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Sample records for collisionless drift wave

  1. Collisionless inter-species energy transfer and turbulent heating in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-08-15

    We reconsider the classic problems of calculating 'turbulent heating' and collisionless inter-species transfer of energy in drift wave turbulence. These issues are of interest for low collisionality, electron heated plasmas, such as ITER, where collisionless energy transfer from electrons to ions is likely to be significant. From the wave Poynting theorem at steady state, a volume integral over an annulus r{sub 1}=-S{sub r}|{sub r{sub 1}{sup r{sub 2}}}{ne}0. Here S{sub r} is the wave energy density flux in the radial direction. Thus, a wave energy flux differential across an annular region indeed gives rise to a net heating, in contrast to previous predictions. This heating is related to the Reynolds work by the zonal flow, since S{sub r} is directly linked to the zonal flow drive. In addition to net heating, there is inter-species heat transfer. For collisionless electron drift waves, the total turbulent energy source for collisionless heat transfer is due to quasilinear electron cooling. Subsequent quasilinear ion heating occurs through linear ion Landau damping. In addition, perpendicular heating via ion polarization currents contributes to ion heating. Since at steady state, Reynolds work of the turbulence on the zonal flow must balance zonal flow frictional damping ({approx}{nu}{sub ii}{sup 2}{approx}|(e{phi}(tilde sign)/T)|{sup 4}), it is no surprise that zonal flow friction appears as an important channel for ion heating. This process of energy transfer via zonal flow has not previously been accounted for in analyses of energy transfer. As an application, we compare the rate of turbulent energy transfer in a low collisionality plasma with the rate of the energy transfer by collisions. The result shows that the collisionless turbulent energy transfer is a significant energy coupling process for ITER plasma.

  2. Two Case Studies of Stochastic Transport: Anomalous Transport in Two Drift Waves, and Collisionless Reconnection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doxas, Isidoros

    1988-12-01

    One-wave vec E times vec B motion in a slab geometry is described by a hamiltonian with a phase space composed of an infinite square lattice of counterrotating rolls. When a small amount of a second wave is added, the hamiltonian becomes time dependent, the energy of a single particle is no longer conserved, and all energy values are accessible to the particle. Most of the contribution to the change in the energy of a particle that moves close to the separatrix from the vicinity of one X-point to the next, is shown to be imparted to the particle during a short interaction time around the midpoint of the particle's trajectory. The magnitude of the change in energy is calculated, and particle motion near the separatrix is reduced to the standard map. Collisionless magnetic reconnection is studied in the context of a reversed field with a small normal component b, modelling the geomagnetic tail. The magnetic moment is adiabatically conserved far from the reversal layer, but it changes in small increments Deltamu as the particle crosses the layer. The magnitude of Deltamu is calculated and the analytic expression is found to agree well with numerical calculations for epsilon < 1, where epsilon is the small parameter in the adiabatic expansion. A test particle code is used to study the time evolution of ensembles of particles placed in the model magnetic field. The code gives ion temperatures of a few keV and earthward drift velocities of 400 -900 km/s in the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer, in good quantitative agreement with observed values. The numerical value of the height-integrated in-phase current < jcdot E> seems to be in qualitative agreement with theoretical values based on a decorrelation time equal to half a gyroperiod around the normal field, while a decorrelation time equal to 1/kv, where k is the wavenumber of the tearing mode, seems to give the wrong scaling. Finally the system seems to always tend to the same (qualitatively) state around the time the

  3. Lattice Boltzmann model for collisionless electrostatic drift wave turbulence obeying Charney-Hasegawa-Mima dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, M.; Kendl, A.

    2015-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) approach to the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima (CHM) model for adiabatic drift wave turbulence in magnetised plasmas is implemented. The CHM-LBM model contains a barotropic equation of state for the potential, a force term including a cross-product analogous to the Coriolis force in quasigeostrophic models, and a density gradient source term. Expansion of the resulting lattice Boltzmann model equations leads to cold-ion fluid continuity and momentum equations, which resemble CHM dynamics under drift ordering. The resulting numerical solutions of standard test cases (monopole propagation, stable drift modes and decaying turbulence) are compared to results obtained by a conventional finite difference scheme that directly discretizes the CHM equation. The LB scheme resembles characteristic CHM dynamics apart from an additional shear in the density gradient direction. The occurring shear reduces with the drift ratio and is ascribed to the compressible limit of the underlying LBM.

  4. Second order kinetic theory of parallel momentum transport in collisionless drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Gao, Zhe; Chen, Jiale

    2016-08-01

    A second order kinetic model for turbulent ion parallel momentum transport is presented. A new nonresonant second order parallel momentum flux term is calculated. The resonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force is the momentum source, while the nonresonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force compensates for that of the nonresonant second order parallel momentum flux. The resonant component of the kinetic momentum flux can be divided into three parts, including the pinch term, the diffusive term, and the residual stress. By reassembling the pinch term and the residual stress, the residual stress can be considered as a pinch term of parallel wave-particle resonant velocity, and, therefore, may be called as "resonant velocity pinch" term. Considering the resonant component of the ion parallel electrostatic force is the transfer rate between resonant ions and waves (or, equivalently, nonresonant ions), a conservation equation of the parallel momentum of resonant ions and waves is obtained.

  5. A collisionless shock wave experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Jones, M.E.; Sgro, A.G.; Thomas, V.A.

    1995-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves are a very important heating mechanism for plasmas and are commonly found in space and astrophysical environments. Collisionless shocks were studied in the laboratory more than 20 years ago, and more recently in space via in situ satellite measurements. The authors propose a new laboratory shock wave experiment to address unresolved issues related to the differences in the partition of plasma heating between electrons and ions in space and laboratory plasmas, which can have important implications for a number of physical systems.

  6. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonjae Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.; Angus, J. R.

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  7. Collisionless drift-tearing modes in the magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladd, N. T.

    1990-01-01

    The linear stability properties of collisionless drift-tearing modes are analyzed in a modified Harris equilibrium model of the magnetopause. Particular attention is paid to the relevance of the parametric behavior of growth rates to the 'magnetic percolation' theory of flux transfer event formation (Galeev et al., 1986). Numerical methods are used to solve the drift-tearing eigenmode equations and the results are compared with those previously obtained by analytical methods. The analytical results are found to correctly model important parametric dependencies but to typically overestimate the rate of growth. The eigenmode equations are numerically difficult, and an integration scheme utilizing Ricatti transforms is developed to affect their solution.

  8. Drift Wave Turbulence and Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, L.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2015-12-01

    An important feature in collisionless magnetic reconnection is the development of sharp discontinuities along the separatrices bounding the Alfvenic outflow. The typical scale length of these features is ρs (the Larmor radius based on the sound speed) for guide field reconnection. Temperature gradients in the inflowing plasma (as might be found in the magnetopause and the magnetotail) can lead to instabilities at these separatrices, specifically drift wave turbulence. We present standalone 2D and 3D PIC simulations of drift wave turbulence to investigate scaling properties and growth rates. We specifically consider stabilization of the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) and the development of this instability in the presence of a sheared magnetic field. Further investigations of the relative importance of drift wave turbulence in the development of reconnection will also be considered.

  9. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcowith, A.; Bret, A.; Bykov, A.; Dieckman, M. E.; O'C Drury, L.; Lembège, B.; Lemoine, M.; Morlino, G.; Murphy, G.; Pelletier, G.; Plotnikov, I.; Reville, B.; Riquelme, M.; Sironi, L.; Stockem Novo, A.

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics.

  10. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves.

    PubMed

    Marcowith, A; Bret, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O'C; Lembège, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics. PMID:27007555

  11. Low Frequency Waves at and Upstream of Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. B.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter focuses on the range of low frequency electromagnetic modes observed at and upstream of collisionless shocks in the heliosphere. It discusses a specific class of whistler mode wave observed immediately upstream of collisionless shock ramps, called a whistler precursor. Though these modes have been (and are often) observed upstream of quasi-parallel shocks, the authors limit their discussion to those observed upstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. The chapter discusses the various ion velocity distributions observed at and upstream of collisionless shocks. It also introduces some terminology and relevant instabilities for ion foreshock waves. The chapter discusses the most common ultra-low frequency (ULF) wave types, their properties, and their free energy sources. It discusses modes that are mostly Alfvénic (i.e., mostly transverse but can be compressive) in nature.

  12. Weak turbulence theory of collisionless trapped electron driven drift instability in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.; Tang, W.M.

    1990-10-01

    The toroidal collisionless trapped electron modes are analyzed in the weak turbulence regime treating both ions and trapped electrons nonlinearly in the presence of ion and electron temperature gradients. The spectral intensity of the density fluctuations in the nonlinearly saturated state is analytically obtained from the steady state solution of the wave-kinetic equation. Distant nonlinear interactions between low-k{sub {theta}} and high-k{sub {theta}} modes of similar frequencies via trapped electron scattering (the resonance between the beat wave and the trapped electron precession drift frequencies) suppress the low-k{sub {theta}} (k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s} {much lt} (L{sub n}/R){sup 1/2}) modes while close interactions via ion Compton scattering (nonlinear ion Landau damping) produce a monotonically decreasing spectrum from k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s} {congruent} (L{sub n}/R){sup 1/2} to k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s} {congruent} 1 according to an approximate power law k{sub {theta}}{sup {minus}3}. Various fluctuation amplitudes at saturation and the fluctuation-induced anomalous particle and heat fluxes are found to be smaller than the mixing length estimates. The plasma confinement is predicted to improve with higher T{sub i}/T{sub e}, more peaked density profile, larger aspect ratio, and higher plasma current. Also, a significant dependence of transport on the electron temperature gradient is found which could contribute to the rigidity of the electron temperature profile often experimentally observed.

  13. Whistler waves observed upstream from collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Waves in the frequency range 0.5 - 4 Hz were studied in the region upstream of the earth's bow shock using data from the fluxgate magnetic field experiment on IMP-6. Analysis of 150 examples of these waves during a three month interval indicates that amplitudes are generally less than 1 or 2 gammas and propagation directions generally make angles of between 20 and 40 degrees with the field direction. The waves as measured in the spacecraft frame of reference are either left or right hand polarized with respect to the average field direction. It is concluded that the observed waves are right handed waves in the plasma frame of reference with wavelengths of approximately 100 km propagating upstream in the whistler mode. Doppler shifting reduces the observed frequencies in the spacecraft frame and reverses the observed polarization for those waves propagating more directly upstream. Similar waves are seen ahead of most interplanetary shocks.

  14. Plasma waves downstream of weak collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Greenstadt, E. W.; Moses, S. L.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    In September 1983 the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE 3) International Cometary Explorer (ICE) spacecraft made a long traversal of the distant dawnside flank region of the Earth's magnetosphere and had many encounters with the low Mach number bow shock. These weak shocks excite plasma wave electric field turbulence with amplitudes comparable to those detected in the much stronger bow shock near the nose region. Downstream of quasi-perpendicular (quasi-parallel) shocks, the E field spectra exhibit a strong peak (plateau) at midfrequencies (1 - 3 kHz); the plateau shape is produced by a low-frequency (100 - 300 Hz) emission which is more intense behind downstream of two quasi-perpendicular shocks show that the low frequency signals are polarized parallel to the magnetic field, whereas the midfrequency emissions are unpolarized or only weakly polarized. A new high frequency (10 - 30 kHz) emission which is above the maximum Doppler shift exhibit a distinct peak at high frequencies; this peak is often blurred by the large amplitude fluctuations of the midfrequency waves. The high-frequency component is strongly polarized along the magnetic field and varies independently of the lower-frequency waves.

  15. Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic Waves In The Collisionless Space Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhalilov, N. S.; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Staude, J.

    2007-12-01

    The instability of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) waves in an anisotropic, collisionless, rarefied hot plasma is studied. Anisotropy properties of such a plasma are caused by a strong magnetic field, when the thermal gas pressures across and along the field become unequal. Moreover, there appears an anisotropy of the thermal fluxes. The study of the anisotropy features of the plasma are motivated by observed solar coronal data. The 16 moments equations derived from the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation are used. These equations strongly differ from the usual isotropic MHD case. For linear disturbances the wave equations in homogenous anisotropic plasma are deduced. The general dispersion relation for the incompressible wave modes is derived, solved and analyzed. It is shown that a wide wave spectrum with stable and unstable behavior is possible, in contrast to the usual isotropic MHD case. The dependence of the instability on magnetic field, pressure anisotropy, and heat fluxes is investigated. The general instability condition is obtained. The results can be applied to the theory of solar and stellar coronal heating, to wind models and in other modeling, where the collisionless approximation is valid.

  16. Hybrid numerical model of shock waves in collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vshivkova, L.; Dudnikova, G.; Vshivkov, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present a 2D hybrid numerical plasma model of generation and structure of collisionless shock waves in plasma and ion acceleration on their front considering physical processes in supernova remnant shock precursor. In modeling a shock wave is generated by sending a supersonic flow against a reflecting wall. The consequent interaction between incoming and reflected plasma flows lead to formation of waves, the structure of which depends on a flow velocity. The hybrid approach reduces the computational expenses relative to a fully kinetic one, and on the other hand, permits to model ions with a greater accuracy than the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) allows. Also, another important advantage of the hybrid approach is the possibility to study the important instabilities on an ion time scale, neglecting the modes associated with electrons. In the current work a new computational scheme where stability condition allows carry out computations on more wide set of computational and physical parameters is presented.

  17. The theory of magnetohydrodynamic wave generation by localized sources. II - Collisionless dissipation of wave packets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, William

    1989-01-01

    The dispersion equation of Barnes (1966) is used to study the dissipation of asymptotic wave packets generated by localized periodic sources. The solutions of the equation are linear waves, damped by Landau and transit-time processes, in a collisionless warm plasma. For the case of an ideal MHD system, most of the waves emitted from a source are shown to cancel asympotically through destructive interference. The modes transporting significant flux to asymptotic distances are found to be Alfven waves and fast waves with theta (the angle between the magnetic field and the characteristics of the far-field waves) of about 0 and about pi/2.

  18. Neoclassical polarization drift of collisionless single ions in a sheared radial electric field in a tokamak magnetic geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Hoyul; Ku, Seunghoe; Chang, C. S.

    2006-01-15

    Neoclassical polarization drift is known to play critical role in the dynamical behavior of a sheared radial electric field E{sub r} in a toroidal confinement device. However, basic studies on the effect of radial electric shear on neoclassical polarization drift have not yet appeared in the literature. In the present report, the neoclassical polarization drift speed V{sub NP} of collisionless single ions is studied using a guiding-center code in a time-varying, spatially sheared E{sub r} in a realistic tokamak geometry. It is found numerically that the V{sub NP} for single ions is not only a function of the time derivative {partial_derivative}E{sub r}/{partial_derivative}t, but also a strong function of the radial shear {delta}r{partial_derivative}E{sub r}/{partial_derivative}r if the shear length is on the same order as the ion banana width {delta}r. Comparison with an analytic investigation reveals that this effect is simply due to the finite banana modification to the orbital average E{sub r}. An approximate analytic formula has been presented for collisionless single banana ions in a conventional tokamak magnetic geometry. The trapped-passing boundary layer physics is not treated.

  19. Modelling of drift wave turbulence with a finite ion temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaguchi, S.; Horton, W.

    1990-10-01

    With the use of consistent orderings in {var epsilon} = {rho}{sub s}/a and {delta} = k{sub {perpendicular}}{rho}{sub s} model equations are derived for the drift instabilities from the electrostatic two-fluid equations. The electrical resistivity {eta} included in the system allows the dynamics of both the collisional drift wave instability ({eta} {ne} 0) and the collisionless ion temperature gradient driven instability ({eta} = 0). The model equations used extensively in earlier nonlinear studies are obtained as appropriate limits of the model equations derived in the present work. The effects of sheared velocity flows in the equilibrium plasma and electron temperature fluctuations are also discussed. 14 refs.

  20. Large-amplitude hydromagnetic waves in collisionless relativistic plasma - Exact solution for the fast-mode magnetoacoustic wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, A.

    1983-01-01

    An exact nonlinear solution is found to the relativistic kinetic and electrodynamic equations (in their hydromagnetic limit) that describes the large-amplitude fast-mode magnetoacoustic wave propagating normal to the magnetic field in a collisionless, previously uniform plasma. It is pointed out that a wave of this kind will be generated by transverse compression of any collisionless plasma. The solution is in essence independent of the detailed form of the particle momentum distribution functions. The solution is obtained, in part, through the method of characteristics; the wave exhibits the familiar properties of steepening and shock formation. A detailed analysis is given of the ultrarelativistic limit of this wave.

  1. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves. [plasma simulation model applied to electrostatic waves in collisionless plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuda, Y.

    1974-01-01

    A low-noise plasma simulation model is developed and applied to a series of linear and nonlinear problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. It is demonstrated that use of the hybrid simulation model allows economical studies to be carried out in both the linear and nonlinear regimes with better quantitative results, for comparable computing time, than can be obtained by conventional particle simulation models, or direct solution of the Vlasov equation. The characteristics of the hybrid simulation model itself are first investigated, and it is shown to be capable of verifying the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as .000001 of the plasma thermal energy. Having established the validity of the hybrid simulation model, it is then used to study the nonlinear dynamics of monochromatic wave, sideband instability due to trapped particles, and satellite growth.

  2. Drift waves in helically symmetric stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Rafiq, T.; Hegna, C.

    2005-11-15

    The local linear stability of electron drift waves and ion temperature gradient modes (ITG) is investigated in a quasihelically symmetric (QHS) stellarator and a conventional asymmetric (Mirror) stellarator. The geometric details of the different equilibria are emphasized. Eigenvalue equations for the models are derived using the ballooning mode formalism and solved numerically using a standard shooting technique in a fully three-dimensional stellarator configuration. While the eigenfunctions have a similar shape in both magnetic geometries, they are slightly more localized along the field line in the QHS case. The most unstable electron drift modes are strongly localized at the symmetry points (where stellarator symmetry is present) and in the regions where normal curvature is unfavorable and magnitude of the local magnetic shear and magnetic field is minimum. The presence of a large positive local magnetic shear in the bad curvature region is found to be destabilizing. Electron drift modes are found to be more affected by the normal curvature than by the geodesic curvature. The threshold of stability of the ITG modes in terms of {eta}{sub i} is found to be 2/3 in this fluid model consistent with the smallest threshold for toroidal geometry with adiabatic electrons. Optimization to favorable drift wave stability has small field line curvature, short connection lengths, the proper combination of geodesic curvature and local magnetic shear, large values of local magnetic shear, and the compression of flux surfaces in the unfavorable curvature region.

  3. Some Basic Concepts of Wave-Particle Interactions in Collisionless Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1997-01-01

    The physical concepts of wave-particle interactions in a collisionless plasma are developed from first principles. Using the Lorentz force, starting with the concepts of gyromotion, particle mirroring and the loss-cone, normal and anomalous cyclotron resonant interactions, pitch-angle scattering, and cross-field diffusion are developed.

  4. Drift Wave Simulations with Reduced Stellarator Equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    1999-12-10

    A three-field model to study drift-resistive, low-frequency waves in low-beta, non-axisymmetric plasmas [J.L.V. Lewandowski, Phys. Plasmas, 4 (11) 4023 (1997)] is used to analyze the effect of the inhomogeneities in the stellarator magnetic field on the fastest (linear) growth rate, gamma. Extensive numerical calculations for a toroidal heliac show that not all Fourier components in the representation of the equilibrium configuration are important as far as gamma is concerned.

  5. Nonlinear mechanisms for drift wave saturation and induced particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dimits, A.M. . Lab. for Plasma Research); Lee, W.W. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1989-12-01

    A detailed theoretical study of the nonlinear dynamics of gyrokinetic particle simulations of electrostatic collisionless and weakly collisional drift waves is presented. In previous studies it was shown that, in the nonlinearly saturated phase of the evolution, the saturation levels and especially the particle fluxes have an unexpected dependence on collisionality. In this paper, the explanations for these collisionality dependences are found to be as follows: The saturation level is determined by a balance between the electron and ion fluxes. The ion flux is small for levels of the potential below an E {times} B-trapping threshold and increases sharply once this threshold is crossed. Due to the presence of resonant electrons, the electron flux has a much smoother dependence on the potential. In the 2-1/2-dimensional ( pseudo-3D'') geometry, the electrons are accelerated away from the resonance as they diffuse spatially, resulting in an inhibition of their diffusion. Collisions and three-dimensional effects can repopulate the resonance thereby increasing the value of the particle flux. 30 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Collisionless damping of dust-acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive ions

    SciTech Connect

    Amour, Rabia; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    The charge variation induced nonlinear dust-acoustic wave damping in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive ions is considered. It is shown that the collisionless damping due to dust charge fluctuation causes the nonlinear dust acoustic wave propagation to be described by a damped Korteweg-de Vries (dK-dV) equation the coefficients of which depend sensitively on the nonextensive parameter q. The damping term, solely due to the dust charge variation, is affected by the ion nonextensivity. For the sake of completeness, the possible effects of nonextensivity and collisionless damping on weakly nonlinear wave packets described by the dK-dV equation are succinctly outlined by deriving a nonlinear Schrödinger-like equation with a complex nonlinear coefficient.

  7. Effect of the drift wave turbulence on the evolution of the low-[ital m] tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Siva Rama Prasad, P.V.; Tewari, D.P. )

    1994-01-01

    The effect of the background drift wave turbulence on the evolution of the low-[ital m] tearing modes has been studied, in the quasilinear regime, in various limiting cases. It is found, in the cases of the [ital m]=1 classical, collisionless, and drift-tearing modes, that the turbulence introduces finite real frequencies to these modes, which are otherwise purely growing ones, but reduces their instability activity. In the case of the [ital m][ge]2 classical modes, in a limit [vert bar][alpha][vert bar][sup 1/2][much gt][rho][sub [ital i

  8. Lower hybrid drift waves: space observations.

    PubMed

    Norgren, Cecilia; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri V; André, Mats

    2012-08-01

    Lower hybrid drift waves (LHDWs) are commonly observed at plasma boundaries in space and laboratory, often having the strongest measured electric fields within these regions. We use data from two of the Cluster satellites (C3 and C4) located in Earth's magnetotail and separated by a distance of the order of the electron gyroscale. These conditions allow us, for the first time, to make cross-spacecraft correlations of the LHDWs and to determine the phase velocity and wavelength of the LHDWs. Our results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We show that the electrostatic potential of LHDWs is linearly related to fluctuations in the magnetic field magnitude, which allows us to determine the velocity vector through the relation ∫δEdt·v = ϕ(δB)(∥). The electrostatic potential fluctuations correspond to ∼10% of the electron temperature, which suggests that the waves can strongly affect the electron dynamics. PMID:23006181

  9. Charging-delay induced dust acoustic collisionless shock wave: Roles of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran; Bharuthram, R.; Khan, Manoranjan; Gupta, M. R.

    2006-11-15

    The effects of charging-delay and negative ions on nonlinear dust acoustic waves are investigated. It has been found that the charging-delay induced anomalous dissipation causes generation of dust acoustic collisionless shock waves in an electronegative dusty plasma. The small but finite amplitude wave is governed by a Korteweg-de Vries Burger equation in which the Burger term arises due to the charging-delay. Numerical investigations reveal that the charging-delay induced dissipation and shock strength decreases (increases) with the increase of negative ion concentration (temperature)

  10. Kinetic Electron Closures for Electromagnetic Simulation of Drift and Shear-Alfven Waves (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I; Dimits, A M; Nevins, W M; Chen, Y; Parker, S

    2001-10-11

    An electromagnetic hybrid scheme (fluid electrons and gyrokinetic ions) is elaborated in example calculations and extended to toroidal geometry. The scheme includes a kinetic electron closure valid for {beta}{sub e} > m{sub e}/m{sub i} ({beta}{sub e} is the ratio of the plasma electron pressure to the magnetic field energy density). The new scheme incorporates partially linearized ({delta}f) drift-kinetic electrons whose pressure and number density moments are used to close the fluid momentum equation for the electron fluid (Ohm's law). The test cases used are small-amplitude kinetic shear-Alfven waves with electron Landau damping, the ion-temperature-gradient instability, and the collisionless drift instability (universal mode) in an unsheared slab as a function of the plasma {beta}{sub e}. Attention is given to resolution and convergence issues in simulations of turbulent steady states.

  11. Spatiotemporal mode structure of nonlinearly coupled drift wave modes

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Christian; Grulke, Olaf; Klinger, Thomas; Negrete, Jose Jr.; Bousselin, Guillaume; Brochard, Frederic; Bonhomme, Gerard; Oldenbuerger, Stella

    2011-11-15

    This paper presents full cross-section measurements of drift waves in the linear magnetized plasma of the Mirabelle device. Drift wave modes are studied in regimes of weakly developed turbulence. The drift wave modes develop azimuthal space-time structures of plasma density, plasma potential, and visible light fluctuations. A fast camera diagnostic is used to record visible light fluctuations of the plasma column in an azimuthal cross section with a temporal resolution of 10 {mu}s corresponding approximately to 10% of the typical drift wave period. Mode coupling and drift wave dispersion are studied by spatiotemporal Fourier decomposition of the camera frames. The observed coupling between modes is compared to calculations of nonlinearly coupled oscillators described by the Kuramoto model.

  12. Anomalous phase shifts in drift wave fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, Ahmed; Skiff, Fred

    2003-10-01

    Ion phase space density fluctuation measurements are performed in a linearly magnetized device using Laser Induced Fluorescence(LIF). An ICP source produces an 8cm diameter plasma column that drifts in a cylindrical vessel whose diameter and length are 40 cm and 3 m, respectively. These experiments are performed using a CW singly ionized Argon plasma that is immersed in a 1kG magnetic field along the axis of the cylinder. A density of the order of 10^9 cm-3 is obtained under a regulated neutral background pressure of 2.× 10-4 torr. The electron and ion temperature are respectively 2 eV and 0.1 eV. LIF is carried out by pumping the Ar II metastable (3d^1)^2G_9/2, using a CW tunable laser centered at 611.6653 nm scanned over 6 GHz, to metastable (4p^1)F_7/2, and then detecting the 460nm photons emitted from its transition to (4s^1)^2F_5/2. This collection is made possible using two low f-umber periscopes that are directed to PMTs. Here we present measurements of the complex two-point correlation function < f(v_i_allel),z_1,ω)f(v_i_allel,z_2,ω)> as a function of the spatial separation of two LIF detection systems Δ d = z_2-z_1, the ion parallel velocity v_i_allel and the frequency ω. Preliminary results show ion particle velocity dependent phase shifts at the drift wave frequency.

  13. Fast wave stabilization/destabilization of ion temperature gradient drift waves in a tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Anuraj; Ryu, Chang-Mo

    2015-11-01

    A kinetic description is developed for the stabilization/destabilization of ion temperature gradient drift waves by a large amplitude whistler wave. Parametric coupling of a whistler wave with the low frequency drift waves can yields whistler sidebands of their sum and difference frequencies. The whistler pump and sidebands can exert a ponderomotive force on electrons and modify the eigen-frequency of drift waves. This coupling process can lead to the stabilization/destabilization of drift waves, depending on the wave numbers of the interacting waves as well as the whistler pump power. The effectiveness of obliquely propagating whistler pump is also examined.

  14. The Saturnian Environment as a Unique Laboratory for Collisionless Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, Ali; Masters, Adam; Dougherty, Michele; Burgess, David; Fujimoto, Masaki; Hospodarsky, George

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves are ubiquitous in the universe and fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. The interplay between particles (ions and electrons) and fields (electromagnetic) introduces a variety of both physical and geometrical parameters such as Mach numbers (e.g. MA, Mf), β, and θBn. These vary drastically from terrestrial to astrophysical regimes resulting in radically different characteristics of shocks. This poses two complexities. Firstly, separating the influences of these parameters on physical mechanisms such as energy dissipation. Secondly, correlating observations of shock waves over a wide range of each parameter, enough to span across different regimes. Investigating the latter has been restricted since the majority of studies on shocks at exotic regimes (such as supernova remnants) have been achieved either remotely or via simulations, but rarely by means of in-situ observations. It is not clear what happens in the higher MA regime. Here we show the parameter space of MA for all bow shock crossings from 2004-2012 as measured by the Cassini spacecraft. We found that the Saturnian bow shock exhibits characteristics akin to both terrestrial and astrophysical regimes (MA of order 100), which is principally controlled by the upstream magnetic field strength. Moreover, we estimated the θbn of each crossing and were able to further constrain the sample into categories of similar features. Our results demonstrate how MA plays a central role in controlling the onset of physical mechanisms in collisionless shocks, particularly reformation. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. We show conclusive evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted timescale of ˜0.3 τc, where τc is the ion gyroperiod. In addition, we experimentally underpin the relationship between

  15. Drift laws for spiral waves on curved anisotropic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dierckx, Hans; Brisard, Evelien; Verschelde, Henri; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2013-07-01

    Rotating spiral waves organize spatial patterns in chemical, physical, and biological excitable systems. Factors affecting their dynamics, such as spatiotemporal drift, are of great interest for particular applications. Here, we propose a quantitative description for spiral wave dynamics on curved surfaces which shows that for a wide class of systems, including the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction and anisotropic cardiac tissue, the Ricci curvature scalar of the surface is the main determinant of spiral wave drift. The theory provides explicit equations for spiral wave drift direction, drift velocity, and the period of rotation. Depending on the parameters, the drift can be directed to the regions of either maximal or minimal Ricci scalar curvature, which was verified by direct numerical simulations. PMID:23944539

  16. Ion streaming instabilities with application to collisionless shock wave structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, K. I.; Linson, L. M.; Mani, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    The electromagnetic dispersion relation for two counterstreaming ion beams of arbitrary relative strength flowing parallel to a dc magnetic field is derived. The beams flow through a stationary electron background and the dispersion relation in the fluid approximation is unaffected by the electron thermal pressure. The dispersion relation is solved with a zero net current condition applied and the regions of instability in the k-U space (U is the relative velocity between the two ion beams) are presented. The parameters are then chosen to be applicable for parallel shocks. It was found that unstable waves with zero group velocity in the shock frame can exist near the leading edge of the shock for upstream Alfven Mach numbers greater than 5.5. It is suggested that this mechanism could generate sufficient turbulence within the shock layer to scatter the incoming ions and create the required dissipation for intermediate strength shocks.

  17. Drift-wave Turbulence in the Helimak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin; Felkl, Jakub; Gentle, Kenneth; Miracle, Dylan

    2007-11-01

    We present an experimental characterization of drift-wave turbulence in the Helimak, not only a finite realization of the sheared, cylindrical slab used in turbulence calculations, but also a good approximation for the SOL of a tokamak. Measurements of electrostatic turbulence are made both using an large fixed array of langmuir probes and a moveable array on a motorized probe drive. We examine such non-spatially oriented quantities as turbulence levels, fluctuation frequencies, and phases between density and electrostatic potential fluctuations. Measurements on dispersion relations and coherence lengths in both the radial and vertical directions are used to characterize the turbulence in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. In addition to this information, we also present a study of fluctuations parallel to the field lines, including measurements of parallel coherence lengths and parallel wavenumbers. Furthermore, we employ the use of wire coil probes to characterize fluctuations of both radial and vertical magnetic fields. We explore the relationships between density, potential, and magnetic turbulence.

  18. Damping of lower hybrid waves by low-frequency drift waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, Nicholas A.

    1989-11-01

    The conditions under which a spectrum of lower hybrid drift waves will decay into low-frequency drift waves (LFD) are calculated. The purpose is to help understand why lower hybrid drift waves are not seen in all field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiments in which they are predicted. It is concluded that if there is in the plasma a LFD wave amplitude above a critical level, lower hybrid waves will decay into low-frequency drift waves. The critical level required to stabilize TRX-2 [Phys. Fluids 30, 1497 (1987)] is calculated and found to be reasonably consistent with theoretical estimates.

  19. Plasma Waves Around Separatrix in Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection with Weak Guide Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Fujimoto, K.; Xiao, C.; Ji, H.

    2015-12-01

    Electrostatic and electromagnetic waves excited by electron beam around the separatrix region are analyzed in detail during the collisionless magnetic reconnection with a weak guide field by using 2D particle-in-cell simulation with the adaptive mesh refinement. Broadband electrostatic waves are excited both in the inflow and outflow regions around the separatrices due to the electron bump-on-tail, two-stream, and Buneman instabilities. In contrast, the quasi-monochromatic electromagnetic waves are excited only in the inflow side of the separatrices due to a beam-driven Whistler instability. The localization of the Whistler waves is attributed to the non-uniformity of the out-of-plane magnetic field By. The Whistler instability is suppressed in the outflow side where By is too small for the oblique propagation. The electrostatic waves with distinct speeds can explain the in situ spacecraft observations. From the causality point of view, the waves are generated as the consequence of the electron bulk acceleration to thermalize the particles through wave-particle interactions. These simulation results provide guidance to analyze high-resolution wave observations during reconnection in the ongoing and upcoming satellite missions, as well as in dedicated laboratory experiments.

  20. A kinetic theory of trapped electron driven drift wave turbulence in a sheared magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Gang, F.Y. . Inst. for Fusion Studies); Diamond, P.H.; Rosenbluth, M.N. . Dept. of Physics General Atomics, San Diego, CA )

    1990-09-01

    A kinetic theory of collisionless and dissipative trapped electron driven drift wave turbulence in a sheared magnetic field is presented. Weak turbulence theory is employed to calculate the nonlinear electron and ion responses and to derive a wave kinetic equation that determines the nonlinear evolution of trapped electron mode turbulence. Saturated fluctuation spectrum is calculated using the condition of nonlinear saturation. The turbulent transport coefficients are in turn calculated using saturated fluctuation spectrum. Due to the disparity in the three different radial scale lengths of the slab-like eigenmode: {Delta} (trapped electron layer width), x{sub t} (turning point width) and x{sub i} (Landau damping point), {Delta} < x{sub t} < x{sub i}, we find that ion Compton scattering rather than trapped electron Compton scattering is the dominant nonlinear saturation mechanism. Ion Compton scattering transfers wave energy from short to long wavelengths where the wave energy is shear damped. As a consequence, a saturated fluctuation spectrum {vert bar}{phi}{vert bar}{sup 2}(k{sub {theta}}) {approximately} k{sub {theta}}{sup {minus}{alpha}} ({alpha} = 2 and 3 for the dissipative and collisionless regime, respectively) occurs for k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s} < 1 and is heavily damped for k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s} > 1. The predicted fluctuation level and transport coefficients are well below the mixing length'' estimate. This is due to the contribution of radial wavenumbers x{sub t}{sup {minus}1} < k{sub r} {le} {rho}{sub i}{sup {minus}1} to the nonlinear couplings, the effect of radial localization of trapped electron response to a layer of width, {Delta}, and the weak turbulence factor {l angle}({gamma}{sub e}{sup l})/({omega}{sub {rvec {kappa}}}){r angle}{sub {rvec k}} < 1, which enters the saturation level. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Two-fluid MHD Regime of Drift Wave Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shang-Chuan; Zhu, Ping; Xie, Jin-Lin; Liu, Wan-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Drift wave instabilities contribute to the formation of edge turbulence and zonal flows, and thus are believed to play essential roles in the anomalous transport processes in tokamaks. Whereas drift waves are generally assumed to be local and electrostatic, experiments have often found regimes where the spatial scales and the magnetic components of drift waves approach those of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes. In this work we study such a drift wave regime in a cylindrical magnetized plasma using a full two-fluid MHD model implemented in the NIMROD code. The linear dependency of growth rates on resistivity and the dispersion relation found in the NIMROD calculations qualitatively agree with theoretical analysis. As the azimuthal mode number increases, the drift modes become highly localized radially; however, unlike the conventional local approximation, the radial profile of the drift mode tends to shift toward the edge away from the center of the density gradient slope, suggesting the inhomogeneity of two-fluid effects. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 11275200 and National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant 2014GB124002.

  2. Chaotic neoclassical separatrix dissipation in parametric drift-wave decay.

    PubMed

    Kabantsev, A A; Tsidulko, Yu A; Driscoll, C F

    2014-02-01

    Experiments and theory characterize a parametric decay instability between plasma drift waves when the nonlinear coupling is modified by an electrostatic barrier. Novel mode coupling terms representing enhanced dissipation and mode phase shifts are caused by chaotic separatrix crossings on the wave-ruffled separatrix. Experimental determination of these coupling terms is in broad agreement with new chaotic neoclassical transport analyses. PMID:24580605

  3. Quasilinear wave-particle scattering rate in high-beta turbulent collisionless plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos de Lima, Reinaldo; Yan, Huirong; Lazarian, Alex; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete

    2015-08-01

    Collisionless or weakly collisional plasmas, like the plasma of the intracluster medium of galaxies, are subject to electromagnetic instabilities driven by temperature anisotropy, which naturally arise in the presence of turbulence. These instabilities produce anomalous collisionality via wave-particle scattering, then reducing the mean-free-path of the particles by several orders of magnitude. This reduction affects directly the transport properties of the plasma and makes its large scale dynamics to behave similar to collisional MHD. In particular, it allows the turbulence to amplify the magnetic fields via the small-scale dynamo. Using the quasilinear theory, we calculate the scattering rate of ions due to the kinetic instabilities ion-cyclotron, mirror, and firehose. Using these results we estimate the average scattering rate of ions consistent with data cubes of high-beta MHD turbulence which represent the intracluster medium.

  4. On the drift magnetosonic waves in anisotropic low beta plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Naim, Hafsa; Bashir, M. F.; Murtaza, G.

    2014-10-15

    A generalized dispersion relation of obliquely propagating drift magnetosonic waves is derived by using the gyrokinetic theory for anisotropic low beta plasmas. The stability analysis applicable to a wide range of plasma parameters is performed to understand the stabilization mechanism of the drift magnetosonic instability and the estimation of the growth rate is also presented. It is noted that the growth rate of the drift instability enhances for small anisotropy (A{sub e,i} = T{sub ⊥e,i}/T{sub ∥e,i} < 1) whereas it is suppressed for large anisotropy (A{sub e,i} > 1)

  5. Nonlinear frequency shift of electrostatic waves in general collisionless plasma: Unifying theory of fluid and kinetic nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chang; Dodin, Ilya Y.

    2015-08-15

    The nonlinear frequency shift is derived in a transparent asymptotic form for intense Langmuir waves in general collisionless plasma. The formula describes both fluid and kinetic effects simultaneously. The fluid nonlinearity is expressed, for the first time, through the plasma dielectric function, and the kinetic nonlinearity accounts for both smooth distributions and trapped-particle beams. Various known limiting scalings are reproduced as special cases. The calculation avoids differential equations and can be extended straightforwardly to other nonlinear plasma waves.

  6. Antenna excitation of drift wave in a toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, A.; Ricci, P.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Mueller, S. H.; Podesta, M.; Poli, F. M.; Skiff, F.

    2007-10-15

    In a magnetized toroidal plasma, an antenna tunable in vertical wave number is used to excite density perturbations. Coherent detection is performed by means of Langmuir probes to directly determine both the wave vector and the plasma response induced by the antenna. Comparison between the theoretical density response predicted by the generalized Hasegawa-Wakatani model, and the experimentally determined density response enables us the identification of one peak of the plasma response as a drift wave.

  7. Asymmetric drift instability of magnetosonic waves in anisotropic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, M. F.; Chen, Lunjin

    2016-10-01

    The general dispersion relation of obliquely propagating magneto-sonic (MS) waves for the inhomogeneous and anisotropic plasmas is analyzed including the effect of wave-particle interaction. The numerical analysis is performed without expanding both the plasma dispersion and the modified Bessel functions to highlight the effects of density inhomogeneity and the temperature anisotropy. The obtained results are compared with the recent work [Naim et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 062117 (2015)], where only drift mode near the magnetosonic frequency is investigated. In our paper, we additionally analyzed two related modes depicting that the drift effect leads to an asymmetric behavior in the dispersion properties of drift MS waves. The possible application to the solar coronal heating problem has also been discussed.

  8. Spatiotemporal synchronization of drift waves in a magnetron sputtering plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Antoni, V.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Adámek, J.

    2014-10-15

    A feedforward scheme is applied for drift waves control in a magnetized magnetron sputtering plasma. A system of driven electrodes collecting electron current in a limited region of the explored plasma is used to interact with unstable drift waves. Drift waves actually appear as electrostatic modes characterized by discrete wavelengths of the order of few centimeters and frequencies of about 100 kHz. The effect of external quasi-periodic, both in time and space, travelling perturbations is studied. Particular emphasis is given to the role played by the phase relation between the natural and the imposed fluctuations. It is observed that it is possible by means of localized electrodes, collecting currents which are negligible with respect to those flowing in the plasma, to transfer energy to one single mode and to reduce that associated to the others. Due to the weakness of the external action, only partial control has been achieved.

  9. Scroll wave drift along steps, troughs, and corners.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hua; Zhang, Zhihui; Steinbock, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Three-dimensional excitable systems can create nonlinear scroll waves that rotate around one-dimensional phase singularities. Recent theoretical work predicts that these filaments drift along step-like height variations. Here, we test this prediction using experiments with thin layers of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. We observe that over short distances scroll waves are attracted towards the step and then rapidly commence a steady drift along the step line. The translating filaments always reside on the shallow side of the step near the edge. Accordingly, filaments in the deep domain initially collide with and shorten at the step wall. The drift speeds obey the predicted proportional dependence on the logarithm of the height ratio and the direction depends on the vortex chirality. We also observe drift along the perimeter of rectangular plateaus and find that the filaments perform sharp turns at the corners. In addition, we investigate rectangular troughs for which vortices of equal chirality can drift in different directions. The latter two effects are reproduced in numerical simulations with the Barkley model. The simulations show that narrow troughs instigate scroll wave encounters that induce repulsive interaction and symmetry breaking. Similar phenomena could exist in the geometrically complicated ventricles of the human heart where reentrant vortex waves cause tachycardia and fibrillation. PMID:26117114

  10. Effect of drift waves on plasma blob dynamics.

    PubMed

    Angus, Justin R; Umansky, Maxim V; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I

    2012-05-25

    Most of the work to date on plasma blobs found in the edge region of magnetic confinement devices is limited to 2D theory and simulations which ignore the variation of blob parameters along the magnetic field line. However, if the 2D convective rate of blobs is on the order of the growth rate of unstable drift waves, then drift wave turbulence can drastically alter the dynamics of blobs from that predicted by 2D theory. The density gradients in the drift plane that characterize the blob are mostly depleted during the nonlinear stage of drift waves resulting in a much more diffuse blob with a greatly reduced radial velocity. Sheath connected plasma blobs driven by effective gravity forces are considered in this Letter and it is found that the effects of resistive drift waves occur at earlier stages in the 2D motion for smaller blobs and in systems with a smaller effective gravity force. These conclusions are supported numerically by a direct comparison of 2D and 3D seeded blob simulations.

  11. Strange Attractors in Drift Wave Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-09-03

    There are growing experimental, numerical and theoretical evidences that the anomalous transport observed in tokamaks and stellarators is caused by slow, drift-type modes (such as trapped electron modes and ion-temperature gradient-driven modes). Although typical collision frequencies in hot, magnetized fusion plasmas can be quite low in absolute values, collisional effects are nevertheless important since they act as dissipative sinks. As it is well known, dissipative systems with many (strictly speaking more than two) degrees of freedom are often chaotic and may evolve towards a so-called attractor.

  12. Conditions for Debris-Background Ion Interactions and Collisionless Shock Wave Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, Dan; Cowee, Misa

    2012-07-10

    We use hybrid simulations and simple theoretical arguments to determine when debris ions streaming relative to background ions in a collisionless, magnetized plasma couple strongly enough to generate a magnetosonic shock wave. We consider three types of configurations: one-dimensional, the two-dimensional extension of the 1-D case, and a more complex 2-D geometry that contains some effects that would be found in a laser-produced, laboratory plasma. We show that the simulation results as well as previous Russian and LLNL results reduce to a simple condition (R{sub m}/{rho}{sub d} = equal mass radius/debris ion gyroradius {ge} 0.7) for the generation of a shock wave. Strong debris interaction with the background is characterized by the formation of a magnetic pulse that steepens and speeds up as it encounters the debris ions deflected by the magnetic field. The pulse further evolves into a shock. As the earlier work has indicated, the process also involves the generation of a transverse electric field perpendicular to the flow and the magnetic field that accelerates the background ions radially outward, which in turn causes the speedup of the pulse. With electric and magnetic field probes, the UCLA laser experiments should be able to detect these signatures of coupling as well as the generation of the shock wave.

  13. Nonlinear interaction of drift waves with driven plasma currents

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Christian; Grulke, Olaf; Klinger, Thomas

    2010-03-15

    In a cylindrical magnetized plasma, coherent drift wave modes are synchronized by a mode selective drive of plasma currents. Nonlinear effects of the synchronization are investigated in detail. Frequency pulling is observed over a certain frequency range. The dependence of the width of this synchronization range on the amplitude of the driven plasma currents forms Arnold tongues. The transition between complete and incomplete synchronization is indicated by the onset of periodic pulling and phase slippage. Synchronization is observed for driven current amplitudes, which are some percent of the typical value of parallel currents generated by drift waves.

  14. Nonlinear generation of magnetostatic fluctuations by drift waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Kaw, P. K.

    1984-10-01

    A self-consistent analysis of nonlinear coupling between drift waves and magnetostatic modes in tokomak discharges is presented. It is shown that an instability arises in the magnetostatic modes when they couple back to the drift waves. The disturbances are modeled with a parallel electron momentum equation and, in the case of a hydrogen plasma, have a growth rate close to 100 msec. The growth rate could, however, accelerate with higher electron densities, which may be a problem in current cold plasma toroidal devices which have a 5 msec confinement time.

  15. Drift waves in a high-density cylindrical helicon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Christiane; Grulke, Olaf; Klinger, Thomas; Naulin, Volker

    2005-04-15

    A low-frequency instability is investigated in a helicon plasma, which is characterized by comparably high plasma-{beta} and high collision frequencies. Single movable Langmuir probes and a poloidal probe array are used for studies of spatiotemporal dynamics and for characterization of the background plasma parameters. All experimentally observed features of the instability are found to be consistent with drift waves. A linear nonlocal numerical model for drift modes, based on the two-fluid description of a plasma, is used for comparison between the experimental observations and theory. Comparing numerical and experimental frequencies, it is found that the experimentally observed frequencies are consistent with drift waves. The numerical results show that the high electron collision frequencies provide the strongest destabilization mechanism in the helicon plasma.

  16. Gas scintillation drift chambers with wave shifter fiber readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Weiss, Steven; Parsons, Ann; Lin, Robert P.; Smith, Garth

    1988-01-01

    Results for a prototype xenon gas scintillation drift chamber are presented. Its operation is discussed using two types of light detection schemes: one based on an Anger camera geometry and one based on an array of wave-shifting light fibers. The results are judged to demonstrate the instrument's potential.

  17. The stability of the dust acoustic waves under transverse perturbations in a magnetized and collisionless dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dong-Ning; Qi, Xin; Hong, Xue-Ren; Yang, Xue; Duan, Wen-Shan; Yang, Lei; Yang

    2014-06-01

    Numerical and theoretical investigations are carried out for the stability of the dust acoustic waves (DAWs) under the transverse perturbation in a two-ion temperature magnetized and collisionless dusty plasma. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation, modified ZK equation, and Extended ZK (EZK) equation of the DAWs are given by using the reductive perturbation technique. The cut-off frequency is obtained by applying higher-order transverse perturbations to the soliton solution of the EZK equation. The propagation velocity of solitary waves, the real cut-off frequency, as well as the growth rate of the higher-order perturbation to the solitary wave are obtained.

  18. Impacts of wave spreading and multidirectional waves on estimating Stokes drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, A.; Fox-Kemper, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Stokes drift, and its leading-order approximation, for a random sea depend upon the interaction of different wave groups and the process of wave spreading. Here Stokes drift direction and magnitude from prescribed spectra, local observational buoy data, and global model WAVEWATCH III output are used to analyze approximations of Stokes drift for directional random seas in deep water. To facilitate analysis, a new approximation is defined to incorporate the systematic effects of wave spreading. Stokes drift is typically overestimated by ignoring these effects or by ignoring directional differences in swell and wind seas. These two errors are differentiated and found to be largely uncorrelated. These errors depend strongly on depth, with deeper Stokes drift favoring narrow-banded swell and shallower Stokes drift favoring wind seas. Results are consistent among the data examined. Mean Stokes drift magnitude reductions from wave spreading and multidirectional wave effects alone are 14-20% and 7-23% respectively, giving a combined reduction of 20-40% versus unidirectional waves, depending on wave age and depth. Approximations that do not include these reductions however, will on average overestimate Stokes drift by 16-26%, 26-43%, and 45-71% respectively. In addition to magnitude, the direction of Stokes drift is also affected and multidirectional waves generate a directional veer with depth: the 30/60/90% confidence intervals are bounded (approximately) by ± 0.12/0.28/0.84 radians (± 7/16/48 deg) at the surface, with smaller intervals at depth. Complementary depth-integrated approximations are also investigated and directional effects are similar with depth-dependent subsurface results. Furthermore, an optimized directional spread correction for the surface is nearly identical for global simulations and a buoy located at Ocean Weather Station P (50°N 145°W), and does not require directional wave spectrum data.

  19. Drift waves and vortices: a dynamical point vortex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoncini, Xavier; Verga, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Interactions of localized vortices with drift waves are investigated using a model of point vortices in the presence of a transverse or longitudinal wave. This simple model shows a rich dynamical behavior including oscillations of a dipole, splitting and merging of two like-circulation vortices, and chaos. The analytical and numerical results of this model have been found to predict under certain conditions, the behavior of more complex systems, such as the vortices of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation, where the presence of waves strongly affects the evolution of large coherent structures.

  20. Electrostatic probe disruption of drift waves in magnetized microdischarges

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, T.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2009-05-25

    Ultrahigh speed images of ExB discharges are collected during electrostatic probing of magnetized microdischarges. Two azimuthally separated floating micro-Langmuir probes inserted into an axisymmetric microscale magnetically confined plasma are used to characterize azimuthal drift waves. The images reveal features associated with probe intrusion, showing how the electrostatic probes may disrupt the otherwise coherent azimuthal waves. The resulting wave dispersion calculated from the probe signals is consistent with the disruptions seen in the images. These images demonstrate how probe measurements of fluctuations and turbulence, even when probe dimensions are much smaller than characteristic discharge scales, must be interpreted with caution.

  1. Drift waves and chaos in a LAPTAG plasma physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Birge-Lee, Henry; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Wolman, Ben; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Patankar, Vedang; Bridges, Gabriel; Buckley-Bonanno, Samuel; Buckley, Susan; Ge, Andrew; Thomas, Sam

    2016-02-01

    In a project involving an alliance between universities and high schools, a magnetized plasma column with a steep pressure gradient was established in an experimental device. A two-dimensional probe measured fluctuations in the plasma column in a plane transverse to the background magnetic field. Correlation techniques determined that the fluctuations were that of electrostatic drift waves. The time series data were used to generate the Bandt-Pompe entropy and Jensen-Shannon complexity for the data. These quantities, when plotted against one another, revealed that a combination of drift waves and other background fluctuations were a deterministically chaotic system. Our analysis can be used to tell the difference between deterministic chaos and random noise, making it a potentially useful technique in nonlinear dynamics.

  2. Virtual wave stress and mean drift in spatially damped surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Jan Erik

    2001-06-01

    The concept of virtual wave stress (VWS) is applied to spatially attenuated, deepwater surface gravity waves. With particular emphasis on laboratory wave tank measurements it is pointed out that VWS induces a mean Eulerian drift current that increases with time. This can be important for the determination of the wave-induced drift current, especially when the surface contains thin slicks of contaminating material. A novel formulation is derived that relates VWS to the lateral divergence of the mean wave momentum flux. It is suggested that this formulation can be helpful in determining the mean drift current in the presence of surface slicks as well as the mean volume flux associated with deepwater waves that break in a limited spatial region.

  3. Fast wave stabilization/destabilization of drift waves in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-03-15

    Four wave-nonlinear coupling of a large amplitude whistler with low frequency drift wave and whistler wave sidebands is examined. The pump and whistler sidebands exert a low frequency ponderomotive force on electrons introducing a frequency shift in the drift wave. For whistler pump propagating along the ambient magnetic field B{sub s}z-caret with wave number k(vector sign){sub 0}, drift waves of wave number k(vector sign)=k(vector sign){sub Up-Tack }+k{sub ||}z-caret see an upward frequency shift when k{sub Up-Tack }{sup 2}/k{sub 0}{sup 2}>4k{sub ||}/k{sub 0} and are stabilized once the whistler power exceeds a threshold value. The drift waves of low transverse wavelength tend to be destabilized by the nonlinear coupling. Oblique propagating whistler pump with transverse wave vector parallel to k(vector sign){sub Up-Tack} is also effective but with reduced effectiveness.

  4. Drift-Wave Instabilities and Transport in Non - Tokamak Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Daniel Duc

    Motivated by experimental scaling laws that suggest an improvement in the confinement time of fusion plasmas in tokamaks with elongated cross section, we search theoretically for favorable dependence on elongation for drift-wave instabilities, which may be responsible for anomalous transport in tokamaks. First, using thermodynamic methods, we derive upper bounds on thermal diffusivities for drift-wave instabilities in tokamaks but find no elongation dependence to lowest order. Also, compared with experimentally inferred ion thermal diffusivities from the DIIID tokamak, the thermodynamic bounds are as much as 100 times bigger in the plasma core. Second, utilizing a simulation code to calculate linear growth rates, we obtain mixing-length estimates of ion thermal diffusivities for a specific drift wave, the ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) mode, which becomes unstable only if the temperature gradient exceeds a finite threshold value (whereas the thermodynamic constraints allow instability for any value). We find that the simulation growth rates and the diffusivities estimated from them do decrease for increasing elongation, due to finite Larmor radius effects (which do not explicitly appear in the thermodynamic constraints). Compared with the experimentally inferred diffusivities, the simulation diffusivities are similar near the edge but are 10 times bigger in the core. However, a small adjustment in the temperature profile, within experimental and theoretical uncertainties, would produce good agreement everywhere. Therefore, we suggest that for the DIIID experiments studied, the plasma is actually very close to the ITG instability threshold in the core and farther away from threshold near the edge, but not far enough to induce the full thermodynamic level of diffusivities. This conjecture is supported by model transport calculations that reproduce the experimental diffusivity profile fairly well.

  5. Effect of wave-induced Stokes drift on the dynamics of ocean mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhifeng; Wu, Kejian; Dong, Sheng; Deng, Zeng'an; Zhang, Xiaoshuang

    2015-01-01

    The wave-forcing `Coriolis-Stokes forcing' and `Stokes-vortex force' induced by Stokes drift affect the upper ocean jointly. To study the effect of the wave-induced Stokes drift on the dynamics of the ocean mixed layer, a new three-dimensional (3D) numerical model is derived using the primitive basic equations and Eulerian wave averaging. The Princeton Ocean Model (POM), a 3D primitive equation ocean model is used with the upper wave-averaged basic equations. The global ocean circulation is simulated using the POM model, and the Stokes drift is evaluated based on the wave data generated by WAVEWATCH III. We compared simulations with and without the Stokes drift. The results show that the magnitude of the Stokes drift is comparable with the Eulerian mean current. Including the Stokes drift in the ocean model affects both the Eulerian current and the Lagranian drift and causes the vertical mixing coefficients to increase.

  6. Large-scale drift and Rossby wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, K. L.; Nazarenko, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    We study drift/Rossby wave turbulence described by the large-scale limit of the Charney–Hasegawa–Mima equation. We define the zonal and meridional regions as Z:= \\{{k} :| {k}y| \\gt \\sqrt{3}{k}x\\} and M:= \\{{k} :| {k}y| \\lt \\sqrt{3}{k}x\\} respectively, where {k}=({k}x,{k}y) is in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field such that k x is along the isopycnals and k y is along the plasma density gradient. We prove that the only types of resonant triads allowed are M≤ftrightarrow M+Z and Z≤ftrightarrow Z+Z. Therefore, if the spectrum of weak large-scale drift/Rossby turbulence is initially in Z it will remain in Z indefinitely. We present a generalised Fjørtoft’s argument to find transfer directions for the quadratic invariants in the two-dimensional {k}-space. Using direct numerical simulations, we test and confirm our theoretical predictions for weak large-scale drift/Rossby turbulence, and establish qualitative differences with cases when turbulence is strong. We demonstrate that the qualitative features of the large-scale limit survive when the typical turbulent scale is only moderately greater than the Larmor/Rossby radius.

  7. Large-scale drift and Rossby wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, K. L.; Nazarenko, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    We study drift/Rossby wave turbulence described by the large-scale limit of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation. We define the zonal and meridional regions as Z:= \\{{k} :| {k}y| \\gt \\sqrt{3}{k}x\\} and M:= \\{{k} :| {k}y| \\lt \\sqrt{3}{k}x\\} respectively, where {k}=({k}x,{k}y) is in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field such that k x is along the isopycnals and k y is along the plasma density gradient. We prove that the only types of resonant triads allowed are M≤ftrightarrow M+Z and Z≤ftrightarrow Z+Z. Therefore, if the spectrum of weak large-scale drift/Rossby turbulence is initially in Z it will remain in Z indefinitely. We present a generalised Fjørtoft’s argument to find transfer directions for the quadratic invariants in the two-dimensional {k}-space. Using direct numerical simulations, we test and confirm our theoretical predictions for weak large-scale drift/Rossby turbulence, and establish qualitative differences with cases when turbulence is strong. We demonstrate that the qualitative features of the large-scale limit survive when the typical turbulent scale is only moderately greater than the Larmor/Rossby radius.

  8. Dust gravitational drift wave in complex plasma under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Salahshoor, M. Niknam, A. R.

    2014-12-15

    The dispersion relation of electrostatic waves in a complex plasma under gravity is presented. It is assumed that the waves propagate parallel to the external fields. The effects of weak electric field, neutral drag force, and ion drag force are also taken into account. The dispersion relation is numerically examined in an appropriate parameter space in which the gravity plays the dominant role in the dynamics of microparticles. The numerical results show that, in the low pressure complex plasma under gravity, a low frequency drift wave can be developed in the long wavelength limit. The stability state of this wave is switched at a certain critical wavenumber in such a way that the damped mode is transformed into a growing one. Furthermore, the influence of the external fields on the dispersion properties is analyzed. It is shown that the wave instability is essentially due to the electrostatic streaming of plasma particles. It is also found that by increasing the electric field strength, the stability switching occurs at smaller wavenumbers.

  9. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND WAVE EXCITATION IN QUASI-PARALLEL HIGH-MACH-NUMBER COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS: PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tsunehiko N.

    2015-04-01

    We herein investigate shock formation and particle acceleration processes for both protons and electrons in a quasi-parallel high-Mach-number collisionless shock through a long-term, large-scale, particle-in-cell simulation. We show that both protons and electrons are accelerated in the shock and that these accelerated particles generate large-amplitude Alfvénic waves in the upstream region of the shock. After the upstream waves have grown sufficiently, the local structure of the collisionless shock becomes substantially similar to that of a quasi-perpendicular shock due to the large transverse magnetic field of the waves. A fraction of protons are accelerated in the shock with a power-law-like energy distribution. The rate of proton injection to the acceleration process is approximately constant, and in the injection process, the phase-trapping mechanism for the protons by the upstream waves can play an important role. The dominant acceleration process is a Fermi-like process through repeated shock crossings of the protons. This process is a “fast” process in the sense that the time required for most of the accelerated protons to complete one cycle of the acceleration process is much shorter than the diffusion time. A fraction of the electrons are also accelerated by the same mechanism, and have a power-law-like energy distribution. However, the injection does not enter a steady state during the simulation, which may be related to the intermittent activity of the upstream waves. Upstream of the shock, a fraction of the electrons are pre-accelerated before reaching the shock, which may contribute to steady electron injection at a later time.

  10. Global theory to understand toroidal drift waves in steep gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hua-sheng; Li, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Toroidal drift waves with unconventional mode structures and non-ground eigenstates, which differ from a typical ballooning structure mode, are found to be important recently by large scale global gyrokinetic simulations and especially become dominant at strong gradient edge plasmas [cf. H. S. Xie and Y. Xiao, Phys. Plasmas 22, 090703 (2015)]. The global stability and mode structures of drift wave in this steep edge density and temperature gradients are examined by both direct numerical solutions of a model two-dimensional eigen equation and analytical theory employing WKB-ballooning approach. Theory agrees with numerical solutions quite well. Our results indicate that (i) non-ground eigenstates and unconventional mode structures generally exist and can be roughly described by two parameters "quantum number" l and ballooning angle ϑk , (ii) local model can overestimate the growth rate largely, say, >50 % , and (iii) the narrow steep equilibrium profile leads to twisting (triangle-like) radial mode structures. With velocity space integral, semi-local theory predicts that the critical jump gradient of the most unstable ion temperature gradient mode from ground state l = 0 to non-ground state l = 1 is LT-1R ˜50 . These features can have important consequences to turbulent transport.

  11. Collisionless damping of dust-acoustic waves in a charge varying electronegative dusty plasma with nonthermal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzekka, Moufida; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present communication is to investigate the charge variation induced nonlinear dust acoustic wave damping in a charge varying electronegative dusty plasma with nonthermal ions. It is shown that the collisionless damping due to dust charge fluctuation causes the nonlinear dust acoustic wave propagation to be described by a damped Korteweg-de Vries equation (dK-dV). The latter is significantly modified by the nonthermal negative ions effects. It may be useful to note that we consider nonthermal negative ions because of the role of their distribution into the formation and dynamics of nonlinear dust acoustic structures. Moreover, the observation of nonthermal ion distributions made by Phobos and Nozomi motivated us to consider non- Maxwellian ions.

  12. Stability of dust ion acoustic solitary waves in a collisionless unmagnetized nonthermal plasma in presence of isothermal positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardar, Sankirtan; Bandyopadhyay, Anup; Das, K. P.

    2016-07-01

    A three-dimensional KP (Kadomtsev Petviashvili) equation is derived here describing the propagation of weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive dust ion acoustic wave in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions, static negatively charged dust grains, nonthermal electrons, and isothermal positrons. When the coefficient of the nonlinear term of the KP-equation vanishes an appropriate modified KP (MKP) equation describing the propagation of dust ion acoustic wave is derived. Again when the coefficient of the nonlinear term of this MKP equation vanishes, a further modified KP equation is derived. Finally, the stability of the solitary wave solutions of the KP and the different modified KP equations are investigated by the small-k perturbation expansion method of Rowlands and Infeld [J. Plasma Phys. 3, 567 (1969); 8, 105 (1972); 10, 293 (1973); 33, 171 (1985); 41, 139 (1989); Sov. Phys. - JETP 38, 494 (1974)] at the lowest order of k, where k is the wave number of a long-wavelength plane-wave perturbation. The solitary wave solutions of the different evolution equations are found to be stable at this order.

  13. Coupling of magnetic electron drift vortex mode with longitudinal perturbations in collision-less and dissipative electron and electron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.

    2015-08-15

    The plasma density non-uniformity gives rise to the coupling of transverse magnetic electron drift vortex (MEDV) mode with the longitudinal perturbations in dissipative and non-dissipative electron plasmas. This coupling produces partially transverse and partially longitudinal low frequency instabilities in classical un-magnetized laser plasmas. The MEDV mode couples with the ion acoustic wave, when the ion dynamics is also included. Both the modes have frequencies of the same order of magnitude and couple to give rise to electromagnetic instabilities in un-magnetized plasmas.

  14. Interactions between Drift-Wave Microturbulence and the Tearing Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S. D.; Brennan, D. P.; Izacard, O.; Holland, C.

    2014-10-01

    Turbulent dynamics are known to be affected by the presence of a magnetic island. The evolution of a magnetic island is also known to be affected by evolving turbulent fields. Capturing this interaction is a challenging computational problem due to the disparate scales involved. Using a Hasegawa-Wakatani model for the small spatial and temporal scale drift-wave microturbulence and coupling it to Ohm's Law for evolving the larger-scale magnetic island we can capture the dynamics of this interaction self-consistently. We have developed a new code, TURBO, to simulate this system using an equilibrium with prescribed turbulent drives and magnetohydrodynamic stability properties. We present progress toward understanding this interaction via comparisons with analytic predictions for a turbulent resistivity and turbulent viscosity. These two transport coefficients are calculated as integrals over the wave spectrum and the scaling with wave number is investigated. An extension to a five-field model including the ion temperature gradient is also presented. Supported in part by US DOE Grant DE-SC0007851

  15. Time-spectral modelling of drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffel, Jan

    2013-10-01

    Time spectral methods for initial-value partial differential equations avoid the time stepping being characteristic for temporal finite difference schemes. Large gains in efficiency should then be within reach for problems in plasma physics with widely separated time scales. In the recently developed Generalized Weighted Residual Method GWRM, temporal, spatial and parameter domains are all handled using a Chebyshev polynomial solution ansatz. The coefficients of the ansatz are determined using a generalized weighted residual method, for which a new efficient equation system solver has been applied. In addition, subdomain methods for the temporal and spatial domains have been developed and employed successfully in a number of test problems. We will here also present a related method, being based on least square minimization of the residual rather than on the Galerkin method. Both methods are applied to problems in drift wave turbulence from which results will be presented.

  16. Drift-wave transport in the velocity shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalem, K. C.; Roberto, M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    Particle drift driven by electrostatic wave fluctuations is numerically computed to describe the transport in a gradient velocity layer at the tokamak plasma edge. We consider an equilibrium plasma in large aspect ratio approximation with E × B flow and specified toroidal plasma velocity, electric field, and magnetic field profiles. A symplectic map, previously derived for infinite coherent time modes, is used to describe the transport dependence on the electric, magnetic, and plasma velocity shears. We also show that resonant perturbations and their correspondent islands in the Poincaré maps are much affected by the toroidal velocity profiles. Moreover, shearless transport barriers, identified by extremum values of the perturbed rotation number profiles of the invariant curves, allow chaotic trajectories trapped into the plasma. We investigate the influence of the toroidal plasma velocity profile on these shearless transport barriers.

  17. Drift-wave fluctuation in an inviscid tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian-Rong; Mao, Jie-Jian; Tang, Xiao-Yan

    2013-11-01

    In order to describe the characterization of resistive drift-wave fluctuation in a tokamak plasma, a coupled inviscid two-dimensional Hasegawa—Wakatani model is investigated. Two groups of new analytic solutions with and without phase shift between the fluctuant density and the fluctuant potential are obtained by using the special function transformation method. It is demonstrated that the fluctuant potential shares similar spatio—temporal variations with the density. It is found from the solutions without phase shift that the effect of the diffusion and adiabaticity on the fluctuant density is quite complex, and that the fluctuation may be controlled through the adiabaticity and diffusion. By using the typical parameters in the quasi-adiabatic regime in the solutions with phase shift, it is shown that the density gradient becomes larger as the contours become dense toward the plasma edge and the contours have irregular structures, which reveal the nonuniform distribution in the tokamak edge.

  18. Drift wave turbulence in the presence of a dust density gradient.

    PubMed

    Kendl, A; Shukla, P K

    2011-10-01

    We present turbulent properties of electrostatic drift waves in a nonuniform collisional plasma composed of magnetized electrons and ions in the presence of immobile dust particles. For this purpose, we derive a pair of nonlinear quasi-two-dimensional equations exhibiting the coupling between the generalized ion vorticity and the density fluctuations associated with collisional drift waves. The effect of a dust density gradient on the initial drift instability and fully developed turbulence is examined numerically. PMID:22181281

  19. Elasticity in drift-wave-zonal-flow turbulence.

    PubMed

    Guo, Z B; Diamond, P H; Kosuga, Y; Gürcan, Ö D

    2014-04-01

    We present a theory of turbulent elasticity, a property of drift-wave-zonal-flow (DW-ZF) turbulence, which follows from the time delay in the response of DWs to ZF shears. An emergent dimensionless parameter |〈v〉'|/Δωk is found to be a measure of the degree of Fickian flux-gradient relation breaking, where |〈v〉'| is the ZF shearing rate and Δωk is the turbulence decorrelation rate. For |〈v〉'|/Δωk>1, we show that the ZF evolution equation is converted from a diffusion equation, usually assumed, to a telegraph equation, i.e., the turbulent momentum transport changes from a diffusive process to wavelike propagation. This scenario corresponds to a state very close to the marginal instability of the DW-ZF system, e.g., the Dimits shift regime. The frequency of the ZF wave is ΩZF=±γd1/2γmodu1/2, where γd is the ZF friction coefficient and γmodu is the net ZF growth rate for the case of the Fickian flux-gradient relation. This insight provides a natural framework for understanding temporally periodic ZF structures in the Dimits shift regime and in the transition from low confined mode to high confined mode in confined plasmas. PMID:24827182

  20. Drift-Kinetic Alfven Waves Observed near a Reconnection X Line in the Earth's Magnetopause

    SciTech Connect

    Chaston, C.C.; Phan, T.D.; Bonnell, J.W.; Mozer, F.S.; Acuna, M.; Goldstein, M.L.; Balogh, A.; Andre, M.; Reme, H.; Fazakerley, A.

    2005-08-05

    We identify drift-kinetic Alfven waves in the vicinity of a reconnection X line on the Earth's magnetopause. The dispersive properties of these waves have been determined using wavelet interferometric techniques applied to multipoint observations from the Cluster spacecraft. Comparison of the observed wave dispersion with that expected for drift-kinetic Alfven waves shows close agreement. The waves propagate outwards from the X line suggesting that reconnection is a kinetic Alfven wave source. Energetic O{sup +} ions observed in these waves indicate that reconnection is a driver of auroral ion outflow.

  1. Nonlinear saturation spectra of electric fields and density fluctuations in drift wave turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    The detection of drift waves in the nonlinear evolution of a space plasma process driven at long wavelengths is considered, adducing measurements of the electric field and density fluctuation power spectra as evidence. Since the driving mechanism is clearly at long wavelengths, the detection of drift waves suggests that they may play an important role in the transfer of wave energy from long to short wavelengths in a low beta plasma. The saturated spectral density is compared with theoretical results in order to estimate the anomalous diffusion rate. The observed spectral form and amplitude is in excellent agreement with drift wave predictions.

  2. Observations of Stochastic Ion Heating by Low - Drift Waves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McChesney, Jon Mearns

    Several laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments were performed on the Encore tokamak device. These experiments represent the first application of this technique to the majority ions of a tokamak. The LIF technique allowed the Doppler-broadened, ion distribution function to be scanned with high resolution, giving accurate ion temperature measurements. As a preliminary test, the diagnostic was used to observe ion heating in the presence of lower hybrid RF power. Ion temperatures were found to increase dramatically with increasing RF power. By using a second dye laser, actual ion trajectories were determined using the technique of "optical tagging." Tagging involves the use of a so-called "pump" laser to alter the fraction of ions in a particular quantum state. As a preliminary test, this technique was used to demonstrate ion gyro-motion in Encore. Using the ion distribution functions determined by means of LIF, it was possible to make detailed measurements of ion heating during an ohmically heated tokamak discharge. It was found that the observed rate of ion heating was nearly two orders of magnitude faster than expected from collisional energy exchange with the hot electrons. These high ion temperatures were later verified by measuring the Landau damping of ion acoustic waves. The observed damping lengths were roughly in accord with those calculated using measured values of T_{e} and T _{i}. This enhanced ion heating was correlated with the presence of large amplitude, low frequency ( omega < omega _{ci}), drift-Alfven waves. Using numerical calculations, it was shown, that in the presence of electrostatic modes of sufficient amplitude, ion motion becomes stochastic. In physical terms, stochasticity occurs when the ion displacement that is due to the polarization drift becomes comparable to the perpendicular wavelength, i.e., when alpha = m_ {i}k_sp{|}{2} phi_0/qB_sp{0}{2} ~ 1. A combination of numerical calculations and experiments were used to demonstrate

  3. Theory of the large-amplitude plane magnetoacoustic wave propagating transverse to the magnetic field in a hot collisionless plasma. [in astrophysical environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, A.

    1979-01-01

    An exact solution of the kinetic and electromagnetic equations for a large-amplitude plane magnetoacoustic wave propagating transverse to the magnetic field in a hot collisionless plasma is presented. The solution gives simple relations among the magnetic-field strength, density, stress tensor, and plasma velocity, all of which are measurable in the interplanetary plasma. These relations are independent of the electron and ion velocity distributions, subject to certain restrictions on 'high-velocity tails.' The magnetic field of the wave is linearly polarized. The wave steepens to form a shock much as the analogous waves of MHD theory do.

  4. Statistical theory of resistive drift-wave turbulence and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, G.; Krommes, J.A.; Bowman, J.C.

    1997-06-01

    Resistive drift-wave turbulence in a slab geometry is studied by statistical closure methods and direct numerical simulations. The two-field Hasegawa{endash}Wakatani (HW) fluid model, which evolves the electrostatic potential and plasma density self-consistently, is a paradigm for understanding the generic nonlinear behavior of multiple-field plasma turbulence. A gyrokinetic derivation of the HW model is sketched. The recently developed Realizable Markovian Closure (RMC) is applied to the HW model; spectral properties, nonlinear energy transfers, and turbulent transport calculations are discussed. The closure results are also compared to direct numerical simulation results; excellent agreement is found. The transport scaling with the adiabaticity parameter, which measures the strength of the parallel electron resistivity, is analytically derived and understood through weak- and strong-turbulence analyses. No evidence is found to support previous suggestions that coherent structures cause a large depression of saturated transport from its quasilinear value in the hydrodynamic regime of the HW model. Instead, the depression of transport is well explained by the spectral balance equation of the (second-order) statistical closure when account is taken of incoherent noise. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Fluctuations, turbulence and transports in the presence of drift waves

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, H.; Sato, T.; Hasegawa, A.; Pellat, R.

    1980-02-01

    Turbulence spectrum and plasma diffusion have been studied by theoretical analysis as well as by numerical simulations using a drift wave model in which electrons are assumed to follow the Boltzmann distribution, while ions are assumed to move two-dimensionally in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. For a plasma near local thermal equilibrium, it is found that while the ion density diffusion is negligibly small, the energy diffusion is much larger and is comparable to the test particle diffusion. In the presence of strong turbulence, deltan approx. n/sub 0/, fluctuation energy is found to cascade toward long wavelength modes which accompanies the density diffusion. The resultant turbulence spectrum is isotropic in two dimensions perpendicular to the magnetic field. However, the particle diffusion coefficient remains small. When the ion density gradient is maintained by freezing the electron background density, it is found that the turbulence spectrum cascades toward smaller wavenumbers only in the direction perpendicular to the density gradient. As a result an anisotropic turbulence spectrum if formed indicating an appearance of zonal flow in this direction.

  6. Electrostatic Drift-Wave Instability in Field-Reversed Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Calvin; Fulton, Daniel; Holod, Ihor; Lin, Zhihong; Binderbauer, Michl; Tajima, Toshiki; Schmitz, Lothar

    2015-11-01

    Recent progress in the C-2 advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment [Binderbauer 2015] at Tri Alpha Energy has led to consistently reproducible plasma lifetimes of 5+ ms, ie. transport regimes. To understand the mechanisms, gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations of drift-wave instabilities have been carried out for the FRC [Fulton 2015]. The realistic magnetic geometry is represented in Boozer coordinates in the upgraded gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) [Lin 1998]. Radially local simulations find that, in the FRC core, ion scale modes are stable for realistic pressure gradients while the electron scale modes are unstable. On the other hand, in the scrape-off layer (SOL) outside of the separatrix, both ion and electron scale modes are unstable. These findings and linear instability thresholds found in simulation are consistent with the C-2 experimental measurements of density fluctuations [Schmitz 2015]. Collisional effects and instability drive mechanism will be clarified. Nonlocal and nonlinear simulation results will also be reported. supported by TAE.

  7. Drift of scroll waves in thin layers caused by thickness features: asymptotic theory and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Biktasheva, I V; Dierckx, H; Biktashev, V N

    2015-02-13

    A scroll wave in a very thin layer of excitable medium is similar to a spiral wave, but its behavior is affected by the layer geometry. We identify the effect of sharp variations of the layer thickness, which is separate from filament tension and curvature-induced drifts described earlier. We outline a two-step asymptotic theory describing this effect, including asymptotics in the layer thickness and calculation of the drift of so-perturbed spiral waves using response functions. As specific examples, we consider drift of scrolls along thickness steps, ridges, ditches, and disk-shaped thickness variations. Asymptotic predictions agree with numerical simulations.

  8. Rescaling effects on a low-frequency drift wave in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xin; Liu, Sanqiu

    2015-03-01

    The effect of dust on the low-frequency drift wave in inhomogeneous magnetized dusty plasmas is investigated. It is shown that a low-frequency drift wave can be modeled by the Hasegawa-Mima equation (HME) both in mobile and immobile dusty plasmas, which are dust-modified HME and HME in dusty background, respectively. The former is rescaled significantly by the presence of the dust and the space-time scale greatly increases with the increasing density and mass of dust, while the latter is not rescaled, but an additional driving force appears to drive the drift waves.

  9. Dispersive nature of high mach number collisionless plasma shocks: Poynting flux of oblique whistler waves.

    PubMed

    Sundkvist, David; Krasnoselskikh, V; Bale, S D; Schwartz, S J; Soucek, J; Mozer, F

    2012-01-13

    Whistler wave trains are observed in the foot region of high Mach number quasiperpendicular shocks. The waves are oblique with respect to the ambient magnetic field as well as the shock normal. The Poynting flux of the waves is directed upstream in the shock normal frame starting from the ramp of the shock. This suggests that the waves are an integral part of the shock structure with the dispersive shock as the source of the waves. These observations lead to the conclusion that the shock ramp structure of supercritical high Mach number shocks is formed as a balance of dispersion and nonlinearity.

  10. Streamers generation by small-scale drift-Alfvén waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. S.; Yu, M. Y.

    2014-10-15

    Excitation of streamers by modulationally unstable small-scale drift-Alfvén wave (SSDAW) is investigated. It is found that the excitation depends strongly on the propagation direction of the SSDAW, and the ion and electron diamagnetic drift waves are both unstable due to the generation of streamers. It is also shown that zonal flows can be effectively excited by the SSDAW with the propagation direction different from that for streamer excitation.

  11. Linear study of the nonmodal growth of drift waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Greiner, F.

    2010-06-15

    The main effect of dust on drift wave turbulence is the enhancement of the nonadiabaticity. Previous work found that nonmodal behavior is important in the nonadiabatic regime of the drift wave system. Here, the modal and nonmodal properties of the linear Hasegawa-Wakatani system of dusty plasmas are investigated. The non-normality of the linear evolution operator can lead to enhanced transient growth rates compared to the modal growth rates.

  12. Drift kinetic Alfvén wave in temperature anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Naim, Hafsa Bashir, M. F.; Murtaza, G.

    2014-03-15

    By using the gyrokinetic theory, the kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) are discussed to emphasize the drift effects through the density inhomogeneity and the temperature anisotropy on their dispersion characteristics. The dependence of stabilization mechanism of the drift-Alfvén wave instability on the temperature anisotropy is highlighted. The estimate of the growth rate and the threshold condition for a wide range of parameters are also discussed.

  13. Electrostatic drift-wave instability in a nonuniform quantum magnetoplasma with parallel velocity shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Tariq, Sabeen; Mirza, Arshad M.; Masood, W.

    2010-10-15

    The propagation of high and low frequency (in comparison with the cyclotron frequency) electrostatic drift-waves is investigated in a nonuniform, dense magnetoplasma (composed of electrons and ions), in the presence of parallel shear flow, by employing the quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model. Using QMHD model, a new set of equations is presented in order to investigate linear properties of electrostatic drift-waves with sheared plasma flows for dense plasmas. In this regard, dispersion relations for coupled electron-thermal and drift-ion acoustic modes are derived and several interesting limiting cases are discussed. For instance, it is found that sheared ion flow parallel to the external magnetic field can drive the quantum drift-ion acoustic wave unstable, etc. The present investigation may have relevance in dense astrophysical environments where quantum effects are significant.

  14. Landau-fluid closure and drift-wave dispersion relations for arbitrary collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonjae; Umansky, M. V.; Angus, J. R.; Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorr, M. R.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2015-11-01

    The Landau fluid model has been revisited to describe drift-wave instabilities in edge plasmas where the plasma parameters can vary by an order of magnitude or more. Usually, simple fluid models without Landau-fluid closure have been used to describe edge plasma dynamics. However, the collisionality conditions for the simple fluid descriptions are only marginally satisfied in present-day tokamaks and the validity conditions for such models will not be satisfied for future devices. As a result, the simple fluid models without Landau closure cannot properly describe the electron kinetic effects (e.g. the wave-electron resonances) in weakly collisional plasmas. We compare the analytical growth rates of drift-wave instabilities from the electromagnetic Landau-fluid model and the electromagnetic drift-kinetic model by conducting linear analysis on both models in various plasma parameters. Consequently, we demonstrate that both the electromagnetic Landau-fluid model and the electromagnetic drift-kinetic model, which yield similar linear growth rates, can be used to describe drift wave turbulence in a wide range of plasma parameters. We also present comparative simulations of drift wave instability using BOUT++ and COGENT(M. Dorf, invited talk, this meeting). Work performed for USDOE, at UCSD under Grants DE-FG02-04ER54739 and DE-SC0010413, and at LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Numerical studies of electron dynamics in oblique quasi-perpendicular collisionless shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liewer, P. C.; Decyk, V. K.; Dawson, J. M.; Lembege, B.

    1991-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear electron damping of the whistler precursor wave train to low Mach number quasi-perpendicular oblique shocks is studied using a one-dimensional electromagnetic plasma simulation code with particle electrons and ions. In some parameter regimes, electrons are observed to trap along the magnetic field lines in the potential of the whistler precursor wave train. This trapping can lead to significant electron heating in front of the shock for low beta(e). Use of a 64-processor hypercube concurrent computer has enabled long runs using realistic mass ratios in the full particle in-cell code and thus simulate shock parameter regimes and phenomena not previously studied numerically.

  16. Numerical comparison between a gyrofluid and gyrokinetic model investigating collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, O.; Kleiber, R.; Borchardt, M.; Comisso, L.; Grasso, D.; Hatzky, R.

    2014-06-15

    The first detailed comparison between gyrokinetic and gyrofluid simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection has been carried out. Both the linear and nonlinear evolution of the collisionless tearing mode have been analyzed. In the linear regime, we have found a good agreement between the two approaches over the whole spectrum of linearly unstable wave numbers, both in the drift kinetic limit and for finite ion temperature. Nonlinearly, focusing on the small-Δ′ regime, with Δ′ indicating the standard tearing stability parameter, we have compared relevant observables such as the evolution and saturation of the island width, as well as the island oscillation frequency in the saturated phase. The results are basically the same, with small discrepancies only in the value of the saturated island width for moderately high values of Δ′. Therefore, in the regimes investigated here, the gyrofluid approach can describe the collisionless reconnection process as well as the more complete gyrokinetic model.

  17. Drift ion acoustic shock waves in an inhomogeneous two-dimensional quantum magnetoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Karim, S.; Shah, H. A.; Siddiq, M.

    2009-04-01

    Linear and nonlinear propagation characteristics of drift ion acoustic waves are investigated in an inhomogeneous quantum plasma with neutrals in the background employing the quantum hydrodynamics (QHD) model. In this regard, a quantum Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burgers (KPB) equation is derived for the first time. It is shown that the ion acoustic wave couples with the drift wave if the parallel motion of ions is taken into account. Discrepancies in the earlier works on drift solitons and shocks in inhomogeneous plasmas are also pointed out and a correct theoretical framework is presented to study the one-dimensional as well as the two-dimensional propagation of shock waves in an inhomogeneous quantum plasma. Furthermore, the solution of KPB equation is presented using the tangent hyperbolic (tanh) method. The variation of the shock profile with the quantum Bohm potential, collision frequency, and ratio of drift to shock velocity in the comoving frame, v∗/u, are also investigated. It is found that increasing the number density and collision frequency enhances the strength of the shock. It is also shown that the fast drift shock (i.e., v∗/u>0) increases, whereas the slow drift shock (i.e., v∗/u<0) decreases the strength of the shock. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to dense astrophysical environments is also pointed out.

  18. A Computer Simulation Study of Anatomy Induced Drift of Spiral Waves in the Human Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Kharche, Sanjay R.; Biktasheva, Irina V.; Seemann, Gunnar; Zhang, Henggui; Biktashev, Vadim N.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of spiral waves of excitation with atrial anatomy remains unclear. This simulation study isolates the role of atrial anatomical structures on spiral wave spontaneous drift in the human atrium. We implemented realistic and idealised 3D human atria models to investigate the functional impact of anatomical structures on the long-term (∼40 s) behaviour of spiral waves. The drift of a spiral wave was quantified by tracing its tip trajectory, which was correlated to atrial anatomical features. The interaction of spiral waves with the following idealised geometries was investigated: (a) a wedge-like structure with a continuously varying atrial wall thickness; (b) a ridge-like structure with a sudden change in atrial wall thickness; (c) multiple bridge-like structures consisting of a bridge connected to the atrial wall. Spiral waves drifted from thicker to thinner regions and along ridge-like structures. Breakthrough patterns caused by pectinate muscles (PM) bridges were also observed, albeit infrequently. Apparent anchoring close to PM-atrial wall junctions was observed. These observations were similar in both the realistic and the idealised models. We conclude that spatially altering atrial wall thickness is a significant cause of drift of spiral waves. PM bridges cause breakthrough patterns and induce transient anchoring of spiral waves. PMID:26587545

  19. Instability of Drift Waves in Two-Component Solid-State Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgakov, A.A.; Shramkova, O.V.

    2005-09-15

    The instabilities of longitudinal waves in infinite semiconductor plasma containing charge carriers of two types are considered under the assumption that the thermal velocity of electrons slightly exceeds that of holes. The main result of this study is that instability can occur in intrinsic semiconductors if the electron drift velocity is lower than the thermal velocity. Drift wave instabilities are studied in intrinsic semiconductors and semiconductors with identical plasma frequencies of electrons and holes. The influence of dissipation on the instability of these waves is also considered.

  20. Observation of drift compressional waves with a mid-latitude decameter coherent radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelpanov, Maksim; Mager, Pavel; Klimushkin, Dmitriy; Berngardt, Oleg; Mager, Olga

    2016-06-01

    Magnetospheric Pc5 pulsations observed on December 26, 2014 are analyzed. They were recorded in the nightside magnetosphere with a mid-latitude coherent decameter radar located near Ekaterinburg. It registers velocity variations in electric drift of ionospheric plasma caused by ULF waves in the magnetosphere. The westward direction of azimuthal propagation of wave coincides with the direction of magnetic drift of protons. A cross-wavelet analysis reveals that the frequency of oscillations depends on the wave number m, and the correlation between them is 0.90. The frequency increase from 2.5 to 5 mHz was followed by an increase in the absolute value m from 20 to 80. These features of the wave under study testify that it should be classified as a drift compressional mode which is typical for the ULF mode in kinetics. Existence conditions for it are the terminal pressure of plasma and its inhomogeneity across magnetic shells.

  1. Linear and nonlinear coupled drift and ion acoustic waves in collisional pair ion-electron magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mushtaq, A.; Saeed, R.; Haque, Q.

    2011-04-15

    Linear and nonlinear coupled electrostatic drift and ion acoustic waves are studied in inhomogeneous, collisional pair ion-electron plasma. The Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) equation for a medium where both dispersion and dissipation are present is derived. An attempt is made to obtain exact solution of KdVB equation by using modified tanh-coth method for arbitrary velocity of nonlinear drift wave. Another exact solution for KdVB is obtained, which gives a structure of shock wave. Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and Burgers equations are derived in limiting cases with solitary and monotonic shock solutions, respectively. Effects of species density, magnetic field, obliqueness, and the acoustic to drift velocity ratio on the solitary and shock solutions are investigated. The results discussed are useful in understanding of low frequency electrostatic waves at laboratory pair ion plasmas.

  2. Up-gradient particle flux in a drift wave-zonal flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, L.; Tynan, G. R.; Thakur, S. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Brandt, C.

    2015-05-15

    We report a net inward, up-gradient turbulent particle flux in a cylindrical plasma when collisional drift waves generate a sufficiently strong sheared azimuthal flow that drives positive (negative) density fluctuations up (down) the background density gradient, resulting in a steepening of the mean density gradient. The results show the existence of a saturation mechanism for drift-turbulence driven sheared flows that can cause up-gradient particle transport and density profile steepening.

  3. Wave-number spectrum of dissipative drift waves and a transition scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, K.; Gürcan, Ö. D.

    2015-09-01

    We study the steady state spectrum of the Hasegawa-Wakatani (HW) equations that describe drift wave turbulence. Beyond a critical scale kc, which appears as a balance between the nonlinear time and the parallel conduction time, the adiabatic electron response breaks down nonlinearly and an internal energy density spectrum of the form F (k⊥)∝k⊥-3 , associated with the background gradient, is established. More generally a dual power law spectrum, approximately of the form F (k⊥)∝k⊥-3(kc-2+k⊥-2) is obtained, which captures this transition. Using dimensional analysis, an expression of the form kc∝C /κ is derived for the transition scale, where C and κ are normalized parameters of the HW equations signifying the electron adiabaticity and the density gradient, respectively. The results are numerically confirmed using a shell model developed and used for the Hasegawa-Wakatani system.

  4. Wave-number spectrum of dissipative drift waves and a transition scale.

    PubMed

    Ghantous, K; Gürcan, Ö D

    2015-09-01

    We study the steady state spectrum of the Hasegawa-Wakatani (HW) equations that describe drift wave turbulence. Beyond a critical scale k_{c}, which appears as a balance between the nonlinear time and the parallel conduction time, the adiabatic electron response breaks down nonlinearly and an internal energy density spectrum of the form F(k_{⊥})∝k_{⊥}^{-3}, associated with the background gradient, is established. More generally a dual power law spectrum, approximately of the form F(k_{⊥})∝k_{⊥}^{-3}(k_{c}^{-2}+k_{⊥}^{-2}) is obtained, which captures this transition. Using dimensional analysis, an expression of the form k_{c}∝C/κ is derived for the transition scale, where C and κ are normalized parameters of the HW equations signifying the electron adiabaticity and the density gradient, respectively. The results are numerically confirmed using a shell model developed and used for the Hasegawa-Wakatani system.

  5. Eddy, drift wave and zonal flow dynamics in a linear magnetized plasma

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, H.; Inagaki, S.; Sasaki, M.; Kosuga, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Kasuya, N.; Nagashima, Y.; Yamada, T.; Lesur, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence and its structure formation are universal in neutral fluids and in plasmas. Turbulence annihilates global structures but can organize flows and eddies. The mutual-interactions between flow and the eddy give basic insights into the understanding of non-equilibrium and nonlinear interaction by turbulence. In fusion plasma, clarifying structure formation by Drift-wave turbulence, driven by density gradients in magnetized plasma, is an important issue. Here, a new mutual-interaction among eddy, drift wave and flow in magnetized plasma is discovered. A two-dimensional solitary eddy, which is a perturbation with circumnavigating motion localized radially and azimuthally, is transiently organized in a drift wave – zonal flow (azimuthally symmetric band-like shear flows) system. The excitation of the eddy is synchronized with zonal perturbation. The organization of the eddy has substantial impact on the acceleration of zonal flow. PMID:27628894

  6. Eddy, drift wave and zonal flow dynamics in a linear magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, H.; Inagaki, S.; Sasaki, M.; Kosuga, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Kasuya, N.; Nagashima, Y.; Yamada, T.; Lesur, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-09-01

    Turbulence and its structure formation are universal in neutral fluids and in plasmas. Turbulence annihilates global structures but can organize flows and eddies. The mutual-interactions between flow and the eddy give basic insights into the understanding of non-equilibrium and nonlinear interaction by turbulence. In fusion plasma, clarifying structure formation by Drift-wave turbulence, driven by density gradients in magnetized plasma, is an important issue. Here, a new mutual-interaction among eddy, drift wave and flow in magnetized plasma is discovered. A two-dimensional solitary eddy, which is a perturbation with circumnavigating motion localized radially and azimuthally, is transiently organized in a drift wave – zonal flow (azimuthally symmetric band-like shear flows) system. The excitation of the eddy is synchronized with zonal perturbation. The organization of the eddy has substantial impact on the acceleration of zonal flow.

  7. Eddy, drift wave and zonal flow dynamics in a linear magnetized plasma.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, H; Inagaki, S; Sasaki, M; Kosuga, Y; Kobayashi, T; Kasuya, N; Nagashima, Y; Yamada, T; Lesur, M; Fujisawa, A; Itoh, K; Itoh, S-I

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence and its structure formation are universal in neutral fluids and in plasmas. Turbulence annihilates global structures but can organize flows and eddies. The mutual-interactions between flow and the eddy give basic insights into the understanding of non-equilibrium and nonlinear interaction by turbulence. In fusion plasma, clarifying structure formation by Drift-wave turbulence, driven by density gradients in magnetized plasma, is an important issue. Here, a new mutual-interaction among eddy, drift wave and flow in magnetized plasma is discovered. A two-dimensional solitary eddy, which is a perturbation with circumnavigating motion localized radially and azimuthally, is transiently organized in a drift wave - zonal flow (azimuthally symmetric band-like shear flows) system. The excitation of the eddy is synchronized with zonal perturbation. The organization of the eddy has substantial impact on the acceleration of zonal flow. PMID:27628894

  8. Drift Wave Chaos and Turbulence in a LAPTAG Plasma Physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Cami; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Wise, Joe; Birge-Lee, Henry; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Thomas, Sam; Buckley-Bonnano, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    Whenever there is a pressure gradient in a magnetized plasma drift waves occur spontaneously. Drift waves have density and electrical potential fluctuations but no self magnetic field. In our experiment the drift waves form spontaneously in a narrow plasma column. (ne = 5 ×1011 cm3 , Te = 5 eV , B = 200 Gauss, dia = 25 cm , L = 1 . 5 m). As the drift waves grow from noise simple averaging techniques cannot be used to map them out in space and time. The ion saturation current Isat n√{Te} is recorded for an ensemble of 50 shots on a fixed probe located on the density gradient and for a movable probe. The probe signals are not sinusoidal and are filtered to calculate the cross-spectral function CSF = ∫ ∑ nshot Ifix, ωr->1 , tImov , ω (r->1 + δr-> , t + τ) dt , which can be used to extract the temporal and spatially varying wave patterns. The dominant wave at 18 kHz is a rotating spiral with m =2. LAPTAG is a university-high school alliance outreach program, which has been in existence for over 20 years. Work done at the BaPSF and supported by NSF/DOE.

  9. Ion-Neutral Collisions in the Interstellar Medium: Wave Damping and Elimination of Collisionless Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Spangler, Steven R.; Savage, Allison H.; Redfield, Seth

    2011-09-21

    Most phases of the interstellar medium contain neutral atoms in addition to ions and electrons. This introduces differences in plasma physics processes in those media relative to the solar corona and the solar wind at a heliocentric distance of 1 astronomical unit. In this paper, we consider two well-diagnosed, partially-ionized interstellar plasmas. The first is the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM) which is probably the most extensive phase in terms of volume. The second is the gas of the Local Clouds of the Very Local Interstellar Medium (VLISM). Ion-neutral interactions seem to be important in both media. In the WIM, ion-neutral collisions are relatively rare, but sufficiently frequent to damp magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves (as well as propagating MHD eddies) within less than a parsec of the site of generation. This result raises interesting questions about the sources of turbulence in the WIM. In the case of the VLISM, the ion-neutral collision frequency is higher than that in the WIM, because the hydrogen is partially neutral rather than fully ionized. We present results showing that prominent features of coronal and solar wind turbulence seem to be absent in VLISM turbulence. For example, ion temperature does not depend on ion mass. This difference may be due to ion-neutral collisions, which distribute power from more effectively heated massive ions such as iron to other ion species and neutral atoms.

  10. Ion-Neutral Collisions in the Interstellar Medium: Wave Damping and Elimination of Collisionless Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.; Savage, Allison H.; Redfield, Seth

    2011-09-01

    Most phases of the interstellar medium contain neutral atoms in addition to ions and electrons. This introduces differences in plasma physics processes in those media relative to the solar corona and the solar wind at a heliocentric distance of 1 astronomical unit. In this paper, we consider two well-diagnosed, partially-ionized interstellar plasmas. The first is the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM) which is probably the most extensive phase in terms of volume. The second is the gas of the Local Clouds of the Very Local Interstellar Medium (VLISM). Ion-neutral interactions seem to be important in both media. In the WIM, ion-neutral collisions are relatively rare, but sufficiently frequent to damp magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves (as well as propagating MHD eddies) within less than a parsec of the site of generation. This result raises interesting questions about the sources of turbulence in the WIM. In the case of the VLISM, the ion-neutral collision frequency is higher than that in the WIM, because the hydrogen is partially neutral rather than fully ionized. We present results showing that prominent features of coronal and solar wind turbulence seem to be absent in VLISM turbulence. For example, ion temperature does not depend on ion mass. This difference may be due to ion-neutral collisions, which distribute power from more effectively heated massive ions such as iron to other ion species and neutral atoms.

  11. Ionospheric vertical plasma drift perturbations due to the quasi 2 day wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Sheng-Yang; Liu, Han-Li; Li, Tao; Dou, Xiankang

    2015-05-01

    The thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics-general circulation model is utilized to study the vertical E × B drift perturbations due to the westward quasi 2 day wave with zonal wave numbers 2 and 3 (W2 and W3). The simulations show that both wind components contribute directly and significantly to the vertical drift, which is not merely confined to low latitudes. The vertical drifts at the equator induced by the total wind perturbations of W2 are comparable with that at middle latitudes, while the vertical drifts from W3 are much stronger at middle latitudes than at the equator. The ion drift perturbations induced by the zonal and meridional wind perturbations of W2 are nearly in-phase with each other, whereas the phase discrepancies of the ion drift induced by the individual wind component of W3 are much larger. This is because the wind perturbations of W2 and W3 have different latitudinal structures and phases, which result in different ionospheric responses through wind dynamo.

  12. Dynamics of vortices and drift waves: a point vortex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoncini, Xavier; Verga, Alberto

    2013-03-01

    The complex interactions of localized vortices with waves are investigated using a model of point vortices in the presence of a transverse or longitudinal wave. This simple model shows a rich dynamical behavior including oscillations of a dipole, splitting and merging of two like-circulation vortices, and chaos. The analytical and numerical results of this model have been found to predict under certain conditions, the behavior of more complex systems, such as the vortices of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation, where the presence of waves strongly affects the evolution of large coherent structures.

  13. Models for electrostatic drift waves with density variations along magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, O. E.; Pécseli, H. L.

    2013-11-01

    Drift waves with vertical magnetic fields in gravitational ionospheres are considered where the unperturbed plasma density is enhanced in a magnetic flux tube. The gravitational field gives rise to an overall decrease of plasma density for increasing altitude. Simple models predict that drift waves with finite vertical wave vector components can increase in amplitude merely due to a conservation of energy density flux of the waves. Field-aligned currents are some of the mechanisms that can give rise to fluctuations that are truly unstable. We suggest a self-consistent generator or "battery" mechanism that in the polar ionospheres can give rise to magnetic field-aligned currents even in the absence of electron precipitation. The free energy here is supplied by steady state electric fields imposed in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field in the collisional lower parts of the ionosphere or by neutral winds that have similar effects.

  14. A probe array for the investigation of spatio-temporal structures in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Latten, A.; Klinger, T.; Piel, A.; Pierre, T.

    1995-05-01

    A probe array with 64 azimuthally arranged Langmuir probes is presented as a new diagnostic tool for the investigation of drift waves. A parallel data acquisition system provides full spatio-temporal data of azimuthally propagating waves. For both regular and turbulent states of current-driven drift waves, the information provided by such space-time patterns is compared with results obtained from conventional two-point correlation methods. The probe array allows one to directly estimate the time-averaged wave number spectrum. In a turbulent state, the spectrum yields to a power law of {ital S}({ital k}){proportional_to}{ital k}{sup {minus}3.6{plus_minus}0.1}. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  15. KINETIC INSTABILITY OF DRIFT-ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR CORONA AND STOCHASTIC HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Poedts, S. E-mail: Stefaan.Poedts@wis.kuleuven.b

    2010-08-20

    The solar atmosphere is structured and inhomogeneous, both horizontally and vertically. The omnipresence of coronal magnetic loops implies gradients of the equilibrium plasma quantities such as the density, magnetic field, and temperature. These gradients are responsible for the excitation of drift waves that grow both within the two-component fluid description (both in the presence of collisions and without it) and within the two-component kinetic descriptions (due to purely kinetic effects). In this work, the effects of the density gradient in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field vector are investigated within the kinetic theory, in both electrostatic (ES) and electromagnetic (EM) regimes. The EM regime implies the coupling of the gradient-driven drift wave with the Alfven wave. The growth rates for the two cases are calculated and compared. It is found that, in general, the ES regime is characterized by stronger growth rates, as compared with the EM perturbations. Also discussed is the stochastic heating associated with the drift wave. The released amount of energy density due to this heating should be more dependent on the magnitude of the background magnetic field than on the coupling of the drift and Alfven waves. The stochastic heating is expected to be much higher in regions with a stronger magnetic field. On the whole, the energy release rate caused by the stochastic heating can be several orders of magnitude above the value presently accepted as necessary for a sustainable coronal heating. The vertical stratification and the very long wavelengths along the magnetic loops imply that a drift-Alfven wave, propagating as a twisted structure along the loop, in fact occupies regions with different plasma-{beta} and, therefore, may have different (EM-ES) properties, resulting in different heating rates within just one or two wavelengths.

  16. Plasma diffusion at the magnetopause - The case of lower hybrid drift waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treumann, R. A.; Labelle, J.; Pottelette, R.

    1991-01-01

    The diffusion expected from the quasi-linear theory of the lower hybrid drift instability at the earth's magnetopause is recalculated. The resulting diffusion coefficient is marginally large enough to explain the thickness of the boundary layer under quiet conditions, based on observational upper limits for the wave intensities. Thus, one possible model for the boundary layer could involve equilibrium between the diffusion arising from lower hybrid waves and various loss processes.

  17. Route to Drift Wave Chaos and Turbulence in a Bounded Low-{beta} Plasma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, T.; Latten, A.; Piel, A.; Bonhomme, G.; Pierre, T.; Dudok de Wit, T.

    1997-11-01

    The transition scenario from stability to drift wave turbulence is experimentally investigated in a magnetized low-{beta} plasma with cylindrical geometry. It is demonstrated that the temporal dynamics is determined by the interaction and destabilization of spatiotemporal patterns, in particular, traveling waves. The analysis of the temporal and the spatiotemporal data shows that the bifurcations sequence towards weakly developed turbulence follows the Ruelle-Takens scenario. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. The Use of the Information Wave Function in a Drift Dependent Option Price: A Simple Example

    SciTech Connect

    Haven, Emmanuel

    2009-03-10

    This paper briefly describes how a drift-dependent option price is obtained, following the work of Tan. We briefly argue how the information wave function concept, which has now been used in various financial settings, can be used in this type of option price.

  19. Dust magneto-gravitational drift wave in g×B configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Salahshoor, M. Niknam, A. R.

    2014-11-15

    The dispersion relation of electrostatic waves in a magnetized complex plasma under gravity is presented. It is assumed that the waves propagate perpendicular to the external fields. The effects of weak electric field, neutral drag force, and ion drag force are also taken into account. The dispersion relation is numerically examined in an appropriate parameter space in which the gravity plays the dominant role in the dynamics of magnetized microparticles. The numerical results show that an unstable low frequency drift wave can be developed in the long wavelength limit. This unstable mode is transformed into an aperiodic stationary structure at a cut-off wavenumber. Furthermore, the influence of the external fields on the dispersion properties is analyzed. It is shown that the instability is essentially due to the E×B drift motion of plasma particles. However, in the absence of weak electric field, the g×B drift motion of microparticles can cause the instability in a wide range of wavenumbers. It is also found that by increasing the magnetic field strength, the wave frequency is first increased and then decreased. This behaviour is explained by the existence of an extremum point in the dust magneto-gravitational drift velocity.

  20. The Entropy and Complexity of Drift waves in a LAPTAG Plasma Physics Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birge-Lee, Henry; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Thomas, Sam; Buckley-Bonnano, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    Drift waves grow from noise on a density gradient in a narrow (dia = 3 cm, L = 1.5 m) magnetized (Boz = 160G) plasma column. A two-dimensional probe drive measured fluctuations in the plasma column in a plane transverse to the background magnetic field. Correlation techniques determined that the fluctuations were that of electrostatic drift waves. The time series data was used to generate the Bandt-Pompe/Shannon entropy, H, and Jensen-Shannon complexity, CJS. C-H diagrams can be used to tell the difference between deterministic chaos, random noise and stochastic processes and simple waves, which makes it a powerful tool in nonlinear dynamics. The C-H diagram in this experiment, reveal that the combination of drift waves and other background fluctuations is a deterministically chaotic system. The PDF of the time series, the wave spectra the spatial dependence of the entropy wave complexity will be presented. LAPTAG is a university-high school alliance outreach program, which has been in existence for over 20 years. Work done at BaPSF at UCLA and supported by NSF and DOE.

  1. Lion roars and nonoscillatory drift mirror waves in the magnetosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurutani, B.T.; Smith, E.J.; Anderson, R.R.; Ogilvie, K.W.; Scudder, J.D.; Baker, D.N.; Bame, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    A complete set of ISEE plasma wave, plasma, and field data are used to identify the plasma instability responsible for the generation of extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic lion roars. Lion roars detected close to the magnetopause are generated by the cyclotron instability of anisotropic (T/sup -//sub perpendicular//T/sup -//sub parallel/approx. =1.2) thermal electrons when the local plasma critical energy, E/sub M/ = B/sup 2//8..pi..N, falls to values (E/sub M/ approx.10--30 eV) close to or below the electron thermal energy, 25 eV, as a result of decreases in B. The lion roars are terminated by increases in the ambient magnetic field magnitude and consequential increases in E/sub M/ to values greater than 100 eV. Because there are few resonant particles at these high energies, the growth rate decreases by 3 orders of magnitude and measurable growth ceases. The value of the absolute upper limit of the frequency of unstable waves predicted by theory, ..omega../sub max/ = A/sup -/..cap omega../sup -//(A/sup -/+1), is compared with observations. The predictions and observations are found to be in general, but not exact, agreement. Several possible explanations are explored. The quasi-periodic, approx.20-s magnetic and plasma oscillations which cause the variations in E/sub M/ and hence alternately drive the cyclotron waves unstable and then stable are also investigated.

  2. Transition from collisional drift-wave to multi-instability turbulence in a helicon plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Ashourvan, A.; Cui, L.; Diamond, P.; Holland, C.; Hong, R.; Tynan, G.; Vaezi, P.; McKee, J.; Scime, E.; Sears, S.

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation eXperiment reported a sharp non-monotonic global transition in the plasma dynamics during the transition to broadband turbulence. Using a combination of probes, high speed imaging and laser induced fluorescence, we find that below a threshold magnetic field, the plasma is dominated by density gradient driven resistive drift waves. Above this threshold a new global equilibrium occurs, characterized by steepened density and ion temperature gradients and both azimuthal and parallel velocity shear layers, along with multiple plasma instabilities. At the center, high azimuthal mode number fluctuations are observed rotating in the ion diamagnetic drift direction, while in the density gradient region, drift waves propagate in the electron diamagnetic direction. Outside of this zone, velocity shear-driven fluctuations are observed. Simultaneously a very bright helicon blue core forms, and appears to be associated with a radial particle transport barrier. This new regime shows very rich plasma dynamics including intermittency, blobs, radial transport barrier, inward particle flux against density gradients etc. Above the threshold conditions, linear stability analysis show co-existence of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability and velocity shear instability together with collisional electron drift waves. Supported by CMTFO # DE-SC0008378, US DoE # DE-FG02-04ER54738 and NSF # PHY-1360278.

  3. Nonlinear Evolution of 3D Drift-Ion-Sound Standing Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranov, Volodymyr

    2000-10-01

    Drift waves play an important role in transport processes in plasmas [1]. Detailed investigation of their stability must include an account of the coupling to ion-sound waves [2]. General properties of the model [2] were studied in [3], stability analysis was done in [4], but linear drift dispersion effects were neglected. Incorrectness of this neglect was emphasized in [5]. In the present work, evolution of spatially periodic 3D standing waves is studied. All physical effects contained in the model [2] are taken into account, namely additional vortex nonlinearity and dispersion effects due to the emission of coupled drift and ion-sound waves. For the waves of small but finite amplitude, perturbation theory based on multiple-time-scale formalism is built. Second and third order in amplitude effects are discussed. References [1] Horton W. 1999. Rev.Mod.Phys. 3. 735. [2] Meiss J.D. and W.Horton. 1983. Phys.Fluids 26. 990. [3] Nycander J. 1994. Chaos 4. 253. [4] Akerstedt H.O., J.Nycander and V.P.Pavlenko. 1996. Phys.Plasmas 3. 160. [5] Goloborod'ko V.Ya., V.B.Taranov. 1999. J. of Plasma and Fusion Res. SERIES 2. 335.

  4. The role of coherent vorticity in turbulent transport in resistive drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, W. J. T.; Futatani, S.; Benkadda, S.; Schneider, K.

    2008-07-15

    The coherent vortex extraction method, a wavelet technique for extracting coherent vortices out of turbulent flows, is applied to simulations of resistive drift-wave turbulence in magnetized plasma (Hasegawa-Wakatani system). The aim is to retain only the essential degrees of freedom, responsible for the transport. It is shown that the radial density flux is carried by these coherent modes. In the quasi-hydrodynamic regime, coherent vortices exhibit depletion of the polarization-drift nonlinearity and vorticity strongly dominates strain, in contrast to the quasiadiabatic regime.

  5. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface I: Wave-current coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; William, Perrie; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-06-01

    To study the electromagnetic backscattering from a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface, a fractal sea surface wave-current model is derived, based on the mechanism of wave-current interactions. The numerical results show the effect of the ocean current on the wave. Wave amplitude decreases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height increase, spectrum intensity decreases and shifts towards lower frequencies when the current occurs parallel to the direction of the ocean wave. By comparison, wave amplitude increases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height decrease, spectrum intensity increases and shifts towards higher frequencies if the current is in the opposite direction to the direction of ocean wave. The wave-current interaction effect of the ocean current is much stronger than that of the nonlinear wave-wave interaction. The kurtosis of the nonlinear fractal ocean surface is larger than that of linear fractal ocean surface. The effect of the current on skewness of the probability distribution function is negligible. Therefore, the ocean wave spectrum is notably changed by the surface current and the change should be detectable in the electromagnetic backscattering signal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Development Program of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service.

  6. Collisionless parallel shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khabibrakhmanov, I. KH.; Galeev, A. A.; Galinskii, V. L.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to a collisionless parallel shock based on solitary-type solutions of the modified derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation (MDNLS) for parallel Alfven waves. The standard derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation is generalized in order to include the possible anisotropy of the plasma distribution and higher-order Korteweg-de Vies-type dispersion. Stationary solutions of MDNLS are discussed. The anisotropic nature of 'adiabatic' reflections leads to the asymmetric particle distribution in the upstream as well as in the downstream regions of the shock. As a result, nonzero heat flux appears near the front of the shock. It is shown that this causes the stochastic behavior of the nonlinear waves, which can significantly contribute to the shock thermalization.

  7. Effects of Drift-Shell Splitting by Chorus Waves on Radiation Belt Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. A.; Zheng, L.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.; Elkington, S. R.; Albert, J.

    2015-12-01

    Drift shell splitting in the radiation belts breaks all three adiabatic invariants of charged particle motion via pitch angle scattering, and produces new diffusion terms that fully populate the diffusion tensor in the Fokker-Planck equation. Based on the stochastic differential equation method, the Radbelt Electron Model (REM) simulation code allows us to solve such a fully three-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation, and to elucidate the sources and transport mechanisms behind the phase space density variations. REM has been used to perform simulations with an empirical initial phase space density followed by a seed electron injection, with a Tsyganenko 1989 magnetic field model, and with chorus wave and ULF wave diffusion models. Our simulation results show that adding drift shell splitting changes the phase space location of the source to smaller L shells, which typically reduces local electron energization (compared to neglecting drift-shell splitting effects). Simulation results with and without drift-shell splitting effects are compared with Van Allen Probe measurements.

  8. Zonal flow generation and its feedback on turbulence production in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, Andrey V.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Nazarenko, Sergey V.

    2013-04-15

    Plasma turbulence described by the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations is simulated numerically for different models and values of the adiabaticity parameter C. It is found that for low values of C turbulence remains isotropic, zonal flows are not generated and there is no suppression of the meridional drift waves and particle transport. For high values of C, turbulence evolves towards highly anisotropic states with a dominant contribution of the zonal sector to the kinetic energy. This anisotropic flow leads to a decrease of turbulence production in the meridional sector and limits the particle transport across the mean isopycnal surfaces. This behavior allows to consider the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations a minimal PDE model, which contains the drift-wave/zonal-flow feedback loop mechanism.

  9. Zonal flow generation and its feedback on turbulence production in drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, Andrey V.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Nazarenko, Sergey V.

    2013-04-01

    Plasma turbulence described by the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations is simulated numerically for different models and values of the adiabaticity parameter C. It is found that for low values of C turbulence remains isotropic, zonal flows are not generated and there is no suppression of the meridional drift waves and particle transport. For high values of C, turbulence evolves towards highly anisotropic states with a dominant contribution of the zonal sector to the kinetic energy. This anisotropic flow leads to a decrease of turbulence production in the meridional sector and limits the particle transport across the mean isopycnal surfaces. This behavior allows to consider the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations a minimal PDE model, which contains the drift-wave/zonal-flow feedback loop mechanism.

  10. Spatiotemporal control and synchronization of flute modes and drift waves in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Brochard, F.; Bonhomme, G.; Gravier, E.; Oldenbuerger, S.; Philipp, M.

    2006-05-15

    An open-loop spatiotemporal synchronization method is applied to flute modes in a cylindrical magnetized plasma. It is demonstrated that synchronization can be achieved only if the exciter signal rotates in the same direction as the propagating mode. Moreover, the efficiency of the synchronization is shown to depend on the radial properties of the instability under consideration. It is also demonstrated that the control disposition can alternatively be used to produce strongly developed turbulence of drift waves or flute instabilities.

  11. An analysis of the role of drift waves in equatorial spread F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labelle, J.; Kelley, M. C.; Seyler, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of results of rocket measurements of the wave number spectrum of equatorial spread F irregularities, with emphasis on wavelengths less than 100 m. The measurements were made from two sounding rockets launched from Peru as part of Project Condor. The Condor density fluctuation spectra display a break at a wavelength near 100 m, identical to that found in the PLUMEX experiment (Kelley et al., 1982). The Condor data also confirm a subrange in which the density and the wave potential obey the Boltzmann relation - a strong indication of the presence of low-frequency electrostatic waves with finite wavelength parallel to the magnetic field, perhaps low-frequency drift waves as proposed by Kelley et al. The Condor data are also consistent with the previous conjecture that drift waves only exist above 300 km altitude. To investigate the difference in spectra observed over two altitude ranges, the data must be fitted to a form for the power spectrum taken from Keskinen and Ossakow (1981). The fitted spectrum, along with empirically determined growth and dissipation rates, is used to calculate the energy pumped into the spectrum at long wavelengths as well as the energy dissipated at shorter wavelengths. It is found that the energy is balanced by classical collisional effects in the low-altitude case, but energy balance in the high-altitude case requires an enhanced dissipation of about 500 times that due to classical diffusion. The model is consistent with, but does not uniquely imply, an inverse cascade of drift wave turbulence in equatorial spread F.

  12. Anatomy of Drift Ridges Revealed by Shallow Seismic Shear Wave Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, A. C.

    2005-12-01

    Ridges, up to 30 m high and generally oriented NE-SW across the Illinois Episode drift plain in southern Illinois, USA, have been variously interpreted as eskers, crevasse fills, moraines, and kames. The ice contact diamictons and sorted sediments that occur in these ridges are typically Illinois Episode in age and likely record the final melting of the Laurentide Ice Sheet near its southernmost extent in the continental U.S. Shallow shear wave seismic profiles across several of these ridges help reveal their complex origins. Borehole control includes sediment cores with shear wave and natural gamma logs. The shear wave profiles reveal m-scale features of drift and bedrock over a depth range of 1 up to 100 m. Terrapin Ridge overlies a bedrock valley with drift up to 70 m thick. Dipping seismic reflectors on the stoss side are interpreted as imbricated till sheets, whereas horizontal reflectors on the lee side are interpreted as mainly outwash sediments over basal till and glacilacustrine sediment. Although most ridges were probably formed during the Illinois Episode, based on current data, the core of this particular ridge may be a remnant moraine from a pre-Illinois Episode glaciation.

  13. Coupled nonlinear drift and ion acoustic waves in dense dissipative electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Karim, S.; Shah, H. A.; Siddiq, M.

    2009-11-01

    Linear and nonlinear propagation characteristics of drift ion acoustic waves are investigated in an inhomogeneous electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) quantum magnetoplasma with neutrals in the background using the well known quantum hydrodynamic model. In this regard, Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) and Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burgers (KPB) equations are obtained. Furthermore, the solutions of KdVB and KPB equations are presented by using the tangent hyperbolic (tanh) method. The variation in the shock profile with the quantum Bohm potential, collision frequency, and the ratio of drift to shock velocity in the comoving frame, v*/u, is also investigated. It is found that increasing the positron concentration and collision frequency decreases the strength of the shock. It is also shown that when the localized structure propagates with velocity greater than the diamagnetic drift velocity (i.e., u >v*), the shock strength decreases. However, the shock strength is observed to increase when the localized structure propagates with velocity less than that of drift velocity (i.e., u

  14. Kinetic instability of drift magnetosonic wave in anisotropic low beta plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naim, H.; Bashir, M. F.; Vranjes, J.; Murtaza, G.

    2015-06-01

    The kinetic instability of the obliquely propagating drift magnetosonic wave for temperature anisotropic low beta plasmas is studied by using the gyro-kinetic model. The interplay between the temperature anisotropy and the density inhomogeneity free energy sources is discussed in order to provide stabilization of drift instability by the temperature anisotropy effect. It is shown that the anisotropy suppresses the growth rate when the anisotropy ratio A e , i ( = T ⊥ ( e , i ) / T ∥ ( e , i ) ) is greater than unity, whereas it enhances the growth rate for A e , i < 1 . Comparison of kinetic instability with reactive instability [Naim et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 102112 (2014)] and the scaling of growth time with the diffusion and the anisotropy relaxation times are presented. Additionally, the stability analysis applicable to a wide range of plasma parameters is also performed.

  15. Transition from flute modes to drift waves in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Brochard, F.; Gravier, E.; Bonhomme, G.

    2005-06-15

    Recent experiments performed on the low {beta} plasma device Mirabelle [T. Pierre, G. Leclert, and F. Braun, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 58, 6 (1987)] using a limiter have shown that transitions between various gradient driven instabilities occurred on increasing the magnetic field strength. New thorough measurements allow to identify unambiguously three instability regimes. At low magnetic field the strong ExB velocity shear drives a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, whereas at high magnetic field drift waves are only observed. A centrifugal (Rayleigh-Taylor) instability is also observed in between when the ExB velocity is shearless and strong enough. A close connection is made between the ratio {rho}{sub s}/L{sub perpendicular} of the drift parameter to the radial density gradient length and each instability regime.

  16. Effects of water depth and spectral bandwidth on Stokes drift estimation based on short-term variation of wave conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrhaug, Dag; Wang, Hong; Holmedal, Lars Erik

    2016-04-01

    The Stokes drift represents an important transport component of ocean circulation models. Locally it is responsible for transport of e.g. contaminated ballast water from ships, oil spills, plankton and larvae. It also plays an important role in mixing processes across the interphase between the atmosphere and the ocean. The Stokes drift is the mean Lagrangian velocity obtained from the water particle trajectory in the wave propagation direction; it is maximum at the surface, decreasing rapidly with the depth below the surface. The total mean mass transport is obtained by integrating the Stokes drift over the water depth; this is also referred to as the volume Stokes transport. The paper provides a simple analytical method which can be used to give estimates of the Stokes drift in moderate intermediate water depth based on short-term variation of wave conditions. This is achieved by using a joint distribution of individual wave heights and wave periods together with an explicit solution of the wave dispersion equation. The mean values of the surface Stokes drift and the volume Stokes transport for individual random waves within a sea state are presented, and the effects of water depth and spectral bandwidth parameter are discussed. Furthermore, example of results corresponding to typical field conditions are presented to demonstrate the application of the method, including the Stokes drift profile in the water column beneath the surface. Thus, the present analytical method can be used to estimate the Stokes drift in moderate intermediate water depth for random waves within a sea state based on available wave statistics.

  17. Predator prey oscillations in a simple cascade model of drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Berionni, V.; Guercan, Oe. D.

    2011-11-15

    A reduced three shell limit of a simple cascade model of drift wave turbulence, which emphasizes nonlocal interactions with a large scale mode, is considered. It is shown to describe both the well known predator prey dynamics between the drift waves and zonal flows and to reduce to the standard three wave interaction equations. Here, this model is considered as a dynamical system whose characteristics are investigated. The analytical solutions for the purely nonlinear limit are given in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions. An approximate analytical solution involving Jacobi elliptic functions and exponential growth is computed using scale separation for the case of unstable solutions that are observed when the energy injection rate is high. The fixed points of the system are determined, and the behavior around these fixed points is studied. The system is shown to display periodic solutions corresponding to limit cycle oscillations, apparently chaotic phase space orbits, as well as unstable solutions that grow slowly while oscillating rapidly. The period doubling route to transition to chaos is examined.

  18. Drift wave stabilized by an additional streaming ion or plasma population.

    PubMed

    Bashir, M F; Vranjes, J

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that the universally unstable kinetic drift wave in an electron-ion plasma can very effectively be suppressed by adding an extra flowing ion (or plasma) population. The effect of the flow of the added ions is essential, their response is of the type (vph-vf0)exp[-(vph-vf0)2], where vf0 is the flow speed and vph is the phase speed parallel to the magnetic field vector. The damping is strong and it is mainly due to this ion exponential term, and this remains so for vf0

  19. Electromagnetic drift waves in nonuniform quantum magnetized electron positron ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haijun; Wu, Zhengwei; Cao, Jintao; Chu, Paul K.

    2008-03-01

    Electromagnetic drift waves in a nonuniform quantum magnetized electron positron ion (EPI) plasma are studied. By using the quantum hydrodynamic equations with magnetic fields of the Wigner Maxwell system, we obtained a new dispersion relation in which ions' motions are not considered. The positrons component (featured by the parameter ξ), density gradient of electrons, and of positrons are shown to have a significant impact on the dispersion relation. Our results should be relevant to dense astrophysical objects, e.g. white dwarf and pulsar magnetospheres, as well as low-temperature laboratory EPI plasmas.

  20. Nonlinear mode coupling theory of the lower-hybrid-drift instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, J. F.; Guzdar, P. N.; Hassam, A. B.; Huba, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A nonlinear mode coupling theory of the lower-hybrid-drift instability is presented. A two-dimensional nonlinear wave equation is derived which describes lower-hybrid drift wave turbulence in the plane transverse to B (k.B = 0), and which is valid for finite beta, collisional and collisionless plasmas. The instability saturates by transferring energy from growing, long wavelength modes to damped, short wavelength modes. Detailed numerical results are presented which compare favorably to both recent computer simulations and experimental observations. Applications of this theory to space plasmas, the earth's magnetotail and the equatorial F region ionosphere, are discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N84-17734

  1. Collisionless shocks in the heliosphere: A tutorial review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Robert G. (Editor); Tsurutani, Bruce T. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    An update is presented on current knowledge of collisionless shocks in the heliosphere. The individual papers address: a quarter century of collisionless shock research, some macroscopic properties of shock waves in the heliosphere, microinstabilities and anomalous transport, and acceleration of energetic particles.

  2. Network approach to the pinning control of drift-wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Panpan; Deng, Zhigang; Yang, Lei; Zhan, Meng; Wang, Xingang

    2014-06-01

    Network of coupled oscillators has long been employed as an important approach to explore the complicated dynamics in spatially extended systems. Here we show how this approach can be used to the analysis of turbulence pinning control. Specifically, by use of a model of two-dimensional drift-wave plasma turbulence, we investigate how the performance of the turbulence control is influenced by the spatial distribution of the pinning strength. It is found that the dynamics of pinned turbulence can be well captured by a simple model of networked modes, based on which the dependence of the control performance on the pinning distribution can be analytically obtained. In particular, the model predicts that as the distribution of the pinning strength becomes more nonuniform, the performance of turbulence control will be gradually decreased. This theoretical prediction is in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations, including the sinusoidal and localized pinning distributions. Our studies provide a new viewpoint to the mechanism of mode couplings in drift-wave turbulence, as well as be constructive to the design of new schemes for controlling turbulence in realistic systems.

  3. Spatial localization of resistive drift wave structure in tokamak edge plasmas with an embedded magnetic island

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shilin; Qu, Hongpeng; Li, Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.

    2014-10-15

    Resistive drift wave instability is investigated numerically in tokamak edge plasma confined by sheared slab magnetic field geometry with an embedded magnetic island. The focus is on the structural characteristics of eigenmode inside the island, where the density profile tends to be flattened. A transition of the dominant eigenmode occurs around a critical island width w{sub c}. For thin islands with a width below w{sub c}, two global long wavelength eigenmodes with approximately the same growth rate but different eigenfrequency are excited, which are stabilized by the magnetic island through two-dimensional mode coupling in both x and y (corresponding to radial and poloidal in tokamak) directions. On the other hand, a short wavelength eigenmode, which is destabilized by thick islands with a width above w{sub c}, dominates the edge fluctuation, showing a prominent structural localization in the region between the X-point and the O-point of the magnetic island. The main destabilization mechanism is identified as the mode coupling in the y direction, which is similar to the so-called toroidal coupling in tokamak plasmas. These three eigenmodes may coexist in the drift wave fluctuation for the island with a width around w{sub c}. It is demonstrated that the structural localization results mainly from the quasilinear flattening of density profile inside the magnetic island.

  4. Simulating the coupled evolution of drift-wave turbulence and the tearing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S. D.; Brennan, D. P.; Izacard, O.; Holland, C.

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations of turbulence and MHD instabilities such as the tearing mode can be computationally expensive and only recently have simulations begun to address their coupled, self-consistent interactions. The disparate scales involved in simulating the coupled evolution of small-scale turbulence and the larger-scale tearing mode make this a challenging numerical problem. Using the newly developed code, TURBO, we have performed nonlinear simulations of Hasegawa-Wakatani drift-wave turbulence coupled to Ohm's law. An equilibrium with prescribed stability properties and turbulent drives is used to examine the impact of drift-wave turbulence on the stability of the tearing mode and the energy transport between them in the context of a turbulent resistivity and turbulent viscosity. We find that the spatial structure of the density flux and these transport coefficients are asymmetric in the poloidal direction and peaked away from the X-point in the presence of an island in a poloidal flow. Similar effects are seen in simulations of ITG turbulence in the presence of a magnetic island and we discuss the connections to our work. Supported by US DOE Grant DE-SC0007851.

  5. Effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on secondary structures in drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, M.; Diamond, P. H.

    2011-08-15

    Recent experiments showed a decrease of long range correlations during the application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) [Y. Xu et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 063020 (2011)]. This finding suggests that RMPs damp zonal flows. To elucidate the effect of the RMPs on zonal structures in drift wave turbulence, we construct a generalized Hasegawa-Wakatani model including RMP fields. The effect of the RMPs is to induce a linear coupling between the zonal electric field and the zonal density gradient, which drives the system to a state of electron radial force balance for large RMP amplitude. A predator-prey model coupling the primary drift wave dynamics to the zonal modes evolution is derived. This model has both turbulence drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. The novel regime has a power threshold which increases with RMP amplitude as {gamma}{sub c}{approx}[({delta}B{sub r}/B)]{sup 2}.

  6. Spontaneous profile self-organization in a simple realization of drift-wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, L.; Ashourvan, A.; Thakur, S. C.; Hong, R.; Diamond, P. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-05-01

    We report the observation of a transport bifurcation that occurs by spontaneous self-organization of a drift-wave and shear flow system in a linear plasma device. As we increase the magnetic field above a threshold ( BC r = 1200 G), a global transition occurs, with steepening of mean density and ion pressure profiles, onset of strong E ×B shearing, a reduction of turbulence, and improved turbulent radial particle transport. An abrupt transition appears in the graph of turbulent particle flux versus density gradient. Hysteresis in the density gradient further confirms this transport bifurcation. The total Reynolds work on the flow sharply increases above threshold. This correlates with the increase of density steepness, which suggests the Reynolds stress-driven flow that plays an essential role in density steepening and transport bifurcation. A change in turbulence feature from drift waves (DWs) to a mix of DWs and ion temperature gradients also coincides with the transport bifurcation. Interesting phenomena related to the transport bifurcation are also reported; a local inward particle flux, the co-existence of ion and electron features, and a self-sustained axial flow absent momentum input.

  7. The adiabatic energy change of plasma electrons and the frame dependence of the cross-shock potential at collisionless magnetosonic shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. C.; Scudder, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The adiabatic energy gain of electrons in the stationary electric and magnetic field structure of collisionless shock waves was examined analytically in reference to conditions of the earth's bow shock. The study was performed to characterize the behavior of electrons interacting with the cross-shock potential. A normal incidence frame (NIF) was adopted in order to calculate the reversible energy change across a time stationary shock, and comparisons were made with predictions made by the de Hoffman-Teller (HT) model (1950). The electron energy gain, about 20-50 eV, is demonstrated to be consistent with a 200-500 eV potential jump in the bow shock quasi-perpendicular geometry. The electrons lose energy working against the solar wind motional electric field. The reversible energy process is close to that modeled by HT, which predicts that the motional electric field vanishes and the electron energy gain from the electric potential is equated to the ion energy loss to the potential.

  8. Seismic architecture and morphology of Neogenic sediment waves and drifts, offshore West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglioni, Luca; Bonamini, Enrico

    2013-04-01

    The three dimension visualisation softwares of seismic data and the recent development of semi-automatic interpretation tools allow to define the 3D morphology of ancient depositional systems at a resolution never achieved before. This study analyses a Neogenic stratigraphic interval in the deep water of the West African margin. The purpose of the work is the understanding of the sedimentary architectures and the link with the genetic depositional processes. The study is mainly based on the interpretation of seismic geometries and amplitude/isochron maps derived from newly-interpreted seismic horizons. The seismic stratigraphy reveals abrupt changes in depositional styles and sedimentary processes. Transitions between Sediment Drifts (SD), Sediment Waves (SWs) and Mass Transport Complexes (MTCs) are here frequently observed, suggesting that cyclically either bottom-current intensity decreased or gravity-flow input overwhelmed the bottom-current signal. The lower studied interval corresponds to a SD sequence, made up of stacked individual packages and having a maximum thickness of 300 ms. The landward drift morphology is characterized by convex-upward, mounded seismic reflections. Each drift onlaps on a seaward-dipping reflection interpreted as paleo-slope. These contouritic deposits are concentrated near the base of slope, and fade out downdip. The drift appears to be grown from the deeper part of the basin and backstepped up the slope. It is inferred that the deposition of the drifts took place under the influence of a marine current, subparallel to the southern margin of West African coast. The backstepping of the onlapping architecture may have resulted from bottom current acceleration across the ramp. The intermediate studied interval represents a transitional sequence in which SW are alternated with MTDs of minor size (up to 60 ms thick). In this transition interval, onlap relationships and thickness variations suggest that gravity flow deposits preferentially

  9. A flowing plasma model to describe drift waves in a cylindrical helicon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.; Hole, M. J.; Corr, C. S.

    2011-04-15

    A two-fluid model developed originally to describe wave oscillations in the vacuum arc centrifuge, a cylindrical, rapidly rotating, low temperature, and confined plasma column, is applied to interpret plasma oscillations in a RF generated linear magnetized plasma [WOMBAT (waves on magnetized beams and turbulence)], with similar density and field strength. Compared to typical centrifuge plasmas, WOMBAT plasmas have slower normalized rotation frequency, lower temperature, and lower axial velocity. Despite these differences, the two-fluid model provides a consistent description of the WOMBAT plasma configuration and yields qualitative agreement between measured and predicted wave oscillation frequencies with axial field strength. In addition, the radial profile of the density perturbation predicted by this model is consistent with the data. Parameter scans show that the dispersion curve is sensitive to the axial field strength and the electron temperature, and the dependence of oscillation frequency with electron temperature matches the experiment. These results consolidate earlier claims that the density and floating potential oscillations are a resistive drift mode, driven by the density gradient. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed physics model of flowing plasmas in the diffusion region away from the RF source. Possible extensions to the model, including temperature nonuniformity and magnetic field oscillations, are also discussed.

  10. Drift-Alfven wave mediated particle transport in an elongated density depression

    SciTech Connect

    Vincena, Stephen; Gekelman, Walter

    2006-06-15

    Cross-field particle transport due to drift-Alfven waves is measured in an elongated density depression within an otherwise uniform, magnetized helium plasma column. The depression is formed by drawing an electron current to a biased copper plate with cross-field dimensions of 28x0.24 ion sound-gyroradii {rho}{sub s}=c{sub s}/{omega}{sub ci}. The process of density depletion and replenishment via particle flux repeats in a quasiperiodic fashion for the duration of the current collection. The mode structure of the wave density fluctuations in the plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field is revealed using a two-probe correlation technique. The particle flux as a function of frequency is measured using a linear array of Langmuir probes and the only significant transport occurs for waves with frequencies between 15%-25% of the ion cyclotron frequency (measured in the laboratory frame) and with perpendicular wavelengths k{sub perpendicular}{rho}{sub s}{approx}0.7. The frequency-integrated particle flux is in rough agreement with observed increases in density in the center of the depletion as a function of time. The experiments are carried out in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] at the Basic Plasma Science Facility located at the University of California, Los Angeles.

  11. Small scale coherent vortex generation in drift wave-zonal flow turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Z. B. Hahm, T. S.; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-12-15

    We present a paradigm for the generation of small scale coherent vortex (SSCV) in drift wave-zonal flow (DW-ZF) turbulence. We demonstrate that phases of DWs can couple coherently, mediated by the ZF shearing. A SSCV is formed when the phases of the DWs are “attracted” to form a stable “phase cluster.” We show that the ZF shearing induces asymmetry between “attractive” and “repulsive” phase couplings, so that a net attractive phase coupling results. The turbulent DWs will (partially)synchronize into a stable SSCV at locations, where the attractive phase coupling induced by the ZF shearing exceeds the “detuning” effects by the DW dispersion and random phase scattering. We also discuss the “self-binding” effect of the newly formed SSCV.

  12. Comparison of impurity transport in Alcator C-Mod with fluid models of drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, W. L.; Bespamyatnov, I. O.; Fu, X.; Gentle, K. W.; Horton, W.; Liao, K. T.; Futatani, S.; Fiore, C. L.

    2010-11-01

    Using a new theory, we investigate the influence of the impurity density and impurity density gradient on turbulent particle transport. Heavy impurities (argon is the example here) appear to have the strongest influence while light impurities (boron, for example) may simply transport as passive tracers when in the presence of a significant quantity of heavy impurity. The theory describes how collisional and trapped electron drift wave dynamics are modified by impurities and how the turbulence transports the impurities in a background hydrogenic plasma. The collisional regime is described using a Hasegawa-Wakatani system of equations. The trapped electron mode is modeled with a generalized form of the Terry-Horton system of equations. Measured positive and negative impurity gradients can be predicted, but new experiments will be required to verify the implications of the theory.

  13. Excitation of kinetic geodesic acoustic modes by drift waves in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Z.; Chen, L.; Zonca, F.

    2014-02-15

    Effects of system nonuniformities and kinetic dispersiveness on the spontaneous excitation of Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) by Drift Wave (DW) turbulence are investigated based on nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. The coupled nonlinear equations describing parametric decay of DW into GAM and DW lower sideband are derived and then solved both analytically and numerically to investigate the effects on the parametric decay process due to system nonuniformities, such as nonuniform diamagnetic frequency, finite radial envelope of DW pump, and kinetic dispersiveness. It is found that the parametric decay process is a convective instability for typical tokamak parameters when finite group velocities of DW and GAM associated with kinetic dispersiveness and finite radial envelope are taken into account. When, however, nonuniformity of diamagnetic frequency is taken into account, the parametric decay process becomes, time asymptotically, a quasi-exponentially growing absolute instability.

  14. Gyroaverage effects on chaotic transport by drift waves in zonal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinell, Julio J.; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego

    2013-02-01

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on E × B test particle chaotic transport in the presence of zonal flows is studied. The FLR effects are introduced by the gyro-average of a simplified E × B guiding center model consisting of the linear superposition of a non-monotonic zonal flow and drift waves. Non-monotonic zonal flows play a critical role on transport because they exhibit robust barriers to chaotic transport in the region(s) where the shear vanishes. In addition, the non-monotonicity gives rise to nontrivial changes in the topology of the orbits of the E × B Hamiltonian due to separatrix reconnection. The present study focuses on the role of FLR effects on these two signatures of non-monotonic zonal flows: shearless transport barriers and separatrix reconnection. It is shown that, as the Larmor radius increases, the effective zonal flow profile bifurcates and multiple shearless regions are created. As a result, the topology of the gyro-averaged Hamiltonian exhibits very complex separatrix reconnection bifurcations. It is also shown that FLR effects tend to reduce chaotic transport. In particular, the restoration of destroyed transport barriers is observed as the Larmor radius increases. A detailed numerical study is presented on the onset of global chaotic transport as function of the amplitude of the drift waves and the Larmor radius. For a given amplitude, the threshold for the destruction of the shearless transport barrier, as function of the Larmor radius, exhibits a fractal-like structure. The FLR effects on a thermal distribution of test particles are also studied. In particular, the fraction of confined particles with a Maxwellian distribution of gyroradii is computed, and an effective transport suppression is found for high enough temperatures.

  15. Gyroaverage effects on chaotic transport by drift waves in zonal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Martinell, Julio J.; Castillo-Negrete, Diego del

    2013-02-15

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on E Multiplication-Sign B test particle chaotic transport in the presence of zonal flows is studied. The FLR effects are introduced by the gyro-average of a simplified E Multiplication-Sign B guiding center model consisting of the linear superposition of a non-monotonic zonal flow and drift waves. Non-monotonic zonal flows play a critical role on transport because they exhibit robust barriers to chaotic transport in the region(s) where the shear vanishes. In addition, the non-monotonicity gives rise to nontrivial changes in the topology of the orbits of the E Multiplication-Sign B Hamiltonian due to separatrix reconnection. The present study focuses on the role of FLR effects on these two signatures of non-monotonic zonal flows: shearless transport barriers and separatrix reconnection. It is shown that, as the Larmor radius increases, the effective zonal flow profile bifurcates and multiple shearless regions are created. As a result, the topology of the gyro-averaged Hamiltonian exhibits very complex separatrix reconnection bifurcations. It is also shown that FLR effects tend to reduce chaotic transport. In particular, the restoration of destroyed transport barriers is observed as the Larmor radius increases. A detailed numerical study is presented on the onset of global chaotic transport as function of the amplitude of the drift waves and the Larmor radius. For a given amplitude, the threshold for the destruction of the shearless transport barrier, as function of the Larmor radius, exhibits a fractal-like structure. The FLR effects on a thermal distribution of test particles are also studied. In particular, the fraction of confined particles with a Maxwellian distribution of gyroradii is computed, and an effective transport suppression is found for high enough temperatures.

  16. Estimates of Lagrangian particle transport by wave groups: forward transport by Stokes drift and backward transport by the return flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bremer, Ton S.; Taylor, Paul H.

    2014-11-01

    Although the literature has examined Stokes drift, the net Lagrangian transport by particles due to of surface gravity waves, in great detail, the motion of fluid particles transported by surface gravity wave groups has received considerably less attention. In practice nevertheless, the wave field on the open sea often has a group-like structure. The motion of particles is different, as particles at sufficient depth are transported backwards by the Eulerian return current that was first described by Longuet-Higgins & Stewart (1962) and forms an inseparable counterpart of Stokes drift for wave groups ensuring the (irrotational) mass balance holds. We use WKB theory to study the variation of the Lagrangian transport by the return current with depth distinguishing two-dimensional seas, three-dimensional seas, infinite depth and finite depth. We then provide dimensional estimates of the net horizontal Lagrangian transport by the Stokes drift on the one hand and the return flow on the other hand for realistic sea states in all four cases. Finally we propose a simple scaling relationship for the transition depth: the depth above which Lagrangian particles are transported forwards by the Stokes drift and below which such particles are transported backwards by the return current.

  17. Selecting, Characterizing, and Acting on Drift Waves and Flute Modes Turbulence in a Low-{beta} Magnetized Plasma Column

    SciTech Connect

    Bonhomme, G.; Brochard, F.; Gravier, E.; Oldenbuerger, S.; Philipp, M.

    2006-01-15

    We report on experiments performed on the low-{beta} plasma device MIRABELLE. Using a limiter, we recently observed that when increasing the magnetic field strength transitions between various gradient driven instabilities occur. New thorough measurements allow to identify unambiguously three instability regimes. At low magnetic field the strong ErxB velocity shear drives a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, whereas at high magnetic field drift waves are only observed. A centrifugal (Rayleigh-Taylor) instability is also observed in between when the poloidal velocity field is shearless and strong enough. A close connection is made between the ratio {rho}s /L perpendicular of the drift parameter to the radial density gradient length and each instability regime. The transition scenario from regular waves to turbulence was experimentally investigated. As for drift waves the transition from regular state to spatio-temporal chaos and turbulence follows the quasi-periodicity (or Ruelle-Takens-Newhouse) route. Eventually we present new results on the efficiency of control and synchronization methods on Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor spatio-temporal chaos in comparison with drift waves.

  18. Precursor wave structure, prereversal vertical drift, and their relative roles in the development of post sunset equatorial spread-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, Mangalathayil; Sobral, José; alam Kherani, Esfhan; Batista, Inez S.; Souza, Jonas

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of large-scale wave structure in the equatorial bottomside F region that are present during daytime as precursor to post sunset development of the spread F/plasma bubble irregularities are investigated in this paper. Digisonde data from three equatorial sites in Brazil (Fortaleza, Sao Luis and Cachimbo) for a period of few months at low to medium/high solar activity phases are analyzed. Small amplitude oscillations in the F layer true heights, representing wave structure in polarization electric field, are identified as upward propagating gravity waves having zonal scale of a few hundred kilometers. Their amplitudes undergo amplification towards sunset, and depending on the amplitude of the prereversal vertical drift (PRE) they may lead to post sunset generation of ESF/plasma bubble irregularities. On days of their larger amplitudes they appear to occur in phase coherence on all days, and correspondingly the PRE vertical drift velocities are larger than on days of the smaller amplitudes of the wave structure that appear at random phase on the different days. The sustenance of these precursor waves structures is supported by the relatively large ratio (approaching unity) of the F region-to- total field line integrated Pedersen conductivities as calculated using the SUPIM simulation of the low latitude ionosphere. This study examines the role of the wave structure relative to that of the prereversal vertical drift in the post sunset spread F irregularity development.

  19. Coupled ion acoustic and drift waves in magnetized superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Adnan, Muhammad; Qamar, Anisa; Mahmood, S.

    2014-09-15

    Linear and nonlinear coupled drift-ion acoustic waves are investigated in a nonuniform magnetoplasma having kappa distributed electrons and positrons. In the linear regime, the role of kappa distribution and positron content on the dispersion relation has been highlighted; it is found that strong superthermality (low value of κ) and addition of positrons lowers the phase velocity via decreasing the fundamental scalelengths of the plasmas. In the nonlinear regime, first, coherent nonlinear structure in the form of dipoles and monopoles are obtained and the boundary conditions (boundedness) in the context of superthermality and positron concentrations are discussed. Second, in case of scalar nonlinearity, a Korteweg–de Vries-type equation is obtained, which admit solitary wave solution. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive solitons are formed in the present model. The present work may be useful to understand the low frequency electrostatic modes in inhomogeneous electron positron ion plasmas, which exist in astrophysical plasma situations such as those found in the pulsar magnetosphere.

  20. Lessons on collisionless reconnection from quantum fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Yasuhito; Baumjohann, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection in space plasmas remains a challenge in physics in that the phenomenon is associated with the breakdown of frozen-in magnetic field in a collisionless medium. Such a topology change can also be found in superfluidity, known as the quantum vortex reconnection. We give a plasma physicists' view of superfluidity to obtain insights on essential processes in collisionless reconnection, including discussion of the kinetic and fluid pictures, wave dynamics, and time reversal asymmetry. The most important lesson from the quantum fluid is the scenario that reconnection is controlled by the physics of topological defects on the microscopic scale, and by the physics of turbulence on the macroscopic scale. Quantum vortex reconnection is accompanied by wave emission in the form of Kelvin waves and sound waves, which imprints the time reversal asymmetry.

  1. Physics of collisionless phase mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, D.; Haruki, T.

    2008-11-15

    Previous studies of phase mixing of ion cyclotron (IC), Alfvenic, waves in the collisionless regime have established the generation of parallel electric field and hence acceleration of electrons in the regions of transverse density inhomogeneity. However, outstanding issues were left open. Here we use the 2.5 D, relativistic, fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code and an analytic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) formulation, to establish the following points: (i) Using the generalized Ohm's law we find that the parallel electric field is supported mostly by the electron pressure tensor, with a smaller contribution from the electron inertia term. (ii) The generated parallel electric field and the fraction of accelerated electrons are independent of the IC wave frequency remaining at a level of six orders of magnitude larger than the Dreicer value and approximately 20%, respectively. The generated parallel electric field and the fraction of accelerated electrons increase with the increase of IC wave amplitude. The generated parallel electric field seems to be independent of plasma beta, while the fraction of accelerated electrons strongly increases with the decrease of plasma beta (for plasma beta of 0.0001 the fraction of accelerated electrons can be as large as 47%). (iii) In the collisionless regime IC wave dissipation length (that is defined as the distance over which the wave damps) variation with the driving frequency shows a deviation from the analytical MHD result, which we attribute to a possible frequency dependence of the effective resistivity. (iv) Effective anomalous resistivity, inferred from our numerical simulations, is at least four orders of magnitude larger than the classical Spitzer value.

  2. Rossby and drift wave turbulence and zonal flows: The Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connaughton, Colm; Nazarenko, Sergey; Quinn, Brenda

    2015-12-01

    A detailed study of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions is presented. These simple nonlinear partial differential equations suggested for both Rossby waves in the atmosphere and drift waves in a magnetically-confined plasma, exhibit some remarkable and nontrivial properties, which in their qualitative form, survive in more realistic and complicated models. As such, they form a conceptual basis for understanding the turbulence and zonal flow dynamics in real plasma and geophysical systems. Two idealised scenarios of generation of zonal flows by small-scale turbulence are explored: a modulational instability and turbulent cascades. A detailed study of the generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability reveals that the dynamics of this zonal flow generation mechanism differ widely depending on the initial degree of nonlinearity. The jets in the strongly nonlinear case further roll up into vortex streets and saturate, while for the weaker nonlinearities, the growth of the unstable mode reverses and the system oscillates between a dominant jet, which is slightly inclined to the zonal direction, and a dominant primary wave. A numerical proof is provided for the extra invariant in Rossby and drift wave turbulence-zonostrophy. While the theoretical derivations of this invariant stem from the wave kinetic equation which assumes weak wave amplitudes, it is shown to be relatively well-conserved for higher nonlinearities also. Together with the energy and enstrophy, these three invariants cascade into anisotropic sectors in the k-space as predicted by the Fjørtoft argument. The cascades are characterised by the zonostrophy pushing the energy to the zonal scales. A small scale instability forcing applied to the model has demonstrated the well-known drift wave-zonal flow feedback loop. The drift wave turbulence is generated from this primary instability. The zonal flows are then excited by either one of the generation mechanisms, extracting energy from

  3. Early stages of wind wave and drift current generation under non-stationary wind conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Diaz, Lucia; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Generation and amplification mechanisms of ocean waves are well understood under constant wind speed or limited fetch conditions. Under these situations, the momentum and energy transfers from air to water are also quite well known. However during the wind field evolution over the ocean, we may observe sometime high wind acceleration/deceleration situations (e.g. Mexican Tehuano or Mediterranean Mistral wind systems). The evolution of wave systems under these conditions is not well understood. The purpose of these laboratory experiments is to better understand the early stages of water-waves and surface-drift currents under non-stationary wind conditions and to determine the balance between transfers creating waves and surface currents during non-equilibrium situations. The experiments were conducted in the Institut Pythéas wind-wave facility in Marseille-France. The wave tank is 40 m long, 2.7 m wide and 1 m deep. The air section is 50 m long, 3 m wide and 1.8 m height. We used 11 different resistive wave-gauges located along the tank. The momentum fluxes in the air column were estimated from single and X hot-film anemometer measurements. The sampling frequency for wind velocity and surface displacement measurements was 256 Hz. Water-current measurements were performed with a profiling velocimeter. This device measures the first 3.5 cm of the water column with a frequency rate of 100Hz. During the experiments, the wind intensity was abruptly modified with a constant acceleration and deceleration over time. We observed that wind drag coefficient values for accelerated wind periods are lower than the ones reported in previous studies for constant wind speed (Large and Pond 1981; Ocampo-Torres et al. 2010; Smith 1980; Yelland and Taylor 1996). This is probably because the turbulent boundary layer is not completely developed during the increasing-wind sequence. As it was reported in some theoretical studies (Miles 1957; Phillips 1957; Kahma and Donelan 1988), we

  4. Early stages of wind wave and drift current generation under non-stationary wind conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Diaz, Lucia; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.; Branger, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Generation and amplification mechanisms of ocean waves are well understood under constant wind speed or limited fetch conditions. Under these situations, the momentum and energy transfers from air to water are also quite well known. However during the wind field evolution over the ocean, we may observe sometime high wind acceleration/deceleration situations (e.g. Mexican Tehuano or Mediterranean Mistral wind systems). The evolution of wave systems under these conditions is not well understood. The purpose of these laboratory experiments is to better understand the early stages of water-waves and surface-drift currents under non-stationary wind conditions and to determine the balance between transfers creating waves and surface currents during non-equilibrium situations. The experiments were conducted in the Institut Pythéas wind-wave facility in Marseille-France. The wave tank is 40 m long, 2.7 m wide and 1 m deep. The air section is 50 m long, 3 m wide and 1.8 m height. We used 11 different resistive wave-gauges located along the tank. The momentum fluxes in the air column were estimated from single and X hot-film anemometer measurements. The sampling frequency for wind velocity and surface displacement measurements was 256 Hz. Water-current measurements were performed with a profiling velocimeter. This device measures the first 3.5 cm of the water column with a frequency rate of 100Hz. During the experiments, the wind intensity was abruptly modified with a constant acceleration and deceleration over time. We observed that wind drag coefficient values for accelerated wind periods are lower than the ones reported in previous studies for constant wind speed (Large and Pond 1981; Ocampo-Torres et al. 2010; Smith 1980; Yelland and Taylor 1996). This is probably because the turbulent boundary layer is not completely developed during the increasing-wind sequence. As it was reported in some theoretical studies (Miles 1957; Phillips 1957; Kahma and Donelan 1988), we

  5. Fast, purely growing collisionless reconnection as an eigenfunction problem related to but not involving linear whistler waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bellan, Paul M.

    2014-10-15

    If either finite electron inertia or finite resistivity is included in 2D magnetic reconnection, the two-fluid equations become a pair of second-order differential equations coupling the out-of-plane magnetic field and vector potential to each other to form a fourth-order system. The coupling at an X-point is such that out-of-plane even-parity electric and odd-parity magnetic fields feed off each other to produce instability if the scale length on which the equilibrium magnetic field changes is less than the ion skin depth. The instability growth rate is given by an eigenvalue of the fourth-order system determined by boundary and symmetry conditions. The instability is a purely growing mode, not a wave, and has growth rate of the order of the whistler frequency. The spatial profile of both the out-of-plane electric and magnetic eigenfunctions consists of an inner concave region having extent of the order of the electron skin depth, an intermediate convex region having extent of the order of the equilibrium magnetic field scale length, and a concave outer exponentially decaying region. If finite electron inertia and resistivity are not included, the inner concave region does not exist and the coupled pair of equations reduces to a second-order differential equation having non-physical solutions at an X-point.

  6. Effect of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations on secondary structures in Drift-Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leconte, Michael

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we study the effects of RMPs on turbulence, flows and confinement, in the framework of two paradigmatic models, resistive ballooning and resistive drift waves. For resistive ballooning turbulence, we use 3D global numerical simulations, including RMP fields and (externally-imposed) sheared rotation profile. Without RMPs, relaxation oscillations of the pressure profile occur. With RMPs, results show that long-lived convection cells are generated by the combined effects of pressure modulation and toroidal curvature coupling. These modify the global structure of the turbulence and eliminate relaxation oscillations. This effect is due mainly to a modification of the pressure profile linked to the presence of residual magnetic island chains. Hence convection-cell generation increases for increasing δBr/B0. For RMP effect on zonal flows in drift wave turbulence, we extend the Hasegawa-Wakatani model to include RMP fields. The effect of the RMPs is to induce a linear coupling between the zonal electric field and the zonal density gradient, which drives the system to a state of electron radial force balance for large δBr/B0. Both the vorticity flux (Reynolds stress), and particle flux are modulated. We derive an extended predator prey model which couples zonal potential and density dynamics to the evolution of turbulence intensity. This model has both turbulence drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters, and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. We find a novel set of system states that are similar to the Hmode-like state of the standard predator-prey model, but for which the power threshold is now a function of the RMP strength. For small RMP amplitude and low collisionality, both the ambient turbulence and zonal flow energy increase with δBr/B0. For larger RMP strength, the turbulence energy increases, but the energy of zonal flows decreases with δBr/B0, corresponding to a damping of zonal flows. At high

  7. The Influence of Drift Gas Composition on the Separation Mechanism in Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Insight from Electrodynamic Simulations.

    PubMed

    May, Jody C; McLean, John A

    2003-06-01

    The influence of three different drift gases (helium, nitrogen, and argon) on the separation mechanism in traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry is explored through ion trajectory simulations which include considerations for ion diffusion based on kinetic theory and the electrodynamic traveling wave potential. The model developed for this work is an accurate depiction of a second-generation commercial traveling wave instrument. Three ion systems (cocaine, MDMA, and amphetamine) whose reduced mobility values have previously been measured in different drift gases are represented in the simulation model. The simulation results presented here provide a fundamental understanding of the separation mechanism in traveling wave, which is characterized by three regions of ion motion: (1) ions surfing on a single wave, (2) ions exhibiting intermittent roll-over onto subsequent waves, and (3) ions experiencing a steady state roll-over which repeats every few wave cycles. These regions of ion motion are accessed through changes in the gas pressure, wave amplitude, and wave velocity. Resolving power values extracted from simulated arrival times suggest that momentum transfer in helium gas is generally insufficient to access regions (2) and (3) where ion mobility separations occur. Ion mobility separations by traveling wave are predicted to be effectual for both nitrogen and argon, with slightly lower resolving power values observed for argon as a result of band-broadening due to collisional scattering. For the simulation conditions studied here, the resolving power in traveling wave plateaus between regions (2) and (3), with further increases in wave velocity contributing only minor improvements in separations.

  8. Complete classification of discrete resonant Rossby/drift wave triads on periodic domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamante, Miguel D.; Hayat, Umar

    2013-09-01

    We consider the set of Diophantine equations that arise in the context of the partial differential equation called "barotropic vorticity equation" on periodic domains, when nonlinear wave interactions are studied to leading order in the amplitudes. The solutions to this set of Diophantine equations are of interest in atmosphere (Rossby waves) and Tokamak plasmas (drift waves), because they provide the values of the spectral wavevectors that interact resonantly via three-wave interactions. These wavenumbers come in "triads", i.e., groups of three wavevectors. We provide the full solution to the Diophantine equations in the physically sensible limit when the Rossby deformation radius is infinite. The method is completely new, and relies on mapping the unknown variables via rational transformations, first to rational points on elliptic curves and surfaces, and from there to rational points on quadratic forms of "Minkowski" type (such as the familiar space-time in special relativity). Classical methods invented centuries ago by Fermat, Euler, Lagrange, Minkowski, are used to classify all solutions to our original Diophantine equations, thus providing a computational method to generate numerically all the resonant triads in the system. Computationally speaking, our method has a clear advantage over brute-force numerical search: on a 10,0002 grid, the brute-force search would take 15 years using optimised C codes on a cluster, whereas our method takes about 40 min using a laptop. Moreover, the method is extended to generate so-called quasi-resonant triads, which are defined by relaxing the resonant condition on the frequencies, allowing for a small mismatch. Quasi-resonant triads' distribution in wavevector space is robust with respect to physical perturbations, unlike resonant triads' distribution. Therefore, the extended method is really valuable in practical terms. We show that the set of quasi-resonant triads form an intricate network of connected triads, forming

  9. BURNING PLASMA PROJECTIONS USING DRIFT WAVE TRANSPORT MODELS AND SCALINGS FOR THE H-MODE PEDESTAL

    SciTech Connect

    KINSEY,JE; ONJUN,T; BATEMAN,G; KRITZ,A; PANKIN,A; STAEBLER,GM; WALTZ,RE

    2002-10-01

    OAK-B135 The GLF23 and Multi-Mode (MM95) transport models are used along with a model for the H-mode pedestal to predict the fusion performance for the ITER, FIRE, and IGNITOR tokamak designs. The drift-wave predictive transport models reproduce the core profiles in a wide variety of tokamak discharges, yet they differ significantly in their response to temperature gradient (stiffness). Recent gyro-kinetic simulations of ITG/TEM and ETG modes motivate the renormalization of the GLF23 model. The normalizing coefficients for the ITG/TEM modes are reduced by a factor of 3.7 while the ETG mode coefficient is increased by a factor of 4.8 in comparison with the original model. A pedestal temperature model is developed for type I ELMy H-mode plasmas based on ballooning mode stability and a theory-motivated scaling for the pedestal width. In this pedestal model, the pedestal density is proportional to the line-averaged density and the pedestal temperature is inversely related to the pedestal density.

  10. Characterization of Drift-wave Turbulence in the Sheared, Cylindrical Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin; Gentle, Kenneth

    2008-11-01

    We present an experimental characterization of drift-wave turbulence in the Helimak, a finite realization of the sheared, cylindrical slab used in turbulence calculations. Measurements of electrostatic turbulence are made both using an large fixed array of langmuir probes and a moveable array on a motorized probe drive. We examine such non-spatially oriented quantities as turbulence levels, fluctuation frequencies, and phases between density and electrostatic potential fluctuations. Measurements on dispersion relations and coherence lengths in both the radial and vertical directions are used to characterize the turbulence in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. Radial turbulent transport is also investigated. In addition to this information, we present a study of fluctuations parallel to the field lines, including measurements of parallel coherence lengths and parallel wavenumbers. Furthermore, we characterize fluctuations of both radial and vertical magnetic fields. We explore the relationships between density, potential, and magnetic turbulence. Finally, a description of nonlinear aspects of the turbulence in this configuration such as mode coupling and intermittency is offered. To complete our characterization, comparisons to theory are given where possible. Supported by DOE-OFES grant DE-FG02-04ER54766.

  11. Impact of resonant magnetic perturbations on nonlinearly driven modes in drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, M.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-05-15

    In this work, we study the effects of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on turbulence, flows, and confinement in the framework of resistive drift wave turbulence. We extend the Hasegawa-Wakatani model to include RMP fields. The effect of the RMPs is to induce a linear coupling between the zonal electric field and the zonal density gradient, which drives the system to a state of electron radial force balance for large ({delta}B{sub r}/B{sub 0}). Both the vorticity flux (Reynolds stress) and particle flux are modulated. We derive an extended predator prey model which couples zonal potential and density dynamics to the evolution of turbulence intensity. This model has both turbulence drive and RMP amplitude as control parameters and predicts a novel type of transport bifurcation in the presence of RMPs. We find states that are similar to the ZF-dominated state of the standard predator-prey model, but for which the power threshold is now a function of the RMP strength. For small RMP amplitude, the energy of zonal flows decreases and the turbulence energy increases with ({delta}B{sub r}/B{sub 0}), corresponding to a damping of zonal flows.

  12. Flow topology and Lagrangian conditional statistics in dissipative drift-wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadoch, Benjamin; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Lagrangian statistics in drift-wave turbulence, modeled by the Hasegawa-Wakatani system and its modified version, are investigated. The later shows the emergence of pronounced zonal flows. Different values of the adiabaticity parameter are considered. The main goal is to characterize the role of coherent structures (vortices and zonal flows) on the Lagrangian statistics of particles. Computationally intensive simulations following ensembles of test particles over hundreds of eddy turnover times are considered in statistically stationary turbulent flows. The flow topology is characterized using the Lagrangian Okubo-Weiss criterion [Kadoch et al., Phys. Rev. E 83 (2011)], and the flow is thus split into topologically different domains. In elliptic and hyperbolic regions, the probability density functions (pdfs) of the residence time have self-similar algebraic decaying tails. However, in the intermediate regions the pdfs do exhibit exponentially decaying tails. Topologically conditioned pdfs of the Lagrangian velocity and acceleration are also computed. The differences between the classical Hasegawa-Wakatani system and its modified version are assessed.

  13. Excitation of Kinetic Geodesic Acoustic Modes by Drift Waves in Nonuniform Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Chen, Liu; Zonca, Fulvio

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous excitation of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) by drift wave turbulence (DW), which is expected to play an important role in the DW saturation process, is investigated including effects of system nonuniformities and kinetic plasma response. The coupled equations describing the fully nonlinear interaction between GAM and DW are derived based on the nonlinear gyrokinetic theory, and then we solved both analytically and numerically to investigate the spatial-temporal evolution of the coupled DW-GAM system. Kinetic effects as well as nonuniformities due to diamagnetic frequency profile, finite radial envelope width of DW pump and GAM continuum are systematically included in the analysis. It is found that the parametric decay process is a convective instability for typical tokamak parameters, when finite group velocities of DW and GAM associated with kinetic effects and finite radial envelope width are taken into account. The nonlinearly driven GAM propagates at a group velocity, that, due to coupling with DW, is typically much larger than that predicted by the linear theory of GAM. When, however, nonuniformity of diamagnetic frequency is taken into account, the parametric decay process becomes, time asymptotically, a quasi-exponentially growing absolute instab Work supported by US DoE, ITER-CN, NSFC and EUROfusion projects.

  14. Shear flow and drift wave turbulence dynamics in a cylindrical plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.; Tynan, G. R.; Holland, C.; Xu, M.; Mueller, S. H.; Yu, J. H.

    2010-03-15

    The experimental observations of the dynamics of the coupled drift wave turbulence (DWT)/sheared zonal flow (ZF) system in a cylindrical plasma device using a combination of Langmuir probe and fast-framing imaging measurements are reported. The results show the presence of an azimuthal ZF that exhibits low frequency (approx250 Hz) fluctuations. The envelope of the higher frequency (above 5 kHz) floating potential fluctuations associated with the DWT, the density gradient, and the turbulent radial particle flux are all modulated out of phase with the strength of the ZF. The divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress is also modulated at the same slow time scale in a phase-coherent manner consistent with a turbulent-driven shear flow sustained against the collisional and viscous damping. The radial turbulence correlation length and cross-field particle transport are reduced during periods of strong flow shear. The results are qualitatively consistent with theoretical expectations for coupled DWT-ZF dynamics.

  15. Comparison of Collisional Drift-Wave Simulation with CSDX Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaezi, Payam; Holland, Christopher; Tynan, George; Thakur, Saikat; Brandt, Christian; Dudson, Benjamin; Friedman, Brett; Carter, Troy

    2013-10-01

    Recent upgrades to the linear Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment (CSDX) [Burin et al., PoP 2005] at UCSD (maximum Bz from 1 kG to 2.4 kG, increase of helicon source diameter from 10 cm to 15 cm) have revealed a rich array of turbulence dynamics at previously inaccessible conditions. We report initial comparisons of linear and nonlinear collisional drift-wave physics made using analytic theory and the BOUT + + code [Dudson et al., CPC 2009] against these observations, focusing upon the transition from nonlinearly coupled but distinct eigenmodes at 0.9 kG to fully developed broadband turbulence at 2.4 kG. Comparisons of predicted linear eigenmode structures, frequencies, and density-potential cross-phases to measurement are presented, as well as predictions for nonlinear frequency power spectra and saturated fluctuation levels. We also report progress on the development and implementation of synthetic Langmuir probe and fast framing camera diagnostics for improving the fidelity of our model-experiment comparisons.

  16. Effects of drift gas on collision cross sections of a protein standard in linear drift tube and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jurneczko, Ewa; Kalapothakis, Jason; Campuzano, Iain D G; Morris, Michael; Barran, Perdita E

    2012-10-16

    There has been a significant increase in the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to investigate conformations of proteins and protein complexes following electrospray ionization. Investigations which employ traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TW IM-MS) instrumentation rely on the use of calibrants to convert the arrival times of ions to collision cross sections (CCS) providing "hard numbers" of use to structural biology. It is common to use nitrogen as the buffer gas in TW IM-MS instruments and to calibrate by extrapolating from CCS measured in helium via drift tube (DT) IM-MS. In this work, both DT and TW IM-MS instruments are used to investigate the effects of different drift gases (helium, neon, nitrogen, and argon) on the transport of multiply charged ions of the protein myoglobin, frequently used as a standard in TW IM-MS studies. Irrespective of the drift gas used, recorded mass spectra are found to be highly similar. In contrast, the recorded arrival time distributions and the derived CCS differ greatly. At low charge states (7 ≤ z ≤ 11) where the protein is compact, the CCS scale with the polarizability of the gas; this is also the case for higher charge states (12 ≤ z ≤ 22) where the protein is more unfolded for the heavy gases (neon, argon, and nitrogen) but not the case for helium. This is here interpreted as a different conformational landscape being sampled by the lighter gas and potentially attributable to increased field heating by helium. Under nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI) conditions, where myoglobin is sprayed from an aqueous solution buffered to pH 6.8 with 20 mM ammonium acetate, in the DT IM-MS instrument, each buffer gas can yield a different arrival time distribution (ATD) for any given charge state.

  17. Effects of drift gas on collision cross sections of a protein standard in linear drift tube and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jurneczko, Ewa; Kalapothakis, Jason; Campuzano, Iain D G; Morris, Michael; Barran, Perdita E

    2012-10-16

    There has been a significant increase in the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to investigate conformations of proteins and protein complexes following electrospray ionization. Investigations which employ traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TW IM-MS) instrumentation rely on the use of calibrants to convert the arrival times of ions to collision cross sections (CCS) providing "hard numbers" of use to structural biology. It is common to use nitrogen as the buffer gas in TW IM-MS instruments and to calibrate by extrapolating from CCS measured in helium via drift tube (DT) IM-MS. In this work, both DT and TW IM-MS instruments are used to investigate the effects of different drift gases (helium, neon, nitrogen, and argon) on the transport of multiply charged ions of the protein myoglobin, frequently used as a standard in TW IM-MS studies. Irrespective of the drift gas used, recorded mass spectra are found to be highly similar. In contrast, the recorded arrival time distributions and the derived CCS differ greatly. At low charge states (7 ≤ z ≤ 11) where the protein is compact, the CCS scale with the polarizability of the gas; this is also the case for higher charge states (12 ≤ z ≤ 22) where the protein is more unfolded for the heavy gases (neon, argon, and nitrogen) but not the case for helium. This is here interpreted as a different conformational landscape being sampled by the lighter gas and potentially attributable to increased field heating by helium. Under nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI) conditions, where myoglobin is sprayed from an aqueous solution buffered to pH 6.8 with 20 mM ammonium acetate, in the DT IM-MS instrument, each buffer gas can yield a different arrival time distribution (ATD) for any given charge state. PMID:22974196

  18. Generation of Large-Scale Zonal Structures by Drift Flute Waves in High-Beta HED Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Essam; Sotnikov, Vladmir; Kindel, Joseph; Onishchenko, O. G.; Leboeuf, J. N.

    2009-05-01

    Our aim is to develop a more general analysis of nonlinear dynamics of drift-flute waves, applicable to arbitrary plasma beta and arbitrary spatial scales in comparison with the ion Larmor radius. This study is of interest for fundamental plasma theory as well as for the interpretation of Z-pinch and laboratory astrophysics experiments. Description of low-frequency waves and in particular drift flute waves in a high beta plasma, generally speaking, requires a kinetic approach, based on the Vlasov-Maxwell set of equations. In the present work we show that the alternative two-fluid description can adequately describe the ion perturbations with arbitrary ratio of the characteristic spatial scales to the ion Larmor radius in so-called Pade approximation. For this purpose reduced two-fluid hydrodynamic equations which describe nonlinear dynamics of the flute waves with arbitrary spatial scales and arbitrary plasma beta are derived. The linear dispersion relation of the flute waves and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are analyzed. A general nonlinear dispersion relation which describes generation of large-scale zonal structures by the flute waves is presented and analyzed.

  19. Suppression of drift wave turbulence and zonal flow formation by changing axial boundary conditions in a cylindrical magnetized plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty Thakur, Saikat; Xu Min; Manz, Peter; Fedorczak, Nicolas; Tynan, George R.; Holland, Chris

    2013-01-15

    For drift wave turbulence, due to charge conservation, the divergence of the parallel current is coupled to the divergence of the perpendicular polarization current, which determines the effective radial momentum flux, i.e., the Reynolds stress. Changes in the current flow patterns also affect the nonlinear energy transfer from smaller to larger scales. Here, we show that by changing the end plate boundary conditions in a cylindrical plasma device, the radial currents through the plasma and hence the net momentum transport and the nonlinear coupling for the inverse energy transfer are strongly modified. The transition to drift wave turbulence and the formation of low frequency zonal flows can be either suppressed with conducting boundaries or enhanced with insulating boundaries.

  20. A statistical study of gyro-averaging effects in a reduced model of drift-wave transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fonseca, J. D.; del-Castillo-Negrete, D.; Sokolov, I. M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-08-01

    A statistical study of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on transport driven by electrostatic drift-waves is presented. The study is based on a reduced discrete Hamiltonian dynamical system known as the gyro-averaged standard map (GSM). In this system, FLR effects are incorporated through the gyro-averaging of a simplified weak-turbulence model of electrostatic fluctuations. Formally, the GSM is a modified version of the standard map in which the perturbation amplitude, K0, becomes K0J0(ρ ̂ ) , where J0 is the zeroth-order Bessel function and ρ ̂ is the Larmor radius. Assuming a Maxwellian probability density function (pdf) for ρ ̂ , we compute analytically and numerically the pdf and the cumulative distribution function of the effective drift-wave perturbation amplitude K0J0(ρ ̂ ) . Using these results, we compute the probability of loss of confinement (i.e., global chaos), Pc, and the probability of trapping in the main drift-wave resonance, Pt. It is shown that Pc provides an upper bound for the escape rate, and that Pt provides a good estimate of the particle trapping rate. The analytical results are compared with direct numerical Monte-Carlo simulations of particle transport.

  1. Transition from Collisionless to Collisional MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Prateek Sharma; Gregory W. Hammett; Eliot Quataert

    2003-07-24

    Recent calculations by Quataert et al. (2002) found that the growth rates of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless plasma can differ significantly from those calculated using MHD. This can be important in hot accretion flows around compact objects. In this paper, we study the transition from the collisionless kinetic regime to the collisional MHD regime, mapping out the dependence of the MRI growth rate on collisionality. A kinetic closure scheme for a magnetized plasma is used that includes the effect of collisions via a BGK operator. The transition to MHD occurs as the mean free path becomes short compared to the parallel wavelength 2*/k(sub)||. In the weak magnetic field regime where the Alfven and MRI frequencies w are small compared to the sound wave frequency k(sub)||c(sub)0, the dynamics are still effectively collisionless even if omega << v, so long as the collision frequency v << k(sub)||c(sub)0; for an accretion flow this requires n less than or approximately equal to *(square root of b). The low collisionality regime not only modifies the MRI growth rate, but also introduces collisionless Landau or Barnes damping of long wavelength modes, which may be important for the nonlinear saturation of the MRI.

  2. Scattering of radiation in collisionless dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.

    2013-04-15

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves in collisionless dusty plasmas is studied in the framework of a multi-component kinetic model. The investigation focuses on the spectral distribution of the scattered radiation. Pronounced dust signatures are identified in the coherent spectrum due to scattering from the shielding cloud around the dust grains, dust acoustic waves, and dust-ion acoustic waves. The magnitude and shape of the scattered signal near these spectral regions are determined with the aid of analytical expressions and its dependence on the dust parameters is investigated. The use of radiation scattering as a potential diagnostic tool for dust detection is discussed.

  3. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators. I. Analytical theory of trapped-particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Proll, J. H. E.; Plunk, G. G.

    2013-12-15

    This is the first in a series of papers about collisionless, electrostatic micro-instabilities in stellarators, with an emphasis on trapped-particle modes. It is found that, in so-called maximum-J configurations, trapped-particle instabilities are absent in large regions of parameter space. Quasi-isodynamic stellarators have this property (approximately), and the theory predicts that trapped electrons are stabilizing to all eigenmodes with frequencies below the electron bounce frequency. The physical reason is that the bounce-averaged curvature is favorable for all orbits, and that trapped electrons precess in the direction opposite to that in which drift waves propagate, thus precluding wave-particle resonance. These considerations only depend on the electrostatic energy balance and are independent of all geometric properties of the magnetic field other than the maximum-J condition. However, if the aspect ratio is large and the instability phase velocity differs greatly from the electron and ion thermal speeds, it is possible to derive a variational form for the frequency showing that stability prevails in a yet larger part of parameter space than what follows from the energy argument. Collisionless trapped-electron modes should therefore be more stable in quasi-isodynamic stellarators than in tokamaks.

  4. Spontaneous magnetic reconnection. Collisionless reconnection and its potential astrophysical relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treumann, R. A.; Baumjohann, W.

    2015-10-01

    low as α ≈ 2. Spontaneous reconnection generates small-scale turbulence. Imposed external turbulence tends to temporarily increase the reconnection rate. Reconnecting ultra-relativistic current sheets decay into large numbers of magnetic flux ropes composed of chains of plasmoids and lepton exhausts. They form highly structured current surfaces, "current carpets". By including synchrotron radiation losses, one favours tearing-mode reconnection over the drift-kink deformation of the current sheet. Lepton acceleration occurs in the reconnection-electric field in multiple encounters with the exhausts and plasmoids. This is a Fermi-like process. It results in power-law tails on the lepton energy distribution. This effect becomes pronounced in ultra-relativistic reconnection where it yields extremely hard lepton power-law energy spectra approaching F(γ )∝ γ ^{-1}, with γ the lepton energy. The synchrotron radiation limit becomes substantially exceeded. Relativistic reconnection is a probable generator of current and magnetic turbulence, and a mechanism that produces high-energy radiation. It is also identified as the ultimate dissipation mechanism of the mechanical energy in collisionless magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascades via lepton-inertial-scale turbulent current filaments. In this case, the volume-filling factor is large. Magnetic turbulence causes strong plasma heating of the entire turbulent volume and violent acceleration via spontaneous lepton-scale reconnection. This may lead to high-energy particle populations filling the whole volume. In this case, it causes non-thermal radiation spectra that span the entire interval from radio waves to gamma rays.

  5. Attribution of ionospheric vertical plasma drift perturbations to large-scale waves and the dependence on solar activity (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Richmond, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we quantify the contribution of individual large-scale waves to ionospheric electrodynamics, and examine the dependence of the ionospheric perturbations on solar activity. We focus on migrating diurnal tide (DW1) plus mean winds, migrating semidiurnal tide (SW2), quasi-stationary planetary wave 1 (QSPW1), and nonmigrating semidiurnal westward wave 1 (SW1) under northern winter conditions, when QSPW1 and SW1 are climatologically strong. From TIME-GCM simulations under solar minimum conditions, we calculate equatorial vertical ExB drifts due to mean winds and DW1, SW2, SW1 and QSPW1. In particular, wind components of both SW2 and SW1 become large at mid to high latitudes in the E-region, and kernel functions obtained from numerical experiments reveal that they can significantly affect the equatorial ion drift, likely through modulating the E-region wind dynamo. The most evident changes of total ionospheric vertical drift when solar activity is increased are seen around dawn and dusk, reflecting the more dominant role of large F-region Pedersen conductivity and of the F-region dynamo under high solar activity. Therefore, the lower atmosphere driving of the ionospheric variability is more evident under solar minimum conditions, not only because variability is more identifiable in a quieter background, but also because the E-region wind dynamo is more significant. These numerical experiments also demonstrate that the amplitudes, phases and latitudinal and vertical structures of large-scale waves are important in quantifying the ionospheric responses.

  6. Electric field and plasma density measurements in the strongly driven daytime equatorial electrojet. I - The unstable layer and gradient drift waves. II - Two-stream waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Kelley, M. C.; Kudeki, E.; Fejer, B. G.; Baker, K. D.

    1987-01-01

    The results of electric field and plasma density measurements in the strongly driven daytime equatorial electrojet over Peru, made during the March 1983 Condor electrojet experiment from Punta Lobos, Peru, are discussed together with the rocket instrumentation used for the measurements and the pertinent payload dynamics. The overall characteristics of the irregularity layer observed in situ in the electrojet are described. Special consideration is given to the waves generated by the gradient drift instability (observed between 90 and 106.5 km) and to primary and secondary two-stream waves detected by the two probes on the topside between 103 and 111 km, where the electron current was considered to be strongest.

  7. Reversible collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2013-10-15

    Reversible magnetic reconnection is demonstrated for the first time by means of gyrokinetic numerical simulations of a collisionless magnetized plasma. Growth of a current-driven instability in a sheared magnetic field is accompanied by magnetic reconnection due to electron inertia effects. Following the instability growth, the collisionless reconnection is accelerated with development of a cross-shaped structure of current density, and then all field lines are reconnected. The fully reconnected state is followed by the secondary reconnection resulting in a weakly turbulent state. A time-reversed simulation starting from the turbulent state manifests that the collisionless reconnection process proceeds inversely leading to the initial state. During the reversed reconnection, the kinetic energy is reconverted into the original magnetic field energy. In order to understand the stability of reversed process, an external perturbation is added to the fully reconnected state, and it is found that the accelerated reconnection is reversible when the deviation of the E × B streamlines due to the perturbation is comparable with or smaller than a current layer width.

  8. Simulating the effects of stellarator geometry on gyrokinetic drift-wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertel, Jessica Ann

    Nuclear fusion is a clean, safe form of energy with abundant fuel. In magnetic fusion energy (MFE) experiments, the plasma fuel is confined by magnetic fields at very high temperatures and densities. One fusion reactor design is the non-axisymmetric, torus-shaped stellarator. Its fully-3D fields have advantages over the simpler, better-understood axisymmetric tokamak, including the ability to optimize magnetic configurations for desired properties, such as lower transport (longer confinement time). Turbulence in the plasma can break MFE confinement. While turbulent transport is known to cause a significant amount of heat loss in tokamaks, it is a new area of research in stellarators. Gyrokinetics is a good mathematical model of the drift-wave instabilities that cause turbulence. Multiple gyrokinetic turbulence codes that had great success comparing to tokamak experiments are being converted for use with stellarator geometry. This thesis describes such adaptations of the gyrokinetic turbulence code, GS2. Herein a new computational grid generator and upgrades to GS2 itself are described, tested, and benchmarked against three other gyrokinetic codes. Using GS2, detailed linear studies using the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) geometry were conducted. The first compares stability in two equilibria with different β=(plasma pressure)/(magnetic pressure). Overall, the higher β case was more stable than the lower β case. As high β is important for MFE experiments, this is encouraging. The second compares NCSX linear stability to a tokamak case. NCSX was more stable with a 20% higher critical temperature gradient normalized by the minor radius, suggesting that the fusion power might be enhanced by ˜ 50%. In addition, the first nonlinear, non-axisymmetric GS2 simulations are presented. Finally, linear stability of two locations in a W7-AS plasma were compared. The experimentally-measured parameters used were from a W7-AS shot in which measured heat fluxes

  9. Long-range correlations induced by the self-regulation of zonal flows and drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Ramisch, M.; Stroth, U.

    2010-11-15

    By means of a unique probe array, the interaction between zonal flows and broad-band drift-wave turbulence has been investigated experimentally in a magnetized toroidal plasma. Homogeneous potential fluctuations on a magnetic flux surface, previously reported as long range correlations, could be traced back to a predator-prey-like interaction between the turbulence and the zonal flow. At higher frequency the nonlocal transfer of energy to the zonal flow is dominant and the low-frequency oscillations are shown to result from the reduced turbulence activity due to this energy loss. This self-regulation process turns out to be enhanced with increased background shear flows.

  10. Nonlinear Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, D.; Tassi, E.; Borgogno, D.; Pegoraro, F.

    2008-10-15

    We review some recent results that have been obtained in the investigation of collisionless reconnection in two and three dimensional magnetic configurations with a strong guide field in regimes of interest for laboratory plasmas. First, we adopt a two-field plasma model where two distinct regimes, laminar and turbulent, can be identified. Then, we show that these regimes may combine when we consider a more general four-field model, where perturbation of the magnetic and velocity fields are allowed also along the ignorable coordinate.

  11. Intercomponent momentum transport and electrical conductivity of collisionless plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    Based on the Lenard-Balescu equation, the interaction integral for the intercomponent momentum transfer in a two-component, collisionless plasma is evaluated in closed form. The distribution functions of the electrons and ions are represented in the form of nonisothermal, displaced Maxwellians corresponding to the 5-moment approximation. As an application, the transport of electrical current in an electric field is discussed for infrasonic up to sonic electron-ion drift velocities.

  12. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-05-24

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability ismore » exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3×107 s-1.« less

  13. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability is exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3  ×  107 s‑1.

  14. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of ion velocity in a DC magnetron microdischarge with self-organized drift wave modes propagating in the direction opposite the E x B electron drift velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Chris; Gascon, Nicolas; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Cappelli, Mark; Ito, Tsuyohito; Stanford Plasma Physics Laboratory Collaboration; Osaka University CenterAtomic; Molecular Technologies Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Evidence is presented of rotating azimuthal wave structures in a planar DC magnetron microdischarge operating in argon and xenon. Plasma emission captured using a high frame rate camera reveals waves of varying azimuthal modes propagating in the negative E x B direction. The dominant stable mode structure depends on discharge voltage. The negative drift direction is attributed to a local field reversal arising from strong density gradients that drive excess ions towards the anode. The transition between modes is shown to be consistent with models of gradient drift-wave dispersion in the presence of such a field reversal when the fluid representation includes ambipolar diffusion along the direction parallel to the magnetic field. Time-average and time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence measurements are carried out to elucidate the anode-bound ion dynamics driven by the field reversal. This research is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  15. ELF wave production by an electron beam emitting rocket system and its suppression on auroral field lines - Evidence for Alfven and drift waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.; Erickson, K. N.; Abe, Y.; Steffen, J. E.; Malcolm, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    Orthogonal probes on a free-flying plasma diagnostics payload are used to study ELF electric disturbances in the auroral ionosphere that are due to the injection of powerful electron beams. Frequency spectrograms are presented for various pitch angles, pulsing characteristics, and other properties of the injected beams; the large scale DC ionospheric convection electric field is measured, together with auroral particle precipitation, visual auroral forms, and ionospheric parameters. In view of the experimental results obtained, it is postulated that the observed ELF waves are in the Alfven and drift modes, and are generated by the positive vehicle potential during beam injection.

  16. Lower hybrid drift instability with temperature gradient in a perpendicular shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Y. M.; Wong, H. K.; Wu, C. S.

    1983-01-01

    Finite beta effects and an electron temperature gradient are included in the present study of the perpendicular bow shock geometry's lower hybrid instability, where the flute mode that is stable at the shock for constant electron temperature is destabilized in the case of a sufficiently great temperature gradient. Numerical solutions are given for cases in which the ion distribution is either drifting Maxwellian or consists of two Maxwellians, to represent the effect of reflected ions at the shock. A discussion is presented of the implications of results obtained for ion and electron heating and electron acceleration at the bow shock.

  17. Projected Changes on the Global Surface Wave Drift Climate towards the END of the Twenty-First Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Ana; Semedo, Alvaro; Behrens, Arno; Weisse, Ralf; Breivik, Øyvind; Saetra, Øyvind; Håkon Christensen, Kai

    2016-04-01

    The global wave-induced current (the Stokes Drift - SD) is an important feature of the ocean surface, with mean values close to 10 cm/s along the extra-tropical storm tracks in both hemispheres. Besides the horizontal displacement of large volumes of water the SD also plays an important role in the ocean mix-layer turbulence structure, particularly in stormy or high wind speed areas. The role of the wave-induced currents in the ocean mix-layer and in the sea surface temperature (SST) is currently a hot topic of air-sea interaction research, from forecast to climate ranges. The SD is mostly driven by wind sea waves and highly sensitive to changes in the overlaying wind speed and direction. The impact of climate change in the global wave-induced current climate will be presented. The wave model WAM has been forced by the global climate model (GCM) ECHAM5 wind speed (at 10 m height) and ice, for present-day and potential future climate conditions towards the end of the end of the twenty-first century, represented by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) CMIP3 (Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project phase 3) A1B greenhouse gas emission scenario (usually referred to as a ''medium-high emissions'' scenario). Several wave parameters were stored as output in the WAM model simulations, including the wave spectra. The 6 hourly and 0.5°×0.5°, temporal and space resolution, wave spectra were used to compute the SD global climate of two 32-yr periods, representative of the end of the twentieth (1959-1990) and twenty-first (1969-2100) centuries. Comparisons of the present climate run with the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) ERA-40 reanalysis are used to assess the capability of the WAM-ECHAM5 runs to produce realistic SD results. This study is part of the WRCP-JCOMM COWCLIP (Coordinated Ocean Wave Climate Project) effort.

  18. Spatiotemporal splitting of global eigenmodes due to cross-field coupling via vortex dynamics in drift wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C; Thakur, S C; Light, A D; Negrete, J; Tynan, G R

    2014-12-31

    Spatiotemporal splitting events of drift wave (DW) eigenmodes due to nonlinear coupling are investigated in a cylindrical helicon plasma device. DW eigenmodes in the radial-azimuthal cross section have been experimentally observed to split at radial locations and recombine into the global eigenmode with a time shorter than the typical DW period (t≪fDW(-1)). The number of splits correlates with the increase of turbulence. The observed dynamics can be theoretically reproduced by a Kuramoto-type model of a network of radially coupled azimuthal eigenmodes. Coupling by E×B-vortex convection cell dynamics and ion gyro radii motion leads to cross-field synchronization and occasional mode splitting events. PMID:25615346

  19. Spatiotemporal splitting of global eigenmodes due to cross-field coupling via vortex dynamics in drift wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C; Thakur, S C; Light, A D; Negrete, J; Tynan, G R

    2014-12-31

    Spatiotemporal splitting events of drift wave (DW) eigenmodes due to nonlinear coupling are investigated in a cylindrical helicon plasma device. DW eigenmodes in the radial-azimuthal cross section have been experimentally observed to split at radial locations and recombine into the global eigenmode with a time shorter than the typical DW period (t≪fDW(-1)). The number of splits correlates with the increase of turbulence. The observed dynamics can be theoretically reproduced by a Kuramoto-type model of a network of radially coupled azimuthal eigenmodes. Coupling by E×B-vortex convection cell dynamics and ion gyro radii motion leads to cross-field synchronization and occasional mode splitting events.

  20. Two-state on-off intermittency caused by unstable dimension variability in periodically forced drift waves

    SciTech Connect

    Galuzio, P. P.; Lopes, S. R.; Viana, R. L.

    2011-11-15

    Certain high-dimensional dynamical systems present two or more attractors characterized by different energy branches. For some parameter values the dynamics oscillates between these two branches in a seemingly random fashion, a phenomenon called two-state on-off intermittency. In this work we show that the dynamical mechanism underlying this intermittency involves the severe breakdown of hyperbolicity of the attractors through a mechanism known as unstable dimension variability. We characterize the parametric evolution of this variability using statistical properties of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents. As a model system that exhibits this behavior we consider periodically forced and damped drift waves. In this spatiotemporal example there is a low-dimensional chaotic attractor that is created by an interior crisis, already presenting unstable dimension variability.

  1. Burning plasma projections using drift-wave transport models and scalings for the H-mode pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, J. E.; Bateman, G.; Onjun, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Pankin, A.; Staebler, G. M.; Waltz, R. E.

    2003-12-01

    The GLF23 and multi-mode core transport models are used along with models for the H-mode pedestal to predict the fusion performance for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, Fusion Ignition Research Experiment, and IGNITOR tokamak designs. Simulations using combinations of core and pedestal models have also been compared with experimental data for H-mode profiles in DIII-D, JET, and Alcator C-Mod. Power-independent (ballooning mode limit) and power-dependent pedestal scalings lead to very different predictions when used with the core models. Although the two drift-wave transport models reproduce the core profiles in a wide variety of tokamak discharges, they differ in their projections to burning plasma experiments for the same pedestal parameters. Differences in the core transport models in their response to the ion temperature gradient (i.e. their stiffness) and impact of the power dependence of the H-mode pedestal on fusion performance predictions are discussed.

  2. Existence of a directional Stokes drift in asymmetrical three-dimensional travelling gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iooss, Gérard; Plotnikov, Pavel

    2009-09-01

    We consider periodic travelling gravity waves at the surface of an infinitely deep perfect fluid. The pattern is non-symmetric with respect to the propagation direction of the waves and we consider a general non-resonant situation. Defining a couple of amplitudes ɛ,ɛ along the basis of wave vectors which satisfy the dispersion relation, following Iooss and Plotnikov (2009), travelling waves exist with an asymptotic expansion in powers of ɛ,ɛ, for nearly all pair of angles made by the basic wave vectors with the critical propagation direction, and for values of the couple (ɛ12,ɛ22) in a subset of the plane, with asymptotic full measure at the origin. We prove the remarkable property that on the free surface, observed in the moving frame, the propagation direction of the waves differs from the asymptotic direction taken by fluid particles, by a small angle which is computed. To cite this article: G. Iooss, P. Plotnikov, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  3. Two-dimensional bispectral analysis of drift wave turbulence in a cylindrical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.; Inagaki, S.; Yagi, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Shinohara, S.; Terasaka, K.; Kamataki, K.; Arakawa, H.; Kasuya, N.; Itoh, K.

    2010-05-15

    Bispectral analysis and multichannel measurement are becoming attractive investigation tools in plasma fluctuation studies. In the Large Mirror Device-Upgrade, the measurement of fluctuations in the ion saturation-current with a 64-channel poloidal Langmuir probe array was performed. The two-dimensional (2D) (poloidal wave number and frequency) power spectrum showed a number of pronounced peaks and broadband fluctuations in the poloidal wave number-frequency space. We applied 2D bispectral analysis, which considers both the matching conditions of poloidal wave number and frequency, to the spatiotemporal waveform, and confirmed the nonlinear couplings between coherent-coherent, coherent-broadband, and broadband-broadband fluctuation components. More than ten peaks were revealed to have as their origins only three original parent modes generated in the plasma. Comparison between the theoretical estimate and experimental observation for the bicoherence showed good agreement.

  4. Effect of the magnetic field curvature on the generation of zonal flows by drift-Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Kovalishen, E. A.; Shirokov, M. S.; Tsypin, V. S.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2007-05-15

    The generation of zonal flows by drift-Alfven waves is studied with allowance for magnetic curvature effects. The basic plasmadynamic equations relating the electrostatic potential, vector potential, and perturbed plasma density are the vorticity equation, longitudinal Ohm's law, and continuity equation. The basic equations are analyzed by applying a parametric formalism similar to that used in the theory of the generation of convective cells. In contrast to most previous investigations on the subject, consideration is given to primary modes having an arbitrary spectrum rather than to an individual monochromatic wave packet. The parametric approach so modified makes it possible to reveal a new class of instabilities of zonal flows that are analogous to two-stream instabilities in linear theory. It is shown that, in the standard theory of zonal flows, the zonal components of the vector potential and perturbed density are not excited. It is pointed out that zonal flows can be generated both in the case of a magnetic hill and in the case of a magnetic well. In the first case, the instabilities of zonal flows are analogous to negative-mass instabilities in linear theory, and, in the second case, they are analogous to two-stream instabilities.

  5. Regulation of ion drifts and anisotropies by parametrically unstable finite-amplitude Alfvén-cyclotron waves in the fast solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Maneva, Y. G.; Araneda, J. A.; Marsch, E.

    2014-03-10

    We study the preferential heating and differential acceleration of minor ions by dissipation of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) generated by parametric instabilities of a finite-amplitude monochromatic Alfvén-cyclotron pump wave. We consider the associated kinetic effects of Landau damping and nonlinear pitch-angle scattering of protons and α particles in the tenuous plasma of coronal holes and the fast solar wind. Various data collected by Wind spacecraft show signatures for a local transverse heating of the minor ions, presumably by Alfvén-cyclotron wave dissipation, and an unexpected parallel heating by a so far unknown mechanism. Here, we present the results from a set of 1.5 dimensional hybrid simulations in search for a plausible explanation for the observed field-aligned kinetic features in the fast solar wind minor ions. We investigate the origin and regulation of ion relative drifts and temperature anisotropies in low plasma β, fast solar wind conditions. Depending on their initial drifts, both ion species can heat up not only transversely through cyclotron resonance and non-resonant wave-particle interactions, but also strongly in the parallel direction by Landau damping of the daughter IAWs. We discuss the dependence of the relative ion drifts and temperature anisotropies on the plasma β of the individual species and we describe the effect of the pump wave amplitude on the ion heating and acceleration.

  6. The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on ion-temperature-gradient driven drift-wave instabilities in electron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Batool, Nazia; Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2012-08-15

    The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven drift-wave instabilities in the presence of equilibrium density, temperature, and magnetic field gradients are investigated here. By using Braginskii's transport equations for ions and Cairns as well as Kappa distribution for electrons, the coupled mode equations are derived. The modified ITG driven modes are derived, and it is found both analytically as well as numerically that the nonthermal distribution of electrons significantly modify the real frequencies as well as the growth rate of the ITG driven drift wave instability. The growth rate of ion-temperature-gradient driven instability is found to be maximum for Cairns, intermediate for Kappa, and minimum for the Maxwellian distributed electron case. The results of present investigation might be helpful to understand several wave phenomena in space and laboratory plasmas in the presence of nonthermal electrons.

  7. Nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Q.; Mahmood, S.; Mushtaq, A.

    2008-08-01

    The Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB)-type equation is obtained using the quantum hydrodynamic model in an inhomogeneous electron-positron-ion quantum magnetoplasma with neutral particles in the background. The KdV-type solitary waves, Burgers-type monotonic, and oscillatory shock like solutions are discussed in different limits. The quantum parameter is also dependent on the positron concentration in dense multicomponent plasmas. It is found that both solitary hump and dip are formed and their amplitude and width are dependent on percentage presence of positrons in electron-ion plasmas. The height of the monotonic shock is decreased with the increase of positron concentration and it is independent of the quantum parameter in electron-positron-ion magnetized quantum plasmas. However, the amplitude of the oscillatory shock is dependent on positron concentration and quantum parameter in electron-positron-ion plasmas.

  8. Nonlinear electrostatic drift waves in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Mahmood, S.; Mushtaq, A.

    2008-08-15

    The Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB)-type equation is obtained using the quantum hydrodynamic model in an inhomogeneous electron-positron-ion quantum magnetoplasma with neutral particles in the background. The KdV-type solitary waves, Burgers-type monotonic, and oscillatory shock like solutions are discussed in different limits. The quantum parameter is also dependent on the positron concentration in dense multicomponent plasmas. It is found that both solitary hump and dip are formed and their amplitude and width are dependent on percentage presence of positrons in electron-ion plasmas. The height of the monotonic shock is decreased with the increase of positron concentration and it is independent of the quantum parameter in electron-positron-ion magnetized quantum plasmas. However, the amplitude of the oscillatory shock is dependent on positron concentration and quantum parameter in electron-positron-ion plasmas.

  9. Coherent vorticity extraction in resistive drift-wave turbulence: Comparison of orthogonal wavelets versus proper orthogonal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Futatani, S.; Bos, W.J.T.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Schneider, Kai; Benkadda, S.; Farge, Marie

    2011-01-01

    We assess two techniques for extracting coherent vortices out of turbulent flows: the wavelet based Coherent Vorticity Extraction (CVE) and the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). The former decomposes the flow field into an orthogonal wavelet representation and subsequent thresholding of the coefficients allows one to split the flow into organized coherent vortices with non-Gaussian statistics and an incoherent random part which is structureless. POD is based on the singular value decomposition and decomposes the flow into basis functions which are optimal with respect to the retained energy for the ensemble average. Both techniques are applied to direct numerical simulation data of two-dimensional drift-wave turbulence governed by Hasegawa Wakatani equation, considering two limit cases: the quasi-hydrodynamic and the quasi-adiabatic regimes. The results are compared in terms of compression rate, retained energy, retained enstrophy and retained radial flux, together with the enstrophy spectrum and higher order statistics. (c) 2010 Published by Elsevier Masson SAS on behalf of Academie des sciences.

  10. On the correct implementation of Fermi-Dirac statistics and electron trapping in nonlinear electrostatic plane wave propagation in collisionless plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamel, Hans; Eliasson, Bengt

    2016-05-01

    Quantum statistics and electron trapping have a decisive influence on the propagation characteristics of coherent stationary electrostatic waves. The description of these strictly nonlinear structures, which are of electron hole type and violate linear Vlasov theory due to the particle trapping at any excitation amplitude, is obtained by a correct reduction of the three-dimensional Fermi-Dirac distribution function to one dimension and by a proper incorporation of trapping. For small but finite amplitudes, the holes become of cnoidal wave type and the electron density is shown to be described by a ϕ ( x ) 1 / 2 rather than a ϕ ( x ) expansion, where ϕ ( x ) is the electrostatic potential. The general coefficients are presented for a degenerate plasma as well as the quantum statistical analogue to these steady state coherent structures, including the shape of ϕ ( x ) and the nonlinear dispersion relation, which describes their phase velocity.

  11. Influences of shear in the ion parallel drift velocity and of inhomogeneous perpendicular electric field on generation of oblique ion acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyasov, Askar; Chernyshov, Alexander; Mogilevsky, Mikhail; Golovchanskaya, Irina; Kozelov, Boris

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that the broadband electrostatic turbulence observed in the topside auroral ionosphere can be identified with electrostatic ion cyclotron and/or oblique ion acoustic waves. Under certain conditions generation of the ion cyclotron modes is inhibited, so that the oblique ion acoustic waves become the prevailing part of the broadband noise. While generation of ion cyclotron waves by the inhomogeneous distribution of energy density (IEDD) instability has been actively studied in recent years, much less attention was paid to the excitation of ion acoustic waves by means of the IEDD instability. In this work, influence of shear in the ion parallel drift velocities and of inhomogeneous perpendicular electric field on generation of nonlocal oblique ion acoustic mode is studied. It is demonstrated that the shear of the ion parallel drift velocities can generate ion acoustic waves. It is shown that this mechanism of instability development provides broadband spectrum in the frequency range around 0.1 of ion gyrofrequency, and thus, this instability can be invoked to explain the observed broadband electrostatic turbulence in the auroral region. Effect of the main background plasma parameters on excitation of oblique ion acoustic waves is analyzed.

  12. Dispersion discontinuities of strong collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1970-01-01

    Linear fluid equations are used to estimate wave train properties of strong collisionless shocks. Fast shocks exhibit several dispersion changes with increasing Mach number. For perpendicular propagation into a finite-beta plasma, an ion cyclotron radius trailing wave train exists only for (M sub F)2 is smaller than 2. Oblique fast shocks have a leading ion inertia wave train if M sub A is smaller than root of M(+)/M(-) cos theta/2 and a trailing electron inertia train if M sub A is greater than root of M(+)/M(-) cos theta/2. If the downstream sound speed exceeds the flow speed, linear wave theory predicts a trailing ion acoustic structure which probably resides within the magnetic shock. For a turbulent shock model in which an effective electron-ion collision frequency exceeds the lower hybrid frequency, ions decouple from the magnetic field; the shock wave train now trails with electron inertia and electron gyroradius lengths. Comparisons of this turbulent model and observations on the earth's bow shock are made.

  13. Hurricane-induced ocean waves and stokes drift and their impacts on surface transport and dispersion in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcic, Milan; Chen, Shuyi S.; Özgökmen, Tamay M.

    2016-03-01

    Hurricane Isaac induced large surface waves and a significant change in upper ocean circulation in the Gulf of Mexico before making landfall at the Louisiana coast on 29 August 2012. Isaac was observed by 194 surface drifters during the Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD). A coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model was used to forecast hurricane impacts during GLAD. The coupled model and drifter observations provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the impacts of hurricane-induced Stokes drift on ocean surface currents. The Stokes drift induced a cyclonic (anticyclonic) rotational flow on the left (right) side of the hurricane and accounted for up to 20% of the average Lagrangian velocity. In a significant deviation from drifter measurements prior to Isaac, the scale-dependent relative diffusivity is estimated to be 6 times larger during the hurricane, which represents a deviation from Okubo's (1971) canonical results for lateral dispersion in nonhurricane conditions at the ocean surface.

  14. Simultaneous acceleration of protons and electrons at nonrelativistic quasiparallel collisionless shocks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaehong; Caprioli, Damiano; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2015-02-27

    We study diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of protons and electrons at nonrelativistic, high Mach number, quasiparallel, collisionless shocks by means of self-consistent 1D particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, both species are found to develop power-law distributions with the universal spectral index -4 in momentum space, in agreement with the prediction of DSA. We find that scattering of both protons and electrons is mediated by right-handed circularly polarized waves excited by the current of energetic protons via nonresonant hybrid (Bell) instability. Protons are injected into DSA after a few gyrocycles of shock drift acceleration (SDA), while electrons are first preheated via SDA, then energized via a hybrid acceleration process that involves both SDA and Fermi-like acceleration mediated by Bell waves, before eventual injection into DSA. Using the simulations we can measure the electron-proton ratio in accelerated particles, which is of paramount importance for explaining the cosmic ray fluxes measured on Earth and the multiwavelength emission of astrophysical objects such as supernova remnants, radio supernovae, and galaxy clusters. We find the normalization of the electron power law is ≲10^{-2} of the protons for strong nonrelativistic shocks.

  15. Weak collisionless shocks in laser-plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, R. A.; Bingham, R.; Trines, R. G. M.; Norreys, P.

    2015-04-01

    We obtain a theory describing laminar shock-like structures in a collisionless plasma and examine the parameter limits, in terms of the ion sound Mach number and the electron/ion temperature ratio, within which these structures exist. The essential feature is the inclusion of finite ion temperature with the result that some ions are reflected from a potential ramp. This destroys the symmetry between upstream and downstream regions that would otherwise give the well-known ion solitary wave solution. We have shown earlier (Cairns et al 2014 Phys. Plasmas 21 022112) that such structures may be relevant to problems such as the existence of strong, localized electric fields observed in laser compressed pellets and laser acceleration of ions. Here we present results on the way in which these structures may produce species separation in fusion targets and suggest that it may be possible to use shock ion acceleration for fast ignition.

  16. Multiple eigenmodes of geodesic acoustic mode in collisionless plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zhe; Itoh, K.; Sanuki, H.; Dong, J. Q.

    2006-10-15

    We report a series of eigenmodes of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM), which includes the standard GAM, a branch of low-frequency mode, and a series of ion sound wave-like modes. The case of T{sub i}>>T{sub e} is investigated, and eigenfrequencies of these modes are obtained analytically from a linear gyrokinetic model in collisionless plasmas with a rigid constant electrostatic potential around a magnetic surface.

  17. The resolved layer of a collisionless, high beta, supercritical, quasi-perpendicular shock wave. I - Rankine-Hugoniot geometry, currents, and stationarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Aggson, T. L.; Mangeney, A.; Lacombe, C.; Harvey, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Data collected by the ISEE dual-spacecraft mission (on November 7, 1977) on a slowly moving, supercritical, high-beta, quasi-perpendicular bow shock are presented, and the local geometry, spatial scales, and stationarity of this shock wave are assessed in a self-consistent Rankine-Hugoniot-constrained frame of reference. Included are spatial profiles of the ac and dc magnetic and electric fields, electron and proton fluid velocities, current densities, electron and proton number densities, temperatures, pressures, and partial densities of the reflected protons. The observed layer profile is shown to be nearly phase standing and one-dimensional in a Rankine-Hugoniot frame, empirically determined by the magnetofluid parameters outside the layer proper.

  18. Nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities in the presence of collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Federici, J.F.; Lee, W.W.; Tang, W.M.

    1986-07-01

    Nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities in the presence of electron-ion collisions in a shear-free slab has been studied by using gyrokinetic particle simulation techniques as well as by solving, both numerically and analytically, model mode-coupling equations. The purpose of the investigation is to determine the mechanisms responsible for the nonlinear saturation of the instability and for the ensuing steady-state transport. Such an insight is very valuable for understanding drift wave problems in more complicated geometries. The results indicate that the electron E x B convection is the dominant mechanism for saturation. It is also found that the saturation amplitude and the associated quasilinear diffusion are greatly enhanced over their collisionless values as a result of weak collisions. In the highly collisional (fluid) limit, there is an upper bound for saturation with ephi/T/sub e/ approx. = (..omega../sub l//..cap omega../sub i/)/(k/sub perpendicular/rho/sub s/)/sup 2/. The associated quasilinear diffusion, which increases with collisionality, takes the form of D/sub ql/ approx. = ..gamma../sub l//k/sub perpendicular//sup 2/, where ..omega../sub l/ and ..gamma../sub l/ are the linear frequency and growth rate, respectively. In the steady state, the diffusion process becomes stochastic in nature. The relevant mechanisms here are related to the velocity-space nonlinearities and background fluctuations. The magnitude of the diffusion at this stage can be comparable to that of quasilinear diffusion in the presence of collisions, and it remains finite even in the collisionless limit.

  19. Nonlinear upper hybrid drift waves for a longitudinal electric field perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field in the Vlasov-Maxwell approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham-Shrauner, B.

    1986-01-01

    Upper hybrid drift waves are found as a special solution to a Vlasov-Maxwell plasma which has a longitudinal electric field and a perpendicular uniform magnetic field. A single-species plasma with a constant-density mobile neutralizing background supports spatially varying disturbances that oscillate at the upper hybrid frequency. The general functional dependences of the electric field, the plasma number density, and the one-particle distribution function for the special case are found from more general Vlasov-Maxwell equations invariant under a Lie group point transformation. The one-particle distribution function for the plasma is a function of the Liouville invariant, which is the energy in the generalized Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) reference frame, and the momentum in the drift direction.

  20. Collisionless magnetic reconnection under anisotropic MHD approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Kota; Hoshino, Masahiro

    We study the formation of slow-mode shocks in collisionless magnetic reconnection by using one- and two-dimensional collisionless magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) simulations based on the double adiabatic approximation, which is an important step to bridge the gap between the Petschek-type MHD reconnection model accompanied by a pair of slow shocks and the observational evidence of the rare occasion of in-situ slow shock observation. According to our results, a pair of slow shocks does form in the reconnection layer. The resultant shock waves, however, are quite weak compared with those in an isotropic MHD from the point of view of the plasma compression and the amount of the magnetic energy released across the shock. Once the slow shock forms, the downstream plasma are heated in highly anisotropic manner and a firehose-sense (P_{||}>P_{⊥}) pressure anisotropy arises. The maximum anisotropy is limited by the marginal firehose criterion, 1-(P_{||}-P_{⊥})/B(2) =0. In spite of the weakness of the shocks, the resultant reconnection rate is kept at the same level compared with that in the corresponding ordinary MHD simulations. It is also revealed that the sequential order of propagation of the slow shock and the rotational discontinuity, which appears when the guide field component exists, changes depending on the magnitude of the guide field. Especially, when no guide field exists, the rotational discontinuity degenerates with the contact discontinuity remaining at the position of the initial current sheet, while with the slow shock in the isotropic MHD. Our result implies that the slow shock does not necessarily play an important role in the energy conversion in the reconnection system and is consistent with the satellite observation in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  1. The role of microturbulence on collisionless reconnection. [in magnetospheric plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    1980-01-01

    The linear, non-linear and anomalous transport properties associated with various microinstabilities driven by cross field currents in reconnecting geometries are reviewed. An assessment of their role in collisionless tearing based on analytic theory, computer simulations and experimental evidence, supports the dominant role of lower hybrid waves. The relevance of microturbulence on macroscopic stationary and time dependent models of merging is presented. It is concluded that a fluid-numerical simulation approach that includes (at each space and time step) the effects of anomalous transport in a self consistent manner, similar to the one used for laboratory collisionless shocks, represents the best method for studying and modeling the details of the reconnection process.

  2. Is collisionless heating in capacitively coupled plasmas really collisionless?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Chabert, P.

    2015-08-01

    By performing a combination of test-particle and particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate electron heating in single frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs). In agreement with previous theoretical considerations highlighted in Kaganovich et al (1996 Appl. Phys. Lett. 69 3818), we show that the level of true collisionless/stochastic heating in typical CCPs is significantly smaller than that due to collisional interactions; even at very low pressures and wide gap lengths. Fundamentally electron heating is a collisional phenomenon whereby particle collisions provide the vital phase randomization and stochastization mechanism needed to generate both a local (or ohmic) heating component, and a non-local (or hybrid) heating component.

  3. Dielectric and permeability effects in collisionless plasmas. [in collisionless plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    Using the unabridged Maxwell equations (including vectors D, E and H) new effects in collisionless plasmas are uncovered. In a steady state, it is found that spatially varying energy density of the electric field (E perpendicular) orthogonal to B produces electric current leading, under certain conditions, to the relationship P perpendicular + B(2)/8 pi-epsilon E perpendicular(2)/8 pi = constant, where epsilon is the dielectric constant of the plasma for fields orthogonal to B. In steady state quasi-two-dimensional flows in plasmas, a general relationship between the components of electric field parallel and perpendicular to B is found. These effects are significant in geophysical and astrophysical plasmas. The general conditions for a steady state in collisionless plasma are deduced. With time variations in a plasma, slow compared to ion-gyroperiod, there is a general current, (j-asterisk), which includes the well-known polarization current, given by J-asterisk = d/dt (E x M) + (P x B) x B B(-2) where M and P are the magnetization and polarization vectors respectively.

  4. Initial Results of DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, Magnetic Fields, and Plasma Waves Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Maynard, N.

    2010-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically < 1 mV/m. Although average drift directions show similarities to those previously reported, eastward/outward during day and westward/downward at night, this pattern varies significantly with longitude and is not always present. Daytime vertical drifts near the magnetic equator are largest after sunrise, with smaller average velocities after noon. Little or no pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drift near sunset is observed, attributable to the solar minimum conditions creating a much reduced neutral dynamo at the satellite altitude. The nighttime ionosphere is characterized by larger amplitude, structured electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF oscillations corresponding to a variety of plasma waves

  5. Gravitational Instability in Collisionless Cosmological Pancakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valinia, Azita; Shapiro, Paul R.; Martel, Hugo; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1997-04-01

    The gravitational instability of cosmological pancakes composed of collisionless dark matter in an Einstein-de Sitter universe is investigated numerically to demonstrate that pancakes are unstable with respect to fragmentation and the formation of filaments. A ``pancake'' is defined here as the nonlinear outcome of the growth of a one-dimensional, sinusoidal, plane-wave, adiabatic density perturbation. We have used high-resolution, two-dimensional, N-body simulations by the particle mesh (PM) method to study the response of pancakes to perturbation by either symmetric (density) or antisymmetric (bending or rippling) modes, with corresponding wavevectors ks and ka transverse to the wavevector kp of the unperturbed pancake plane wave. We consider dark matter that is initially ``cold'' (i.e., with no random thermal velocity in the initial conditions). We also investigate the effect of a finite, random, isotropic, initial velocity dispersion (i.e., initial thermal velocity) on the fate of pancake collapse and instability. Our results include the following: (1) For ``cold'' initial conditions, pancakes are gravitationally unstable with respect to all perturbations of wavenumber k >~ 1 (where k = λp/λ, and λp and λ are the wavelengths of the unperturbed pancake and of the perturbation, respectively). This is contrary to the expectations of an approximate, thin-sheet energy argument applied to the results of one-dimensional pancake simulations. The latter predicts that unstable wavenumbers are restricted to the range kmin < k < kmax, where perturbations with k < kmin ~ 1 are stabilized by Hubble expansion, while those with k > kmax > 1 are stabilized by the one-dimensional velocity dispersion of the collisionless particles along the direction of pancake collapse, within the region of shell crossing. (2) Shortly after the pancake first reaches a nonlinear state of collapse, the dimensionless growth rate of the perturbation of pancake surface density by unstable

  6. The role of entropy in collisionless evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Eric

    2011-04-01

    Understanding the path to mechanical equilibria for collisionless systems is a topic with a rich history. We are investigating the part that entropy plays in determining the outcome of collisionless evolution. I will discuss some previous work that lays a foundation for our current studies. With that framework in place, I will explain a modification to the entropy maximization procedure and compare the results to previous ideas. It is possible that entropy maxima are not achievable, and we argue that entropy production rates can influence collisionless system evolution. This work has been supported by NASA ATP grant NNX07AG86G.

  7. Tether-Induced Airglow: Collisionless Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishin, E. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    Martinez-Sanchez and Sanmartin [1997] showed that a bare conducting tether can be used as a source of an energetic electron beam. Interacting with the E region atmosphere, the beam should produce airglow thus making possible to deduce the neutral density on a continuous basis. Fujii et al. [2005] suggested that this idea be tested in a specially-designed sounding rocket experiment. We show that collisionless beam-plasma interactions (BPI) complement direct impact, leading to appreciable green-line (557.7 nm) emissions in the F region. In the E region, BPI develops near the entry in the valley, resulting in a narrow layer of strongly-elevated and airglow. Besides, neutralizing electric currents carried by ionospheric electrons in the valley can become unstable or even insufficient to compensate the beam current. Developing plasma waves inhibit neutralizing currents. In the extreme case, the beam might be locked in the valley (the 'virtual cathode'). In addition to optical observations, these effects can also be observed by radiophysical means.

  8. Collisionless microtearing modes in hot tokamaks: Effect of trapped electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, Aditya K.; Ganesh, R.; Brunner, S.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L.

    2015-07-15

    Collisionless microtearing modes have recently been found linearly unstable in sharp temperature gradient regions of large aspect ratio tokamaks. The magnetic drift resonance of passing electrons has been found to be sufficient to destabilise these modes above a threshold plasma β. A global gyrokinetic study, including both passing electrons as well as trapped electrons, shows that the non-adiabatic contribution of the trapped electrons provides a resonant destabilization, especially at large toroidal mode numbers, for a given aspect ratio. The global 2D mode structures show important changes to the destabilising electrostatic potential. The β threshold for the onset of the instability is found to be generally downshifted by the inclusion of trapped electrons. A scan in the aspect ratio of the tokamak configuration, from medium to large but finite values, clearly indicates a significant destabilizing contribution from trapped electrons at small aspect ratio, with a diminishing role at larger aspect ratios.

  9. Entropy production rate as a constraint for collisionless fluid closures

    SciTech Connect

    Fleurence, E.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grandgirard, V.; Ottaviani, M.

    2006-11-30

    A novel method is proposed to construct collisionless fluid closures accounting for some kinetic properties. The first dropped fluid moment is assumed to be a linear function of the lower order ones. Optimizing the agreement between the fluid and kinetic entropy production rates is used to constrain the coefficients of the linear development. This procedure is applied to a reduced version of the interchange instability. The closure, involving the absolute value of the wave vector, is non-local in real space. In this case, the linear instability thresholds are the same, and the linear growth rates exhibit similar characteristics. Such a method is applicable to other models and classes of instabilities.

  10. Drift instabilities' interaction: A tightening of the B-direction component on the amplitude of the azimouthally propagating wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xaplanteris, Constantine L.

    2011-06-01

    A suitable modification on the plasma production device makes the plasma column length changeable; the axially propagating wave strikes on the movable circular base of the cavity and the reflected wave is affected enough. A tightening on the azimouthally propagating wave makes the amplitude measurements precarious, and the previous experimental results for fixed cavity length are valid. A strong boundaries' influence on the instability's reinforcement makes clear the need to extend even more the thermonuclear reactor's dimensions. In the present paper, an extended research of plasma parameters has been carried out, a corresponding theoretical model is developed to explain the phenomena and the comparison to the simulated results has been confirmed.

  11. Large-Amplitude Electrostatic Waves Observed at a Supercritical Interplanetary Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Cattell, C. A.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Kersten, K.; Kasper, J. C.; Szabo, A.; Wilber, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first observations at an interplanetary shock of large-amplitude (> 100 mV/m pk-pk) solitary waves and large-amplitude (approx.30 mV/m pk-pk) waves exhibiting characteristics consistent with electron Bernstein waves. The Bernstein-like waves show enhanced power at integer and half-integer harmonics of the cyclotron frequency with a broadened power spectrum at higher frequencies, consistent with the electron cyclotron drift instability. The Bernstein-like waves are obliquely polarized with respect to the magnetic field but parallel to the shock normal direction. Strong particle heating is observed in both the electrons and ions. The observed heating and waveforms are likely due to instabilities driven by the free energy provided by reflected ions at this supercritical interplanetary shock. These results offer new insights into collisionless shock dissipation and wave-particle interactions in the solar wind.

  12. Doppler effect in a solid medium: Spin wave emission by a precessing domain wall drifting in spin current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hong; Chen, Jie; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Yan, Ming

    2016-04-01

    The Doppler effect is a fundamental physical phenomenon observed for waves propagating in vacuum or various media, commonly gaseous or liquid. Here, we report on the occurrence of a Doppler effect in a solid medium. Instead of a real object, a topological soliton, i.e., a magnetic domain wall (DW) traveling in a current-carrying ferromagnetic nanowire, plays the role of the moving wave source. The Larmor precession of the DW in an external field stimulates emission of monochromatic spin waves (SWs) during its motion, which show a significant Doppler effect, comparable to the acoustic one of a train whistle. This process involves two prominent spin-transfer-torque effects simultaneously, the current-driven DW motion and the current-induced SW Doppler shift. The latter gives rise to an interesting feature, i.e., the observed SW Doppler effect appears resulting from a stationary source and a moving observer, contrary to the laboratory frame.

  13. Collisionless Reconnection and Electron Demagnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, J. D.

    Observable, dimensionless properties of the electron diffusion region of collisionless magnetic reconnection are motivated and benchmarked in two and three dimensional Particle In Cell (PIC) simulations as appropriate for measurements with present state of the art spacecraft. The dimensionless quantities of this paper invariably trace their origin to breaking the magnetization of the thermal electrons. Several observable proxies are also motivated for the rate of frozen flux violation and a parameter \\varLambda _{\\varPhi } that when greater than unity is associated with close proximity to the analogue of the saddle point region of 2D reconnection usually called the electron diffusion region. Analogous regions to the electron diffusion region of 2D reconnection with \\varLambda _{\\varPhi } > 1 have been identified in 3D simulations. 10-20 disjoint diffusion regions are identified and the geometrical patterns of their locations illustrated. First examples of associations between local observables based on electron demagnetization and global diagnostics (like squashing) are also presented. A by product of these studies is the development of a single spacecraft determinations of gradient scales in the plasma.

  14. Diamagnetic boundary layers - A kinetic theory. [for collisionless magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemaire, J.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1976-01-01

    A kinetic theory is presented for boundary layers associated with MHD tangential 'discontinuities' in a collisionless magnetized plasma, such as those observed in the solar wind. The theory consists of finding self-consistent solutions of Vlasov's equation and Maxwell's equation for stationary one-dimensional boundary layers separating two Maxwellian plasma states. Layers in which the current is carried by electrons are found to have a thickness of the order of a few electron gyroradii, but the drift speed of the current-carrying electrons is found to exceed the Alfven speed, and accordingly such layers are not stable. Several types of layers in which the current is carried by protons are discussed; in particular, cases are considered in which the magnetic-field intensity, direction, or both, changed across the layer. In every case, the thickness was of the order of a few proton gyroradii, and the field changed smoothly, although the characteristics depended somewhat on the boundary conditions. The drift speed was always less than the Alfven speed, consistent with stability of such structures. These results are consistent with observations of boundary layers in the solar wind near 1 AU.

  15. Drift of Scroll Wave Filaments in an Anisotropic Model of the Left Ventricle of the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Pravdin, Sergei; Dierckx, Hans; Markhasin, Vladimir S.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Scroll waves are three-dimensional vortices which occur in excitable media. Their formation in the heart results in the onset of cardiac arrhythmias, and the dynamics of their filaments determine the arrhythmia type. Most studies of filament dynamics were performed in domains with simple geometries and generic description of the anisotropy of cardiac tissue. Recently, we developed an analytical model of fibre structure and anatomy of the left ventricle (LV) of the human heart. Here, we perform a systematic study of the dynamics of scroll wave filaments for the cases of positive and negative tension in this anatomical model. We study the various possible shapes of LV and different degree of anisotropy of cardiac tissue. We show that, for positive filament tension, the final position of scroll wave filament is mainly determined by the thickness of the myocardial wall but, however, anisotropy attracts the filament to the LV apex. For negative filament tension, the filament buckles, and for most cases, tends to the apex of the heart with no or slight dependency on the thickness of the LV. We discuss the mechanisms of the observed phenomena and their implications for cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26539486

  16. Modeling combined collisional/collisionless plasma interpenetration

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, V.A.

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes one technique by which multifluid modeling capability can be achieved within the context of a Lagrangean single-fluid model. This technique is applied to the interpenetration of laser-produced, substantially collisionless plasmas. A single-fluid model by itself cannot simulate the interpenetration of a collisionless plasma correctly, but must be augmented with some other tool. One tool that can calculate collisionless plasma interpenetration correctly is ISIS, a particle code for plasma simulations which includes appropriate collision models. However, ISIS does not have the necessary physics to do the laser deposition, the atomic physics, the radiation transport, and does not possess a realistic electron temperature model. With appropriate integration of the single-fluid code and ISIS, a new capability is achieved which allows simulation of the colliding plasma problem, a problem that neither code can properly simulate individually.

  17. On the theory of Langmuir waves in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzelev, M. V.

    2010-04-15

    Nonlinear quantum-mechanical equations are derived for Langmuir waves in an isotropic electron collisionless plasma. A general analysis of dispersion relations is carried out for complex spectra of Langmuir waves and van Kampen waves in a quantum plasma with an arbitrary electron momentum distribution. Quantum nonlinear collisionless Landau damping in Maxwellian and degenerate plasmas is studied. It is shown that collisionless damping of Langmuir waves (including zero sound) occurs in collisionless plasmas due to quantum correction in the Cherenkov absorption condition, which is a purely quantum effect. Solutions to the quantum dispersion equation are obtained for a degenerate plasma.

  18. Wave-particle transport from density drift instabilities - A comparison of local and nonlocal theories. [applicable to ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    Second-order Vlasov theory is used to compute the dissipation rates of plasma irregularities with a variety of shapes. A derivation of the nonlocal dispersion equation using linearized Vlasov theory is presented. Expressions for the normalized amplitudes of the first-order plasma density and electrostatic potential fluctuations are derived. Expressions are given for the saturation amplitudes of the electrostatic eigenmodes. The wave-particle transport and irregularity dissipation rate are computed by using formulas whose derivation is presented. Computational results for specific density variations are shown, and conclusions on the validity of the local theory as opposed to the nonlocal theory are given.

  19. Magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas - Prescribed fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Drake, J. F.; Chen, J.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of the dissipation region during magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasma is investigated by examining a prescribed two-dimensional magnetic x line configuration with an imposed inductive electric field E(y). The calculations represent an extension of recent MHD simulations of steady state reconnection (Biskamp, 1986; Lee and Fu, 1986) to the collisionless kinetic regime. It is shown that the structure of the x line reconnection configuration depends on only two parameters: a normalized inductive field and a parameter R which represents the opening angle of the magnetic x lines.

  20. Physics of collisionless shocks: theory and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Bret, A.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks occur in various fields of physics. In the context of space and astrophysics they have been investigated for many decades. However, a thorough understanding of shock formation and particle acceleration is still missing. Collisionless shocks can be distinguished into electromagnetic and electrostatic shocks. Electromagnetic shocks are of importance mainly in astrophysical environments and they are mediated by the Weibel or filamentation instability. In such shocks, charged particles gain energy by diffusive shock acceleration. Electrostatic shocks are characterized by a strong electrostatic field, which leads to electron trapping. Ions are accelerated by reflection from the electrostatic potential. Shock formation and particle acceleration will be discussed in theory and simulations.

  1. Hamiltonian derivation of a gyrofluid model for collisionless magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassi, E.

    2014-11-01

    We consider a simple electromagnetic gyrokinetic model for collisionless plasmas and show that it possesses a Hamiltonian structure. Subsequently, from this model we derive a two-moment gyrofluid model by means of a procedure which guarantees that the resulting gyrofluid model is also Hamiltonian. The first step in the derivation consists of imposing a generic fluid closure in the Poisson bracket of the gyrokinetic model, after expressing such bracket in terms of the gyrofluid moments. The constraint of the Jacobi identity, which every Poisson bracket has to satisfy, selects then what closures can lead to a Hamiltonian gyrofluid system. For the case at hand, it turns out that the only closures (not involving integro/differential operators or an explicit dependence on the spatial coordinates) that lead to a valid Poisson bracket are those for which the second order parallel moment, independently for each species, is proportional to the zero order moment. In particular, if one chooses an isothermal closure based on the equilibrium temperatures and derives accordingly the Hamiltonian of the system from the Hamiltonian of the parent gyrokinetic model, one recovers a known Hamiltonian gyrofluid model for collisionless reconnection. The proposed procedure, in addition to yield a gyrofluid model which automatically conserves the total energy, provides also, through the resulting Poisson bracket, a way to derive further conservation laws of the gyrofluid model, associated with the so called Casimir invariants. We show that a relation exists between Casimir invariants of the gyrofluid model and those of the gyrokinetic parent model. The application of such Hamiltonian derivation procedure to this two-moment gyrofluid model is a first step toward its application to more realistic, higher-order fluid or gyrofluid models for tokamaks. It also extends to the electromagnetic gyrokinetic case, recent applications of the same procedure to Vlasov and drift- kinetic systems.

  2. The many faces of shear Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Gekelman, W.; Vincena, S.; Van Compernolle, B.; Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.; Pribyl, P.; Carter, T. A.

    2011-05-15

    One of the fundamental waves in magnetized plasmas is the shear Alfven wave. This wave is responsible for rearranging current systems and, in fact all low frequency currents in magnetized plasmas are shear waves. It has become apparent that Alfven waves are important in a wide variety of physical environments. Shear waves of various forms have been a topic of experimental research for more than fifteen years in the large plasma device (LAPD) at UCLA. The waves were first studied in both the kinetic and inertial regimes when excited by fluctuating currents with transverse dimension on the order of the collisionless skin depth. Theory and experiment on wave propagation in these regimes is presented, and the morphology of the wave is illustrated to be dependent on the generation mechanism. Three-dimensional currents associated with the waves have been mapped. The ion motion, which closes the current across the magnetic field, has been studied using laser induced fluorescence. The wave propagation in inhomogeneous magnetic fields and density gradients is presented as well as effects of collisions and reflections from boundaries. Reflections may result in Alfvenic field line resonances and in the right conditions maser action. The waves occur spontaneously on temperature and density gradients as hybrids with drift waves. These have been seen to affect cross-field heat and plasma transport. Although the waves are easily launched with antennas, they may also be generated by secondary processes, such as Cherenkov radiation. This is the case when intense shear Alfven waves in a background magnetoplasma are produced by an exploding laser-produced plasma. Time varying magnetic flux ropes can be considered to be low frequency shear waves. Studies of the interaction of multiple ropes and the link between magnetic field line reconnection and rope dynamics are revealed. This manuscript gives us an overview of the major results from these experiments and provides a modern

  3. Collisionless Reconnection with Weak Slow Shocks Under Anisotropic MHD Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, K.; Hoshino, M.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection accompanied by a pair of slow-mode shock waves, known as Petschek's theory, has been widely studied as an efficient mechanism to convert magnetically stored energy to thermal and/or kinetic energy in plasmas. Satellite observations in the Earth's magnetotail, on the other hand, report that the detection of slow shocks is rare compared with the theory. As an important step to bridge the gap between the observational fact and the Petschek-type reconnection, we performed one- and two- dimensional collisionless magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of magnetic reconnection paying special attention to the effect of temperature anisotropy. In high-beta plasmas such as a plasma sheet in the magnetotail, it is expected that even weak temperature anisotropy can greatly modify the dynamics. We demonstrate that the slow shocks do exist in the reconnection layer even under the anisotropic temperature. The resultant shocks, however, are weaker than those in isotropic MHD in terms of plasma compression. In addition, the amount of magnetic energy released across the shock is extremely small, that is, the shock is no longer switch-off type. In spite of the weakness of the shocks, the reconnection rates measured by the inflow velocities are kept at the same level as the isotropic cases. Once the slow shock forms, the downstream plasma is heated in highly anisotropic manner, and the firehose-sense anisotropy affects the wave structure in the system. In particular, it is remarkable that the sequential order of propagation of slow shocks and rotational discontinuities reverses depending upon the magnitude of a superposed guide field. Our result is consistent with the rareness of the slow shock detection in the magnetotail, and implies that shocks do not necessarily play an important role. Furthermore, a variety of wave structure of a reconnection layer shown here will help interpretation of observational data in collisionless reconnection.

  4. Surface drift prediction in the Adriatic Sea using hyper-ensemble statistics on atmospheric, ocean and wave models: Uncertainties and probability distribution areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rixen, M.; Ferreira-Coelho, E.; Signell, R.

    2008-01-01

    Despite numerous and regular improvements in underlying models, surface drift prediction in the ocean remains a challenging task because of our yet limited understanding of all processes involved. Hence, deterministic approaches to the problem are often limited by empirical assumptions on underlying physics. Multi-model hyper-ensemble forecasts, which exploit the power of an optimal local combination of available information including ocean, atmospheric and wave models, may show superior forecasting skills when compared to individual models because they allow for local correction and/or bias removal. In this work, we explore in greater detail the potential and limitations of the hyper-ensemble method in the Adriatic Sea, using a comprehensive surface drifter database. The performance of the hyper-ensembles and the individual models are discussed by analyzing associated uncertainties and probability distribution maps. Results suggest that the stochastic method may reduce position errors significantly for 12 to 72??h forecasts and hence compete with pure deterministic approaches. ?? 2007 NATO Undersea Research Centre (NURC).

  5. Quantified Energy Dissipation Rates in the Terrestrial Bow Shock. 2; Waves and Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Sibeck, D. G.; Breneman, A. W.; Le Contel, O.; Cully, C.; Turner, D. L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Malaspina, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first quantified measure of the energy dissipation rates, due to wave-particle interactions, in the transition region of the Earth's collision-less bow shock using data from the Time History of Events and Macro-Scale Interactions during Sub-Storms spacecraft. Our results show that wave-particle interactions can regulate the global structure and dominate the energy dissipation of collision-less shocks. In every bow shock crossing examined, we observed both low-frequency (less than 10 hertz) and high-frequency (approximately or greater than10 hertz) electromagnetic waves throughout the entire transition region and into the magnetosheath. The low-frequency waves were consistent with magnetosonic-whistler waves. The high-frequency waves were combinations of ion-acoustic waves, electron cyclotron drift instability driven waves, electrostatic solitary waves, and whistler mode waves. The high-frequency waves had the following: (1) peak amplitudes exceeding delta B approximately equal to 10 nanoteslas and delta E approximately equal to 300 millivolts per meter, though more typical values were delta B approximately equal to 0.1-1.0 nanoteslas and delta E approximately equal to 10-50 millivolts per meter (2) Poynting fluxes in excess of 2000 microWm(sup -2) (micro-waves per square meter) (typical values were approximately 1-10 microWm(sup -2) (micro-waves per square meter); (3) resistivities greater than 9000 omega meters; and (4) associated energy dissipation rates greater than 10 microWm(sup -3) (micro-waves per cubic meter). The dissipation rates due to wave-particle interactions exceeded rates necessary to explain the increase in entropy across the shock ramps for approximately 90 percent of the wave burst durations. For approximately 22 percent of these times, the wave-particle interactions needed to only be less than or equal to 0.1 percent efficient to balance the nonlinear wave steepening that produced the shock waves. These results show that wave

  6. Kinetic dissipation and anisotropic heating in a turbulent collisionless plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, T. N.; Shay, M. A.; Cassak, P. A.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2009-03-15

    The kinetic evolution of the Orszag-Tang vortex is studied using collisionless hybrid simulations. In magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) this configuration leads rapidly to broadband turbulence. At large length scales, the evolution of the hybrid simulations is very similar to MHD, with magnetic power spectra displaying scaling similar to a Kolmogorov scaling of -5/3. At small scales, differences from MHD arise, as energy dissipates into heat almost exclusively through the magnetic field. The magnetic energy spectrum of the hybrid simulation shows a break where linear theory predicts that the Hall term in Ohm's law becomes significant, leading to dispersive kinetic Alfven waves. A key result is that protons are heated preferentially in the plane perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, creating a proton temperature anisotropy of the type observed in the corona and solar wind.

  7. Three-dimensional magnetic reconnection under coupling of tearing and lower-hybrid-drift instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    Understanding of the particle acceleration and plasma heating in a current sheet is an important problem in space and astrophysical plasmas. So far the inertia resistivity associated with tearing instability and the current driven instability such as the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) have been discussed as possible candidates for the origin of microscopic process of magnetic energy dissipation. It is known that the inertia resistivity effectively works at the neutral sheet, while the LHDI is mainly excited in the plasma sheet boundary. Then it is commonly understood that the role of the LHDI to the magnetic field dissipation is less important than that of the inertia resistivity. However, the heated electrons together with the activity of lower hybrid drift waves are often observed in the plasma sheet boundary by modern satellite observations, and their impact on the magnetic field dissipation at the neutral sheet might not be necessarily neglected. In addition, the nonlinear coupling between them is not theoretically understood yet. In this talk, we study the coupling of the collisionless reconnection and the LHDI by using a three-dimensional PIC simulation, and discuss that the current driven instabilities dynamically play an important role on magnetic reconnection.

  8. Collisionless shock structures of Earth and other planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, Eugene W.; Moses, Stewart L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the closing segment of our multi-spacecraft, multi-instrument study of collisionless shock structure. In this last year of our study, we have necessarily concentrated on subjects that limited time and remaining resources could be expected to bring to reasonable stopping points, if not full conclusions. Our attention has been focused therefore on matters that were either well underway when the year began or that could be expected to yield rapidly completed reports publishable quickly in abbreviated versions. Contemporary publication delays prevent any new initiatives from reaching the literature within the year in the best of circumstances. The topics that fell into these categories were detailed plasma wave (pw) phenomenology in slow shocks in the Earth's distant geomagnetic tail, instantaneous orientations of theta(sub Bn) in quasiparallel (Q(sub parallel)) shock structure, and a comprehensive overview of the relationship between structural ULF waves in the Qll shock environment and waves in the magnetosphere, i.e. geomagnetic ULF pulsations. The remainder of this report describes our freshly completed results, discusses two related investigations of pw waves in the foreshock and magnetosheath, and appends the abstracts of published papers and the texts of papers in press.

  9. Electron nongyrotropy in the context of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Aunai, Nicolas; Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Maria

    2013-09-15

    Collisionless magnetized plasmas have the tendency to isotropize their velocity distribution function around the local magnetic field direction, i.e., to be gyrotropic, unless some spatial and/or temporal fluctuations develop at the particle gyroscales. Electron gyroscale inhomogeneities are well known to develop during the magnetic reconnection process. Nongyrotropic electron velocity distribution functions have been observed to play a key role in the dissipative process breaking the field line connectivity. In this paper, we present a new method to quantify the deviation of a particle population from gyrotropy. The method accounts for the full 3D shape of the distribution and its analytical formulation allows fast numerical computation. Regions associated with a significant degree of nongyrotropy are shown, as well as the kinetic origin of the nongyrotropy and the fluid signature it is associated with. Using the result of 2.5D Particle-In-Cell simulations of magnetic reconnection in symmetric and asymmetric configurations, it is found that neither the reconnection site nor the topological boundaries are generally associated with a maximized degree of nongyrotropy. Nongyrotropic regions do not correspond to a specific fluid behavior as equivalent nongyrotropy is found to extend over the electron dissipation region as well as in non-dissipative diamagnetic drift layers. The localization of highly nongyrotropic regions in numerical models and their correlation with other observable quantities can, however, improve the characterization of spatial structures explored by spacecraft missions.

  10. Improved Boundary Model for Particle Simulation of Collisionless Driven Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, H.; Horiuchi, R.

    2006-10-01

    To clarify the relationship between particle kinetic effects and anomalous resistivity due to plasma instabilities in collisionless driven reconnection, we develop a three-dimensional Particle Simulation code for Magnetic reconnection in an Open system (PASMO). Recently, we have improved a model of upstream boundary to satisfy sufficiently the frozen-in condition both for ions and electrons. From the condition, plasma inflow is driven by ExB drift due to a driving electric field. In the previous model, particles are supplied into the system each time step, based on the particle flux through upstream boundary. The number density changes in proportion to magnetic field. In the improved model, particles in a cell near upstream boundary are newly loaded so as to satisfy shifted Maxwellian rigorously every time step. Using this model, the frozen-in condition is satisfied near the boundary both for electrons and ions. We will discuss the relationship between excitation of instability and mechanism of magnetic reconnection in the meeting.

  11. Expansion techniques for collisionless stellar dynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiron, Yohai

    2016-02-01

    We present ETICS, a collisionless N-body code based on two kinds of series expansions of the Poisson equation, implemented for graphics processing units (GPUs). The code is publicly available and can be used as a standalone program or as a library (an AMUSE plugin is included). One of the two expansion methods available is the self-consistent field (SCF) method, which is a Fourier-like expansion of the density field in some basis set; the other is the multipole expansion (MEX) method, which is a Taylor-like expansion of the Green's function. MEX, which has been advocated in the past, has not gained as much popularity as SCF. Both are particle-field methods and optimized for collisionless galactic dynamics, but while SCF is a ``pure'' expansion, MEX is an expansion in just the angular part; thus, MEX is capable of capturing radial structure easily, while SCF needs a large number of radial terms.

  12. Supermagnetosonic Jets behind a Collisionless Quasiparallel Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, H.; Vainio, R.; Laitinen, T. V.; Vaivads, A.; Andreeova, K.; Palmroth, M.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Koskinen, H. E. J.; Lucek, E. A.; Reme, H.

    2009-12-11

    The downstream region of a collisionless quasiparallel shock is structured containing bulk flows with high kinetic energy density from a previously unidentified source. We present Cluster multispacecraft measurements of this type of supermagnetosonic jet as well as of a weak secondary shock front within the sheath, that allow us to propose the following generation mechanism for the jets: The local curvature variations inherent to quasiparallel shocks can create fast, deflected jets accompanied by density variations in the downstream region. If the speed of the jet is super(magneto)sonic in the reference frame of the obstacle, a second shock front forms in the sheath closer to the obstacle. Our results can be applied to collisionless quasiparallel shocks in many plasma environments.

  13. Electrostatic drift modes in quantum pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Haijun; Cao Jintao; Wu Zhengwei

    2008-10-15

    Electrostatic drift waves in a nonuniform quantum magnetized electron-positron (pair) plasma are investigated. An explicit and straightforward analytical expression of the fluctuation frequency is presented. The effects induced by quantum fluctuations, density gradients, and magnetic field inhomogeneity on the wave frequencies are discussed and a purely quantum drift mode appears. The present analytical investigations are relevant to dense astrophysical objects as well as laboratory ultracold plasmas.

  14. Particle distributions in collisionless magnetic reconnection: An implicit Particle-In-Cell (PIC) description

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D.W.; Francis, G.E.; Max, C.E.

    1990-06-29

    Evidence from magnetospheric and solar flare research supports the belief that collisionless magnetic reconnection can proceed on the Alfven-wave crossing timescale. Reconnection behavior that occurs this rapidly in collisionless plasmas is not well understood because underlying mechanisms depend on the details of the ion and electron distributions in the vicinity of the emerging X-points. We use the direct implicit Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code AVANTI to study the details of these distributions as they evolve in the self-consistent E and B fields of magnetic reconnection. We first consider a simple neutral sheet model. We observe rapid movement of the current-carrying electrons away from the emerging X-point. Later in time an oscillation of the trapped magnetic flux is found, superimposed upon continued linear growth due to plasma inflow at the ion sound speed. The addition of a current-aligned and a normal B field widen the scope of our studies.

  15. The effect of broad-band Alfven-cyclotron waves spectra on the preferential heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Maneva, Y. G.; Ofman, L.; Vinas, A. F.

    2013-06-13

    In anticipation of results from inner heliospheric missions such as the Solar Orbiter and the Solar Probe we present the results from 1.5D hybrid simulations to study the role of magnetic fluctuations for the heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind. We consider the effects of nonlinear Alfven-cyclotron waves at different frequency regimes. Monochromatic nonlinear Alfven-alpha-cyclotron waves are known to preferentially heat and accelerate He{sup ++} ions in collisionless low beta plasma. In this study we demonstrate that these effects are preserved when higherfrequency monochromatic and broad-band spectra of Alfven-proton-cyclotron waves are considered. Comparison between several nonlinear monochromatic waves shows that the ion temperatures, anisotropies and relative drift are quantitatively affected by the shift in frequency. Including a broad-band wave-spectrum results in a significant reduction of both the parallel and the perpendicular temperature components for the He{sup ++} ions, whereas the proton heating is barely influenced, with the parallel proton temperature only slightly enhanced. The differential streaming is strongly affected by the available wave power in the resonant daughter ion-acoustic waves. Therefore for the same initial wave energy, the relative drift is significantly reduced in the case of initial wave-spectra in comparison to the simulations with monochromatic waves.

  16. Constraints on fluid modeling of magnetized collisionless plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulem, Pierre-Louis; Passot, Thierry; Laveder, Dimitri; Hunana, Peter; Henri, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that a complete description of the solar wind requires a kinetic description and that, particularly at sub-proton scales, kinetic effects cannot be ignored. It is nevertheless usually assumed that, at scales significantly larger than the proton gyroscale, MHD or bifluid models with isotropic pressures provide a satisfactory description. We demonstrate that in order to accurately capture, even at large scales, the low-frequency dynamics of a collisionless plasma, a fluid model should actually include kinetic effects such as Landau damping and finite Larmor radius corrections. Indeed, the usual polytropic bi-fluid models strongly overestimate the magnetic compressibility of oblique Alfvén waves. Retaining pressure anisotropy and Landau damping partially corrects this deficiency, but an accurate description of the Alfvén wave polarization and of the mirror instability growth rate actually requires to take into account the finite-Larmor corrections to all the retained moments. These remarks lead us to use the so-called FLR Landau fluid model (Phys. Plasmas, 19, 082113, 2012), for which a three-dimensional parallel code has been developed. Preliminary simulations in the turbulent regime will be presented, showing the reduction of the fluid compressibility and the inhibition of the parallel energy transfer. We will also report on the development of temperature anisotropy, associated with non-resonant perpendicular ion heating and constrained by the onset of the mirror instability.

  17. New Expression for Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    For 2D, symmetric, anti-parallel, collisionless magnetic reconnection, a new expression for the reconnection rate in the electron diffusion region is introduced. It is shown that this expression can be derived in just a few simple steps from a physically intuitive starting point; the derivation is given in its entirety and the validity of each step is confirmed. The predictions of this expression are compared to the results of several long-duration, open-boundary PIC reconnection simulations to demonstrate excellent agreement.

  18. Evidence for collisionless magnetic reconnection at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastwood, J. P.; Brain, D. A.; Halekas, J. S.; Drake, J. F.; Phan, T. D.; Øieroset, M.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Acuña, M.

    2008-01-01

    Using data from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) in combination with Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations of reconnection, we present the first direct evidence of collisionless magnetic reconnection at Mars. The evidence indicates that the spacecraft passed through the diffusion region where reconnection is initiated and observed the magnetic field signatures of differential electron and ion motion - the Hall magnetic field - that uniquely indicate the reconnection process. These are the first such in-situ reconnection observations at an astronomical body other than the Earth. Reconnection may be the source of Mars' recently discovered auroral activity and the changing boundaries of the closed regions of crustal magnetic field.

  19. Thin-shell instability in collisionless plasma.

    PubMed

    Dieckmann, M E; Ahmed, H; Doria, D; Sarri, G; Walder, R; Folini, D; Bret, A; Ynnerman, A; Borghesi, M

    2015-09-01

    Thin-shell instability is one process which can generate entangled structures in astrophysical plasma on collisional (fluid) scales. It is driven by a spatially varying imbalance between the ram pressure of the inflowing upstream plasma and the downstream's thermal pressure at a nonplanar shock. Here we show by means of a particle-in-cell simulation that an analog process can destabilize a thin shell formed by two interpenetrating, unmagnetized, and collisionless plasma clouds. The amplitude of the shell's spatial modulation grows and saturates after about ten inverse proton plasma frequencies, when the shell consists of connected piecewise linear patches.

  20. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-01

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  1. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, X. M. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-15

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  2. Collisionless Relaxation in Non-Neutral Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Yan; Pakter, Renato; Teles, Tarcisio N.

    2008-02-01

    A theoretical framework is presented which allows us to quantitatively predict the final stationary state achieved by a non-neutral plasma during a process of collisionless relaxation. As a specific application, the theory is used to study relaxation of charged-particle beams. It is shown that a fully matched beam relaxes to the Lynden-Bell distribution. However, when a mismatch is present and the beam oscillates, parametric resonances lead to a core-halo phase separation. The approach developed accounts for both the density and the velocity distributions in the final stationary state.

  3. New expression for collisionless magnetic reconnection rate

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, Alex

    2015-04-15

    For 2D, symmetric, anti-parallel, collisionless magnetic reconnection, new expressions for the reconnection rate in the electron diffusion region are introduced. It is shown that these expressions can be derived in just a few simple steps from a physically intuitive starting point; the derivations are given in their entirety, and the validity of each step is confirmed. The predictions of these expressions are compared to the results of several long-duration, open-boundary particle-in-cell reconnection simulations to demonstrate excellent agreement.

  4. Forecast of iceberg ensemble drift

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tahan, M.S.; El-Tahan, H.W.; Venkatesh, S.

    1983-05-01

    The objectives of the study are to gain a better understanding of the characteristics of iceberg motion and the factors controlling iceberg drift, and to develop an iceberg ensemble drift forecast system to be operated by the Canadian Atmospheric Environment Service. An extensive review of field and theoretical studies on iceberg behaviour, and the factors controlling iceberg motion has been carried out. Long term and short term behaviour of icebergs are critically examined. A quantitative assessment of the effects of the factors controlling iceberg motion is presented. The study indicated that wind and currents are the primary driving forces. Coriolis Force and ocean surface slope also have significant effects. As for waves, only the higher waves have a significant effect. Iceberg drift is also affected by iceberg size characteristics. Based on the findings of the study a comprehensive computerized forecast system to predict the drift of iceberg ensembles off Canada's east coast has been designed. The expected accuracy of the forecast system is discussed and recommendations are made for future improvements to the system.

  5. The collisionless magnetoviscous-thermal instability

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Tanim

    2014-05-20

    It is likely that nearly all central galactic massive and supermassive black holes are nonradiative: their accretion luminosities are orders of magnitude below what can be explained by efficient black hole accretion within their ambient environments. These objects, of which Sagittarius A* is the best-known example, are also dilute (mildly collisional to highly collisionless) and optically thin. In order for accretion to occur, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities must develop that not only transport angular momentum, but also gravitational energy generated through matter infall, outward. A class of new magnetohydrodynamical fluid instabilities—the magnetoviscous-thermal instability (MVTI)—was found to transport angular momentum and energy along magnetic field lines through large (fluid) viscosities and thermal conductivities. This paper describes the analog to the MVTI, the collisionless MVTI (CMVTI), that similarly transports energy and angular momentum outward, expected to be important in describing the flow properties of hot, dilute, and radiatively inefficient accretion flows around black holes. We construct a local equilibrium for MHD stability analysis in this differentially rotating disk. We then find and characterize specific instabilities expected to be important in describing their flow properties, and show their qualitative similarities to instabilities derived using the fluid formalism. We conclude with further work needed in modeling this class of accretion flow.

  6. Nonlinear Gyroviscous Force in a Collisionless Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Belova, E.V.

    2001-05-23

    Nonlinear gyroviscous forces in a collisionless plasma with temperature variations are calculated from the gyrofluid moments of the gyrokinetic Vlasov equation. The low-frequency gyrokinetic ordering and electrostatic perturbations are assumed, and an additional finite Larmor radius (FLR) expansion is performed. This approach leads naturally to an expression for the gyroviscous force in terms of the gyrocenter distribution function, thus including all resonant effects, and represents a systematic FLR expansion in a general form (no assumption of any closure is made). The expression for the gyroviscous force is also calculated in terms of the particle-fluid moments by making the transformation from the gyrocenter to particle coordinates. The calculated expression represents a modification of the Braginskii gyroviscosity for a collisionless plasma with nonuniform temperature. It is compared with previous calculations based on the traditional fluid approach. As a byproduct of the gyroviscosity calculations, we derive a set of nonlinear reduced gyrofluid (and a corresponding set of particle-fluid) moment equations with FLR corrections, which exhibit a generalized form of the ''gyroviscous cancellation.''

  7. Measuring Collisionless Damping in Heliospheric Plasmas using Field-Particle Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G.

    2016-08-01

    An innovative field-particle correlation technique is proposed that uses single-point measurements of the electromagnetic fields and particle velocity distribution functions to investigate the net transfer of energy from fields to particles associated with the collisionless damping of turbulent fluctuations in weakly collisional plasmas, such as the solar wind. In addition to providing a direct estimate of the local rate of energy transfer between fields and particles, it provides vital new information about the distribution of that energy transfer in velocity space. This velocity-space signature can potentially be used to identify the dominant collisionless mechanism responsible for the damping of turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind. The application of this novel field-particle correlation technique is illustrated using the simplified case of the Landau damping of Langmuir waves in an electrostatic 1D-1V Vlasov-Poisson plasma, showing that the procedure both estimates the local rate of energy transfer from the electrostatic field to the electrons and indicates the resonant nature of this interaction. Modifications of the technique to enable single-point spacecraft measurements of fields and particles to diagnose the collisionless damping of turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind are discussed, yielding a method with the potential to transform our ability to maximize the scientific return from current and upcoming spacecraft missions, such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Solar Probe Plus missions.

  8. Measuring Collisionless Damping in Heliospheric Plasmas using Field–Particle Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G.

    2016-08-01

    An innovative field–particle correlation technique is proposed that uses single-point measurements of the electromagnetic fields and particle velocity distribution functions to investigate the net transfer of energy from fields to particles associated with the collisionless damping of turbulent fluctuations in weakly collisional plasmas, such as the solar wind. In addition to providing a direct estimate of the local rate of energy transfer between fields and particles, it provides vital new information about the distribution of that energy transfer in velocity space. This velocity-space signature can potentially be used to identify the dominant collisionless mechanism responsible for the damping of turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind. The application of this novel field–particle correlation technique is illustrated using the simplified case of the Landau damping of Langmuir waves in an electrostatic 1D-1V Vlasov–Poisson plasma, showing that the procedure both estimates the local rate of energy transfer from the electrostatic field to the electrons and indicates the resonant nature of this interaction. Modifications of the technique to enable single-point spacecraft measurements of fields and particles to diagnose the collisionless damping of turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind are discussed, yielding a method with the potential to transform our ability to maximize the scientific return from current and upcoming spacecraft missions, such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Solar Probe Plus missions.

  9. The generalized drift flux approach: Identification of the void-drift closure law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boure, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    The main characteristics and the potential advantages of generalized drift flux models are presented. In particular it is stressed that the issue on the propagation properties and on the mathematical nature (hyperbolic or not) of the model and the problem of closure are easier to tackle than in two fluid models. The problem of identifying the differential void-drift closure law inherent to generalized drift flux models is then addressed. Such a void-drift closure, based on wave properties, is proposed for bubbly flows. It involves a drift relaxation time which is of the order of 0.25 s. It is observed that, although wave properties provide essential closure validity tests, they do not represent an easily usable source of quantitative information on the closure laws.

  10. Collisionless shock formation and the prompt acceleration of solar flare ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, P. J.; Goodrich, C. C.; Vlahos, L.

    1988-01-01

    The formation mechanisms of collisionless shocks in solar flare plasmas are investigated. The priamry flare energy release is assumed to arise in the coronal portion of a flare loop as many small regions or 'hot spots' where the plasma beta locally exceeds unity. One dimensional hybrid numerical simulations show that the expansion of these 'hot spots' in a direction either perpendicular or oblique to the ambient magnetic field gives rise to collisionless shocks in a few Omega(i), where Omega(i) is the local ion cyclotron frequency. For solar parameters, this is less than 1 second. The local shocks are then subsequently able to accelerate particles to 10 MeV in less than 1 second by a combined drift-diffusive process. The formation mechanism may also give rise to energetic ions of 100 keV in the shock vicinity. The presence of these energetic ions is due either to ion heating or ion beam instabilities and they may act as a seed population for further acceleration. The prompt acceleration of ions inferred from the Gamma Ray Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission can thus be explained by this mechanism.

  11. THE FINAL-PARSEC PROBLEM IN THE COLLISIONLESS LIMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliev, Eugene; Antonini, Fabio; Merritt, David E-mail: fabio.antonini@northwestern.edu

    2015-09-01

    A binary supermassive black hole loses energy via ejection of stars in a galactic nucleus, until emission of gravitational waves becomes strong enough to induce rapid coalescence. Evolution via the gravitational slingshot requires that stars be continuously supplied to the binary, and it is known that in spherical galaxies the reservoir of such stars is quickly depleted, leading to stalling of the binary at parsec-scale separations. Recent N-body simulations of galaxy mergers and isolated nonspherical galaxies suggest that this stalling may not occur in less idealized systems. However, it remains unclear to what degree these conclusions are affected by collisional relaxation, which is much stronger in the numerical simulations than in real galaxies. In this study, we present a novel Monte Carlo method that can efficiently deal with both collisional and collisionless dynamics, and with galaxy models having arbitrary shapes. We show that without relaxation, the final-parsec problem may be overcome only in triaxial galaxies. Axisymmetry is not enough, but even a moderate departure from axisymmetry is sufficient to keep the binary shrinking. We find that the binary hardening rate is always substantially lower than the maximum possible, “full-loss-cone” rate, and that it decreases with time, but that stellar-dynamical interactions are nevertheless able to drive the binary to coalescence on a timescale ≲1 Gyr in any triaxial galaxy.

  12. The Final-parsec Problem in the Collisionless Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Eugene; Antonini, Fabio; Merritt, David

    2015-09-01

    A binary supermassive black hole loses energy via ejection of stars in a galactic nucleus, until emission of gravitational waves becomes strong enough to induce rapid coalescence. Evolution via the gravitational slingshot requires that stars be continuously supplied to the binary, and it is known that in spherical galaxies the reservoir of such stars is quickly depleted, leading to stalling of the binary at parsec-scale separations. Recent N-body simulations of galaxy mergers and isolated nonspherical galaxies suggest that this stalling may not occur in less idealized systems. However, it remains unclear to what degree these conclusions are affected by collisional relaxation, which is much stronger in the numerical simulations than in real galaxies. In this study, we present a novel Monte Carlo method that can efficiently deal with both collisional and collisionless dynamics, and with galaxy models having arbitrary shapes. We show that without relaxation, the final-parsec problem may be overcome only in triaxial galaxies. Axisymmetry is not enough, but even a moderate departure from axisymmetry is sufficient to keep the binary shrinking. We find that the binary hardening rate is always substantially lower than the maximum possible, “full-loss-cone” rate, and that it decreases with time, but that stellar-dynamical interactions are nevertheless able to drive the binary to coalescence on a timescale ≲1 Gyr in any triaxial galaxy.

  13. Drift of dislocation tripoles under ultrasound influence.

    PubMed

    Murzaev, R T; Bachurin, D V; Nazarov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of dynamics of different stable dislocation tripoles under influence of monochromatic standing sound wave were performed. The basic conditions necessary for the drift and mutual rearrangements between dislocation structures were investigated. The dependence of the drift velocity of the dislocation tripoles as a function of the frequency and amplitude of the external influence was obtained. The results of the work can be useful in analysis of motion and self-organization of dislocation structure under ultrasound influence. PMID:26278625

  14. Evidence for Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, D.; Eastwood, J.; Halekas, J.; Drake, J.; Phan, T.; Oieroset, M.; Mitchell, D.; Lin, R.; Acuna, M.

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma process that enables the rapid conversion of magnetic to particle energy and is important in astrophysics as well as solar, space and planetary physics. Using data from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft in combination with simulations of reconnection, we present the first direct evidence of collisionless magnetic reconnection at Mars. The evidence indicates that the spacecraft passed through the diffusion region where reconnection is initiated and observed the magnetic field signatures of differential electron and ion motion that uniquely indicate the reconnection process. These are the first such in- situ reconnection observations at an astronomical body other than the Earth. Reconnection may be the source of Mars" recently discovered auroral activity and the changing boundaries of the closed regions of crustal magnetic field.

  15. Collisionless Dynamics and the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    I review the nature of three-dimensional collapse in the Zeldovich approximation, how it relates to the underlying nature of the three-dimensional Lagrangian manifold and naturally gives rise to a hierarchical structure formation scenario that progresses through collapse from voids to pancakes, filaments and then halos. I then discuss how variations of the Zeldovich approximation (based on the gravitational or the velocity potential) have been used to define classifications of the cosmic large-scale structure into dynamically distinct parts. Finally, I turn to recent efforts to devise new approaches relying on tessellations of the Lagrangian manifold to follow the fine-grained dynamics of the dark matter fluid into the highly non-linear regime and both extract the maximum amount of information from existing simulations as well as devise new simulation techniques for cold collisionless dynamics.

  16. Interaction between a drifting spiral and defects

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, X.; Levine, H. ); Kessler, D.A. )

    1993-02-01

    Spiral waves, a type of reentrant excitation,'' are believed to be associated with the most dangerous cardiac arrhythmias, including ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. Recent experimental findings have implicated defective regions as a means of trapping spirals which would otherwise drift and (eventually) disappear. Here, we model the myocardium as a simple excitable medium and study via simulation the interaction between a drifting spiral and one or more such defects. We interpret our results in terms of a criterion for the transition between trapped and untrapped drifting spirals.

  17. The model of a collisionless current sheet in a homogeneous gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovsky, Igor S.; Kislov, Roman A.; Malova, Helmi V.; Khabarova, Olga V.

    2016-10-01

    The self-consistent 1D kinetic Harris-like model of a collisionless current sheet is developed for the case of the current sheet experiencing the impact of an external uniform gravity field. The ambipolar Pannekoek-Rosseland electric field appears in the system as a result of the additional drift motion of ions and electrons. This produces separation of charges, which is responsible for corresponding changes of the current sheet form. The presence of gravitation leads to formation of asymmetric distributions of the magnetic field as well as the plasma and the current density changes. Our estimations show that gravity-forced disruptions of the current sheet profile may occur in the Mercurial magnetosphere and, most probable, in the Io plasma torus near the Jupiter. Also, the model can be applied to magnetospheres of exoplanets.

  18. Tempest Simulations of Collisionless Damping of the Geodesic-Acoustic Mode in Edge-Plasma Pedestals

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X. Q.; Xiong, Z.; Nevins, W. M.; Gao, Z.; McKee, G. R.

    2008-05-30

    The fully nonlinear (full-f) four-dimensional TEMPEST gyrokinetic continuum code correctly produces the frequency and collisionless damping of geodesic-acoustic modes (GAMs) and zonal flow, with fully nonlinear Boltzmann electrons for the inverse aspect ratio {epsilon} scan and the tokamak safety factor q scan in homogeneous plasmas. TEMPEST simulations show that the GAMs exist in the edge pedestal for steep density and temperature gradients in the form of outgoing waves. The enhanced GAM damping may explain experimental beam emission spectroscopy measurements on the edge q scaling of the GAM amplitude.

  19. Tempest Simulations of Collisionless Damping of the Geodesic-Acoustic Mode in Edge-Plasma Pedestals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. Q.; Xiong, Z.; Gao, Z.; Nevins, W. M.; McKee, G. R.

    2008-05-01

    The fully nonlinear (full-f) four-dimensional TEMPEST gyrokinetic continuum code correctly produces the frequency and collisionless damping of geodesic-acoustic modes (GAMs) and zonal flow, with fully nonlinear Boltzmann electrons for the inverse aspect ratio γ scan and the tokamak safety factor q scan in homogeneous plasmas. TEMPEST simulations show that the GAMs exist in the edge pedestal for steep density and temperature gradients in the form of outgoing waves. The enhanced GAM damping may explain experimental beam emission spectroscopy measurements on the edge q scaling of the GAM amplitude.

  20. Kinetic model for the collisionless sheath of a collisional plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2016-08-01

    Collisional plasmas typically have mean-free-path still much greater than the Debye length, so the sheath is mostly collisionless. Once the plasma density, temperature, and flow are specified at the sheath entrance, the profile variation of electron and ion density, temperature, flow speed, and conductive heat fluxes inside the sheath is set by collisionless dynamics, and can be predicted by an analytical kinetic model distribution. These predictions are contrasted here with direct kinetic simulations, showing good agreement.

  1. Global Scale-Invariant Dissipation in Collisionless Plasma Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyani, K. H.; Chapman, S. C.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Dunlop, M. W.; Sahraoui, F.

    2009-08-14

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of the dissipation range of collisionless plasma turbulence is presented using in situ high-frequency magnetic field measurements from the Cluster spacecraft in a stationary interval of fast ambient solar wind. The observations, spanning five decades in temporal scales, show a crossover from multifractal intermittent turbulence in the inertial range to non-Gaussian monoscaling in the dissipation range. This presents a strong observational constraint on theories of dissipation mechanisms in turbulent collisionless plasmas.

  2. Study of electric and magnetic field fluctuations from lower hybrid drift instability waves in the terrestrial magnetotail with the fully kinetic, semi-implicit, adaptive multi level multi domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Norgren, C.; Newman, D.; Goldman, M.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-05-01

    The newly developed fully kinetic, semi-implicit, adaptive multi-level multi-domain (MLMD) method is used to simulate, at realistic mass ratio, the development of the lower hybrid drift instability (LHDI) in the terrestrial magnetotail over a large wavenumber range and at a low computational cost. The power spectra of the perpendicular electric field and of the fluctuations of the parallel magnetic field are studied at wavenumbers and times that allow to appreciate the onset of the electrostatic and electromagnetic LHDI branches and of the kink instability. The coupling between electric and magnetic field fluctuations observed by Norgren et al. ["Lower hybrid drift waves: Space observations," Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 055001 (2012)] for high wavenumber LHDI waves in the terrestrial magnetotail is verified. In the MLMD simulations presented, a domain ("coarse grid") is simulated with low resolution. A small fraction of the entire domain is then simulated with higher resolution also ("refined grid") to capture smaller scale, higher frequency processes. Initially, the MLMD method is validated for LHDI simulations. MLMD simulations with different levels of grid refinement are validated against the standard semi-implicit particle in cell simulations of domains corresponding to both the coarse and the refined grid. Precious information regarding the applicability of the MLMD method to turbulence simulations is derived. The power spectra of MLMD simulations done with different levels of refinements are then compared. They consistently show a break in the magnetic field spectra at k⊥di˜30 , with di the ion skin depth and k⊥ the perpendicular wavenumber. The break is observed at early simulated times, Ωcit <6 , with Ωci the ion cyclotron frequency. It is due to the initial decoupling of electric and magnetic field fluctuations at intermediate and low wavenumbers, before the development of the electromagnetic LHDI branch. Evidence of coupling between electric and magnetic

  3. Transient-induced climate drift

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, A.; Reinhold, B.; Saha, S. )

    1993-05-01

    The climate drift of various quantities associated with deep, planetary-scale, equilibrated, transient Rossby waves are estimated for the Southern Hemisphere extratropical summer as revealed by the DERF II (Dynamical Extended Range Forecasting) dataset. It is found that the vertical structures of these waves systematically become too baroclinic during the course of integration. There are two time scales associated with this climate drift. There is one very short time scale, estimated to be of the order of one day, when the waves become more barotropic. It is followed by a period when the wave baroclinicity monotonically increases, and after roughly 10 days the model structures appear to have reached their statistically equilibrated state. In the meantime, the kinetic energy of the transient waves decreases substantially to roughly half the observed value. After this initial drop, however, the transient kinetic energy increases again, and it is not clear if an equilibrium value has been reached after 30 days, which is the limit of the DERF II dataset. This third time scale is not found in the quantities directly associated with the vertical structures per se, but it is hypothesized to be a consequence of these errors. A theory is utilized that in a simplified way takes into account the processes that determine the vertical structure of baroclinic waves as well as their robustness as a means of understanding the processes leading to these errors. The implications from this theory are that the formulation and magnitude of the dissipative and diffusive processes in the model are the most likely problem, but there are other possibilities. 37 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Dike/Drift Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  5. Collisionless loss-cone refilling: there is no final parsec problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualandris, Alessia; Read, Justin I.; Dehnen, Walter; Bortolas, Elisa

    2016-10-01

    Coalescing massive black hole binaries, formed during galaxy mergers, are expected to be a primary source of low frequency gravitational waves. Yet in isolated gas-free spherical stellar systems, the hardening of the binary stalls at parsec-scale separations owing to the inefficiency of relaxation-driven loss-cone refilling. Repopulation via collisionless orbit diffusion in triaxial systems is more efficient, but published simulation results are contradictory. While sustained hardening has been reported in simulations of galaxy mergers with N ˜ 106 stars and in early simulations of rotating models, in isolated non-rotating triaxial models the hardening rate continues to fall with increasing N, a signature of spurious two-body relaxation. We present a novel approach for studying loss cone repopulation in galactic nuclei. Since loss cone repopulation in triaxial systems owes to orbit diffusion, it is a purely collisionless phenomenon and can be studied with an approximated force calculation technique, provided the force errors are well behaved and sufficiently small. We achieve this using an accurate fast multipole method and define a proxy for the hardening rate that depends only on stellar angular momenta. We find that the loss cone is efficiently replenished even in very mildly triaxial models (with axis ratios 1 : 0.9 : 0.8). Such triaxiality is unavoidable following galactic mergers and can drive binaries into the gravitational wave regime. We conclude that there is no `final parsec problem'.

  6. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma.

    PubMed

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-12

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas. PMID:27035981

  7. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma

    PubMed Central

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A.; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas. PMID:27035981

  8. Expansion techniques for collisionless stellar dynamical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Meiron, Yohai; Li, Baile; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Spurzem, Rainer

    2014-09-10

    We present graphics processing unit (GPU) implementations of two fast force calculation methods based on series expansions of the Poisson equation. One method is the self-consistent field (SCF) method, which is a Fourier-like expansion of the density field in some basis set; the other method is the multipole expansion (MEX) method, which is a Taylor-like expansion of the Green's function. MEX, which has been advocated in the past, has not gained as much popularity as SCF. Both are particle-field methods and optimized for collisionless galactic dynamics, but while SCF is a 'pure' expansion, MEX is an expansion in just the angular part; thus, MEX is capable of capturing radial structure easily, while SCF needs a large number of radial terms. We show that despite the expansion bias, these methods are more accurate than direct techniques for the same number of particles. The performance of our GPU code, which we call ETICS, is profiled and compared to a CPU implementation. On the tested GPU hardware, a full force calculation for one million particles took ∼0.1 s (depending on expansion cutoff), making simulations with as many as 10{sup 8} particles fast for a comparatively small number of nodes.

  9. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A.; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas.

  10. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma.

    PubMed

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-12

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas.

  11. Drift Chamber Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walenta, A. H.; ćonka Nurdan, T.

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes a laboratory course held at ICFA 2002 Regional Instrumentation School in Morelia, Mexico. This course intends to introduce drift chambers, which play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. The experimental setup consists of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber, a plastic scintillator detector and a collimated 90Sr source. The measurements on the drift velocity of electrons, its change as a function of a drift field, gas gain and diffusion are performed at this laboratory course.

  12. Free Drifting Buoys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Information was exchanged between people directly involved with the development, use, and/or potential use of free drifting buoys. Tracking systems and techniques, where methods and accuracy of optical, radio, radar, satellite, and sonic tracking of free-drifting buoys were discussed. Deployment and retrieval covering methods currently used or planned in the deployment and retrieval of free-drifting buoys from boats, ships, helicopters, fixed platforms, and fixed-wing aircraft were reported. Simulation, sensors, and data emphasizing the status of water circulation modeling, and sensors useful on free-drifting buoys, and data display and analysis were described.

  13. Collisionless Plasma Turbulence: Insights from Magnetohydrodynamic and Hall Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations and Observations of the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stawarz, Julia E.

    Turbulence is a ubiquitous phenomenon that occurs throughout the universe, in both neutral fluids and plasmas. For collisionless plasmas, kinetic effects, which alter the nonlinear dynamics and result in small-scale dissipation, are still not well understood in the context of turbulence. This work uses direct numerical simulations (DNS) and observations of Earth's magnetosphere to study plasma turbulence. Long-time relaxation in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is examined using DNS with particular focus on the role of magnetic and cross helicity and symmetries of the initial configurations. When strong symmetries are absent or broken through perturbations, flows evolve towards states predicted by statistical mechanics with an energy minimization principle, which features two main regimes; one magnetic helicity dominated and one with quasi-equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energy. The role of the Hall effect, which contributes to the dynamics of collisionless plasmas, is also explored numerically. At scales below the ion inertial length, a transition to a magnetically dominated state, associated with advection becoming subdominant to dissipation, occurs. Real-space current, vorticity, and electric fields are examined. Strong current structures are associated with alignment between the current and magnetic field, which may be important in collisionless plasmas where field-aligned currents can be unstable. Turbulence within bursty bulk flow braking events, thought to be associated with near-Earth magnetotail reconnection, are then studied using the THEMIS spacecraft. It is proposed that strong field-aligned currents associated with turbulent intermittency destabilize into double layers, providing a collisionless dissipation mechanism for the turbulence. Plasma waves may also radiate from the region, removing energy from the turbulence and potentially depositing it in the aurora. Finally, evidence for turbulence in the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) on the

  14. Driving Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks with NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiuza, Frederico; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Ryutov, Dmitri; Ross, Steven; Huntington, Channing; Mori, Warren; Silva, Luis; Park, Hye-Sook; Remington, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    Collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysical plasmas and are known to be responsible for particle acceleration; however, the microphysics underlying shock formation and particle acceleration is not yet fully understood. High-power lasers are bringing the study of collisionless shocks into the realm of laboratory experiments. In particular, the National Ignition Facility allows for the generation of collisionless plasma flows that are hundreds of ion skin-depths long and provides ideal conditions for the study of Weibel-mediated shocks. We have performed detailed 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations with OSIRIS to explore the laboratory conditions associated with counter-streaming high-velocity plasma flows for realistic profiles. We have modeled the proton radiography of the interaction for self-consistent fields and determined the experimental signatures of the generation of Weibel B-fields and collisionless shocks. We will discuss the importance of modeling realistic ion to electron mass ratios and of taking into account Biermann battery B-fields. Our work identifies the conditions for the formation of collisionless shocks in laboratory, both in unmagnetized and magnetized scenarios, showing the possibility of observing for the first time Weibel-mediated shocks in near future experiments.

  15. Shearing Box Simulations of the MRI in a Collisionless Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Prateek; Hammett, Gregory, W.; Quataert, Eliot; Stone, James, M.

    2005-08-31

    We describe local shearing box simulations of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless plasma. Collisionless effects may be important in radiatively inefficient accretion flows, such as near the black hole in the Galactic Center. The MHD version of ZEUS is modified to evolve an anisotropic pressure tensor. A fluid closure approximation is used to calculate heat conduction along magnetic field lines. The anisotropic pressure tensor provides a qualitatively new mechanism for transporting angular momentum in accretion flows (in addition to the Maxwell and Reynolds stresses). We estimate limits on the pressure anisotropy due to pitch angle scattering by kinetic instabilities. Such instabilities provide an effective ''collision'' rate in a collisionless plasma and lead to more MHD-like dynamics. We find that the MRI leads to efficient growth of the magnetic field in a collisionless plasma, with saturation amplitudes comparable to those in MHD. In the saturated state, the anisotropic stress is comparable to the Maxwell stress, implying that the rate of angular momentum transport may be moderately enhanced in a collisionless plasma.

  16. Gyrokinetic δ f simulation of collisionless and semi-collisional tearing mode instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Weigang; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott

    2004-11-01

    The evolution of collisionless and semi-collisional tearing mode instabilities is studied using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation model that utilizes the δ f-method with the split-weight scheme to enhance the time step, and a novel algorithm(Y. Chen and S.E. Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 198), 463 (2003) to accurately solve the Ampere's equation for experimentally relevant β values, βfracm_im_e≫ 1. We use the model of drift-kinetic electrons and gyrokinetic ions. Linear simulation results are benchmarked with eigenmode analysis for the case of fixed ions. In small box simulations the ions response can be neglected but for large box simulations the ions response is important because the width of perturbed current is larger than ρ_i.The nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands will be studied and the results will be compared with previous theoretical studiesfootnote J.F. Drake and Y. C. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 39, 453 (1977) on the saturation level and the electron bounce frequency. A collision operator is included in the electron drift kinetic equation to study the simulation in the semi-collisional regime. The algebraical growth stage has been observed and compared quantitatively with theory. Our progress on three-dimensional simulations of tearing mode instabilities will be reported.

  17. Booktalking: Avoiding Summer Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittingham, Jeff; Rickman, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    Summer drift, otherwise known as loss of reading comprehension skills or reading achievement, has been a well-known and well-documented phenomenon of public education for decades. Studies from the late twentieth century to the present have demonstrated a slowdown in summer drift attributed to specific summer reading programs addressing motivation…

  18. Particle simulation of collisionless reconnection using TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotzé, P. B.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; Büchner, J.

    Magnetic reconnection is an important mechanism in the dynamics of the magnetosphere in facilitating the change in magnetospheric topology in response to the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). In the magnetosphere the classical collision rate is small, while the inertia of the electrons allows the frozen-in flux constraint to be broken. At small values of resistivity, this dissipation region then controls the rate of reconnection by forming an elongated Sweet-Parker layer, with an inflow velocity νi into the x-line that scales like: νi = δ ∆ νA νA (1) where δ and ∆ are the width (controlled by resistivity) and length (macroscopic) of the dissipation region respectively and νA is the Alfvén velocity. The scale length around the x-line where the electrons become demagnetised is of the order of the electron skin depth c/ωpe. This region is however much smaller than the ion inertial length c/ωpi, below which the Hall terms in the kinetic Ohm's law become important. Within this distance from the x-line the ions decouple from the electrons and are accelerated away at Alfv´enic velocities (Burkhart et al., 1990) The dynamics of the system at the scale length of the electron dissipation layer is therefore linked to Hall physics, making it a critical ingredient in determining collisionless reconnection rates. Particle simulation techniques have been used to investigate magnetic reconnection in 2-D for a Harris sheet equilibrium. A set of parameters are chosen as well as the dimensions of the computational domain, the boundary conditions and the initial amplitude and form of a seed magnetic island to start the reconnection process. Some preliminary results will be given in this paper.

  19. Evolution Of Nonlinear Waves in Compressing Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit, I.Y. Dodin, and N.J. Fisch

    2011-05-27

    Through particle-in-cell simulations, the evolution of nonlinear plasma waves is examined in one-dimensional collisionless plasma undergoing mechanical compression. Unlike linear waves, whose wavelength decreases proportionally to the system length L(t), nonlinear waves, such as solitary electron holes, conserve their characteristic size {Delta} during slow compression. This leads to a substantially stronger adiabatic amplification as well as rapid collisionless damping when L approaches {Delta}. On the other hand, cessation of compression halts the wave evolution, yielding a stable mode.

  20. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-11-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package corrosion or radionuclide transport.

  1. Electron acceleration to high energies at quasi-parallel shock waves in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, G.; Classen, H.-T.

    1995-01-01

    In the solar corona shock waves are generated by flares and/or coronal mass ejections. They manifest themselves in solar type 2 radio bursts appearing as emission stripes with a slow drift from high to low frequencies in dynamic radio spectra. Their nonthermal radio emission indicates that electrons are accelerated to suprathermal and/or relativistic velocities at these shocks. As well known by extraterrestrial in-situ measurements supercritical, quasi-parallel, collisionless shocks are accompanied by so-called SLAMS (short large amplitude magnetic field structures). These SLAMS can act as strong magnetic mirrors, at which charged particles can be reflected and accelerated. Thus, thermal electrons gain energy due to multiple reflections between two SLAMS and reach suprathermal and relativistic velocities. This mechanism of accelerating electrons is discussed for circumstances in the solar corona and may be responsible for the so-called 'herringbones' observed in solar type 2 radio bursts.

  2. ICPP: Collisionless shock and supernova remnant simulation experiments on VULCAN.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, Nigel C.

    2000-10-01

    The VULCAN laser at the Central Laser Facility is used for laboratory-based simulations of collisionless shocks. One of the most difficult aspects of collisionless shock behaviour, the role of the magnetic field, is to be tested directly against experiment. Preliminary experiments to generate strong magnetic fields using a laser-driven mm-scale Helmholtz coil, and the formation of collisionless colliding plasmas using two counter-streaming exploding foil plasmas will be discussed. We consider the scaling of the hydrodynamics and magnetic field of the these experiments to those in supernova remnants (SNR) impacting the interstellar medium (ISM). This is achieved by ensuring the experiment and the SNR-ISM exhibit similar values of key dimensionless parameters. Work supported in part by EPSRC, CLF Direct Access, CEC-ERB FMR XCT 980168, Euratom and the UK DTI.

  3. In situ detection of collisionless reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail.

    PubMed

    Oieroset, M; Phan, T D; Fujimoto, M; Lin, R P; Lepping, R P

    2001-07-26

    Magnetic reconnection is the process by which magnetic field lines of opposite polarity reconfigure to a lower-energy state, with the release of magnetic energy to the surroundings. Reconnection at the Earth's dayside magnetopause and in the magnetotail allows the solar wind into the magnetosphere. It begins in a small 'diffusion region', where a kink in the newly reconnected lines produces jets of plasma away from the region. Although plasma jets from reconnection have previously been reported, the physical processes that underlie jet formation have remained poorly understood because of the scarcity of in situ observations of the minuscule diffusion region. Theoretically, both resistive and collisionless processes can initiate reconnection, but which process dominates in the magnetosphere is still debated. Here we report the serendipitous encounter of the Wind spacecraft with an active reconnection diffusion region, in which are detected key processes predicted by models of collisionless reconnection. The data therefore demonstrate that collisionless reconnection occurs in the magnetotail.

  4. PARTICLE ACCELERATION DURING MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN A COLLISIONLESS ACCRETION DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, Masahiro

    2013-08-20

    Particle acceleration during the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless accretion disk was investigated by using a particle-in-cell simulation. We discuss the important role that magnetic reconnection plays not only on the saturation of MRI but also on the relativistic particle generation. The plasma pressure anisotropy of p > p{sub ||} induced by the action of MRI dynamo leads to rapid growth in magnetic reconnection, resulting in the fast generation of nonthermal particles with a hard power-law spectrum. This efficient particle acceleration mechanism involved in a collisionless accretion disk may be a possible model to explain the origin of high-energy particles observed around massive black holes.

  5. The Link Between Shocks, Turbulence, and Magnetic Reconnection in Collisionless Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Vu, H. X.; Omelchenko, Y. A.; Scudder, J.; Daughton, W.; Dimmock, A.; Nykyri, K.; Wan, M.; Sibeck, D.; Tatineni, M.; Majumdar, A.; Loring, B.; Geveci, B.

    2014-01-01

    Global hybrid (electron fluid, kinetic ions) and fully kinetic simulations of the magnetosphere have been used to show surprising interconnection between shocks, turbulence and magnetic reconnection. In particular collisionless shocks with their reflected ions that can get upstream before retransmission can generate previously unforeseen phenomena in the post shocked flows: (i) formation of reconnecting current sheets and magnetic islands with sizes up to tens of ion inertial length. (ii) Generation of large scale low frequency electromagnetic waves that are compressed and amplified as they cross the shock. These 'wavefronts' maintain their integrity for tens of ion cyclotron times but eventually disrupt and dissipate their energy. (iii) Rippling of the shock front, which can in turn lead to formation of fast collimated jets extending to hundreds of ion inertial lengths downstream of the shock. The jets, which have high dynamical pressure, 'stir' the downstream region, creating large scale disturbances such as vortices, sunward flows, and can trigger flux ropes along the magnetopause. This phenomenology closes the loop between shocks, turbulence and magnetic reconnection in ways previously unrealized. These interconnections appear generic for the collisionless plasmas typical of space, and are expected even at planar shocks, although they will also occur at curved shocks as occur at planets or around ejecta.

  6. The link between shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Karimabadi, H.; Omelchenko, Y. A.; Roytershteyn, V.; Vu, H. X.; Scudder, J.; Daughton, W.; Dimmock, A.; Nykyri, K.; Wan, M.; Sibeck, D.; Tatineni, M.; Majumdar, A.; Loring, B.; Geveci, B.

    2014-06-15

    Global hybrid (electron fluid, kinetic ions) and fully kinetic simulations of the magnetosphere have been used to show surprising interconnection between shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection. In particular, collisionless shocks with their reflected ions that can get upstream before retransmission can generate previously unforeseen phenomena in the post shocked flows: (i) formation of reconnecting current sheets and magnetic islands with sizes up to tens of ion inertial length. (ii) Generation of large scale low frequency electromagnetic waves that are compressed and amplified as they cross the shock. These “wavefronts” maintain their integrity for tens of ion cyclotron times but eventually disrupt and dissipate their energy. (iii) Rippling of the shock front, which can in turn lead to formation of fast collimated jets extending to hundreds of ion inertial lengths downstream of the shock. The jets, which have high dynamical pressure, “stir” the downstream region, creating large scale disturbances such as vortices, sunward flows, and can trigger flux ropes along the magnetopause. This phenomenology closes the loop between shocks, turbulence, and magnetic reconnection in ways previously unrealized. These interconnections appear generic for the collisionless plasmas typical of space and are expected even at planar shocks, although they will also occur at curved shocks as occur at planets or around ejecta.

  7. Heat flux and viscosity of ions in the collisionless solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. L.

    1995-01-01

    Between 1 and 2 solar radii, the Coulomb-collision mean free path for thermal ions exceeds the scale height of the solar atmosphere. The expanding solar plasma becomes collisionless and the kinetics of the solar wind are no longer dominated by thermalizing collisions. The usual Braginskii-type expressions for solar wind ion heat flux and viscosity are no longer valid. However, another microscale still exists in the solar wind, dictated by the gyro-radius of ions in the turbulent embedded solar wind magnetic field. Wave-particle interactions will act to isotropize (but not thermalize) particle distributions, and the relevant microscale for this process is the ion gyro-radius. The ion distribution can be modelled as undergoing isotropizing 'collisions,' with the relevant mean free path scaling with gyro-radius. Here, the author presents the heat flux and viscosity expected for solar wind protons which are relaxing to isotropy on a microscale that scales with gyro-radius. The collisionless viscosity and heat flux have a functional dependence different than their collisional analogs. The collisional expressions for ion viscosity and heat flux drastically overestimate the efficiency of diffusive energy and momentum transport actually operative in the solar wind.

  8. Electron precipitation in solar flares - Collisionless effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Rowland, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    A large fraction of the electrons which are accelerated during the impulsive phase of solar flares stream towards the chromosphere and are unstable to the growth of plasma waves. The linear and nonlinear evolution of plasma waves as a function of time is analyzed with a set of rate equations that follows, in time, the nonlinearly coupled system of plasma waves-ion fluctuations. As an outcome of the fast transfer of wave energy from the beam to the ambient plasma, nonthermal electron tails are formed which can stabilize the anomalous Doppler resonance instability responsible for the pitch angle scattering of the beam electrons. The non-collisional losses of the precipitating electrons are estimated, and the observational implication of these results are discussed.

  9. Lithium drifted germanium system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fjarlie, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    General characteristics of the lithium-drifted germanium photodiode-Dewar-preamplifier system and particular operating instructions for the device are given. Information is included on solving operational problems.

  10. Continental drift before 1900.

    PubMed

    Rupke, N A

    1970-07-25

    The idea that Francis Bacon and other seventeenth and eighteenth century thinkers first conceived the notion of continental drift does not stand up to close scrutiny. The few authors who expressed the idea viewed the process as a catastrophic event.

  11. Coupled electron and ion nonlinear oscillations in a collisionless plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Karimov, A. R.

    2013-05-15

    Dynamics of coupled electrostatic electron and ion nonlinear oscillations in a collisionless plasma is studied with reference to a kinetic description. Proceeding from the exact solution of Vlasov-Maxwell equations written as a function of linear functions in the electron and ion velocities, we arrive at the two coupled nonlinear equations which describe the evolution of the system.

  12. Hydrodynamics of Collisionless Boltzmann Equation for a Highly Flattened Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, S.

    The collisionless Boltzmann equation is studied in order to be connected with hydrodynamic equations. Each of the later equations can be obtained by taking a moment of the former equation. The difficulty against the system of moment equations, called closure problem, can be overtaken by a trick of neglecting the terms of higher order moments under small-pressure assumption.

  13. Gyrokinetic-ion drift-kinetic-electron simulation of the (m = 2, n = 1) cylindrical tearing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Chowdhury, J.; Maksimovic, N.; Parker, S. E.; Wan, W.

    2016-05-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations of (m =2 ,n =1 ) tearing mode in cylindrical plasmas are carried out with kinetic electrons using the split-weight control-variate algorithm [Y. Chen and S. E. Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 220, 839 (2007)]. Radially, global simulation shows global mode structure in agreement with reduced-magnetohydrodynamic eigenmode calculation. Simulations of the tearing layer are verified with analytic results for the collisionless, semi-collisional, and drift-tearing mode.

  14. Ionospheric vertical drift response at a mid-latitude station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, Daniel; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    2016-07-01

    equinox. In general, the detected values of the observed vertical drift are of lower magnitudes compare to low latitudes. Drift data in midlatitudes seems to be more influenced by the atmospheric waves than data in lower latitudes.

  15. Drift Scale THM Model

    SciTech Connect

    J. Rutqvist

    2004-10-07

    This model report documents the drift scale coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes model development and presents simulations of the THM behavior in fractured rock close to emplacement drifts. The modeling and analyses are used to evaluate the impact of THM processes on permeability and flow in the near-field of the emplacement drifts. The results from this report are used to assess the importance of THM processes on seepage and support in the model reports ''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' and ''Abstraction of Drift Seepage'', and to support arguments for exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the analysis reports ''Features, Events, and Processes in Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport and Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events''. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations do not use any output from this report. Specifically, the coupled THM process model is applied to simulate the impact of THM processes on hydrologic properties (permeability and capillary strength) and flow in the near-field rock around a heat-releasing emplacement drift. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in elevated rock temperatures for thousands of years after waste emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, resulting in water redistribution and altered flow paths. These temperatures will also cause thermal expansion of the rock, with the potential of opening or closing fractures and thus changing fracture permeability in the near-field. Understanding the THM coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally induced permeability changes potentially effect the magnitude and spatial distribution of percolation flux in the vicinity of the drift, and hence the seepage of water into the drift. This is important because a sufficient amount of water must be available within a

  16. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIZED COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON-ION SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Spitkovsky, Anatoly E-mail: anatoly@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-01-10

    We investigate shock structure and particle acceleration in relativistic magnetized collisionless electron-ion shocks by means of 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations with ion-to-electron mass ratios (m{sub i} /m{sub e} ) ranging from 16 to 1000. We explore a range of inclination angles between the pre-shock magnetic field and the shock normal. In 'subluminal' shocks, where relativistic particles can escape ahead of the shock along the magnetic field lines, ions are efficiently accelerated via the first-order Fermi process. The downstream ion spectrum consists of a relativistic Maxwellian and a high-energy power-law tail, which contains {approx}5% of ions and {approx}30% of ion energy. Its slope is -2.1 {+-} 0.1. The scattering is provided by short-wavelength non-resonant modes produced by Bell's instability, whose growth is seeded by the current of shock-accelerated ions that propagate ahead of the shock. Upstream electrons enter the shock with lower energy than ions (albeit by only a factor of {approx}5 << m{sub i} /m{sub e} ), so they are more strongly tied to the field. As a result, only {approx}1% of the incoming electrons are accelerated at the shock before being advected downstream, where they populate a steep power-law tail (with slope -3.5 {+-} 0.1). For 'superluminal' shocks, where relativistic particles cannot outrun the shock along the field, the self-generated turbulence is not strong enough to permit efficient Fermi acceleration, and the ion and electron downstream spectra are consistent with thermal distributions. The incoming electrons are heated up to equipartition with ions, due to strong electromagnetic waves emitted by the shock into the upstream. Thus, efficient electron heating ({approx}>15% of the upstream ion energy) is the universal property of relativistic electron-ion shocks, but significant nonthermal acceleration of electrons ({approx}>2% by number, {approx}>10% by energy, with slope flatter than -2.5) is hard to achieve in

  17. The Drifting Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    By studying in great detail the 'ringing' of a planet-harbouring star, a team of astronomers using ESO's 3.6-m telescope have shown that it must have drifted away from the metal-rich Hyades cluster. This discovery has implications for theories of star and planet formation, and for the dynamics of our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 09a/08 ESO PR Photo 09a/08 Iota Horologii The yellow-orange star Iota Horologii, located 56 light-years away towards the southern Horologium ("The Clock") constellation, belongs to the so-called "Hyades stream", a large number of stars that move in the same direction. Previously, astronomers using an ESO telescope had shown that the star harbours a planet, more than 2 times as large as Jupiter and orbiting in 320 days (ESO 12/99). But until now, all studies were unable to pinpoint the exact characteristics of the star, and hence to understand its origin. A team of astronomers, led by Sylvie Vauclair from the University of Toulouse, France, therefore decided to use the technique of 'asteroseismology' to unlock the star's secrets. "In the same way as geologists monitor how seismic waves generated by earthquakes propagate through the Earth and learn about the inner structure of our planet, it is possible to study sound waves running through a star, which forms a sort of large, spherical bell," says Vauclair. The 'ringing' from this giant musical instrument provides astronomers with plenty of information about the physical conditions in the star's interior. And to 'listen to the music', the astronomers used one of the best instruments available. The observations were conducted in November 2006 during 8 consecutive nights with the state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla. Up to 25 'notes' could be identified in the unique dataset, most of them corresponding to waves having a period of about 6.5 minutes. These observations allowed the astronomers to obtain a very precise portrait of Iota Horologii: its

  18. Intense laser driven collision-less shock and ion acceleration in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mima, K.; Jia, Q.; Cai, H. B.; Taguchi, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Sanz, J. R.; Honrubia, J.

    2016-05-01

    The generation of strong magnetic field with a laser driven coil has been demonstrated by many experiments. It is applicable to the magnetized fast ignition (MFI), the collision-less shock in the astrophysics and the ion shock acceleration. In this paper, the longitudinal magnetic field effect on the shock wave driven by the radiation pressure of an intense short pulse laser is investigated by theory and simulations. The transition of a laminar shock (electro static shock) to the turbulent shock (electromagnetic shock) occurs, when the external magnetic field is applied in near relativistic cut-off density plasmas. This transition leads to the enhancement of conversion of the laser energy into high energy ions. The enhancement of the conversion efficiency is important for the ion driven fast ignition and the laser driven neutron source. It is found that the total number of ions reflected by the shock increases by six time when the magnetic field is applied.

  19. Collisionless shocks driven by 800 nm laser pulses generate high-energy carbon ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Shen, B. F. Wang, W. P.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Y. Q.; Liang, X. Y.; Leng, Y. X.; Li, R. X. Xu, Z. Z.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.

    2015-01-15

    We present experimental studies on ion acceleration from diamond-like carbon (DLC) foils irradiated by 800 nm, linearly polarized laser pulses with peak intensity of 1.7 × 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2} to 3.5 × 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2} at oblique incidence. Diamond-like carbon foils are heated by the prepulse of a high-contrast laser pulse and expand to form plasmas of near-critical density caused by thermal effect before the arrival of the main pulse. It is demonstrated that carbon ions are accelerated by a collisionless shock wave in slightly overdense plasma excited by forward-moving hot electrons generated by the main pulse.

  20. A description of electron heating with an electrostatic potential jump in a parallel, collisionless, fire hose shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Jones, Frank C.

    1988-01-01

    The electron heating required if protons scatter elastically in a parallel, collisionless shock is calculated. Near-elastic proton scattering off large amplitude background magnetic field fluctuations might be expected if the waves responsible for the shock dissipation are generated by the fire hose instability. The effects of an electrostatic potential jump in the shock layer are included by assuming that the energy lost by protons in traversing the potential jump is converted into electron thermal pressure. It is found that the electron temperature increase is a strong function of the potential jump. Comparison is made to the parallel shock plasma simulation of Quest (1987).

  1. Drift Degradation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D. Kicker

    2004-09-16

    Degradation of underground openings as a function of time is a natural and expected occurrence for any subsurface excavation. Over time, changes occur to both the stress condition and the strength of the rock mass due to several interacting factors. Once the factors contributing to degradation are characterized, the effects of drift degradation can typically be mitigated through appropriate design and maintenance of the ground support system. However, for the emplacement drifts of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, it is necessary to characterize drift degradation over a 10,000-year period, which is well beyond the functional period of the ground support system. This document provides an analysis of the amount of drift degradation anticipated in repository emplacement drifts for discrete events and time increments extending throughout the 10,000-year regulatory period for postclosure performance. This revision of the drift degradation analysis was developed to support the license application and fulfill specific agreement items between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The earlier versions of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 156304]) relied primarily on the DRKBA numerical code, which provides for a probabilistic key-block assessment based on realistic fracture patterns determined from field mapping in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. A key block is defined as a critical block in the surrounding rock mass of an excavation, which is removable and oriented in an unsafe manner such that it is likely to move into an opening unless support is provided. However, the use of the DRKBA code to determine potential rockfall data at the repository horizon during the postclosure period has several limitations: (1) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply dynamic loads due to seismic ground motion. (2) The DRKBA code cannot explicitly apply loads due to thermal stress. (3) The DRKBA

  2. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  3. The dispersive Alfven wave in the time-stationary limit with a focus on collisional and warm-plasma effects

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, S. M.; Koepke, M. E.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2008-05-15

    A nonlinear, collisional, two-fluid model of uniform plasma convection across a field-aligned current (FAC) sheet, describing the stationary Alfven (StA) wave, is presented. In a previous work, Knudsen showed that, for cold, collisionless plasma [D. J. Knudsen, J. Geophys. Res. 101, 10761 (1996)], the stationary inertial Alfven (StIA) wave can accelerate electrons parallel to a background magnetic field and cause large, time-independent plasma-density variations having spatial periodicity in the direction of the convective flow over a broad range of spatial scales and energies. Knudsen suggested that these fundamental properties of the StIA wave may play a role in the formation of discrete auroral arcs. Here, Knudsen's model has been generalized for warm, collisional plasma. From this generalization, it is shown that nonzero ion-neutral and electron-ion collisional resistivity significantly alters the perpendicular ac and dc structure of magnetic-field-aligned electron drift, and can either dissipate or enhance the field-aligned electron energy depending on the initial value of field-aligned electron drift velocity. It is also shown that nonzero values of plasma pressure increase the dominant Fourier component of perpendicular wavenumber.

  4. A modified WKB formulation for linear eigenmodes of a collisionless self-gravitating disc in the epicyclic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulati, Mamta; Saini, Tarun Deep

    2016-07-01

    The short-wave asymptotics (WKB) of spiral density waves in self-gravitating stellar discs is well suited for the study of the dynamics of tightly-wound wavepackets. But the textbook WKB theory is not well adapted to the study of the linear eigenmodes in a collisionless self-gravitating disc because of the transcendental nature of the dispersion relation. We present a modified WKB theory of spiral density waves, for collisionless discs in the epicyclic limit, in which the perturbed gravitational potential is related to the perturbed surface density by the Poisson integral in Kalnaj's logarithmic spiral form. An integral equation is obtained for the surface density perturbation, which is seen to also reduce to the standard WKB dispersion relation. Although our formulation is general and applies to all discs, we present our analysis only for nearly Keplerian, low-mass, self-gravitating discs revolving around massive central objects, and derive an integral equation governing the slow precessional modes of such discs. For a prograde disc, the integral kernel turns out be real and symmetric, implying that all slow modes are stable. We apply the slow mode integral equation to two unperturbed disc profiles, the Jalali-Tremaine annular discs, and the Kuzmin disc. We determine eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for both m = 1 and m = 2 slow modes for these profiles and discuss their properties. Our results compare well with those of Jalali-Tremaine.

  5. Theoretical Studies of Drift-Alfven and Energetic Particle Physics in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chen

    2005-07-06

    Nonlinear equations for the slow space-time evolution of the radial drift-wave envelope and zonal flow amplitude have been self-consistently derived for a model nonuniform tokamak equilibrium within the coherent four-wave drift wave-zonal flow modulation interaction model of Chen, Lin, and White [Phys. Plasmas 7, 3129 (2000)]. Solutions clearly demonstrate turbulence spreading due to nonlinearly dispersiveness and, consequently, the device-size dependence of the saturated wave intensities and transport coefficients.

  6. Collisionless Weibel Shocks and Electron Acceleration in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardaneh, Kazem; Cai, Dongsheng; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Lembége, Bertrand

    2015-09-01

    A study of collisionless external shocks in gamma-ray bursts is presented. The shock structure, electromagnetic field, and process of electron acceleration are assessed by performing a self-consistent 3D particle-in-cell simulation. In accordance with hydrodynamic shock systems, the shock consists of a reverse shock (RS) and forward shock separated by a contact discontinuity. The development and structure are controlled by the ion Weibel instability. The ion filaments are sources of strong transverse electromagnetic fields at both sides of the double shock structure over a length of 30–100 ion skin depths. Electrons are heated up to a maximum energy {ε }{ele}≈ \\sqrt{{ε }{{b}}}, where ɛ is the energy normalized to the total incoming energy. Jet electrons are trapped in the RS transition region due to the presence of an ambipolar electric field and reflection by the strong transverse magnetic fields in the shocked region. In a process similar to shock surfing acceleration for ions, electrons experience drift motion and acceleration by ion filament transverse electric fields in the plane perpendicular to the shock propagation direction. Ultimately, accelerated jet electrons are convected back into the upstream.

  7. Collisionless Weibel Shocks and Electron Acceleration in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardaneh, Kazem; Cai, Dongsheng; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Lembége, Bertrand

    2015-09-01

    A study of collisionless external shocks in gamma-ray bursts is presented. The shock structure, electromagnetic field, and process of electron acceleration are assessed by performing a self-consistent 3D particle-in-cell simulation. In accordance with hydrodynamic shock systems, the shock consists of a reverse shock (RS) and forward shock separated by a contact discontinuity. The development and structure are controlled by the ion Weibel instability. The ion filaments are sources of strong transverse electromagnetic fields at both sides of the double shock structure over a length of 30-100 ion skin depths. Electrons are heated up to a maximum energy {ɛ }{ele}≈ \\sqrt{{ɛ }{{b}}}, where ɛ is the energy normalized to the total incoming energy. Jet electrons are trapped in the RS transition region due to the presence of an ambipolar electric field and reflection by the strong transverse magnetic fields in the shocked region. In a process similar to shock surfing acceleration for ions, electrons experience drift motion and acceleration by ion filament transverse electric fields in the plane perpendicular to the shock propagation direction. Ultimately, accelerated jet electrons are convected back into the upstream.

  8. Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Collisionless Driven Reconnection with Open Boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimas, Alex; Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji; Kuznetsova, Maria

    2010-01-01

    First results are discussed from an ongoing study of driven collisionless reconnection using a 2 1/2-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation model with open inflow and outflow boundaries. An extended electron diffusion region (EEDR) is defined as that region surrounding a reconnecting neutral line in which the out-of-plane nonideal electric field is positive. It is shown that the boundaries of this region in the directions of the outflow jets are at the positions where the electrons make the transition from unfrozen meandering motion in the current sheet to outward drifting with the magnetic field in the outflow jets; a turning length scale is defined to mark these positions, The initial width of the EEDR in the inflow directions is comparable to the electron bounce width. Later. as shoulders develop to form a two-scale structure. thc EEDR width expands to the ion bounce width scale. The inner portion of the EEDR or the electron diffusion region proper remains at the electron bounce width. Two methods are introduced for predicting the reconnection electric field using the dimensions of the EEDR. These results are interpreted as further evidence that the EEDR is the region that is relevant to understanding the electron role in the neutral line vicinity.

  9. Collisionless shock experiments with lasers and observation of Weibel instabilitiesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H.-S.; Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Kugland, N. L.; Kuranz, C. C.; Lamb, D. Q.; Levy, M. C.; Li, C. K.; Meinecke, J.; Morita, T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Pollock, B. B.; Remington, B. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M.; Ross, J. S.; Ryutov, D. D.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Takabe, H.; Turnbull, D. P.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weber, S. V.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2015-05-01

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are common in the universe, occurring in supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, and protostellar jets. They appear in colliding plasma flows when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions is much larger than the system size. It is believed that such shocks could be mediated via the electromagnetic Weibel instability in astrophysical environments without pre-existing magnetic fields. Here, we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers and investigate the dynamics of high-Mach-number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Our recent proton-probe experiments on Omega show the characteristic filamentary structures of the Weibel instability that are electromagnetic in nature with an inferred magnetization level as high as ˜1% [C. M. Huntington et al., "Observation of magnetic field generation via the weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows," Nat. Phys. 11, 173-176 (2015)]. These results imply that electromagnetic instabilities are significant in the interaction of astrophysical conditions.

  10. Collisionless shock experiments with lasers and observation of Weibel instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H. -S.; Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Kugland, N. L.; Kuranz, C. C.; Lamb, D. Q.; Levy, M. C.; Li, C. K.; Meinecke, J.; Morita, T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Pollock, B. B.; Remington, B. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M.; Ross, J. S.; Ryutov, D. D.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Takabe, H.; Turnbull, D. P.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weber, S. V.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2015-05-13

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are common in the universe, occurring in supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, and protostellar jets. They appear in colliding plasma flows when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions is much larger than the system size. It is believed that such shocks could be mediated via the electromagnetic Weibel instability in astrophysical environments without preexisting magnetic fields. Here, we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers and investigate the dynamics of high-Mach-number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Our recent proton-probe experiments on Omega show the characteristic filamentary structures of the Weibel instability that are electromagnetic in nature with an inferred magnetization level as high as ~1% These results imply that electromagnetic instabilities are significant in the interaction of astrophysical conditions.

  11. Exploring the nature of collisionless shocks under laboratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stockem, A.; Fiuza, F.; Bret, A.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-01-01

    Collisionless shocks are pervasive in astrophysics and they are critical to understand cosmic ray acceleration. Laboratory experiments with intense lasers are now opening the way to explore and characterise the underlying microphysics, which determine the acceleration process of collisionless shocks. We determine the shock character – electrostatic or electromagnetic – based on the stability of electrostatic shocks to transverse electromagnetic fluctuations as a function of the electron temperature and flow velocity of the plasma components, and we compare the analytical model with particle-in-cell simulations. By making the connection with the laser parameters driving the plasma flows, we demonstrate that shocks with different and distinct underlying microphysics can be explored in the laboratory with state-of-the-art laser systems. PMID:24488212

  12. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    The infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behavior of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results are used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the big flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.

  13. Collisionless shock formation, spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations, and streaming instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.; Stockem, A.; Fiuza, F.; Silva, L. O.; Narayan, R.

    2013-04-15

    Collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysics and in the lab. Recent numerical simulations and experiments have shown how they can arise from the encounter of two collisionless plasma shells. When the shells interpenetrate, the overlapping region turns unstable, triggering the shock formation. As a first step towards a microscopic understanding of the process, we analyze here in detail the initial instability phase. On the one hand, 2D relativistic Particle-In-Cell simulations are performed where two symmetric initially cold pair plasmas collide. On the other hand, the instabilities at work are analyzed, as well as the field at saturation and the seed field which gets amplified. For mildly relativistic motions and onward, Weibel modes govern the linear phase. We derive an expression for the duration of the linear phase in good agreement with the simulations. This saturation time constitutes indeed a lower-bound for the shock formation time.

  14. Collisionless shock experiments with lasers and observation of Weibel instabilities

    DOE PAGES

    Park, H. -S.; Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Kugland, N. L.; Kuranz, C. C.; Lamb, D. Q.; et al

    2015-05-13

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are common in the universe, occurring in supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, and protostellar jets. They appear in colliding plasma flows when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions is much larger than the system size. It is believed that such shocks could be mediated via the electromagnetic Weibel instability in astrophysical environments without preexisting magnetic fields. Here, we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers and investigate the dynamics of high-Mach-number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Our recent proton-probe experiments on Omega show the characteristic filamentary structures of the Weibel instability that are electromagneticmore » in nature with an inferred magnetization level as high as ~1% These results imply that electromagnetic instabilities are significant in the interaction of astrophysical conditions.« less

  15. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    DOE PAGES

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We found that the infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We also discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behaviour of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results aremore » used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the Big Flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic, and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.« less

  16. Continental drift before 1900.

    PubMed

    Rupke, N A

    1970-07-25

    The idea that Francis Bacon and other seventeenth and eighteenth century thinkers first conceived the notion of continental drift does not stand up to close scrutiny. The few authors who expressed the idea viewed the process as a catastrophic event. PMID:16057953

  17. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  18. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Collisionless Reconnection in an Electron-Positron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bessho, N.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2005-12-09

    Electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of fast collisionless reconnection in a two-dimensional electron-positron plasma (without an equilibrium guide field) are presented. A generalized Ohm's law in which the Hall current cancels out exactly is given. It is suggested that the key to fast reconnection in this plasma is the localization caused by the off-diagonal components of the pressure tensors, which produce an effect analogous to a spatially localized resistivity.

  20. How to Patch Active Plasma and Collisionless Sheath: Practical Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-08-22

    Most plasmas have a very thin sheath compared with the plasma dimension. This necessitates separate calculations of the plasma and sheath. The Bohm criterion provides the boundary condition for calculation of plasma profiles. To calculate sheath properties, a value of electric field at the plasma-sheath interface has to be specified in addition to the Bohm criterion. The value of the boundary electric field and robust procedure to approximately patch plasma and collisionless sheath with a very good accuracy are reported.

  1. MHD instabilities of collisionless space plasma with heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. D.; Dzhalilov, N. S.

    2014-12-01

    Properties of instabilities in a collisionless plasma are considered based on 16-moment MHD equations with allowance for differences between the heat fluxes along the magnetic field due to longitudinal and transverse thermal ion motions. It is shown that the increments and thresholds appreciably depend on these two heat fluxes for all compressible instabilities arising in the MHD approach (second compressible fire-hose, mirror, and thermal instabilities).

  2. Vlasov simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection without background density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, H.; Grauer, R.

    2008-02-01

    A standard starting point for the simulation of collisionless reconnection is the Harris equilibrium which is made up of a current sheet that separates two regions of opposing magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of collisionless reconnection usually include a homogeneous background density for reasons of numerical stability. While, in some cases, this is a realistic assumption, the background density may introduce new effects both due to the more involved structure of the distribution function or due to the fact that the Alfvèn speed remains finite far away from the current sheet. We present a fully kinetic Vlasov simulation of the perturbed Harris equilibrium using a Vlasov code. Parameters are chosen to match the Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) Magnetic Reconnection Challenge but excluding the background density. This allows to compare with earlier simulations [Schmitz H, Grauer R. Kinetic Vlasov simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection. Phys Plasmas 2006;13:092309] which include the background density. It is found that the absence of a background density causes the reconnection rate to be higher. On the other hand, the time until the onset of reconnection is hardly affected. Again the off diagonal elements of the pressure tensor are found to be important on the X-line but with modified importance for the individual terms.

  3. Dike Propagation Near Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) supporting the Site Recommendation/License Application (SR/LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project is the development of elementary analyses of the interactions of a hypothetical dike with a repository drift (i.e., tunnel) and with the drift contents at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This effort is intended to support the analysis of disruptive events for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). This AMR supports the Process Model Report (PMR) on disruptive events (CRWMS M&O 2000a). This purpose is documented in the development plan (DP) ''Coordinate Modeling of Dike Propagation Near Drifts Consequences for TSPA-SR/LA'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). Evaluation of that Development Plan and the work to be conducted to prepare Interim Change Notice (ICN) 1 of this report, which now includes the design option of ''Open'' drifts, indicated that no revision to that DP was needed. These analyses are intended to provide reasonable bounds for a number of expected effects: (1) Temperature changes to the waste package from exposure to magma; (2) The gas flow available to degrade waste containers during the intrusion; (3) Movement of the waste package as it is displaced by the gas, pyroclasts and magma from the intruding dike (the number of packages damaged); (4) Movement of the backfill (Backfill is treated here as a design option); (5) The nature of the mechanics of the dike/drift interaction. These analyses serve two objectives: to provide preliminary analyses needed to support evaluation of the consequences of an intrusive event and to provide a basis for addressing some of the concerns of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expressed in the Igneous Activity Issue Resolution Status Report.

  4. DRIFT COMPENSATED DIRECT COUPLED AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Windsor, A.A.

    1959-05-01

    An improved direct-coupled amplifier having zerolevel drift correction is described. The need for an auxiliary corrective-potential amplifier is eliminated thereby giving protection against overload saturation of the zero- level drift correcting circuit. (T.R.H.)

  5. Linear theory for fast collisionless magnetic reconnection in the lower-hybrid frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, D.; Shukla, P. K.

    2005-05-01

    A linear theory is presented for the interplay between the fast collisionless magnetic reconnection and the lower-hybrid waves that has been observed in recent computer simulations [J. F. Drake, M. Swisdak, C. Cattell et al., Science 299, 873 (2003)]. In plasma configurations with a strong guide field and anisotropic electron temperature, the electron dynamics is described within the framework of standard electron magnetohydrodynamic equations, accounting also for the effects of the electron polarization and ion motions in the presence of perpendicular electric fields. In the linear phase, we find two types of instabilities of a thin current sheet with steep edges, corresponding to its filamentation (or tearing) and bending. Using a surface-wave formalism for the perturbations whose wavelength is larger than the thickness of the current sheet, the corresponding growth rates are calculated as the contributions of singularities in the plasma dispersion function. These are governed by the electron inertia and the linear coupling of the reconnecting magnetic field with local plasma modes propagating in the perpendicular direction that are subject to the Buneman instability. The linear surface wave instability may be particularly important as a secondary instability, dissipating the thin current sheets that develop in the course of the fast reconnection in the shear-Alfvén and kinetic-Alfvén regimes, and providing the anomalous resistivity for the growth of magnetic islands beyond the shear-Alfvén and kinetic-Alfvén scales.

  6. Relativistic tearing and drift-kink instabilities in two-fluid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkov, Maxim V.; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2016-05-01

    The stability of current sheets in collisionless relativistic pair plasma was studied via two-dimensional two-fluid relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations with vanishing internal friction between fluids. In particular, we investigated the linear growth of the tearing and drift-kink modes in the current sheets both with and without the guide field and obtained the growth rates which are very similar to what has been found in the corresponding particle in cell (PIC) simulations. This suggests that the two-fluid simulations can be useful in studying the large-scale dynamics of astrophysical relativistic plasmas in problems involving magnetic reconnection.

  7. Steady-State Electrostatic Layers From Weibel Instability in Relativistic Collisionless Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Milosavljevic, Milos; Nakar, Ehud; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-08-04

    It is generally accepted that magnetic fields generated in the nonlinear development of the transverse Weibel instability provide effective collisionality in unmagnetized collisionless shocks. Recently, extensive two and three dimensional simulations improved our understanding of the growth and saturation of the instability in colliding plasma shells. However, the steady-state structure of the shock wave transition layers remains poorly understood. We use basic physical considerations and order-of-magnitude arguments to study the steady state structure in relativistic unmagnetized collisionless shocks in pair plasmas. The shock contains an electrostatic layer resulting from the formation of stationary, magnetically-focused current filaments. The filaments form where the cold upstream plasma and the counterstreaming thermal plasma interpenetrate. The filaments are not entirely neutral and strong electrostatic fields are present. Most of the downstream particles cannot cross this layer into the upstream because they are trapped by the electrostatic field. We identify the critical location in the shock transition layer where the electromagnetic field ceases to be static. At this location, the degree of charge separation in the filaments reaches a maximum value, the current inside the filaments comes close to the Alfven limit, and the phase space distribution function starts to isotropize. We argue that the radius of the current filaments upstream of the critical location is about twice the upstream plasma skin depth. Finally, we show that some downstream particles cross the electrostatic layer and run ahead of the shock into the preshock medium without causing instability. These particles may play an important role in particle acceleration.

  8. Preferential heating of oxygen 5+ ions by finite-amplitude oblique Alfvén waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Yana G.; Viñas, Adolfo; Araneda, Jaime; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-03-01

    Minor ions in the fast solar wind are known to have higher temperatures and to flow faster than protons in the interplanetary space. In this study we combine previous research on parametric instability theory and 2.5D hybrid simulations to study the onset of preferential heating of Oxygen 5+ ions by large-scale finite-amplitude Alfvén waves in the collisionless fast solar wind. We consider initially non-drifting isotropic multi-species plasma, consisting of isothermal massless fluid electrons, kinetic protons and kinetic Oxygen 5+ ions. The external energy source for the plasma heating and energization are oblique monochromatic Alfvén-cyclotron waves. The waves have been created by rotating the direction of initial parallel pump, which is a solution of the multi-fluid plasma dispersion relation. We consider propagation angles θ ≤ 30°. The obliquely propagating Alfvén pump waves lead to strong diffusion in the ion phase space, resulting in highly anisotropic heavy ion velocity distribution functions and proton beams. We discuss the application of the model to the problems of preferential heating of minor ions in the solar corona and the fast solar wind.

  9. Particle-in-cell simulations of an alpha channeling scenario: electron current drive arising from lower hybrid drift instability of fusion-born ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, James; Chapman, Sandra; Dendy, Richard

    2010-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of fusion-born protons in deuterium plasmas demonstrate a key alpha channeling phenomenon for tokamak fusion plasmas. We focus on obliquely propagating modes at the plasma edge, excited by centrally born fusion products on banana orbits, known to be responsible for observations of ion cyclotron emission in JET and TFTR. A fully self-consistent electromagnetic 1D3V PIC code evolves a ring-beam distribution of 3MeV protons in a 10keV thermal deuterium-electron plasma with realistic mass ratio. A collective instability occurs, giving rise to electromagnetic field activity in the lower hybrid range of frequencies. Waves spontaneously excited by this lower hybrid drift instability undergo Landau damping on resonant electrons, drawing out an asymmetric tail in the distribution of electron parallel velocities, which constitutes a net current. These simulations demonstrate a key building block of some alpha channeling scenarios: the direct collisionless coupling of fusion product energy into a form which can help sustain the equilibrium of the tokamak.

  10. Turbulent energization of ions in warm collisionless plasmas - hybrid simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Yana; Vinas, Adolfo; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-04-01

    Turbulent waves and structures are ubiquitous and indispensable part of the solar wind throughout the Heliosphere and have crucial contribution to the energization of particles in the warm collisionless plasma near the Earth, especially in regions where strong wave activity is observed. Wave-based turbulent energization of protons and minor ions in the undisturbed solar wind can occur through resonant and non-resonant wave-particle interactions and related wave absorption, particle scattering and diffusion in phase space. The efficiency of the ion heating depends on the characteristics of the waves carrying energy at the ion scales, such as polarization, direction of propagation and spectral properties of the fluctuations. The observed solar wind turbulence includes different types of waves at all scales, starting from the large-scale fluid regime and reaching towards the small electron scales, where the magnetic fluctuations are ultimately dissipated. Although the spatial and temporal scales of these fluctuation are separated by few orders of magnitudes, they can still exchange energy due to large and small-scales turbulent cascades. Trying to model part of the solar wind turbulence at the ion scales we assume a superposition of non-resonant Alfvén waves, which follow Kolmogorov-type spectral slope by construction. Such waves are frequently observed in situ in the solar wind, and yet their specific role for the energization of minor ions remains unclear. We perform 2.5D hybrid simulations with fluid electrons, kinetic ions and minor ions to study the effects of turbulent energization of minor ions by initial broad-band spectra, consisting of parallel and oblique forward propagating Alfvén waves. The numerical model is driven by observations of the solar wind plasma parameters at 1AU and takes into account the differential streaming between the protons and the minor ions. For the chosen spectral range of the external initial wave spectra we observe preferential

  11. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  12. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, J.

    1984-02-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  13. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ferreira, Ix-B.; García-Herrera, J.; Villaseñor, L.

    2006-09-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas.

  14. Multisatellite studies of ULF waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Kazue

    1988-01-01

    Multisatellite studies of ULF waves are reviewed, with a special emphasis on compressional Pc 5 waves. The observations of the radial extent, azimuthal wave number and the field-aligned standing wave structure of the waves are described. When combined with plasma data, the waves appear to be consistent with drift-mirror waves originating from the pressure anisotropy of the ring current plasma. The most recent observations revealed some features not considered in previous theories of the drift-mirror wave: antisymmetric standing wave structure and rather small pressure anisotropy that can drive the waves to instability. Recent theoretical work shows that these observations can be explained if the coupling of the drift-mirror wave to the shear Alfven wave is properly treated in a realistic magnetic field geometry.

  15. Oblique firehose instability in hot collisionless plasmas - interplay between protons and electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Yana; Lazar, Marian; Vinas, Adolfo; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-04-01

    We solve the linearized kinetic Vlasov-Maxwell dispersion relation for oblique wave propagation in a homogeneous highly anisotropic hot electron-proton plasma. We assume bi-Maxwellian velocity distributions for both species, charge neutrality and current conservation, and consider no differential streaming between the ions and the electrons. We calculate the growth rate of the parallel and oblique proton firehose instabilities for various angles of wave propagation and varios electron plasma properties. We study the transition from stable to unstable scales with increasing electron temperature and temperature anisotropies. We find that for highly anisotropic hot plasma both the oscillatory parallel and the aperiodic oblique proton firehose branches may easily couple to the parallel and oblique electron firehose branches. In other words our work demonstrates the interplay between the proton and electron firehose instabilities, whose scales become fully mixed in hot collisionless plasma when the protons and the electrons are simultaneously anisotropic. In the case of parallel wave propagation both left and right-hand polarized waves are simultaneously excited. As we increase the angle of propagation the electron firehose starts to dominate with excitation of large-amplitude aperiodic fluctuations over a large range of wave-numbers, starting at the protons scales and extending up to the smaller electron scales. Whereas the maximum growth rate of the parallel proton firehose branch remains always at the proton scales, the maximum growth rate for the oblique proton firehose extends down to the electron scales. The observed electron-proton scale mixing can have significant implications for the observed plasma properties and instability thresholds in hot colissionless solar wind streams.

  16. Emplacement Drift System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-31

    The Emplacement Drift System is part of the Engineered Barrier System and provides the interface between the various waste package (WP) systems and the Ground Control System. In conjunction with the various WPs, the Emplacement Drift System limits the release and transport of radionuclides from the WP to the Natural Barrier following waste emplacement. Collectively, the Emplacement Drift System consists of the structural support hardware (emplacement drift invert and WP emplacement pallet) and any performance-enhancing barriers (drip shields and invert ballast) installed or placed in the emplacement drifts. The Emplacement Drift System is entirely located within the emplacement drifts in the subsurface portion of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR); specifically, it is physically bounded by the Subsurface Facility System, the Ground Support System, and the Natural Barrier. The Emplacement Drift System supports the key MGR functions of limiting radionuclide release to the Natural Barrier, minimizing the likelihood of a criticality external to the WPs, limiting natural and induced environmental effects, and providing WP support. The Emplacement Drift System limits radionuclide release to the Natural Barrier by controlling the movement of radionuclides within the emplacement drift and to the Natural Barrier, and by limiting water contact with the WPs. The Emplacement Drift System provides physical support and barriers for emplaced WPs that reduce water contact. The Emplacement Drift WP spacing supports the thermal loading performance by complimenting drift layout and orientation as described in the system description document for the Subsurface Facility System. The Emplacement Drift System supports the WP and also provides an environment that aids in enhancing WP confinement performance. As part of the Engineered Barrier System, the Emplacement Drift System interfaces with the WP systems. The Emplacement Drift System also interfaces with the Natural Barrier

  17. Critical pitch angle for electron acceleration in a collisionless shock layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Y.; Comişel, H.; Motschmann, U.

    2016-07-01

    Collisionless shock waves in space and astrophysical plasmas can accelerate electrons along the shock layer by an electrostatic potential, and scatter or reflect electrons back to the upstream region by the amplified magnetic field or turbulent fluctuations. The notion of the critical pitch angle is introduced for non-adiabatic electron acceleration by balancing the two timescales under a quasi-perpendicular shock wave geometry in which the upstream magnetic field is nearly perpendicular to the shock layer normal direction. An analytic expression of the critical pitch angle is obtained as a function of the electron velocity parallel to the magnetic field, the ratio of the electron gyro- to plasma frequency, the cross-shock potential, the width of the shock transition layer, and the shock angle (which is the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the shock normal direction). For typical non-relativistic solar system applications, the critical pitch angle is predicted to be about 10°. An efficient acceleration is expected below the critical pitch angle.

  18. Time-dependent closure relations for relativistic collisionless fluid equations

    SciTech Connect

    Bendib-Kalache, K.; Bendib, A.; El Hadj, K. Mohammed

    2010-11-15

    Linear fluid equations for relativistic and collisionless plasmas are derived. Closure relations for the fluid equations are analytically computed from the relativistic Vlasov equation in the Fourier space ({omega},k), where {omega} and k are the conjugate variables of time t and space x variables, respectively. The mathematical method used is based on the projection operator techniques and the continued fraction mathematical tools. The generalized heat flux and stress tensor are calculated for arbitrary parameter {omega}/kc where c is the speed of light, and for arbitrary relativistic parameter z=mc{sup 2}/T, where m is the particle rest mass and T, the plasma temperature in energy units.

  19. A new fast reconnection model in a collisionless regime

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, David

    2008-11-15

    Based on the first principles [i.e., (i) by balancing the magnetic field advection with the term containing electron pressure tensor nongyrotropic components in the generalized Ohm's law; (ii) using the conservation of mass; and (iii) assuming that the weak magnetic field region width, where electron meandering motion supports electron pressure tensor off-diagonal (nongyrotropic) components, is of the order of electron Larmor radius] a simple model of magnetic reconnection in a collisionless regime is formulated. The model is general, resembling its collisional Sweet-Parker analog in that it is not specific to any initial configuration, e.g., Harris-type tearing unstable current sheet, X-point collapse or otherwise. In addition to its importance from the fundamental point of view, the collisionless reconnection model offers a much faster reconnection rate [M{sub c{sup '}}{sub less}=(c/{omega}{sub pe}){sup 2}/(r{sub L,e}L)] than Sweet-Parker's classical one (M{sub sp}=S{sup -1/2}). The width of the diffusion region (current sheet) in the collisionless regime is found to be {delta}{sub c{sup '}}{sub less}=(c/{omega}{sub pe}){sup 2}/r{sub L,e}, which is independent of the global reconnection scale L and is only prescribed by microphysics (electron inertial length, c/{omega}{sub pe}, and electron Larmor radius, r{sub L,e}). Amongst other issues, the fastness of the reconnection rate alleviates, e.g., the problem of interpretation of solar flares by means of reconnection, as for the typical solar coronal parameters the obtained collisionless reconnection time can be a few minutes, as opposed to Sweet-Parker's equivalent value of less than a day. The new theoretical reconnection rate is compared to the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment device experimental data by Yamada et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 052119 (2006)] and Ji et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, 13106 (2008)], and a good agreement is obtained.

  20. A mean field Ohm's law for collisionless plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H. ); Diamond, P.H. )

    1993-11-01

    A mean field Ohm's law valid for collisionless plasmas is derived kinetically. It is shown that contrary to conventional thinking, the resulting hyperresistivity is significantly smaller than its fluid counterpart due to the fact that the turbulent decorrelation rate is linked to the rapid electron ballistic motion rather than the slower nonlinear mixing time. Moreover, the off-diagonal contributions to the parallel electron momentum flux are shown to result in Ohm's law renormalizations that dwarf the current diffusivity and break radial parity symmetry.

  1. Neoclassical Transport Caused by Collisionless Scattering across an Asymmetric Separatrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.; Driscoll, C. F.; Tsidulko, Yu. A.

    2010-10-29

    Plasma loss due to apparatus asymmetries is a ubiquitous phenomenon in magnetic plasma confinement. When the plasma equilibrium has locally trapped particle populations partitioned by a separatrix from one another and from passing particles, the asymmetry transport is enhanced. The trapped and passing particle populations react differently to the asymmetries, leading to the standard 1/{nu} and {radical}({nu}) transport regimes of superbanana orbit theory as particles collisionally scatter from one orbit type to another. However, when the separatrix is itself asymmetric, particles can collisionlessly transit from trapped to passing and back, leading to enhanced transport.

  2. Reconnection properties in collisionless plasma with open boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, H. E.; Ma, Z. W.; Huang, J.

    2014-07-15

    Collisionless magnetic reconnection in a Harris current sheet with different initial thicknesses is investigated using a 21/2 -D Darwin particle-in-cell simulation with the magnetosonic open boundary condition. It is found that the thicknesses of the ion dissipation region and the reconnection current sheet, when the reconnection rate E{sub r} reaches its first peak, are independent of the initial thickness of the current sheet; while the peak reconnection rate depends on it. The peak reconnection rate increases with decrease of the current sheet thickness as E{sub r}∼a{sup −1/2}, where a is the initial current sheet half-thickness.

  3. Generation of collisionless shock in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2015-08-01

    Collisionless shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysical environments and are tightly connected with magnetic-field amplification and particle acceleration. The fast progress in high-power laser technology is bringing the study of high Mach number shocks into the realm of laboratory plasmas, where in situ measurements can be made helping us understand the fundamental kinetic processes behind shocks. I will discuss the recent progress in laser-driven shock experiments at state-of-the-art facilities like NIF and Omega and how these results, together with ab initio massively parallel simulations, can impact our understanding of magnetic field amplification and particle acceleration in astrophysical plasmas.

  4. Vlasov equation and collisionless hydrodynamics adapted to curved spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2010-11-15

    The modification of the Vlasov equation, in its standard form describing a charged particle distribution in the six-dimensional phase space, is derived explicitly within a formal Hamiltonian approach for arbitrarily curved spacetime. The equation accounts simultaneously for the Lorentz force and the effects of general relativity, with the latter appearing as the gravity force and an additional force due to the extrinsic curvature of spatial hypersurfaces. For an arbitrary spatial metric, the equations of collisionless hydrodynamics are also obtained in the usual three-vector form.

  5. Analytical collisionless damping rate of geodesic acoustic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, H.; Xu, X. Q.

    2016-10-01

    Collisionless damping of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is analytically investigated by considering the finite-orbit-width (FOW) resonance effect to the 3rd order in the gyro-kinetic equations. A concise and transparent expression for the damping rate is presented for the first time. Good agreement is found between the analytical damping rate and the previous TEMPEST simulation result (Xu 2008 et al Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 215001) for systematic q scans. Our result also shows that it is of sufficient accuracy and has to take into account the FOW effect to the 3rd order.

  6. Time-dependent closure relations for relativistic collisionless fluid equations.

    PubMed

    Bendib-Kalache, K; Bendib, A; El Hadj, K Mohammed

    2010-11-01

    Linear fluid equations for relativistic and collisionless plasmas are derived. Closure relations for the fluid equations are analytically computed from the relativistic Vlasov equation in the Fourier space (ω,k), where ω and k are the conjugate variables of time t and space x variables, respectively. The mathematical method used is based on the projection operator techniques and the continued fraction mathematical tools. The generalized heat flux and stress tensor are calculated for arbitrary parameter ω/kc where c is the speed of light, and for arbitrary relativistic parameter z=mc²/T , where m is the particle rest mass and T, the plasma temperature in energy units.

  7. Quantification of Stokes Drift as a Mechanism for Surface Oil Advection in the DWH Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M.

    2013-12-01

    Stokes drift has previously been qualitatively shown to be a factor in ocean surface particle transport, but has never been comprehensively quantified. In addition, most operational ocean particle advection models used during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill do not explicitly account for Stokes drift, instead using a simple parameterization based on wind drift (or ignoring it completely). This research works to quantify Stokes drift via direct calculation, with a focus on shallow water, where Stokes drift is more likely to have a relatively large impact compared to other transport processes such as ocean currents. For this study, WaveWatch III modeled waves in the Gulf of Mexico are used, from which Stokes drift is calculated using the peak wave period and significant wave height outputs. Trajectories are also calculated to examine the role Stokes drift plays in bringing surface particles (and specifically surface oil slicks) onshore. The impact of Stokes drift is compared to transport by currents and traditional estimates of wind drift.

  8. Non-Maxwellian electron distribution functions due to self-generated turbulence in collisionless guide-field reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, P. A.; Büchner, J.

    2016-10-01

    Non-Maxwellian electron velocity space distribution functions (EVDFs) are useful signatures of plasma conditions and non-local consequences of collisionless magnetic reconnection. In the past, EVDFs were obtained mainly for antiparallel reconnection and under the influence of weak guide-fields in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane. EVDFs are, however, not well known, yet, for oblique (or component-) reconnection in case and in dependence on stronger guide-magnetic fields and for the exhaust (outflow) region of reconnection away from the diffusion region. In view of the multi-spacecraft Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS), we derived the non-Maxwellian EVDFs of collisionless magnetic reconnection in dependence on the guide-field strength bg from small ( b g ≈ 0 ) to very strong (bg = 8) guide-fields, taking into account the feedback of the self-generated turbulence. For this sake, we carried out 2.5D fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations using the ACRONYM code. We obtained anisotropic EVDFs and electron beams propagating along the separatrices as well as in the exhaust region of reconnection. The beams are anisotropic with a higher temperature in the direction perpendicular rather than parallel to the local magnetic field. The beams propagate in the direction opposite to the background electrons and cause instabilities. We also obtained the guide-field dependence of the relative electron-beam drift speed, threshold, and properties of the resulting streaming instabilities including the strongly non-linear saturation of the self-generated plasma turbulence. This turbulence and its non-linear feedback cause non-adiabatic parallel electron acceleration. We further obtained the resulting EVDFs due to the non-linear feedback of the saturated self-generated turbulence near the separatrices and in the exhaust region of reconnection in dependence on the guide field strength. We found that the influence of the self-generated plasma turbulence

  9. Approximate Stokes Drift Profiles and their use in Ocean Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, Oyvind; Bidlot, Jea-Raymond; Janssen, Peter A. E. M.; Mogensen, Kristian

    2016-04-01

    Deep-water approximations to the Stokes drift velocity profile are explored as alternatives to the monochromatic profile. The alternative profiles investigated rely on the same two quantities required for the monochromatic profile, viz the Stokes transport and the surface Stokes drift velocity. Comparisons against parametric spectra and profiles under wave spectra from the ERA-Interim reanalysis and buoy observations reveal much better agreement than the monochromatic profile even for complex sea states. That the profiles give a closer match and a more correct shear has implications for ocean circulation models since the Coriolis-Stokes force depends on the magnitude and direction of the Stokes drift profile and Langmuir turbulence parameterizations depend sensitively on the shear of the profile. Of the two Stokes drift profiles explored here, the profile based on the Phillips spectrum is by far the best. In particular, the shear near the surface is almost identical to that influenced by the f-5 tail of spectral wave models. The NEMO general circulation ocean model was recently extended to incorporate the Stokes-Coriolis force along with two other wave-related effects. The ECWMF coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean ensemble forecast system now includes these wave effects in the ocean model component (NEMO).

  10. Approximate Stokes Drift Profiles and their use in Ocean Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, Oyvind; Bidlot, Jea-Raymond; Janssen, Peter A. E. M.; Mogensen, Kristian

    2016-04-01

    Deep-water approximations to the Stokes drift velocity profile are explored as alternatives to the monochromatic profile. The alternative profiles investigated rely on the same two quantities required for the monochromatic profile, viz the Stokes transport and the surface Stokes drift velocity. Comparisons against parametric spectra and profiles under wave spectra from the ERA-Interim reanalysis and buoy observations reveal much better agreement than the monochromatic profile even for complex sea states. That the profiles give a closer match and a more correct shear has implications for ocean circulation models since the Coriolis-Stokes force depends on the magnitude and direction of the Stokes drift profile and Langmuir turbulence parameterizations depend sensitively on the shear of the profile. Of the two Stokes drift profiles explored here, the profile based on the Phillips spectrum is by far the best. In particular, the shear near the surface is almost identical to that influenced by the f‑5 tail of spectral wave models. The NEMO general circulation ocean model was recently extended to incorporate the Stokes-Coriolis force along with two other wave-related effects. The ECWMF coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean ensemble forecast system now includes these wave effects in the ocean model component (NEMO).

  11. Fingermark ridge drift.

    PubMed

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification.

  12. Fingermark ridge drift.

    PubMed

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification. PMID:26646735

  13. CEAREX Drift Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CEAREX Drift Group

    The Coordinated Eastern Arctic Experiment (CEAREX) was conducted to study the processes regulating eastern Arctic Ocean exchange of momentum, heat, and biomass. The primary CEAREX objectives were to understand the structure and function of mesoscale (order 10 km) and submesoscale processes in the transport of heat northward, and to understand the ice behavior and associated acoustic ambient noise and coherence. The Drift Experiment described here was one part of the comprehensive CEAREX program. It focused on the transition period during freeze up and on the dark winter period. The Drift Experiment was designed to observe atmosphere, ice, and ocean behavior simultaneously. Specific observations were carried out under independent research programs by investigators from a number of organizations. The concurrent information provided an opportunity to measure and understand the relationship between stresses observed in individual ice floes and the geophysical driving forces and overall ice conditions, and to identify and describe noise generated by different processes. The coordinated effort has resulted in a complete set of data for helping to understand the dynamic interactions among ice, ocean, and atmosphere. This large, valuable, and unique data set will be archived by the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colo. Some subsets will be available on CD-ROM for simple and inexpensive use on personal computers.

  14. Collisionless shock experiments with lasers and observation of Weibel instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.-S. Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Levy, M. C.; Pollock, B. B.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S.; Ryutov, D. D.; Turnbull, D. P.; Weber, S. V.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Froula, D. H.; Rosenberg, M.; Gregori, G.; Meinecke, J.; Koenig, M.; Kugland, N. L.; Lamb, D. Q.; Tzeferacos, P.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are common in the universe, occurring in supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, and protostellar jets. They appear in colliding plasma flows when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions is much larger than the system size. It is believed that such shocks could be mediated via the electromagnetic Weibel instability in astrophysical environments without pre-existing magnetic fields. Here, we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers and investigate the dynamics of high-Mach-number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Our recent proton-probe experiments on Omega show the characteristic filamentary structures of the Weibel instability that are electromagnetic in nature with an inferred magnetization level as high as ∼1% [C. M. Huntington et al., “Observation of magnetic field generation via the weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows,” Nat. Phys. 11, 173–176 (2015)]. These results imply that electromagnetic instabilities are significant in the interaction of astrophysical conditions.

  15. Laboratory astrophysical collisionless shock experiments on Omega and NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Ross, J. S.; Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Ryutov, D.; Casey, D.; Drake, R. P.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D.; Gregori, G.; Kugland, N. L.; Kuranz, C.; Levy, M. C.; Li, C. K.; Meinecke, J.; Morita, T.; Petrasso, R.; Plechaty, C.; Remington, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Takabe, H.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2016-03-01

    We are performing scaled astrophysics experiments on Omega and on NIF. Laser driven counter-streaming interpenetrating supersonic plasma flows can be studied to understand astrophysical electromagnetic plasma phenomena in a controlled laboratory setting. In our Omega experiments, the counter-streaming flow plasma state is measured using Thomson scattering diagnostics, demonstrating the plasma flows are indeed super-sonic and in the collisionless regime. We observe a surprising additional electron and ion heating from ion drag force in the double flow experiments that are attributed to the ion drag force and electrostatic instabilities. [1] A proton probe is used to image the electric and magnetic fields. We observe unexpected large, stable and reproducible electromagnetic field structures that arise in the counter-streaming flows [2]. The Biermann battery magnetic field generated near the target plane, advected along the flows, and recompressed near the midplane explains the cause of such self-organizing field structures [3]. A D3He implosion proton probe image showed very clear filamentary structures; three-dimensional Particle-In-Cell simulations and simulated proton radiography images indicate that these filamentary structures are generated by Weibel instabilities and that the magnetization level (ratio of magnetic energy over kinetic energy in the system) is ∼0.01 [4]. These findings have very high astrophysical relevance and significant implications. We expect to observe true collisionless shock formation when we use >100 kJ laser energy on NIF.

  16. Simplex-in-cell technique for collisionless plasma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kates-Harbeck, Julian; Totorica, Samuel; Zrake, Jonathan; Abel, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We extend the simplex-in-cell (SIC) technique recently introduced in the context of collisionless dark matter fluids [1,2] to the case of collisionless plasmas. The six-dimensional phase space distribution function f (x , v) is represented by an ensemble of three-dimensional manifolds, which we refer to as sheets. The electric potential field is obtained by solving the Poisson equation on a uniform mesh, where the charge density is evaluated by a spatial projection of the phase space sheets. The SIC representation of phase space density facilitates robust, high accuracy numerical evolution of the Vlasov-Poisson system using significantly fewer tracer particles than comparable particle-in-cell (PIC) approaches by reducing the numerical shot-noise associated with the latter. We introduce the SIC formulation and describe its implementation in a new code, which we validate using standard test problems including plasma oscillations, Landau damping, and two stream instabilities in one dimension. Merits of the new scheme are shown to include higher accuracy and faster convergence rates in the number of particles. We finally motivate and outline the efficient application of SIC to higher dimensional problems.

  17. Density drift instabilities and weak collisions. [in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Cole, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    A model is developed which describes the effects of weak collisions on the linear kinetic theory of electrostatic density drift instabilities. A dispersion equation valid at all frequencies and wave numbers is derived using the assumptions of a weak, uniform density gradient; a uniform magnetic field; and the BGK collision operator with a modification of the local approximation. The properties of the universal and collisional density drift instabilities at maximum growth rates are examined in detail. The thresholds of the instabilities are examined for an ionospheric model which includes ion-neutral, electron-neutral, and electron-ion collisions, and are compared with the threshold of the lower hybrid density drift instability. It is concluded that the k to the -5th short wavelength density power spectra observed above 280 km in the PLUMEX experiment are due to the effects of the universal density drift instability.

  18. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    SciTech Connect

    J. Houseworth

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water. The invert is the structure constructed in a drift to provide the floor of the

  19. Ponderomotive Force and Lower Hybrid Turbulence Effects in Space Plasmas Subjected to Large-Amplitude Low-Frequency Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Khazanov, George; Liemohn, M. W.; Stone, N. H.; Coffey, V. N.

    1997-01-01

    In the auroral region, simultaneous occurrences of upward-flowing ions and field-aligned electrons have been observed by the Viking satellite. The occurrence is strongly correlated with large amplitude low frequency fluctuations of the electric field. Large-amplitude shear Alfven waves have also been observed by sounding rockets in the auroral ionosphere. When such LF waves are propagating in a plasma, a ponderomotive force and other types of waves are produced which may lead to significant effects on the plasma. This force is directed toward decreasing density, providing the electromagnetic lift of the background plasma and an increase of collisionless plasma expansion. We find that even for modest wave strengths, the influence on the outflowing oxygen ions can be dramatic, increasing the high-altitude density by orders of magnitude. It is also demonstrated that large-amplitude low-frequency waves (LFW) may generate lower hybrid waves (LHW) in the auroral zone. The excitation of LHW by a LF wave may lead to the appearance of an additional channel of energy transfer from, for example, Alfven or fast magnetosonic waves, to particles. This process then influences the formation of the plasma distribution function at the expense of acceleration in the tail of the distribution during the collapse of the LHW. The ion energization due to the LHW can be comparable with that produced by the ponderomotive force of the LFW. It is shown that the LH turbulence leads to equalization of the ponderomotive acceleration of the different ion species. The mechanism of LHW excitation due to the oxygen ion relative drift in a plasma subjected to low-frequency waves is used for analysis of Viking satellite data for events in the cusp/cleft region. It is found that, in some cases, such a mechanism leads to LHW energy densities and ion distribution functions close to those observed.

  20. Drift-induced Benjamin-Feir instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Patti, F.; Fanelli, D.; Carletti, T.

    2016-06-01

    A modified version of the Ginzburg-Landau equation is introduced which accounts for asymmetric couplings between neighbors sites on a one-dimensional lattice, with periodic boundary conditions. The drift term which reflects the imposed microscopic asymmetry seeds a generalized class of instabilities, reminiscent of the Benjamin-Feir type. The uniformly synchronized solution is spontaneously destabilized outside the region of parameters classically associated to the Benjamin-Feir instability, upon injection of a nonhomogeneous perturbation. The ensuing patterns can be of the traveling wave type or display a patchy, colorful mosaic for the modulus of the complex oscillators amplitude.

  1. MAGSAT anomaly map and continental drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemouel, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anomaly maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length anomalies. The anomalies were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic anomalies are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the anomalies found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African anomalies. It is also shown that anomalies are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.

  2. Drift-Alfven eigenmodes in inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Poedts, S.

    2006-03-15

    A set of three nonlinear equations describing drift-Alfven waves in a nonuniform magnetized plasma is derived and discussed both in linear and nonlinear limits. In the case of a cylindric radially bounded plasma with a Gaussian density distribution in the radial direction the linearized equations are solved exactly yielding general solutions for modes with quantized frequencies and with radially dependent amplitudes. The full set of nonlinear equations is also solved yielding particular solutions in the form of rotating radially limited structures. The results should be applicable to the description of electromagnetic perturbations in solar magnetic structures and in astrophysical column-like objects including cosmic tornados.

  3. Time-dependence in relativistic collisionless shocks: theory of the variable

    SciTech Connect

    Spitkovsky, A

    2004-02-05

    We describe results from time-dependent numerical modeling of the collisionless reverse shock terminating the pulsar wind in the Crab Nebula. We treat the upstream relativistic wind as composed of ions and electron-positron plasma embedded in a toroidal magnetic field, flowing radially outward from the pulsar in a sector around the rotational equator. The relativistic cyclotron instability of the ion gyrational orbit downstream of the leading shock in the electron-positron pairs launches outward propagating magnetosonic waves. Because of the fresh supply of ions crossing the shock, this time-dependent process achieves a limit-cycle, in which the waves are launched with periodicity on the order of the ion Larmor time. Compressions in the magnetic field and pair density associated with these waves, as well as their propagation speed, semi-quantitatively reproduce the behavior of the wisp and ring features described in recent observations obtained using the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. By selecting the parameters of the ion orbits to fit the spatial separation of the wisps, we predict the period of time variability of the wisps that is consistent with the data. When coupled with a mechanism for non-thermal acceleration of the pairs, the compressions in the magnetic field and plasma density associated with the optical wisp structure naturally account for the location of X-ray features in the Crab. We also discuss the origin of the high energy ions and their acceleration in the equatorial current sheet of the pulsar wind.

  4. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sanpietro, M.; Kemmer, J.; Dietl, H.; Holl, P.; Klanner, R.; Lutz, G.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements.

  5. CURVATURE-DRIFT INSTABILITY FAILS TO GENERATE PULSAR RADIO EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Alexander; Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2010-10-01

    The curvature-drift instability has long been considered as a viable mechanism for pulsar radio emission. We reconsidered this mechanism by finding an explicit solution describing the propagation of short electromagnetic waves in a plasma flow along curved magnetic field lines. We show that even though the waves could be amplified, the amplification factor remains very close to unity; therefore, this mechanism is unable to generate high brightness temperature emission from initial weak fluctuations.

  6. Perpendicular diffusion of energetic particles in collisionless plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shalchi, A.

    2015-01-15

    A fundamental problem in plasma and astrophysics is the interaction between energetic particles and magnetized plasmas. In the current paper, we focus on particle diffusion across the guide magnetic field. It is shown that the perpendicular diffusion coefficient depends only on the parallel diffusion coefficient and the Kubo number. Therefore, one can find four asymptotic limits depending on the values of these two parameters. These regimes are the quasilinear limit, the Kadomtsev and Pogutse limit, the scaling of Rechester and Rosenbluth, and the scaling found by Zybin and Istomin. In the current article, we focus on the Rechester and Rosenbluth scenario because this was not discovered before in the context of collisionless plasmas. Examples and applications are discussed as well. We show that an energy independent ratio of perpendicular and parallel diffusion coefficients can be found and that this ratio can be very small but also close to unity. This is exactly what one observes in the solar wind.

  7. Nonlinear Weibel Instability and Turbulence in Strong Collisionless Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, Mikhail M.

    2008-08-31

    This research project was devoted to studies of collisionless shocks, their properties, microphysics and plasma physics of underlying phenomena, such as Weibel instability and generation of small-scale fields at shocks, particle acceleration and transport in the generated random fields, radiation mechanisms from these fields in application to astrophysical phenomena and laboratory experiments (e.g., laser-plasma and beam-plasma interactions, the fast ignition and inertial confinement, etc.). Thus, this study is highly relevant to astrophysical sciences, the inertial confinement program and, in particular, the Fast Ignition concept, etc. It makes valuable contributions to the shock physics, nonlinear plasma theory, as well as to the basic plasma science, in general.

  8. Scaling of Magnetic Reconnection in Relativistic Collisionless Pair Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Guo, Fan; Daughton, William; Li, Hui; Hesse, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we study the scaling of the inflow speed of collisionless magnetic reconnection in electron-positron plasmas from the non-relativistic to ultra-relativistic limit. In the anti-parallel configuration, the inflow speed increases with the upstream magnetization parameter sigma and approaches the speed of light when sigma is greater than O(100), leading to an enhanced reconnection rate. In all regimes, the divergence of the pressure tensor is the dominant term responsible for breaking the frozen-in condition at the x-line. The observed scaling agrees well with a simple model that accounts for the Lorentz contraction of the plasma passing through the diffusion region. The results demonstrate that the aspect ratio of the diffusion region, modified by the compression factor of proper density, remains approximately 0.1 in both the non-relativistic and relativistic limits.

  9. ENTROPY PRODUCTION IN COLLISIONLESS SYSTEMS. III. RESULTS FROM SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Eric I.; Egerer, Colin P. E-mail: egerer.coli@uwlax.edu

    2015-05-20

    The equilibria formed by the self-gravitating, collisionless collapse of simple initial conditions have been investigated for decades. We present the results of our attempts to describe the equilibria formed in N-body simulations using thermodynamically motivated models. Previous work has suggested that it is possible to define distribution functions for such systems that describe maximum entropy states. These distribution functions are used to create radial density and velocity distributions for comparison to those from simulations. A wide variety of N-body code conditions are used to reduce the chance that results are biased by numerical issues. We find that a subset of initial conditions studied lead to equilibria that can be accurately described by these models, and that direct calculation of the entropy shows maximum values being achieved.

  10. Effects of electron inertia in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Andrés, Nahuel Gómez, Daniel; Martin, Luis; Dmitruk, Pablo

    2014-07-15

    We present a study of collisionless magnetic reconnection within the framework of full two-fluid MHD for a completely ionized hydrogen plasma, retaining the effects of the Hall current, electron pressure and electron inertia. We performed 2.5D simulations using a pseudo-spectral code with no dissipative effects. We check that the ideal invariants of the problem are conserved down to round-off errors. Our numerical results confirm that the change in the topology of the magnetic field lines is exclusively due to the presence of electron inertia. The computed reconnection rates remain a fair fraction of the Alfvén velocity, which therefore qualifies as fast reconnection.

  11. Nonlinear Particle Pinch in Collisionless Trapped Electron Mode Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, P. W.; Gatto, R.

    2005-10-01

    Collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence is shown to have an anomalous particle pinch fundamentally unlike pinches identified previously. It arises from a nonlinear fluctuation eigenmode, placing it outside the purview of quasilinear theory. The nonlinear eigenmode develops because the nonlinearity excites a damped linear eigenmode, changing the density- potential correlation. The flux is solved from spectrum balance equations in a complete basis spanning the fluctuation space under a joint expansion in collision frequency and instability threshold parameter. The solution accounts for saturation by anisotropic energy transfer to zonal wavenumbers of the damped eigenmode. To lowest order the pinch is a convective-like flux driven by temperature gradient. It arises from the damped eigenmode energy and the real part of the correlation between damped and growing eigenmodes. The pinch is slightly smaller than the outwardly directed flux associated with the growing eigenmode, making the flux a small fraction of the quasilinear value. Work supported by US DOE.

  12. Perpendicular diffusion of energetic particles in collisionless plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalchi, A.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental problem in plasma and astrophysics is the interaction between energetic particles and magnetized plasmas. In the current paper, we focus on particle diffusion across the guide magnetic field. It is shown that the perpendicular diffusion coefficient depends only on the parallel diffusion coefficient and the Kubo number. Therefore, one can find four asymptotic limits depending on the values of these two parameters. These regimes are the quasilinear limit, the Kadomtsev and Pogutse limit, the scaling of Rechester and Rosenbluth, and the scaling found by Zybin and Istomin. In the current article, we focus on the Rechester and Rosenbluth scenario because this was not discovered before in the context of collisionless plasmas. Examples and applications are discussed as well. We show that an energy independent ratio of perpendicular and parallel diffusion coefficients can be found and that this ratio can be very small but also close to unity. This is exactly what one observes in the solar wind.

  13. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  14. Electron Force Balance in Steady Collisionless-Driven Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bin; Horiuchi, Ritoku

    2008-11-21

    Steady collisionless-driven reconnection in an open system is investigated by means of full-particle simulations. A long thin electron current sheet extends towards the outflow direction when the system relaxes to a steady state. Although the pressure tensor term along the reconnection electric field contributes to the violation of the electron frozen-in condition, a new force balance in the inflow direction is realized between the Lorentz and electrostatic forces, which is quite different from that in Harris equilibrium. The strong electrostatic field is generated through the combined effect of the Hall term and a driving inflow. This new force balance is more evident in the three-dimensional case due to the growth of an instability along the reconnection electric field. It is also found that the normalized charge density is in proportion to the square of the electron Alfven velocity averaged over the electron dissipation region.

  15. Effects of the ring current and plasmasphere on ULF waves in the inner magnetosphere based on the GEMSIS-RC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, K.; Amano, T.; saito, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Matsumoto, Y.; Umeda, T.; Miyashita, Y.; Ebihara, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Acceleration mechanisms of electrons to cause drastic variation of the Earth's outer radiation belt is one of outstanding issues of the geospace researches. While the radial diffusion of the electrons driven by ULF waves has been considered as one of the candidate mechanisms, efficiency of the mechanism under realistic ULF characteristics and distribution is far from understood. GEMSIS (Geospace Environment Modeling System for Integrated Studies) of STEL, Nagoya University, is the observation-based modeling project for understanding energy and mass transportation from the Sun to the Earth in the geospace environment. Aiming at understanding the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere during the geospace storms, the GEMSIS-Magnetosphere working team has developed a new physics-based model for the global dynamics of the ring current (GEMSIS-RC model). The GEMSIS-RC model is a self-consistent and kinetic numerical simulation code solving the five-dimensional collisionless drift-kinetic equation for the ring-current ions in the inner-magnetosphere coupled with Maxwell equations. We applied the GEMSIS-RC model for simulation of global distribution of ULF waves to test its capability of describing fast time scale phenomena like SCs and ULF waves. Two cases of background profile, i.e., cases without/with plasmapause in the simulation domain, are compared. The result shows that existence of plasmapause strengthens ULFs outside the plasmapause and widens the MLT region where the E_r (toroidal) component is excited from initially-given E_phi (poloidal) component. Comparison between runs with/without ring current ions show that the existence of hot ring current ions can deform and amplify the original sinusoidal waveforms. The deformation causes the energy cascade to higher frequency range (Pc4 and Pc3 ranges). The cascade is more pronounced in the high beta case. Combination with GEMSIS-RB model reproduced rapid radial transport by the drift resonance for ions with drift period

  16. Wave-Number Spectrum of Drift-Wave Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Guercan, Oe. D.; Hennequin, P.; Garbet, X.; Casati, A.; Falchetto, G. L.; Diamond, P. H.

    2009-06-26

    A simple model for the evolution of turbulence fluctuation spectra, which includes neighboring interactions leading to the usual dual cascade as well as disparate scale interactions corresponding to refraction by large scale structures, is derived. The model recovers the usual Kraichnan-Kolmogorov picture in the case of exclusively local interactions and midrange drive. On the other hand, when disparate scale interactions are dominant, a simple spectrum for the density fluctuations of the form |n{sub k}|{sup 2}propor tok{sup -3}/(1+k{sup 2}){sup 2} is obtained. This simple prediction is then compared to, and found to be in fair agreement with, Tore Supra CO{sub 2} laser scattering data.

  17. Electrodeless drift chambers with 50-cm drift distance

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, D.S.; Price, L.E.

    1982-08-01

    The electrodeless drift-chamber technique is potentially very useful in applications requiring the drifting of ionization in gas over long distances in narrow channels. Chamber construction is simple and cheap; the technique is well suited to very large detectors operating in low-rate environments. Prototype tests on planar chambers reveal excellent drifting characteristics after the initial charging, but show a substantial degradation of pulse height from cosmic rays over a two-week period. The loss of efficiency appears to be caused by excess charge buildup on the dielectric surfaces of the chamber. Several solutions are suggested.

  18. Studies of Zonal Flows Driven by Drift Mode Turbulence in Laboratory and Space Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, R.; Trines, R.; Dunlop, M. W.; Davies, J. A.; Bamford, R. A.; Mendonca, J. T.; Silva, L. O.; Shukla, P. K.; Vaivads, A.; Mori, W. B.; Tynan, G.

    2008-10-15

    The interaction between broadband drift mode turbulence and zonal flows is an important topic associated with transport at plasma boundaries. The generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability of broad band drift waves has resulted in the observation of self organized solitary wave structures at the magnetopause. To understand these structures and their importance to future burning plasmas and space plasmas we have developed a unique numerical simulation code that describes drift wave--zonal flow turbulence. We show that observations by cluster spacecraft confirms the role of drift wave zonal flow turbulence at the Earth's magnetopause and further demonstrates that the magnetopause boundary acts in a s similar manner to transport barriers in tokamak fusion devices. Thus cementing the relationship between the plasma physics of laboratory devices and space plasmas.

  19. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Merlino, Robert L.

    2009-11-10

    A historical overview of some of the early theoretical and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some of the theoretical refinements that have been made, including the effects of collisions, plasma absorption, dust charge fluctuations, particle drifts and strong coupling effects are discussed. Some recent experimental findings and outstanding problems are also presented.

  20. On the evolution of linear waves in cosmological plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2010-08-15

    The scalings for basic plasma modes in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model of the expanding Universe are revised. Contrary to the existing literature, the wave collisionless evolution must comply with the action conservation theorem. The proper steps to deduce the action conservation from ab initio analytical calculations are presented, and discrepancies in the earlier papers are identified. In general, the cosmological wave evolution is more easily derived from the action conservation in the collisionless limit, whereas when collisions are essential, the statistical description must suffice, thereby ruling out the need for using dynamic equations in either case.

  1. Outer Belt Radial Transport Signatures in Drift Phase Structure - Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul; Green, Janet; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Roeder, James; Kwan, Betty; Mulligan Skov, Tamitha

    2016-07-01

    During geomagnetic storms, the Earth's outer radiation belt experiences enhanced radial transport. Different modes of radial transport have different temporal signatures in the particle phase-space density on timescales shorter than a drift period. We use such drift phase structure in time series particle flux observations to identify transport signatures of impulsive and oscillatory drift resonant transport. We perform multiple case studies of geomagnetic storms using particle flux taken near geostationary orbit. We estimate the radial diffusion coefficients from the drift phase structures. We show how these radial diffusion coefficients derived from particle data compare to transport coefficients deduced from wave observations.

  2. Suppression of collisionless magnetic reconnection in asymmetric current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Hesse, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we study the suppression of asymmetric reconnection in the limit where the diamagnetic drift speed ≫ Alfvén speed and the magnetic shear angle is moderate. We demonstrate that the slippage between electrons and the magnetic flux mitigates the suppression and can even result in fast reconnection that lacks one of the outflow jets. Through comparing a case where the diamagnetic drift is supported by the temperature gradient with a companion case that has a density gradient instead, we identify a robust suppression mechanism. The drift of the x-line is slowed down locally by the asymmetric nature of the x-line, and then the x-line is run over and swallowed by the faster-moving following flux.

  3. Suppression of Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection in Asymmetric Current Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Hesse, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we study the suppression of asymmetric reconnection in the limit where the diamagnetic drift speed >> Alfven speed and the magnetic shear angle is moderate. We demonstrate that the slippage between electrons and the magnetic flux mitigates the suppression and can even result in fast reconnection that lacks one of the outflow jets. Through comparing a case where the diamagnetic drift is supported by the temperature gradient with a companion case that has a density gradient instead, we identify a robust suppression mechanism. The drift of the x-line is slowed down locally by the asymmetric nature of the x-line, and then the x-line is run over and swallowed by the faster-moving following flux.

  4. On the quasi-linear diffusion in collisionless plasmas (to say nothing about Landau damping)

    SciTech Connect

    Hellinger, Petr; Travnicek, Pavel M.

    2012-06-15

    General quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for nonrelativistic collisionless plasmas are derived for unstable modes and analytically continued to damped modes. Properties of the resulting diffusion are investigated and discussed.

  5. General-relativistic approach to the nonlinear evolution of collisionless matter

    SciTech Connect

    Matarrese, S.; Pantano, O. ); Saez, D. )

    1993-02-15

    A new general-relativistic algorithm is developed to study the nonlinear evolution of scalar (density) perturbations of an irrotational collisionless fluid up to shell crossing, under the approximation of neglecting the interaction with tensor (gravitational-wave) perturbations. The dynamics of each fluid element is separately followed in its own inertial rest frame by a system of twelve coupled first-order ordinary differential equations, which can be further reduced to six under very general conditions. Initial conditions are obtained in a cosmological framework, from linear theory, in terms of a single gauge-invariant potential. Physical observables, which are expressed in the Lagrangian form at different times, can be traced back to the Eulerian picture by solving supplementary first-order differential equations for the relative position vectors of neighboring fluid elements. Similarly to the Zel'dovich approximation, in our approach the evolution of each fluid element is completely determined by the local initial conditions and can be independently followed up to the time when it enters a multistream region. Unlike the Zel'dovich approximation, however, our approach is correct also in three dimensions (except for the possible role of gravitational waves). The accuracy of our numerical procedure is tested by integrating the nonlinear evolution of a spherical perturbation in an otherwise spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe and comparing the results with the exact Tolman-Bondi solution for the same initial profile. An exact solution for the planar symmetric case is also given, which turns out to be locally identical to the Zel'dovich solution.

  6. Metocean input data for drift models applications: Loustic study

    SciTech Connect

    Michon, P.; Cabioc`h, M.

    1995-12-31

    Real-time monitoring and crisis management of oil slicks or floating structures displacement require a good knowledge of local winds, waves and currents used as input data for operational drift models. Fortunately, thanks to world-wide and all-weather coverage, satellite measurements have recently enabled the introduction of new methods for the remote sensing of the marine environment. Within a French joint industry project, a procedure has been developed using basically satellite measurements combined to metocean models in order to provide marine operators` drift models with reliable wind, wave and current analyses and short term forecasts. Particularly, a model now allows the calculation of the drift current, under the joint action of wind and sea-state, thus radically improving the classical laws. This global procedure either directly uses satellite wind and waves measurements (if available on the study area) or indirectly, as calibration of metocean models results which are brought to the oil slick or floating structure location. The operational use of this procedure is reported here with an example of floating structure drift offshore from the Brittany coasts.

  7. Collisionless current generation in the center of the tokamak plasma by an isotropic source of {alpha}-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgisonis, V. I.; Sorokina, E. A.; Yurchenko, E. I.

    2010-01-15

    The density of the noninductive current generated due to collisionless motion of {alpha}-particles in the tokamak magnetic field is calculated. The analysis is based on fully three-dimensional calculations of charged particle trajectories without simplifying assumptions typical for drift and neoclassical approaches. The current is calculated over the entire cross section of the plasma column, including the magnetic axis. It is shown that the current density is not a function of a magnetic surface and is strongly polarized over the poloidal angle. The current density distribution in the tokamak poloidal cross section is obtained, and the current density as a function of the safety factor, the tokamak aspect ratio, and the ratio of the particle Larmor radius on the axis to the tokamak minor radius is determined. It is shown that, when the source of {alpha}-particles is spatially nonuniform, the current density in the center of the tokamak is nonzero due to asymmetry of the phase-space boundary between trapped and passing particles. The current density scaling in the tokamak center differs from the known approximations for the bootstrap current and is sensitive to the spatial distribution of {alpha}-particles.

  8. Generalized lower-hybrid-drift instability. [of plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsia, J. B.; Chiu, S. M.; Hsia, M. F.; Chou, R. L.; Wu, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of lower-hybrid-drift instability is extended to include a finite value of the component of wave vector parallel to the ambient magnetic field so that the analysis bridges the usual lower-hybrid-drift instability of flute modes and the modified-two-stream instability. The present theory also includes electromagnetic and ambient magnetic field-gradient effects. It is found that in the cold-electron limit the density and magnetic gradients can qualitatively modify the conclusion obtained in the early theory of the modified-two-stream instability. For example, even if the relative drift far exceeds the Alfven speed of the plasma, the instability may still persist. This result is in contrast to that established in the literature. When the electron temperature is finite, the problem is complicated. Numerical solutions are obtained for a number of cases.

  9. Dynamics and microinstabilities at perpendicular collisionless shock: A comparison of large-scale two-dimensional full particle simulations with different ion to electron mass ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, Takayuki Kidani, Yoshitaka; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2014-02-15

    Large-scale two-dimensional (2D) full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are carried out for studying the relationship between the dynamics of a perpendicular shock and microinstabilities generated at the shock foot. The structure and dynamics of collisionless shocks are generally determined by Alfven Mach number and plasma beta, while microinstabilities at the shock foot are controlled by the ratio of the upstream bulk velocity to the electron thermal velocity and the ratio of the plasma-to-cyclotron frequency. With a fixed Alfven Mach number and plasma beta, the ratio of the upstream bulk velocity to the electron thermal velocity is given as a function of the ion-to-electron mass ratio. The present 2D full PIC simulations with a relatively low Alfven Mach number (M{sub A} ∼ 6) show that the modified two-stream instability is dominant with higher ion-to-electron mass ratios. It is also confirmed that waves propagating downstream are more enhanced at the shock foot near the shock ramp as the mass ratio becomes higher. The result suggests that these waves play a role in the modification of the dynamics of collisionless shocks through the interaction with shock front ripples.

  10. ELECTRON HEAT CONDUCTION IN THE SOLAR WIND: TRANSITION FROM SPITZER-HAeRM TO THE COLLISIONLESS LIMIT

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, S. D.; Quataert, E.; Pulupa, M.; Salem, C.; Chen, C. H. K.

    2013-06-01

    We use a statistically significant set of measurements to show that the field-aligned electron heat flux q{sub Parallel-To} in the solar wind at 1 AU is consistent with the Spitzer-Haerm collisional heat flux q{sub sh} for temperature gradient scales larger than a few mean free paths L{sub T} {approx}> 3.5{lambda}{sub fp}. This represents about 65% of the measured data and corresponds primarily to high {beta}, weakly collisional plasma ({sup s}low solar wind{sup )}. In the more collisionless regime {lambda}{sub fp}/L{sub T} {approx}> 0.28, the electron heat flux is limited to q{sub Parallel-To }/q{sub 0} {approx} 0.3, independent of mean free path, where q{sub 0} is the ''free-streaming'' value; the measured q{sub Parallel-To} does not achieve the full q{sub 0}. This constraint q{sub Parallel-To }/q{sub 0} {approx} 0.3 might be attributed to wave-particle interactions, effects of an interplanetary electric potential, or inherent flux limitation. We also show a {beta}{sub e} dependence to these results that is consistent with a local radial electron temperature profile T{sub e} {approx} r {sup -{alpha}} that is a function of the thermal electron beta {alpha} = {alpha}({beta}{sub e}) and that the {beta} dependence of the collisionless regulation constraint is not obviously consistent with a whistler heat flux instability. It may be that the observed saturation of the measured heat flux is a simply a feature of collisional transport. We discuss the results in a broader astrophysical context.

  11. Theory of a cylindrical probe in a collisionless magnetoplasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laframboise, J. G.; Rubinstein, J.

    1976-01-01

    A theory is presented for a cylindrical electrostatic probe in a collisionless plasma in the case where the probe axis is inclined at an angle to a uniform magnetic field. The theory is applicable to electron collection, and under more restrictive conditions, to ion collection. For a probe at space potential, the theory is exact in the limit where probe radius is much less than Debye length. At attracting probe potentials, the theory yields an upper bound and an adiabatic limit for current collection. At repelling probe potentials, it provides a lower bound. The theory is valid if the ratios of probe radius to Debye length and probe radius to mean gyroradius are not simultaneously large enough to produce extrema in the probe sheath potential. The numerical current calculations are based on the approximation that particle orbits are helices near the probe, together with the use of kinetic theory to relate velocity distributions near the probe to those far from it. Probe characteristics are presented for inclination angles from 0 to 90 deg and for probe-radius mean-gyroradius ratios from 0.1 to infinity. For an angle of 0 deg, the end-effect current is calculated separately.

  12. Modeling the Lyα Forest in Collisionless Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorini, Daniele; Oñorbe, José; Lukić, Zarija; Hennawi, Joseph F.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmological hydrodynamic simulations can accurately predict the properties of the intergalactic medium (IGM), but only under the condition of retaining the high spatial resolution necessary to resolve density fluctuations in the IGM. This resolution constraint prohibits simulating large volumes, such as those probed by BOSS and future surveys, like DESI and 4MOST. To overcome this limitation, we present “Iteratively Matched Statistics” (IMS), a novel method to accurately model the Lyα forest with collisionless N-body simulations, where the relevant density fluctuations are unresolved. We use a small-box, high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation to obtain the probability distribution function (PDF) and the power spectrum of the real-space Lyα forest flux. These two statistics are iteratively mapped onto a pseudo-flux field of an N-body simulation, which we construct from the matter density. We demonstrate that our method can reproduce the PDF, line of sight and 3D power spectra of the Lyα forest with good accuracy (7%, 4%, and 7% respectively). We quantify the performance of the commonly used Gaussian smoothing technique and show that it has significantly lower accuracy (20%–80%), especially for N-body simulations with achievable mean inter-particle separations in large-volume simulations. In addition, we show that IMS produces reasonable and smooth spectra, making it a powerful tool for modeling the IGM in large cosmological volumes and for producing realistic “mock” skies for Lyα forest surveys.

  13. Collisionless electron heating in periodic arrays of inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnetzki, U.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2014-12-15

    A novel mechanism of collisionless heating in large planar arrays of small inductive coils operated at radio frequencies is presented. In contrast to the well-known case of non-local heating related to the transversal conductivity, when the electrons move perpendicular to the planar coil, we investigate the problem of electrons moving in a plane parallel to the coils. Two types of periodic structures are studied. Resonance velocities where heating is efficient are calculated analytically by solving the Vlasov equation. Certain scaling parameters are identified. The concept is further investigated by a single particle simulation based on the ergodic principle and combined with a Monte Carlo code allowing for collisions with Argon atoms. Resonances, energy exchange, and distribution functions are obtained. The analytical results are confirmed by the numerical simulation. Pressure and electric field dependences are studied. Stochastic heating is found to be most efficient when the electron mean free path exceeds the size of a single coil cell. Then the mean energy increases approximately exponentially with the electric field amplitude.

  14. Modeling the Lyα Forest in Collisionless Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorini, Daniele; Oñorbe, José; Lukić, Zarija; Hennawi, Joseph F.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmological hydrodynamic simulations can accurately predict the properties of the intergalactic medium (IGM), but only under the condition of retaining the high spatial resolution necessary to resolve density fluctuations in the IGM. This resolution constraint prohibits simulating large volumes, such as those probed by BOSS and future surveys, like DESI and 4MOST. To overcome this limitation, we present “Iteratively Matched Statistics” (IMS), a novel method to accurately model the Lyα forest with collisionless N-body simulations, where the relevant density fluctuations are unresolved. We use a small-box, high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation to obtain the probability distribution function (PDF) and the power spectrum of the real-space Lyα forest flux. These two statistics are iteratively mapped onto a pseudo-flux field of an N-body simulation, which we construct from the matter density. We demonstrate that our method can reproduce the PDF, line of sight and 3D power spectra of the Lyα forest with good accuracy (7%, 4%, and 7% respectively). We quantify the performance of the commonly used Gaussian smoothing technique and show that it has significantly lower accuracy (20%-80%), especially for N-body simulations with achievable mean inter-particle separations in large-volume simulations. In addition, we show that IMS produces reasonable and smooth spectra, making it a powerful tool for modeling the IGM in large cosmological volumes and for producing realistic “mock” skies for Lyα forest surveys.

  15. STATISTICAL MECHANICS OF COLLISIONLESS ORBITS. II. STRUCTURE OF HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Liliya L. R.; Hjorth, Jens E-mail: jens@dark-cosmology.d

    2010-10-10

    In this paper, we present the density, {rho}, velocity dispersion, {sigma}, and {rho}/{sigma}{sup 3} profiles of isotropic systems which have the energy distribution, N({epsilon}) {proportional_to} [exp({phi}{sub 0} - {epsilon}) - 1], derived in Paper I. This distribution, dubbed {sup D}ARKexp{sup ,} is the most probable final state of a collisionless self-gravitating system, which is relaxed in terms of particle energies, but not necessarily in terms of angular momentum. We compare the DARKexp predictions with the results obtained using the extended secondary infall model (ESIM). The ESIM numerical scheme is optimally suited for this purpose because (1) it relaxes only through energy redistribution, leaving shell/particle angular momenta unaltered and (2) being a shell code with radially increasing shell thickness, it has very good mass resolution in the inner halo, where the various theoretical treatments give different predictions. The ESIM halo properties, and especially their energy distributions, are very well fit by DARKexp, implying that the techniques of statistical mechanics can be used to explain the structure of relaxed self-gravitating systems.

  16. Collisionless spectral-kinetic Simulation of the Multipole Resonance Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrygin, Wladislaw; Szeremley, Daniel; Schilling, Christian; Oberrath, Jens; Eremin, Denis; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2012-10-01

    Plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well established plasma diagnostic method realized in several designs. One of these designs is the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In its idealized - geometrically simplified - version it consists of two dielectrically shielded, hemispherical electrodes to which an RF signal is applied. A numerical tool is under development, which is capable of simulating the dynamics of the plasma surrounding the MRP in electrostatic approximation. In the simulation the potential is separeted in an inner and a vacuum potential. The inner potential is influenced by the charged partilces and is calculated by a specialized Poisson solver. The vacuum potential fulfills Laplace's equetion and consists of the applied voltage of the probe as boundary condition. Both potentials are expanded in spherical harmonics. For a practical particle pusher implementation, the expansion must be appropriately truncated. Compared to a PIC simulation a grid is unnecessary to calculate the force on the particles. This work purpose is a collisionless kinetic simulation, which can be used to investigate kinetic effects on the resonance behavior of the MRP.[4pt] [1] M. Lapke et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 2008, 051502.

  17. COSMIC-RAY-INDUCED FILAMENTATION INSTABILITY IN COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, D.; Spitkovsky, A.

    2013-03-01

    We used unprecedentedly large two-dimensional and three-dimensional hybrid (kinetic ions-fluid electrons) simulations of non-relativistic collisionless strong shocks in order to investigate the effects of self-consistently accelerated ions on the overall shock dynamics. The current driven by suprathermal particles streaming ahead of the shock excites modes transverse to the background magnetic field. The Lorentz force induced by these self-amplified fields tends to excavate tubular, underdense, magnetic-field-depleted cavities that are advected with the fluid and perturb the shock surface, triggering downstream turbulent motions. These motions further amplify the magnetic field, up to factors of 50-100 in knot-like structures. Once downstream, the cavities tend to be filled by hot plasma plumes that compress and stretch the magnetic fields in elongated filaments; this effect is particularly evident if the shock propagates parallel to the background field. Highly magnetized knots and filaments may provide explanations for the rapid X-ray variability observed in RX J1713.7-3946 and for the regular pattern of X-ray bright stripes detected in Tycho's supernova remnant.

  18. Kinetic Study of the Collisionless Expansion of Spherical Nanoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peano, Fabio; Peinetti, Federico; Coppa, Gianni; Silva, Luis

    2006-10-01

    The collisionless expansion of spherical plasmas composed of cold ions and hot electrons is analyzed using a novel Lagrangian model [1], which allows a highly accurate, kinetic description of the radial motion of the ions and of the three-dimensional motion of nonrelativistic electrons (the validity of the model is checked both with 3D particle-in-cell simulations, performed with the OSIRIS framework [2], and using a new, ad-hoc developed particle method). The paradigmatic case of initially-Maxwellian electrons is investigated in detail for a wide range of initial conditions: simple relationships are deduced for the key expansion features [1], and a threshold in the electron energy is identified, beyond which the energy spectrum becomes monotonic and the Coulomb explosion regime is approached. Non-Maxwellian initial distributions of the electrons are also considered. [1] F. Peano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 175002 (2006). [2] R.A. Fonseca et al., Lect. Notes Comp. Sci. 2331, 342 (Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, 2002).

  19. Firehose, Mirror, and Magnetorotational Instabilities in a Collisionless Shearing Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Matthew; Schekochihin, Alexander; Stone, James; Melville, Scott; Quataert, Eliot

    2015-11-01

    Describing the large-scale behavior of weakly collisional magnetized plasmas, such as the solar wind, black-hole accretion flows, or the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters, necessitates a detailed understanding of the kinetic-scale physics governing the dynamics of magnetic fields and the transport of momentum and heat. This physics is complicated by the fact that such plasmas are expected to exhibit particle distribution functions with unequal thermal pressures in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the local magnetic field. This pressure anisotropy can trigger fast Larmor-scale instabilities - namely, firehose and mirror - which solar-wind observations suggest to be effective at regulating the pressure anisotropy to marginally stable levels. Results from weakly nonlinear theory and hybrid-kinetic particle-in-cell simulations that address how marginal stability is achieved and maintained in a plasma whose pressure anisotropy is driven by a shearing magnetic field are presented. Fluctuation spectra and effective collisionality are highlighted. These results are placed in the context of our ongoing studies of magnetorotational turbulence in collisionless astrophysical accretion disks, in which microscale plasma instabilities regulate angular-momentum transport.

  20. Landau, Case, van Kampen and Collisionless Fluid Closures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Ilon

    2015-11-01

    Landau damping represents a fundamental paradox within plasma physics. The equations of motion of classical particles and fields are symmetric under time-reversal; yet, the open system formed by integration over velocity space is not invariant and damping results from phase-mixing. Here, it is shown that the Case-van Kampen theorem can be extended to magnetized plasmas: the linear eigenfunctions provide a complete representation of the particle distribution function and exponentially damped and growing eigenmodes must appear in pairs. The numerical Case-van Kampen transformation can performed efficiently in Fourier velocity space and allows fast timescales in the evolution of the system to be treated using exponential integration. On the other hand, fluid moments require integration over velocity space, and, thus, representation of Landau damping requires explicit introduction of the arrow of time through a collisionless damping operator. This operator captures linear phenomena at the cost of damping nonlinear phenomena such as the plasma echo. Numerical comparisons of these two rather different representations will be presented. LLNL-ABS-674917 prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Atlas of Dutch drift sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riksen, Michel; Jungerius, Pieter

    2013-04-01

    The Netherlands is well known for its aeolian landscapes. Frequent storms during the High Middle Ages (1000-1300 AD) reactivated Pleistocene coversands and river dunes and are responsible for the formation of the Holocene drift sands at a scale which is unique for Europe. A hypothesized relationship with farmer practices for making plaggensoils has recently been refuted, because drift sand formation began centuries earlier. The coastal dune belt with their parabolic dunes dates from the same period as the drift sand. An estimate of the extent of drift sands can be made from soil maps: drift sands are too young to show much profile development (Regosols). With this method Koster estimated the maximum extent of Holocene drift sands in the Netherlands to be about 800 km2 (Koster 2005). Laser altimetry allows a more precise estimate of the total surface affected by wind from the characteristic relief patterns produced by the Holocene wind, which is different from the smooth surface of cover sand deposits. Laser altimetry has been used before to investigate the mechanism of drift sand formation (Jungerius & Riksen 2010). Most of the surface affected by wind is not active anymore, but the tell-tale rough surface survived ages of different landuse. The total affected surface amounts to 825 km2. It is noteworthy that both methods give comparable results. We recorded a total number of 367 of affected areas of varying shapes, ranging in size from 1.6 ha to a large complex of drif sands of 7,119.5 ha. As is to be expected from their mode of origin, most occurrences are associated with cover sands, and with river dunes along the river Meuse and smaller rivers in other parts of the country. Particularly the final phases of cover sand and river dunes that show more relief as parabolic dunes were affected. There are also small aeolian deposits at the lee side blown from fallow agricultural fields but they are (sub)recent. Most of the relief is irregular, but the larger

  2. In-Drift Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    D. Jolley

    2000-11-09

    As directed by written work direction (CRWMS M and O 1999f), Performance Assessment (PA) developed a model for microbial communities in the engineered barrier system (EBS) as documented here. The purpose of this model is to assist Performance Assessment and its Engineered Barrier Performance Section in modeling the geochemical environment within a potential repository drift for TSPA-SR/LA, thus allowing PA to provide a more detailed and complete near-field geochemical model and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This model and its predecessor (the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document, CRWMS M and O 1998a) was developed to respond to the applicable KTIs. Additionally, because of the previous development of the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a), the M and O was effectively able to resolve a previous KTI concern regarding the effects of microbial processes on seepage and flow (NRC 1998). This document supercedes the in-drift microbial communities model as documented in Chapter 4 of the TSPA-VA Technical Basis Document (CRWMS M and O 1998a). This document provides the conceptual framework of the revised in-drift microbial communities model to be used in subsequent performance assessment (PA) analyses.

  3. Dust waves in rotating planetary magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Saleem, H.

    2005-10-31

    Low frequency electrostatic drift and acoustic waves are studied in rotating dusty plasmas. Linear dispersion relation is found. It is pointed out that rotation of the planet can introduce dust drift waves through Coriolis force in the planetary magnetospheres. This mode can couple with dust acoustic mode. Coriolis force effect may give rise to dipolar vortices in rotating dusty plasmas of planetary magnetospheres.

  4. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgalla, R. J. F.

    2015-02-01

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the f ˜ 40 kHz oscillation observed in tokamak TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is λr ˜ 25 cm, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs).

  5. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sgalla, R. J. F.

    2015-02-15

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the f ∼ 40 kHz oscillation observed in tokamak TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is λ{sub r} ∼ 25 cm, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs)

  6. PARTICLE ACCELERATION BY COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS CONTAINING LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC-FIELD VARIATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, F.; Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J. E-mail: jokipii@lpl.arizona.ed

    2010-12-10

    Diffusive shock acceleration at collisionless shocks is thought to be the source of many of the energetic particles observed in space. Large-scale spatial variations of the magnetic field have been shown to be important in understanding observations. The effects are complex, so here we consider a simple, illustrative model. Here we solve numerically the Parker transport equation for a shock in the presence of large-scale sinusoidal magnetic-field variations. We demonstrate that the familiar planar-shock results can be significantly altered as a consequence of large-scale, meandering magnetic lines of force. Because the perpendicular diffusion coefficient {kappa}{sub perpendicular} is generally much smaller than the parallel diffusion coefficient {kappa}{sub ||}, the energetic charged particles are trapped and preferentially accelerated along the shock front in the regions where the connection points of magnetic field lines intersecting the shock surface converge, and thus create the 'hot spots' of the accelerated particles. For the regions where the connection points separate from each other, the acceleration to high energies will be suppressed. Further, the particles diffuse away from the 'hot spot' regions and modify the spectra of downstream particle distribution. These features are qualitatively similar to the recent Voyager observations in the Heliosheath. These results are potentially important for particle acceleration at shocks propagating in turbulent magnetized plasmas as well as those which contain large-scale nonplanar structures. Examples include anomalous cosmic rays accelerated by the solar wind termination shock, energetic particles observed in propagating heliospheric shocks, galactic cosmic rays accelerated by supernova blast waves, etc.

  7. NOVel Adaptive softening for collisionless N-body simulations: eliminating spurious haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Alexander; Read, Justin I.; Agertz, Oscar; Iannuzzi, Francesca; Power, Chris

    2016-05-01

    We describe a NOVel form of Adaptive softening (NOVA) for collisionless N-body simulations, implemented in the RAMSES adaptive mesh refinement code. In RAMSES - that we refer to as a `standard N-body method' - cells are only split if they contain more than eight particles (a mass refinement criterion). Here, we introduce an additional criterion that the particle distribution within each cell be sufficiently isotropic, as measured by the ratio of the maximum to minimum eigenvalues of its moment of inertia tensor: η = λmax/λmin. In this way, collapse is only refined if it occurs along all three axes, ensuring that the softening ɛ is always of order twice the largest interparticle spacing in a cell. This more conservative force softening criterion is designed to minimize spurious two-body effects, while maintaining high force resolution in collapsed regions of the flow. We test NOVA using an antisymmetric perturbed plane wave collapse (`Valinia' test) before applying it to warm dark matter (WDM) simulations. For the Valinia test, we show that - unlike the standard N-body method - NOVA produces no numerical fragmentation while still being able to correctly capture fine caustics and shells around the collapsing regions. For the WDM simulations, we find that NOVA converges significantly more rapidly than standard N-body, producing little or no spurious haloes on small scales. We will use NOVA in forthcoming papers to study the issue of halo formation below the free-streaming mass Mfs; filament stability; and to obtain new constraints on the temperature of dark matter.

  8. Constraining the magnetic field in GRB relativistic collisionless shocks using radio data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barniol Duran, R.

    2014-08-01

    Using gamma-ray burst (GRB) radio afterglow observations, we calculate the fraction of shocked plasma energy in the magnetic field in relativistic collisionless shocks (ɛB). We obtained ɛB for 38 bursts by assuming that the radio afterglow light curve originates in the external forward shock, and that its peak at a few to tens of days is due to the passage of the minimum (injection) frequency through the radio band. This allows for the determination of the peak synchrotron flux of the external forward shock, fp, which is f_p ∝ ɛ _B^{1/2}. The obtained value of ɛB is conservatively a minimum if the time of the `jet break' is unknown, since after the `jet break' fp is expected to decay with time faster than before it. Claims of `jet breaks' have been made for a subsample of 23 bursts, for which we can estimate a measurement of ɛB. Our results depend on the blast wave total energy, E, and the density of the circumstellar medium (CSM), n, as ɛB ∝ E-2n-1. However, by assuming a CSM magnetic field (˜10 μG), we can express the lower limits/measurements on ɛB as a density-independent ratio, B/Bsc, of the magnetic field behind the shock to the CSM shock-compressed magnetic field. We find that the distribution on both the lower limit on and the measurement of B/Bsc spans ˜3.5 orders of magnitude and both have a median of B/Bsc ˜ 30. This suggests that some amplification, beyond simple shock compression, is necessary to explain these radio afterglow observations.

  9. The CLAS drift chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Mestayer, M.D.; Carman, D.S.; Asavaphibhop, B.

    1999-04-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on a toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  10. Collisionless encounters and the origin of the lunar inclination.

    PubMed

    Pahlevan, Kaveh; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2015-11-26

    The Moon is generally thought to have formed from the debris ejected by the impact of a planet-sized object with the proto-Earth towards the end of planetary accretion. Models of the impact process predict that the lunar material was disaggregated into a circumplanetary disk and that lunar accretion subsequently placed the Moon in a near-equatorial orbit. Forward integration of the lunar orbit from this initial state predicts a modern inclination at least an order of magnitude smaller than the lunar value--a long-standing discrepancy known as the lunar inclination problem. Here we show that the modern lunar orbit provides a sensitive record of gravitational interactions with Earth-crossing planetesimals that were not yet accreted at the time of the Moon-forming event. The currently observed lunar orbit can naturally be reproduced via interaction with a small quantity of mass (corresponding to 0.0075-0.015 Earth masses eventually accreted to the Earth) carried by a few bodies, consistent with the constraints and models of late accretion. Although the encounter process has a stochastic element, the observed value of the lunar inclination is among the most likely outcomes for a wide range of parameters. The excitation of the lunar orbit is most readily reproduced via collisionless encounters of planetesimals with the Earth-Moon system with strong dissipation of tidal energy on the early Earth. This mechanism obviates the need for previously proposed (but idealized) excitation mechanisms, places the Moon-forming event in the context of the formation of Earth, and constrains the pristineness of the dynamical state of the Earth-Moon system. PMID:26607544

  11. Multiscale dynamics based on kinetic simulation of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Keizo; Takamoto, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a natural energy converter which allows explosive energy release of the magnetic field energy into plasma kinetic energy. The reconnection processes inherently involve multi-scale process. The breaking of the field lines takes place predominantly in a small region called the diffusion region formed near the x-line, while the fast plasma jets resulting from reconnection extend to a distance far beyond the ion kinetic scales from the x-line. There has been a significant gap in understanding of macro-scale and micro-scale processes. The macro-scale model of reconnection has been developed using the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations, while the micro-scale processes around the x-line have been based on kinetic equations including the ion and electron inertia. The problem is that these two kinds of model have significant discrepancies. It has been believed without any guarantee that the microscopic model near the x-line would connect to the macroscopic model far downstream of the x-line. In order to bridge the gap between the macro and micro-scale processes, we have performed large-scale particle-in-cell simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement. The simulation results suggest that the microscopic processes around the x-line do not connect to the previous MHD model even in the region far downstream of the x-line. The slow mode shocks and the associated plasma acceleration do not appear at the exhaust boundary of kinetic reconnection. Instead, the ions are accelerated due to the Speiser motion in the current layer extending to a distance beyond the kinetic scales. The different acceleration mechanisms between the ions and electrons lead to the Hall current system in broad area of the exhaust. Therefore, the previous MHD model could be inappropriate for collisionless magnetic reconnection. Ref. K. Fujimoto & M. Takamoto, Phys. Plasmas, 23, 012903 (2016).

  12. Statistical mechanics of collisionless orbits. IV. Distribution of angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Liliya L. R.; Hjorth, Jens; Wojtak, Radosław E-mail: jens@dark-cosmology.dk

    2014-03-01

    It has been shown in previous work that DARKexp, which is a theoretically derived, maximum entropy, one shape parameter model for isotropic collisionless systems, provides very good fits to simulated and observed dark matter halos. Specifically, it fits the energy distribution, N(E), and the density profiles, including the central cusp. Here, we extend DARKexp N(E) to include the distribution in angular momentum, L {sup 2}, for spherically symmetric systems. First, we argue, based on theoretical, semi-analytical, and simulation results, that while dark matter halos are relaxed in energy, they are not nearly as relaxed in angular momentum, which precludes using maximum entropy to uniquely derive N(E, L {sup 2}). Instead, we require that when integrating N(E, L {sup 2}) over squared angular momenta one retrieves the DARKexp N(E). Starting with a general expression for N(E, L {sup 2}) we show how the distribution of particles in L {sup 2} is related to the shape of the velocity distribution function, VDF, and velocity anisotropy profile, β(r). We then demonstrate that astrophysically realistic halos, as judged by the VDF shape and β(r), must have linear or convex distributions in L {sup 2}, for each separate energy bin. The distribution in energy of the most bound particles must be nearly flat, and become more tilted in favor of radial orbits for less bound particles. These results are consistent with numerical simulations and represent an important step toward deriving the full distribution function for spherically symmetric dark matter halos.

  13. Collisionless encounters and the origin of the lunar inclination.

    PubMed

    Pahlevan, Kaveh; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2015-11-26

    The Moon is generally thought to have formed from the debris ejected by the impact of a planet-sized object with the proto-Earth towards the end of planetary accretion. Models of the impact process predict that the lunar material was disaggregated into a circumplanetary disk and that lunar accretion subsequently placed the Moon in a near-equatorial orbit. Forward integration of the lunar orbit from this initial state predicts a modern inclination at least an order of magnitude smaller than the lunar value--a long-standing discrepancy known as the lunar inclination problem. Here we show that the modern lunar orbit provides a sensitive record of gravitational interactions with Earth-crossing planetesimals that were not yet accreted at the time of the Moon-forming event. The currently observed lunar orbit can naturally be reproduced via interaction with a small quantity of mass (corresponding to 0.0075-0.015 Earth masses eventually accreted to the Earth) carried by a few bodies, consistent with the constraints and models of late accretion. Although the encounter process has a stochastic element, the observed value of the lunar inclination is among the most likely outcomes for a wide range of parameters. The excitation of the lunar orbit is most readily reproduced via collisionless encounters of planetesimals with the Earth-Moon system with strong dissipation of tidal energy on the early Earth. This mechanism obviates the need for previously proposed (but idealized) excitation mechanisms, places the Moon-forming event in the context of the formation of Earth, and constrains the pristineness of the dynamical state of the Earth-Moon system.

  14. Asymmetric evolution of magnetic reconnection in collisionless accretion disk

    SciTech Connect

    Shirakawa, Keisuke Hoshino, Masahiro

    2014-05-15

    An evolution of a magnetic reconnection in a collisionless accretion disk is investigated using a 2.5 dimensional hybrid code simulation. In astrophysical disks, magnetorotational instability (MRI) is considered to play an important role by generating turbulence in the disk and contributes to an effective angular momentum transport through a turbulent viscosity. Magnetic reconnection, on the other hand, also plays an important role on the evolution of the disk through a dissipation of a magnetic field enhanced by a dynamo effect of MRI. In this study, we developed a hybrid code to calculate an evolution of a differentially rotating system. With this code, we first confirmed a linear growth of MRI. We also investigated a behavior of a particular structure of a current sheet, which would exist in the turbulence in the disk. From the calculation of the magnetic reconnection, we found an asymmetric structure in the out-of-plane magnetic field during the evolution of reconnection, which can be understood by a coupling of the Hall effect and the differential rotation. We also found a migration of X-point whose direction is determined only by an initial sign of J{sub 0}×Ω{sub 0}, where J{sub 0} is the initial current density in the neutral sheet and Ω{sub 0} is the rotational vector of the background Keplerian rotation. Associated with the migration of X-point, we also found a significant enhancement of the perpendicular magnetic field compared to an ordinary MRI. MRI-Magnetic reconnection coupling and the resulting magnetic field enhancement can be an effective process to sustain a strong turbulence in the accretion disk and to a transport of angular momentum.

  15. Onset of stimulated Raman scattering of a laser in a plasma in the presence of hot drifting electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, D. N. Yadav, Pinki; Avinash, K.; Jang, D. G.; Suk, H.; Hur, M. S.

    2015-05-15

    Stimulated Raman scattering of a laser in plasmas with energetic drifting electrons was investigated by analyzing the growth of interacting waves during the Raman scattering process. The Langmuir wave and scattered electromagnetic sideband wave grow initially and are dampened after attaining a maximum level that indicates a periodic exchange of energy between the pump wave and the daughter waves. The presence of energetic drifting electrons in the laser-produced plasma influences the stimulated Raman scattering process. The plasma wave generated by Raman scattering may be influenced by the energetic electrons, which enhance the growth rate of the instability. Our results show that the presence of energetic (hot) drifting electrons in a plasma has an important effect on the evolution of the interacting waves. This phenomenon is modeled via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the propagation and interaction of the laser under Raman instability.

  16. Hybrid simulation codes with application to shocks and upstream waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hybrid codes in which part of the plasma is represented as particles and the rest as a fluid are discussed. In the past few years such codes with particle ions and massless, fluid electrons have been applied to space plasmas, especially to collisionless shocks. All of these simulation codes are one-dimensional and similar in structure, except for how the field equations are solved. The various approaches that are used (resistive Ohm's law, predictor-corrector, Hamiltonian) are described in detail and results from the various codes are compared with examples taken from collisionless shocks and low frequency wave phenomena upstream of shocks.

  17. Does the geoid drift west?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, G. E.; Parker, R. L.; Zumberge, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    In 1970 Hide and Malin noted a correlation of about 0.8 between the geoid and the geomagnetic potential at the Earth's surface when the latter is rotated eastward in longitude by about 160 degrees and the spherical harmonic expansions of both functions are truncated at degree 4. From a century of magnetic observatory data, Hide and Malin inferred an average magnetic westward drift rate of about 0.27 degrees/year. They attributed the magnetic-gravitational correlation to a core event at about 1350 A.D. which impressed the mantle's gravity pattern at long wavelengths onto the core motion and the resulting magnetic field. The impressed pattern was then carried westward 160 degrees by the nsuing magnetic westward drift. An alternative possibility is some sort of steady physical coupling between the magnetic and gravitational fields (perhaps migration of Hide's bumps on the core-mantle interface). This model predicts that the geoid will drift west at the magnetic rate. On a rigid earth, the resulting changes in sea level would be easily observed, but they could be masked by adjustment of the mantle if it has a shell with viscosity considerably less than 10 to the 21 poise. However, steady westward drift of the geoid also predicts secular changes in g, the local acceleration of gravity, at land stations. These changes are now ruled out by recent independent high-accuracy absolute measurements of g made by several workers at various locations in the Northern Hemisphere.

  18. Drift Hamiltonian in magnetic coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Boozer, A.H.; Hay, R.

    1982-02-01

    A Hamiltonian formulation of the guiding-center drift in arbitrary, steady state, magnetic and electric fields is given. The canonical variables of this formulation are simply related to the magnetic coordinates. The modifications required to treat ergodic magnetic fields using magnetic coordinates are explicitly given in the Hamiltonian formulation.

  19. The effects of strong temperature anisotropy on the kinetic structure of collisionless slow shocks and reconnection exhausts. II. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2011-09-01

    Simulations of collisionless oblique propagating slow shocks have revealed the existence of a transition associated with a critical temperature anisotropy ɛ = 1 - μ0(P|| - P⊥)/B2 = 0.25 (Y.-H. Liu, J. F. Drake, and M. Swisdak, Phys. Plasmas 18, 062110 (2011)). An explanation for this phenomenon is proposed here based on anisotropic fluid theory, in particular, the anisotropic derivative nonlinear-Schrödinger-Burgers equation, with an intuitive model of the energy closure for the downstream counter-streaming ions. The anisotropy value of 0.25 is significant because it is closely related to the degeneracy point of the slow and intermediate modes and corresponds to the lower bound of the coplanar to non-coplanar transition that occurs inside a compound slow shock (SS)/rotational discontinuity (RD) wave. This work implies that it is a pair of compound SS/RD waves that bound the outflows in magnetic reconnection, instead of a pair of switch-off slow shocks as in Petschek's model. This fact might explain the rareness of in-situ observations of Petschek-reconnection-associated switch-off slow shocks.

  20. The effects of strong temperature anisotropy on the kinetic structure of collisionless slow shocks and reconnection exhausts. II. Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2011-09-15

    Simulations of collisionless oblique propagating slow shocks have revealed the existence of a transition associated with a critical temperature anisotropy {epsilon} = 1 - {mu}{sub 0}(P{sub ||} - P{sub perpendicular})/B{sup 2} = 0.25 (Y.-H. Liu, J. F. Drake, and M. Swisdak, Phys. Plasmas 18, 062110 (2011)). An explanation for this phenomenon is proposed here based on anisotropic fluid theory, in particular, the anisotropic derivative nonlinear-Schroedinger-Burgers equation, with an intuitive model of the energy closure for the downstream counter-streaming ions. The anisotropy value of 0.25 is significant because it is closely related to the degeneracy point of the slow and intermediate modes and corresponds to the lower bound of the coplanar to non-coplanar transition that occurs inside a compound slow shock (SS)/rotational discontinuity (RD) wave. This work implies that it is a pair of compound SS/RD waves that bound the outflows in magnetic reconnection, instead of a pair of switch-off slow shocks as in Petschek's model. This fact might explain the rareness of in-situ observations of Petschek-reconnection-associated switch-off slow shocks.

  1. An asymmetric outer retinal response to drifting sawtooth gratings.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Nina; Hugrass, Laila; Jayasuriya, Jude; Crewther, Sheila G; Crewther, David P

    2016-05-01

    Electroretinogram (ERG) studies have demonstrated that the retinal response to temporally modulated fast-ON and fast-OFF sawtooth flicker is asymmetric. The response to spatiotemporal sawtooth stimuli has not yet been investigated. Perceptually, such drifting gratings or diamond plaids shaded in a sawtooth pattern appear brighter when movement produces fast-OFF relative to fast-ON luminance profiles. The neural origins of this illusion remain unclear (although a retinal basis has been suggested). Thus we presented toad eyecups with sequential epochs of sawtooth, sine-wave, and square-wave gratings drifting horizontally across the retina at temporal frequencies of 2.5-20 Hz. All ERGs revealed a sustained direct-current (DC) transtissue potential during drift and a peak at drift offset. The amplitudes of both phenomena increased with temporal frequency. Consistent with the human perceptual experience of sawtooth gratings, the sustained DC potential effect was greater for fast-OFF cf. fast-ON sawtooth. Modeling suggested that the dependence of temporal luminance contrast on stimulus device frame rate contributed to the temporal frequency effects but could not explain the divergence in response amplitudes for the two sawtooth profiles. The difference between fast-ON and fast-OFF sawtooth profiles also remained following pharmacological suppression of postreceptoral activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX), 2-amino-4-phosphonobutric acid (APB), and 2,3 cis-piperidine dicarboxylic acid (PDA). Our results indicate that the DC potential difference originates from asymmetries in the photoreceptoral response to fast-ON and fast-OFF sawtooth profiles, thus pointing to an outer retinal origin for the motion-induced drifting sawtooth brightness illusion.

  2. Electrostatic waves in the magnetosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.; Fredricks, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Electric dipole antennas on magnetospheric spacecraft measure E field components of many kinds of electromagnetic waves. In addition, lower hybrid resonance emissions are frequently observed well above the ionosphere. The Ogo 5 plasma wave experiment has also detected new forms of electrostatic emissions that appear to interact very strongly with the local plasma particles. Greatly enhanced wave amplitudes have been found during the expansion phases of substorms, and analysis indicates that these emissions produce strong pitch angle diffusion. Intense broadband electrostatic turbulence is also detected at current layers containing steep magnetic field gradients. This current-driven instability is operative at the bow shock and also at field null regions just within the magnetosheath, and at the magnetopause near the dayside polar cusp. The plasma turbulence appears to involve ion acoustic waves, and the wave particle scattering provides an important collisionless dissipation mechanism for field merging.

  3. Enhanced thermal self-focusing of a Gaussian laser beam in a collisionless plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Devki Nandan; Suk, Hyyong

    2011-12-15

    Theory given by Wang-Zhou [Phys. Plasmas 18, 043101 (2011)] for the thermal self-focusing of a Gaussian laser beam in a collisionless plasma is revisited by including the effect of a localized upward plasma-density ramp. As the equilibrium electron density is an increasing function of the distance of propagation of the laser beam, the diffraction length decreases rapidly as the beam penetrates deeper into the plasma and the diffraction effect becomes reduced; thus, the laser becomes more focused. A significant enhancement in laser thermal self-focusing in a collisionless plasma is consequently observed if a localized plasma density ramp is introduced.

  4. Time-resolved characterization of the formation of a collisionless shock.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, H; Dieckmann, M E; Romagnani, L; Doria, D; Sarri, G; Cerchez, M; Ianni, E; Kourakis, I; Giesecke, A L; Notley, M; Prasad, R; Quinn, K; Willi, O; Borghesi, M

    2013-05-17

    We report on the temporally and spatially resolved detection of the precursory stages that lead to the formation of an unmagnetized, supercritical collisionless shock in a laser-driven laboratory experiment. The measured evolution of the electrostatic potential associated with the shock unveils the transition from a current free double layer into a symmetric shock structure, stabilized by ion reflection at the shock front. Supported by a matching particle-in-cell simulation and theoretical considerations, we suggest that this process is analogous to ion reflection at supercritical collisionless shocks in supernova remnants. PMID:25167421

  5. Evolution: drift will tear us apart.

    PubMed

    Maderspacher, Florian

    2012-11-01

    That the widely scattered geographical distribution of some animals could be due to continental drift is a neat idea. Now, cave animals provide evidence for extreme long-term persistence on continents drifting apart. PMID:23137684

  6. Evolution: drift will tear us apart.

    PubMed

    Maderspacher, Florian

    2012-11-01

    That the widely scattered geographical distribution of some animals could be due to continental drift is a neat idea. Now, cave animals provide evidence for extreme long-term persistence on continents drifting apart.

  7. Electrometer preamplifier has drift correction feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labarthe, L. C.

    1965-01-01

    Negative feedback circuit corrects output drift in an electrometer. The negative feedback is used in the no signal state to maintain the output level at zero reference. Drift voltage storage in the signal on state is also used to provide a drift-free readout.

  8. Generalized banana-drift transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1985-10-01

    The theory of tokamak ripple transport in the banana-drift and ripple-plateau regimes is extended in a number of directions. The theory is valid for small values of the toroidal periodicity number n of the perturbation, as well as for the moderate values (n approx. 10 to 20) previously assumed. It is shown that low-n perturbations can produce much greater transport than the larger-n perturbations usually studied. In addition, the ripple perturbation is allowed arbitrary values of poloidal mode number m and frequency ..omega.., making it applicable to the transport induced by MHD modes. Bounce averaging is avoided, so the theory includes the contributions to transport from all harmonics of the bounce frequency, providing a continuous description of the transition from the banana drift to the ripple-plateau regime. The implications of the theory for toroidal rotation in tokamaks are considered.

  9. A Pascalian lateral drift sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, H.

    2016-09-01

    A novel concept of a layer-wise produced semiconductor sensor for precise particle tracking is proposed herein. In contrast to common semiconductor sensors, local regions with increased doping concentration deep in the bulk termed charge guides increase the lateral drift of free charges on their way to the read-out electrode. This lateral drift enables charge sharing independent of the incident position of the traversing particle. With a regular grid of charge guides the lateral charge distribution resembles a normalised Pascal's triangle for particles that are stopped in depths lower than the depth of the first layer of the charge guides. For minimum ionising particles a sum of binomial distributions describes the lateral charge distribution. This concept decouples the achievable sensor resolution from the pitch size as the characteristic length is replaced by the lateral distance of the charge guides.

  10. Random drift and culture change.

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, R. Alexander; Hahn, Matthew W.; Shennan, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    We show that the frequency distributions of cultural variants, in three different real-world examples--first names, archaeological pottery and applications for technology patents--follow power laws that can be explained by a simple model of random drift. We conclude that cultural and economic choices often reflect a decision process that is value-neutral; this result has far-reaching testable implications for social-science research. PMID:15306315

  11. MPS II drift chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed.

  12. Abstraction of Seepage into Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Wilson; C.K. Ho

    2000-09-26

    A total-system performance assessment (TSPA) for a potential nuclear-waste repository requires an estimate of the amount of water that might contact waste. This paper describes the model used for part of that estimation in a recent TSPA for the Yucca Mountain site. The discussion is limited to estimation of how much water might enter emplacement drifts; additional considerations related to flow within the drifts, and how much water might actually contact waste, are not addressed here. The unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain is being considered for the potential repository, and a drift opening in unsaturated rock tends to act as a capillary barrier and divert much of the percolating water around it. For TSPA, the important questions regarding seepage are how many waste packages might be subjected to water flow and how much flow those packages might see. Because of heterogeneity of the rock and uncertainty about the future (how the climate will evolve, etc.), it is not possible to predict seepage amounts or locations with certainty. Thus, seepage is treated as a stochastic quantity in TSPA simulations, with the magnitude and spatial distribution of seepage sampled from uncertainty distributions. The distillation of the essential components of process modeling into a form suitable for use in TSPA simulations is referred to as abstraction. In the following sections, seepage process models and abstractions will be summarized and then some illustrative results are presented.

  13. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  14. Collisionless relaxation of downstream ion distributions in low-Mach number shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gedalin, M.; Friedman, Y.; Balikhin, M.

    2015-07-15

    Collisionlessly formed downstream distributions of ions in low-Mach number shocks are studied. General expressions for the asymptotic value of the ion density and pressure are derived for the directly transmitted ions. An analytical approximation for the overshoot strength is suggested for the low-β case. Spatial damping scale of the downstream magnetic oscillations is estimated.

  15. Scaling laws for collisionless laser-plasma interactions of relevance for laboratory astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Rermington, B A

    2006-04-04

    Scaling laws for interaction of ultra-intense laser beams with a collisionless plasmas are discussed. Special attention is paid to the problem of the collective ion acceleration. Symmetry arguments in application to the generation of the poloidal magnetic field are presented. A heuristic model for evaluating the magnetic field strength is proposed.

  16. Warm wavebreaking of nonlinear plasma waves with arbitrary phasevelocities

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2004-11-12

    A warm, relativistic fluid theory of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed to analyze nonlinear plasma waves excited by intense drive beams. The maximum amplitude and wavelength are calculated for nonrelativistic plasma temperatures and arbitrary plasma wave phase velocities. The maximum amplitude is shown to increase in the presence of a laser field. These results set a limit to the achievable gradient in plasma-based accelerators.

  17. Sheared Flow Driven Drift Instability and Vortices in Dusty Plasmas with Opposite Polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtaq, A.; Shah, AttaUllah; Ikram, M.; Clark, R. E. H.

    2016-02-01

    Low-frequency electrostatic drift waves are studied in an inhomogeneous dust magnetoplasma containing dust with components of opposite polarity. The drift waves are driven by the magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) sheared flows in the presence of electrons and ions. Due to sheared flow in the linear regime, the electrostatic dust drift waves become unstable. The conditions of mode instability, with the effects of dust streaming and opposite polarity, are studied. These are excited modes which gain large amplitudes and exhibit interactions among themselves. The interaction is governed by the Hasegawa-Mima (HM) nonlinear equation with vector nonlinearity. The stationary solutions of the HM equation in the form of a vortex chain and a dipolar vortex, including effects of dust polarity and electron (ion) temperatures, are studied. The relevance of the present work to space and laboratory four component dusty plasmas is noted.

  18. Drift-tearing magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.; Waelbroeck, F. L.

    2008-01-15

    A systematic fluid theory of nonlinear magnetic island dynamics in conventional low-{beta}, large aspect-ratio, circular cross-section tokamak plasmas is developed using an extended magnetohydrodynamics model that incorporates diamagnetic flows, ion gyroviscosity, fast parallel electron heat transport, the ion sound wave, the drift wave, and average magnetic field-line curvature. The model excludes the compressible Alfven wave, geodesic field-line curvature, neoclassical effects, and ion Landau damping. A collisional closure is used for plasma dynamics parallel to the magnetic field. Two distinct branches of island solutions are found, namely the 'sonic' and 'hypersonic' branches. Both branches are investigated analytically, using suitable ordering schemes, and in each case the problem is reduced to a relatively simple set of nonlinear differential equations that can be solved numerically via iteration. The solution determines the island phase velocity, relative to the plasma, and the effect of local currents on the island stability. Sonic islands are relatively wide, flatten both the temperature and density profiles, and tend to propagate close to the local ion fluid velocity. Hypersonic islands, on the other hand, are relatively narrow, only flatten the temperature profile, radiate drift-acoustic waves, and tend to propagate close to the local electron fluid velocity. The hypersonic solution branch ceases to exist above a critical island width. Under normal circumstances, both types of island are stabilized by local ion polarization currents.

  19. Influence of the dissipation mechanism on collisionless magnetic reconnection in symmetric and asymmetric current layers

    SciTech Connect

    Aunai, Nicolas; Hesse, Michael; Black, Carrie; Evans, Rebekah; Kuznetsova, Maria

    2013-04-15

    Numerical studies implementing different versions of the collisionless Ohm's law have shown a reconnection rate insensitive to the nature of the non-ideal mechanism occurring at the X line, as soon as the Hall effect is operating. Consequently, the dissipation mechanism occurring in the vicinity of the reconnection site in collisionless systems is usually thought not to have a dynamical role beyond the violation of the frozen-in condition. The interpretation of recent studies has, however, led to the opposite conclusion that the electron scale dissipative processes play an important dynamical role in preventing an elongation of the electron layer from throttling the reconnection rate. This work re-visits this topic with a new approach. Instead of focusing on the extensively studied symmetric configuration, we aim to investigate whether the macroscopic properties of collisionless reconnection are affected by the dissipation physics in asymmetric configurations, for which the effect of the Hall physics is substantially modified. Because it includes all the physical scales a priori important for collisionless reconnection (Hall and ion kinetic physics) and also because it allows one to change the nature of the non-ideal electron scale physics, we use a (two dimensional) hybrid model. The effects of numerical, resistive, and hyper-resistive dissipation are studied. In a first part, we perform simulations of symmetric reconnection with different non-ideal electron physics. We show that the model captures the already known properties of collisionless reconnection. In a second part, we focus on an asymmetric configuration where the magnetic field strength and the density are both asymmetric. Our results show that contrary to symmetric reconnection, the asymmetric model evolution strongly depends on the nature of the mechanism which breaks the field line connectivity. The dissipation occurring at the X line plays an important role in preventing the electron current layer

  20. `Effective' collisions in weakly magnetized collisionless plasma: importance of Pitaevski's effect for magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, Lev M.; Artemyev, Anton V.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we revisit the paradigm of space science turbulent dissipation traditionally considered as myth (Coroniti, Space Sci. Rev., vol. 42, 1985, pp. 399-410). We demonstrate that due to approach introduced by Pitaevskii (Sov. J. Expl Theor. Phys., vol. 44, 1963, pp. 969-979 (in Russian)) (the effect of a finite Larmor radius on a classical collision integral) dissipation induced by effective interaction with microturbulence produces a significant effect on plasma dynamics, especially in the vicinity of the reconnection region. We estimate the multiplication factor of collision frequency in the collision integral for short wavelength perturbations. For waves propagating transverse to the background magnetic field, this factor is approximately ρekx)2 an electron gyroradius and where kx a transverse wavenumber. We consider recent spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetotail reconnection region to the estimate possible impact of this multiplication factor. For small-scale reconnection regions this factor can significantly increase the effective collision frequency produced both by lower-hybrid drift turbulence and by kinetic Alfvén waves. We discuss the possibility that the Pitaevskii's effect may be responsible for the excitation of a resistive electron tearing mode in thin current sheets formed in the outflow region of the primary X-line.

  1. A Stokes drift approximation based on the Phillips spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Janssen, Peter A. E. M.

    2016-04-01

    A new approximation to the Stokes drift velocity profile based on the exact solution for the Phillips spectrum is explored. The profile is compared with the monochromatic profile and the recently proposed exponential integral profile. ERA-Interim spectra and spectra from a wave buoy in the central North Sea are used to investigate the behavior of the profile. It is found that the new profile has a much stronger gradient near the surface and lower normalized deviation from the profile computed from the spectra. Based on estimates from two open-ocean locations, an average value has been estimated for a key parameter of the profile. Given this parameter, the profile can be computed from the same two parameters as the monochromatic profile, namely the transport and the surface Stokes drift velocity.

  2. Test particle study of ion transport in drift type turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.

    2013-12-15

    Ion transport regimes in drift type turbulence are determined in the frame of a realistic model for the turbulence spectrum based on numerical simulations. The model includes the drift of the potential with the effective diamagnetic velocity, turbulence anisotropy, and dominant waves. The effects of the zonal flow modes are also analyzed. A semi-analytical method that is able to describe trajectory stochastic trapping or eddying is used for obtaining the transport coefficients as function of the parameters of the turbulence. Analytical approximations of the transport coefficients are derived from the results. They show the transition from Bohm to gyro-Bohm scaling as plasma size increases in very good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  3. Magnetic field waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Mish, William H.; Wong, Hung K.

    1994-01-01

    The research efforts funded by the Uranus Data Analysis Program (UDAP) grant to the Bartol Research Institute (BRI) involved the study of magnetic field waves associated with the Uranian bow shock. Upstream wave studies are motivated as a study of the physics of collisionless shocks. Collisionless shocks in plasmas are capable of 'reflecting' a fraction of the incoming thermal particle distribution and directing the resulting energetic particle motion back into the upstream region. Once within the upstream region, the backward streaming energetic particles convey information of the approaching shock to the supersonic flow. This particle population is responsible for the generation of upstream magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations known as 'upstream waves', for slowing the incoming wind prior to the formation of the shock ramp, and for heating of the upstream plasma. The waves produced at Uranus not only differed in several regards from the observations at other planetary bow shocks, but also gave new information regarding the nature of the reflected particle populations which were largely unmeasurable by the particle instruments. Four distinct magnetic field wave types were observed upstream of the Uranian bow shock: low-frequency Alfven or fast magnetosonic waves excited by energetic protons originating at or behind the bow shock; whistler wave bursts driven by gyrating ion distributions within the shock ramp; and two whistler wave types simultaneously observed upstream of the flanks of the shock and argued to arise from resonance with energetic electrons. In addition, observations of energetic particle distributions by the LECP experiment, thermal particle populations observed by the PLS experiment, and electron plasma oscillations recorded by the PWS experiment proved instrumental to this study and are included to some degree in the papers and presentations supported by this grant.

  4. Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks in laser-irradiated dense plasmas: Prevailing role of the electrons in generating the field fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Ruyer, C. Gremillet, L.; Bonnaud, G.

    2015-08-15

    We present a particle-in-cell simulation of the generation of a collisionless strong shock in a dense plasma driven by an ultra-intense, plane-wave laser pulse. A linear theory analysis, based on a multi-waterbag model of the particle distributions, highlights the role of the laser-heated electrons in triggering the Weibel-like instability causing shock formation. It is demonstrated that the return-current electrons play a major role in the instability development as well as in the determination of the saturated magnetic field. By contrast, the ions are found of minor importance in driving the instability and the magnetic field fluctuations responsible for their isotropization. Finally, we show that a Weibel-mediated shock can also be generated by a focused laser pulse of large enough spot size.

  5. Effects of alpha-proton drift velocity on alpha particle firehose instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seough, Jungjoon; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    In situ measurements have shown that the less-abundant alpha particles are characterized by temperature anisotropy which could drive the anisotropy-driven kinetic instabilities in the solar wind. In the collisionless plasma, the differential alpha-proton flow velocity V d = V α - V p usually has a non-zero value of the order of the local Alfvén velocity. The presence of such differential flow may affect the properties of dispersion relations for anisotropy-driven instabilities. Based upon linear Vlasov dispersion theory in a homogeneous plasma, the present study investigates the effects of the alpha-proton drift velocity on the parallel and oblique firehose instabilities driven by an excessive parallel temperature anisotropy of alpha particles, where the parallel and oblique represent directions of fluctuation propagation relative to the background magnetic field. It is found that for oblique firehose mode as well as parallel mode, the dispersion properties are affected by the presence of the alpha-proton drift velocity, which in turn results in the increase of the maximum growth rates as Vd increases and consequently leads to the modification of the marginal stability conditions in the parameter space ( β ∥ α , T ⊥ α / T ∥ α ) . We discuss the relevance of our results to the measured temperature anisotropy of alpha particles in the solar wind context.

  6. Radar studies of midlatitude ionospheric plasma drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherliess, L.; Fejer, B. G.; Holt, J.; Goncharenko, L.; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Buonsanto, M. J.

    2001-02-01

    We use incoherent scatter radar measurements from Millstone Hill and Saint Santin to study the midlatitude F region electrodynamic plasma drifts during geomagnetically quiet and active periods. We present initially a local time, season, and solar flux dependent analytical model of the quiet time zonal and meridional E×B drifts over these stations. We discuss, for the first time, the Saint Santin drift patterns during solar maximum. We have used these quiet time models to extract the geomagnetic perturbation drifts which were modeled as a function of the time history of the auroral electrojet indices. Our results illustrate the evolution of the disturbance drifts driven by the combined effects of prompt penetration and longer lasting perturbation electric fields. The meridional electrodynamic disturbance drifts have largest amplitudes in the midnight-noon sector. The zonal drifts are predominantly westward, with largest amplitudes in the dusk-midnight sector and, following a decrease in the high-latitude convection, they decay more slowly than the meridional drifts. The prompt penetration and steady state zonal disturbance drifts derived from radar measurements are in good agreement with results obtained from both the ion drift meter data on board the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) satellite and from the Rice Convection Model.

  7. Investigations of SPS Orbit Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    Drøsdal, Lene; Bracco, Chiara; Cornelis, Karel; Goddard, Brennan; Kain, Verena; Meddahi, Malika; Wenninger, Jorg; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2014-07-01

    The LHC is filled from the last pre-injector, the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), via two 3 km long transfer lines, TI 2 and TI 8. Over the LHC injection processes, a drift of the beam trajectories has been observed in TI 2 and TI 8, requiring regular correction of the trajectories, in order to ensure clean injection into the LHC. Investigations of the trajectory variations in the transfer lines showed that the main source of short term trajectory drifts are current variations of the SPS extraction septa (MSE). The stability of the power converters has been improved, but the variations are still present and further improvements are being investigated. The stability over a longer period of time cannot be explained by this source alone. The analysis of trajectory variations shows that there are also slow variations in the SPS closed orbit at extraction. A set of SPS orbit measurements has been saved and analysed. These observations will be used together with simulations and observed field errors to locate the second source of variations.

  8. Simulation of laser-driven, ablated plasma flows in collisionless shock experiments on OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, M. J.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rutter, E. M.; Ross, J. S.; Kugland, N. L.; Plechaty, C.; Remington, B. A.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C. D.; Meinecke, J.; Reville, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D. H.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Fu, W.; Woolsey, N.; Park, H.-S.

    2013-03-01

    Experiments investigating the physics of interpenetrating, collisionless, ablated plasma flows have become an important area of research in the high-energy-density field. In order to evaluate the feasibility of designing experiments that will generate a collisionless shock mediated by the Weibel instability on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser, computer simulations using the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) radiation-hydrodynamics model have been carried out. This paper reports assessment of whether the experiment can reach the required scale size while maintaining the low interflow collisionality necessary for the collisionless shock to form. Comparison of simulation results with data from Omega experiments shows the ability of the CRASH code to model these ablated systems. The combined results indicate that experiments on the NIF are capable of reaching the regimes necessary for the formation of a collisionless shock in a laboratory experiment.

  9. Experimental investigation of collisionless electron-electron microinstabilities. Final technical report for the period August 1, 1997-October 31, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Scime, Earl E.

    2000-12-11

    This is the final report for the Office of Fusion Energy sponsored project entitled, "Experimental Investigation of Collisionless Electron-Electron Microinstabilities." The report summarizes the scientific and human resource development accomplishments supported through this project.

  10. Collisionless stellar hydrodynamics as an efficient alternative to N-body methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Nigel L.; Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Hensler, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The dominant constituents of the Universe's matter are believed to be collisionless in nature and thus their modelling in any self-consistent simulation is extremely important. For simulations that deal only with dark matter or stellar systems, the conventional N-body technique is fast, memory efficient and relatively simple to implement. However when extending simulations to include the effects of gas physics, mesh codes are at a distinct disadvantage compared to Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) codes. Whereas implementing the N-body approach into SPH codes is fairly trivial, the particle-mesh technique used in mesh codes to couple collisionless stars and dark matter to the gas on the mesh has a series of significant scientific and technical limitations. These include spurious entropy generation resulting from discreteness effects, poor load balancing and increased communication overhead which spoil the excellent scaling in massively parallel grid codes. In this paper we propose the use of the collisionless Boltzmann moment equations as a means to model the collisionless material as a fluid on the mesh, implementing it into the massively parallel FLASH Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) code. This approach which we term `collisionless stellar hydrodynamics' enables us to do away with the particle-mesh approach and since the parallelization scheme is identical to that used for the hydrodynamics, it preserves the excellent scaling of the FLASH code already demonstrated on peta-flop machines. We find that the classic hydrodynamic equations and the Boltzmann moment equations can be reconciled under specific conditions, allowing us to generate analytic solutions for collisionless systems using conventional test problems. We confirm the validity of our approach using a suite of demanding test problems, including the use of a modified Sod shock test. By deriving the relevant eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Boltzmann moment equations, we are able to use high order

  11. A maximally informative version of inelastic scattering of electromagnetic waves by Langmuir waves

    SciTech Connect

    Erofeev, V. I.

    2015-09-15

    The concept of informativeness of nonlinear plasma physics scenarios is explained. Natural ideas of developing highly informative models of plasma kinetics are spelled out. A maximally informative version of inelastic scattering of electromagnetic waves by Langmuir waves in a weakly turbulent inhomogeneous plasma is developed with consideration of possible changes in wave polarization. In addition, a new formula for wave drift in spatial positions and wave vectors is derived. New scenarios of the respective wave drift and inelastic scattering are compared with the previous visions. The results indicate the need for further revision of the traditional understanding of nonlinear plasma phenomena.

  12. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  13. WORLD SURFACE CURRENTS FROM SHIP'S DRIFT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, C.P.; Schladow, S.G.

    1980-11-01

    Over 4 million observations of ship's drift are on file at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Centre, in Washington, D. C., representing a vast amount of information on ocean surface currents. The observed drift speeds are dependent on the frequency of occurence of the particular current speeds and the frequency of observation. By comparing frequency of observation with the drift speeds observed it is possible to confirm known current patterns and detect singularities in surface currents.

  14. Electron injection in semiconductor drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P. ); Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Castoldi, A. ); Vacchi, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports the first successful results of a simple MOS structure to inject electrons at a given position in Silicon Drift Detectors. The structure allows on-line calibration of the drift velocity of electrons within the detector. The calibration is a practical method to trace the temperature dependence of the electron mobility. Several of these injection structures can be implemented in silicon drift detectors without additional steps in the fabrication process. 5 refs., 11 figs.

  15. The collisional drift mode in a partially ionized plasma. [in the F region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Kennel, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of the drift instability was examined in several density regimes. Let sub e be the total electron mean free path, k sub z the wave-vector component along the magnetic field, and the ratio of perpendicular ion diffusion to parallel electron streaming rates. At low densities (k sub z lambda 1) the drift mode is isothermal and should be treated kineticly. In the finite heat conduction regime square root of m/M k sub z Lambda sub 1) the drift instability threshold is reduced at low densities and increased at high densities as compared to the isothermal threshold. Finally, in the energy transfer limit (k sub z kambda sub e square root of m/M) the drift instability behaves adiabatically in a fully ionized plasma and isothermally in a partially ionized plasma for an ion-neutral to Coulomb collision frequency ratio.

  16. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, A. G.; Mastrano, A.; Geppert, U.

    2016-07-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within ˜104-105 yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths ˜1014 G maintained over ≳106 yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity ɛ ˜ 10-6, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after ˜105 yr. A pulsar rotating at ˜102 Hz with such ɛ is a promising gravitational wave source candidate. Since such large deformations can be caused only by a particular magnetic field configuration that penetrates the whole star and whose maximum magnetic energy is concentrated in the outer core region, gravitational wave emission observed from radio pulsars can thus inform us about the internal field structures of young neutron stars.

  17. Biology undergraduates' misconceptions about genetic drift.

    PubMed

    Andrews, T M; Price, R M; Mead, L S; McElhinny, T L; Thanukos, A; Perez, K E; Herreid, C F; Terry, D R; Lemons, P P

    2012-01-01

    This study explores biology undergraduates' misconceptions about genetic drift. We use qualitative and quantitative methods to describe students' definitions, identify common misconceptions, and examine differences before and after instruction on genetic drift. We identify and describe five overarching categories that include 16 distinct misconceptions about genetic drift. The accuracy of students' conceptions ranges considerably, from responses indicating only superficial, if any, knowledge of any aspect of evolution to responses indicating knowledge of genetic drift but confusion about the nuances of genetic drift. After instruction, a significantly greater number of responses indicate some knowledge of genetic drift (p = 0.005), but 74.6% of responses still contain at least one misconception. We conclude by presenting a framework that organizes how students' conceptions of genetic drift change with instruction. We also articulate three hypotheses regarding undergraduates' conceptions of evolution in general and genetic drift in particular. We propose that: 1) students begin with undeveloped conceptions of evolution that do not recognize different mechanisms of change; 2) students develop more complex, but still inaccurate, conceptual frameworks that reflect experience with vocabulary but still lack deep understanding; and 3) some new misconceptions about genetic drift emerge as students comprehend more about evolution.

  18. Stochastic Ion Heating by the Lower-Hybrid Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G.; Tel'nikhin, A.; Krotov, A.

    2011-01-01

    The resonance lower-hybrid wave-ion interaction is described by a group (differentiable map) of transformations of phase space of the system. All solutions to the map belong to a strange attractor, and chaotic motion of the attractor manifests itself in a number of macroscopic effects, such as the energy spectrum and particle heating. The applicability of the model to the problem of ion heating by waves at the front of collisionless shock as well as ion acceleration by a spectrum of waves is discussed. Keywords: plasma; ion-cyclotron heating; shocks; beat-wave accelerator.

  19. Visualizing electromagnetic fields in laser-produced counter-streaming plasma experiments for collisionless shock laboratory astrophysicsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugland, N. L.; Ross, J. S.; Chang, P.-Y.; Drake, R. P.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gregori, G.; Grosskopf, M.; Huntington, C.; Koenig, M.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Kuranz, C.; Levy, M. C.; Liang, E.; Martinez, D.; Meinecke, J.; Miniati, F.; Morita, T.; Pelka, A.; Plechaty, C.; Presura, R.; Ravasio, A.; Remington, B. A.; Reville, B.; Ryutov, D. D.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Takabe, H.; Park, H.-S.

    2013-05-01

    Collisionless shocks are often observed in fast-moving astrophysical plasmas, formed by non-classical viscosity that is believed to originate from collective electromagnetic fields driven by kinetic plasma instabilities. However, the development of small-scale plasma processes into large-scale structures, such as a collisionless shock, is not well understood. It is also unknown to what extent collisionless shocks contain macroscopic fields with a long coherence length. For these reasons, it is valuable to explore collisionless shock formation, including the growth and self-organization of fields, in laboratory plasmas. The experimental results presented here show at a glance with proton imaging how macroscopic fields can emerge from a system of supersonic counter-streaming plasmas produced at the OMEGA EP laser. Interpretation of these results, plans for additional measurements, and the difficulty of achieving truly collisionless conditions are discussed. Future experiments at the National Ignition Facility are expected to create fully formed collisionless shocks in plasmas with no pre-imposed magnetic field.

  20. Experimental Study of Lower-hybrid Drift Turbulence in a Reconnecting Current Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, T. A.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Kulsrud, R. M.; Trintchouck, F.

    2002-06-18

    The role of turbulence in the process of magnetic reconnection has been the subject of a great deal of study and debate in the theoretical literature. At issue in this debate is whether turbulence is essential for fast magnetic reconnection to occur in collisionless current sheets. Some theories claim it is necessary in order to provide anomalous resistivity, while others present a laminar fast reconnection mechanism based on the Hall term in the generalized Ohm's law. In this work, a thorough study of electrostatic potential fluctuations in the current sheet of the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) [M. Yamada et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 1936 (1997)] was performed in order to ascertain the importance of turbulence in a laboratory reconnection experiment. Using amplified floating Langmuir probes, broadband fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range (fLH approximately 5-15 MHz) were measured which arise with the formation of the current sheet in MRX. The frequency spectrum, spatial amplitude profile, and spatial correlation characteristics of the measured turbulence were examined carefully, finding consistency with theories of the lower-hybrid drift instability (LHDI). The LHDI and its role in magnetic reconnection has been studied theoretically for decades, but this work represents the first detection and detailed study of the LHDI in a laboratory current sheet. The observation of the LHDI in MRX has provided the unique opportunity to uncover the role of this instability in collisionless reconnection. It was found that: (1) the LHDI fluctuations are confined to the low-beta edge of current sheets in MRX; (2) the LHDI amplitude does not correlate well in time or space with the reconnection electric field, which is directly related to the rate of reconnection; and (3) significant LHDI amplitude persists in high collisionality current sheets where the reconnection rate is classical. These findings suggest that the measured LHDI fluctuations do not play an

  1. Carrier Drift Velocity and Edge Magnetoplasmons in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, I.; Williams, F. I. B.; Bennaceur, K.; Portier, F.; Roche, P.; Glattli, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate electron dynamics at the graphene edge by studying the propagation of collective edge magnetoplasmon excitations. By timing the travel of narrow wave packets on picosecond time scales around exfoliated samples, we find chiral propagation with low attenuation at a velocity that is quantized on Hall plateaus. We extract the carrier drift contribution from the edge magnetoplasmon propagation and find it to be slightly less than the Fermi velocity, as expected for an abrupt edge. We also extract the characteristic length for Coulomb interaction at the edge and find it to be smaller than that for soft depletion-edge systems.

  2. Bifurcation Theory of the Transition to Collisionless Ion-temperature-gradient-driven Plasma Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, R.A.; Krommes, J.A.

    2005-09-22

    The collisionless limit of the transition to ion-temperature-gradient-driven plasma turbulence is considered with a dynamical-systems approach. The importance of systematic analysis for understanding the differences in the bifurcations and dynamics of linearly damped and undamped systems is emphasized. A model with ten degrees of freedom is studied as a concrete example. A four-dimensional center manifold (CM) is analyzed, and fixed points of its dynamics are identified and used to predict a ''Dimits shift'' of the threshold for turbulence due to the excitation of zonal flows. The exact value of that shift in terms of physical parameters is established for the model; the effects of higher-order truncations on the dynamics are noted. Multiple-scale analysis of the CM equations is used to discuss possible effects of modulational instability on scenarios for the transition to turbulence in both collisional and collisionless cases.

  3. Model and particle-in-cell simulation of ion energy distribution in collisionless sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhuwen; Kong, Bo; Luo, Yuee; Chen, Deliang; Wang, Yuansheng

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we propose a self-consistent theoretical model, which is described by the ion energy distributions (IEDs) in collisionless sheaths, and the analytical results for different combined dc/radio frequency (rf) capacitive coupled plasma discharge cases, including sheath voltage errors analysis, are compared with the results of numerical simulations using a one-dimensional plane-parallel particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The IEDs in collisionless sheaths are performed on combination of dc/rf voltage sources electrodes discharge using argon as the process gas. The incident ions on the grounded electrode are separated, according to their different radio frequencies, and dc voltages on a separated electrode, the IEDs, and widths of energy in sheath and the plasma sheath thickness are discussed. The IEDs, the IED widths, and sheath voltages by the theoretical model are investigated and show good agreement with PIC simulations.

  4. FULL PARTICLE ELECTROMAGNETIC SIMULATIONS OF ENTROPY GENERATION ACROSS A COLLISIONLESS SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhongwei; Liu, Ying D.; Wang, Rui; Hu, Huidong; Parks, George K.; Wu, Pin; Huang, Can; Shi, Run

    2014-09-20

    Experimental data from Cluster have shown that entropy density can be generated across Earth's bow shock. These new observations are a starting point for a more sophisticated analysis that includes computer modeling of a collisionless shock using observed shock parameters as input. In this Letter, we present the first comparison between observations and particle-in-cell simulations of such entropy generation across a collisionless shock. The ion heating at the shock is dominated by the phase mixing of reflected and directly transmitted ions, which are separated from the incident ions. The electron heating is a nearly thermal process due to the conservation of their angular momentum. For both species, we calculate the entropy density across the shock, and obtain good consistency between observations and simulations on entropy generation across the shock. We also find that the entropy generation rate is reduced as the shock Mach number decreases.

  5. Two-fluid regimes of the resistive and collisionless tearing instability

    SciTech Connect

    Hosseinpour, M.; Vekstein, G.; Bian, N.

    2009-01-15

    The two-fluid (electrons and ions) plasma description is used to investigate spontaneous magnetic reconnection (tearing instability) in a sheared force-free magnetic configuration. The study includes both collisional (resistive) and collisionless (electron inertia) reconnection mechanisms. Together with the Hall effect, this yields various instability regimes, which can be identified by the magnitude of the four nondimensional parameters: Lundquist number S>>1, electron/ion mass ratio {mu}{identical_to}m{sub e}/m{sub i}<<1, plasma {beta}, and the scaled ion inertial skin-depth d{sub i}=c/({omega}{sub pi}l), with l being the shear length of the magnetic field. The role of the electron gyroviscosity in the collisionless case is also clarified.

  6. Self-Regulation of Solar Coronal Heating Process via the Collisionless Reconnection Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2007-12-31

    I propose a new paradigm for solar coronal heating viewed as a self-regulating process keeping the plasma marginally collisionless. The mechanism is based on the coupling between two effects. First, coronal density controls the plasma collisionality and hence the transition between the slow collisional Sweet-Parker and the fast collisionless reconnection regimes. In turn, coronal energy release leads to chromospheric evaporation, increasing the density and thus inhibiting subsequent reconnection of the newly reconnected loops. As a result, statistically, the density fluctuates around some critical level, comparable to that observed in the corona. In the long run, coronal heating can be represented by repeating cycles of fast reconnection events (nanoflares), evaporation episodes, and long periods of slow magnetic stress buildup and radiative cooling of the coronal plasma.

  7. Self-regulation of solar coronal heating process via the collisionless reconnection condition.

    PubMed

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2007-12-31

    I propose a new paradigm for solar coronal heating viewed as a self-regulating process keeping the plasma marginally collisionless. The mechanism is based on the coupling between two effects. First, coronal density controls the plasma collisionality and hence the transition between the slow collisional Sweet-Parker and the fast collisionless reconnection regimes. In turn, coronal energy release leads to chromospheric evaporation, increasing the density and thus inhibiting subsequent reconnection of the newly reconnected loops. As a result, statistically, the density fluctuates around some critical level, comparable to that observed in the corona. In the long run, coronal heating can be represented by repeating cycles of fast reconnection events (nanoflares), evaporation episodes, and long periods of slow magnetic stress buildup and radiative cooling of the coronal plasma. PMID:18233563

  8. An exact collisionless equilibrium for the Force-Free Harris Sheet with low plasma beta

    SciTech Connect

    Allanson, O. Neukirch, T. Wilson, F. Troscheit, S.

    2015-10-15

    We present a first discussion and analysis of the physical properties of a new exact collisionless equilibrium for a one-dimensional nonlinear force-free magnetic field, namely, the force-free Harris sheet. The solution allows any value of the plasma beta, and crucially below unity, which previous nonlinear force-free collisionless equilibria could not. The distribution function involves infinite series of Hermite polynomials in the canonical momenta, of which the important mathematical properties of convergence and non-negativity have recently been proven. Plots of the distribution function are presented for the plasma beta modestly below unity, and we compare the shape of the distribution function in two of the velocity directions to a Maxwellian distribution.

  9. Collisionless “thermalization” in the sheath of an argon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Coulette, David Manfredi, Giovanni

    2015-04-15

    We performed kinetic Vlasov simulations of the plasma-wall transition for a low-pressure argon discharge without external magnetic fields, using the same plasma parameters as in the experiments of Claire et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 062103 (2006)]. Experimentally, it was found that the ion velocity distribution function is highly asymmetric in the presheath, but, surprisingly, becomes again close to Maxwellian inside the sheath. Here, we show that this “thermalization” can be explained by purely collisionless effects that are akin to the velocity bunching phenomenon observed in charged particles beams. Such collisionless thermalization is also observed in the presheath region close to the sheath entrance, although it is much weaker there and in practice probably swamped by collisional processes (standard or enhanced by instabilities)

  10. Low-frequency instabilities of collisionless plasma and the 16-moment approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhalilov, N. S. Kuznetsov, V. D.

    2013-12-15

    Using the 16-moment equations that take into account heat fluxes in anisotropic collisionless plasma, the properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities are investigated. For all instabilities occurring in the MHD approach (the normal incompressible firehose instability, the second compressible almost longitudinal firehose instability, and the almost transverse mirror instability of slow magnetosonic modes, as well as thermal instability caused by the heat flux directed along the magnetic field), their kinetic analogs are considered. The kinetic dispersion relation in the low-frequency range in the vicinity of the ion thermal velocity is analyzed. The flow of plasma ions along the magnetic field is taken into account. The thresholds and instability growth rates obtained in the MHD and kinetic approaches are found to be in good agreement. This indicates that the 16-moment MHD equations adequately describe the dynamics of collisionless plasma.

  11. Modulational and filamentational instabilities of a monochromatic Langmuir pump wave in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sayed, F.; Tyshetskiy, Yu.; Vladimirov, S. V.; Ishihara, O.

    2015-05-15

    The modulational and filamentational instabilities of a monochromatic Langmuir pump wave are investigated for the case of collisionless quantum plasmas, using renormalized quantum linear and nonlinear plasma polarization responses. We obtain the quantum-corrected dispersion equation for the modulational and filamentational instabilities growth rates. It is demonstrated that the quantum effect suppresses the growth rates of the modulational and filamentational instabilities.

  12. Abstraction of Seepage into Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    WILSON,MICHAEL L.; HO,CLIFFORD K.

    2000-10-16

    The abstraction model used for seepage into emplacement drifts in recent TSPA simulations has been presented. This model contributes to the calculation of the quantity of water that might contact waste if it is emplaced at Yucca Mountain. Other important components of that calculation not discussed here include models for climate, infiltration, unsaturated-zone flow, and thermohydrology; drip-shield and waste-package degradation; and flow around and through the drip shield and waste package. The seepage abstraction model is stochastic because predictions of seepage are necessarily quite uncertain. The model provides uncertainty distributions for seepage fraction fraction of waste-package locations flow rate as functions of percolation flux. In addition, effects of intermediate-scale flow with seepage and seep channeling are included by means of a flow-focusing factor, which is also represented by an uncertainty distribution.

  13. The Genetic Drift Inventory: A Tool for Measuring What Advanced Undergraduates Have Mastered about Genetic Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Rebecca M.; Andrews, Tessa C.; McElhinny, Teresa L.; Mead, Louise S.; Abraham, Joel K.; Thanukos, Anna; Perez, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding genetic drift is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of biology, yet it is difficult to learn because it combines the conceptual challenges of both evolution and randomness. To help assess strategies for teaching genetic drift, we have developed and evaluated the Genetic Drift Inventory (GeDI), a concept inventory that measures…

  14. Collisionless Heating in Capacitive Discharges Enhanced by Dual-Frequency Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.M.; Chabert, P.

    2006-05-26

    We discuss collisionless electron heating in capacitive discharges excited by a combination of two disparate frequencies. By developing an analytical model, we find, contrary to expectation, that the net heating in this case is much larger than the sum of the effects occurring when the two frequencies act separately. This prediction is substantiated by kinetic simulations, which are also in excellent general quantitative agreement with the model for discharge parameters that are typical of recent experiments.

  15. Similarity Laws for Collisionless Interaction of Superstrong Electromagnetic Fields with a Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Remington, B A

    2005-10-18

    Several similarity laws for the collisionless interaction of ultra-intense electromagnetic fields with a plasma of an arbitrary initial shape is presented. Both ultra-relativistic and non-relativistic cases are covered. The ion motion is included. A brief discussion of possible ways of experimental verification of scaling laws is presented. The results can be of interest for experiments and numerical simulations in the areas of particle acceleration, harmonic generation, and Coulomb explosion of clusters.

  16. Observation of Ion Acceleration and Heating during Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Myers, Clayton E.

    2012-12-10

    The ion dynamics in a collisionless magnetic reconnection layer are studied in a laboratory plasma. The measured in-plane plasma potential profile, which is established by electrons accelerated around the electron diffusion region, shows a saddle-shaped structure that is wider and deeper towards the outflow direction. This potential structure ballistically accelerates ions near the separatrices toward the outflow direction. Ions are heated as they travel into the high pressure downstream region.

  17. Birefringing arising from the reorientation of the polarizability anisotropy of molecules in collisionless gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. H.; Heritage, J. P.; Gustafson, T. K.; Chiao, R. Y.; Mctague, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The refractive index change in a collisionless gas is evaluated from the Stark shifts of the rotational energy levels that arise from the polarizability anisotropy. For the limit of an extremely short-duration excitation, a multilevel coherent effect resulted in delayed refractive index bursts. Both stationary and transient responses of this birefringence to an optical field were considered for symmetric top molecules, with particular emphasis on the special case of linear molecules.

  18. The Transition to Collisionless Ion-temperature-gradient-driven Plasma Turbulence: A Dynamical Systems Approach

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Kolesnikov; J.A. Krommes

    2004-10-21

    The transition to collisionless ion-temperature-gradient-driven plasma turbulence is considered by applying dynamical systems theory to a model with ten degrees of freedom. Study of a four-dimensional center manifold predicts a ''Dimits shift'' of the threshold for turbulence due to the excitation of zonal flows and establishes the exact value of that shift in terms of physical parameters. For insight into fundamental physical mechanisms, the method provides a viable alternative to large simulations.

  19. Experimental Demonstration of the Collisionless Plasmoid Instability below the Ion Kinetic Scale during Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, J.; Egedal, J.; Greess, S.; Myers, R.; Clark, M.; Endrizzi, D.; Flanagan, K.; Milhone, J.; Peterson, E.; Wallace, J.; Weisberg, D.; Forest, C. B.

    2016-06-01

    The spontaneous formation of magnetic islands is observed in driven, antiparallel magnetic reconnection on the Terrestrial Reconnection Experiment. We here provide direct experimental evidence that the plasmoid instability is active at the electron scale inside the ion diffusion region in a low collisional regime. The experiments show the island formation occurs at a smaller system size than predicted by extended magnetohydrodynamics or fully collisionless simulations. This more effective seeding of magnetic islands emphasizes their importance to reconnection in naturally occurring 3D plasmas.

  20. Birefringence arising from the reorientation of the polarizability anisotropy of molecules in collisionless gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. H.; Heritage, J. P.; Gustafson, T. K.; Chiao, R. Y.; Mctague, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    The refractive-index change in a collisionless gas is evaluated from the Stark shifts of the rotational energy levels that arise from the polarizability anisotropy. In the limit of an extremely-short-duration excitation, a multilevel coherent effect results in delayed refractive-index bursts. Both stationary and transient responses of this birefringence to an optical field are considered for symmetric-top molecules, with particular emphasis on the special case of linear molecules.