrain and midair obstacles is one of the common causes of severe aircraft accidents. The various data from the coremicro AHRS/INS/GPS Integration Unit, terrain data base, and object detection sensors are processed to produce collision warning audio/visual messages and collision detection and avoidance of terrain and obstacles through generation of guidance commands in a closed-loop system. The vision sensors provide more information for the Integrated System, such as, terrain recognition and ranging of terrain and obstacles, which plays an important role to the improvement of the Integrated Collision Avoidance System.

  3. Ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions: Direction of spectator flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshin, Sergei A.; Niida, Takafumi

    2016-08-01

    In high-energy heavy-ion collisions, the directed flow of particles is conventionally measured with respect to that of the projectile spectators, which is defined as positive x direction, but it is not known if the spectators deflect in the outward or inward directions—outward or toward the center line of the collision. In this Communication we discuss how the measurements of the directed flow at midrapidity, especially in asymmetric collision such as Cu +Au , can be used to answer this question. We show that the existing data strongly favor the case that the spectators, in the ultrarelativistic collisions, on average deflect outward.

  4. Liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Aussillous, P; Quéré, D

    2001-06-21

    The transport of a small amount of liquid on a solid is not a simple process, owing to the nature of the contact between the two phases. Setting a liquid droplet in motion requires non-negligible forces (because the contact-angle hysteresis generates a force opposing the motion), and often results in the deposition of liquid behind the drop. Different methods of levitation-electrostatic, electromagnetic, acoustic, or even simpler aerodynamic techniques-have been proposed to avoid this wetting problem, but all have proved to be rather cumbersome. Here we propose a simple alternative, which consists of encapsulating an aqueous liquid droplet with a hydrophobic powder. The resulting 'liquid marbles' are found to behave like a soft solid, and show dramatically reduced adhesion to a solid surface. As a result, motion can be generated using gravitational, electrical and magnetic fields. Moreover, because the viscous friction associated with motion is very small, we can achieve quick displacements of the droplets without any leaks. All of these features are of potential benefit in microfluidic applications, and also permit the study of a drop in a non-wetting situation-an issue of renewed interest following the recent achievement of super-hydrophobic substrates. PMID:11418851

  5. Liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Aussillous, P; Quéré, D

    2001-06-21

    The transport of a small amount of liquid on a solid is not a simple process, owing to the nature of the contact between the two phases. Setting a liquid droplet in motion requires non-negligible forces (because the contact-angle hysteresis generates a force opposing the motion), and often results in the deposition of liquid behind the drop. Different methods of levitation-electrostatic, electromagnetic, acoustic, or even simpler aerodynamic techniques-have been proposed to avoid this wetting problem, but all have proved to be rather cumbersome. Here we propose a simple alternative, which consists of encapsulating an aqueous liquid droplet with a hydrophobic powder. The resulting 'liquid marbles' are found to behave like a soft solid, and show dramatically reduced adhesion to a solid surface. As a result, motion can be generated using gravitational, electrical and magnetic fields. Moreover, because the viscous friction associated with motion is very small, we can achieve quick displacements of the droplets without any leaks. All of these features are of potential benefit in microfluidic applications, and also permit the study of a drop in a non-wetting situation-an issue of renewed interest following the recent achievement of super-hydrophobic substrates.

  6. Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  7. Exotics from Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Akira; Jido, Daisuke; Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Yazaki, Koichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2011-10-21

    Discriminating hadronic molecular and multi-quark states is a long standing problem in hadronic physics. We propose here to utilize relativistic heavy ion collisions to resolve this problem, as exotic hadron yields are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model, we find that the exotic hadron yield relative to the statistical model result is typically an order of magnitude smaller for a compact multi-quark state, and larger by a factor of two or more for a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured at RHIC and LHC.

  8. Collisions of F(+) with Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hottoka, Matti; Roos, Bjorn; Delos, J. B.; Srivastava, R.; Sharma, R. B.

    1987-06-01

    Measurements of inelastic collisions of F(+) with Ne have been made. Transitions between 3P and 1D terms of F(+) are seen, with the inelastically scattered ions sharply focused in the forward direction. Potential energy curves of (FNe)/+/ have been calculated. The 3Sigma and 3Pi curves correlating to F(+)/(3P) are repulsive, while the 1Sigma correlating to F(+)(1D) is attractive. Several curve crossings are identified, where transitions occur through spin-orbit coupling. Scattering angles and differential cross sections have been calculated, and they show the presence of a 'glory' (or halo) effect, which account for the forward scattering of ions.

  9. Continuum and molecular-dynamics simulation of nanodroplet collisions.

    PubMed

    Bardia, Raunak; Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel; Trujillo, Mario F

    2016-05-01

    The extent to which the continuum treatment holds in binary droplet collisions is examined in the present work by using a continuum-based implicit surface capturing strategy (volume-of-fluid coupled to Navier-Stokes) and a molecular dynamics methodology. The droplet pairs are arranged in a head-on-collision configuration with an initial separation distance of 5.3 nm and a velocity of 3 ms^{-1}. The size of droplets ranges from 10-50 nm. Inspecting the results, the collision process can be described as consisting of two periods: a preimpact phase that ends with the initial contact of both droplets, and a postimpact phase characterized by the merging, deformation, and coalescence of the droplets. The largest difference between the continuum and molecular dynamics (MD) predictions is observed in the preimpact period, where the continuum-based viscous and pressure drag forces significantly overestimate the MD predictions. Due to large value of Knudsen number in the gas (Kn_{gas}=1.972), this behavior is expected. Besides the differences between continuum and MD, it is also observed that the continuum simulations do not converge for the set of grid sizes considered. This is shown to be directly related to the initial velocity profile and the minute size of the nanodroplets. For instance, for micrometer-size droplets, this numerical sensitivity is not an issue. During the postimpact period, both MD and continuum-based simulations are strikingly similar, with only a moderate difference in the peak kinetic energy recorded during the collision process. With values for the Knudsen number in the liquid (Kn_{liquid}=0.01 for D=36nm) much closer to the continuum regime, this behavior is expected. The 50 nm droplet case is sufficiently large to be predicted reasonably well with the continuum treatment. However, for droplets smaller than approximately 36 nm, the departure from continuum behavior becomes noticeably pronounced, and becomes drastically different for the 10 nm

  10. Macromolecular liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Safinya, C.R.; Safran, S.A. ); Pincus, P.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Liquids include a broad range of material systems which are of high scientific and technological interest. Generally speaking, these are partially ordered or disordered phases where the individual molecular species have organized themselves on length scales which are larger than simple fluids, typically between 10 Angstroms and several microns. The specific systems reported on in this book include membranes, microemulsions, micelles, liquid crystals, colloidal suspensions, and polymers. They have a major impact on a broad spectrum of technological industries such as displays, plastics, soap and detergents, chemicals and petroleum, and pharmaceuticals.

  11. Viscosity and thermal conductivity effects at first-order phase transitions in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Voskresensky, D. N.; Skokov, V. V.

    2012-06-15

    Effects of viscosity and thermal conductivity on the dynamics of first-order phase transitions are studied. The nuclear gas-liquid and hadron-quark transitions in heavy-ion collisions are considered. We demonstrate that at nonzero thermal conductivity, {kappa} {ne} 0, onset of spinodal instabilities occurs on an isothermal spinodal line, whereas for {kappa} = 0 instabilities take place at lower temperatures, on an adiabatic spinodal.

  12. Liquid ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Suman; Paswan, Anil; Prakas, S.

    2014-01-01

    Human have lungs to breathe air and they have no gills to breath liquids like fish. When the surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung increases as in acute lung injury, scientists started to think about filling the lung with fluid instead of air to reduce the surface tension and facilitate ventilation. Liquid ventilation (LV) is a technique of mechanical ventilation in which the lungs are insufflated with an oxygenated perfluorochemical liquid rather than an oxygen-containing gas mixture. The use of perfluorochemicals, rather than nitrogen as the inert carrier of oxygen and carbon dioxide offers a number of advantages for the treatment of acute lung injury. In addition, there are non-respiratory applications with expanding potential including pulmonary drug delivery and radiographic imaging. It is well-known that respiratory diseases are one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in intensive care unit. During the past few years several new modalities of treatment have been introduced. One of them and probably the most fascinating, is of LV. Partial LV, on which much of the existing research has concentrated, requires partial filling of lungs with perfluorocarbons (PFC's) and ventilation with gas tidal volumes using conventional mechanical ventilators. Various physico-chemical properties of PFC's make them the ideal media. It results in a dramatic improvement in lung compliance and oxygenation and decline in mean airway pressure and oxygen requirements. No long-term side-effect reported. PMID:25886321

  13. 46 CFR 179.310 - Collision bulkheads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Collision bulkheads. 179.310 Section 179.310 Shipping... recess or step, up to the bulkhead deck; (c) The after collision bulkhead on a double-ended ferry of more... step, at least up to the bulkhead deck....

  14. Variation of transverse momentum in hadronic collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Amand, J.; Uritam, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed parameterization of the transverse momentum in hadronic collisions on multiplicity and on beam momentum. Hadronic collisions are considered at energies below the ultra-high energy domain, on the basis of an uncertainty relation and a naive eikonal model with an impact-parameter-dependent multiplicity.

  15. Mechanical Energy Changes in Perfectly Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Suppose a block of mass "m"[subscript 1] traveling at speed "v"[subscript 1] makes a one-dimensional perfectly inelastic collision with another block of mass "m"[subscript 2]. What else does one need to know to calculate the fraction of the mechanical energy that is dissipated in the collision? (Contains 1 figure.)

  16. Oblique and Head-On Elastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2008-01-01

    When a moving ball collides elastically with an identical, initially stationary ball, the incident ball will either come to rest (head-on collision; see Fig. 1) or will acquire a velocity that is perpendicular to that acquired by the target ball (oblique collision; see Fig. 2). These two possible outcomes are related in an interesting way, which…

  17. Long-Range Collisions in Magnetized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D.

    2015-12-01

    Astrophysical (and earthbound) plasmas in strong magnetic fields exhibit collisional effects that are not described by classical collision theory nor by the standard collision operators, such as the Landau or Balescu-Lenard operators. These theories implicitly neglect "long-range" collisions, i.e. collisions with impact parameters large compared to the cyclotron radius. This presentation will review several important physical effects such collisions have on various phenomena, including cross-magnetic field diffusion, heat conduction, and collisional slowing parallel to the magnetic field. Long-range collisions are analyzed as guiding-centers moving in one-dimension along the magnetic field, with parallel energy and momentum transferred to particles on separate field lines through the screened Coulomb interaction. This causes cross-field heat transport that is independent of magnetic field strength B (as opposed to the classical 1/B2 scaling), and enhances the rate of collisional slowing parallel to B. The Coulomb interaction between guiding centers on different field lines also produces random ExB drifts that enhance cross-magnetic field diffusion compared to the classical theory. The theory of long-range guiding center collisions must also include the novel effect of "collisional caging": plasma noise causes two colliding guiding centers to diffuse in relative parallel velocity, reversing their motion along B and colliding several times before becoming uncorrelated. This further enhances cross-field diffusion from long-range collisions by a factor of three, and enhances parallel slowing by a factor of approximately 1.5.

  18. Charge exchange in H^+ + He^+ collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Leon, Nicolais; Sabin, John R.; Deumens, Erik; Ohrn, Yngve

    2008-05-01

    Charge exchange in H^+ + He^+ collision are investigated theoretically at projectile energies below the ionization threshold at about 100 keV/amu. The electron nuclear dynamics (END) method is used to analyze the collision processes. Total charge exchange cross sections were calculated and compared with other theoretical and experimental data.

  19. Crab Waist Collision at DAFNE

    SciTech Connect

    Milardi, C.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, G.; Murtas, F.; Pellegrino, L.; /Frascati /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN /INFN, Cosenza /INFN, Rome /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Rome U. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Rome3 /SLAC

    2011-11-30

    DAFNE is an accelerator complex consisting of a double ring lepton collider working at the c.m. energy of the {Phi}-resonance (1.02 GeV) and an injection system. In its original configuration the collider consisted of two independent rings, each {approx}97 m long, sharing two 10 m long interaction regions (IR1 and IR2) where the KLOE and FINUDA or DEAR detectors were respectively installed. A full energy injection system, including an S-band linac, 180 m long transfer lines and an accumulator/damping ring, provides fast and high efficiency electron positron injection also in topping-up mode during collisions. Recently the DAFNE collider has been upgraded in order to implement a new collision scheme based on large Piwinski angle and cancellation of the synchro-betatron resonances by means of electromagnetic sextupoles (Crab-Waist compensation). The novel approach has proved to be effective in improving beam-beam interaction and collider luminosity.

  20. Molecular collisions coming into focus.

    PubMed

    Onvlee, Jolijn; Vogels, Sjoerd N; von Zastrow, Alexander; Parker, David H; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

    2014-08-14

    The Stark deceleration method exploits the concepts of charged particle accelerator physics to produce beams of neutral polar molecules with an almost perfect quantum state purity, a tunable velocity and a narrow velocity distribution. These monochromatic molecular beams offer interesting perspectives for precise studies of molecular scattering processes, in particular when used in conjunction with state-of-the-art laser-based detection techniques such as velocity map imaging. Here, we describe crossed beam scattering experiments in which the Stark deceleration method is combined with the velocity map imaging technique. The narrow velocity spread of Stark-decelerated molecular beams results in scattering images with unprecedented velocity and angular resolution. We demonstrate this by resolving quantum diffraction oscillations in state-to-state inelastic differential scattering cross sections for collisions between NO radicals and rare gas atoms. We describe the future prospects of this "best-of-two-worlds" combination, ranging from scattering studies at low collision energies to bimolecular scattering using two decelerators, and discuss the challenges that lie ahead to achieve these goals. PMID:24967721

  1. Energy coupling in catastrophic collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holsapple, K. A.; Choe, K. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The prediction of events leading to the catastrophic collisions and disruption of solar system bodies is fraught with the same difficulties as are other theories of impact events; since one simply cannot perform experiments in the regime of interest. In the catastrophic collisions of asteroids that regime involves bodies of a few tons to hundred of kilometers in diameter, and velocities of several kilometers pre second. For hundred kilometer bodies, gravitational stresses dominate material fracture strengths, but those gravitational stresses are essentially absent for laboratory experiments. Only numerical simulations using hydrocodes can in principle analyze the true problems, but they have their own major uncertainties about the correctness of the physical models and properties. The question of the measure of the impactor and its energy coupling is investigated using numerical code calculations. The material model was that of a generic silicate rock, including high pressure melt and vapor phases, and includes material nonlinearity and dissipation via a Mie-Gruniesen model. A series of calculations with various size ratios and impact velocities are reported.

  2. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

    2013-10-01

    Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

  3. Liquid/liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1980-01-01

    Conceptual design for heat exchanger, utilizing two immiscible liquids with dissimilar specific gravities in direct contact, is more efficient mechanism of heat transfer than conventional heat exchangers with walls or membranes. Concept could be adapted for collection of heat from solar or geothermal sources.

  4. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  5. Restricted Collision List method for faster Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrossan, Michael N.

    2016-08-01

    The 'Restricted Collision List' (RCL) method for speeding up the calculation of DSMC Variable Soft Sphere collisions, with Borgnakke-Larsen (BL) energy exchange, is presented. The method cuts down considerably on the number of random collision parameters which must be calculated (deflection and azimuthal angles, and the BL energy exchange factors). A relatively short list of these parameters is generated and the parameters required in any cell are selected from this list. The list is regenerated at intervals approximately equal to the smallest mean collision time in the flow, and the chance of any particle re-using the same collision parameters in two successive collisions is negligible. The results using this method are indistinguishable from those obtained with standard DSMC. The CPU time saving depends on how much of a DSMC calculation is devoted to collisions and how much is devoted to other tasks, such as moving particles and calculating particle interactions with flow boundaries. For 1-dimensional calculations of flow in a tube, the new method saves 20% of the CPU time per collision for VSS scattering with no energy exchange. With RCL applied to rotational energy exchange, the CPU saving can be greater; for small values of the rotational collision number, for which most collisions involve some rotational energy exchange, the CPU may be reduced by 50% or more.

  6. A method of inferring collision ratio based on maneuverability of own ship under critical collision conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Youngjun; Rhee, Key-Pyo; Ahn, Kyoungsoo

    2013-06-01

    In constructing a collision avoidance system, it is important to determine the time for starting collision avoidance maneuver. Many researchers have attempted to formulate various indices by applying a range of techniques. Among these indices, collision risk obtained by combining Distance to the Closest Point of Approach (DCPA) and Time to the Closest Point of Approach (TCPA) information with fuzzy theory is mostly used. However, the collision risk has a limit, in that membership functions of DCPA and TCPA are empirically determined. In addition, the collision risk is not able to consider several critical collision conditions where the target ship fails to take appropriate actions. It is therefore necessary to design a new concept based on logical approaches. In this paper, a collision ratio is proposed, which is the expected ratio of unavoidable paths to total paths under suitably characterized operation conditions. Total paths are determined by considering categories such as action space and methodology of avoidance. The International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (1972) and collision avoidance rules (2001) are considered to solve the slower ship's dilemma. Different methods which are based on a constant speed model and simulated speed model are used to calculate the relative positions between own ship and target ship. In the simulated speed model, fuzzy control is applied to determination of command rudder angle. At various encounter situations, the time histories of the collision ratio based on the simulated speed model are compared with those based on the constant speed model.

  7. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    1994-01-01

    A dropping electrolyte electrode for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions.

  8. Photon scattering in muon collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Klasen, M.

    1997-12-18

    The authors estimate the benefit of muon colliders for photon physics. They calculate the rate at which photons are emitted from muon beams in different production mechanisms. Bremsstrahlung is reduced, beamstrahlung disappears, and laser backscattering suffers from a bad conversion of the incoming to the outgoing photon beam in addition to requiring very short wavelengths. As a consequence, the cross sections for jet photoproduction in {mu}p and {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collisions are reduced by factors of 2.2 and 5 compared to ep and e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} machines. However, the cross sections remain sizable and measurable giving access to the photon and proton parton densities down to x values of 10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup {minus}4}.

  9. Thermally induced collision of droplets in an immiscible outer fluid.

    PubMed

    Davanlou, Ashkan; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2015-01-01

    Micro-total analysis systems (μTAS) have attracted wide attention and are identified as a promising solution for sample transport, filtration, chemical reactions, separation and detection. Despite their popularity, the selection of an appropriate mechanism for droplet transport and coalescence has always been a challenge. This paper investigates the use of Marangoni flow as a mechanism for levitating and transporting droplets on immiscible liquid films at higher speeds than is possible currently. For the first time, we show that it is possible to realize the natural coalescence of droplets through Marangoni effect without any external stimulation, and deliver the coalesced droplet to a certain destination through the use of surface tension gradients. The effects of shape and size on collision outcome are studied. Regions of coalescence and stretching separation of colliding droplets are delineated based on Weber number and impact number. In addition, the effect of viscosity on post collision regimes is studied. The findings in this fundamental study can be beneficial to many applications such as welding, drug delivery and microfluidics devices in controlling small droplets and targeting them to various locations. PMID:25948547

  10. Thermally induced collision of droplets in an immiscible outer fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davanlou, Ashkan; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2015-05-01

    Micro-total analysis systems (μTAS) have attracted wide attention and are identified as a promising solution for sample transport, filtration, chemical reactions, separation and detection. Despite their popularity, the selection of an appropriate mechanism for droplet transport and coalescence has always been a challenge. This paper investigates the use of Marangoni flow as a mechanism for levitating and transporting droplets on immiscible liquid films at higher speeds than is possible currently. For the first time, we show that it is possible to realize the natural coalescence of droplets through Marangoni effect without any external stimulation, and deliver the coalesced droplet to a certain destination through the use of surface tension gradients. The effects of shape and size on collision outcome are studied. Regions of coalescence and stretching separation of colliding droplets are delineated based on Weber number and impact number. In addition, the effect of viscosity on post collision regimes is studied. The findings in this fundamental study can be beneficial to many applications such as welding, drug delivery and microfluidics devices in controlling small droplets and targeting them to various locations.

  11. Data for modeling of positron collisions and transport in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Z. Lj.; Banković, A.; Dujko, S.; Marjanović, S.; Malović, G.; Sullivan, J. P.; Buckman, S. J.

    2013-07-01

    We review the current status of positron cross sections for collisions with atoms and molecules from the viewpoint of their use in studies of positron transport processes in gases, liquids and human tissue. The data include cross sections for positron scattering in rare gases, molecular gases (eg., for N2, H2, CO2, CF4) and in particular for organic molecules and those relevant for applications in medicine (e.g. formic acid and water vapor). The cross sections were taken from an assessment of previously published positron-target cross sections. All of the cross sections are based on binary collision measurements and theoretical calculations, and they were not explicitly modified according to the standard swarm analysis. The main reason for this is systematic lack of experimental data for positron transport properties in gases. However, we believe that our compiled sets of cross sections are at level of sophistication, and of sufficient accuracy, to provide correct interpretation of future positron-based experiments. Using these cross sections as an input in our Monte Carlo simulations and Boltzmann equation treatment, we review some interesting points observed in the profiles of various transport coefficients for positrons in gases. Particular emphasis is placed upon the analysis of kinetic phenomena generated by the explicit influence of Ps formation.

  12. Particle accumulation on periodic orbits by repeated free surface collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ernst; Kuhlmann, Hendrik C.

    2011-07-01

    The motion of small particles suspended in cylindrical thermocapillary liquid bridges is investigated numerically in order to explain the experimentally observed particle accumulation structures (PAS) in steady two- and time-dependent three-dimensional flows. Particles moving in this flow are modeled as perfect tracers in the bulk, which can undergo collisions with the free surface. By way of free-surface collisions the particles are transferred among different streamlines which represents the particle trajectories in the bulk. The inter-streamline transfer-process near the free surface together with the passive transport through the bulk is used to construct an iterative map that can describe the accumulation process as an attraction to a stable fixed point which represents PAS. The flow topology of the underlying azimuthally traveling hydrothermal wave turns out to be of key importance for the existence of PAS. In a frame of reference exactly rotating with the hydrothermal wave the three-dimensional flow is steady and exhibits co-existing regular and chaotic streamlines. We find that particles are attracted to accumulation structures if a closed regular streamline exists in the rotating frame of reference which closely approaches the free surface locally. Depending on the closed streamline and the particle radius PAS can arise as a specific trajectory which winds about the closed regular streamline or as the surface of a particular stream tube containing the closed streamline.

  13. Collisions in the Kuiper belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael

    2007-07-01

    For most of the 15 year history of observations of Kuiper belt objects, it has been speculated that impacts must have played a major role in shaping the physical and chemical characteristics of these objects, yet little direct evidence of the effects of such impacts has been seen. The past 18 months, however, have seen an explosion of major new discoveries giving some of the first insights into the influence of this critical process. From a diversity of observations we have been led to the hypotheses that: {1} satellite-forming impacts must have been common in the Kuiper belt; {2} such impacts led to significant chemical modification; and {3} the outcomes of these impacts are sufficiently predictable that we can now find and study these impact-derived systems by the chemical and physical attributes of both the satellites and the primaries. If our picture is correct, we now have in hand for the first time a set of incredibly powerful tools to study the frequency and outcome of collisions in the outer solar system. Here we propose three linked projects that would answer questions critical to the multiple prongs of our hypothesis. In these projects we will study the chemical effects of collisions through spectrophotometric observations of collisionally formed satellites and through the search for additional satellites around primaries with potential impact signatures, and we will study the physical effects of impacts through the examination of tidal evolution in proposed impact systems. The intensive HST program that we propose here will allow us to fully test our new hypotheses and will provide the ability to obtain the first extensive insights into outer solar system impact processes.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF WILD PIG VEHICLE COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J; Paul E. Johns, P

    2007-05-23

    Wild pig (Sus scrofa) collisions with vehicles are known to occur in the United States, but only minimal information describing these accidents has been reported. In an effort to better characterize these accidents, data were collected from 179 wild pig-vehicle collisions from a location in west central South Carolina. Data included accident parameters pertaining to the animals involved, time, location, and human impacts. The age structure of the animals involved was significantly older than that found in the population. Most collisions involved single animals; however, up to seven animals were involved in individual accidents. As the number of animals per collision increased, the age and body mass of the individuals involved decreased. The percentage of males was significantly higher in the single-animal accidents. Annual attrition due to vehicle collisions averaged 0.8 percent of the population. Wild pig-vehicle collisions occurred year-round and throughout the 24-hour daily time period. Most accidents were at night. The presence of lateral barriers was significantly more frequent at the collision locations. Human injuries were infrequent but potentially serious. The mean vehicle damage estimate was $1,173.

  15. Pump for Saturated Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    Boiling liquids pumped by device based on proven components. Expanding saturated liquid in nozzle and diverting its phases along separate paths in liquid/vapor separator raises pressure of liquid. Liquid cooled in process. Pump makes it unnecessary to pressurize cryogenic liquids in order to pump them. Problems of introducing noncondensable pressurizing gas avoided.

  16. A collision avoidance system for workpiece protection

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, D.J.; Weber, T.M.; Novak, J.L.; Maslakowski, J.E.

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes an application of Sandia`s non-contact capacitive sensing technology for collision avoidance during the manufacturing of rocket engine thrust chambers. The collision avoidance system consists of an octagon shaped collar with a capacitive proximity sensor mounted on each face. The sensors produced electric fields which extend several inches from the face of the collar and detect potential collisions between the robot and the workpiece. A signal conditioning system processes the sensor output and provides varying voltage signals to the robot controller for stopping the robot.

  17. Vorticity in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-06-01

    We study the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Au +Au collisions and CERN Large Hadron Collider Pb +Pb collisions by using the hijing model. Different definitions of the vorticity field and velocity field are considered. A variety of properties of the vorticity are explored, including the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction, and the time evolution. In addition, the spatial distribution of the flow helicity is also studied.

  18. Collision experiments between centimeter-sized protoplanetesimals in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whizin, Akbar; Colwell, Joshua E.; Dove, Adrienne; Brisset, Julie; Cruz, Roberto; Foster, Zach

    2016-10-01

    In the early stages of planet formation in a protoplanetary disk the first coalescing bodies are weakly bound. Conditions in the disk, such as the presence of gas (drag), make further growth through centimeter and meter sized bodies difficult. For centimeter-sized aggregates self-gravity is almost non-existent and electrostatic surface forces such as van der Waals-type forces play a critical role in holding loosely bound rubble-piles together during their early formation. In order to understand how aggregates of this size grow we study the mechanical strengths, material, and collisional properties of cm-sized aggregates. The collisional outcomes between two aggregates can be determined by a set of definable collision parameters and experimental constraints on these parameters will aid in astrophysical models of planet formation. We have carried out a series of microgravity laboratory experiments in which we collide a pair of weakly bound aggregates together. In our free-fall chamber we collide two 3-cm aggregates together at collision velocities ranging from 50 to 220 cm/s and with pressure ~1 mbar. The aggregates are made of mm-sized silica bead particles and require internal cohesion to avoid fragmentation above modest collision speeds, which is supplied by adding H2O (later dehydrated) and between 0 - 0.1 g of a well-mixed liquid adhesive to simulate surface forces and bonds between particles. We measure the compressive strengths of the aggregates (0.5 - 10 kPa), find their coefficients of restitution (CoR), and determine their bouncing and fragmentation thresholds, over a range of velocities and internal strengths. We observed collisional outcomes such as bouncing, erosion (mass-loss), and fragmentation of the aggregates. We find the CoR of the aggregates to have a mean of 0.11 ± 0.1 with no dependence on velocity or strength. Impact velocities above ~2 m/s resulted in fragmentation of our aggregates, higher than the ~1 m/s threshold for porous dust aggregates

  19. Liquid electrode

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1994-07-05

    A dropping electrolyte electrode is described for use in electrochemical analysis of non-polar sample solutions, such as benzene or cyclohexane. The liquid electrode, preferably an aqueous salt solution immiscible in the sample solution, is introduced into the solution in dropwise fashion from a capillary. The electrolyte is introduced at a known rate, thus, the droplets each have the same volume and surface area. The electrode is used in making standard electrochemical measurements in order to determine properties of non-polar sample solutions. 2 figures.

  20. Chemical reactions in liquid induced by atmospheric-pressure dc glow discharge in contact with liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi; Shimokawa, Yudai; Shirai, Naoki; Uchida, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally investigated some of the initial reactions in a liquid induced by electron or positive-ion irradiation from an atmospheric-pressure dc glow discharge in contact with the liquid. Aqueous solutions of NaCl, AgNO3, and HAuCl4 are used as the electrolyte. We measured the pH and conductivity in the liquid at approximately 1 cm below the solution surfaces. OH radical generation in the liquid was observed by a chemical probe method. Experimental results showed that electron irradiation of the liquid surface generates OH- in water and that positive-ion irradiation of the liquid surface generates H+ in water even without the dissolution of gas-phase nitrogen oxide. A possible reaction process is qualitatively discussed. In particular, the contribution of charge transfer collision between impinging low-energy positive ions and water molecules to the ionic species in the liquid is used to explain the overall tendency of the experimental results.

  1. Efficient DSMC collision-partner selection schemes.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert

    2010-07-01

    The effect of collision-partner selection schemes on the accuracy and the efficiency of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird is investigated. Several schemes to reduce the total discretization error as a function of the mean collision separation and the mean collision time are examined. These include the historically first sub-cell scheme, the more recent nearest-neighbor scheme, and various near-neighbor schemes, which are evaluated for their effect on the thermal conductivity for Fourier flow. Their convergence characteristics as a function of spatial and temporal discretization and the number of simulators per cell are compared to the convergence characteristics of the sophisticated and standard DSMC algorithms. Improved performance is obtained if the population from which possible collision partners are selected is an appropriate fraction of the population of the cell.

  2. Binary collisions in Popovici's photogravitational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioc, V.; Blaga, C.

    The dynamics of bodies under the combined action of the gravitational attraction and the radiative repelling force has large and deep implications in astronomy. In the 1920s, the Romanian astronomer Constantin Popovici proposed a modified photogravitational law (considered by other scientists, too). This paper deals with the collisions of the two-body problem associated with Popovici's model. Resorting to McGehee-type transformations of the second kind, we obtain regular equations of motion and define the collision manifold. The flow on this boundary manifold is wholly described. This allows to point out some important qualitative features of the collisional motion: existence of the black-hole effect, gradientlikeness of the flow on the collision manifold, regularizability of collisions under certain conditions. Some questions, coming from the comparison of Levi-Civita's regularizing transformations and McGehee's ones, are formulated.

  3. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Rovibrationally Inelastic Collisions of Ultracold Lithium Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasmine, William; Stewart, Brian

    2016-05-01

    We have calculated cross sections for rovibrationally inelastic collisions of Li2 A(1) 1Σu+ colliding with neon and xenon on ab initio potentials. We find that the inelastic cross section can be very large and increasing at low collision velocity. This behavior is very well modeled as a Langevin process. The total inelastic cross section is a sizable fraction of the total capture cross section, typically about a third. For Li2 - Xe, the total inelastic rate constants are several thousand square angstroms, and level-to-level rate constants are several hundred square angstroms at collision speeds below 1000 cm/s, implying that such collisions might be observable in photoassociated lithium dimer.

  5. Efficient DSMC collision-partner selection schemes.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert

    2010-05-01

    The effect of collision-partner selection schemes on the accuracy and the efficiency of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird is investigated. Several schemes to reduce the total discretization error as a function of the mean collision separation and the mean collision time are examined. These include the historically first sub-cell scheme, the more recent nearest-neighbor scheme, and various near-neighbor schemes, which are evaluated for their effect on the thermal conductivity for Fourier flow. Their convergence characteristics as a function of spatial and temporal discretization and the number of simulators per cell are compared to the convergence characteristics of the sophisticated and standard DSMC algorithms. Improved performance is obtained if the population from which possible collision partners are selected is an appropriate fraction of the population of the cell.

  6. Molecular vibrational states during a collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Recamier, Jose A.; Jauregui, Rocio

    1995-01-01

    Alternative algebraic techniques to approximate a given Hamiltonian by a harmonic oscillator are described both for time-independent and time-dependent systems. We apply them to the description of a one dimensional atom-diatom collision. From the resulting evolution operator, we evaluate vibrational transition probabilities as well as other time-dependent properties. As expected, the ground vibrational state becomes a squeezed state during the collision.

  7. Transition rates in proton - Rydberg atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrinceanu, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for energy and angular momentum transfer processes in proton - Ryderg atom collisions were performed and the corresponding rates are reported.The relevance of these rates in the context of cosmological recombination is discussed. The rates are contrasted with the similar rates in electron - Rydberg atom collisions. This work has been supported by National Science Foundation through grants for the Center for Research on Complex Networks (HRD-1137732) and Research Infrastructure for Science and Engineering (RISE) (HRD-1345173).

  8. Kink Collisions in Curved Field Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlqvist, Pontus; Eckerle, Kate; Greene, Brian

    2015-04-01

    We study bubble universe collisions in the ultrarelativistic limit with the new feature of allowing for nontrivial curvature in field space. We establish a simple geometrical interpretation of such collisions in terms of a double family of field profiles whose tangent vector fields stand in mutual parallel transport. This provides a generalization of the well-known flat field space limit of the free passage approximation. We investigate the limits of this approximation and illustrate our analytical results with numerical simulations.

  9. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  10. Modelling Coulomb Collisions in Anisotropic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P. M.

    2009-12-01

    Collisional transport in anisotropic plasmas is investigated comparing the theoretical transport coefficients (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2009) for anisotropic particles with the results of the corresponding Langevin equation, obtained as a generalization of Manheimer et al. (1997). References: Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2009), On Coulomb collisions in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 16, 054501. Manheimer, W. M., M. Lampe and G. Joyce (1997), Langevin representation of Coulomb collisions in PIC simulations, J. Comput. Phys., 138, 563-584.

  11. Collision integrals for isotopic hydrogen molecules.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, N. J.; Munn, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the effects of reduced mass and differences in asymmetry on the collision integrals and thermal diffusion factors of isotopic hydrogen systems. Each system selected for study consisted of two diatoms, one in the j = 0 rotation state and the other in the j = 1 state. The molecules interacted with a Lennard-Jones type potential modified to include angular terms. A set of cross sections and collision integrals were obtained for each system.

  12. Icy Collisions - Planet Building beyond the snowline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Sabrina; Hill, Catherine; Heisselmann, Daniel; Blum, Juergen; Fraser, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Collisions of small icy and dust particles beyond the “snow-line” are a key step in planet formation. Whilst the physical forces that underpin the aggregation of the smallest grains (van der Waals) and the largest planetessimals (gravity) are well understood, the processes involving mm - cm sized particles remain a mystery.In a unique set of experiments, we investigated low velocity collisions of dust and icy particles in this size range under microgravity conditions - utilizing parabolic flight (e.g. Salter 2009, Hill 2015 (a) & (b)). Experiments were performed at cryogenic temperatures (below 140 K) for icy aggregates and ambient as well as cryogenic temperatures (80 - 220 K) for dust aggregates.The kinetic analysis of the observed collisions of different aggregate types in different shapes and sizes revealed astonishing results - as the collisional properties of all investigated particles differ strongly from the usual assumptions in models of planet formation.Here, we present a summary of the results on the collisions of icy particles as well as first results on the collisions of dust aggregates. Focus will be on the coefficient of restitution, which measures the loss of translational energy in bouncing collisions and is a key parameter in models of planet formation.

  13. Fast collision detection for fracturing rigid bodies.

    PubMed

    Glondu, Loeiz; Schvartzman, Sara C; Marchal, Maud; Dumont, Georges; Otaduy, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    In complex scenes with many objects, collision detection plays a key role in the simulation performance. This is particularly true in fracture simulation for two main reasons. One is that fracture fragments tend to exhibit very intensive contact, and the other is that collision detection data structures for new fragments need to be computed on the fly. In this paper, we present novel collision detection algorithms and data structures for real-time simulation of fracturing rigid bodies. We build on a combination of well-known efficient data structures, namely, distance fields and sphere trees, making our algorithm easy to integrate on existing simulation engines. We propose novel methods to construct these data structures, such that they can be efficiently updated upon fracture events and integrated in a simple yet effective self-adapting contact selection algorithm. Altogether, we drastically reduce the cost of both collision detection and collision response. We have evaluated our global solution for collision detection on challenging scenarios, achieving high frame rates suited for hard real-time applications such as video games or haptics. Our solution opens promising perspectives for complex fracture simulations involving many dynamically created rigid objects. PMID:24201324

  14. Fast Collision Detection for Fracturing Rigid Bodies.

    PubMed

    Glondu, Loeiz; Schvartzman, Sara C; Marchal, Maud; Dumont, Georges; Otaduy, Miguel A

    2013-07-01

    In complex scenes with many objects, collision detection plays a key role in the simulation performance. This is particularly true in fracture simulation for two main reasons. One is that fracture fragments tend to exhibit very intensive contact, and the other is that collision detection data structures for new fragments need to be computed on the fly. In this paper, we present novel collision detection algorithms and data structures for real-time simulation of fracturing rigid bodies. We build on a combination of well-known efficient data structures, namely distance fields and sphere trees, making our algorithm easy to integrate on existing simulation engines. We propose novel methods to construct these data structures, such that they can be efficiently updated upon fracture events and integrated in a simple yet effective self-adapting contact selection algorithm. Altogether, we drastically reduce the cost of both collision detection and collision response. We have evaluated our global solution for collision detection on challenging scenarios, achieving high frame rates suited for hard real-time applications such as video games or haptics. Our solution opens promising perspectives for complex fracture simulations involving many dynamically created rigid objects. PMID:23836702

  15. Estimating collision efficiencies from contact freezing experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, B.; Marcolli, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-04-01

    Interactions of atmospheric aerosols with clouds influence cloud properties and modify the aerosol life cycle. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles or become incorporated into cloud droplets by scavenging. For an accurate description of aerosol scavenging and ice nucleation in contact mode, collision efficiency between droplets and aerosol particles needs to be known. This study derives the collision rate from experimental contact freezing data obtained with the ETH Collision Ice Nucleation Chamber CLINCH. Freely falling 80 μm water droplets are exposed to an aerosol consisting of 200 nm diameter silver iodide particles of concentrations from 500-5000 cm-3, which act as ice nucleating particles in contact mode. The chamber is kept at ice saturation in the temperature range from 236-261 K leading to slow evaporation of water droplets giving rise to thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis. Droplets and particles bear charges inducing electrophoresis. The experimentally derived collision efficiency of 0.13 is around one order of magnitude higher than theoretical formulations which include Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and electric forces. This discrepancy is most probably due to uncertainties and inaccuracies in the description of thermophoretic and diffusiophoretic processes acting together. This is to the authors knowledge the first dataset of collision efficiencies acquired below 273 K. More such experiments with different droplet and particle diameters are needed to improve our understanding of collision processes acting together.

  16. Computing with liquid crystal fingers: Models of geometric and logical computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew; Kitson, Stephen; Costello, Ben De Lacy; Matranga, Mario Ariosto; Younger, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    When a voltage is applied across a thin layer of cholesteric liquid crystal, fingers of cholesteric alignment can form and propagate in the layer. In computer simulation, based on experimental laboratory results, we demonstrate that these cholesteric fingers can solve selected problems of computational geometry, logic, and arithmetics. We show that branching fingers approximate a planar Voronoi diagram, and nonbranching fingers produce a convex subdivision of concave polygons. We also provide a detailed blueprint and simulation of a one-bit half-adder functioning on the principles of collision-based computing, where the implementation is via collision of liquid crystal fingers with obstacles and other fingers.

  17. Extremely-efficient, miniaturized, long-lived alpha-voltaic power source using liquid gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Patel, Jagdishbhai (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A power source converts .alpha.-particle energy to electricity for use in electrical systems. Liquid gallium or other liquid medium is subjected to .alpha.-particle emissions. Electrons are freed by collision from neutral gallium atoms to provide gallium ions. The electrons migrate to a cathode while the gallium ions migrate to an anode. A current and/or voltage difference then arises between the cathode and anode because of the work function difference of the cathode and anode. Gallium atoms are regenerated by the receiving of electrons from the anode enabling the generation of additional electrons from additional .alpha.-particle collisions.

  18. RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS: EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlander, Erwin M.; Heckman, Harry H.

    1982-04-01

    Relativistic heavy ion physics began as a 'no man's land' between particle and nuclear physics, with both sides frowning upon it as 'unclean', because on one hand, hadronic interactions and particle production cloud nuclear structure effects, while on the other, the baryonic environment complicates the interpretation of production experiments. They have attempted to review here the experimental evidence on RHI collisions from the point of view that it represents a new endeavor in the understanding of strong interaction physics. Such an approach appears increasingly justified; first, by the accumulation of data and observations of new features of hadronic interactions that could not have been detected outside a baryonic environment; second, by the maturation of the field owing to the advances made over the past several years in experimental inquiries on particle production by RHI, including pions, kaons, hyperons, and searches for antiprotons; and third, by the steady and progressive increase in the energy and mass ranges of light nuclear beams that have become available to the experiment; indeed the energy range has widened from the {approx} 0.2 to 2 AGeV at the Bevalac to {approx}4 AGeV at Dubna and recently, to the quantum jump in energies to {approx} 1000 equivalent AGeV at the CERN PS-ISR. Accompanying these expansions in the energy frontier are the immediate prospects for very heavy ion beams at the Bevalac up to, and including, 1 AGeV {sup 238}U, thereby extending the 'mass frontier' to its ultimate extent.

  19. Impulsive model for reactive collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marron, M. T.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    A simple classical mechanical model of the reactive scattering of a structureless atom A and a quasi-diatomic BC is developed which takes full advantage of energy, linear and angular momentum conservation relations but introduces a minimum of further assumptions. These are as follows: (1) the vibrational degree of freedom of the reactant (BC) and product (AB) molecules is suppressed, so the change in vibrational energy is simply a parameter; (2) straight-line trajectories are assumed outside of a reaction shell; (3) within this zone, momentum transfer occurs impulsively (essentially instantaneously) following mass transfer; (4) the impulse, which may be either positive or negative, is directed along the BC axis, which may, however, assume all orientations with respect to the incident relative velocity. The model yields differential and total cross sections and product rotational energy distributions for a given collision exoergicity Q, or for any known distribution over Q. Numerical results are presented for several prototype reactions whose dynamics have been well-studied.

  20. A zero-gravity demonstration of the collision and coalescence of water droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Vaughan, O. H.; Smith, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The mechanics of the collision and coalescence of liquid droplets is one of the main research areas in the fields of nuclear physics, astrophysics, meteorology and fluid mechanics. The crew members on the Skylab 3 and 4 missions were requested to perform demonstrations of the collision and coalescence of water droplets under the low gravity environment at orbital altitude. In Skylab 4 two water droplets with equal volumes, 30 cu cm each, were used. A dark colored droplet (contaminated with grape drink) moving with a velocity of 3.14 cm/sec collided with a stationary pink colored droplet (contaminated with strawberry drink) and coalescence occurred. Theoretical models are proposed to study the various stages of the collision-coalescence processes. Special considerations are concentrated in the investigation of the bounce-coalescence and coalescence-instability processes. The surface tension of the coalesced droplets was calculated to be 52 dynes/cm in perfect agreement with laboratory measurements made after the flight using a reproduction of the liquids.

  1. Collision prediction software for radiotherapy treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, Laura; Pearson, Erik A.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This work presents a method of collision predictions for external beam radiotherapy using surface imaging. The present methodology focuses on collision prediction during treatment simulation to evaluate the clearance of a patient’s treatment position and allow for its modification if necessary. Methods: A Kinect camera (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) is used to scan the patient and immobilization devices in the treatment position at the simulator. The surface is reconstructed using the SKANECT software (Occipital, Inc., San Francisco, CA). The treatment isocenter is marked using simulated orthogonal lasers projected on the surface scan. The point cloud of this surface is then shifted to isocenter and converted from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates. A slab models the treatment couch. A cylinder with a radius equal to the normal distance from isocenter to the collimator plate, and a height defined by the collimator diameter is used to estimate collisions. Points within the cylinder clear through a full gantry rotation with the treatment couch at 0° , while points outside of it collide. The angles of collision are reported. This methodology was experimentally verified using a mannequin positioned in an alpha cradle with both arms up. A planning CT scan of the mannequin was performed, two isocenters were marked in PINNACLE, and this information was exported to AlignRT (VisionRT, London, UK)—a surface imaging system for patient positioning. This was used to ensure accurate positioning of the mannequin in the treatment room, when available. Collision calculations were performed for the two treatment isocenters and the results compared to the collisions detected the room. The accuracy of the Kinect-Skanect surface was evaluated by comparing it to the external surface of the planning CT scan. Results: Experimental verification results showed that the predicted angles of collision matched those recorded in the room within 0.5°, in most cases (largest deviation

  2. Bulk Measurements at RHIC and the Perfect Liquid Conjecture

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Monika

    2009-12-17

    The agreement of hydrodynamic predictions of elliptic flow with data from Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV suggests the strongly coupled Quark Gluon Plasma, sQGP, produced at RHIC is a perfect liquid. Shear viscosity to entropy density ({eta}/s) ratio provides a measure of fluidity of a liquid. Small value of {eta}/s may indicate that the system is more strongly coupled. We present estimations of {eta}/s based on elliptic flow measurements in Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV. We show how the initial conditions affect the transport coefficients such as viscosity. In this paper we also present an alternative approach for the calculation of {eta}/s proposed by Gavin et al.[14]. This technique is based on the measurement of the collision centrality evolution of transverse momentum two-particle correlation functions.We also present measurements of higher moments of event-by-event net proton multiplicities from Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at 200 and 62.4 GeV. It has been proposed that event-by-event net proton multiplicities can be a characteristic signature of the existence of a QCD critical point.

  3. Bulk Measurements at RHIC and the Perfect Liquid Conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Monika

    2009-12-01

    The agreement of hydrodynamic predictions of elliptic flow with data from Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV suggests the strongly coupled Quark Gluon Plasma, sQGP, produced at RHIC [1, 2, 3] is a perfect liquid. Shear viscosity to entropy density (η/s) ratio provides a measure of fluidity of a liquid. Small value of η/s may indicate that the system is more strongly coupled. We present estimations of η/s based on elliptic flow measurements in Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV. We show how the initial conditions affect the transport coefficients such as viscosity. In this paper we also present an alternative approach for the calculation of η/s proposed by Gavin et al. [14]. This technique is based on the measurement of the collision centrality evolution of transverse momentum two-particle correlation functions. We also present measurements of higher moments of event-by-event net proton multiplicities from Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at 200 & 62.4 GeV. It has been proposed that event-by-event net proton multiplicities can be a characteristic signature of the existence of a QCD critical point [4].

  4. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  5. Liquid Crystal Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marroum, Renata-Maria

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the properties and classification of liquid crystals. Presents a simple experiment that illustrates the structure of liquid crystals and the differences between the various phases liquid crystals can assume. (JRH)

  6. Simultaneous detection of single attoliter droplet collisions by electrochemical and electrogenerated chemiluminescent responses.

    PubMed

    Dick, Jeffrey E; Renault, Christophe; Kim, Byung-Kwon; Bard, Allen J

    2014-10-27

    We provide evidence of single attoliter oil droplet collisions at the surface of an ultra-microelectrode (UME) by the observation of simultaneous electrochemical current transients (i-t curves) and electrogenerated chemiluminescent (ECL) transients in an oil/water emulsion. An emulsion system based on droplets of toluene and tri-n-propylamine (2:1 v/v) emulsified with an ionic liquid and suspended in an aqueous continuous phase was formed by ultrasonification. When an ECL luminophore, such as rubrene, is added to the emulsion droplet, stochastic events can be tracked by observing both the current blips from oxidation at the electrode surface and the ECL blips from the follow-up ECL reaction, which produces light. This report provides a means of studying fundamental aspects of electrochemistry using the attoliter oil droplet and offers complementary analytical techniques for analyzing discrete collision events, size distribution of emulsion systems, and individual droplet electroactivity. PMID:25213468

  7. REDISTRIBUTOR FOR LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, J.G.

    1957-10-29

    An improved baffle plate construction to intimately mix immiscible liquid solvents for solvent extraction processes in a liquid-liquid pulse column is described. To prevent the light and heavy liquids from forming separate continuous homogeneous vertical channels through sections of the column, a baffle having radially placed rectangular louvers with deflection plates opening upon alternate sides of the baffle is placed in the column, normal to the axis. This improvement substantially completely reduces strippiig losses due to poor mixing.

  8. Binary collisions and the slingshot effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rica da Silva, Amaro J.; Lemos, José P. S.

    2008-03-01

    We derive the equations for the gravity assist manoeuvre in the general 2D case without the constraints of circular planetary orbits or widely different masses as assumed by Broucke (AIAA/AAS 1988) and obtain the slingshot conditions and maximum energy gain for arbitrary mass ratios of two colliding rigid bodies. Using the geometric view developed in an earlier paper by the authors (Rica da Silva, A., Lemos, J.P.S.: Am. J. Phys. 74, 584-590, 2006) the possible trajectories are computed for both attractive or repulsive interactions yielding a further insight on the slingshot mechanics and its parametrization. http://centra.ist.utl.pt/amaro/Collisions/Collisions.html Collisions/Collisions.html" TargetType="URL"/> . The general slingshot manoeuvre for arbitrary masses is explained as a particular case of the possible outcomes of attractive or repulsive binary collisions, and the correlation between asymptotic information and orbital parameters is obtained in general.

  9. Collisions of trapped molecules with slow beams

    SciTech Connect

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Dalgarno, A.; Pavlovic, Z.; Sadeghpour, H. R.; Cote, R.

    2010-08-15

    We present a theoretical study of molecular-trap loss induced by collisions with slow atomic beams based on an explicit analysis of collision kinematics in the laboratory frame and a rigorous quantum description of atom-molecule scattering in external fields. The theory is applied to elucidate the effects of nonuniform magnetic and optical trapping fields on low-temperature collisions of OH (J=3/2,M{sub J}=3/2,f) molecules with {sup 4}He atoms. Our calculations quantify the extent to which both elastic and inelastic cross sections are suppressed by external trapping fields, clarify the role of small-angle scattering in trap loss, and may benefit future experiments on collisional cooling of molecules in electromagnetic traps. The calculated cross sections for trap loss in {sup 4}He + OH collisions are consistent with recent experimental observations at low beam energies [B. C. Sawyer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 203203 (2008)], demonstrating the importance of including the effects of nonuniform trapping fields in theoretical simulations of cold collision experiments with trapped molecules and slow atomic beams.

  10. Modelling of a collision between two smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus, V. L. B.; Sasaki, D. G. G.

    2016-09-01

    In the predominant approach in physics textbooks, the collision between particles is treated as a black box, where no physical quantity can be measured. This approach becomes even more evident in experimental classes where collisions are the simplest and most common way of applying the theorem of conservation of linear momentum in the asymptotic behavior. In this paper we develop and analyse an experiment on collisions using only two smartphones. The experimental setup is amazingly simple; the two devices are aligned on a horizontal table of lacquered wood, in order to slide more easily. At the edge of one of them a piece of common sponge is glued using double-sided tape. By using a free smartphone application, the values generated by the accelerometer of the two devices in full motion are measured and tabulated. Through numerical iteration, the speed graphs of the smartphones before, during, and after the collision are obtained. The main conclusions were: (i) the demonstration of the feasibility of using smartphones as an alternative to air tracks and electronic sensors employed in a teaching lab, (ii) the possibility of investigating the collision itself, its characteristics and effects; this is the great advantage of the use of smartphones over traditional experiments, (iii) the compatibility of the results with the impulse-momentum theorem, within the margin of uncertainty.

  11. Formation of rings by galactic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puerari, I.; Aguilar, L.

    2009-05-01

    We study the formation and evolution of rings in disk galaxies by the impact of a spherical companion. This study is carried out by using numerical simulations and fully self-consistent models. We have tested a number of target disk galaxies with different radial scalelengths or central radial velocity dispersion, and a number of companions with different masses and radial scalelengths. We also have tested a large number of initial conditions to produce collisions with different velocities, inclinations and impact parameters. Our main results are: (a) strong interactions (high companion mass and/or slow impact velocity) result in rings with constant expansion velocity; (b) our tested collisions are very effective to heat the disk, increasing the radial velocity dispersion; (c) the rings created by collisions are certainly density waves; (d) inclined-central collisions create inclined rings, but they are not effective to displace the nucleus of the target; (e) perpendicular-peripheral collisions are more effective to displace the nucleus, as well as to create inclined rings, which remain inclined for a long period of time (some 10^8 years).

  12. Collisions of solid ice in planetesimal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, J.; Teiser, J.

    2016-03-01

    We present collision experiments of centimetre projectiles on to decimetre targets, both made up of solid ice, at velocities of 15-45 m s-1 at an average temperature of {T_{avg}}=255.8 ± 0.7 K. In these collisions, the centimetre body gets disrupted and part of it sticks to the target. This behaviour can be observed up to an upper threshold, that depends on the projectile size, beyond which there is no mass transfer. In collisions of small particles, as produced by the disruption of the centimetre projectiles, we also find mass transfer to the target. In this way, the larger body can gain mass, although the efficiency of the initial mass transfer is rather low. These collision results can be applied to planetesimal formation near the snowline, where evaporation and condensation is expected to produce solid ice. In free fall collisions at velocities up to about 7 m s-1, we investigated the threshold to fragmentation and coefficient of restitution of centimetre ice spheres.

  13. Thermal Conductivity of Spin-Polarized Liquid {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Sawkey, D.; Puech, L.; Wolf, P.E.

    2006-06-02

    We present the first measurements of the thermal conductivity of spin-polarized normal liquid {sup 3}He. Using the rapid melting technique to produce nuclear polarizations up to 0.7, and a vibrating wire both as a heater and a thermometer, we show that, unlike the viscosity, the conductivity increases much less than predicted for s-wave scattering. We suggest that this might be due to a small probability for head-on collisions between quasiparticles.

  14. Liquid annulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludewig, Hans

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the specific impulse varies with the square root of the temperature and inversely with the square root of the molecular weight of the propellant. Typical values for specific impulse corresponding to various rocket concepts are shown. The Liquid Annulus core concept consists of a fuel element which will be arranged in a moderator block. The advantages as seen for the system are: high specific impulse; structural material will all run at low temperature; and lower fission product inventory because of evaporation. It is felt that this concept is worth at least a first look because of the promise of very high specific impulse. Because of the low thrust, one would probably need a cluster of engines. This is not necessarily bad because there would be some redundancy, but because of the low thrust one might have to refuel while running. Depending on the fuel vaporization, material can be included in the uranium that is injected as one is running along.

  15. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  16. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remaindermore » is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.« less

  17. Chiral Magnetic Effect in Heavy Ion Collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-12-01

    The Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) is a remarkable phenomenon that stems from highly nontrivial interplay of QCD chiral symmetry, axial anomaly, and gluonic topology. We show it is of fundamental importance to search for the CME in experiments. The heavy ion collisions provide a unique environment where a hot chiral-symmetric quark-gluon plasma is created, gluonic topological fluctuations generate chirality imbalance, and very strong magnetic fields |Β→|~m2π are present during the early stage of such collisions. Significant efforts have been made to look for CME signals in heavy ion collision experiments. Lastly, in this contribution we give a brief overview onmore » the status of such efforts.« less

  18. Collision-spike Sputtering of Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2015-12-01

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  19. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-10-15

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  20. Hit-and-run planetary collisions.

    PubMed

    Asphaug, Erik; Agnor, Craig B; Williams, Quentin

    2006-01-12

    Terrestrial planet formation is believed to have concluded in our Solar System with about 10 million to 100 million years of giant impacts, where hundreds of Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos acquired random velocities through gravitational encounters and resonances with one another and with Jupiter. This led to planet-crossing orbits and collisions that produced the four terrestrial planets, the Moon and asteroids. But here we show that colliding planets do not simply merge, as is commonly assumed. In many cases, the smaller planet escapes from the collision highly deformed, spun up, depressurized from equilibrium, stripped of its outer layers, and sometimes pulled apart into a chain of diverse objects. Remnants of these 'hit-and-run' collisions are predicted to be common among remnant planet-forming populations, and thus to be relevant to asteroid formation and meteorite petrogenesis.

  1. Physics of Ultra-Peripheral Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertulani, Carlos A.; Klein, Spencer R.; Nystrand, Joakim

    2005-02-02

    Moving highly-charged ions carry strong electromagnetic fields which act as a field of photons. In collisions at large impact parameters, hadronic interactions are not possible, and the ions interact through photon-ion and photon-photon collisions known as ultra-peripheral collisions (UPC). Hadron colliders like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) produce photonuclear and two-photon interactions at luminosities and energies beyond that accessible elsewhere; the LHC will reach a {gamma}p energy ten times that of the Hadron-Electron Ring Accelerator (HERA). Reactions as diverse as the production of anti-hydrogen, photoproduction of the {rho}{sup 0}, transmutation of lead into bismuth and excitation of collective nuclear resonances have already been studied. At the LHC, UPCs can study many types of ''new physics''.

  2. Neutrino quantum kinetic equations: The collision term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, Daniel N.; Cirigliano, Vincenzo

    2016-08-01

    We derive the collision term relevant for neutrino quantum kinetic equations in the early universe and compact astrophysical objects, displaying its full matrix structure in both flavor and spin degrees of freedom. We include in our analysis neutrino-neutrino processes, scattering and annihilation with electrons and positrons, and neutrino scattering off nucleons (the latter in the low-density limit). After presenting the general structure of the collision terms, we take two instructive limiting cases. The one-flavor limit highlights the structure in helicity space and allows for a straightforward interpretation of the off-diagonal entries in terms of the product of scattering amplitudes of the two helicity states. The isotropic limit is relevant for studies of the early universe: in this case the terms involving spin coherence vanish and the collision term can be expressed in terms of two-dimensional integrals, suitable for computational implementation.

  3. Active Collision Avoidance for Planetary Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Hannan, Mike; Srinivasan, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Present day robotic missions to other planets require precise, a priori knowledge of the terrain to pre-determine a landing spot that is safe. Landing sites can be miles from the mission objective, or, mission objectives may be tailored to suit landing sites. Future robotic exploration missions should be capable of autonomously identifying a safe landing target within a specified target area selected by mission requirements. Such autonomous landing sites must (1) 'see' the surface, (2) identify a target, and (3) land the vehicle. Recent advances in radar technology have resulted in small, lightweight, low power radars that are used for collision avoidance and cruise control systems in automobiles. Such radar systems can be adapted for use as active hazard avoidance systems for planetary landers. The focus of this CIF proposal is to leverage earlier work on collision avoidance systems for MSFC's Mighty Eagle lander and evaluate the use of automotive radar systems for collision avoidance in planetary landers.

  4. Neutrino quantum kinetic equations: The collision term

    DOE PAGES

    Blaschke, Daniel N.; Cirigliano, Vincenzo

    2016-08-25

    We derive the collision term relevant for neutrino quantum kinetic equations in the early universe and compact astrophysical objects, displaying its full matrix structure in both flavor and spin degrees of freedom. We include in our analysis neutrino-neutrino processes, scattering and annihilation with electrons and positrons, and neutrino scattering off nucleons (the latter in the low-density limit). After presenting the general structure of the collision terms, we take two instructive limiting cases. The one-flavor limit highlights the structure in helicity space and allows for a straightforward interpretation of the off-diagonal entries in terms of the product of scattering amplitudes ofmore » the two helicity states. As a result, the isotropic limit is relevant for studies of the early universe: in this case the terms involving spin coherence vanish and the collision term can be expressed in terms of two-dimensional integrals, suitable for computational implementation.« less

  5. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapiditymore » spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.« less

  6. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapidity spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.

  7. Tilting Uranus without a Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogoszinski, Zeeve; Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2016-10-01

    The most accepted hypothesis for the origin of Uranus' 98° obliquity is a giant collision during the late stages of planetary accretion. This model requires a single Earth mass object striking Uranus at high latitudes; such events occur with a probability of about 10%. Alternatively, Uranus' obliquity may have arisen from a sequence of smaller impactors which lead to a uniform distribution of obliquities. Here we explore a third model for tilting Uranus using secular spin-orbit resonance theory. We investigate early Solar System configurations in which a secular resonance between Uranus' axial precession frequency and another planet's orbital node precession frequency might occur.Thommes et al. (1999) hypothesized that Uranus and Neptune initially formed between Jupiter and Saturn, and were then kicked outward. In our scenario, Neptune leaves first while Uranus remains behind. As an exterior Neptune slowly migrates outward, it picks up both Uranus and Saturn in spin-orbit resonances (Ward and Hamilton 2004; Hamilton and Ward 2004). Only a distant Neptune has a nodal frequency slow enough to resonate with Uranus' axial precession.This scenario, with diverging orbits, results in resonance capture. As Neptune migrates outward its nodal precession slows. While in resonance, Uranus and Saturn each tilt a bit further, slowing their axial precession rates to continually match Neptune's nodal precession rate. Tilting Uranus to high obliquities takes a few 100 Myrs. This timescale may be too long to hold Uranus captive between Jupiter and Saturn, and we are investigating how to reduce it. We also find that resonance capture is rare if Uranus' initial obliquity is greater than about 10°, as the probability of capture decreases as the planet's initial obliquity increases. We will refine this estimate by quantifying capture statistics, and running accretion simulations to test the likelihood of a low early obliquity. Our preliminary findings show that most assumptions about

  8. Evolution of stellar collision products in open clusters. II. A grid of low-mass collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebbeek, E.; Pols, O. R.

    2008-09-01

    In a companion paper we studied the detailed evolution of stellar collision products that occurred in an N-body simulation of the old open cluster M 67 and compared our detailed models to simple prescriptions. In this paper we extend this work by studying the evolution of the collision products in open clusters as a function of mass and age of the progenitor stars. We calculated a grid of head-on collisions covering the section of parameter space relevant for collisions in open clusters. We create detailed models of the merger remnants using an entropy-sorting algorithm and follow their subsequent evolution during the initial contraction phase, through the main sequence and up to the giant branch with our detailed stellar evolution code. We compare the location of our models in a colour-magnitude diagram to the observed blue straggler population of the old open clusters M 67 and NGC 188 and find that they cover the observed blue straggler region of both clusters. For M 67, collisions need to have taken place recently. Differences between the evolution tracks of the collision products and normal main sequence stars can be understood quantitatively using a simple analytic model. We present an analytic recipe that can be used in an N-body code to transform a precomputed evolution track for a normal star into an evolution track for a collision product. Tables 4 and 5 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Modeling of collision and coalescence of droplets during microgravity processing of Zn-Bi immiscible alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. H.; Rogers, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    A population balance model is presented for the coarsening of the dispersed phase of liquid-liquid two-phase mixtures in microgravity due to gravity sedimentation and Marangoni migration, which lead to the collision and coalescence of droplets. The model is used to predict the evolution of the size distribution of the dispersed phase in a liquid-phase miscibility gap system, Zn-Bi, which has been used in a number of experimental microgravity processing studies in which significant phase segregation has been observed. The analysis shows that increasing the temperature gradient, gravity level, volume fraction of the dispersed phase, initial average drop radius, initial standard deviation of droplet radii, or the temperature coefficient of the interfacial tension leads to an increase in the rate of droplet growth due to collision and coalescence. Comparison of the distribution evolutions for unimodal and bimodal initial distributions shows that the latter yield significantly more rapid droplet growth. Finally, it is shown that droplet growth can be dramatically reduced with antiparallel orientation of the gravity vector and the temperature gradient, provided that the relative magnitude of these two vectors is properly chosen.

  10. Fluid Dynamics of Bubbly Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Y. H.; Koch, D. L.; Zenit, R.; Sangani, A.; Kushch, V. I.; Spelt, P. D. M.; Hoffman, M.; Nahra, H.; Fritz, C.; Dolesh, R.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to study the average flow properties of inertially dominated bubbly liquids which may be described by a novel analysis. Bubbles with high Reynolds number and low Weber number may produce a fluid velocity disturbance that can be approximated by a potential flow. We studied the behavior of suspensions of bubbles of about 1.5 mm diameter in vertical and inclined channels. The suspension was produced using a bank of 900 glass capillaries with inner diameter of about 100 microns in a quasi-steady fashion. In addition, salt was added to the suspension to prevent bubble-bubble coalescence. As a result, a nearly monodisperse suspension of bubble was produced. By increasing the inclination angle, we were able to explore an increasing amount of shear to buoyancy motion. A pipe flow experiment with the liquid being recirculated is under construction. This will provide an even larger range of shear to buoyancy motion. We are planning a microgravity experiment in which a bubble suspension is subjected to shearing in a couette cell in the absence of a buoyancy-driven relative motion of the two phases. By employing a single-wire, hot film anemometer, we were able to obtain the liquid velocity fluctuations. The shear stress at the wall was measured using a hot film probe flush mounted on the wall. The gas volume fraction, bubble velocity, and bubble velocity fluctuations were measured using a homemade, dual impedance probe. In addition, we also employed a high-speed camera to obtain the bubble size distribution and bubble shape in a dilute suspension. A rapid decrease in bubble velocity for a dilute bubble suspension is attributed to the effects of bubble-wall collisions. The more gradual decrease of bubble velocity as gas volume fraction increases, due to subsequent hindering of bubble motion, is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of Spelt and Sangani for the effects of potential-flow bubble-bubble interactions on the mean velocity. The

  11. Development of a collision risk assessment tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcon Rodriguez, J.; Martinez Fadrique, F.; Klinkrad, H.

    The avoidance of near misses and catastrophic collisions is of particular interest to manned missions and to valuable assets at densely populated altitude regions. GMV has developed a software tool for ESOC, ESA's European Space Operations Centre, which forecasts close conjunctions of selected spacecraft with over 8,000 objects included in the USSPACECOM catalog. The Collision Risk Assessment Tool (CRASS) generates collision risk estimates and collision warnings based on collision probability for a time span on the order of one week. In the framework of this activity, several collision probability algorithms have been implemented and tested. Considerable effort has also been placed in the characterisation of orbit determination errors and covariance propagation. The direct comparison of orbits of several spacecraft against a large catalog is an extremely computation intensive task. As a consequence, pre-filtering and parallel computing techniques have been proposed and used in the past as a means to reduce the computing time. However, the "smart sieve" algorithm devised and implemented by GMV retains the reliability of a "direct" method while drastically reducing the computing time. Therefore, the "smart sieve" is far more reliable than traditional pre-filtering techniques with no need for parallel computing. Besides, the method presents no constraints or singularities for any terrestrial orbit, as it is not based on simplifying assumptions. In summary, the method's main characteristics are general applicability, high reliability, and high computing efficiency. As a result of the increased efficiency, the field of application of the tool can be extended to other challenging problems. For instance, all to all comparisons of objects within a large catalog, or comparisons of a single spacecraft against a complete catalog over long periods of time can be completed in a reasonable time.

  12. Early hydrodynamic evolution of a stellar collision

    SciTech Connect

    Kushnir, Doron; Katz, Boaz

    2014-04-20

    The early phase of the hydrodynamic evolution following the collision of two stars is analyzed. Two strong shocks propagate from the contact surface and move toward the center of each star at a velocity that is a small fraction of the velocity of the approaching stars. The shocked region near the contact surface has a planar symmetry and a uniform pressure. The density vanishes at the (Lagrangian) surface of contact, and the speed of sound diverges there. The temperature, however, reaches a finite value, since as the density vanishes, the finite pressure is radiation dominated. For carbon-oxygen white dwarf (CO WD) collisions, this temperature is too low for any appreciable nuclear burning shortly after the collision, which allows for a significant fraction of the mass to be highly compressed to the density required for efficient {sup 56}Ni production in the detonation wave that follows. This property is crucial for the viability of collisions of typical CO WD as progenitors of type Ia supernovae, since otherwise only massive (>0.9 M {sub ☉}) CO WDs would have led to such explosions (as required by all other progenitor models). The divergence of the speed of sound limits numerical studies of stellar collisions, as it makes convergence tests exceedingly expensive unless dedicated schemes are used. We provide a new one-dimensional Lagrangian numerical scheme to achieve this. A self-similar planar solution is derived for zero-impact parameter collisions between two identical stars, under some simplifying assumptions (including a power-law density profile), which is the planar version of previous piston problems that were studied in cylindrical and spherical symmetries.

  13. Affordable MMW aircraft collision avoidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almsted, Larry D.; Becker, Robert C.; Zelenka, Richard E.

    1997-06-01

    Collision avoidance is of concern to all aircraft, requiring the detection and identification of hazardous terrain or obstacles in sufficient time for clearance maneuvers. The collision avoidance requirement is even more demanding for helicopters, as their unique capabilities result in extensive operations at low-altitude, near to terrain and other hazardous obstacles. TO augment the pilot's visual collision avoidance abilities, some aircraft are equipped with 'enhanced-vision' systems or terrain collision warning systems. Enhanced-vision systems are typically very large and costly systems that are not very covert and are also difficult to install in a helicopter. The display is typically raw images from infrared or radar sensors, and can require a high degree of pilot interpretation and attention. Terrain collision warning system that rely on stored terrain maps are often of low resolution and accuracy and do not represent hazards to the aircraft placed after map sampling. Such hazards could include aircraft parked on runway, man- made towers or buildings and hills. In this paper, a low cost dual-function scanning pencil-beam, millimeter-wave radar forward sensor is used to determine whether an aircraft's flight path is clear of obstructions. Due to the limited space and weight budget in helicopters, the system is a dual function system that is substituted in place of the existing radar altimeter. The system combines a 35 GHz forward looking obstacle avoidance radar and a 4.3 GHz radar altimeter. The forward looking 35 GHz 3D radar's returns are used to construct a terrain and obstruction database surrounding an aircraft, which is presented to the pilot as a synthetic perspective display. The 35 GHz forward looking radar and the associated display was evaluated in a joint NASA Honeywell flight test program in 1996. The tests were conducted on a NASA/Army test helicopter. The test program clearly demonstrated the systems potential usefulness for collision avoidance.

  14. High energy density in multisoliton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatmand, Danial; Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.

    2015-09-01

    Solitons are very effective in transporting energy over great distances and collisions between them can produce high energy density spots of relevance to phase transformations, energy localization and defect formation among others. It is then important to study how energy density accumulation scales in multisoliton collisions. In this study, we demonstrate that the maximal energy density that can be achieved in collision of N slowly moving kinks and antikinks in the integrable sine-Gordon field, remarkably, is proportional to N2, while the total energy of the system is proportional to N . This maximal energy density can be achieved only if the difference between the number of colliding kinks and antikinks is minimal, i.e., is equal to 0 for even N and 1 for odd N and if the pattern involves an alternating array of kinks and antikinks. Interestingly, for odd (even) N the maximal energy density appears in the form of potential (kinetic) energy, while kinetic (potential) energy is equal to zero. The results of the present study rely on the analysis of the exact multisoliton solutions for N =1 ,2 , and 3 and on the numerical simulation results for N =4 ,5 ,6 , and 7. The effect of weak Hamiltonian and non-Hamiltonian perturbations on the maximal energy density in multikink collisions is also discussed as well as that of the collision relative phase. Based on these results one can speculate that the soliton collisions in the sine-Gordon field can, in principle, controllably produce very high energy density. This can have important consequences for many physical phenomena described by the Klein-Gordon equations.

  15. QCD tests in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Huth, John E.; Mangano, Michelangelo L.

    1993-02-01

    We review the status of QCD tests in high energy p-pbar collisions. Contents: i) Introduction ii) QCD in Hadronic Collisions iii) Jet Production iv) Heavy Flavour Production v) W and Z Production vi) Direct Photons.

  16. Elliptic flow from collision geometry and rescattering

    SciTech Connect

    Boeggild, H.; Hansen, Ole; Humanic, T. J.

    2009-04-15

    Calculations of elliptic flow based on two initial state models of Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV/n coupled with a hadronic rescattering calculation are presented. The two initial state models used are a thermal model and a partonic model. Results from these calculations are compared with experiments and it is found that both initial state models give satisfactory representations of elliptic flow measurements, provided that the rescattering is started early enough in the collision process. It is also found that the present hadronic model studies do not show the jet suppression observed experimentally.

  17. Intelligent Sensor Tasking for Space Collision Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Pertica, A J; Henderson, J R

    2010-04-01

    Orbital collisions pose a hazard to space operations. Using a high performance computer modeling and simulation environment for space situational awareness, we explore a new paradigm for improving satellite conjunction analysis by obtaining more precise orbital information only for those objects that pose a collision risk greater than a defined threshold to a specific set of satellites during a specified time interval. In particular, we assess the improvement in the quality of the conjunction analysis that can be achieved using a distributed network of ground-based telescopes.

  18. GEO Collision Avoidance using a Service Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, M.; Concha, M.

    2013-09-01

    Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is defined as the knowledge and characterization of all aspects of space. SSA is now a fundamental and critical component of space operations. The increased dependence on our space assets has in turn lead to a greater need for accurate, near real-time knowledge of all space activities. Key areas of SSA include improved tracking of small objects, determining the intent of maneuvering spacecraft, identifying all potential high risk conjunction events, and leveraging non-traditional sensors in support of the SSA mission. As the size of the space object population grows, the number of collision avoidance maneuvers grows. Moreover, as the SSA mission evolves to near real-time assessment and analysis, the need for new, more sophisticated collision avoidance methods are required. This paper demonstrates the utility of using a service vehicle to perform collision avoidance maneuver for GEO satellites. We present the planning and execution details required to successfully execute a maneuver; given the traditional conjunction analysis timelines. Various operational constraints and scenarios are considered as part of the demonstration. Development of the collision avoidance strategy is created using SpaceNav's collision risk management tool suite. This study aims to determine the agility required of any proposed servicing capability to provide collision avoidance within traditional conjunction analysis and collision avoidance operations timelines. Key trades and analysis items are given to be: 1. How do we fuse the spacecraft state data with the tracking data collected from the proximity sensor that resides on the servicing spacecraft? 2. How do we deal with the possibility that the collision threat for the event may change as the time to close approach is reduced? 3. Perform trade space of maneuver/thrust time versus achievable change in the spacecraft's orbit. 4. Perform trade space of proximity of service vehicle to spacecraft versus time

  19. Isotope effect in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Barragan, P.; Errea, L. F.; Mendez, L.; Rabadan, I.

    2010-09-15

    We explain the origin of the unusual large isotopic dependence found in charge-transfer cross sections for H(D,T){sup +}+Be collisions. We show that this large effect appears in a semiclassical treatment as a consequence of the mass dependence of the charge-transfer transition probabilities, which is due to the variation of the radial velocity in the region where the nonadiabatic transitions take place. The possibility of finding such a large isotope effect in other collision systems is discussed.

  20. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosek, Thomas; Rourke, Kenneth

    Collision avoidance must be ensured during Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) operations near the space station. The design of the Collision Avoidance Maneuver (CAM) will involve analysis of CTV failure modes during rendezvous and proximity operations as well as analysis of possible problems external to the CTV, but that would require CTV to execute a CAM. In considering the requirements and design of the CAM for the CTV, the CAM design for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) is a useful reference point from which some lessons can be learned and many CTV design options can be set forth.

  1. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosek, Thomas; Rourke, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    Collision avoidance must be ensured during Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) operations near the space station. The design of the Collision Avoidance Maneuver (CAM) will involve analysis of CTV failure modes during rendezvous and proximity operations as well as analysis of possible problems external to the CTV, but that would require CTV to execute a CAM. In considering the requirements and design of the CAM for the CTV, the CAM design for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) is a useful reference point from which some lessons can be learned and many CTV design options can be set forth.

  2. Source dimensions in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1994-05-16

    Recent experiments on pion correlations, interpreted as interferometric measurements of the collision zone, are compared with models that distinguish a prehadronic phase and a hadronic phase. The models include prehadronic longitudinal expansion, conversion to hadrons in local kinetic equilibrium, and rescattering of the produced hadrons. The longitudinal radius measured in collisions of 200 GeV/u sulfur nuclei on a heavy target require the existence of a prehadronic phase which converts to the hadronic phase at densities around 0.8 GeV/fm{sup 3}. The transverse radii cannot be reproduced without introducing more complex dynamics into the transverse expansion.

  3. Automobile Collisions, Kinematics and Related Injury Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    It has been determined clinically that fatalities and injury severity resulting from automobile collisions have decreased during the last five years for low impact speeds. This reduction is a direct result of the application of biomechanics and occupant kinematics, as well as changes in automobile design. The paper defines terminology used in the field of mechanics and develops examples and illustrations of the physical concepts of acceleration, force strength, magnitude duration, rate of onset and others, as they apply to collision phenomena and injury. The mechanism of injury pattern reduction through the use of restraint systems is illustrated. PMID:5059661

  4. Collective flow in Au + Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, H.G.; EOS Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    Based on a preliminary sample of Au + Au collisions in the EOS time projection chamber at the Bevalac, we study sideward flow as a function of bombarding energy between 0.25A GeV and 1.2A GeV. We focus on the increase in in-plane transverse momentum per nucleon with fragment mass. We also find event shapes to be close to spherical in the most central collisions, independent of bombarding energy and fragment mass up to {sup 4}He.

  5. Fully dynamical simulation of central nuclear collisions.

    PubMed

    van der Schee, Wilke; Romatschke, Paul; Pratt, Scott

    2013-11-27

    We present a fully dynamical simulation of central nuclear collisions around midrapidity at LHC energies. Unlike previous treatments, we simulate all phases of the collision, including the equilibration of the system. For the simulation, we use numerical relativity solutions to anti-de Sitter space/conformal field theory for the preequilibrium stage, viscous hydrodynamics for the plasma equilibrium stage, and kinetic theory for the low-density hadronic stage. Our preequilibrium stage provides initial conditions for hydrodynamics, resulting in sizable radial flow. The resulting light particle spectra reproduce the measurements from the ALICE experiment at all transverse momenta. PMID:24329444

  6. Electrokinetics over liquid/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Todd M.

    2011-11-01

    Since liquid-liquid interfaces flow in response to an applied stress, one might expect electrokinetic flows at liquid-liquid interfaces to be significantly higher than over liquid-solid interfaces. The earliest predictions for the electrophoretic mobility of charged mercury drops - distinct approaches by Frumkin and Levich (1946), and Booth (1951) - differed by O (a /λD) , where a is the radius of the drop and λD is the Debye screening length. Seeking to reconcile this rather striking discrepancy, Levine (1973) showed double-layer polarization to be the key ingredient. Without a physical mechanism by which electrokinetic effects are enhanced, however, it is difficult to know how general the enhancement is - whether it holds only for liquid metal surfaces, or more generally, for all liquid/liquid surfaces. By considering a series of systems in which a planar metal strip is coated with either a liquid metal or liquid dielectric, we show that the central physical mechanism behind the enhancement predicted by Frumkin and Levich (1946) is the presence of an unmatched electrical stress upon the electrolyte-liquid interface, which establishes a Marangoni stress on the droplet surface and drives it into motion. The source of the unbalanced electrokinetic stress on a liquid metal surface is clear - metals represent equipotential surfaces, so no field exists to drive an equal and opposite force on the surface charge. This might suggest that liquid metals represent a unique system, since dielectric liquids can support finite electric fields, which might be expected to exert an electrical stress on the surface charge that balances the electric stress. We demonstrate, however, that electrical and osmotic stresses on relaxed double-layers internal to dielectric liquids precisely cancel, so that internal electrokinetic stresses generally vanish in closed, ideally polarizable liquids. The enhancement for liquid mercury drops can thus be expected quite generally over clean

  7. Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 147 Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo) (Web, free access)   IUPAC Ionic Liquids Database, ILThermo, is a free web research tool that allows users worldwide to access an up-to-date data collection from the publications on experimental investigations of thermodynamic, and transport properties of ionic liquids as well as binary and ternary mixtures containing ionic liquids.

  8. 14 CFR 417.231 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 417.231..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.231 Collision avoidance analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a collision avoidance analysis...

  9. 14 CFR 121.356 - Collision avoidance system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collision avoidance system. 121.356 Section... Collision avoidance system. Effective January 1, 2005, any airplane you operate under this part must be equipped and operated according to the following table: Collision Avoidance Systems If you operate...

  10. 14 CFR 125.224 - Collision avoidance system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collision avoidance system. 125.224 Section... Requirements § 125.224 Collision avoidance system. Effective January 1, 2005, any airplane you operate under this part 125 must be equipped and operated according to the following table: Collision...

  11. Meson multiplicity versus energy in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, T. W.; Freier, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic study of meson multiplicity as a function of energy at energies up to 100 GeV/u in nucleus-nucleus collisions has been made, using cosmic-ray data in nuclear emulsion. The data are consistent with simple nucleon-nucleon superposition models. Multiplicity per interacting nucleon in AA collisions does not appear to differ significantly from pp collisions.

  12. Comments about the electromagnetic field in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLerran, L.; Skokov, V.

    2014-09-01

    In this article we discuss the properties of electromagnetic fields in heavy-ion collisions and consequences for observables. We address quantitatively the issue of the magnetic field lifetime in a collision including the electric and chiral magnetic conductivities. We show that for reasonable parameters, the magnetic field created by spectators in a collision is not modified by the presence of matter.

  13. Analysing Collisions Using Minkowski Diagrams in Momentum Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokor, Nandor

    2011-01-01

    Momentum space and Minkowski diagrams are powerful tools for interpreting and analysing relativistic collisions in one or two spatial dimensions. All relevant quantities that characterize a collision, including the mass, velocity, momentum and energy of the interacting particles, both before and after collision, can be directly seen from a single…

  14. Strangeness production in AA and pp collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Paolo; Satz, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Boost-invariant hadron production in high-energy collisions occurs in causally disconnected regions of finite space-time size. As a result, globally conserved quantum numbers (charge, strangeness, baryon number) are conserved locally in spatially restricted correlation clusters. Their size is determined by two time scales: the equilibration time specifying the formation of a quark-gluon plasma, and the hadronization time, specifying the onset of confinement. The expected values for these scales provide the theoretical basis for the suppression observed for strangeness production in elementary interactions ( pp , e^+e^- below LHC energies. In contrast, the space-time superposition of individual collisions in high-energy heavy-ion interactions leads to higher energy densities, resulting in much later hadronization and hence much larger hadronization volumes. This largely removes the causality constraints and results in an ideal hadronic resonance gas in full chemical equilibrium. In the present paper, we determine the collision energies needed for that; we also estimate when pp collisions reach comparable hadronization volumes and thus determine when strangeness suppression should disappear there as well.

  15. Chemical activation through super energy transfer collisions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan M; Nikow, Matthew; Ma, Jianqiang; Wilhelm, Michael J; Han, Yong-Chang; Sharma, Amit R; Bowman, Joel M; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2014-02-01

    Can a molecule be efficiently activated with a large amount of energy in a single collision with a fast atom? If so, this type of collision will greatly affect molecular reactivity and equilibrium in systems where abundant hot atoms exist. Conventional expectation of molecular energy transfer (ET) is that the probability decreases exponentially with the amount of energy transferred, hence the probability of what we label "super energy transfer" is negligible. We show, however, that in collisions between an atom and a molecule for which chemical reactions may occur, such as those between a translationally hot H atom and an ambient acetylene (HCCH) or sulfur dioxide, ET of chemically significant amounts of energy commences with surprisingly high efficiency through chemical complex formation. Time-resolved infrared emission observations are supported by quasi-classical trajectory calculations on a global ab initio potential energy surface. Results show that ∼10% of collisions between H atoms moving with ∼60 kcal/mol energy and HCCH result in transfer of up to 70% of this energy to activate internal degrees of freedom.

  16. Statistical Analysis For Nucleus/Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes use of several statistical techniques to charactertize angular distributions of secondary particles emitted in collisions of atomic nuclei in energy range of 24 to 61 GeV per nucleon. Purpose of statistical analysis to determine correlations between intensities of emitted particles and angles comfirming existence of quark/gluon plasma.

  17. QCD in hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.

    1997-03-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics provides a good description of many aspects of high energy hadron-hadron collisions, and this will be described, along with some aspects that are not yet understood in QCD. Topics include high E{sub T} jet production, direct photon, W, Z and heavy flavor production, rapidity gaps and hard diffraction.

  18. Super high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, W.M.

    1987-12-01

    Basic theoretical ideas on a phase transition to a plasma of free quarks and gluons in heavy ion collisions are outlined. First results from experiments with oxygen beams at 14.5 GeV/c/N (BNL), 60 and 200 GeV/c/N (CERN) are discussed. 30 refs., 9 figs.

  19. 46 CFR 179.310 - Collision bulkheads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Collision bulkheads. 179.310 Section 179.310 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) SUBDIVISION, DAMAGE STABILITY, AND WATERTIGHT INTEGRITY Watertight Integrity Requirements § 179.310...

  20. 46 CFR 179.310 - Collision bulkheads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Collision bulkheads. 179.310 Section 179.310 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) SUBDIVISION, DAMAGE STABILITY, AND WATERTIGHT INTEGRITY Watertight Integrity Requirements § 179.310...

  1. Relativistic Hydrodynamics for Heavy-Ion Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is essential to our current understanding of nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultrarelativistic energies (current experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, forthcoming experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider). This is an introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics for graduate students. It includes a detailed…

  2. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  3. Computations of drop collision and coalescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Juric, Damir; Nobari, Mohammed H. R.; Nas, Selman

    1994-01-01

    Computations of drops collision and coalescence are presented. The computations are made possible by a recently developed finite difference/front tracking technique that allows direct solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for a multi-fluid system with complex, unsteady internal boundaries. This method has been used to examine the boundaries between the various collision modes for drops of equal size and two examples, one of a 'reflective' collision and another of a 'grazing' collision is shown. From drops of unequal size, coalescence can result in considerable mixing between the fluid from the small and the large drop. This problem is discussed and one example showed. In many cases it is necessary to account also for heat transfer along with the fluid mechanics. We show two preliminary results where we are using extensions of the method to simulate such a problem. One example shows pattern formation among many drops moving due to thermal migration, the other shows unstable evolution of a solidification front.

  4. (Atomic collisions in solid and plasma physics)

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.T.

    1989-09-05

    The author visited the Max-Planck-Institut for Plasma Physics, Garching, FRG, to continue collaborative research activities in the area of sputtering and plasma-wall interactions. He then attended the Thirteenth International Conference on Atomic Collisions in Solids, where he presented a paper on recent research at ORNL. A few remarks about cold fusion'' are appended.

  5. Primordial Particles; Collisions of Inelastic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi, George

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional matter is not defined by Euclidian or Cartesian geometries. Newton's and Einstein's laws are related to the motions of elastic masses. The study of collisions of inelastic particles opens up new vistas in physics. The present article reveals how such particles create clusters composed of various numbers of particles. The Probability of each formation, duplets, triplets, etc. can be calculated. The particles are held together by a binding force, and depending upon the angles of collisions they may also rotate around their center of geometry. Because of these unique properties such inelastic particles are referred to as primordial particles, Pp. When a given density of Pp per cubic space is given, then random collisions create a field. The calculation of the properties of such primordial field is very complex and beyond the present study. However, the angles of collisions are infinite in principle, but the probabilities of various cluster sizes are quantum dependent. Consequently, field calculations will require new complex mathematical methods to be discovered yet.

  6. Coulomb Collision Algorithms for Particle Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Bruce

    2006-04-01

    This paper surveys some of the particle code algorithms used to model Coulomb collisions in fully ionized plasmas, e.g., pair-wise operators such as the Takizuka-Abe^1 scheme and extensions^2, Langevin equation collision operators^3,4, and partially linearized gyrokinetic collisions operators for strongly magnetized plasmas.^5,6,7 Some recent experience is reported.^8 Issues such as physics completeness, accuracy, and comparative algorithm performance are highlighted. 1. T. Takizuka and H. Abe, J. Comput. Phys. 25, 205 (1977). 2. K. Nanbu, Phys. Rev. E 55, 4642 (1997). 3. M.E. Jones, et al., J. Comp. Phys. 123, 169 (1996). 4. W.M. Manheimer, M. Lampe, and G. Joyce, et al., J. Comp. Phys. 138, 565 (1997). 5. X.Q. Xu and M.N. Rosenbluth, Phys. Fluids B 3, 627 (1991). 6. A.M. Dimits and B.I. Cohen, Phys. Rev. E 49, 709 (1994). 7. Z. Lin, W. M. Tang, and W. W. Lee, Phys.Plasmas 2, 2975 (August 1995). 8. B.I. Cohen, et al., ``Effects of ion-ion collisions and inhomogeneity in two-dimensional kinetic ion simulations of stimulated Brillouin backscattering,'' accepted for publication in Phys. Plasmas (2006).

  7. A collision detection algorithm for telerobotic arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Doan Minh; Bartholomew, Maureen Obrien

    1991-01-01

    The telerobotic manipulator's collision detection algorithm is described. Its applied structural model of the world environment and template representation of objects is evaluated. Functional issues that are required for the manipulator to operate in a more complex and realistic environment are discussed.

  8. High energy nuclear collisions: Theory overview

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, R.J.

    2010-08-01

    We review some basic concepts of relativistic heavy-ion physics and discuss our understanding of some key results from the experimental program at the relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC). We focus in particular on the early time dynamics of nuclear collisions, some result from lattice QCD, hard probes and photons.

  9. Collision detection for spacecraft proximity operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Robin M.; Bergmann, Edward V.; Walker, Bruce K.

    1991-04-01

    A new collision detection algorithm has been developed for use when two spacecraft are operating in the same vicinity. The two spacecraft are modeled as unions of convex polyhedra, where the resulting polyhedron many be either convex or nonconvex. The relative motion of the two spacecraft is assumed to be such that one vehicle is moving with constant linear and angular velocity with respect to the other. Contacts between the vertices, faces, and edges of the polyhedra representing the two spacecraft are shown to occur when the value of one or more of a set of functions is zero. The collision detection algorithm is then formulated as a search for the zeros (roots) of these functions. Special properties of the functions for the assumed relative trajectory are exploited to expedite the zero search. The new algorithm is the first algorithm that can solve the collision detection problem exactly for relative motion with constant angular velocity. This is a significant improvement over models of rotational motion used in previous collision detection algorithms.

  10. Universal reaction rates for ultracold molecular collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julienne, Paul; Idziaszek, Zbigniew

    2010-03-01

    We offer a simple yet general model of reactive collisions using a quantum defect framework based on the separation of the collision dynamics into long-range and a short-range parts [1]. Two dimensionless quantum defect parameters s and y are used to characterize the S-matrix for a given entrance channel; s represents a phase parameter and y the probability of short-range reaction. The simple analytic expressions we obtain give universal values for s-wave and p-wave collision rates for a van der Waals potential when y approaches unity. In this limit, reaction rates are governed entirely by the threshold laws governing the quantum transmission of the long range potential and depend only on the van der Waals coefficient. The universal rate constants explain the magnitude of the observed rate constants for reactive collisions of fermionic KRb + KRb or K + KRb [2]. In contrast, reaction rates will be non-universal and depend strongly on the phase parameter s if the short range reaction probability is low, y << 1. [1] Z. Idziaszek and P. S. Julienne, arXiv:0912.0370. [2] S. Ospelkaus, K.-K. Ni, D. Wang, M. H. G. de Miranda, B. Neyenhuis, G. Qu'em'ener, P. S. Julienne, J. L. Bohn, D. S. Jin, and J. Ye, arXiv:0912.3854.

  11. Collision of Bose Condensate Dark Matter structures

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, F. S.

    2008-12-04

    The status of the scalar field or Bose condensate dark matter model is presented. Results about the solitonic behavior in collision of structures is presented as a possible explanation to the recent-possibly-solitonic behavior in the bullet cluster merger. Some estimates about the possibility to simulate the bullet cluster under the Bose Condensate dark matter model are indicated.

  12. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  13. Sudden Hadronization in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rafelski, Johann; Letessier, Jean

    2000-11-27

    We formulate and study a mechanical instability criterion for sudden hadronization of dense matter fireballs formed in 158A GeV Pb-Pb collisions. Considering properties of quark-gluon matter and hadron gas we obtain the phase boundary between these two phases and demonstrate that the required deep quark-gluon-plasma supercooling prior to sudden hadronization has occurred.

  14. Heavy quark production in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McGaughey, P.L.; Quack, E.; Ruuskanen, P.V. |

    1995-07-01

    A systematic study of the inclusive single heavy quark and heavy-quark pair production cross sections in pp collisions is presented for RHIC and LHC energies. We compare with existing data when possible. The dependence of the rates on the renormalization and factorization scales is discussed. Predictions of the cross sections are given for two different sets of parton distribution functions.

  15. New Directions in Play: Consensus or Collision?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this article are to explore contemporary challenges to developing play in early childhood settings, and to identify areas of consensus and collision in policy and practice. Contemporary research highlights the effectiveness of mixed pedagogical approaches, including child- and adult-initiated play. Whilst early childhood specialists…

  16. Birthday Paradox for Multi-Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Tonien, Dongvu; Kurosawa, Kaoru; Toyota, Koji

    In this paper, we study multi-collision probability. For a hash function H:D→R with |R|=n, it has been believed that we can find an s-collision by hashing Q=n(s-1)/s times. We first show that this probability is at most 1/s! for any s, which is very small for large s. (for example, s=n(s-1)/s) Thus the above folklore is wrong for large s. We next show that if s is small, so that we can assume Q-s≈Q, then this probability is at least 1/s!-1/2(s!)2, which is very high for small s (for example, s is a constant). Thus the above folklore is true for small s. Moreover, we show that by hashing (s!)1/s×Q+s-1(≤n) times, an s-collision is found with probability approximately 0.5 for any n and s such that (s!/n)1/s≈0. Note that if s=2, it coincides with the usual birthday paradox. Hence it is a generalization of the birthday paradox to multi-collisions.

  17. 46 CFR 171.085 - Collision bulkhead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... paragraphs (h) through (j) of this section apply to each vessel that is less than 100 gross tons. (b) The... bulkhead must— (1) Be located above the bulkhead deck; and (2) Have a watertight closure. (h) Each... the bulkhead deck; and (2) There are at least 36 inches (92 centimeters) of intact collision...

  18. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosek, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    Cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) operations near Space Station Freedom will require positive collision avoidance maneuver (CAM) capability to preclude any change of collision, even in the event of CTV failures. The requirements for CAM are discussed, and the CAM design approach and design of the Orbiting Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are reviewed; this design met requirements for OMV operation near the Space Station, provided a redundant collision avoidance maneuver capability. Significant portions of the OMV CAM design should be applicable to CTV. The key features of the OMV design are summarized and related to the CTV mission design to that of OMV's. CAM is a defined sequence of events executed by the CTV to place the vehicle in a safe position relative to a target such as the Space Station. CAM can be performed through software commands to the propulsion system, or through commands pre-stored in hardware. Various techniques for triggering CAM are considered, and the risks associated with CAM enable and execution in phases are considered. OMV CAM design features both hardware and software CAM capability, with analyses conducted to assess the ability to meet the collision-free requirement during all phases of the mission.

  19. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosek, Thomas P.

    Cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) operations near Space Station Freedom will require positive collision avoidance maneuver (CAM) capability to preclude any change of collision, even in the event of CTV failures. The requirements for CAM are discussed, and the CAM design approach and design of the Orbiting Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are reviewed; this design met requirements for OMV operation near the Space Station, provided a redundant collision avoidance maneuver capability. Significant portions of the OMV CAM design should be applicable to CTV. The key features of the OMV design are summarized and related to the CTV mission design to that of OMV's. CAM is a defined sequence of events executed by the CTV to place the vehicle in a safe position relative to a target such as the Space Station. CAM can be performed through software commands to the propulsion system, or through commands pre-stored in hardware. Various techniques for triggering CAM are considered, and the risks associated with CAM enable and execution in phases are considered. OMV CAM design features both hardware and software CAM capability, with analyses conducted to assess the ability to meet the collision-free requirement during all phases of the mission.

  20. Electron-atom /molecule/ collision processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1980-01-01

    Electron-atom (molecule) collision processes at low and intermediate energies, from near threshold to a few hundred electron volts, are discussed. Attention is given to experimental techniques and procedures, electron impact cross sections, impact excitation and electron-atom scattering in laser fields. Specific examples are presented that illustrate various experimental techniques and interpretations of observations.

  1. Collision-based mechanics of bipedal hopping.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, Anne K; Lee, David V; McGowan, Craig P

    2013-08-23

    The muscle work required to sustain steady-speed locomotion depends largely upon the mechanical energy needed to redirect the centre of mass and the degree to which this energy can be stored and returned elastically. Previous studies have found that large bipedal hoppers can elastically store and return a large fraction of the energy required to hop, whereas small bipedal hoppers can only elastically store and return a relatively small fraction. Here, we consider the extent to which large and small bipedal hoppers (tammar wallabies, approx. 7 kg, and desert kangaroo rats, approx. 0.1 kg) reduce the mechanical energy needed to redirect the centre of mass by reducing collisions. We hypothesize that kangaroo rats will reduce collisions to a greater extent than wallabies since kangaroo rats cannot elastically store and return as high a fraction of the mechanical energy of hopping as wallabies. We find that kangaroo rats use a significantly smaller collision angle than wallabies by employing ground reaction force vectors that are more vertical and center of mass velocity vectors that are more horizontal and thereby reduce their mechanical cost of transport. A collision-based approach paired with tendon morphometry may reveal this effect more generally among bipedal runners and quadrupedal trotters.

  2. Behavioral training to improve collision detection

    PubMed Central

    DeLoss, Denton J.; Bian, Zheng; Watanabe, Takeo; Andersen, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Young drivers are a high-risk group for vehicle crashes due to inexperience in detecting an impending collision and are one group that may benefit from perceptual learning (PL) training. The present study assessed whether PL could be used to improve performance in collision detection. Ten college-aged subjects participated in the first experiment, which consisted of seven 1-hr sessions conducted on separate days. Thresholds at three observer/object speeds were measured prior to training using a two-alternative forced choice procedure during which they indicated whether an approaching object would result in a collision or noncollision event. Participants were then trained near threshold at one of these speeds for 5 days. After training, participants showed a significant reduction in the time needed to detect a collision at the trained speed. This improvement was also found to transfer to the higher observer speed condition. A second experiment was conducted to determine whether this improvement was due to training near threshold or whether this improvement was merely due to practice with the task. Training with stimuli well above threshold showed no significant improvement in performance, indicating that the improvement seen in the first experiment was not solely due to task practice. PMID:26230917

  3. Dynamical resonant electron capture in atom surface collisions: H- formation in H-Al(111) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. G.; Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1992-05-01

    The formation of H- ion by grazing-angle collisions of hydrogen on an Al(111) surface is investigated with the newly developed coupled angular mode method. The capture process involves a dynamical resonant process induced by the collision velocity. All the resonance properties of the H- level in front of an Al(111) surface are determined: position, width, and angular distribution of ejected electrons. The results are shown to account for the recent observations on H- formation by Wyputta, Zimny, and Winter.

  4. Modeling collisions in circumstellar debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvold, Erika

    2015-10-01

    Observations of resolved debris disks show a spectacular variety of features and asymmetries, including inner cavities and gaps, inclined secondary disks or warps, and eccentric, sharp-edged rings. Embedded exoplanets could create many of these features via gravitational perturbations, which sculpt the disk directly and by generating planetesimal collisions. In this thesis, I present the Superparticle Model/Algorithm for Collisions in Kuiper belts and debris disks (SMACK), a new method for simultaneously modeling, in 3-D, the collisional and dynamical evolution of planetesimals in a debris disk with planets. SMACK can simulate azimuthal asymmetries and how these asymmetries evolve over time. I show that SMACK is stable to numerical viscosity and numerical heating over 107 yr, and that it can reproduce analytic models of disk evolution. As an example of the algorithm's capabilities, I use SMACK to model the evolution of a debris ring containing a planet on an eccentric orbit and demonstrate that differential precession creates a spiral structure as the ring evolves, but collisions subsequently break up the spiral, leaving a narrower eccentric ring. To demonstrate SMACK's utility in studying debris disk physics, I apply SMACK to simulate a planet on a circular orbit near a ring of planetesimals that are experiencing destructive collisions. Previous simulations of a planet opening a gap in a collisionless debris disk have found that the width of the gap scales as the planet mass to the 2/7th power (alpha = 2/7). I find that gap sizes in a collisional disk still obey a power law scaling with planet mass, but that the index alpha of the power law depends on the age of the system t relative to the collisional timescale t coll of the disk by alpha = 0.32(t/ tcoll)-0.04, with inferred planet masses up to five times smaller than those predicted by the classical gap law. The increased gap sizes likely stem from the interaction between collisions and the mean motion

  5. Collision effects on high-n ballooning modes with a full Lorentz collision operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianxun; Chen, Shaoyong; Tang, Changjian

    2012-02-01

    The dispersion relation for high-n ballooning modes is obtained from the customary drift gyro-kinetic equation employing the energy-dependent Lorenz collision operator. There are significant differences between our results and those with the Krook collision operator. The present results show that collision seems to have much weaker stabilizing effects, if any, on the high-n ballooning modes than those with the Krook collision operator when the collisionality, υ*e, is smaller than a critical value. However, contrary to the phenomenon, the collision shows strong stabilizing effects on the ballooning mode once the collisionality exceeds a critical value. These differences are supposed to arise from boundary layer behaviour which refers to the electron perturbation at the boundary between trapped and passing electrons in velocity space, but the physical process cannot be described by non-conserving Krook collision operators. This destabilizing mechanism of boundary layer behaviour is discussed in this paper. In addition, the critical value shows a considerably strong dependence on ηe (ηe ≡ d ln Te/d ln Ne).

  6. On the quantum Landau collision operator and electron collisions in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daligault, Jérôme

    2016-03-01

    The quantum Landau collision operator, which extends the widely used Landau/Fokker-Planck collision operator to include quantum statistical effects, is discussed. The quantum extension can serve as a reference model for including electron collisions in non-equilibrium dense plasmas, in which the quantum nature of electrons cannot be neglected. In this paper, the properties of the Landau collision operator that have been useful in traditional plasma kinetic theory and plasma transport theory are extended to the quantum case. We outline basic properties in connection with the conservation laws, the H-theorem, and the global and local equilibrium distributions. We discuss the Fokker-Planck form of the operator in terms of three potentials that extend the usual two Rosenbluth potentials. We establish practical closed-form expressions for these potentials under local thermal equilibrium conditions in terms of Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein integrals. We study the properties of linearized quantum Landau operator, and extend two popular approximations used in plasma physics to include collisions in kinetic simulations. We apply the quantum Landau operator to the classic test-particle problem to illustrate the physical effects embodied in the quantum extension. We present useful closed-form expressions for the electron-ion momentum and energy transfer rates. Throughout the paper, similarities and differences between the quantum and classical Landau collision operators are emphasized.

  7. Atom trap loss, elastic collisions, and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, James

    2012-10-01

    The study of collisions and scattering has been one of the most productive approaches for modern physics, illuminating the fundamental structure of crystals, surfaces, atoms, and sub-atomic particles. In the field of cold atoms, this is no less true: studies of cold atom collisions were essential to the production of quantum degenerate matter, the formation of cold molecules, and so on. Over the past few years it has been my delight to investigate elastic collisions between cold atoms trapped in either a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or a magnetic trap with hot, background gas in the vacuum environment through the measurement of the loss of atoms from the trap. Motivated by the goal of creating cold atom-based technology, we are deciphering what the trapped atoms are communicating about their environment through the observed loss rate. These measurements have the advantages of being straightforward to implement and they provide information about the underlying, fundamental inter-atomic processes. In this talk I will present some of our recent work, including the observation of the trap depth dependence on loss rate for argon-rubidium collisions. The data follow the computed loss rate curve based on the long-range Van der Waals interaction between the two species. The implications of these findings are exciting: trap depths can be determined from the trap loss measurement under controlled background density conditions; observation of trap loss rate in comparison to models for elastic, inelastic, and chemical processes can lead to improved understanding and characterization of these fundamental interactions; finally the marriage of cold atoms with collision modeling offers the promise of creating a novel pressure sensor and pressure standard for the high and ultra-high vacuum regime.

  8. Total Probability of Collision as a Metric for Finite Conjunction Assessment and Collision Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigm, R.; Johnson, L.

    The Probability of Collision (Pc) has become a universal metric and statement of on-orbit collision risk. Although several flavors of the computation exist and are well-documented in the literature, the basic calculation requires the same input: estimates for the position, position uncertainty, and sizes of the two objects involved. The Pc is used operationally to make decisions on whether a given conjunction poses significant collision risk to the primary object (or space asset of concern). It is also used to determine necessity and degree of mitigative action (typically in the form of an orbital maneuver) to be performed. The predicted post-maneuver Pc also informs the maneuver planning process into regarding the timing, direction, and magnitude of the maneuver needed to mitigate the collision risk. Although the data sources, techniques, decision calculus, and workflows vary for different agencies and organizations, they all have a common thread. The standard conjunction assessment and collision risk concept of operations (CONOPS) predicts conjunctions, assesses the collision risk (typically, via the Pc), and plans and executes avoidance activities for conjunctions as a discrete events. As the space debris environment continues to increase and improvements are made to remote sensing capabilities and sensitivities to detect, track, and predict smaller debris objects, the number of conjunctions will in turn continue to increase. The expected order-of-magnitude increase in the number of predicted conjunctions will challenge the paradigm of treating each conjunction as a discrete event. The challenge will not be limited to workload issues, such as manpower and computing performance, but also the ability for satellite owner/operators to successfully execute their mission while also managing on-orbit collision risk. Executing a propulsive maneuver occasionally can easily be absorbed into the mission planning and operations tempo; whereas, continuously planning evasive

  9. Semiconductor nanorod liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang-shi; Walda, Joost; Manna, Liberato; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2002-01-28

    Rodlike molecules form liquid crystalline phases with orientational order and positional disorder. The great majority of materials in which liquid crystalline phases have been observed are comprised of organic molecules or polymers, even though there has been continuing and growing interest in inorganic liquid crystals. Recent advances in the control of the sizes and shapes of inorganic nanocrystals allow for the formation of a broad class of new inorganic liquid crystals. Here we show the formation of liquid crystalline phases of CdSe semiconductor nanorods. These new liquid crystalline phases may have great importance for both application and fundamental study.

  10. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Grasso, A.P.

    1984-02-21

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  11. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Grasso, Albert P.

    1986-01-01

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  12. Final Report for Project ``Theory of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions''

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich W. Heinz

    2012-11-09

    In the course of this project the Ohio State University group led by the PI, Professor Ulrich Heinz, developed a comprehensive theoretical picture of the dynamical evolution of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions and of the numerous experimental observables that can be used to diagnose the evolving and short-lived hot and dense fireball created in such collisions. Starting from a qualitative understanding of the main features based on earlier research during the last decade of the twentieth century on collisions at lower energies, the group exploited newly developed theoretical tools and the stream of new high-quality data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory (which started operations in the summer of the year 2000) to arrive at an increasingly quantitative description of the experimentally observed phenomena. Work done at Ohio State University (OSU) was instrumental in the discovery during the years 2001-2003 that quark-gluon plasma (QGP) created in nuclear collisions at RHIC behaves like an almost perfect liquid with minimal viscosity. The tool of relativistic fluid dynamics for viscous liquids developed at OSU in the years 2005-2007 opened the possibility to quantitatively determine the value of the QGP viscosity empirically from experimental measurements of the collective flow patterns established in the collisions. A first quantitative extraction of the QGP shear viscosity, with controlled theoretical uncertainty estimates, was achieved during the last year of this project in 2010. OSU has paved the way for a transition of the field of relativistic heavy-ion physics from a qualitative discovery stage to a new stage of quantitative precision in the description of quark-gluon plasma properties. To gain confidence in the precision of our theoretical understanding of quark-gluon plasma dynamics, one must test it on a large set of experimentally measured observables. This achievement report demonstrates that we have, at

  13. Effect of Surface Mobility on Collision of Spherical Drops.

    PubMed

    Jeelani; Hartland

    1998-10-01

    The collision of two spherical liquid drops is considered which allows the effect of coalescence on the formation and stability of dispersions to be studied. An analytical solution is derived for the variation in the hydrodynamic force with the approach velocity and the separation thickness during the impact in terms of the drop diameter, allowing for the effect of induced flow inside the drops. Setting this force equal to the rate of change of momentum of the drops enables the variation with time in the separation between the drops to be obtained in terms of the initial approach velocity, drop diameter, and viscosity ratio. The analysis also yields the time variation in the force and approach velocity. For a given impact velocity, the separation thickness decreases with time until a minimum value is reached, which decreases as the impact velocity and the viscosity ratio of the continuous and dispersed phases increase. Previous authors have only obtained the variation in the approach velocity with the unknown variable force and separation thickness during the impact and therefore could not obtain the variation in the separation thickness with time. Knowing this variation enables the possibility of coalescence during impact to be investigated. Coalescence is influenced by the minimum separation thickness attained at low impact velocities and by drop deformation and inertial drainage at high velocities. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  14. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: Benzene–benzene vs benzene–rare gas atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jie; Krems, Roman V.; Li, Zhiying

    2014-10-28

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom–molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom–benzene calculations with those for benzene–benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  15. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  16. Zero gravity liquid mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Bruce, R. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus for mixing liquids under conditions of zero gravity is disclosed. The apparatus is comprised of a closed reservoir for the liquids, with a means for maintaining a positive pressure on the liquids in the reservoir. A valved liquid supply line is connected to the reservoir for supplying the reservoir with the liquids to be mixed in the reservoir. The portion of the reservoir containing the liquids to be mixed is in communication with a pump which alternately causes a portion of the liquids to flow out of the pump and into the reservoir to mix the liquids. The fluids in the reservoir are in communication through a conduit with the pump which alternately causes a portion of the fluids to flow out of the pump and into the sphere. The conduit connecting the pump and sphere may contain a nozzle or other jet-forming structure such as a venturi for further mixing the fluids.

  17. Liquid medication administration

    MedlinePlus

    ... easily. Oral syringes have some advantages for giving liquid medicines. They are accurate. They are easy to ... cups are also a handy way to give liquid medicines. However, dosing errors have occurred with them. ...

  18. Simple treatment of ultracold polar molecule collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, John; Quèmèner, Goulven; Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Julienne, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Collisions of polar molecules at ultracold (< μK) temperatures open the way for prospects of manipulating collision dynamics, including chemical reactions, by by varying an electric field. To understand such processes, one needs a scattering theory that accounts sufficiently accurately for the long-range van der Waals and dipolar forces acting between the molecules, but that also has a reasonable parametrization of the short-range physics when the molecules actually encounter one another. In this presentation we discuss a theory that marries a quantum-defect-theory parametrization of short-range physics, to a modified Langevin-like model that has successfully estimated the effect of electric fields. We discuss the character of the resulting scattering, including field-dependent chemical reaction rates and resonances.

  19. Radio frequency field assisted cold collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yijue; D'Incao, Jose; Greene, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The radio frequency (RF) field is a promising but less developed tool to control cold collisions. From the few-body perspective, we study cold atom collisions in an external magnetic field and a single-color RF field. We employ the multi-channel quantum defect theory and the hyperspherical toolkit to solve the two-body and three-body Schrödinger equations. Our results show that RF fields can effectively control the two-body scattering length through Feshbach resonances. Such RF induced Feshbach resonances can be applied to quenching experiments or spinor condensates. Analogous to photo association, RF fields can also associate cold atoms into molecules with a reasonable rate. Moreover, we will discuss the feasibility of using RF fields to control three-body recombination, which may improve the experimental timescale by suppressing three-body losses. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  20. Origin of the moon - The collision hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical models of lunar origin involving one or more collisions between the earth and other large sun-orbiting bodies are examined in a critical review. Ten basic propositions of the collision hypothesis (CH) are listed; observational data on mass and angular momentum, bulk chemistry, volatile depletion, trace elements, primordial high temperatures, and orbital evolution are summarized; and the basic tenets of alternative models (fission, capture, and coformation) are reviewed. Consideration is given to the thermodynamics of large impacts, rheological and dynamical problems, numerical simulations based on the CH, disk evolution models, and the chemical implications of the CH. It is concluded that the sound arguments and evidence supporting the CH are not (yet) sufficient to rule out other hypotheses.

  1. US Coast Guard collision at sea.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, B G

    1985-01-01

    The collision between the USCGC Cuyahoga and the motor vessel Santa Cruz II resulted in psychological distress among the Coast Guard crewmen. The US Navy Special Psychiatric Rapid Intervention Team (SPRINT) was activated to provide mental health services to the Coast Guard survivors and others who had been affected by the disaster. The psychiatric records of the 18 survivors were examined and summarized, and combined with anecdotal comments made by SPRINT members. The most prominent psychological reactions among the survivors were shock, anger, sadness, and guilt. Spouses of the survivors dealt with bereavement and strove to understand their husbands' reactions. Variables identified by the SPRINT as being important to their success were communication with and support from the training center command, assurances of confidentiality to the survivors, and commencement of their work almost immediately following the collision.

  2. Anomalons, honey, and glue in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.

    1982-12-01

    In these lectures, selected topics in nuclear collisions in the energy range 10/sup -1/ to 10/sup 3/ GeV per nucleon are discussed. The evidence for anomalous projectile fragments with short mean free paths is presented. Theoretical speculations on novel topological nuclear excitation and on quark-nuclear complexes in connection with anomalons are discussed. Recent tests for pion field instabilities are presented. Then evidence for collective nuclear flow phenomena are reviewed. Global event analysis and cascade simulations are presented. We address the question of whether nuclear flow is like viscous honey. Finally, the criteria for the production of a quark-gluon plasma are discussed. Nuclear stopping power and longitudinal growth at high energies are considered. Results from cosmic ray data show that nuclear collision at TeV per nucleon energies are likely to product a plasma.

  3. Theory of Electron-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Donald C

    2009-10-02

    Collisions of electrons with atoms and ions play a crucial role in the modeling and diagnostics of fusion plasmas. In the edge and divertor regions of magnetically confined plasmas, data for the collisions of electrons with neutral atoms and low charge-state ions are of particular importance, while in the inner region, data on highly ionized species are needed. Since experimental measurements for these collisional processes remain very limited, data for such processes depend primarily on the results of theoretical calculations. Over the period of the present grant (January 2006 - August 2009), we have made additional improvements in our parallel scattering programs, generated data of direct fusion interest and made these data available on The Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center Web site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In addition, we have employed these data to do collsional-radiative modeling studies in support of a variety of experiments with magnetically confined fusion plasmas.

  4. Collision zone magmatism aids continental crustal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savov, Ivan; Meliksetian, Khachatur; Ralf, Halama; Gevorg, Navasardian; Chuck, Connor; Massimo, D'Antonio; Samuele, Agostini; Osamu, Ishizuka; Sergei, Karapetian; Arkadi, Karakhanian

    2014-05-01

    The continental crust has a broadly andesitic bulk composition and is predominantly generated at convergent margins. However, estimates of the bulk composition of oceanic arcs indicate a bulk composition closer to basalt than to andesite. Hence, reworking processes that transform basaltic island arc crust into andesitic continental crust are essential[1] and explaining growth of andesitic continental crust via accretion of arc crustal fragments remains problematic. Recent studies of magmatism in the Great Tibetan Plateau[2], as site of multiple and still active continent-continent collisions, have proposed that andesitic CC is generated via amalgamation of large volumes of collision-related felsic magmas generated by melting of hydrated oceanic crust with mantle geochemical signatures. We aim to test this hypothesis by evaluating geochemical data from the volcanically and tectonically active Lesser Caucasus region (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia and E. Turkey), as the only other region where active continent-continent collision takes place. We will benefit from the newly compiled volcano-tectonic database of collision-related volcanic and plutonic rocks of Armenia that is comparable in quality and detail to the one available on Tibet. Our dataset combines several detailed studies from the large Aragats shield volcano[3] and associated monogenetic volcanic fields (near the capital city of Yerevan), as well as > 500 Quaternary to Holocene volcanoes from Gegham, Vardenis and Syunik volcanic highlands (toward Armenia-Nagorno-Karabakh-Azerbaijan-Iran border). The Armenian collision-related magmatism is diverse in volume, composition, eruption style and volatile contents. Interestingly, the majority of exposed volcanics are andesitic in composition. Nearly all collision-related volcanic rocks, even the highly differentiated dacite and rhyolite ignimbrites, have elevated Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios varying only little (average ~ 0.7043 and ~ 0

  5. Fluid dynamical description of relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nix, J. R.; Strottman, D.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of both a conventional relativistic nuclear fluid dynamic model and a two fluid generalization that takes into account the interpenetration of the target and projectile upon contact, collisions between heavy nuclei moving at relativistic speeds are calculated. This is done by solving the relevant equations of motion numerically in three spatial dimensions by use of particle in cell finite difference computing techniques. The effect of incorporating a density isomer, or quasistable state, in the nuclear equation of state at three times normal nuclear density, and the effect of doubling the nuclear compressibility coefficient are studied. For the reaction 20Ne + 238U at a laboratory bombarding energy per nucleon of 393 MeV, the calculated distributions in energy and angle of outgoing charged particles are compared with recent experimental data both integrated over all impact parameters and for nearly central collisions.

  6. Properties of compacton-anticompacton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Andres; Mihaila, Bogdan; Cooper, Fred; Saxena, Avadh

    2011-06-15

    We study the properties of compacton-anticompacton collision processes. We compare and contrast results for the case of compacton-anticompacton solutions of the K(l,p) Rosenau-Hyman (RH) equation for l=p=2, with compacton-anticompacton solutions of the L(l,p) Cooper-Shepard-Sodano (CSS) equation for p=1 and l=3. This study is performed using a Pade discretization of the RH and CSS equations. We find a significant difference in the behavior of compacton-anticompacton scattering. For the CSS equation, the scattering can be interpreted as 'annihilation' as the wake left behind dissolves over time. In the RH equation, the numerical evidence is that multiple shocks form after the collision, which eventually lead to 'blowup' of the resulting wave form.

  7. The collision of India with Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, L. T.; Lister, G. S.

    2012-05-01

    We review the relative motion of India and Asia for the last 100 million years and present a revised reconstruction for the India-Antarctica-Africa-North America-Eurasia plate circuit based on published motion histories. Deformation of these continental masses during this time introduces uncertainties, as does error in oceanic isochron age and location. Neglecting these factors, the data ipso facto allow the inference that the motion of India relative to Eurasia was distinctly episodic. Although motion is likely to have varied more smoothly than these results would allow, the geological record also suggests a sequence of distinct episodes, at about the same times. Hence we suggest that no single event should be regarded as the collision of India with Asia. The deceleration of the Indian plate commencing at ˜65 Ma is matched by an equally significant prior acceleration and this aspect must be taken into account in geodynamic scenarios proposed to explain the collision of India with Asia.

  8. Effect of viscosity on droplet-droplet collision outcome: Experimental study and numerical comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotaas, Cecilie; Havelka, Pavel; Jakobsen, Hugo A.; Svendsen, Hallvard F.; Hase, Matthias; Roth, Norbert; Weigand, Bernhard

    2007-10-01

    The influence of viscosity on droplet-droplet collision behavior at ambient conditions was studied experimentally and numerically. N-decane, monoethyleneglycol (MEG), diethyleneglycol (DEG), and triethyleneglycol were used as liquid phase providing viscosities in the range from 0.9to48mPas. Collision Weber numbers ranged approximately from 10 to 420. A direct numerical simulation code, based on the volume-of-fluid concept, was used for the simulations. Experimentally, observations of two droplet streams using a modified stroboscopic technique (aliasing method) were used to investigate the whole range of impact parameters during one experimental run. The experimental method has previously been verified for the water/air system [C. Gotaas et al., Phys. Fluids 19, 102105 (2007)]. In the present work, it was tested and validated for the n-decane/air system. Measured data agree well with those published in the literature. Well-defined regions of stretching separation and coalescence were identified, while reflexive separation regions were not found by using a single sinusoidal disturbance. However, the onset of reflexive separation was identified for MEG and DEG using an amplitude modulation technique. The results show that the criteria for onset of reflexive separation for viscous fluids provided by Y. I. Jiang et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 234, 177 (1992)] are not valid. This is consistent with the results given by K. D. Willis and M. Orme [Exp. Fluids 34, 28 (2003)]. A new empirical correlation for the onset of reflexive separation for high viscosity fluids is presented. The borders between coalescing and stretching separation were shifted toward higher Weber numbers with increasing viscosity. The lack of occurrence of reflexive separation for the single sinusoidal disturbance (small droplets), as well as the stretching separation boundary shift, can be explained by dissipation of collision kinetic energy in viscous flows inside the merged droplet after collision. Results

  9. Liquid level sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid level sensing device comprising a load cell supporting a column or stack of segments freely resting on one another. The density of each element is substantially identical to that of the surrounding liquid. The elements are freely guided within a surrounding tube. As each element is exposed above the liquid level, its weight will be impressed through the column to the load cell, thereby providing a signal at the load cell directly proportional to the liquid level elevation.

  10. Gravity waves from cosmic bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Michael P.; Saraswat, Prashant; Shaghoulian, Edgar E-mail: ps88@stanford.edu

    2013-02-01

    Our local Hubble volume might be contained within a bubble that nucleated in a false vacuum with only two large spatial dimensions. We study bubble collisions in this scenario and find that they generate gravity waves, which are made possible in this context by the reduced symmetry of the global geometry. These gravity waves would produce B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which could in principle dominate over the inflationary background.

  11. Novel QCD effects in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1991-12-01

    Heavy ion collisions can provide a novel environment for testing fundamental dynamical processes in QCD, including minijet formation and interactions, formation zone phenomena, color filtering, coherent co-mover interactions, and new higher twist mechanisms which could account for the observed excess production and anomalous nuclear target dependence of heavy flavor production. The possibility of using light-cone thermodynamics and a corresponding covariant temperature to describe the QCD phases of the nuclear fragmentation region is also briefly discussed.

  12. Collisions of Planetesimals and Formation of Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Rudolf; Maindl, Thomas I.; Süli, Áron; Schäfer, Christoph M.; Speith, Roland; Burger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results of models of terrestrial planet formation using on the one hand classical numerical integration of hundreds of small bodies on CPUs and on the other hand-for comparison-the results of our GPU code with thousands of small bodies which then merge to larger ones. To be able to determine the outcome of collision events we use our smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code which tracks how water is lost during such events.

  13. Studying Proton-Proton Collisions Using Pythia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Adi

    2004-10-01

    At Brookhaven National Lab, the RHIC experiments are currently investigating, on a subatomic level, what happens when heavy ions collide at high speeds. This is done in order to create such high temperatures and densities that quarks are no longer bound to one another. This state of matter is called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Evidence for the existence of the QGP may be the quenching of hadron jets, which occurs when the fast quarks or gluons lose so much energy in the hot, dense medium that they cannot survive. Then the jets of particles that these particles usually result in cannot be made. By studying the particle yield at high transverse momentum (Pt), one can probe what is happening to the jets created during collisions. Using Pythia, a standard model event generator based on the Lund String Model, we study jets of particles created when elementary protons collide. Then we know what should happen to jets at high transverse momentum transfer, when no QGP is present. Comparing the pt spectrum of jet partners generated by Pythia to RHIC results for proton-proton collisions shows that the two do in fact agree. This not only insures that the analysis of RHIC data is correct, but it also establishes a basis for comparison for Au-Au collisions. Comparing d+Au collision data to the Pythia Pt spectrum of jets with leading baryon and meson triggers, we found good agreement. Thus the jet production does not change drastically in nature in the presence of a cold nuclear medium.

  14. Angular Momentum Sharing in Dissipative Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, G.; Poggi, G.; Bini, M.; Calamai, S.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Taccetti, N.; Steckmeyer, J. C.; Laforest, R.; Saint-Laurent, F.

    1999-09-01

    Light charged particles emitted by the projectilelike fragment were measured in the direct and reverse collision of 93Nb and 116Sn at 25A MeV. The experimental multiplicities of hydrogen and helium particles as a function of the primary mass of the emitting fragment show evidence for a correlation with net mass transfer. The ratio of hydrogen and helium multiplicities points to a dependence of the angular momentum sharing on the net mass transfer.

  15. Hadron thermodynamics in relativistic nuclear collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ammiraju, P.

    1985-01-01

    Various phenomenological models based on statistical thermodynamical considerations were used to fit the experimental data at high P sub T to a two temperature distribution. Whether this implies that the two temperatures belong to two different reaction mechanisms, or consequences of Lorentz-contraction factor, or related in a fundamental way to the intrinsic thermodynamics of Space-Time can only be revealed by further theoretical and experimental investigations of high P sub T phenomena in extremely energetic hadron-hadron collisions.

  16. Recommended Screening Practices for Launch Collision Aviodance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaver, Brian A.; Hametz, Mark E.; Ollivierre, Jarmaine C.; Newman, Lauri K.; Hejduk, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this document is to assess the value of launch collision avoidance (COLA) practices and provide recommendations regarding its implementation for NASA robotic missions. The scope of this effort is limited to launch COLA screens against catalog objects that are either spacecraft or debris. No modifications to manned safety COLA practices are considered in this effort. An assessment of the value of launch COLA can be broken down into two fundamental questions: 1) Does collision during launch represent a significant risk to either the payload being launched or the space environment? 2) Can launch collision mitigation be performed in a manner that provides meaningful risk reduction at an acceptable level of operational impact? While it has been possible to piece together partial answers to these questions for some time, the first attempt to comprehensively address them is documented in reference (a), Launch COLA Operations: an Examination of Data Products, Procedures, and Thresholds, Revision A. This report is the product of an extensive study that addressed fundamental technical questions surrounding launch collision avoidance analysis and practice. The results provided in reference (a) will be cited throughout this document as these two questions are addressed. The premise of this assessment is that in order to conclude that launch COLA is a value-added activity, the answer to both of these questions must be affirmative. A "no" answer to either of these questions points toward the conclusion that launch COLA provides little or no risk mitigation benefit. The remainder of this assessment will focus on addressing these two questions.

  17. Dynamics of reactive collisions by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ureña, A. González; Vetter, R.

    This paper reviews recent developments in the study of reactive collisions using optical methods. Although the basic approach is from the experimental viewpoint, attention is paid to the conceptual and theoretical aspects of the physics underlying modern reaction dynamics. After a brief resume of basic concepts and definitions on both scalar and vectorial quantities characterizing the chemical reaction, a significant body of this paper describes the recent achievements using laser techniques, mainly via laser-induced fluorescence, and chemiluminescence. Both high-resolution crossed-beam and high-resolution bulb studies are presented in a complementary fashion, as they provide a detailed picture of reaction dynamics through the measurement of quantum state specific differential cross-sections. Specific examples include the use of Doppler resolved laser-induced fluorescence, multiphoton ionization or Cars studies. Some examples are also included based on the use of product imaging techniques, the novel approach of obtaining quantum state resolved differential cross-sections for chemical reactions. In addition, new data on the collision energy dependence of the collision cross-section, i.e. the excitation function, obtained by highly sensitive collision energy cross-beam techniques is also presented and reviewed. Another part of the paper is dedicated to recent advances in the study of reaction dynamics using electronically excited species. Emphasis is placed not only on the opening of new channels for chemical reactions but also on the possible outcome of the reaction products associated with the different symmetries of the excited potential energy surfaces. Finally, a section is dedicated to recent developments in studies carried out in the area of van der Waals and cluster reactions. The possibility of clocking the chemical act as well as very efficient trapping of reaction intermediates is illustrated with some examples. Throughout the whole paper care is taken to

  18. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Itikawa, Yukikazu; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  19. Femtoscopy in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa, M; Pratt, S; Soltz, R A; Wiedemann, U

    2005-07-29

    Analyses of two-particle correlations have provided the chief means for determining spatio-temporal characteristics of relativistic heavy ion collisions. We discuss the theoretical formalism behind these studies and the experimental methods used in carrying them out. Recent results from RHIC are put into context in a systematic review of correlation measurements performed over the past two decades. The current understanding of these results are discussed in terms of model comparisons and overall trends.

  20. Meson interferometry in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: Recent HBT results form CERN experiment NA44; interferometry results from E802/E859/E866; recent results on two particle correlations from E814; source sizes from CERN data; intermittency and interferometry; Bose-Einstein correlations in 200A GeV S+Au collisions; HBT correlations at STAR; HBT interferometry with PHENIX; HBT calculations from ARC; three pion correlations; and pion correlations in proton-induced reactions.

  1. Fluid Mechanics of Liquid-Liquid Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, John Reed

    The detailed hydrodynamics of selected liquid -liquid flow systems are investigated to provide a firm foundation for the rational design of separation processes. The implementation of this objective centers on the development of a robust code to simulate liquid-liquid flows. We have applied this code to the realistic simulation of aspects of the complex fluid mechanical behavior, and developed quantitative insight into the underlying processes involved. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) method is combined with the Continuous Surface Force (CSF) algorithm to provide a numerically stable code capable of solving high Reynolds numbers free surface flows. One of the developments during the testing was an efficient method for solving the Young-Laplace equation describing the shape of the meniscus in a vertical cylinder for a constrained liquid volume. The steady-state region near the nozzle for the laminar flow of a Newtonian liquid jet injected vertically into another immiscible Newtonian liquid is investigated for various Reynolds numbers by solving the axisymmetric transient equations of motion and continuity. The analysis takes into account pressure, viscous, inertial, gravitational, and surface tension forces, and comparison with previous experimental measurements shows good agreement. Comparisons of the present numerical method with the numerical results of previous boundary-layer methods help establish their range of validity. A new approximate equation for the shape of the interface of the steady jet, based on an overall momentum balance, is also developed. The full transient from liquid-liquid jet startup to breakup into drops is also simulated numerically. In comparison with experiment, the results of the present numerical method show a greater sensitivity of the jet length to the Reynolds number than the best predictions of previous linear stability analyses. The formation of drops is investigated at low to high Reynolds numbers before and after jet formation. The

  2. Photon-Photon Collisions -- Past and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2005-12-02

    I give a brief review of the history of photon-photon physics and a survey of its potential at future electron-positron colliders. Exclusive hadron production processes in photon-photon and electron-photon collisions provide important tests of QCD at the amplitude level, particularly as measures of hadron distribution amplitudes. There are also important high energy {gamma}{gamma} and e{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, including the production of jets in photon-photon collisions, deeply virtual Compton scattering on a photon target, and leading-twist single-spin asymmetries for a photon polarized normal to a production plane. Since photons couple directly to all fundamental fields carrying the electromagnetic current including leptons, quarks, W's and supersymmetric particles, high energy {gamma}{gamma} collisions will provide a comprehensive laboratory for Higgs production and exploring virtually every aspect of the Standard Model and its extensions. High energy back-scattered laser beams will thus greatly extend the range of physics of the International Linear Collider.

  3. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-01-01

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80-40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70-43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52-51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma. PMID:26395973

  4. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A.; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-01-01

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80–40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70–43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52–51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma. PMID:26395973

  5. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-09-23

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80-40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70-43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52-51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma.

  6. Collisions of Rydberg Atoms with Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAdam, Keith B.

    2000-10-01

    The long range of Coulomb interactions, together with the large size, long radiative lifetimes and high state densities of highly excited Rydberg atoms, results in inelastic collision cross sections of prodigious size -- often large enough to outweigh small number densities in astrophysica and cool laboratory plasmas -- and in other unusual features. This talk will provide: (a) a brief survey of the significant features of collisions between electron or positive ions and state-selected Rydberg atoms and of recent experiments( O. Makarov and K.B. MacAdam, Phys. Rev. A 60), 2131-8 (1999); and K.B. MacAdam, J.C. Day and D.M. Homan, Comm. At. Mol. Phys./Comm. Mod. Phys. 1(2), Part D, 57-73 (1999). to investigate them; (b) an introduction to some of the special techniques that have been developed(J.L. Horn, D.M. Homan, C.S. Hwang, W.L. Fuqua III and K.B. MacAdam, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69), 4086-93 (1998). for preparation, manipulation and detection of Rydberg atoms; and (c) a glimpse at new directions in Rydberg atom collision research.

  7. Collision-induced constructive quantum interference

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xihua; Xie, Hankun

    2003-06-01

    We theoretically study the collision-induced constructive quantum interference in an open four-level system with the density-matrix approach based on the experimental observation of constructive quantum interference between two transition pathways 3P{sub 1/2}-5S (or 4D) and 3P{sub 3/2}-5S (or 4D) via equal-frequency hybrid excitation in the Na{sub 2}-Na system. The effects of the collision-induced coherent and incoherent decay rates and the ratio of the two transition dipole moments on the interference are analyzed. It is shown that through the incoherent process (collision), the coherence between a widely separated doublet and subsequent constructive quantum interference can be realized. The physical origin of the constructive interference can be seen clearly in the dressed-atom picture. The theoretical results can also be used to qualitatively explain the dependence of quantum interference on the experimental buffer gas pressure and sample temperature.

  8. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possiblemore » effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.« less

  9. Spinodal phase separation in relativistic nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, Joergen

    2010-09-15

    The spinodal amplification of density fluctuations is treated perturbatively within dissipative fluid dynamics for the purpose of elucidating the prospects for this mechanism to cause a phase separation to occur during a relativistic nuclear collision. The present study includes not only viscosity but also heat conduction (whose effect on the growth rates is of comparable magnitude but opposite), as well as a gradient term in the local pressure, and the corresponding dispersion relation for collective modes in bulk matter is derived from relativistic fluid dynamics. A suitable two-phase equation of state is obtained by interpolation between a hadronic gas and a quark-gluon plasma, while the transport coefficients are approximated by simple parametrizations that are suitable at any degree of net baryon density. We calculate the degree of spinodal amplification occurring along specific dynamical phase trajectories characteristic of nuclear collision at various energies. The results bring out the important fact that the prospects for spinodal phase separation to occur can be greatly enhanced by careful tuning of the collision energy to ensure that the thermodynamic conditions associated with the maximum compression lie inside the region of spinodal instability.

  10. Dynamics of the baseball-bat collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Alan M.

    2000-11-01

    A model is developed for the collision between the baseball and bat, taking into account the transverse bending vibrations of the bat. By coupling the flexible bat to the ball via a parametrized force that each mutually exerts on the other, a complete description of the collision process is obtained, including the exit speed of the ball vf. It is shown that vibrations play an important role in determining vf. The model is in excellent agreement with experimental data at low impact velocities. At the higher velocities more appropriate to the game of baseball, vf is shown to coincide with the rigid-body value only over a very small region in the barrel of the bat and to drop off sharply for impacts removed from that region. Some interesting insights into the collision process are obtained, including the observation that for impacts in the barrel of the bat, the momentum transferred to the ball is essentially complete by the time the elastic wave first arrives at the handle and that any clamping action of the hands will affect the bat at the impact point only after the ball and bat have separated. This suggests that vf is independent of the size, shape, and method of support of the bat at distances far from the impact location.

  11. Multilevel Monte Carlo simulation of Coulomb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosin, M.S.; Ricketson, L.F.; Dimits, A.M.; Caflisch, R.E.; Cohen, B.I.

    2014-10-01

    We present a new, for plasma physics, highly efficient multilevel Monte Carlo numerical method for simulating Coulomb collisions. The method separates and optimally minimizes the finite-timestep and finite-sampling errors inherent in the Langevin representation of the Landau–Fokker–Planck equation. It does so by combining multiple solutions to the underlying equations with varying numbers of timesteps. For a desired level of accuracy ε, the computational cost of the method is O(ε{sup −2}) or O(ε{sup −2}(lnε){sup 2}), depending on the underlying discretization, Milstein or Euler–Maruyama respectively. This is to be contrasted with a cost of O(ε{sup −3}) for direct simulation Monte Carlo or binary collision methods. We successfully demonstrate the method with a classic beam diffusion test case in 2D, making use of the Lévy area approximation for the correlated Milstein cross terms, and generating a computational saving of a factor of 100 for ε=10{sup −5}. We discuss the importance of the method for problems in which collisions constitute the computational rate limiting step, and its limitations.

  12. SPH simulations of high-speed collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozehnal, Jakub; Broz, Miroslav

    2016-10-01

    Our work is devoted to a comparison of: i) asteroid-asteroid collisions occurring at lower velocities (about 5 km/s in the Main Belt), and ii) mutual collisions of asteroids and cometary nuclei usually occurring at significantly higher relative velocities (> 10 km/s).We focus on differences in the propagation of the shock wave, ejection of the fragments and possible differences in the resultingsize-frequency distributions of synthetic asteroid families. We also discuss scaling with respect to the "nominal" target diameter D = 100 km, projectile velocity 3-7 km/s, for which a number of simulations were done so far (Durda et al. 2007, Benavidez et al. 2012).In the latter case of asteroid-comet collisions, we simulate the impacts of brittle or pre-damaged impactors onto solid monolithic targets at high velocities, ranging from 10 to 15 km/s. The purpose of this numerical experiment is to better understand impact processes shaping the early Solar System, namely the primordial asteroid belt during during the (late) heavy bombardment (as a continuation of Broz et al. 2013).For all hydrodynamical simulations we use a smoothed-particle hydrodynamics method (SPH), namely the lagrangian SPH3D code (Benz & Asphaug 1994, 1995). The gravitational interactions between fragments (re-accumulation) is simulated with the Pkdgrav tree-code (Richardson et al. 2000).

  13. Multilevel Monte Carlo simulation of Coulomb collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Rosin, M. S.; Ricketson, L. F.; Dimits, A. M.; Caflisch, R. E.; Cohen, B. I.

    2014-05-29

    We present a new, for plasma physics, highly efficient multilevel Monte Carlo numerical method for simulating Coulomb collisions. The method separates and optimally minimizes the finite-timestep and finite-sampling errors inherent in the Langevin representation of the Landau–Fokker–Planck equation. It does so by combining multiple solutions to the underlying equations with varying numbers of timesteps. For a desired level of accuracy ε , the computational cost of the method is O(ε–2) or (ε–2(lnε)2), depending on the underlying discretization, Milstein or Euler–Maruyama respectively. This is to be contrasted with a cost of O(ε–3) for direct simulation Monte Carlo or binary collision methods.more » We successfully demonstrate the method with a classic beam diffusion test case in 2D, making use of the Lévy area approximation for the correlated Milstein cross terms, and generating a computational saving of a factor of 100 for ε=10–5. Lastly, we discuss the importance of the method for problems in which collisions constitute the computational rate limiting step, and its limitations.« less

  14. Multilevel Monte Carlo simulation of Coulomb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rosin, M. S.; Ricketson, L. F.; Dimits, A. M.; Caflisch, R. E.; Cohen, B. I.

    2014-05-29

    We present a new, for plasma physics, highly efficient multilevel Monte Carlo numerical method for simulating Coulomb collisions. The method separates and optimally minimizes the finite-timestep and finite-sampling errors inherent in the Langevin representation of the Landau–Fokker–Planck equation. It does so by combining multiple solutions to the underlying equations with varying numbers of timesteps. For a desired level of accuracy ε , the computational cost of the method is O(ε–2) or (ε–2(lnε)2), depending on the underlying discretization, Milstein or Euler–Maruyama respectively. This is to be contrasted with a cost of O(ε–3) for direct simulation Monte Carlo or binary collision methods. We successfully demonstrate the method with a classic beam diffusion test case in 2D, making use of the Lévy area approximation for the correlated Milstein cross terms, and generating a computational saving of a factor of 100 for ε=10–5. Lastly, we discuss the importance of the method for problems in which collisions constitute the computational rate limiting step, and its limitations.

  15. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possible effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.

  16. Orientational rainbows in atom--molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Vervaat, M.G.M.; Spalburg, M.R.; Los, J.; Kleyn, A.W.

    1984-11-01

    The experimental and calculated differential cross sections for ion pair formation in K (27 to 50 eV LAB) O/sub 2/ collisions show an orientational rainbow at small scattering angle. This rainbow is found to be due to the anisotropy of the K--O/sub 2/ interaction potential. Using the position of the orientational rainbow, the anisotropy in the repulsive part of the interaction potential is determined as G = (1+1.3( +- )*P/sub 2/(cos ..cap alpha..)), where P/sub 2/ is a Legendre polynomial and ..cap alpha.. the angle between the molecular axis and the radius vector of the atom. The interaction potential has the form V(R) = 102.9 exp(-0.571R)+(..delta..-1/R), where ..delta.. is the ionization potential of K minus the vertical electron affinity of O/sub 2/, the latter depending on the vibrational phase only; the term placed between the square brackets does not act during the complete collision, but only onward from that point during the collision where the ion-pair formation occurs.

  17. Liquid detection circuit

    DOEpatents

    Regan, Thomas O.

    1987-01-01

    Herein is a circuit which is capable of detecting the presence of liquids, especially cryogenic liquids, and whose sensor will not overheat in a vacuum. The circuit parameters, however, can be adjusted to work with any liquid over a wide range of temperatures.

  18. Renewable liquid reflection grating

    DOEpatents

    Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Toor, Arthur

    2003-10-07

    A renewable liquid reflection grating. Electrodes are operatively connected to a conducting liquid in an arrangement that produces a reflection grating and driven by a current with a resonance frequency. In another embodiment, the electrodes create the grating by a resonant electrostatic force acting on a dielectric liquid.

  19. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  20. Critical condition in gravitational shock wave collision and heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Shu; Shuryak, Edward

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, we derive a critical condition for matter equilibration in heavy ion collisions using a holographic approach. Gravitational shock waves with infinite transverse extension are used to model an infinite nucleus. We construct the trapped surface in the collision of two asymmetric planar shock waves with sources at different depth in the bulk AdS and formulate a critical condition for matter equilibration in the collision of ''nuclei'' in the dual gauge theory. We find the critical condition is insensitive to the depth of the source closer to the AdS boundary. To understand the origin of the critical condition, we compute the Next-to-Leading Order stress tensor in the boundary field theory due to the interaction of the nuclei and find that the critical condition corresponds to the breaking down of the perturbative expansion. We expect nonperturbative effects are needed to describe black hole formation.

  1. Conjunctions and Collision Avoidance with Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E.

    2013-09-01

    Electrodynamic propulsion technology is currently in development by NASA, ESA, and JAXA for the purpose of affordable removal of large debris objects from LEO. At the same time, the Naval Research Laboratory is preparing a 3U CubeSat with a 1-km electrodynamic tether for a flight demonstration of electrodynamic propulsion. This type of propulsion does not require fuel. The electrodynamic thrust is the Lorentz force acting on the electric current in a long conductor (tether) in the geomagnetic field. Electrons are collected from the ambient plasma on one end and emitted back into the plasma from the other end. The electric current loop is closed through the ionosphere, as demonstrated in two previous flights. The vehicle is solar powered. To support safe navigation of electrodynamic tethers, proper conjunction analysis and collision avoidance strategies are needed. The typical lengths of electrodynamic tethers for near-term applications are measured in kilometers, and the conjunction geometry is very different from the geometry of conjunctions between compact objects. It is commonly thought that the collision cross-section in a conjunction between a tether and a compact object is represented by the product of the tether length and the size of the object. However, rigorous analysis shows that this is not the case, and that the above assumption leads to grossly overestimated collision probabilities. The paper will present the results of a detailed mathematical analysis of the conjunction geometry and collision probabilities in close approaches between electrodynamic tethers and compact objects, such as satellites, rocket bodies, and debris fragments. Electrodynamic spacecraft will not require fuel, and therefore, can thrust constantly. Their orbit transfers can take many days, but can result in major orbit changes, including large rotations of the orbital plane, both in the inclination and the node. During these orbit transfers, the electrodynamic spacecraft will

  2. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  3. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koster, James E.; Bolton, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  4. Supported liquid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Danesi, P.R.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of utilizing thin layers of organic solutions of solvent extraction reagents, immobilized on microporous inert supports interposed between two aqueous solutions, for selectively removing metal ions from a mixture represents an attractive alternative to liquid-liquid extraction. A detailed knowledge of the liquid-liquid extraction equilibria and mass transfer kinetics is required to understand and to describe quantitatively the rate laws which control the permeation of metal species through Supported Liquid Membranes (SLM) and to exploit them for separation processes. This paper attempts to understand the mechanism of transport through SLM.

  5. Passenger car collision fatalities--with special emphasis on collisions with heavy vehicles.

    PubMed

    Björnstig, Ulf; Björnstig, Johanna; Eriksson, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Between 1995 and 2004, 293 passenger car occupants died in collisions with other vehicles in northern Sweden (annual incidence: 3.3 per 100,000 inhabitants, 6.9 per 100,000 cars, or 4.8 per 10(9)km driven); half of these deaths involved heavy vehicles. The annual number of passenger car occupant deaths per 100,000 cars in car-truck/bus collisions has remained unchanged since the 1980s, but in car-car collisions it has decreased to one third of its former level. As crash objects, trucks and buses killed five times as many car occupants per truck/bus kilometer driven as did cars. The collisions were characterized by crashes in the oncoming vehicle's lane, under icy, snowy, or wet conditions; crashes into heavy vehicles generally occurred in daylight, on workdays, in winter, and on 90 and 70 km/h two-lane roads. Head and chest injuries accounted for most of the fatal injuries. Multiple fatal injuries and critical and deadly head injuries characterized the deaths in collisions with heavy vehicles. An indication of suicide was present in 4% of the deaths; for those who crashed into trucks, this percentage was doubled. Among the driver victims, 4% had blood alcohol levels above the legal limit of 0.2g/L. Frontal collision risks might be reduced by a mid-barrier, by building less injurious fronts on trucks and buses, by efficient skid prevention, and by use of flexible speed limits varying with road and light conditions. PMID:18215544

  6. Controlling Thermal Collisions with Frequency-Chirped Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    We conduct semi-classical monte-carlo simulations of cold collisions utilizing frequency-chirped laser light on the nanosecond timescale. Previous work revealed partial control of light-assisted collisional mechanisms with relatively slow chirp rates (10 GHz/ μs). Collisions induced with positive chirped light enhance the inelastic collisional loss rate of atoms from a magneto-optical trap whereas these trap loss collisions can be blocked when negative chirped light is used. Early quantum and classical simulations show that for negative chirps the laser's frequency continually interacts with the atom-pair during the collision. We investigate how this process depends on the chirp rate and show that by moderately speeding up the chirp (> 50 GHz/ μs), we can significantly enhance the difference in the collisional loss rate induced by the negative and positive chirps, gaining nearly full control of the collision. We also explore extending this model to probe collisions at temperatures exceeding 1 K.

  7. Factorization, the Glasma and the Ridge in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopalan, Raju

    2008-10-13

    High energy heavy ion collisions can be efficiently described as the collision of two sheets of Color Glass Condensate. The dynamics of the collision can be studied ab initio in a systematic effective field theory approach. This requires factorization theorems that separate the initial state evolution of the wave functions with energy from the final state interactions that produce matter with high energy densities called the Glasma. We discuss how this matter is formed, its remarkable properties and its relevance for understanding thermalization of the Quark Gluon Plasma in heavy ion collisions. Long range rapidity correlations in the collision that have a remarkable ridge like structure may allow us to probe early times in the collision and infer directly the properties of the Glasma.

  8. Particle correlators and possible local parity violation in nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okorokov, V.; Parfenov, P.

    2016-01-01

    The complex topology structure of the vacuum of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) can lead to local violation of the P/CPinvariance of strong interactions. The preliminary estimations of magnetic field and correlators within the model of chiral magnetic effect are presented for types of nuclei and collision energies corresponded to RHIC and the LHC beams. These correlators characterized the asymmetry of the emission of charged particles with respect to the reaction plane in non-central nucleus-nucleus collisions are calculated for two various nuclear densities, namely, for approach of rigid sphere and for two-component Fermi model. The centrality dependence is under consideration for correlators integrated over other kinematic parameters. The correlator magnitudes depend on collision energy weakly for Cu + Cu and Au + Au collisions. The same-charge correlator shows noticeable increasing with growth of atomic number for symmetric collisions. Also magnetic field and centrality dependence of correlator are obtained for asymmetric Cu + Au collisions.

  9. UNIVERSAL BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLE PRODUCTION IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    STEINBERG,P.A.FOR THE PHOBOS COLLABORATION

    2002-07-24

    The PHOBOS experiment at RHIC has measured the multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of centrality and pseudorapidity in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. Two observations indicate universal behavior of charged particle production in heavy ion collisions. The first is that forward particle production, over a range of energies, follows a universal limiting curve with a non-trivial centrality dependence. The second arises from comparisons with pp/{bar p}p and e{sup +}e{sup -} data. / in nuclear collisions at high energy scales with {radical}s in a similar way as N{sub ch} in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and has a very weak centrality dependence. These features may be related to a reduction in the leading particle effect due to the multiple collisions suffered per participant in heavy ion collisions.

  10. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  11. Nanowire liquid pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian Yu; Lo, Yu-Chieh; Niu, Jun Jie; Kushima, Akihiro; Qian, Xiaofeng; Zhong, Li; Mao, Scott X.; Li, Ju

    2013-04-01

    The ability to form tiny droplets of liquids and control their movements is important in printing or patterning, chemical reactions and biological assays. So far, such nanofluidic capabilities have principally used components such as channels, nozzles or tubes, where a solid encloses the transported liquid. Here, we show that liquids can flow along the outer surface of solid nanowires at a scale of attolitres per second and the process can be directly imaged with in situ transmission electron microscopy. Microscopy videos show that an ionic liquid can be pumped along tin dioxide, silicon or zinc oxide nanowires as a thin precursor film or as beads riding on the precursor film. Theoretical analysis suggests there is a critical film thickness of ~10 nm below which the liquid flows as a flat film and above which it flows as discrete beads. This critical thickness is the result of intermolecular forces between solid and liquid, which compete with liquid surface energy and Rayleigh-Plateau instability.

  12. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  13. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition. PMID:27175515

  14. Onset of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzicki, M.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Seyboth, P.

    2012-05-15

    The energy dependence of hadron production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions reveals anomalies-the kink, horn, and step. They were predicted as signals of the deconfinement phase transition and observed by the NA49 Collaboration in central PbPb collisions at the CERN SPS. This indicates the onset of the deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions at about 30 A GeV.

  15. Introduction to the study of collisions between heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bayman, B.F.

    1980-01-01

    Current investigations concerning the collisions of nuclei governed by small de Broglie wavelengths are reviewed. The wave packets localize nuclei in regions small compared to their diameters. Cross sections are examined for potential scattering, elastic scattering, quasi-molecular states, peripheral particle-transfer reactions, fusion, and deep inelastic collisions. Theories of fusion and deep inelastic collisions are summarized. This paper is in the nature of a review-tutorial. 45 references, 51 figures, 2 tables. (RWR)

  16. Critical Phenomena in Liquid-Liquid Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, D. T.

    2000-04-01

    Critical phenomena provide intriguing and essential insight into many issues in condensed matter physics because of the many length scales involved. Large density or concentration fluctuations near a system's critical point effectively mask the identity of the system and produce universal phenomena that have been well studied in simple liquid-vapor and liquid-liquid systems. Such systems have provided useful model systems to test theoretical predictions which can then be extended to more complicated systems. Along various thermodynamic paths, several quantities exhibit a simple power-law dependence close to the critical point. The critical exponents describing these relationships are universal and should depend only on a universality class determined by the order-parameter and spatial dimensionality of the system. Liquid gas, binary fluid mixtures, uniaxial ferromagnetism, polymer-solvent, and protein solutions all belong to the same (Ising model) universality class. The diversity of critical systems that can be described by universal relations indicates that experimental measurements on one system should yield the same information as on another. Our experimental investigations have tested existing theory and also extended universal behavior into new areas. By measuring the coexistence curve, heat capacity, thermal expansion and static light scattering (turbidity) in various liquid-liquid and polymer-solvent systems, we have determined critical exponents and amplitudes that have sometimes confirmed and other times challenged current theory. Recent experiments investigating the heat capacity and light scattering in a liquid-liquid mixture very close to the critical point will be discussed. This research is currently supported by The Petroleum Research Fund and by NASA grant NAG8-1433 with some student support from NSF-DMR 9619406.

  17. Squeezed States and Particle Production in High Energy Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bambah, Bindu A.

    1996-01-01

    Using the 'quantum optical approach' we propose a model of multiplicity distributions in high energy collisions based on squeezed coherent states. We show that the k-mode squeezed coherent state is the most general one in describing hadronic multiplicity distributions in particle collision processes, describing not only p(bar-p) collisions but e(+)e(-), vp and diffractive collisions as well. The reason for this phenomenological fit has been gained by working out a microscopic theory in which the squeezed coherent sources arise naturally if one considers the Lorentz squeezing of hadrons and works in the covariant phase space formalism.

  18. Hydrodynamic evolution and jet energy loss in Cu + Cu collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2011-04-15

    We present results from a hybrid description of Cu + Cu collisions using (3 + 1)-dimensional hydrodynamics (music) for the bulk evolution and a Monte Carlo simulation (martini) for the evolution of high-momentum partons in the hydrodynamical background. We explore the limits of this description by going to small system sizes and determine the dependence on different fractions of wounded nucleon and binary collisions scaling of the initial energy density. We find that Cu + Cu collisions are well described by the hybrid description at least up to 20% central collisions.

  19. Excited-state collisions of trapped 85Rb atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, D.; Feng, P.; Williamson, R. S., III; Walker, T.

    1992-08-01

    We descrbe a new method for measuring excited-state collisions between optically trapped atoms. With this method, trap-loss collision rates are deduced from the loading behavior of clouds of trapped atoms in the regime where radiation trapping limits the atom density. Our measurements indicate that 85Rb trap-loss collisions occur at significantly smaller rates than expected both from previous work on Cs and from recent models. In addition, the dependence of the trap-loss collisions on the frequency of the light used to excite the atom pairs is also different from that of Cs, suggesting that assumptions about the dynamics in these models need modification.

  20. Collision risk against space debris in Earth orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A.; Valsecchi, G. B.

    2006-05-01

    Öpik’s formulae for the probability of collision are applied to the analysis of the collision risk against space debris in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) and Medium Earth Orbit. The simple analytical formulation of Öpik’s theory makes it applicable to complex dynamical systems, such as the interaction of the ISS with the whole debris population in LEO The effect of a fragmentation within a multiplane constellation can also be addressed. The analysis of the evolution of the collision risk in Earth orbit shows the need of effective mitigation measures to limit the growth of the collision risk and of the fragmentation debris in the next century.

  1. Jets and Vector Bosons in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, Begoña

    2013-11-01

    This paper reviews experimental results on jets and electroweak boson (photon,Wand Z) production in heavy-ion collisions, from the CMS and ATLAS detectors, using data collected during 2011 PbPb run and pp data collected at an equivalent energy. By comparing the two collision systems, the energy loss of the partons propagating through the medium produced in PbPb collisions can be studied. Its characterization is done using dijet events and isolated photon-jet pairs. Since the electroweak gauge bosons do not participate in the strong interaction, and are thus unmodified by the nuclear medium, they serve as clean probes of the initial state in the collision.

  2. Exact linearized Coulomb collision operator in the moment expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Jeong -Young; Held, Eric D.

    2006-10-05

    In the moment expansion, the Rosenbluth potentials, the linearized Coulomb collision operators, and the moments of the collision operators are analytically calculated for any moment. The explicit calculation of Rosenbluth potentials converts the integro-differential form of the Coulomb collision operator into a differential operator, which enables one to express the collision operator in a simple closed form for any arbitrary mass and temperature ratios. In addition, it is shown that gyrophase averaging the collision operator acting on arbitrary distribution functions is the same as the collision operator acting on the corresponding gyrophase averaged distribution functions. The moments of the collision operator are linear combinations of the fluid moments with collision coefficients parametrized by mass and temperature ratios. Furthermore, useful forms involving the small mass-ratio approximation are easily found since the collision operators and their moments are expressed in terms of the mass ratio. As an application, the general moment equations are explicitly written and the higher order heat flux equation is derived.

  3. A New Aloha Anti-Collision Algorithm Based on CDMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Enjian; Feng, Zhu

    The tags' collision is a common problem in RFID (radio frequency identification) system. The problem has affected the integrity of the data transmission during the process of communication in the RFID system. Based on analysis of the existing anti-collision algorithm, a novel anti-collision algorithm is presented. The new algorithm combines the group dynamic frame slotted Aloha algorithm with code division multiple access technology. The algorithm can effectively reduce the collision probability between tags. Under the same number of tags, the algorithm is effective in reducing the reader recognition time and improve overall system throughput rate.

  4. Improved intra-species collision models for PIC simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Lemons, D.S.; Winske, D.

    1998-07-01

    In recent years, the authors have investigated methods to improve the effectiveness of modeling collisional processes in particle-in-cell codes. Through the use of generalized collision models, plasma dynamics can be followed both in the regime of nearly collisionless plasmas as well as in the hydrodynamic limit of collisional plasmas. They have developed a collision-field method to treat both the case of collisions between unlike plasma species (inter-species collisions), through the use of a deterministic, grid-based force, and between particles of the same species (intra-species collisions), through the use of a Langevin equation. While the approach used for inter-species collisions is noise-free in that the collision experienced by a particle does not require any random numbers, such random numbers are used for intra-species collisions. This gives rise to a stochastic cooling effect inherent in the Langevin approach. In this paper, the authors concentrate on intra-species collisions and describe how the accuracy of the model can be improved by appropriate corrections to velocity and spatial moments.

  5. Scientists Track Collision of Powerful Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope have tracked the motion of a violent region where the powerful winds of two giant stars slam into each other. The collision region moves as the stars, part of a binary pair, orbit each other, and the precise measurement of its motion was the key to unlocking vital new information about the stars and their winds. WR 140 Image Sequence Motion of Wind Collision Region Graphic superimposes VLBA images of wind collision region on diagram of orbit of Wolf-Rayet (WR) star and its giant (O) companion. Click on image for larger version (412K) CREDIT: Dougherty et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF In Motion: Shockwave File Animated Gif File AVI file Both stars are much more massive than the Sun -- one about 20 times the mass of the Sun and the other about 50 times the Sun's mass. The 20-solar-mass star is a type called a Wolf-Rayet star, characterized by a very strong wind of particles propelled outward from its surface. The more massive star also has a strong outward wind, but one less intense than that of the Wolf-Rayet star. The two stars, part of a system named WR 140, circle each other in an elliptical orbit roughly the size of our Solar System. "The spectacular feature of this system is the region where the stars' winds collide, producing bright radio emission. We have been able to track this collision region as it moves with the orbits of the stars," said Sean Dougherty, an astronomer at the Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics in Canada. Dougherty and his colleagues presented their findings in the April 10 edition of the Astrophysical Journal. The supersharp radio "vision" of the continent-wide VLBA allowed the scientists to measure the motion of the wind collision region and then to determine the details of the stars' orbits and an accurate distance to the system. "Our new calculations of the orbital details and the distance are vitally important to understanding the nature of these

  6. Origin of abnormally sharp features in collision-induced spectra of cryosolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrebout, W. A.; van der Veken, B. J.; Kouzov, A. P.; Filippov, N. N.

    2015-07-01

    A weak, paradoxically narrow resonance feature (shortly, the r-line) near the O2 fundamental frequency in the collision-induced absorption spectrum of oxygen dissolved in liquid argon and liquid nitrogen (T = 89 K) is resolved for the first time. An accurate band shape fitting routine to separate the r-line from the by-far more intense diffuse background and to study its behavior versus the oxygen mole fraction x which ranged from 0.03 up to 0.23 has been elaborated. At small x (≲0.07), the r-line intensity was found to scale as x2 leaving no doubt that it is due to the solute-solute (O2-O2) interactions. In line with our results on the pH2-LNe cryosystem [Herrebout, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 093001 (2008)], the Lorentzian r-line shape and its extraordinary sharpness (half width at half height ≈ 1 cm-1) are indicative of the motional narrowing of the relative solute-solute translational spectrum. As x is further raised, ternary solute-solute interactions impede the r-line growth in the O2-LAr spectrum because of the cancellation effect [J. Van Kranendonk, Physica 23, 825 (1957)]. Theoretical arguments are given that multiple interactions between the solutes should finally destroy the solute-solute induced r-line when the mixed solution approaches the limit of the pure liquid (x = 1). Interestingly, the nonbinary effects are too weak to appreciably affect the quadratic r-line scaling in the O2-LN2 cryosystem which persists up to x = 0.23. It is emphasized that studies of the resonant features in the collision-induced spectra of binary cryosolutions open up unique opportunities to spectroscopically trace the microscopic-scale diffusion.

  7. Collision-geometry fluctuations and triangular flow in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, B.; Roland, G.

    2010-05-01

    We introduce the concepts of participant triangularity and triangular flow in heavy-ion collisions, analogous to the definitions of participant eccentricity and elliptic flow. The participant triangularity characterizes the triangular anisotropy of the initial nuclear overlap geometry and arises from event-by-event fluctuations in the participant-nucleon collision points. In studies using a multiphase transport model (AMPT), a triangular flow signal is observed that is proportional to the participant triangularity and corresponds to a large third Fourier coefficient in two-particle azimuthal correlation functions. Using two-particle azimuthal correlations at large pseudorapidity separations measured by the PHOBOS and STAR experiments, we show that this Fourier component is also present in data. Ratios of the second and third Fourier coefficients in data exhibit similar trends as a function of centrality and transverse momentum as in AMPT calculations. These findings suggest a significant contribution of triangular flow to the ridge and broad away-side features observed in data. Triangular flow provides a new handle on the initial collision geometry and collective expansion dynamics in heavy-ion collisions.

  8. The temporal development of collision cascades in the binary collision approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.T.

    1989-07-01

    A modified binary collision approximation (BCA) was developed to allow explicit evaluation of the times at which projectiles in a collision cascade reach significant points in their trajectories, without altering the ''event-driven'' character of the model. The modified BCA was used to study the temporal development of cascades in copper and gold, initiated by primary atoms of up to 10 keV initial kinetic energy. Cascades generated with time-ordered collisions show fewer ''distant'' Frenkel pairs than do cascades generated with velocity-ordered collisions. In the former, the slower projectiles tend to move in less-damaged crystal than they do in the latter. The effect is larger in Au than in Cu and increases with primary energy. As an approach to cascade nonlinearities, cascades were generated in which stopped cascade atoms were allowed to be redisplaced in later encounters. There were many more redisplacements in time-ordered cascades than in velocity-ordered ones. Because of the additional stopping introduced by the redisplacement events, the cascades in which they were allowed had fewer defects than occurred otherwise. This effect also was larger in Au than in Cu and larger at high energies although most of the redisplacement encounters involved only low-energy particles. 13 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Do cloud-cloud collisions trigger high-mass star formation? I. Small cloud collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Takahira, Ken; Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Habe, Asao

    2014-09-01

    We performed sub-parsec (∼0.06 pc) scale simulations of two idealized molecular clouds with different masses undergoing a collision. Gas clumps with densities greater than 10{sup –20} g cm{sup –3} (0.3 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}) were identified as pre-stellar cores and tracked throughout the simulation. The colliding system showed a partial gas arc morphology with core formation in the oblique shock front at the collision interface. These characteristics support NANTEN observations of objects suspected to be colliding giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We investigated the effect of turbulence and collision speed on the resulting core population and compared the cumulative mass distribution to cores in observed GMCs. Our results suggest that a faster relative velocity increases the number of cores formed but that cores grow via accretion predominately while in the shock front, leading to a slower shock being more important for core growth. The core masses obey a power-law relation with index γ = –1.6, in good agreement with observations. This suggests that core production through collisions should follow a similar mass distribution as quiescent formation, albeit at a higher mass range. If cores can be supported against collapse during their growth, then the estimated ram pressure from gas infall is of the right order to counter the radiation pressure and form a star of 100 M {sub ☉}.

  10. Higher-energy Collision-activated Dissociation Without a Dedicated Collision Cell*

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, Graeme C.; Phanstiel, Douglas H.; Brumbaugh, Justin; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2011-01-01

    Beam-type collisional activation dissociation (HCD) offers many advantages over resonant excitation collision-activated dissociation, including improved identification of phosphorylated peptides and compatibility with isobaric tag-based quantitation (e.g. tandem mass tag (TMT) and iTRAQ). However, HCD typically requires specially designed and dedicated collision cells. Here we demonstrate that HCD can be performed in the ion injection pathway of a mass spectrometer with a standard atmospheric inlet (iHCD). Testing this method on complex peptide mixtures revealed similar identification rates to collision-activated dissociation (2883 versus 2730 IDs for iHCD/CAD, respectively) and precursor-product-conversion efficiency comparable to that achieved within a dedicated collision cell. Compared with pulsed-q dissociation, a quadrupole ion trap-based method that retains low-mass isobaric tag reporter ions, iHCD yielded isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification reporter ions 10-fold more intense. This method involves no additional hardware and can theoretically be implemented on any mass spectrometer with an atmospheric inlet. PMID:21393638

  11. Do Cloud-Cloud Collisions Trigger High-mass Star Formation? I. Small Cloud Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahira, Ken; Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Habe, Asao

    2014-09-01

    We performed sub-parsec (~0.06 pc) scale simulations of two idealized molecular clouds with different masses undergoing a collision. Gas clumps with densities greater than 10-20 g cm-3 (0.3 × 104 cm-3) were identified as pre-stellar cores and tracked throughout the simulation. The colliding system showed a partial gas arc morphology with core formation in the oblique shock front at the collision interface. These characteristics support NANTEN observations of objects suspected to be colliding giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We investigated the effect of turbulence and collision speed on the resulting core population and compared the cumulative mass distribution to cores in observed GMCs. Our results suggest that a faster relative velocity increases the number of cores formed but that cores grow via accretion predominately while in the shock front, leading to a slower shock being more important for core growth. The core masses obey a power-law relation with index γ = -1.6, in good agreement with observations. This suggests that core production through collisions should follow a similar mass distribution as quiescent formation, albeit at a higher mass range. If cores can be supported against collapse during their growth, then the estimated ram pressure from gas infall is of the right order to counter the radiation pressure and form a star of 100 M ⊙.

  12. Collision-geometry fluctuations and triangular flow in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Roland, G.

    2010-05-15

    We introduce the concepts of participant triangularity and triangular flow in heavy-ion collisions, analogous to the definitions of participant eccentricity and elliptic flow. The participant triangularity characterizes the triangular anisotropy of the initial nuclear overlap geometry and arises from event-by-event fluctuations in the participant-nucleon collision points. In studies using a multiphase transport model (AMPT), a triangular flow signal is observed that is proportional to the participant triangularity and corresponds to a large third Fourier coefficient in two-particle azimuthal correlation functions. Using two-particle azimuthal correlations at large pseudorapidity separations measured by the PHOBOS and STAR experiments, we show that this Fourier component is also present in data. Ratios of the second and third Fourier coefficients in data exhibit similar trends as a function of centrality and transverse momentum as in AMPT calculations. These findings suggest a significant contribution of triangular flow to the ridge and broad away-side features observed in data. Triangular flow provides a new handle on the initial collision geometry and collective expansion dynamics in heavy-ion collisions.

  13. Collision-induced dissociation of fluoropyridinide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shuji; Lineberger, W. Carl; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2007-10-01

    Collision-induced dissociation of ortho-fluoro, meta-fluoro, and 2,6-difluoropyridinide anions are studied using the selected ion flow tube technique. Structures and energetics of the reactants, transition states, and products are calculated at the MP4(SDQ)/6-31 + G(d) level of theory based on the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and/or MP2/6-31 + G(d) optimized geometries. The monofluoropyridinide anions (C5NH3F-) dissociate almost exclusively via loss of an HF molecule, i.e., C5NH2- + HF at low collision energies, in addition to loss of F- at higher energies. 2,6-Difluoropyridinide anions (C5NH2F2-) dissociate via successive loss of HF molecules to form C5NHF- then C5N- depending on the collision energy. The CID results strongly suggest formation of ring-intact pyridynide structures (C5NH2-, C5NHF-) with a bent triple bond embedded in the azine ring systems. Calculated reaction energy diagrams are totally consistent with the experimental observations. Didehydropyridynides C5NH2- and C5NHF- have substantial barriers to decomposition. Tetradehydropyridynide C5N- is a highly strained ring system and metastable with a predicted barrier of about 5 kcal mol-1 (20 kJ mol-1) toward ring-opening to a linear NCCCCC- structure. The observed C5N- species is most likely the linear anion under experimental conditions; however, the ring-intact C5N- pyridynide is a highly energetic species releasing about 80 kcal mol-1 (340 kJ mol-1) of energy upon the ring-opening.

  14. Pediatric pelvic fractures in side impact collisions.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Kristy B; Mari-Gowda, Shresta; Kallan, Michael J; Durbin, Dennis R; Winston, Flaura K

    2002-11-01

    Little is known about the mechanism of pelvic injury in the pediatric population, an age range over which the pelvis undergoes tremendous structural change. We hypothesize that these structural changes influence pelvic fracture injury mechanisms. A probability sample of children under age 16 years in crashes were enrolled in an on-going crash surveillance system which links insurance claims data to telephone survey and crash investigation data. 15,725 children in side impact collisions were studied. Risk of pelvic fracture in side impact collisions was estimated and factors associated with these injuries were identified. Eight cases were examined using in-depth investigation to identify the injury mechanisms. Of our study sample, 0.10% of children suffered a pelvic fracture. The typical child with a pelvic fracture was a 12-15 year old female front row occupant of a passenger car involved in a struck side collision with intrusion. Analyses of the in-depth crash investigations determined that the developmental age of the child was the most important parameter associated with the type of pelvic fracture. Children 8-11 years experienced isolated pubic rami fractures, whereas children 12-15 years experienced multiple fractures of the pelvic ring. This distinct injury pattern is directly related to the ossification during puberty of the cartilage connecting the three bones of the pelvis. A secondary influence on the injury pattern was the geometrical and stiffness incompatibilities between impact partners that resulted in vehicle deformation and rotation of the vehicle seat. In the effort to improve the side impact protection of vehicles, attention should be paid to improved structural chassis design that minimizes the dynamic deformation of the seat. PMID:17096230

  15. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Georgia, Athens, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  16. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Concept Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2009-01-01

    An initial Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the initial concept for an aircraft-based method of conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) in the TMA focusing on conflict detection algorithms and alerting display concepts. This paper gives an overview of the CD&R concept, simulation study, and test results.

  17. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Simulation Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2010-01-01

    A Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate pilot reaction to conflict events in the TMA near the airport, different alert timings for various scenarios, alerting display concepts, and directive alerting concepts. This paper gives an overview of the conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) concept, simulation study, and test results

  18. Photon-photon collisions via relativisitic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, James K.

    2012-07-11

    Photon-photon scattering at low energies has been predicted theoretically for many years. However, due to the extremely small cross section there has been no experimental confirmation of this. Due to the rapid increase in laser irradiances and projected peak irradiances in planned facilities regimes could be reached where photon-photon scattering could be experimentally observed. We will first review basic aspects of photon-photon collisions concentrating on the calculation of the photon-photon scattering cross section. Then we will discuss the possibilities for observing these phenomena in ultra-high irradiance laser-plasma interactions involving relativistic mirrors.

  19. Dynamical phase trajectories for relativistic nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Arsene, I. C.; Bravina, L. V.; Cassing, W.; Ivanov, Yu. B.; Russkikh, V. N.; Larionov, A.; Randrup, J.; Toneev, V. D.; Zeeb, G.; Zschiesche, D.

    2007-03-15

    Central collisions of gold nuclei are simulated by several existing models and the central net baryon density {rho} and the energy density {epsilon} are extracted at successive times for beam kinetic energies of 5-40 GeV/nucleon. The resulting trajectories in the ({rho},{epsilon}) phase plane are discussed from the perspective of experimentally exploring the expected first-order hadronization phase transition with the planned FAIR at GSI or in a low-energy campaign at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  20. Jet reconstruction in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciari, Matteo; Rojo, Juan; Salam, Gavin P.; Soyez, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    We examine the problem of jet reconstruction at heavy-ion colliders using jet-area-based background subtraction tools as provided by FastJet. We use Monte Carlo simulations with and without quenching to study the performance of several jet algorithms, including the option of filtering, under conditions corresponding to RHIC and LHC collisions. We find that most standard algorithms perform well, though the anti- k t and filtered Cambridge/Aachen algorithms have clear advantages in terms of the reconstructed p t offset and dispersion.

  1. Ionization Phenomena in Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveney, Edward Francis

    Two many-electron ion-atom collision systems are used to investigate atomic and molecular structure and collisional interactions. Electrons emitted from MeV/u C^{3+} projectile target -atom collisions were measured with a high-resolution position -sensitive electron spectrometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The electrons are predominantly ionized by direct projectile -target interactions or autoionizing (AI) from doubly excited AI levels of the ion which were excited in the collision. The energy dependence of directly scattered target electrons, binary-encounter electrons (BEE), is investigated and compared with theory. AI levels of the projectile 1s to nl single electron excited series, (1s2snl) n = 2,3,4,....infty, including the series limit are identified uniquely using energy level calculations. Original Auger yield calculations using a code by Cowan were used to discover a 1/{n^3} scaling in intensities of Auger peaks in the aforementioned series. This is explained using scattering theory. A nonstatistical population of the terms in the (1s2s2l) configuration was identified and investigated as a function of the beam energy and for four different target atoms. Two electron excited configurations are identified and investigated. The angular distribution of a correlated transfer and excitation AI state is measured and compared to theory. The final scattered charge state distributions of Kr^ {n+}, n = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, projectiles are measured following collisions with Kr targets in the Van de Graaff Laboratory here at The University of Connecticut. Average scattered charge states as high as 12 are observed. It appears that these electrons are ionized during the lifetime of the quasimolecular state but a complete picture of the ionization mechanism(s) is not known. Calculations using a statistical model of ionization, modified in several ways, are compared with the experimental results to see if it is possible to isolate whether or not the electrons originate

  2. Measurement of production in collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Canto, A. Di; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dorosz, P.; Suárez, A. Dosil; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Albor, V. Fernandez; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gándara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manzali, M.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sánchez, A. Martín; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Alvarez, A. Pazos; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Trigo, E. Perez; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Romero, D. A. Roa; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Silva, J. J. Saborido; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spinella, F.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Sierra, C. Vázquez; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-04-01

    The production of , and mesons decaying into the dimuon final state is studied with the LHCb detector using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of TeV. The differential production cross-sections times dimuon branching fractions are measured as functions of the transverse momentum and rapidity, over the ranges GeV/ and . The total cross-sections in this kinematic region, assuming unpolarised production, are measured to be where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  3. Reactive collisions between CH+ and O-.

    PubMed

    Le Padellec, A; Staicu-Casagrande, E M; Nzeyimana, T; Naji, E A; Urbain, X

    2006-04-21

    Integral cross sections were measured for two reactions occurring in CH+ + O- collisions: the formation of the carbon monoxide cation CO+ via a reactive ionization process and the formation of the (iso)formyl cation HCO+ (HOC+) via the associative ionization process. Both carbon monoxide and formyl cations are present in the interstellar medium, the latter one being quite abundant in dense clouds. Provided the oxygen anion would also be present in the interstellar environment, the large efficiency of the two reactive processes reported here would justify their inclusion in astrochemical models. The whole set of data was obtained by means of a merged-beam setup operating with keV beams.

  4. Physics of Nuclear Collisions at High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwa, Rudolph C.

    2012-05-01

    A wide range of problems has been investigated in the research program during the period of this grant. Although the major effort has been in the subject of heavy-ion collisions, we have also studied problems in biological and other physical systems. The method of analysis used in reducing complex data in multiparticle production to simple descriptions can also be applied to the study of complex systems of very different nature. Phase transition is an important phenomenon in many areas of physics, and for heavy-ion collisions we study the fluctuations of multiplicities at the critical point. Human brain activities as revealed in EEG also involve fluctuations in time series, and we have found that our experience enables us to find the appropriate quantification of the fluctuations in ways that can differentiate stroke and normal subjects. The main topic that characterizes the research at Oregon in heavy-ion collisions is the recombination model for the treatment of the hadronization process. We have avoided the hydrodynamical model partly because there is already a large community engaged in it, but more significantly we have found the assumption of rapid thermalization unconvincing. Recent results in studying LHC physics lead us to provide more evidence that shower partons are very important even at low p_T, but are ignored by hydro. It is not easy to work in an environment where the conventional wisdom regards our approach as being incorrect because it does not adhere to the standard paradigm. But that is just what a vibrant research community needs: unconventional approach may find evidences that can challenge the orthodoxy. An example is the usual belief that elliptic flow in fluid dynamics gives rise to azimuthal anisotropy. We claim that it is only sufficient but not necessary. With more data from LHC and more independent thinkers working on the subject what is sufficient as a theory may turn out to be incorrect in reality. Another area of investigation that

  5. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetta, E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  6. RHIC operation with asymmetric collisions in 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Aschenauer, C.; Atoian, G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K. A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Ottavio, T. D.; Drees, K. A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C. J.; Gu, X.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Laster, J. S.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Narayan, G.; Nayak, S.; Nemesure, S.; Pile, P.; Poblaguev, A.; Ranjbar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Wang, G.; White, S.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2015-08-07

    To study low-x shadowing/saturation physics as well as other nuclear effects [1], [2], proton-gold (p-Au, for 5 weeks) and proton-Aluminum (p-Al, for 2 weeks) collisions were provided for experiments in 2015 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), with polarized proton beam in the Blue ring and Au/Al beam in the Yellow ring. The special features of the asymmetric run in 2015 will be introduced. The operation experience will be reviewed as well in the report.

  7. Leptonic annihilation in hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, P.; Eriksson, S.; Jonsell, S.; Saenz, A.; Zygelman, B.; Dalgarno, A.

    2004-08-01

    We consider the question of competition between leptonic and hadronic annihilation in matter-antimatter interaction. The rate of direct positron-electron annihilation in cold hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions has been calculated. The presence of leptonic annihilation introduces an absorptive, imaginary component to the hydrogen-antihydrogen scattering length; this component is 1.4x10{sup -4} a.u. for the singlet state of the leptonic spins, and 1.2x10{sup -7} a.u. for the triplet state. Leptonic annihilation is shown to be about 3 orders of magnitude slower than proton-antiproton annihilation.

  8. Multiverse rate equation including bubble collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Michael P.

    2013-03-01

    The volume fractions of vacua in an eternally inflating multiverse are described by a coarse-grain rate equation, which accounts for volume expansion and vacuum transitions via bubble formation. We generalize the rate equation to account for bubble collisions, including the possibility of classical transitions. Classical transitions can modify the details of the hierarchical structure among the volume fractions, with potential implications for the staggering and Boltzmann-brain issues. Whether or not our vacuum is likely to have been established by a classical transition depends on the detailed relationships among transition rates in the landscape.

  9. Experiments and scaling laws for catastrophic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, A.; Cerroni, P.; Davis, D.; Ryan, E.; di Martino, M.

    The existing data on shattering impacts are reviewed using natural silicate, ice, and cement-mortar targets. A comprehensive data base containing the most important parameters describing these experiments was prepared. The collisional energy needed to shatter consolidated homogeneous targets and the ensuing fragment size distributions have been well studied experimentally. However, major gaps exist in the data on fragment velocity and rotational distributions, as well as collisional energy partitioning for these targets. Current scaling laws lead to predicted outcomes of asteroid collisions that are inconsistent with interpretations of astronomical data.

  10. Anisotropy of dilepton emission from nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovskaya, E.L.; Teryaev, O.V.; Toneev, V.D. |

    1994-11-07

    Attention is paid to studying the angular characteristics of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} pairs created in collisions with nuclear targets at intermediate and relativistic energies. Arising due to general spin and angular momentum constraints, the dilepton anisotropy seems to be quite sensitive to the contribution of different sources and may be used for disentangling these sources (or models) as well as an additional signature of a possible chiral symmetry restoration and phase transition of hadrons into the quark-gluon plasma. An anisotropy estimate for some dilepton sources is given and its relevance to the problems mentioned is discussed.

  11. Leading neutrons from polarized pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan; Soffer, J.

    2008-10-13

    We calculate the cross section and single-spin azimuthal asymmetry, A{sub n}(t) for inclusive neutron production in pp collisions at forward rapidities relative to the polarized proton. Absorptive corrections to the pion pole generate a relative phase between the spin-flip and non-flip amplitudes, which leads to an appreciable spin asymmetry. However, the asymmetry observed recently in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC at very small |t|{approx}0.01 GeV{sup 2} cannot be explained by this mechanism.

  12. Action principle for Coulomb collisions in plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Hirvijoki, Eero

    2016-09-14

    In this study, an action principle for Coulomb collisions in plasmas is proposed. Although no natural Lagrangian exists for the Landau-Fokker-Planck equation, an Eulerian variational formulation is found considering the system of partial differential equations that couple the distribution function and the Rosenbluth-MacDonald-Judd potentials. Conservation laws are derived after generalizing the energy-momentum stress tensor for second order Lagrangians and, in the case of a test-particle population in a given plasma background, the action principle is shown to correspond to the Langevin equation for individual particles.

  13. Non abelian hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Calzetta, E.

    2014-01-14

    The goal of the relativistic heavy ion collisions (RHIC) program is to create a state of matter where color degrees of freedom are deconfined. The dynamics of matter in this state, in spite of the complexities of quantum chromodynamics, is largely determined by the conservation laws of energy momentum and color currents. Therefore it is possible to describe its main features in hydrodynamic terms, the very short color neutralization time notwithstanding. In this lecture we shall give a simple derivation of the hydrodynamics of a color charged fluid, by generalizing the usual derivation of hydrodynamics from kinetic theory to the non abelian case.

  14. Jets In Heavy Ion Collisions with CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salur, Sevil

    2016-08-01

    Jet physics in heavy ion collisions is a rich field which has been rapidly evolving since the first observations of medium interactions at RHIC through back-to-back hadron correlations and at LHC via reconstructed jets. In order to completely characterize the final state via jet-medium interactions and distinguish between competing energy loss mechanisms, complementary and robust jet observables are investigated. Latest developments of jet finding techniques and their applications to heavy ion environments are discussed with an emphasis given on experimental results from CMS experiment.

  15. Action principle for Coulomb collisions in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvijoki, Eero

    2016-09-01

    An action principle for Coulomb collisions in plasmas is proposed. Although no natural Lagrangian exists for the Landau-Fokker-Planck equation, an Eulerian variational formulation is found considering the system of partial differential equations that couple the distribution function and the Rosenbluth-MacDonald-Judd potentials. Conservation laws are derived after generalizing the energy-momentum stress tensor for second order Lagrangians and, in the case of a test-particle population in a given plasma background, the action principle is shown to correspond to the Langevin equation for individual particles.

  16. Ultracold Collisions Involving Heteronuclear Alkali Metal Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Cvitas, Marko T.; Soldan, Pavel; Hutson, Jeremy M.; Honvault, Pascal; Launay, Jean-Michel

    2005-05-27

    We carry out the first quantum dynamics calculations on ultracold atom-diatom collisions in isotopic mixtures. The systems studied are spin-polarized {sup 7}Li+{sup 6}Li{sup 7}Li, {sup 7}Li+{sup 6}Li{sub 2}, {sup 6}Li+{sup 6}Li{sup 7}Li, and {sup 6}Li+{sup 7}Li{sub 2}. Reactive scattering can occur for the first two systems even when the molecules are in their ground rovibrational states, but is slower than vibrational relaxation in homonuclear systems. Implications for sympathetic cooling of heteronuclear molecules are discussed.

  17. On rainbow scattering in inelastic molecular collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Lowell D.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to call attention to a growing misinterpretation in the literature on rainbow scattering in inelastic molecular collisions. The importance of rainbow structures in the angular distributions of elastic scattering cross sections is well established. However, use of approximate cross section formulas has led to an incorrect classification of the types of rainbows which are possible. Actually, however, it is possible to identify two classes of rainbows. If the relevant distributions and classifications are clearly stated, there should be little chance of confusion,

  18. Collision of Dual Aggregates (CODA): Experimental observations of low-velocity collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorges, Jeffery; Dove, Adrienne; Colwell, Josh E.

    2016-10-01

    Low-velocity collisions are one of the driving factors that determine the particle size distribution and particle size evolution in planetary ring systems and in the early stages of planet formation. Collisions of sub-micron to decimeter-sized objects may result in particle growth by accretion, rebounding, or erosive processes that result in the production of additional smaller particles. Numerical simulations of these systems are limited by a need to understand these collisional parameters over a range of conditions. We present the results of a sequence of laboratory experiments designed to explore collisions over a range of parameter space . We are able to observe low-velocity collisions by conducting experiments in vacuum chambers in our 0.8-sec drop tower apparatus. Initial experiments utilize a variety of impacting spheres, including glass, Teflon, aluminum, stainless steel, and brass. These spheres are either used in their natural state or are "mantled" - coated with a few-mm thick layer of a cohesive powder. A high-speed, high-resolution video camera is used to record the motion of the colliding bodies. We track the particles to determine impactor speeds before and after collision, the impact parameter, and the collisional outcome. In the case of the mantled impactors, we can assess how much rotation is generated by the collision and estimate how much powder is released (i.e. how much mass is lost) due to the collision. We also determine how the coefficient of restitution varies as a function of material type, morphology, and impact velocity. With impact velocities ranging from about 20-100 cm/s we observe that mantling of particles significantly reduces their coefficients of restitution, but we see basically no dependence of the coefficient of restitution on the impact velocity, impact parameter, or system mass. The results of this study will contribute to a better empirical model of collisional outcomes that will be refined with numerical simulation of the

  19. Liquid Sloshing Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Raouf A.

    2005-06-01

    The problem of liquid sloshing in moving or stationary containers remains of great concern to aerospace, civil, and nuclear engineers; physicists; designers of road tankers and ship tankers; and mathematicians. Beginning with the fundamentals of liquid sloshing theory, this book takes the reader systematically from basic theory to advanced analytical and experimental results in a self-contained and coherent format. The book is divided into four sections. Part I deals with the theory of linear liquid sloshing dynamics; Part II addresses the nonlinear theory of liquid sloshing dynamics, Faraday waves, and sloshing impacts; Part III presents the problem of linear and nonlinear interaction of liquid sloshing dynamics with elastic containers and supported structures; and Part IV considers the fluid dynamics in spinning containers and microgravity sloshing. This book will be invaluable to researchers and graduate students in mechanical and aeronautical engineering, designers of liquid containers, and applied mathematicians.

  20. Monogroove liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F. (Inventor); Edelstein, Fred (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid supply control is disclosed for a heat transfer system which transports heat by liquid-vapor phase change of a working fluid. An assembly (10) of monogroove heat pipe legs (15) can be operated automatically as either heat acquisition devices or heat discharge sources. The liquid channels (27) of the heat pipe legs (15) are connected to a reservoir (35) which is filled and drained by respective filling and draining valves (30, 32). Information from liquid level sensors (50, 51) on the reservoir (35) is combined (60) with temperature information (55) from the liquid heat exchanger (12) and temperature information (56) from the assembly vapor conduit (42) to regulate filling and draining of the reservoir (35), so that the reservoir (35) in turn serves the liquid supply/drain needs of the heat pipe legs (15), on demand, by passive capillary action (20, 28).

  1. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Tshishiku, Eugene M.

    2011-08-09

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  2. LIQUID CYCLONE CONTACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Whatley, M.E.; Woods, W.M.

    1962-09-01

    This invention relates to liquid-liquid extraction systems. The invention, an improved hydroclone system, comprises a series of serially connected, axially aligned hydroclones, each of which is provided with an axially aligned overflow chamber. The chambers are so arranged that rotational motion of a fluid being passed through the system is not lost in passing from chamber to chamber; consequently, this system is highly efficient in contacting and separating two immiscible liquids. (AEC)

  3. Harvesting contaminants from liquid

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Hunter, Scott R.

    2016-05-31

    Disclosed are examples of apparatuses for evaporative purification of a contaminated liquid. In each example, there is a vessel for storing the contaminated fluid. The vessel includes a surface coated with a layer of superhydrophobic material and the surface is at least partially in contact with the contaminated liquid. The contaminants do not adhere to the surface as the purified liquid evaporates, thus allowing the contaminants to be harvested.

  4. Elasticity of liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Asare-Asher, Samuel; Connor, Jason N; Sedev, Rossen

    2015-07-01

    Liquid marbles are liquid droplets covered densely with small particles. They exhibit hydrophobic properties even on hydrophilic surfaces and this behaviour is closely related to the Cassie wetting state and the phenomenon of superhydrophobicity. Typical liquid marbles are of millimetre size but their properties are analogous to smaller capsules and droplets of Pickering emulsions. We study water marbles covered with an uneven multilayer of polyethylene particles. Their elastic properties were assessed under quasi-static conditions. The liquid marbles are highly elastic and can sustain a reversible deformation of up to 30%. The spring constant is of the same order of magnitude as that for bare water droplets. Therefore the elasticity of the liquid marble is provided mainly by the liquid menisci between the particles. Upon further compression, the spring constant increases up to the point of breakage. This increase may be due to capillary attraction acting across the emerging cracks in the particle coating. The stress-strain curve for liquid marbles is similar to that obtained with liquid-filled microcapsules. A mechanical scaling description proposed for capsules is qualitatively applicable for liquid marbles. The exact mechanical role of the multilayer particle network remains elusive.

  5. Quantum Hall Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzihovsky, Leo

    2003-03-01

    Liquid-crystals, defined as states of matter intermediate in their properties between fully disordered isotropic liquids and fully ordered crystals are ubiquitous in nature. Recent transport measurements on two-dimensional electron systems in moderate magnetic fields suggest the existence of a spontaneously orientationally-ordered, compressible liquid state. I will discuss electronic liquid-crystals interpretation of these experiments, focusing on a recently proposed quantum Hall nematic state that is predicted to exhibit a novel, highly anisotropic q^3 density-director mode and other interesting phenomenology.

  6. PEP liquid level system

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritzen, T.; Sah, R.C.

    1981-03-01

    A liquid level system has been installed in the accelerator housing of the PEP storage ring. This instrument spans the entire 2.2 km circumference of the PEP project, and over one hundred readouts provide reference elevations which are used for the accurate alignment of accelerator components. The liquid level has proven to be extremely precise (+-0.10 mm) and quick to use, and it has contributed to the accurate alignment of PEP before beam turn-on. Since the liquid level readouts are rigidly attached to the accelerator housing, the liquid level has been a convenient means to monitor the settling of the accelerator housing.

  7. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  8. Liquid explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Lowell J.

    1994-03-01

    A Liquid Explosives Screening System capable of scanning unopened bottles for liquid explosives has been developed. The system can be operated to detect specific explosives directly, or to verify the labeled or bar-coded contents of the container. In this system nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to interrogate the liquid. NMR produces an extremely rich data set and many parameters of the NMR response can be determined simultaneously. As a result, multiple NMR signatures may be defined for any given set of liquids, and the signature complexity then selected according to the level of threat.

  9. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Kotz, Dennis M.; Hinz, William R.

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  10. RENEWABLE LIQUID GETTERING PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.

    1962-08-21

    A method and structure were developed for pumping gases by simple absorption into a liquid gettering material. The invention comprises means ror continuously pumping a liquid getterrng material from a reservoir to the top of a generally vertical surface disposed in a vacuum pumping chamber to receive gaseous and other particles in the liquid gettering material which continuously flows downward over the vertical suiface. Means are provided for continuous removal, degassing, and return of a portion of the liquid gettering material from the reservoir connected with collectrng means at the base of the generally vertical plate. (AEC)

  11. Liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A liquid level sensor having a pair of upright conductors spaced by an insulator defining a first high resistance path between the conductors. An electrically conductive path is interposed between the upright conductors at a discrete location at which liquid level is to be measured. It includes a liquid accessible gap of a dimension such that the electrical resistance across the conductor when the gap is filled with the liquid is detectably less than when the gap is emptied. The conductor might also be physically altered by temperature changes to serve also as an indicator of elevated temperature.

  12. Spin response of a normal Fermi liquid with noncentral interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pethick, C. J.; Schwenk, A.

    2009-11-15

    We consider the spin response of a normal Fermi liquid with noncentral interactions under conditions intermediate between the collisionless and hydrodynamic regimes. This problem is of importance for calculations of neutrino properties in dense matter. By expressing the deviation of the quasiparticle distribution function from equilibrium in terms of eigenfunctions of the transport equation under the combined influence of collisions and an external field, we derive a closed expression for the spin-density-spin-density response function and compare its predictions with that of a relaxation-time approximation. Our results indicate that the relaxation-time approximation is reliable for neutrino properties under astrophysically relevant conditions.

  13. Collision avoidance of two general robot manipulators by minimum delay time

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C,; Chung, M.J.; Lee, B.H.

    1994-03-01

    A simple time delay method for avoiding collisions between two general robot arms is proposed. Links of the robots are approximated by polyhedra and the danger of collision between two robots is expressed by distance functions defined between the robots. The collision map scheme, which can describe collisions between two robots effectively, is adopted. The minimum delay time value needed for collision avoidance is obtained by a simple procedure of following the boundary contour of collision region on a collision map. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed time delay method, a computer simulation study is shown where a collision is likely to occur realistically. 11 refs.

  14. Theoretical Concepts for Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2009-07-27

    Various forms of matter may be produced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. These are the Quark GluonPlasma, the Color Glass Condensate , the Glasma and Quarkyoninc Matter. A novel effect that may beassociated with topological charge fluctuations is the Chiral Magnetic Effect. I explain these concepts andexplain how they may be seen in ultra-relatvistic heavy ion collisions

  15. Direct numerical simulations of collision efficiency of cohesive sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Feng; Maa, Jerome P.-Y.; Zhang, Qing-He; Shen, Xiao-Teng

    2016-09-01

    A clear understanding of the collision efficiency of cohesive sediment particles is critical for more accurate simulation of the flocculation processes. It is difficult, if not impossible, to carry out laboratory experiments to determine the collision efficiency for small particles. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is a relatively feasible approach to describe the motion of spherical particles under gravity in calm water, and thus, to study the collision efficiency of these particles. In this study, the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is used to calculate the relative trajectories of two approaching particles with different ratios of sizes and densities. Results show that the inter-molecular forces (i.e., van der Waals attractive force, electrostatic repulsive/attractive force, and displacement force), which are usually neglected in previous studies, would affect the trajectories, and thus, lead to an overestimation of the collision efficiency. It is found that to increase the particle size ratio from 0.1 to 0.8 only slightly increases the collision efficiency, since the force caused by fluid-solid interaction between these two particles is reduced. To increase the submerged particle density ratio from 1 to 22, however, would significantly decrease the collision efficiency. Earlier analytical formulations of collision efficiency, which only consider the effects of particle size ratio, have significantly overestimated the collision efficiency (change from 0.01 to 0.6) when the particle size ratio is around 0.5.

  16. 14 CFR 129.18 - Collision avoidance system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... meets TSO C-118, or a later version, or(2) A collision avoidance system equivalent to excluding any TSO C-118, or a later version, or (3) A collision avoidance system and Mode S transponder that meet...) Turbine-powered airplane of more than 33,000 pounds maximum certificated takeoff weight (1) An...

  17. 14 CFR 121.356 - Collision avoidance system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... version, or(2) A collision avoidance system equivalent to has a TSO C-118, or a later version, or (3) A... C-118, or a later version, or(2) A collision avoidance system equivalent to maximum TSO C-118, or a...— Then you must operate that airplane with— (a) Turbine-powered airplane of more than 33,000...

  18. Lattice approach for {alpha}+H{sub 2}{sup +} collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.C.; Esry, B.D.

    2005-08-15

    We solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for an ion-molecule collision using a lattice approach. This method carries over naturally from similar lattice treatments of ion-atom collisions, and is free from the multicenter problems that make extensions of other ion-atom methods difficult.

  19. Exact linearized Coulomb collision operator in the moment expansion

    DOE PAGES

    Ji, Jeong -Young; Held, Eric D.

    2006-10-05

    In the moment expansion, the Rosenbluth potentials, the linearized Coulomb collision operators, and the moments of the collision operators are analytically calculated for any moment. The explicit calculation of Rosenbluth potentials converts the integro-differential form of the Coulomb collision operator into a differential operator, which enables one to express the collision operator in a simple closed form for any arbitrary mass and temperature ratios. In addition, it is shown that gyrophase averaging the collision operator acting on arbitrary distribution functions is the same as the collision operator acting on the corresponding gyrophase averaged distribution functions. The moments of the collisionmore » operator are linear combinations of the fluid moments with collision coefficients parametrized by mass and temperature ratios. Furthermore, useful forms involving the small mass-ratio approximation are easily found since the collision operators and their moments are expressed in terms of the mass ratio. As an application, the general moment equations are explicitly written and the higher order heat flux equation is derived.« less

  20. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Carbon Monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2015-03-15

    Cross section data are collected and reviewed for electron collisions with carbon monoxide. Collision processes included are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational and electronic states, ionization, and dissociation. For each process, recommended values of the cross sections are presented, when possible. The literature has been surveyed through to the end of 2013.

  1. Rotation as an origin of high energy particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2016-01-01

    We consider collision of two particles in rotating spacetimes without horizons. If the metric coefficient responsible for rotation of spacetime is big enough, the energy of collisions in the center of mass frame can be as large as one likes. This can happen in the ergoregion only. The results are model-independent and apply both to relativistic stars and wormholes.

  2. 14 CFR 129.18 - Collision avoidance system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collision avoidance system. 129.18 Section... § 129.18 Collision avoidance system. Effective January 1, 2005, any airplane you, as a foreign air... Avoidance Systems If you operate in the United States any . . . Then you must operate that airplane with:...

  3. On the utility and ubiquity of atomic collision physics

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is divided into three parts. In the introduction, we discuss the history and makeup of ICPEAC. In the second part, we discuss the extent of applicability of atomic collision physics. In the third part, we chose one subject (dielectronic excitation) to show the interrelationship of various sub-branches of atomic collision physics. 28 refs., 14 figs.

  4. Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, R K; Townsend, L W

    1994-07-01

    Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions. The most favorable conditions of high densities and low temperatures are usually associated with astrophysical processes and may be difficult to achieve in heavy ion collisions. Nonetheless, some suggestions for the possible experimental verification of the existence of this phenomenon are made.

  5. Hyperfine transitions in ultracold hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, A. Yu.; Froelich, P.

    2009-07-15

    We consider the hyperfine transitions in ultracold collisions of hydrogen (H) and antihydrogen (H) atoms. The cross sections for transitions between various spin states are calculated. We show that hyperfine transitions in H-H collisions are basically driven by the strong force between proton and antiproton.

  6. Onset of radial flow in p+p collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; Chen, Hongfang; Li, Cheng; Ruan, Lijuan; Tang, Zebo; Xu, Zhangbu

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below √s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7more » TeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (β) = 0.320 ± 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.« less

  7. Cross sections for electron collisions with nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2016-09-01

    Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with nitric oxide. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature (up to the end of 2015), recommended values of the cross section are determined, as far as possible.

  8. A gyrokinetic collision operator for magnetized Lorentz plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Qin, Hong; Ma, Chenhao; Yu, Xiongjie

    2011-03-01

    A gyrocenter collision operator for magnetized Lorentz plasmas is derived using the Fokker-Plank method. The gyrocenter collision operator consists of drift and diffusion terms in the gyrocenter coordinates, including the diffusion of the gyrocenter, which does not exist for the collision operator in the particle phase space coordinates. The gyrocenter collision operator also depends on the transverse electric field explicitly, which is crucial for the correct treatment of collisional effects and transport in the gyrocenter coordinates. The gyrocenter collision operator derived is applied to calculate the particle and heat transport fluxes in a magnetized Lorentz plasma with an electric field. The particle and heat transport fluxes calculated from our gyrocenter collision operator agree exactly with the classical Braginskii's result [S. I. Braginskii, Reviews of Plasma Physics (Consultants Bureau, New York, 1965), Vol. 1, p. 205: P. Helander and D. J. Sigmar, Collisional Transport in Magnetized Plasmas (Cambridge University, Cambridge, 2002), p. 65], which validates the correctness of our collision operator. To calculate the transport fluxes correctly, it is necessary to apply the pullback transformation associated with gyrocenter coordinate transformation in the presence of collisions, which also serves as a practical algorithm for evaluating collisional particle and heat transport fluxes in the gyrocenter coordinates.

  9. Crabbed Waist Collisions in DAFNE and Super-B Design

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Biscari, C.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.O.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, Giovanni; Milardi, C.; /Frascati /Orsay, LAL /CERN /Rome III U. /Rome U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /KEK, Tsukuba /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Cosenza /SLAC /Frascati

    2011-11-02

    The new idea of increasing the luminosity of a collider with crab waist collisions and first experimental results from the DA{Phi}NE {Phi}-Factory at LNF, Frascati, using this concept are presented. Consequences for the design of future factories will be discussed. An outlook to the performance reach with crab waist collisions is given, with emphasis on future B Factories.

  10. Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1994-01-01

    Using a fully self-consistent quantum statistical model, we demonstrate the possibility of Bose condensation of nuclei in heavy ion collisions. The most favorable conditions of high densities and low temperatures are usually associated with astrophysical processes and may be difficult to achieve in heavy ion collisions. Nonetheless, some suggestions for the possible experimental verification of the existence of this phenomenon are made.

  11. 14 CFR 437.65 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 437.65..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Safety Requirements § 437.65 Collision avoidance analysis. (a) For a permitted flight with a planned maximum altitude greater than 150 kilometers,...

  12. 14 CFR 437.65 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 437.65 Section 437.65 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Safety Requirements § 437.65 Collision avoidance analysis. (a) For a permitted flight with...

  13. 14 CFR 437.65 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 437.65 Section 437.65 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Safety Requirements § 437.65 Collision avoidance analysis. (a) For a permitted flight with...

  14. 14 CFR 437.65 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 437.65 Section 437.65 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Safety Requirements § 437.65 Collision...

  15. 14 CFR 437.65 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 437.65 Section 437.65 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Safety Requirements § 437.65 Collision avoidance analysis. (a) For a permitted flight with...

  16. Educational Materials and Equipment Company: Collisions and Simple Harmonic Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, LeVonda S.; Risley, John S.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews a computer courseware package for mechanics at the high school and introductory college level. Discusses one-dimensional collisions, two-dimensional collisions, and simple harmonic motion programs. Shows two typical monitor displays. Rates this program as good overall. (YP)

  17. Toward a Physical Characterization of Raindrop Collision Outcome Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testik, F. Y.; Barros, Ana P.; Bilven, Francis L.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive raindrop collision outcome regime diagram that delineates the physical conditions associated with the outcome regimes (i.e., bounce, coalescence, and different breakup types) of binary raindrop collisions is proposed. The proposed diagram builds on a theoretical regime diagram defined in the phase space of collision Weber numbers We and the drop diameter ratio p by including critical angle of impact considerations. In this study, the theoretical regime diagram is first evaluated against a comprehensive dataset for drop collision experiments representative of raindrop collisions in nature. Subsequently, the theoretical regime diagram is modified to explicitly describe the dominant regimes of raindrop interactions in (We, p) by delineating the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of distinct types of collision-induced breakup (neck/filament, sheet, disk, and crown breakups) based on critical angle of impact consideration. Crown breakup is a subtype of disk breakup for lower collision kinetic energy that presents distinctive morphology. Finally, the experimental results are analyzed in the context of the comprehensive collision regime diagram, and conditional probabilities that can be used in the parameterization of breakup kernels in stochastic models of raindrop dynamics are provided.

  18. A collision avoidance system for a spaceplane manipulator arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sciomachen, Anna; Magnani, Piergiovanni

    1989-01-01

    Part of the activity in the area of collision avoidance related to the Hermes spaceplane is reported. A collision avoidance software system which was defined, developed and implemented in this project is presented. It computes the intersection between the solids representing the arm, the payload, and the objects. It is feasible with respect to the resources available on board, considering its performance.

  19. Auto Collision Technician: An Instructional Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is designed to help teachers in auto collision technician programs for grades 11 and 12 teach the critical competencies of the program. The critical competencies covered are the High Priority-Individual (HP-I) competencies in Ohio's Occupational Competency Assessment Profile (OCAP) for Auto Collision Technician. HP-I competencies are…

  20. HUBBLE REVEALS STELLAR FIREWORKS ACCOMPANYING GALAXY COLLISION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Hubble Space Telescope image provides a detailed look at a brilliant 'fireworks show' at the center of a collision between two galaxies. Hubble has uncovered over 1,000 bright, young star clusters bursting to life as a result of the head-on wreck. [Left] A ground-based telescopic view of the Antennae galaxies (known formally as NGC 4038/4039) - so named because a pair of long tails of luminous matter, formed by the gravitational tidal forces of their encounter, resembles an insect's antennae. The galaxies are located 63 million light-years away in the southern constellation Corvus. [Right] The respective cores of the twin galaxies are the orange blobs, left and right of image center, crisscrossed by filaments of dark dust. A wide band of chaotic dust, called the overlap region, stretches between the cores of the two galaxies. The sweeping spiral- like patterns, traced by bright blue star clusters, shows the result of a firestorm of star birth activity which was triggered by the collision. This natural-color image is a composite of four separately filtered images taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), on January 20, 1996. Resolution is 15 light-years per pixel (picture element). Credit: Brad Whitmore (STScI), and NASA

  1. COLLIDE-2: Collisions Into Dust Experiment-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, Joshua E.

    2002-01-01

    The Collisions Into Dust Experimental (COLLIDE-2) was the second flight of the COLLIDE payload. The payload performs six low-velocity impact experiments to study the collisions that are prevalent in planetary ring systems and in the early stages of planet formation. Each impact experiment is into a target of granular material, and the impacts occur at speeds between 1 and 100 cm/s in microgravity and in a vacuum. The experiments are recorded on digital videotape which is later analyzed. During the period of performance a plan was developed to address some of the technical issues that prevented the first flight of COLLIDE from being a complete success, and also to maximize the scientific return based on the science results from the first flight. The experiment was modified following a series of reviews of the design plan, and underwent extensive testing. The data from the experiment show that the primary goal of identifying transition regimes for low-velocity impacts based on cratering versus accretion was achieved. Following a brief period of storage, the experiment flew regimes for low-velocity impacts based on cratering versus accretion was achieved. as a Hitchhiker payload on the MACH-1 Hitchhiker bridge on STS-108 in December 2001. These data have been analyzed and submitted for publication. That manuscript is attached to this report. The experiment was retrieved in January 2002, and all six impact experiments functioned nominally. Preliminary results were reported at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference.

  2. Entropy lowering in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.; Bredy, R.; Camp, H.A.; DePaola, B.D.; Lee, T.G.; Awata, T.

    2005-06-15

    In ion-atom collisions, the charge transfer cross section is typically a strong function of the energy defect or Q value, typically with smaller energy defects giving rise to higher capture probabilities. In some theoretical treatments, for example those based on the Demkov model, the cross section is a strong function of the magnitude of the Q value, but is independent of its sign. In order to test this predicted sign independence, one must compare capture cross sections from energetically symmetric collision channels. In this work, relative capture cross sections, differential in scattering angle, are measured and compared for the energetically symmetric channels: Rb{sup +}+Rb(5s){yields}Rb(5p)+Rb{sup +} and Rb{sup +}+Rb(5p){yields}Rb(5s)+Rb{sup +}. It is found that not only are the two cross sections not equal, but that in this case the endoergic channel was 3 times more likely. That is, the entropy reducing channel was preferred. An intuitive model, based on molecular potential curves, is suggested. The endoergic propensity is found to be consistent with this model.

  3. Constraining relativistic models through heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, D. P.; Providencia, C.; Chiapparini, M.; Bracco, M. E.; Delfino, A.; Malheiro, M.

    2007-12-15

    Relativistic models can be successfully applied to the description of compact star properties in nuclear astrophysics as well as to nuclear matter and finite nuclei properties, these studies taking place at low and moderate temperatures. Nevertheless, all results are model dependent, and so far it is unclear whether some of them should be discarded. Moreover, in the regime of hot hadronic matter, very few calculations exist using these relativistic models, in particular when applied to particle yields in heavy ion collisions. A very important investigation is the simulation of a supernova explosion that is based on the construction of an adequate equation of state that needs to be valid within very large ranges of temperatures (0 to 100 MeV at least) and densities (very low to ten times the nuclear saturation density at least). In the present work, we comment on the known constraints that can help the selection of adequate models in this wide regime and investigate the main differences that arise when the particle production during a Au+Au collision at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is calculated with different relativistic models. We conclude that most of the models investigated in the present work give a very good overall description of the data and make predictions for not yet measured particle ratios.

  4. Emission source functions in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapoval, V. M.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.; Karpenko, Iu. A.

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional pion and kaon emission source functions are extracted from hydrokinetic model (HKM) simulations of central Au+Au collisions at the top Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy sNN=200 GeV. The model describes well the experimental data, previously obtained by the PHENIX and STAR collaborations using the imaging technique. In particular, the HKM reproduces the non-Gaussian heavy tails of the source function in the pair transverse momentum (out) and beam (long) directions, observed in the pion case and practically absent for kaons. The role of rescatterings and long-lived resonance decays in forming the mentioned long-range tails is investigated. The particle rescattering contribution to the out tail seems to be dominating. The model calculations also show substantial relative emission times between pions (with mean value 13 fm/c in the longitudinally comoving system), including those coming from resonance decays and rescatterings. A prediction is made for the source functions in Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Pb+Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV, which are still not extracted from the measured correlation functions.

  5. Higher order intercommutations in cosmic string collisions.

    PubMed

    Achúcarro, A; Verbiest, G J

    2010-07-01

    We report the first observation of multiple intercommutation (more than two successive reconnections) of Abelian Higgs cosmic strings at ultrahigh collision speeds, and the formation of "kink trains" with up to four closely spaced left- or right-moving kinks, in the deep type-II regime 16 ≤ β ≤ 64 (where β=m(scalar)2/m(gauge)2). The minimum critical speed for double reconnection goes down from ∼0.98c at β = 1 to ∼0.86c for β = 64. The process leading to the second intercommutation changes with β: it involves an expanding loop if β ≥ 16, but only a radiation blob if 1 < β ≤ 8. Triple reconnections are generic in the loop-mediated regime for collision parameters on the boundary between single and double reconnection. For β = 16 we observe quadruple events. We comment on the effect of strongly repulsive core interactions on the small scale structure on the strings and their gravitational wave emission. PMID:20867697

  6. Higher Order Intercommutations in Cosmic String Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Achucarro, A.; Verbiest, G. J.

    2010-07-09

    We report the first observation of multiple intercommutation (more than two successive reconnections) of Abelian Higgs cosmic strings at ultrahigh collision speeds, and the formation of ''kink trains'' with up to four closely spaced left- or right-moving kinks, in the deep type-II regime 16{<=}{beta}{<=}64 (where {beta}=m{sub scalar}{sup 2}/m{sub gauge}{sup 2}). The minimum critical speed for double reconnection goes down from {approx}0.98c at {beta}=1 to {approx}0.86c for {beta}=64. The process leading to the second intercommutation changes with {beta}: it involves an expanding loop if {beta}{>=}16, but only a radiation blob if 1<{beta}{<=}8. Triple reconnections are generic in the loop-mediated regime for collision parameters on the boundary between single and double reconnection. For {beta}=16 we observe quadruple events. We comment on the effect of strongly repulsive core interactions on the small scale structure on the strings and their gravitational wave emission.

  7. Positronium collisions with rare-gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrikant, Ilya; Gribakin, Gleb; Swann, Andrew; Wilde, Robyn

    2016-05-01

    We calculate elastic scattering of positronium (Ps) by the Xe atom using the recently developed pseudopotential method† and review general features of Ps scattering from heavier rare-gas atoms: Ar, Kr and Xe. The total scattering cross section is dominated by two contributions: elastic scattering and Ps ionization (break-up). To calculate the Ps ionization cross sections we use the binary-encounter method for Ps collisions with an atomic target. Our results for the ionization cross section agree well with previous calculations carried out in the impulse approximation. Our total Ps-Xe cross section, when plotted as a function of the projectile velocity, exhibits similarity with the electron-Xe cross section for the collision velocities higher than 0.8 a.u., and agrees very well with the measurements at Ps velocities above 0.5 a.u. † Fabrikant I I and Gribakin G F 2014 Phys. Rev. A 90 052717 Supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  8. Collision model for non-Markovian quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretschmer, Silvan; Luoma, Kimmo; Strunz, Walter T.

    2016-07-01

    We study the applicability of collisional models for non-Markovian dynamics of open quantum systems. By allowing interactions between the separate environmental degrees of freedom in between collisions we are able to construct a collision model that allows us to study quantum memory effects in open system dynamics. We also discuss the possibility to embed non-Markovian collision model dynamics into Markovian collision model dynamics in an extended state space. As a concrete example we show how, using the proposed class of collision models, we can discretely model non-Markovian amplitude damping of a qubit. In the time-continuous limit, we obtain the well-known results for spontaneous decay of a two-level system into a structured zero-temperature reservoir.

  9. Postcollision extension in arc-continent collision zones, eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, T. R.

    1991-01-01

    Postcollisional extension superimposed on arc-continent collision complexes is a common feature in the orogenic belts of eastern Indonesia. In the southern Banda arc, the arc-continent collision event is essentially a Pliocene and younger feature, but already an element of extension is being superimposed on the compressional structures of the collision complex. It is thus likely that the extension commences within a very short period (<5 m.y.) after the initiation of collision-related compressional deformation. A similar history of fold-belt development immediately followed by extension can be inferred for the Lengguru fold belt and the adjacent Wandamen-Wondiwoi terranes of Irian Jaya and for the Gulf of Bone in Sulawesi. It is suggested that the extension results from decoupling of the subducting oceanic lithosphere from the unsubductable continental lithosphere and that the superimposition of extension is a virtually unavoidable consequence of the arc-continent collision.

  10. High speed video analysis study of elastic and inelastic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Andrew; Beckey, Jacob; Aravind, Vasudeva; Clarion Team

    We study inelastic and elastic collisions with a high frame rate video capture to study the process of deformation and other energy transformations during collision. Snapshots are acquired before and after collision and the dynamics of collision are analyzed using Tracker software. By observing the rapid changes (over few milliseconds) and slower changes (over few seconds) in momentum and kinetic energy during the process of collision, we study the loss of momentum and kinetic energy over time. Using this data, it could be possible to design experiments that reduce error involved in these experiments, helping students build better and more robust models to understand the physical world. We thank Clarion University undergraduate student grant for financial support involving this project.

  11. Photo- and collision-induced dissociation of Ar cluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondow, Tamotsu; Nagata, Takeshi; Nonose, Shinji

    1992-04-01

    Photo- and collision- induced dissociation of an argon cluster ion, Arn+, were investigated by use of mass spectrometry. The kinetic and angular distributions of the ionic and neutral photofragments revealed two reaction pathways; dissociation of the trimeric core ion and evaporation from its solvation shell. In the Kr and Ne collisions with Arn+, the size- and collision energy- dependences of the dissociation cross sections were explained in the scheme of the charge - induced dipole, and induced dipole - induced dipole scatterings. Conversion efficiency of the collision energy into the internal energy of Arn+ was found to be proportional to the internal degrees of freedom. The upper limit of the conversion efficiency was estimated to be about 60 % in the collision energy of 0.2 eV.

  12. The nonlinear dust potential and collision frequencies in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. P.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2016-10-01

    The nonlinear modification to the Debye-Hückel potential of a dust grain depends on the thermodynamic properties of the background plasma. When the grain carries more than one electronic charge, the nonlinear self-interaction of the potential substantially modifies the ion-dust collision frequency. The electron-negatively charged dust collision frequency on the other hand remains largely unaffected by such a nonlinear modification. In the absence of nonlinear modification, collisions between the electrons and the negatively charged dust cease completely when the potential energy is four times the electron thermal energy. Thus once the dust acquires maximum charge, it will encounter electrons only because of its induced dipole field. Our electron-dust collision frequency agrees well with the previously known result whereas ion-dust collision frequency is always small compared with the known fitting formula.

  13. An investigation of collisions between fiber positioning units in LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Gang

    2016-04-01

    The arrangement of fiber positioning units in the LAMOST focal plane may lead to collisions during the fiber allocation process. To avoid these collisions, a software-based protection system has to abandon some targets located in the overlapping field of adjacent fiber units. In this paper, we first analyze the probability of collisions between fibers and infer their possible reasons. It is useful to solve the problem of collisions among fiber positioning units so as to improve the efficiency of LAMOST. Based on this, a collision handling system is designed by using a master-slave control structure between the micro control unit and microcomputer. Simulated experiments validate that the system can provide real-time inspection and swap information between the fiber unit controllers and the main controller.

  14. Simulating collisions of droplets with walls and films using a level set method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Tae-Jun

    A coupled level set and Marker and Cell is developed for computing axisymmetric, incompressible, and immiscible two-phase flows. Instead of using marker particles to track the free surface, the level set function is employed to "capture" the complex interfacial structure. An iterative process is devised in order to maintain the level set function as the signed distance from the interface. As a base line case, the two-phase fluid code is implemented for simulating zero gravity capillary oscillations of liquid droplet in order to validate its capability to handle surface tension effects. Initially deformed shapes of the second spherical harmonics are to oscillate and the simulation results are compared with linearized analytic solutions as well as other numerical calculations. A viscous damping towards an equilibrium sphere and capillary oscillation-period variations are investigated. Axisymmetric steady rising bubbles in an unbounded quiescent viscous liquid are simulated for a validation of code's ability in buoyancy driven deformations and stable breakup processes. The simulation results show a consistency with other numerical results for a high Weber number cases. It should be pointed out that no additional treatment is necessary to handle bubble breakups. An impact of a liquid droplet onto solid surface and/or shallow liquid layer has been simulated and compared with corresponding experimental data. Case studies on the radial extension versus variable Weber numbers show good agreements with experimental observation. Drop collisions onto shallow liquid layer are chosen for splash simulations. The effects of layer thickness are studied by analyzing radial extension and elevation of the splash rim. Drop impingement on deep pool is also examined on purpose to simulate a crater and a central jet. It is found that there exists a criterion to distinguish between the splashing and the deposition events in terms of a single impact parameter. A simple dimensional analysis

  15. Real-time collision avoidance in space: the GETEX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Eckhard; Rossmann, Juergen; Schluse, Michael

    2000-10-01

    Intelligent autonomous robotic systems require efficient safety components to assure system reliability during the entire operation. Especially if commanded over long distances, the robotic system must be able to guarantee the planning of safe and collision free movements independently. Therefore the IRF developed a new collision avoidance methodology satisfying the needs of autonomous safety systems considering the dynamics of the robots to protect. To do this, the collision avoidance system cyclically calculates the actual collision danger of the robots with respect to all static and dynamic obstacles in the environment. If a robot gets in collision danger the methodology immediately starts an evasive action to avoid the collision and guides the robot around the obstacle to its target position. This evasive action is calculated in real-time in a mathematically exact way by solving a quadratic convex optimization problem. The secondary conditions of this optimization problem include the potential collision danger of the robots kinematic chain including all temporarily attached grippers and objects and the dynamic constraints of the robots. The result of the optimization procedure are joint accelerations to apply to prevent the robot from colliding and to guide it to its target position. This methodology has been tested very successfully during the Japanese/German space robot project GETEX in April 1999. During the mission, the collision avoidance system successfully protected the free flying Japanese robot ERA on board the satellite ETS-VII at all times. The experiments showed, that the developed system is fully capable of ensuring the safety of such autonomous robotic systems by actively preventing collisions and generating evasive actions in cases of collision danger.

  16. Sensor management for collision alert in orbital object tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peiran; Chen, Huimin; Charalampidis, D.; Shen, Dan; Chen, Genshe; Blasch, Erik; Pham, Khanh

    2011-06-01

    Given the increasingly dense environment in both low-earth orbit (LEO) and geostationary orbit (GEO), a sudden change in the trajectory of any existing resident space object (RSO) may cause potential collision damage to space assets. With a constellation of electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) sensor platforms and ground radar surveillance systems, it is important to design optimal estimation algorithms for updating nonlinear object states and allocating sensing resources to effectively avoid collisions among many RSOs. Previous work on RSO collision avoidance often assumes that the maneuver onset time or maneuver motion of the space object is random and the sensor management approach is designed to achieve efficient average coverage of the RSOs. Few attempts have included the inference of an object's intent in the response to an RSO's orbital change. We propose a game theoretic model for sensor selection and assume the worst case intentional collision of an object's orbital change. The intentional collision results from maximal exposure of an RSO's path. The resulting sensor management scheme achieves robust and realistic collision assessment, alerts the impending collisions, and identifies early RSO orbital change with lethal maneuvers. We also consider information sharing among distributed sensors for collision alert and an object's intent identification when an orbital change has been declared. We compare our scheme with the conventional (non-game based) sensor management (SM) scheme using a LEO-to-LEO space surveillance scenario where both the observers and the unannounced and unplanned objects have complete information on the constellation of vulnerable assets. We demonstrate that, with adequate information sharing, the distributed SM method can achieve the performance close to that of centralized SM in identifying unannounced objects and making early warnings to the RSO for potential collision to ensure a proper selection of collision avoidance action.

  17. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-10-26

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput.

  18. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  19. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-09

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic liqand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  20. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin

    2011-11-01

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic ligand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  1. Liquid Chromatography in 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, David H.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews trends in liquid chromatography including apparatus, factors affecting efficient separation of a mixture (peak sharpness and speed), simplified problem-solving, adsorption, bonded phase chromatography, ion selectivity, and size exclusion. The current trend is to control chemical selectivity by the liquid phase. (Author/JN)

  2. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,…

  3. INEEL Liquid Effluent Inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Major, C.A.

    1997-06-01

    The INEEL contractors and their associated facilities are required to identify all liquid effluent discharges that may impact the environment at the INEEL. This liquid effluent information is then placed in the Liquid Effluent Inventory (LEI) database, which is maintained by the INEEL prime contractor. The purpose of the LEI is to identify and maintain a current listing of all liquid effluent discharge points and to identify which discharges are subject to federal, state, or local permitting or reporting requirements and DOE order requirements. Initial characterization, which represents most of the INEEL liquid effluents, has been performed, and additional characterization may be required in the future to meet regulations. LEI information is made available to persons responsible for or concerned with INEEL compliance with liquid effluent permitting or reporting requirements, such as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Wastewater Land Application, Storm Water Pollution Prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures, and Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment. The State of Idaho Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Program also needs the information for tracking liquid effluent discharges at the INEEL. The information provides a baseline from which future liquid discharges can be identified, characterized, and regulated, if appropriate. The review covered new and removed buildings/structures, buildings/structures which most likely had new, relocated, or removed LEI discharge points, and at least 10% of the remaining discharge points.

  4. Experimenting with Liquid Membranes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, J. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Outlined are two experiments using liquid membranes that illustrate carrier-facilitated transport, where chemical species are ushered across the membrane by selective "carrier" molecules residing in the membrane. The use of liquid membranes as models for studying and describing biological transport mechanisms is explored. (CS)

  5. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  6. LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLS) are hydrocarbons that exist as a separate, immiscible phase when in contact with water and/or air. ifferences in the physical and chemical properties of water and NAPL result in the formation of a physical interface between the liquids which preve...

  7. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Field, Michael E.; Sullivan, William H.

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  8. Chiral separation by enantioselective liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Schuur, Boelo; Verkuijl, Bastiaan J V; Minnaard, Adriaan J; de Vries, Johannes G; Heeres, Hero J; Feringa, Ben L

    2011-01-01

    The literature on enantioselective liquid-liquid extraction (ELLE) spans more than half a century of research. Nonetheless, a comprehensive overview has not appeared during the past few decades. Enantioselective liquid-liquid extraction is a technology of interest for a wide range of chemists and chemical engineers in the fields of fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, fragrances and foods. In this review the principles and advances of resolution through enantioselective liquid-liquid extraction are discussed, starting with an introduction on the principles of enantioselective liquid-liquid extraction including host-guest chemistry, extraction and phase transfer mechanisms, and multistage liquid-liquid extraction processing. Then the literature on enantioselective liquid-liquid extraction systems is reviewed, structured on extractant classes. The following extractant classes are considered: crown ether based extractants, metal complexes and metalloids, extractants based on tartrates, and a final section with all other types of chiral extractants.

  9. Laboratory experiments on the effect of trace chemicals on charge transfer during ice-hail collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, P. Jish; Kumar, P. Pradeep

    Laboratory experiments were carried out inside the cylindrical steel chamber kept inside the walk-in cold room, which can reach a temperature of - 30 °C, to investigate the effect of ionic compounds on charge transfer during the collision between ice crystals and graupel in the presence of supercooled water droplets. Experiments were carried out at a constant impact velocity of 2.2 m/s using pure water (Milli-Q, 18.2 MΩ-cm) and trace amount of ionic compounds at low rime accretion rate (RAR) and crystal sizes below 50 µm diameter in the temperature regions of - 6 to - 10 °C, - 16 to - 19 °C and - 21 to - 25 °C. It was observed that ice crystals interacting with graupel made of pure water obeys the charge sign regimes [Saunders, C.P.R., Keith, W.D., and Mitzeva, R.P., 1991. The effect of liquid water on thunderstorm charging. J. Geophys. Res. 96, D6, 11007-11017.] as a function of temperature and RAR for all temperatures ranging from - 6 to - 25 °C. The validity of the positive and negative charging zones of Saunders et al. [Saunders, C.P.R., Keith, W.D., and Mitzeva, R.P., 1991. The effect of liquid water on thunderstorm charging. J. Geophys. Res. 96, D6, 11007-11017.] for low effective liquid water content (EW) was verified.

  10. Holographic Quantum Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Karch, A.; Son, D. T.; Starinets, A. O.

    2009-02-06

    Quantum liquids are characterized by the distinctive properties such as the low-temperature behavior of heat capacity and the spectrum of low-energy quasiparticle excitations. In particular, at low temperature, Fermi liquids exhibit the zero sound, predicted by Landau in 1957 and subsequently observed in liquid He-3. In this Letter, we ask whether such characteristic behavior is present in theories with a holographically dual description. We consider a class of gauge theories with fundamental matter fields whose holographic dual in the appropriate limit is given in terms of the Dirac-Born-Infeld action in anti-de Sitter space. We find that these systems also exhibit a sound mode at zero temperature despite having a non-Fermi-liquid behavior of the specific heat. These properties suggest that holography identifies a new type of quantum liquid which potentially could be experimentally realized in strongly correlated systems.

  11. Recent advances in vibro-impact dynamics and collision of ocean vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Raouf A.

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of ship impacts and collisions takes different approaches depending on the emphasis of each discipline. For example, dynamicists, physicist, and mathematicians are dealing with developing analytical models and mappings of vibro-impact systems. On the other hand, naval architects and ship designers are interested in developing design codes and structural assessments due to slamming loads, liquid sloshing impact loads in liquefied natural gas tanks and ship grounding accidents. The purpose of this review is to highlight the main differences of the two disciplines. It begins with a brief account of the theory of vibro-impact dynamics based on modeling and mapping of systems experiencing discontinuous changes in their state of motion due to collision. The main techniques used in modeling include power-law phenomenological modeling, Hertzian modeling, and non-smooth coordinate transformations originally developed by Zhuravlev and Ivanov. In view of their effectiveness, both Zhuravlev and Ivanov non-smooth coordinate transformations will be described and assessed for the case of ship roll dynamics experiencing impact with rigid barriers. These transformations have the advantage of converting the vibro-impact oscillator into an oscillator without barriers such that the corresponding equation of motion does not contain any impact term. One of the recent results dealing with the coefficient of restitution is that its value monotonically decreases with the impact velocity and not unique but random in nature. Slamming loads and grounding events of ocean waves acting on the bottom of high speed vessels will be assessed with reference to the ship structural damage. It will be noticed that naval architects and marine engineers are treating these problems using different approaches from those used by dynamicists. The problem of sloshing impact in liquefied natural gas cargo and related problems will be assessed based on the numerical and experimental results. It is

  12. Liquid-liquid phase transition in a two-dimensional system with anomalous liquid properties.

    PubMed

    Urbic, Tomaz

    2013-12-01

    The phase diagram of the two-dimensional particles interacting through a smooth version of Stell-Hemmer interaction was studied using Monte Carlo computer simulations. By evaluating the pressure-volume isotherms, we observed liquid-liquid, liquid-gas phase transitions and three stable crystal phases. The model shows the liquid-liquid critical point in stable liquid phase and is confirmed by observing properties of other thermodynamic functions such as heat capacity and isothermal compressibility, for example. The liquid-gas and the liquid-liquid critical points were estimated within the thermodynamic limit.

  13. Status of the ATLAS Liquid Argon calorimeter and its performance after two years of LHC operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aperio Bella, L.

    2013-08-01

    The ATLAS detector is designed to study proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Its calorimeter system, for the electromagnetic and forward part and for a fraction of the hadronic part, is made of liquid argon sampling calorimeters. During the 2011 data taking period, ATLAS operated with an excellent efficiency and recorded more than 5fb-1 integrated luminosity of 7 TeV center of mass energy proton-proton collisions. The ATLAS Liquid Argon calorimeters played a significant role in this achievement. Its main features are first described. Then, some of its performances over the past two years are given. Highlights are put on its operation, calibration, stability and data taking efficiency, as well as on the related physics performances.

  14. Relaxation of diatomic molecules by isotropic collisions: application to depolarizing collisions of CS by He atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lique, F.; Spielfiedel, A.; Feautrier, N.

    2007-02-01

    An irreducible tensor formalism is applied to isotropic collisions of diatomic molecules with 1S atoms. Explicit expressions of the generalized spectroscopic relaxation cross sections are given, including pressure broadening cross sections as well as collisional transfer and destruction cross sections of the k-component of the target density matrix. For applications in the high temperature limit, formulae within the infinite order sudden approximation (IOS) are given for 1Σ electronic state molecules and 2S+1Σ electronic state molecules in the Hund's case (b) limit. Application to collisions of CS by He atoms shows that a good agreement is found between close coupling and IOS results at moderate energies and that multipolar depolarizing rates within a j-level are of the same order of magnitude whatever the considered multipole order k whereas multipolar transfer rates are lower by an order of magnitude. Propensity rules in relation to the CS-He potential energy surface are given.

  15. Head-on collision and overtaking collision between an envelope solitary wave and a KdV solitary wave in a dusty plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heng; Duan, Wen-Shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Head-on collision and overtaking collision between a KdV solitary wave and an envelope solitary wave are first studied in present paper by using Particle-in-cell (PIC) method in a dusty plasma. There are phase shifts of the KdV solitary wave in both head-on collision and the overtaking collision, while no phase shift is found for the envelop solitary wave in any cases. The remarkable difference between head-on collision and the overtaking collision is that the phase shift of KdV solitary wave increases as amplitude of KdV solitary wave increases in head-on collision, while it decreases as amplitude of the KdV solitary wave increases in the overtaking collision. It is found that the maximum amplitude during the collision process is less than sum of two amplitudes of both solitary waves, but is larger than either of the amplitude. PMID:26868526

  16. Head-on collision and overtaking collision between an envelope solitary wave and a KdV solitary wave in a dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng; Duan, Wen-Shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Head-on collision and overtaking collision between a KdV solitary wave and an envelope solitary wave are first studied in present paper by using Particle-in-cell (PIC) method in a dusty plasma. There are phase shifts of the KdV solitary wave in both head-on collision and the overtaking collision, while no phase shift is found for the envelop solitary wave in any cases. The remarkable difference between head-on collision and the overtaking collision is that the phase shift of KdV solitary wave increases as amplitude of KdV solitary wave increases in head-on collision, while it decreases as amplitude of the KdV solitary wave increases in the overtaking collision. It is found that the maximum amplitude during the collision process is less than sum of two amplitudes of both solitary waves, but is larger than either of the amplitude.

  17. Head-on collision and overtaking collision between an envelope solitary wave and a KdV solitary wave in a dusty plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Duan, Wen-Shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Head-on collision and overtaking collision between a KdV solitary wave and an envelope solitary wave are first studied in present paper by using Particle-in-cell (PIC) method in a dusty plasma. There are phase shifts of the KdV solitary wave in both head-on collision and the overtaking collision, while no phase shift is found for the envelop solitary wave in any cases. The remarkable difference between head-on collision and the overtaking collision is that the phase shift of KdV solitary wave increases as amplitude of KdV solitary wave increases in head-on collision, while it decreases as amplitude of the KdV solitary wave increases in the overtaking collision. It is found that the maximum amplitude during the collision process is less than sum of two amplitudes of both solitary waves, but is larger than either of the amplitude. PMID:26868526

  18. Quark-Gluon Soup -- The Perfectly Liquid Phase of QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    At temperatures above about 150 MeV and energy densities exceeding 500 MeV/fm3, quarks and gluons exist in the form of a plasma of free color charges that is about 1000 times hotter and a billion times denser than any other plasma ever created in the laboratory. This quark-gluon plasma (QGP) turns out to be strongly coupled, flowing like a liquid. About 35 years ago, the nuclear physics community started a program of relativistic heavy-ion collisions with the goal of producing and studying QGP under controlled laboratory conditions. This article recounts the story of its successful creation in collider experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory and CERN and the subsequent discovery of its almost perfectly liquid nature, and reports on the recent quantitatively precise determination of its thermodynamic and transport properties.

  19. Approaches to Evaluating Probability of Collision Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, Matthew D.; Johnson, Lauren C.

    2016-01-01

    While the two-dimensional probability of collision (Pc) calculation has served as the main input to conjunction analysis risk assessment for over a decade, it has done this mostly as a point estimate, with relatively little effort made to produce confidence intervals on the Pc value based on the uncertainties in the inputs. The present effort seeks to try to carry these uncertainties through the calculation in order to generate a probability density of Pc results rather than a single average value. Methods for assessing uncertainty in the primary and secondary objects' physical sizes and state estimate covariances, as well as a resampling approach to reveal the natural variability in the calculation, are presented; and an initial proposal for operationally-useful display and interpretation of these data for a particular conjunction is given.

  20. Collision-induced gas phase dissociation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1990-01-01

    The Landau-Zener theory of reactive cross sections was applied to diatomic molecules dissociating from a ladder of vibrational states. The result predicts a dissociation rate that is quite well duplicated by an Arrhenius function having a preexponential temperature dependence of about T(sub -1/2), at least for inert collision partners. This relation fits experimental data reasonably well. The theory is then used to calculate the effect of vibrational nonequilibrium on dissociation rate. For Morse oscillators, the results are about the same as given by Hammerling, Kivel, and Teare in their analytic approximation for harmonic oscillators, though at very high temperature a correction for the partition function limit is included. The empirical correction for vibration nonequilibrium proposed by Park, which is a convenient algorithm for CFD calculations, is modified to prevent a drastic underestimation of dissociation rates that occurs with this method when vibrational temperature is much smaller than the kinetic temperature of the gas.

  1. Piezoelectric film load cell robot collision detector

    DOEpatents

    Lembke, John R.

    1989-04-18

    A piezoelectric load cell which can be utilized for detecting collisions and obstruction of a robot arm end effector includes a force sensing element of metallized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. The piezoelectric film sensing element and a resilient support pad are clamped in compression between upper and lower plates. The lower plate has a central recess in its upper face for supporting the support pad and sensing element, while the upper plate has a corresponding central projection formed on its lower face for bearing on the sensing element and support pad. The upper and lower plates are dowelled together for concentric alignment and screwed together. The upper and lower plates are also adapted for mounting between the robot arm wrist and end effector.

  2. Piezoelectric film load cell robot collision detector

    DOEpatents

    Lembke, J.R.

    1989-04-18

    A piezoelectric load cell which can be utilized for detecting collisions and obstruction of a robot arm end effector includes a force sensing element of metallized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. The piezoelectric film sensing element and a resilient support pad are clamped in compression between upper and lower plates. The lower plate has a central recess in its upper face for supporting the support pad and sensing element, while the upper plate has a corresponding central projection formed on its lower face for bearing on the sensing element and support pad. The upper and lower plates are doweled together for concentric alignment and screwed together. The upper and lower plates are also adapted for mounting between the robot arm wrist and end effector. 3 figs.

  3. Piezoelectric film load cell robot collision detector

    DOEpatents

    Lembke, J.R.

    1988-03-15

    A piezoelectric load cell which can be utilized for detecting collisions and obstruction of a robot arm end effector includes a force sensing element of metallized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. The piezoelectric film sensing element and a resilient support pad are clamped in compression between upper and lower plates. The lower plate has a central recess in its upper face for supporting the support pad and sensing element, while the upper plate has a corresponding central projection formed on its lower face for bearing on the sensing element and support pad. The upper and lower plates are dowelled together for concentric alignment and screwed together. The upper and lower plates are also adapted for mounting between the robot arm wrist and end effector. 3 figs.

  4. Identifying Multiquark Hadrons from Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Yazaki, Koichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Akira; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2011-05-27

    Identifying hadronic molecular states and/or hadrons with multiquark components either with or without exotic quantum numbers is a long-standing challenge in hadronic physics. We suggest that studying the production of these hadrons in relativistic heavy ion collisions offers a promising resolution to this problem as yields of exotic hadrons are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model for hadron production, we find that, compared to the case of a nonexotic hadron with normal quark numbers, the yield of an exotic hadron is typically an order of magnitude smaller when it is a compact multiquark state and a factor of 2 or more larger when it is a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured in these experiments.

  5. Viscous photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dion, Maxime; Paquet, Jean-François; Schenke, Björn; Young, Clint; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical studies of the production of real thermal photons in relativistic heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are performed. The space-time evolution of the colliding system is modelled using music, a 3+1D relativistic hydrodynamic simulation, using both its ideal and viscous versions. The inclusive spectrum and its azimuthal angular anisotropy are studied separately, and the relative contributions of the different photon sources are highlighted. It is shown that the photon v2 coefficient is especially sensitive to the details of the microscopic dynamics like the equation of state, the ratio of shear viscosity over entropy density, η/s, and to the morphology of the initial state.

  6. Jet Structure in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaizot, J.-P.; Mehtar-Tani, Y.

    We review recent theoretical developments in the study of the structure of jets that are produced in ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions. The core of the review focusses on the dynamics of the parton cascade that is induced by the interactions of a fast parton crossing a quark-gluon plasma. We recall the basic mechanisms responsible for medium induced radiation, underline the rapid disappearance of coherence effects, and the ensuing probabilistic nature of the medium induced cascade. We discuss how large radiative corrections modify the classical picture of the gluon cascade, and how these can be absorbed in a renormalization of the jet quenching parameter hat q. Then, we analyze the (wave)-turbulent transport of energy along the medium induced cascade, and point out the main characteristics of the angular structure of such a cascade. Finally, color decoherence of the incone jet structure is discussed. Modest contact with phenomenology is presented towards the end of the review.

  7. Jet structure in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaizot, J.-P.; Mehtar-Tani, Y.

    2015-10-01

    We review recent theoretical developments in the study of the structure of jets that are produced in ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions. The core of the review focusses on the dynamics of the parton cascade that is induced by the interactions of a fast parton crossing a quark-gluon plasma. We recall the basic mechanisms responsible for medium induced radiation, underline the rapid disappearance of coherence effects, and the ensuing probabilistic nature of the medium induced cascade. We discuss how large radiative corrections modify the classical picture of the gluon cascade, and how these can be absorbed in a renormalization of the jet quenching parameter q̂. Then, we analyze the (wave)-turbulent transport of energy along the medium induced cascade, and point out the main characteristics of the angular structure of such a cascade. Finally, color decoherence of the in-cone jet structure is discussed. Modest contact with phenomenology is presented towards the end of the review.

  8. Subduction, collision and initiation of hominin dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattner, Uri; Lazar, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Subduction is the main driving force of plate tectonics controlling the physiography of the Earth. The northward subduction of the Sinai plate was interrupted during the Early Pleistocene when the Eratosthenes Seamount began to collide with the Cyprian arc. A series of synchronous structural deformations was triggered across the entire eastern Mediterranean, and local topography was drastically accentuation along the Levantine corridor - one of the main pathways of hominin dispersal out of Africa. However, the choice of this preferred pathway and timing of dispersal has not been resolved. Though causes for dispersal out of Africa are in debate, we show that the transition from subduction to collision in the eastern Mediterranean set the route.

  9. Trending in Probability of Collision Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallejo, J. J.; Hejduk, M. D.; Stamey, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    A simple model is proposed to predict the behavior of Probabilities of Collision (P(sub c)) for conjunction events. The model attempts to predict the location and magnitude of the peak P(sub c) value for an event by assuming the progression of P(sub c) values can be modeled to first order by a downward-opening parabola. To incorporate prior information from a large database of past conjunctions, the Bayes paradigm is utilized; and the operating characteristics of the model are established through a large simulation study. Though the model is simple, it performs well in predicting the temporal location of the peak (P(sub c)) and thus shows promise as a decision aid in operational conjunction assessment risk analysis.

  10. Bubble collisions and measures of the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    To compute the spectrum of bubble collisions seen by an observer in an eternally-inflating multiverse, one must choose a measure over the diverging spacetime volume, including choosing an ''initial'' hypersurface below which there are no bubble nucleations. Previous calculations focused on the case where the initial hypersurface is pushed arbitrarily deep into the past. Interestingly, the observed spectrum depends on the orientation of the initial hypersurface, however one's ability observe the effect rapidly decreases with the ratio of inflationary Hubble rates inside and outside one's bubble. We investigate whether this conclusion might be avoided under more general circumstances, including placing the observer's bubble near the initial hypersurface. We find that it is not. As a point of reference, a substantial appendix reviews relevant aspects of the measure problem of eternal inflation.

  11. Efficient ALL vs. ALL collision risk analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, D.; Paskowitz, M.; Agueda, A.; Garcia, G.; Molina, M.

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, the space debris has gained a lot of attention due to the increasing amount of uncontrolled man-made objects orbiting the Earth. This population poses a significant and constantly growing thread to operational satellites. In order to face this thread in an independent manner, ESA has launched an initiative for the development of a European SSA System where GMV is participating via several activities. Apart from those activities financed by ESA, GMV has developed closeap, a tool for efficient conjunction assessment and collision probability prediction. ESÁs NAPEOS has been selected as computational engine and numerical propagator to be used in the tool, which can be considered as an add-on to the standard NAPEOS package. closeap makes use of the same orbit computation, conjunction assessment and collision risk algorithms implemented in CRASS, but at the same time both systems are completely independent. Moreover, the implementation in closeap has been validated against CRASS with excellent results. This paper describes the performance improvements implemented in closeap at algorithm level to ensure that the most time demanding scenarios (e.g., all catalogued objects are analysed against each other - all vs. all scenarios -) can be analysed in a reasonable amount of time with commercial-off-the-shelf hardware. However, the amount of space debris increases steadily due to the human activities. Thus, the number of objects involved in a full collision assessment is expected to increase notably and, consequently, the computational cost, which scales as the square of the number of objects, will increase as well. Additionally, orbit propagation algorithms that are computationally expensive might be needed to predict more accurately the trajectories of the space debris. In order to cope with such computational needs, the next natural step in the development of collision assessment tools is the use of parallelization techniques. In this paper we investigate

  12. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  13. Collision cross sections for structural proteomics.

    PubMed

    Marklund, Erik G; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Robinson, Carol V; Baldwin, Andrew J; Benesch, Justin L P

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) allows the structural interrogation of biomolecules by reporting their collision cross sections (CCSs). The major bottleneck for exploiting IM-MS in structural proteomics lies in the lack of speed at which structures and models can be related to experimental data. Here we present IMPACT (Ion Mobility Projection Approximation Calculation Tool), which overcomes these twin challenges, providing accurate CCSs up to 10(6) times faster than alternative methods. This allows us to assess the CCS space presented by the entire structural proteome, interrogate ensembles of protein conformers, and monitor molecular dynamics trajectories. Our data demonstrate that the CCS is a highly informative parameter and that IM-MS is of considerable practical value to structural biologists. PMID:25800554

  14. Piezoelectric film load cell robot collision detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembke, John R.

    1988-03-01

    A piezoelectric load cell which can be utilized for detecting collisions and obstruction of a robot arm end effector includes a force sensing element of metallized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. The piezoelectric film sensing element and a resilient support pad are clamped in compression between upper and lower plates. The lower plate has a central recess in its upper face for supporting the support pad and sensing element, while the upper plate has a corresponding central projection formed on its lower face for bearing on the sensing element and support pad. The upper and lower plates are dowelled together for concentric alignment and screwed together. The upper and lower plates are also adapted for mounting between the robot arm wrist and end effector.

  15. Total Probability of Collision as a Metric for Finite Conjunction Assessment and Collision Risk Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigm, Ryan C.; Hejduk, Matthew D.; Johnson, Lauren C.; Plakalovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    On-orbit collision risk is becoming an increasing mission risk to all operational satellites in Earth orbit. Managing this risk can be disruptive to mission and operations, present challenges for decision-makers, and is time-consuming for all parties involved. With the planned capability improvements to detecting and tracking smaller orbital debris and capacity improvements to routinely predict on-orbit conjunctions, this mission risk will continue to grow in terms of likelihood and effort. It is very real possibility that the future space environment will not allow collision risk management and mission operations to be conducted in the same manner as it is today. This paper presents the concept of a finite conjunction assessment-one where each discrete conjunction is not treated separately but, rather, as a continuous event that must be managed concurrently. The paper also introduces the Total Probability of Collision as an analogous metric for finite conjunction assessment operations and provides several options for its usage in a Concept of Operations.

  16. Collision Broadening Of Line Spectrum In Sonoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chaohui; An Yu

    2008-06-24

    The direct measurement of temperature inside a sonoluminescing bubble as it is at its flashing phase is almost impossible due to the smallness of the bubble and the short duration of the flashing. One may estimate the temperature through fitting the continuum spectrum of sonoluminescence by the black body radiation formula, or fitting the shape of atomic or molecular line spectrum (the different temperature, density and pressure result in the different shape of the line spectrum due to the effect of collision broadening). However, the temperature changes in a huge range at short duration as the bubble flashes, therefore, the observed spectra are some kind of average one, so are those fitted results. To evaluate the instantaneous temperature more accurately, we simulate the processes of the bubble motion and the thermodynamics inside the bubble, in which atomic or molecular line spectra with the collision broadening effect and the continuum spectra contributed from the processes of electron-atom bremsstrahlung, electron-ion bremsstrahlung and recombination radiation and radiative attachment of electrons to atoms and molecules are taken into account in calculating the light emission. If both the calculated continuum spectra and the shape of line spectra can well represent the experimental data, we may deduce that the calculation of the temperature, density and pressure is reliable and we indirectly evaluate those quantities inside the bubble. In the present calculation, the line spectra of OH radical at about 310 nm mixing the electron transition with the vibration and rotational bands are considered. The calculation qualitatively consists with the observation, and we expect that with the more precise bubble dynamics model instead of the uniform model employed in the present calculation we may improve the quantitative result.

  17. Activating main belt comets by collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maindl, T. I.; Haghighipour, N.; Schäfer, C.; Speith, R.

    2016-02-01

    Since their identification as a new class of bodies by Hsieh and Jewitt in 2006 active asteroids (or Main Belt Comets, MBCs) have attracted a great deal of interest. Given that sublimation of volatile material (presumably water-ice) drives MBC activity, these bodies are probable candidates for delivering a significant amount of Earth's water. Dynamical studies suggest in-situ formation of MBCs as the remnants of the break-up of large icy asteroids. Also, collisions between MBCs and small objects might have exposed sub-surface water-ice triggering the cometary activity of these bodies. In order to advance the effort of understanding the nature of MBC activation, we have investigated these collision processes by simulating the impacts in detail using a smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) approach that includes material strength and fracture models. Our simulations cover a range of impact velocities (between 0.5 km/s and 5.3 km/s) and angles, allowing m-sized impactors to erode enough of an MBC's surface to expose volatiles and trigger its activation. We also varied the material strength of the active asteroid's surface to study its influence on crater depths and shapes. As expected, depending on the impact energy, impact angle, and MBC's material strength we observe different crater depths. Across all scenarios however, our results show that the crater depths do not exceed a few meters. This implies that if the activity of MBCs is due to sublimating water-ice, ice has to exist in no deeper than a few meters from the surface.

  18. The nature of mutations induced by replication–transcription collisions.

    PubMed

    Sankar, T Sabari; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D; Dong, Yuexin; Lewis, Sarah A; Wang, Jue D

    2016-07-01

    The DNA replication and transcription machineries share a common DNA template and thus can collide with each other co-directionally or head-on. Replication–transcription collisions can cause replication fork arrest, premature transcription termination, DNA breaks, and recombination intermediates threatening genome integrity. Collisions may also trigger mutations, which are major contributors to genetic disease and evolution. However, the nature and mechanisms of collision-induced mutagenesis remain poorly understood. Here we reveal the genetic consequences of replication–transcription collisions in actively dividing bacteria to be two classes of mutations: duplications/deletions and base substitutions in promoters. Both signatures are highly deleterious but are distinct from the previously well-characterized base substitutions in the coding sequence. Duplications/deletions are probably caused by replication stalling events that are triggered by collisions; their distribution patterns are consistent with where the fork first encounters a transcription complex upon entering a transcription unit. Promoter substitutions result mostly from head-on collisions and frequently occur at a nucleotide that is conserved in promoters recognized by the major σ factor in bacteria. This substitution is generated via adenine deamination on the template strand in the promoter open complex, as a consequence of head-on replication perturbing transcription initiation. We conclude that replication–transcription collisions induce distinct mutation signatures by antagonizing replication and transcription, not only in coding sequences but also in gene regulatory elements.

  19. Experimental observation of the collision of three vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, R. H.; Monsalve, E.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate for the first time the motion, interaction and simultaneous collision between three initially stable vortex rings arranged symmetrically, making an angle of 120 degrees between their straight path lines. We report results with laminar vortex rings in air and water obtained through measurements of the ring velocity field with a hot-wire anemometer, both in free flight and during the entire collision. In the air experiment, our flow visualizations allowed us to identify two main collision stages. A first ring-dominated stage where the rings slowdown progressively, increasing their diameter rapidly, followed by secondary vortex structures resulting after the rings make contact. Local portions of the vortex tubes of opposite circulation are coupled together thus creating local arm-like vortex structures moving radially in outward directions, rapidly dissipating kinetic energy. From a similar water experiment, we provide detailed shadowgraph visualizations of both the ring bubble and the full size collision, showing clearly the final expanding vortex structure. It is accurately resolved that the physical contact between vortex ring tubes gives rise to three symmetric expanding vortex arms but also the vortex reconnection of the top and lower vortex tubes. The central collision zone was found to have the lowest kinetic energy during the entire collision and therefore it can be identified as a safe zone. The preserved collision symmetries leading to the weak kinematic activity in the safe zone is the first step into the development of an intermittent hydrodynamic trap for small and lightweight particles.

  20. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore » Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  1. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)

  2. Development of a droplet breakup model considering aerodynamic and droplet collision effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wert, K. L.; Jacobs, H. R.

    1993-01-01

    A model is currently under development to predict the occurrence and outcome of spray droplet breakup induced by aerodynamic forces and droplet collisions. It is speculated that these phenomena may be significant in determining the droplet size distribution in a spray subjected to acoustic velocity fluctuations. The goal is to integrate this breakup model into a larger spray model in order to examine the effects of combustion instabilities on liquid rocket motor fuel sprays. The model is composed of three fundamental components: a dynamic equation governing the deformation of the droplet, a criterion for breakage based on the amount of deformation energy stored in the droplet and an energy balance based equation to predict the Sauter mean diameter of the fragments resulting from breakup. Comparison with published data for aerodynamic breakup indicates good agreement in terms of predicting the occurrence of breakup. However, the model significantly over predicts the size of the resulting fragments. This portion of the model is still under development.

  3. Spreading of miscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Daniel J.; Haward, Simon J.; Shen, Amy Q.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2016-05-01

    Miscible liquids commonly contact one another in natural and technological situations, often in the proximity of a solid substrate. In the scenario where a drop of one liquid finds itself on a solid surface and immersed within a second, miscible liquid, it will spread spontaneously across the surface. We show experimental findings of the spreading of sessile drops in miscible environments that have distinctly different shape evolution and power-law dynamics from sessile drops that spread in immiscible environments, which have been reported previously. We develop a characteristic time to scale radial data of the spreading sessile drops based on a drainage flow due to gravity. This time scale is effective for a homologous subset of the liquids studied. However, it has limitations when applied to significantly chemically different, yet miscible, liquid pairings; we postulate that the surface energies between each liquid and the solid surface becomes important for this other subset of the liquids studied. Initial experiments performed with pendant drops in miscible environments support the drainage flow observed in the sessile drop systems.

  4. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, Loren L.

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  5. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  6. Comparison of measured and calculated collision efficiencies at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, B.; Marcolli, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-12-01

    Interactions of atmospheric aerosols with clouds influence cloud properties and modify the aerosol life cycle. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles or become incorporated into cloud droplets by scavenging. For an accurate description of aerosol scavenging and ice nucleation in contact mode, collision efficiency between droplets and aerosol particles needs to be known. This study derives the collision rate from experimental contact freezing data obtained with the ETH CoLlision Ice Nucleation CHamber (CLINCH). Freely falling 80 μm diameter water droplets are exposed to an aerosol consisting of 200 and 400 nm diameter silver iodide particles of concentrations from 500 to 5000 and 500 to 2000 cm-3, respectively, which act as ice nucleating particles in contact mode. The experimental data used to derive collision efficiency are in a temperature range of 238-245 K, where each collision of silver iodide particles with droplets can be assumed to result in the freezing of the droplet. An upper and lower limit of collision efficiency is also estimated for 800 nm diameter kaolinite particles. The chamber is kept at ice saturation at a temperature range of 236 to 261 K, leading to the slow evaporation of water droplets giving rise to thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis. Droplets and particles bear charges inducing electrophoresis. The experimentally derived collision efficiency values of 0.13, 0.07 and 0.047-0.11 for 200, 400 and 800 nm particles are around 1 order of magnitude higher than theoretical formulations which include Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and electric forces. This discrepancy is most probably due to uncertainties and inaccuracies in the description of thermophoretic and diffusiophoretic processes acting together. This is, to the authors' knowledge, the first data set of collision efficiencies acquired below 273 K. More such experiments with different droplet and

  7. An Approach Toward Understanding Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvaitis, John A.; Tash, Jeffrey P.

    2008-10-01

    Among the most conspicuous environmental effects of roads are vehicle-related mortalities of wildlife. Research to understand the factors that contribute to wildlife-vehicle collisions can be partitioned into several major themes, including (i) characteristics associated with roadkill hot spots, (ii) identification of road-density thresholds that limit wildlife populations, and (iii) species-specific models of vehicle collision rates that incorporate information on roads (e.g., proximity, width, and traffic volume) and animal movements. We suggest that collision models offer substantial opportunities to understand the effects of roads on a diverse suite of species. We conducted simulations using collision models and information on Blanding’s turtles ( Emydoidea blandingii), bobcats ( Lynx rufus), and moose ( Alces alces), species endemic to the northeastern United States that are of particular concern relative to collisions with vehicles. Results revealed important species-specific differences, with traffic volume and rate of movement by candidate species having the greatest influence on collision rates. We recommend that future efforts to reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions be more proactive and suggest the following protocol. For species that pose hazards to drivers (e.g., ungulates), identify collision hot spots and implement suitable mitigation to redirect animal movements (e.g., underpasses, fencing, and habitat modification), reduce populations of problematic game species via hunting, or modify driver behavior (e.g., dynamic signage that warns drivers when animals are near roads). Next, identify those species that are likely to experience additive (as opposed to compensatory) mortality from vehicle collisions and rank them according to vulnerability to extirpation. Then combine information on the distribution of at-risk species with information on existing road networks to identify areas where immediate actions are warranted.

  8. Liquid metal drop ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this project was to demonstrate the possibility of ejecting liquid metals using drop on demand printing technology. The plan was to make transducers for operation in the 100 MHz frequency range and to use these transducers to demonstrate the ability to eject drops of liquid metals such as gallium. Two transducers were made by indium bonding piezoelectric lithium niobate to quartz buffer rods. The lithium niobate plates were thinned by mechanical polishing to a thickness of 37 microns for operation at 100 MHz. Hemispherical lenses were polished in the opposite ends of the buffer rods. The lenses, which focus the sound waves in the liquid metal, had an F-number equals 1. A mechanical housing was made to hold the transducers and to allow precise control over the liquid level above the lens. We started by demonstrating the ability to eject drops of water on demand. The drops of water had a diameter of 15 microns which corresponds to the wavelength of the sound wave in the water. A videotape of this ejection was made. We then used a mixture of Gallium and Indium (used to lower the melting temperature of the Gallium) to demonstrate the ejection of liquid metal drops. This proved to be difficult because of the oxide skin which forms on the surface of the liquid. In some instances, we were able to eject metal drops, however, this was not consistent and reproducible. An experiment was set up at NASA-Lewis to stabilize the process of drop on demand liquid metal ejection. The object was to place the transducer and liquid metal in a vacuum station so that no oxide would form on the surface. We were successful in demonstrating that liquid metals could be ejected on demand and that this technology could be used for making sheet metal in space.

  9. Liquid-level detector

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    Aliquid level sensor is described which has a pair of upright conductors spaced by an insulator defining a first high resistance path between the conductors. An electrically conductive path is interposed between the upright conductors at a discrete location at which liquid level is to be measured. It includes a liquid accessible gap of a dimension such that the electrical resistance across the conductor when the gap is filled with the liquid is detectably less than when the gap is emptied. The conductor might also be physically altered by temperature changes to serve also as an indicator of elevated temperature.

  10. Liquid-metal corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; DeVan, J.H.; Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1985-09-01

    A review of corrosion and environmental effects on the mechanical properties of candidate structural alloys for use with liquid metals in fusion reactors is presented. The corrosion/mass transfer behavior of austenitic and ferritic steels and vanadium-base alloys is evaluated to determine the preliminary operating temperature limits for circulating and static liquid-lithium and Pb-17Li systems. The influence of liquid-metal environment on the mechanical properties of structural materials is discussed. Corrosion effects of nitrate and fluoride salts are presented. Requirements for additional data are identified.

  11. Liquid metal electric pump

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Andraka, Charles E.; Lukens, Laurance L.; Moreno, James B.

    1992-01-01

    An electrical pump for pumping liquid metals to high pressures in high temperature environments without the use of magnets or moving mechanical parts. The pump employs a non-porous solid electrolyte membrane, typically ceramic, specific to the liquid metal to be pumped. A DC voltage is applied across the thickness of the membrane causing ions to form and enter the membrane on the electrically positive surface, with the ions being neutralized on the opposite surface. This action provides pumping of the liquid metal from one side of the non-porous solid electrolyte membrane to the other.

  12. Theoretical interpretation of high-energy nuclear collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Fai, G.

    1992-06-01

    Nuclear collisions are interpreted theoretically. The nuclear equation of state is studied in a wide energy range. Subnucleonic degrees of freedom are invoked at high energy densities and at short length-scales. Questions of dynamical collision simulations are investigated. Direct support is provided for experiment in the form of collaborative projects. The major objective of this nuclear theory program is a better understanding of the properties of strongly interacting matter on the nuclear energy scale, as manifested in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  13. Modification of Atomic Collision Dynamics by Intense Ultrashort Laser Pulses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizer, Theodore, II

    During the past decade there has been a great deal of effort put toward demonstrating that the dynamics of atomic collisions can be modified by the presence of intense laser fields. The term "modified collision dynamics" means here that the potential energy surfaces which govern the collision dynamics are actually distorted by the ac -Stark effect induced by the intense laser field. This results in altered probabilities for the scatterers to end up in certain outgoing channels. The attractiveness of the idea of modified collisions, of course, lies in the possibility of selectively controlling physical or chemical processes by judicious choice of laser frequency and intensity. If one uses laser pulses whose duration is less than an individual collision then the experimenter can actively change the shape of the potentials during the collision. In principle, if one can open and close reactive channels at appropriate times during the collision, one can strongly influence its outcome. In this thesis the first experimental observation of the modification of atomic collision dynamics by ultrashort laser pulses is reported. In order to more fully understand the interaction of the ultrashort laser field with the colliding atomic system, a theoretical model was developed using a solution to Schroedinger's equation in Bloch equation form. The numerical solution was then averaged over various uncontrollable parameters present in the experiment when using a thermally random distribution of atoms. Averaging over these parameters as well as using a realistic temporal pulse shape and spatial beam profile has proven to be extremely important in modeling the experimental outcome. The output of a dye oscillator-amplifier combination was used to study the collision process Na(3s) + Ar + (H/2PI)(omega) (--->) Na(3P(, 1/2)) + Ar. It has been found that at fixed laser intensity the efficiency of exciting the Na(3P(, 1/2)) state is higher for pulses shorter than a collision duration than

  14. p-Wave Cold Collisions in an Optical Lattice Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, N. D.; Sherman, J. A.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.; Stecher, J. von; Rey, A. M.

    2011-09-02

    We study ultracold collisions in fermionic ytterbium by precisely measuring the energy shifts they impart on the atoms' internal clock states. Exploiting Fermi statistics, we uncover p-wave collisions, in both weakly and strongly interacting regimes. With the higher density afforded by two-dimensional lattice confinement, we demonstrate that strong interactions can lead to a novel suppression of this collision shift. In addition to reducing the systematic errors of lattice clocks, this work has application to quantum information and quantum simulation with alkaline-earth atoms.

  15. Division XII / Commission 14 / Working Group Collision Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Gillian; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.

    2012-04-01

    Research in atomic and molecular collision processes and spectral line broadening has been very active since our last report, Peach, Dimitrijević & Stancil 2009. Given the large volume of the published literature and the limited space available, we have attempted to identify work most relevant to astrophysics. Since our report can not be comprehensive, additional publications can be found in the databases at the web addresses listed in the final section. Elastic and inelastic collisions among electrons, atoms, ions, and molecules are included and charge transfer can be very important in collisions between heavy particles.

  16. Division B Commission 14 Working Group: Collision Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Gillian; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.; Barklem, Paul S.

    2016-04-01

    Since our last report (Peach & Dimitrijević 2012), a large number of new publications on the results of research in atomic and molecular collision processes and spectral line broadening have been published. Due to the limited space available, we have only included work of importance for astrophysics. Additional relevant papers, not included in this report, can be found in the databases at the web addresses provided in Section 6. Elastic and inelastic collisions between electrons, atoms, ions, and molecules are included, as well as charge transfer in collisions between heavy particles which can be very important.

  17. Heavy-particle collisions in the plasma edge

    SciTech Connect

    Phaneuf, R.A.; Hunter, H.T.; Barnett, C.F.

    1987-07-01

    Available cross-section data for heavy-particle collision processes which play important roles in the edge plasma of magnetically-confined fusion devices are surveyed and reviewed. The species considered include H, H/sub 2/, He, C, O, Fe, and their ions. The most important heavy-particle collision processes occurring in the edge plasma are charge-exchange reactions. Excitation and dissociation processes are also considered. Emphasis is given to relative collision velocities corresponding to plasma ion temperatures in the 1 to 200 eV range. Evaluated or recommended data are presented where possible along with their estimated uncertainties, and gaps in the data base are indicated.

  18. Zipping and unzipping of cosmic string loops in collision

    SciTech Connect

    Firouzjahi, H.; Karouby, J.; Khosravi, S.; Brandenberger, R.

    2009-10-15

    In this paper the collision of two cosmic string loops is studied. After collision junctions are formed and the loops are entangled. We show that after their formation the junctions start to unzip and the loops disentangle. This analysis provides a theoretical understanding of the unzipping effect observed in numerical simulations of a network of cosmic strings with more than one type of cosmic strings. The unzipping phenomena have important effects in the evolution of cosmic string networks when junctions are formed upon collision, such as in a network of cosmic superstrings.

  19. Determination of electron-nucleus collisions geometry with forward neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.; Aschenauer, E.; Lee, J. H.

    2014-12-29

    There are a large number of physics programs one can explore in electron-nucleus collisions at a future electron-ion collider. Collision geometry is very important in these studies, while the measurement for an event-by-event geometric control is rarely discussed in the prior deep-inelastic scattering experiments off a nucleus. This paper seeks to provide some detailed studies on the potential of tagging collision geometries through forward neutron multiplicity measurements with a zero degree calorimeter. As a result, this type of geometry handle, if achieved, can be extremely beneficial in constraining nuclear effects for the electron-nucleus program at an electron-ion collider.

  20. A space-based concept for a collision warning sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talent, David L.; Vilas, Faith

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a concept for a space-based collision warning sensor experiment, the Debris Collision Warning Sensor (DCWS) experiment, in which the sensor will rely on passive sensing of debris in optical and IR passband. The DCWS experiment will be carried out under various conditions of solar phase angle and pass geometry; debris from 1.5 m to 1 mm diam will be observable. The mission characteristics include inclination in the 55-60 deg range and an altitude of about 500 km. The results of the DCWS experiment will be used to generate collision warning scenarios for the Space Station Freedom.