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Sample records for colloid chemistry

  1. The colloidal chemistry of ceramic clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    The colloidal chemistry and mineralogy of two argil minerals were studied. Deposits of kaolin and of ceramic clays in the United States and England are discussed for the probable mechanism of formation. The structural modifications of the bed, original material associated with the clays and the proper use of flocculants are discussed.

  2. From crystal chemistry to colloid stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, B.; Burrows, N.; Penn, R. L.

    2008-12-01

    Aqueous suspensions of ferrihydrite nanoparticles form a colloid with properties that can be understood using classical theories but which additionally exhibit the distinctive phenomenon of nanocluster formation. While use of in situ light and x-ray scattering methods permit the quantitative determination of colloid stability, interparticle interactions, and cluster or aggregate geometry, there are currently few approaches to predict the colloidal behavior of mineral nanoparticles. A longstanding goal of aqueous geochemistry is the rationalization and prediction of the chemical properties of hydrated mineral interfaces from knowledge of interface structure at the molecular scale. Because interfacial acid-base reactions typically lead to the formation of a net electrostatic charge at the surfaces of oxide, hydroxide, and oxyhydroxide mineral surfaces, quantitative descriptions of this behavior have the potential to permit the prediction of long-range interactions between mineral particles. We will evaluate the feasibility of this effort by constructing a model for surface charge formation for ferrihydrite that combines recent insights into the crystal structure of this phase and proposed methods for estimating the pKa of acidic surface groups. We will test the ability of this model to predict the colloidal stability of ferrihydrite suspensions as a function of solution chemistry.

  3. The use of objects and methods of colloid chemistry in nanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summ, Boris D.; Ivanova, Nina I.

    2000-11-01

    Experimental methods and theoretical concepts of colloid chemistry regarding their possible use in nanochemistry and nanotechnology are considered. The main types of disperse systems which can be regarded as nanosystems are distinguished. Some methods for the preparation of colloidal nanosystems are described. Conditions for extrapolation of phenomenological laws of colloid chemistry to nanosize objects are considered. Examples of self-organised colloidal structures are given. The bibliography includes 205 references.

  4. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This methodis first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  5. Modifying Thermal Transport in Colloidal Nanocrystal Solids with Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-12-22

    We present a systematic study on the effect of surface chemistry on thermal transport in colloidal nanocrystal (NC) solids. Using PbS NCs as a model system, we vary ligand binding group (thiol, amine, and atomic halides), ligand length (ethanedithiol, butanedithiol, hexanedithiol, and octanedithiol), and NC diameter (3.3-8.2 nm). Our experiments reveal several findings: (i) The ligand choice can vary the NC solid thermal conductivity by up to a factor of 2.5. (ii) The ligand binding strength to the NC core does not significantly impact thermal conductivity. (iii) Reducing the ligand length can decrease the interparticle distance, which increases thermal conductivity. (iv) Increasing the NC diameter increases thermal conductivity. (v) The effect of surface chemistry can exceed the effect of NC diameter and becomes more pronounced as NC diameter decreases. By combining these trends, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of NC solids can be varied by an overall factor of 4, from ∼0.1-0.4 W/m-K. We complement these findings with effective medium approximation modeling and identify thermal transport in the ligand matrix as the rate-limiter for thermal transport. By combining these modeling results with our experimental observations, we conclude that future efforts to increase thermal conductivity in NC solids should focus on the ligand-ligand interface between neighboring NCs.

  6. Challenges in Teaching "Colloid and Surface Chemistry"--A Danish Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.; Vigild, Martin E.

    2009-01-01

    Seven years ago we were asked, as one of our first teaching duties at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), to teach a 5 ECTS point course on "Colloid and Surface Chemistry". The topic is itself at the same time exciting and demanding, largely due to its multidisciplinary nature. Several "local" requirements posed…

  7. Subtle Chemistry of Colloidal, Quantum-Confined Semiconductor Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, B. K.; Luther, J. M.; Beard, M. C.

    2012-06-26

    Nanoscale colloidal semiconductor structures with at least one dimension small enough to experience quantum confinement effects have captured the imagination and attention of scientists interested in controlling various chemical and photophysical processes. Aside from having desirable quantum confinement properties, colloidal nanocrystals are attractive because they are often synthesized in low-temperature, low-cost, and potentially scalable manners using simple benchtop reaction baths. Considerable progress in producing a variety of shapes, compositions, and complex structures has been achieved. However, there are challenges to overcome in order for these novel materials to reach their full potential and become new drivers for commercial applications. The final shape, composition, nanocrystal-ligand structure, and size can depend on a delicate interplay of precursors, surface ligands, and other compounds that may or may not participate in the reaction. In this Perspective, we discuss current efforts toward better understanding how the reactivity of the reagents can be used to produce unique and complex nanostructures.

  8. Coordination chemistry and antisolvent strategy to rare-earth solid solution colloidal spheres.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng Chao; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2012-11-21

    We have devised in this work a general synthetic strategy for preparation of single- and multicomponent rare-earth coordination polymer colloidal spheres (RE-CPCSs). This strategy is based on an integration of coordination chemistry and antisolvent effect for synchronized precipitation. Highly monodisperse RE-CPCSs with homogeneous mixing of RE elements, which are not readily attainable by any existing methods, have been successfully prepared for the first time. In addition, the type and molar ratio of these colloidal spheres can be adjusted easily in accordance to the variety and dosage of precursor salts. The molar ratio of RE elements in as-prepared colloidal spheres shows a linear relationship to that of starting reactants. Furthermore, the RE-based core/shell colloidal spheres can be facilely prepared by introducing other metal salts (beyond lanthanide elements) owing to their different coordination chemistry and precipitation behavior. By adjusting concentrations of the ionic activators, luminescent properties can be tuned accordingly. Moreover, the RE-CPCSs can be transformed to monodisperse lanthanide oxide spheres via simple heat treatment. We believe that the present synthetic strategy provides a viable route to prepare other lanthanide-containing colloidal spheres that have enormous potential for future applications as optoelectronic devices, catalysts, gas sensors, and solar cells.

  9. Chemically active colloids near osmotic-responsive walls with surface-chemistry gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, M. N.; Uspal, W. E.; Dietrich, S.

    2017-04-01

    Chemically active colloids move by creating gradients in the composition of the surrounding solution and by exploiting the differences in their interactions with the various molecular species in solution. If such particles move near boundaries, e.g. the walls of the container confining the suspension, gradients in the composition of the solution are also created along the wall. This give rise to chemi-osmosis (via the interactions of the wall with the molecular species forming the solution), which drives flows coupling back to the colloid and thus influences its motility. Employing an approximate ‘point-particle’ analysis, we show analytically that—owing to this kind of induced active response (chemi-osmosis) of the wall—such chemically active colloids can align with, and follow, gradients in the surface chemistry of the wall. In this sense, these artificial ‘swimmers’ exhibit a primitive form of thigmotaxis with the meaning of sensing the proximity of a (not necessarily discontinuous) physical change in the environment. We show that the alignment with the surface-chemistry gradient is generic for chemically active colloids as long as they exhibit motility in an unbounded fluid, i.e. this phenomenon does not depend on the exact details of the propulsion mechanism. The results are discussed in the context of simple models of chemical activity, corresponding to Janus particles with ‘source’ chemical reactions on one half of the surface and either ‘inert’ or ‘sink’ reactions over the other half.

  10. Adhesion of bacterial pathogens to soil colloidal particles: influences of cell type, natural organic matter, and solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenqiang; Walker, Sharon L; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2014-04-15

    Bacterial adhesion to granular soil particles is well studied; however, pathogen interactions with naturally occurring colloidal particles (<2 μm) in soil has not been investigated. This study was developed to identify the interaction mechanisms between model bacterial pathogens and soil colloids as a function of cell type, natural organic matter (NOM), and solution chemistry. Specifically, batch adhesion experiments were conducted using NOM-present, NOM-stripped soil colloids, Streptococcus suis SC05 and Escherichia coli WH09 over a wide range of solution pH (4.0-9.0) and ionic strength (IS, 1-100 mM KCl). Cell characterization techniques, Freundlich isotherm, and Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory (sphere-sphere model) were utilized to quantitatively determine the interactions between cells and colloids. The adhesion coefficients (Kf) of S. suis SC05 to NOM-present and NOM-stripped soil colloids were significantly higher than E. coli WH09, respectively. Similarly, Kf values of S. suis SC05 and E. coli WH09 adhesion to NOM-stripped soil colloids were greater than those colloids with NOM-present, respectively, suggesting NOM inhibits bacterial adhesion. Cell adhesion to soil colloids declined with increasing pH and enhanced with rising IS (1-50 mM). Interaction energy calculations indicate these adhesion trends can be explained by DLVO-type forces, with S. suis SC05 and E. coli WH09 being weakly adhered in shallow secondary energy minima via polymer bridging and charge heterogeneity. S. suis SC05 adhesion decreased at higher IS 100 mM, which is attributed to the change of hydrophobic effect and steric repulsion resulted from the greater presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on S. suis SC05 surface as compared to E. coli WH09. Hence, pathogen adhesion to the colloidal material is determined by a combination of DLVO, charge heterogeneity, hydrophobic and polymer interactions as a function of solution chemistry.

  11. The colloidal chemistry synthesis and electron microscopy characterization of shape-controlled metal and semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biacchi, Adam J.

    Solution methods of materials synthesis have found application in a variety of fields due to the diversity of products accessible, facility of process scalability, and the ease of tuning their properties through prudent selection of reaction conditions. Control of experimental variables during the formation of colloidally stable nanoscale solids within a liquid matrix allows for tailoring of the particles' characteristics, including shape, size, composition, and surface chemistry. In this dissertation, I will discuss how the manipulation of reaction chemistries can be used to synthesize shape-controlled metal and semiconductor colloidal nanocrystals. Further, I will elaborate on the mechanisms by which these particles form from molecular precursors and describe how their properties can differ from their bulk analogues through extensive characterization, especially using transmission electron microscopy. These studies contribute to the continued development of chemical routes to nanocrystals and their application as functional materials. First, I will review recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of shape-controlled nanocrystals, as well as highlight their promising applicability in a number of emerging technologies. These principles will then be leveraged to the specific case of catalytically-active rhodium nanocrystals, which can be synthesized with morphological and dimensional control using a polyol solution-mediated strategy. I describe an innovative shape-controlled synthesis to monodisperse colloidal rhodium icosahedra, cubes, triangular plates, and octahedra using this route. Additionally, new insights into the important role of the polyol reducing solvent on the synthesis of these nanocrystals are revealed, and how these might be exploited to engender superior reaction control and novel products. Next, I will describe how a crystallization mechanism was established for the synthesis of numerous morphologies of noble metal nanocrystals. I

  12. A Study of Functional Polymer Colloids Prepared Using Thiol-Ene/Yne Click Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Olivia Z.

    This project demonstrates the first instance of thiol-ene chemistry as the polymerization method for the production of polymer colloids in two-phase heterogeneous suspensions, miniemulsions, and emulsions. This work was also expanded to thiol-yne chemistry for the production of polymer particles containing increased crosslinking density. The utility of thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistries for polymerization and polymer modification is well established in bulk systems. These reactions are considered 'click' reactions, which can be defined as processes that are both facile and simple, offering high yields with nearly 100% conversion, no side products, easy product separation, compatibility with a diverse variety of commercially available starting materials, and orthogonality with other chemistries. In addition, thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistry follow a step-growth mechanism for the development of highly uniform polymer networks, where polymer growth is dependent on the coupling of functional groups. These step-growth polymerization systems are in stark contrast to the chain-growth mechanisms of acrylic and styrenic monomers that have dominated the field of conventional heterogeneous polymerizations. Preliminary studies evaluated the mechanism of particle production in suspension and miniemulsion systems. Monomer droplets were compared to the final polymer particles to confirm that particle growth occurred through the polymerization of monomer droplets. Additional parameters examined include homogenization energy (mechanical mixing), diluent species and concentration, and monomer content. These reactions were conducted using photoinitiation to yield particles in a matter of minutes with diameters in the size range of several microns to hundreds of microns in suspensions or submicron particles in miniemulsions. Improved control over the particle size and size distribution was examined through variation of reaction parameters. In addition, a method of seeded suspension

  13. Hysteresis of Colloid Retention and Release in Saturated Porous Media During Transients in Solution Chemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saturated packed column and micromodel transport studies wereconducted to gain insightonmechanismsof colloid retention and release under unfavorable attachment conditions. The initial deposition of colloids in porous media was found to be a strongly coupled process that depended on solution chemistr...

  14. Hybrid halide perovskite solar cell precursors: colloidal chemistry and coordination engineering behind device processing for high efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yan, Keyou; Long, Mingzhu; Zhang, Tiankai; Wei, Zhanhua; Chen, Haining; Yang, Shihe; Xu, Jianbin

    2015-04-08

    The precursor of solution-processed perovskite thin films is one of the most central components for high-efficiency perovskite solar cells. We first present the crucial colloidal chemistry visualization of the perovskite precursor solution based on analytical spectra and reveal that perovskite precursor solutions for solar cells are generally colloidal dispersions in a mother solution, with a colloidal size up to the mesoscale, rather than real solutions. The colloid is made of a soft coordination complex in the form of a lead polyhalide framework between organic and inorganic components and can be structurally tuned by the coordination degree, thereby primarily determining the basic film coverage and morphology of deposited thin films. By utilizing coordination engineering, particularly through employing additional methylammonium halide over the stoichiometric ratio for tuning the coordination degree and mode in the initial colloidal solution, along with a thermal leaching for the selective release of excess methylammonium halides, we achieved full and even coverage, the preferential orientation, and high purity of planar perovskite thin films. We have also identified that excess organic component can reduce the colloidal size of and tune the morphology of the coordination framework in relation to final perovskite grains and partial chlorine substitution can accelerate the crystalline nucleation process of perovskite. This work demonstrates the important fundamental chemistry of perovskite precursors and provides genuine guidelines for accurately controlling the high quality of hybrid perovskite thin films without any impurity, thereby delivering efficient planar perovskite solar cells with a power conversion efficiency as high as 17% without distinct hysteresis owing to the high quality of perovskite thin films.

  15. Revisiting the Fundamentals in the Design and Control of Nanoparticulate Colloids in the Frame of Soft Chemistry1

    PubMed Central

    Uskoković, Vuk

    2013-01-01

    This review presents thoughts on some of the fundamental features of conceptual models applied in the design of fine particles in the frames of colloid and soft chemistry. A special emphasis is placed on the limitations of these models, an acknowledgment of which is vital in improving their intricacy and effectiveness in predicting the outcomes of the corresponding experimental settings. Thermodynamics of self-assembly phenomena illustrated on the examples of protein assembly and micellization is analyzed in relation to the previously elaborated thesis that each self-assembly in reality presents a co-assembly, since it implies a mutual reorganization of the assembling system and its immediate environment. Parameters used in the design of fine particles by precipitation are discussed while referring to solubility product, various measures of supersaturation levels, induction time, nucleation and crystal growth rates, interfacial energies, and the Ostwald–Lussac law of phases. Again, the main drawbacks and inadequacies of using the aforementioned parameters in tailoring the materials properties in a soft and colloidal chemical setting were particularly emphasized. The basic and practical limitations of zeta-potential analyses, routinely used to stabilize colloidal dispersions and initiate specific interactions between soft chemical entities, were also outlined. The final section of the paper reiterates the unavoidable presence of practical qualitative models in the design and control of nanoparticulate colloids, which is supported by the overwhelming complexity of quantitative relationships that govern the processes of their formation and assembly. PMID:24490052

  16. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and...

  17. Coupling between bulk- and surface chemistry in suspensions of charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinen, M.; Palberg, T.; Löwen, H.

    2014-03-01

    The ionic composition and pair correlations in fluid phases of realistically salt-free charged colloidal sphere suspensions are calculated in the primitive model. We obtain the number densities of all ionic species in suspension, including low-molecular weight microions, and colloidal macroions with acidic surface groups, from a self-consistent solution of a coupled physicochemical set of nonlinear algebraic equations and non-mean-field liquid integral equations. Here, we study suspensions of colloidal spheres with sulfonate or silanol surface groups, suspended in demineralized water that is saturated with carbon dioxide under standard atmosphere. The only input required for our theoretical scheme are the acidic dissociation constants pKa, and effective sphere diameters of all involved ions. Our method allows for an ab initio calculation of colloidal bare and effective charges, at high numerical efficiency.

  18. Equilibrium and Kinetic Models for Colloid Release Under Transient Solution Chemistry Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, S. A.; Torkzaban, S.; Leij, F. J.; Simunek, J.

    2014-12-01

    Colloid retention and release is well known to depend on a wide variety of physical, chemical, and microbiological factors that may vary temporally in the subsurface environment. We present equilibrium, kinetic, combined equilibrium and kinetic, and two-site kinetic models of colloid release during transient physicochemical conditions. Our mathematical modeling approach relates colloid release under transient conditions to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. The developed models were subsequently applied to experimental colloid release datasets to investigate the influence of variations in ionic strength (IS), pH, cation exchange, colloid size, and water velocity on release. Various combinations of equilibrium and/or kinetic release models were needed to describe the experimental data depending on the transient conditions and colloid type. Release of E. coli D21g was promoted by a decrease in solution IS and an increase in pH, similar to expected trends for a reduction in the secondary minimum and nanoscale chemical heterogeneity, respectively. The retention and release of 20 nm carboxyl modified latex nanoparticles (NPs) were demonstrated to be more sensitive to the presence of Ca2+ than D21g. Specifically, retention of NPs was greater than D21g in the presence of 2 mM CaCl2 solution, and release of NPs only occurred after exchange of Ca2+ by Na+ and then a reduction in the solution IS. These findings highlight the limitations of conventional interaction energy calculations to describe colloid retention and release, and point to the need to consider Born repulsion and nanoscale heterogeneity. Temporal changes in the water velocity did not have a large influence on the release of D21g. This insensitivity was likely due to factors that reduce the applied hydrodynamic torque and/or increase the resisting adhesive torque. Collectively, experimental and modeling results indicate that episodic colloid transport in the

  19. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Scott A; Torkzaban, Saeed; Leij, Feike; Simunek, Jiri

    2015-10-01

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and kinetic, and two-site kinetic models were developed to describe various rates of colloid release. These models were subsequently applied to experimental colloid release datasets to investigate the influence of variations in ionic strength (IS), pH, cation exchange, colloid size, and water velocity on release. Various combinations of equilibrium and/or kinetic release models were needed to describe the experimental data depending on the transient conditions and colloid type. Release of Escherichia coli D21g was promoted by a decrease in solution IS and an increase in pH, similar to expected trends for a reduction in the secondary minimum and nanoscale chemical heterogeneity. The retention and release of 20nm carboxyl modified latex nanoparticles (NPs) were demonstrated to be more sensitive to the presence of Ca(2+) than D21g. Specifically, retention of NPs was greater than D21g in the presence of 2mM CaCl2 solution, and release of NPs only occurred after exchange of Ca(2+) by Na(+) and then a reduction in the solution IS. These findings highlight the limitations of conventional interaction energy calculations to describe colloid retention and release, and point to the need to consider other interactions (e.g., Born, steric, and/or hydration forces) and/or nanoscale heterogeneity. Temporal changes in the water velocity did not have a large influence on the release of D21g for the examined conditions. This insensitivity was likely due to factors that reduce the applied hydrodynamic torque and/or increase the resisting adhesive torque; e.g., macroscopic roughness and grain-grain contacts. Our analysis and models improve our understanding and ability to describe the amounts

  20. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoclusters: Aqueous, Concentrated, Stable, and Catalytically Active Colloids toward Green Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tarutani, Naoki; Vaz, Pedro D; Nunes, Carla D; Prevot, Vanessa; Stenning, Gavin B G; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-05-24

    Increasing attention has been dedicated to the development of nanomaterials rendering green and sustainable processes, which occur in benign aqueous reaction media. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of another family of green nanomaterials, layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoclusters, which are concentrated (98.7 g/L in aqueous solvent), stably dispersed (transparent sol for >2 weeks), and catalytically active colloids of nano LDHs (isotropic shape with the size of 7.8 nm as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering). LDH nanoclusters are available as colloidal building blocks to give access to meso- and macroporous LDH materials. Proof-of-concept applications revealed that the LDH nanocluster works as a solid basic catalyst and is separable from solvents of catalytic reactions, confirming the nature of nanocatalysts. The present work closely investigates the unique physical and chemical features of this colloid, the formation mechanism, and the ability to act as basic nanocatalysts in benign aqueous reaction systems.

  1. Synthesis of ultrasmall magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and study of their colloid and surface chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Goloverda, Galina; Jackson, Barry; Kidd, Clayton; Kolesnichenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles of Fe3O4 (4 nm) were synthesized by high-temperature hydrolysis of chelated iron (II) and (III) diethylene glycol alkoxide complexes in a solution of the parent alcohol (H2DEG) without using capping ligands or surfactants: [Fe(DEG)Cl2]2- + 2[Fe(DEG)Cl3]2- + 2H2O + 2OH- → Fe3O4 + 3H2DEG + 8Cl- The obtained particles were reacted with different small-molecule polydentate ligands, and the resulting adducts were tested for aqueous colloid formation. Both the carboxyl and α-hydroxyl groups of the hydroxyacids are involved in coordination to the nanoparticles’ surface. This coordination provides the major contribution to the stability of the ligand-coated nanoparticles against hydrolysis. PMID:20161232

  2. Molecular Chemistry to the Fore: New Insights into the Fascinating World of Photoactive Colloidal Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Vela-Becerra, Javier

    2013-02-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals possess unique properties that are unmatched by other chromophores such as organic dyes or transition-metal complexes. These versatile building blocks have generated much scientific interest and found applications in bioimaging, tracking, lighting, lasing, photovoltaics, photocatalysis, thermoelectrics, and spintronics. Despite these advances, important challenges remain, notably how to produce semiconductor nanostructures with predetermined architecture, how to produce metastable semiconductor nanostructures that are hard to isolate by conventional syntheses, and how to control the degree of surface loading or valence per nanocrystal. Molecular chemists are very familiar with these issues and can use their expertise to help solve these challenges. In this Perspective, we present our group’s recent work on bottom-up molecular control of nanoscale composition and morphology, low-temperature photochemical routes to semiconductor heterostructures and metastable phases, solar-to-chemical energy conversion with semiconductor-based photocatalysts, and controlled surface modification of colloidal semiconductors that bypasses ligand exchange.

  3. InAs Colloidal Quantum Dots Synthesis via Aminopnictogen Precursor Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Grigel, Valeriia; Dupont, Dorian; De Nolf, Kim; Hens, Zeger; Tessier, Mickael D

    2016-10-05

    Despite their various potential applications, InAs colloidal quantum dots have attracted considerably less attention than more classical II-VI materials because of their complex syntheses that require hazardous precursors. Recently, amino-phosphine has been introduced as a cheap, easy-to-use and efficient phosphorus precursor to synthesize InP quantum dots. Here, we use aminopnictogen precursors to implement a similar approach for synthesizing InAs quantum dots. We develop a two-step method based on the combination of aminoarsine as the arsenic precursor and aminophosphine as the reducing agent. This results in state-of-the-art InAs quantum dots with respect to the size dispersion and band-gap range. Moreover, we present shell coating procedures that lead to the formation of InAs/ZnS(e) core/shell quantum dots that emit in the infrared region. This innovative synthesis approach can greatly facilitate the research on InAs quantum dots and may lead to synthesis protocols for a wide range of III-V quantum dots.

  4. A Surface Chemistry Approach to Enhancing Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids for Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Graham Hamilton

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) photovoltaic devices have improved rapidly over the past decade of research. By taking advantage of the quantum confinement effect, solar cells constructed using films of infrared-bandgap nanoparticles are able to capture previously untapped ranges of the solar energy spectrum. Additionally, films are fabricated using simple, cheap, reproducible solution processing techniques, enabling the creation of low-cost, flexible photovoltaic devices. A key factor limiting the creation of high efficiency CQD solar cells is the short charge carrier diffusion length in films. Driven by a combination of limited carrier mobility, poor nanoparticle surface passivation, and the presence of unexamined electrically active impurities throughout the film, the poor diffusion length limits the active layer thickness in CQD solar cells, leading to lower-than-desired light absorption, and curtailing the photocurrent generated by such devices. This thesis seeks to address poor diffusion length by addressing each of the limiting factors in turn. Electrical transport in quantum dot solids is examined in the context of improved quantum dot packing; methods are developed to improve packing by using actively densifying components, or by dramatically lowering the volume change required between quantum dots in solution and in solid state. Quantum dot surface passivation is improved by introducing a crucial secondary, small halide ligand source, and by surveying the impact of the processing environment on the final quality of the quantum dot surface. A heretofore unidentified impurity present in quantum dot solids is identified, characterized, and chemically eliminated. Finally, lessons learned through these experiments are combined into a single, novel materials system, leading to quantum dot devices with a significantly improved diffusion length (enhanced from 70 to 230 nm). This enabled thick, high current density (30 mA cm -2, compared to typical values in the 20

  5. Dense ionization and subsequent non-homogeneous radical-mediated chemistry of femtosecond laser-induced low density plasma in aqueous solutions: synthesis of colloidal gold.

    PubMed

    Belmouaddine, Hakim; Shi, Minghan; Karsenti, Paul-Ludovic; Meesat, Ridthee; Sanche, Léon; Houde, Daniel

    2017-03-15

    The "cold" low density plasma channels generated by the filamentation of powerful femtosecond laser pulses in aqueous solutions constitute a source of dense ionization. Here, we probed the radiation-assisted chemistry of water triggered by laser ionization via the radical-mediated synthesis of nanoparticles in gold chloride aqueous solutions. We showed that the formation of colloidal gold originates from the reduction of trivalent ionic gold initially present in solution by the reactive radicals (e.g. hydrated electrons) produced upon the photolysis of water. We analyzed both the reaction kinetics of the laser-induced hydrated electrons and the growth kinetics of the gold nanoparticles. Introduction of radical scavengers into the solutions and different initial concentrations of gold chloride provided information about the radical-mediated chemistry. The dense ionization results in the second order cross-recombination of the photolysis primary byproducts. Competition with recombination imposes the non-homogeneous interaction of reactive radicals with solute present in irradiated aqueous solutions. Such a laser-induced non-homogeneous chemistry suggests similarities with the radiation chemistry of water exposed to conventional densely ionizing radiation (high dose rate, high linear energy transfer).

  6. Sampling colloids and colloid-associated contaminants in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Backhus, Debera A.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Groher, Daniel M.; MacFarlane, John K.; Gschwend, Philip M.

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that mobile colloids may affect the transport of contaminants in ground water. To determine the significance of this process, knowledge of both the total mobile load (dissolved + colloid-associated) and the dissolved concentration of a ground-water contaminant must be obtained. Additional information regarding mobile colloid characteristics and concentrations are required to predict accurately the fate and effects of contaminants at sites where significant quantities of colloids are found. To obtain this information, a sampling scheme has been designed and refined to collect mobile colloids while avoiding the inclusion of normally immobile subsurface and well-derived solids. The effectiveness of this sampling protocol was evaluated at a number of contaminated and pristine sites.The sampling results indicated that slow, prolonged pumping of ground water is much more effective at obtaining ground-water samples that represent in situ colloid populations than bailing. Bailed samples from a coal tar-contaminated site contained 10–100 times greater colloid concentrations and up to 750 times greater polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations as were detected in slowly pumped samples. The sampling results also indicated that ground-water colloid concentrations should be monitored in the field to determine the adequacy of purging if colloid and colloid-associated contaminants are of interest. To avoid changes in the natural ground-water colloid population through precipitation or coagulation, in situ ground-water chemistry conditions must be preserved during sampling and storage. Samples collected for determination of the total mobile load of colloids and low-solubility contaminants must not be filtered because some mobile colloids are removed by this process. Finally, suggestions that mobile colloids are present in ground water at any particular site should be corroborated with auxiliary data, such as colloid levels in

  7. Nanosheets by design: The controllable synthesis of group IV-VI layered semiconductor chalcogenide nanostructures using colloidal chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Dimitri D., II

    Nanosheets, a class of nanomaterials with two-dimensional structure and atomic or molecular scale thickness, have attracted a great deal of interest from the scientific community due to excellent physical properties and several promising applications in optoelectronics, energy conversion and storage, and catalysis. While advances in the synthesis of 2D nanostructures using top-down. chemical and physical strategies such as exfoliation and mechanical cleavage have been achieved, improved synthesis may be realized by applying bottom-up. colloidal strategies where nanosheets are built. directly from solution in an atomic layer-by-layer fashion. In this dissertation, I will discuss recent advances in the synthesis of semiconductor nanosheets with controllable lateral dimension, thickness, hierarchical structure, and porosity, specifically focusing on a class of group IV-VI layered semiconductor chalcogenides (GeS, GeSe, SnS, and SnSe) as a model system. Finally, I will highlight my efforts for expanding the synthetic framework mentioned above to access other materials, including the colloidal synthesis of germanium and Ge-based nanostructures.

  8. The Extension of Colloid Chemistry from Aqueous to Non-Aqueous Media with Application to Nanofluid Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, Dan

    Cyclodextrins are cyclic molecules composed of glucose units. The inner cavity of cyclodextrins is noted for its ability to form stable inclusion complexes with a wide variety of guests. A cyclodextrin-glucose host-guest complex was prepared and utilized as both a salt reductant and a particle stabilizer in the generation of aqueous metal colloids including Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt. The resulting colloids demonstrated remarkable stability---3 years and running, in some cases---and have been evaluated for thermal conductivity. Evaluation of the reaction products when the complex is used to reduce Pd 2+ demonstrated a unique comproportionation reaction in which the guest undergoes a two electron oxidation to produce a Pd atom. The resulting atom reduces a neighboring Pd2+ ion to yield two Pd + ions. The monovalent species, in contrast to Pd2+, can then oxidize the host to form atoms which rapidly aggregate to yield particles. Highly stable, crystalline copper(II) oxide particles were prepared which can be isolated as a powder and redispursed in low dielectric media such as hydrocarbons or chloroform. Mass concentrations of up to 20% (1.65 M) were achieved in octane, dodecane, and eicosane and remained stable for at least ten days at room temperature as observed by visible spectroscopy. Quasi-spherical particle shape was observed with the largest fraction possessing a diameter of 9 nm and 90% of the population existing within the range of 5 to 15 nm. The colloidal systems were characterized using FAA, XRD, TEM, UV-Vis, DSC, and a simple device inspired by Newton's Law of cooling which was employed to measure cooling/heating rates. Thermodynamic measurements of sodium oleate-stabilized CuO particles suspended in dodecane and eicosane reveal a decrease in Cp, DeltaH fus , and cooling/heating rates of the resulting colloid with large increases in particle mass concentration. Irradiation with 350 nm photons of anhydrous, air-free octane or toluene solutions of copper(II) oleate

  9. Host-guest chemistry for tuning colloidal solubility, self-organization and photoconductivity of inorganic-capped nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bodnarchuk, Maryna I; Yakunin, Sergii; Piveteau, Laura; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2015-12-09

    Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs), functionalized with inorganic capping ligands, such as metal chalcogenide complexes (MCCs), have recently emerged as versatile optoelectronic materials. As-prepared, highly charged MCC-capped NCs are dispersible only in highly polar solvents, and lack the ability to form long-range ordered NC superlattices. Here we report a simple and general methodology, based on host-guest coordination of MCC-capped NCs with macrocyclic ethers (crown ethers and cryptands), enabling the solubilization of inorganic-capped NCs in solvents of any polarity and improving the ability to form NC superlattices. The corona of organic molecules can also serve as a convenient knob for the fine adjustment of charge transport and photoconductivity in films of NCs. In particular, high-infrared-photon detectivities of up to 3.3 × 10(11) Jones with a fast response (3 dB cut-off at 3 kHz) at the wavelength of 1,200 nm were obtained with films of PbS/K3AsS4/decyl-18-crown-6 NCs.

  10. Host–guest chemistry for tuning colloidal solubility, self-organization and photoconductivity of inorganic-capped nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Bodnarchuk, Maryna I.; Yakunin, Sergii; Piveteau, Laura; Kovalenko, Maksym V.

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs), functionalized with inorganic capping ligands, such as metal chalcogenide complexes (MCCs), have recently emerged as versatile optoelectronic materials. As-prepared, highly charged MCC-capped NCs are dispersible only in highly polar solvents, and lack the ability to form long-range ordered NC superlattices. Here we report a simple and general methodology, based on host–guest coordination of MCC-capped NCs with macrocyclic ethers (crown ethers and cryptands), enabling the solubilization of inorganic-capped NCs in solvents of any polarity and improving the ability to form NC superlattices. The corona of organic molecules can also serve as a convenient knob for the fine adjustment of charge transport and photoconductivity in films of NCs. In particular, high-infrared-photon detectivities of up to 3.3 × 1011 Jones with a fast response (3 dB cut-off at 3 kHz) at the wavelength of 1,200 nm were obtained with films of PbS/K3AsS4/decyl-18-crown-6 NCs. PMID:26647828

  11. Host-guest chemistry for tuning colloidal solubility, self-organization and photoconductivity of inorganic-capped nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnarchuk, Maryna I.; Yakunin, Sergii; Piveteau, Laura; Kovalenko, Maksym V.

    2015-12-01

    Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs), functionalized with inorganic capping ligands, such as metal chalcogenide complexes (MCCs), have recently emerged as versatile optoelectronic materials. As-prepared, highly charged MCC-capped NCs are dispersible only in highly polar solvents, and lack the ability to form long-range ordered NC superlattices. Here we report a simple and general methodology, based on host-guest coordination of MCC-capped NCs with macrocyclic ethers (crown ethers and cryptands), enabling the solubilization of inorganic-capped NCs in solvents of any polarity and improving the ability to form NC superlattices. The corona of organic molecules can also serve as a convenient knob for the fine adjustment of charge transport and photoconductivity in films of NCs. In particular, high-infrared-photon detectivities of up to 3.3 × 1011 Jones with a fast response (3 dB cut-off at 3 kHz) at the wavelength of 1,200 nm were obtained with films of PbS/K3AsS4/decyl-18-crown-6 NCs.

  12. Colloidal Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at Princeton University in colloidal phenomena stressing the physical and dynamical side of colloid science. The course outline, reading list, and requirements are presented. (BT)

  13. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  14. Active colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranson, Igor S.

    2013-01-01

    A colloidal suspension is a heterogeneous fluid containing solid microscopic particles. Colloids play an important role in our everyday life, from food and pharmaceutical industries to medicine and nanotechnology. It is useful to distinguish two major classes of colloidal suspensions: equilibrium and active, i.e., maintained out of thermodynamic equilibrium by external electric or magnetic fields, light, chemical reactions, or hydrodynamic shear flow. While the properties of equilibrium colloidal suspensions are fairly well understood, active colloids pose a formidable challenge, and the research is in its early exploratory stage. One of the most remarkable properties of active colloids is the possibility of dynamic self-assembly, a natural tendency of simple building blocks to organize into complex functional architectures. Examples range from tunable, self-healing colloidal crystals and membranes to self-assembled microswimmers and robots. Active colloidal suspensions may exhibit material properties not present in their equilibrium counterparts, e.g., reduced viscosity and enhanced self-diffusivity, etc. This study surveys the most recent developments in the physics of active colloids, both in synthetic and living systems, with the aim of elucidation of the fundamental physical mechanisms governing self-assembly and collective behavior.

  15. Colloidal polypyrrole

    DOEpatents

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized aromatic heterocyclic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a vinyl pyridine-containing polymer and dopant anions and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are disclosed.

  16. Hexadecapolar colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-02-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of `colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously.

  17. Hexadecapolar colloids

    PubMed Central

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-01-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously. PMID:26864184

  18. Hexadecapolar Colloids

    DOE PAGES

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; ...

    2016-02-11

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and forbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms’ displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. We describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Becausemore » of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and report the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously.« less

  19. Hexadecapolar Colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-02-11

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and forbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms’ displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. We describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and report the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously.

  20. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials/activities. These include: experiments on colloids, processing of uranium ore, action of heat on carbonates; color test for phenols and aromatic amines; solvent properties of non-electrolytes; stereoscopic applications/methods; a valency balance;…

  1. Colloidal polyaniline

    DOEpatents

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized amino-substituted aromatic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a random copolymer containing amino-benzene type moieties as side chain constituents, and dopant anions, and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are provided.

  2. Mechanical Failure in Colloidal Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodger, Thomas Edward

    When colloidal particles in a dispersion are made attractive, they aggregate into fractal clusters which grow to form a space-spanning network, or gel, even at low volume fractions. These gels are crucial to the rheological behavior of many personal care, food products and dispersion-based paints. The mechanical stability of these products relies on the stability of the colloidal gel network which acts as a scaffold to provide these products with desired mechanical properties and to prevent gravitational sedimentation of the dispersed components. Understanding the mechanical stability of such colloidal gels is thus of crucial importance to predict and control the properties of many soft solids. Once a colloidal gel forms, the heterogeneous structure bonded through weak physical interactions, is immediately subject to body forces, such as gravity, surface forces, such as adhesion to a container walls and shear forces; the interplay of these forces acting on the gel determines its stability. Even in the absence of external stresses, colloidal gels undergo internal rearrangements within the network that may cause the network structure to evolve gradually, in processes known as aging or coarsening or fail catastrophically, in a mechanical instability known as syneresis. Studying gel stability in the laboratory requires model colloidal system which may be tuned to eliminate these body or endogenous forces systematically. Using existing chemistry, I developed several systems to study delayed yielding by eliminating gravitational stresses through density matching and cyclic heating to induce attraction; and to study syneresis by eliminating adhesion to the container walls, altering the contact forces between colloids, and again, inducing gelation through heating. These results elucidate the varied yet concomitant mechanisms by which colloidal gels may locally or globally yield, but then reform due to the nature of the physical, or non-covalent, interactions which form

  3. Colloid Transport and Retention in Fractured Media

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.

    2001-02-01

    The goal of this project was to identify the chemical and physical factors that control the transport of colloids in fractured materials, and develop a generalized capability to predict colloid attachment and detachment based on hydraulic factors (head, flow rate), physical processes and structure (fracture aperture, matrix porosity), and chemical properties (surface properties of colloids, solution chemistry, and mineralogy of fracture surfaces). Both aqueous chemistry and physical structure of geologic formations influenced transport. Results of studies at all spatial scales reached consensus on the importance of several key controlling variables: (1) colloid retention is dominated by chemical conditions favoring colloid-wall interactions; (2) even in the presence of conditions favorable to colloid collection, deposited colloids are remobilized over long times and this process contributes substantially to the overall extent of transport; (3) diffusive exchange between water-conducting fractures and finer fractures and pores acts to ''buffer'' the effects of the major fracture network structure, and reduces predictive uncertainties. Predictive tools were developed that account for fundamental mechanisms of colloid dynamics in fracture geometry, and linked to larger-scale processes in networks of fractures. The results of our study highlight the key role of physical and hydrologic factors, and processes of colloid remobilization that are potentially of even greater importance to colloid transport in the vadose zone than in saturated conditions. We propose that this work be extended to focus on understanding vadose zone transport processes so that they can eventually be linked to the understanding and tools developed in our previous project on transport in saturated groundwater systems.

  4. Soil colloidal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent understanding that organic and inorganic contaminants are often transported via colloidal particles has increased interest in colloid science. The primary importance of colloids in soil science stems from their surface reactivity and charge characteristics. Characterizations of size, shape,...

  5. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  6. The Colloidal Stability of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Ionic Liquids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 06-03-2013 to 05-06-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Colloidal Stability of Magnetic...DATES COVERED (From - To) 6 Mar 2013 – 5 June 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Colloidal Stability of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Ionic Liquids...Polymers and Colloids , Chemistry F11, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. - Phone : +61 2 9351 6973 - Fax : +61 2 9351 851 Period of

  7. Colloid-Mediated Transport of Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products through Porous Media

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Chen, Xin; Zhuang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) enter soils through reclaimed water irrigation and biosolid land applications. Colloids, such as clays, that are present in soil may interact with PPCPs and thus affect their fate and transport in the subsurface environment. This study addresses the influence of soil colloids on the sorption and transport behaviors of PPCPs through laboratory column experiments. Results show that the affinities of PPCPs for colloids vary with their molecular chemistry and solution ionic strength. The presence of colloids promotes the breakthrough of ciprofloxacin (over 90% sorbed on colloids) from ~4% to 30–40%, and the colloid-facilitated effect was larger at lower ionic strength (e.g., 2 mM). In comparison, the net effect of colloids on the transport of tetracycline (~50% sorbed on colloids) could be facilitation or inhibition, depending on solution chemistry. This dual effect of colloids is primarily due to the opposite response of migration of dissolved and colloid-bound tetracycline to the change in solution ionic strength. Colloids could also facilitate the transport of ibuprofen (~10% sorbed on colloids) by ~50% due likely to exclusion of dispersion pathways by colloid straining. This study suggests that colloids are significant carriers or transport promoters of some PPCPs in the subsurface environment and could affect their off-site environmental risks. PMID:27734948

  8. Colloid-Mediated Transport of Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Chen, Xin; Zhuang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) enter soils through reclaimed water irrigation and biosolid land applications. Colloids, such as clays, that are present in soil may interact with PPCPs and thus affect their fate and transport in the subsurface environment. This study addresses the influence of soil colloids on the sorption and transport behaviors of PPCPs through laboratory column experiments. Results show that the affinities of PPCPs for colloids vary with their molecular chemistry and solution ionic strength. The presence of colloids promotes the breakthrough of ciprofloxacin (over 90% sorbed on colloids) from ~4% to 30–40%, and the colloid-facilitated effect was larger at lower ionic strength (e.g., 2 mM). In comparison, the net effect of colloids on the transport of tetracycline (~50% sorbed on colloids) could be facilitation or inhibition, depending on solution chemistry. This dual effect of colloids is primarily due to the opposite response of migration of dissolved and colloid-bound tetracycline to the change in solution ionic strength. Colloids could also facilitate the transport of ibuprofen (~10% sorbed on colloids) by ~50% due likely to exclusion of dispersion pathways by colloid straining. This study suggests that colloids are significant carriers or transport promoters of some PPCPs in the subsurface environment and could affect their off-site environmental risks.

  9. Colloid-Mediated Transport of Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products through Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Chen, Xin; Zhuang, Jie

    2016-10-13

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) enter soils through reclaimed water irrigation and biosolid land applications. Colloids, such as clays, that are present in soil may interact with PPCPs and thus affect their fate and transport in the subsurface environment. This study addresses the influence of soil colloids on the sorption and transport behaviors of PPCPs through laboratory column experiments. Results show that the affinities of PPCPs for colloids vary with their molecular chemistry and solution ionic strength. The presence of colloids promotes the breakthrough of ciprofloxacin (over 90% sorbed on colloids) from ~4% to 30-40%, and the colloid-facilitated effect was larger at lower ionic strength (e.g., 2 mM). In comparison, the net effect of colloids on the transport of tetracycline (~50% sorbed on colloids) could be facilitation or inhibition, depending on solution chemistry. This dual effect of colloids is primarily due to the opposite response of migration of dissolved and colloid-bound tetracycline to the change in solution ionic strength. Colloids could also facilitate the transport of ibuprofen (~10% sorbed on colloids) by ~50% due likely to exclusion of dispersion pathways by colloid straining. This study suggests that colloids are significant carriers or transport promoters of some PPCPs in the subsurface environment and could affect their off-site environmental risks.

  10. Enhanced colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borum, La Rhonda Terese

    Hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH) 2 is the most thermodynamically stable calcium phosphate in physiological environments. Hence, it is the main inorganic mineral found in bone and teeth. Its colloidal stability, however, is poor because hydroxyapatite (HAp) particles exhibit sediment formation upon standing at short time periods, where agglomerates form and lead to non-homogeneous suspensions. Surface modification is a promising method to tailor the colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite for biomaterial applications. Three techniques to modify the HAp surface and enhance the colloidal stability of HAp were investigated. Modified particles were characterized by methods sensitive to surface chemistry changes, such as sedimentation studies, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, and electrophoresis. Sedimentation studies demonstrated how effective each technique was in improving the colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite particles. Electrophoresis provided information on electrostatic interactions within each system. The first technique entailed an esterification reaction of the HAp surface with dodecyl alcohol at elevated temperatures. DRIFT results showed that dodecyl groups from the alcohol replaced acidic hydroxyl and phosphate sites on the HAp surface, giving rise to enhanced colloidal stability through steric interactions in ethanol suspensions. TGA curves gave insight to the degree of esterification for the esterified particles. Higher reaction temperatures give rise to a higher degree of esterification resulting in better colloidal stability. The second technique applied a silica coating on the HAp surface by the hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate in ethanol. Silica was coated onto the HAp surface at 5--75 wt% loading amounts. A combination of acid dissolution and x-ray diffraction (XRD), along with BET showed that the silica coating is complete at 50 wt% silica loading. The silica coating

  11. Patchy particles using colloidal caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Christine; Pine, David

    2015-03-01

    We present a method for making patchy particles functionalized with single stranded sticky end DNA only on their patches. This is done by adding ``spherical cap'' particles as patches to spherical colloids using the depletion interaction. The caps are then functionalized with single stranded DNA using copper-free click chemistry. Due to being attached only by depletion, the patches diffuse on the surface of the particle. The patchy particles can then interact with each other in a specific, directional way through the mobile, DNA functionalized patches.

  12. What Is a Colloid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the properties of colloids, listing those commonly encountered (such as whipped cream, mayonnaise, and fog). Also presents several experiments using colloids and discusses "Silly Putty," a colloid with viscoelastic properties whose counterintuitive properties result from its mixture of polymers. (DH)

  13. Electrohydrodynamically patterned colloidal crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, Ryan C. (Inventor); Poon, Hak F. (Inventor); Xiao, Yi (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for assembling patterned crystalline arrays of colloidal particles using ultraviolet illumination of an optically-sensitive semiconducting anode while using the anode to apply an electronic field to the colloidal particles. The ultraviolet illumination increases current density, and consequently, the flow of the colloidal particles. As a result, colloidal particles can be caused to migrate from non-illuminated areas of the anode to illuminated areas of the anode. Selective illumination of the anode can also be used to permanently affix colloidal crystals to illuminated areas of the anode while not affixing them to non-illuminated areas of the anode.

  14. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. Viswanathan; P. Reimus

    2003-09-05

    Colloid retardation is influenced by the attachment and detachment of colloids from immobile surfaces. This analysis demonstrates the development of parameters necessary to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids and, hence, retardation in both fractured tuff and porous alluvium. Field and experimental data specific to fractured tuff are used for the analysis of colloid retardation in fractured tuff. Experimental data specific to colloid transport in alluvial material from Yucca Mountain as well as bacteriophage field studies in alluvial material, which are thought to be good analogs for colloid transport, are used to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids in the alluvial material. There are no alternative scientific approaches or technical methods for calculating these retardation factors.

  15. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  16. Getting Reactions to Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter S.

    1983-01-01

    "COMETS on Careers" describes science-related careers, introduces activities illustrating a science concept being studied, and encourages use of professional persons as activity leaders. Several COMETS chemistry activities are described. These activities, which can be performed in school or at home, focus on colloids, acid/base…

  17. Reaction of Photochemically Generated Organic Cations with Colloidal Clays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    University of Notre Dame. IS. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse aide if neceary end identify by block number) Chemistry of colloidal montmorillonite Absorption...Centlws m ftves n N mee.iy mi Identify by block number) Qi Organic radical cations will dimerize when adsorbed to the surface D of montmorillonite in...1 The Nature and Chemistry of Micelles .... 2 The Nature and Chemistry of Clay Minerals 5 Montmorillonite Catalyzed Color

  18. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation

  19. Bulk synthesis of polymer-inorganic colloidal clusters.

    PubMed

    Perro, Adeline; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2010-12-21

    We describe a procedure to synthesize colloidal clusters with polyhedral morphologies in high yield (liter quantities at up to 70% purity) using a combination of emulsion polymerization and inorganic surface chemistry. We show that the synthesis initially used for silica-polystyrene hybrid clusters can be generalized to create clusters from other inorganic and polymer particles. We also show that high yields of particular morphologies can be obtained by precise control of the inorganic seed particle size, a finding that can be explained using a hard-sphere packing model. These clusters can be further chemically modified for a variety of applications. Introducing a cross-linker leads to colloidal clusters that can be index matched in an appropriate solvent, allowing them to be used for particle tracking or optical studies of colloidal self-assembly. Also, depositing a thin silica layer on these colloids allows the surface properties to be controlled using silane chemistry.

  20. Ring around the colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Marcello, Jr.; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Beller, Daniel A.; Čopar, Simon; Shi, Zheng; Kamien, Randall D.; Yang, Shu; Baumgart, Tobias; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    In this work, we show that Janus washers, genus-one colloids with hybrid anchoring conditions, form topologically required defects in nematic liquid crystals. Experiments under crossed polarizers reveal the defect structure to be a rigid disclination loop confined within the colloid, with an accompanying defect in the liquid crystal. When confined to a homeotropic cell, the resulting colloid-defect ring pair tilts relative to the far field director, in contrast to the behavior of toroidal colloids with purely homeotropic anchoring. We show that this tilting behavior can be reversibly suppressed by the introduction of a spherical colloid into the center of the toroid, creating a new kind of multi-shape colloidal assemblage.

  1. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  2. Pituitary Colloid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Guduk, Mustafa; Sun, Halil Ibrahim; Sav, Murat Aydin; Berkman, Zafer

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Colloid cysts appear most commonly in the third ventricle, their occurrence in the sellar region is uncommon. The authors report a female patient with a pituitary colloid cyst. She was diagnosed incidentally with a sellar lesion by a routine paranasal computed tomography examination performed for planning of a dental implant surgery. Radiologic examinations revealed a pituitary lesion that was removed by transnasal transsphenoidal route. Her pathologic examination revealed that the lesion was a colloid cyst. Although rare, colloid cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pituitary lesions PMID:27792102

  3. Analysis of colloid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1985-12-31

    The population balance methodology is described and applied to the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. The transient model includes particle growth, capture, convective transport, and dispersion. We also follow the dynamic accumulation of captured colloids on the solids. The multidimensional parabolic partial differential equation was solved by a recently enhanced method of characteristics technique. This computational technique minimized numerical dispersion and is computationally very fast. The FORTRAN 77 code ran on a VAX-780 in less than a minute and also runs on an IBM-AT using the Professional FORTRAN compiler. The code was extensively tested against various simplified cases and against analytical models. The packed column experiments by Saltelli et al. were re-analyzed incorporating the experimentally reported size distribution of the colloid feed material. Colloid capture was modeled using a linear size dependent filtration function. The effects of a colloid size dependent filtration factor and various initial colloid size distributions on colloid migration and capture were investigated. Also, we followed the changing colloid size distribution as a function of position in the column. Some simple arguments are made to assess the likelihood of colloid migration at a potential NTS Yucca Mountain waste disposal site. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Generation and behavior of metal oxide colloids in PWR steam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Varsanik, R.G.

    1984-10-01

    This work reviews the curently available literature and research work on the generation and behavior of metal oxide colloids in PWR steam systems. The work of E. Matijevic et al on the generation and adhesion of iron and copper oxides is described. The role of colloid chemistry in the control of plant sludge and corrosion products is described. Factors affecting the adherence and re-entrainment of colloidal metal oxides along with possible methods for the control of metal oxide deposition are reviewed.

  5. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  6. Assembly of Colloidal Materials Using Bioadhesive Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Daniel A.; Hiddessen, Amy L.; Tohver, Valeria; Crocker, John C.; Weitz, David A.

    2002-01-01

    We have pursued the use of biological crosslinking molecules of several types to make colloidal materials at relatively low volume fraction of colloidal particles. The objective is to make binary alloys of colloidal particles, made of two different colloidal particles coated with complementary biological lock-and-key binding molecules, which assemble due to the biological specificity. The long-term goal is to use low affinity lock-and-key biological interactions, so that the can anneal to form crystalline states. We have used a variety of different surface chemistries in order to make colloidal materials. Our first system involved using selectin-carbohydrate (sialyl-Lewis) interactions; this chemistry is derived from immune system. This chemical interaction is of relatively low affinity, with timescales for dissociation of several seconds. Furthermore, the adhesion mediated by these molecules can be reversed by the chelation of calcium atoms; thus assembled structures can be disassembled reversibly. Our second system employed avidin-biotin chemistry. This well-studied system is of high affinity, and is generally irreversible on a laboratory time-scale. Thus, we would expect selectin-carbohydrate interactions at high molecular density and avidin-biotin interactions to give kinetically-trapped structures; however, at low densities, we would expect significant differences in the structure and dynamics of the two materials, owing to their very different release rates. We have also begun to use a third chemistry - DNA hybridization. By attaching single stranded DNA oligonucleotide chains to beads, we can drive the assembly of colloidal materials by hybridization of complementary DNA chains. It is well known that DNA adenosine-thymine (A-T) and guanine-cytosine (G-C) bases hybridize pairwise with a Gibbs free energy change of 1.7 kcal/mol per base; thus, the energy of the assembly can be modulated by altering the number of complementary bases in the DNA chains. Using

  7. Driving magnetic colloidal polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempster, Joshua; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    Magnetic colloids are of growing interest for applications such as drug delivery and in vitro tissue growth. Recent experiments have synthesized 1D chains of magnetic colloids into permanent colloidal polymers. We study magnetic colloidal polymers theoretically and computationally under the influence of time-varying external fields and find a rich set of controllable, dynamic conformations. By iterating through a sequence of conformations, these polymers can perform mechanical functions. We discuss possible roles for these polymers beyond those considered for single colloids. This work was supported as part of the Center for Bio-Inspired Energy Science, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award # DE-SC0000989.

  8. Colloidal Synthesis of Gold Semishells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Denis; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a novel and scalable colloid chemistry strategy to fabricate gold semishells based on the selective growth of gold on Janus silica particles (500 nm in diameter) partly functionalized with amino groups. The modulation of the geometry of the Janus silica particles allows us to tune the final morphology of the gold semishells. This method also provides a route to fabricating hollow gold semishells through etching of the silica cores with hydrofluoric acid. The optical properties were characterized by visible near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy and compared with simulations performed using the boundary element method (BEM). These revealed that the main optical features are located beyond the NIR region because of the large core size. PMID:24551496

  9. Lock and key colloids.

    PubMed

    Sacanna, S; Irvine, W T M; Chaikin, P M; Pine, D J

    2010-03-25

    New functional materials can in principle be created using colloids that self-assemble into a desired structure by means of a programmable recognition and binding scheme. This idea has been explored by attaching 'programmed' DNA strands to nanometre- and micrometre- sized particles and then using DNA hybridization to direct the placement of the particles in the final assembly. Here we demonstrate an alternative recognition mechanism for directing the assembly of composite structures, based on particles with complementary shapes. Our system, which uses Fischer's lock-and-key principle, employs colloidal spheres as keys and monodisperse colloidal particles with a spherical cavity as locks that bind spontaneously and reversibly via the depletion interaction. The lock-and-key binding is specific because it is controlled by how closely the size of a spherical colloidal key particle matches the radius of the spherical cavity of the lock particle. The strength of the binding can be further tuned by adjusting the solution composition or temperature. The composite assemblies have the unique feature of having flexible bonds, allowing us to produce flexible dimeric, trimeric and tetrameric colloidal molecules as well as more complex colloidal polymers. We expect that this lock-and-key recognition mechanism will find wider use as a means of programming and directing colloidal self-assembly.

  10. Practical colloidal processing of multication ceramics

    DOE PAGES

    Bell, Nelson S.; Monson, Todd C.; Diantonio, Christopher; ...

    2015-09-07

    The use of colloidal processing principles in the formation of ceramic materials is well appreciated for developing homogeneous material properties in sintered products, enabling novel forming techniques for porous ceramics or 3D printing, and controlling microstructure to enable optimized material properties. The solution processing of electronic ceramic materials often involves multiple cationic elements or dopants to affect microstructure and properties. Material stability must be considered through the steps of colloidal processing to optimize desired component properties. This review provides strategies for preventing material degradation in particle synthesis, milling processes, and dispersion, with case studies of consolidation using spark plasma sinteringmore » of these systems. The prevention of multication corrosion in colloidal dispersions can be achieved by utilizing conditions similar to the synthesis environment or by the development of surface passivation layers. The choice of dispersing surfactants can be related to these surface states, which are of special importance for nanoparticle systems. A survey of dispersant chemistries related to some common synthesis conditions is provided for perovskite systems as an example. Furthermore, these principles can be applied to many colloidal systems related to electronic and optical applications.« less

  11. Practical colloidal processing of multication ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Nelson S.; Monson, Todd C.; Diantonio, Christopher; Wu, Yiquan

    2015-09-07

    The use of colloidal processing principles in the formation of ceramic materials is well appreciated for developing homogeneous material properties in sintered products, enabling novel forming techniques for porous ceramics or 3D printing, and controlling microstructure to enable optimized material properties. The solution processing of electronic ceramic materials often involves multiple cationic elements or dopants to affect microstructure and properties. Material stability must be considered through the steps of colloidal processing to optimize desired component properties. This review provides strategies for preventing material degradation in particle synthesis, milling processes, and dispersion, with case studies of consolidation using spark plasma sintering of these systems. The prevention of multication corrosion in colloidal dispersions can be achieved by utilizing conditions similar to the synthesis environment or by the development of surface passivation layers. The choice of dispersing surfactants can be related to these surface states, which are of special importance for nanoparticle systems. A survey of dispersant chemistries related to some common synthesis conditions is provided for perovskite systems as an example. Furthermore, these principles can be applied to many colloidal systems related to electronic and optical applications.

  12. MOBILIZATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS GENERATED FROM CEMENT LEACHATES MOVING THROUGH A SRS SANDY SEDIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Seaman, J.

    2011-09-20

    Naturally occurring mobile colloids are ubiquitous and are involved in many important processes in the subsurface zone. For example, colloid generation and subsequent mobilization represent a possible mechanism for the transport of contaminants including radionuclides in the subsurface environments. For colloid-facilitated transport to be significant, three criteria must be met: (1) colloids must be generated; (2) contaminants must associate with the colloids preferentially to the immobile solid phase (aquifer); and (3) colloids must be transported through the groundwater or in subsurface environments - once these colloids start moving they become 'mobile colloids'. Although some experimental investigations of particle release in natural porous media have been conducted, the detailed mechanisms of release and re-deposition of colloidal particles within natural porous media are poorly understood. Even though this vector of transport is known, the extent of its importance is not known yet. Colloid-facilitated transport of trace radionuclides has been observed in the field, thus demonstrating a possible radiological risk associated with the colloids. The objective of this study was to determine if cementitious leachate would promote the in situ mobilization of natural colloidal particles from a SRS sandy sediment. The intent was to determine whether cementitious surface or subsurface structure would create plumes that could produce conditions conducive to sediment dispersion and mobile colloid generation. Column studies were conducted and the cation chemistries of influents and effluents were analyzed by ICP-OES, while the mobilized colloids were characterized using XRD, SEM, EDX, PSD and Zeta potential. The mobilization mechanisms of colloids in a SRS sandy sediment by cement leachates were studied.

  13. Design and synthesis of model transparent aqueous colloids with optimal scattering properties.

    PubMed

    Perro, Adeline; Meng, Guangnan; Fung, Jerome; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2009-10-06

    We demonstrate the synthesis and self-assembly of colloidal particles with independently controlled diameter and scattering cross section. We show that it is possible to prepare bulk colloidal suspensions that are nearly transparent in water, while the particles themselves can be individually resolved using optical microscopy. These particles may be ideal model colloids for real-space studies of self-assembly in aqueous media. Moreover, they illustrate the degree to which the optical properties of colloids can be engineered through straightforward chemistry.

  14. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  15. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  16. Natural analogue studies of the role of colloids, natural organics and microorganisms on radionuclide transport

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-10-01

    Colloids may be important as a geochemical transport mechanism for radionuclides at geological repositories if they are (1) present in the groundwater, (2) stable with respect to both colloidal and chemical stabilities, (3) capable of adsorbing radionuclides, especially if the sorption is irreversible, and (4) mobile in the subsurface. The available evidence from natural analogue and other field studies relevant to these issues is reviewed, as is the potential role of mobile microorganisms ({open_quotes}biocolloids{close_quotes}) on radionuclide migration. Studies have demonstrated that colloids are ubiquitous in groundwater, although colloid concentrations in deep, geochemically stable systems may be too low to affect radionuclide transport. However, even low colloid populations cannot be dismissed as a potential concern because colloids appear to be stable, and many radionuclides that adsorb to colloids are not readily desorbed over long periods. Field studies offer somewhat equivocal evidence concerning colloid mobility and cannot prove or disprove the significance of colloid transport in the far-field environment. Additional research is needed at new sites to properly represent a repository far-field. Performance assessment would benefit from natural analogue studies to examine colloid behavior at sites encompassing a suite of probable groundwater chemistries and that mimic the types of formations selected for radioactive waste repositories.

  17. Self-assembly of active colloidal molecules with dynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Golestanian, Ramin

    Catalytically active colloids maintain non-equilibrium conditions in which they produce and deplete chemicals at their surface. While individual colloids that are symmetrically coated do not exhibit dynamical activity, the concentration fields resulting from their chemical activity decay as 1/r and produce gradients that attract or repel other colloids depending on their surface chemistry and ambient variables. This results in a non-equilibrium analogue of ionic systems, but with the remarkable novel feature of action-reaction symmetry breaking. In dilute conditions these active colloids join up to form molecules via generalized ionic bonds. Colloids are found to join up to form self-assembled molecules that could be inert or have spontaneous activity in the form of net translational velocity and spin depending on their symmetry properties and their constituents. As the interactions do not satisfy detailed-balance, it is possible to achieve structures with time dependent functionality. We study a molecule that adopts spontaneous oscillations and another that exhibits a run-and-tumble dynamics similar to bacteria. Our study shows that catalytically active colloids could be used for designing self-assembled structures that posses dynamical functionalities.

  18. Light-activated self-propelled colloids

    PubMed Central

    Palacci, J.; Sacanna, S.; Kim, S.-H.; Yi, G.-R.; Pine, D. J.; Chaikin, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Light-activated self-propelled colloids are synthesized and their active motion is studied using optical microscopy. We propose a versatile route using different photoactive materials, and demonstrate a multiwavelength activation and propulsion. Thanks to the photoelectrochemical properties of two semiconductor materials (α-Fe2O3 and TiO2), a light with an energy higher than the bandgap triggers the reaction of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and produces a chemical cloud around the particle. It induces a phoretic attraction with neighbouring colloids as well as an osmotic self-propulsion of the particle on the substrate. We use these mechanisms to form colloidal cargos as well as self-propelled particles where the light-activated component is embedded into a dielectric sphere. The particles are self-propelled along a direction otherwise randomized by thermal fluctuations, and exhibit a persistent random walk. For sufficient surface density, the particles spontaneously form ‘living crystals’ which are mobile, break apart and reform. Steering the particle with an external magnetic field, we show that the formation of the dense phase results from the collisions heads-on of the particles. This effect is intrinsically non-equilibrium and a novel principle of organization for systems without detailed balance. Engineering families of particles self-propelled by different wavelength demonstrate a good understanding of both the physics and the chemistry behind the system and points to a general route for designing new families of self-propelled particles. PMID:25332383

  19. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  20. Nucleation in food colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povey, Malcolm J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation in food colloids has been studied in detail using ultrasound spectroscopy. Our data show that classical nucleation theory (CNT) remains a sound basis from which to understand nucleation in food colloids and analogous model systems using n-alkanes. Various interpretations and modifications of CNT are discussed with regard to their relevance to food colloids. Much of the evidence presented is based on the ultrasound velocity spectrometry measurements which has many advantages for the study of nucleating systems compared to light scattering and NMR due to its sensitivity at low solid contents and its ability to measure true solid contents in the nucleation and early crystal growth stages. Ultrasound attenuation spectroscopy also responds to critical fluctuations in the induction region. We show, however, that a periodic pressure fluctuation such as a quasi-continuous (as opposed to a pulse comprising only a few pressure cycles) ultrasound field can alter the nucleation process, even at very low acoustic intensity. Thus care must be taken when using ultrasound techniques that the measurements do not alter the studied processes. Quasi-continuous ultrasound fields may enhance or suppress nucleation and the criteria to determine such effects are derived. The conclusions of this paper are relevant to colloidal systems in foods, pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals, cosmetics, and personal products.

  1. Generation of colloidal granules and capsules from double emulsion drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Kathryn S.

    Assemblies of colloidal particles are extensively used in ceramic processing, pharmaceuticals, inks and coatings. In this project, the aim was to develop a new technique to fabricate monodispersed colloidal assemblies. The use of microfluidic devices and emulsion processing allows for the fabrication of complex materials that can be used in a variety of applications. A microfluidic device is used to create monodispersed water/oil/water (w/o/w) double emulsions with interior droplets of colloidal silica suspension ranging in size from tens to hundreds of microns. By tailoring the osmotic pressure using glycerol as a solute in the continuous and inner phases of the emulsion, we can control the final volume size of the monodispersed silica colloidal crystals that form in the inner droplets of the double emulsion. Modifying the ionic strength in the colloidal dispersion can be used to affect the particle-particle interactions and crystal formation of the final colloidal particle. This w/o/w technique has been used with other systems of metal oxide colloids and cellulose nanocrystals. Encapsulation of the colloidal suspension in a polymer shell for the generation of ceramic-polymer core-shell particles has also been developed. These core-shell particles have spawned new research in the field of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. Systems and chemistries for creating cellulose hydrogels within the double emulsions have also been researched. Water in oil single emulsions and double emulsions have been used to create cellulose hydrogel spheres in the sub-100 micron diameter range. Oil/water/oil double emulsions allow us to create stable cellulose capsules. The addition of a second hydrogel polymer, such as acrylate or alginate, further strengthens the cellulose gel network and can also be processed into capsules and particles using the microfluidic device. This work could have promising applications in acoustic metamaterials, personal care products, pharmaceuticals

  2. Causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Scott A; Kim, Hyunjung

    2012-09-01

    Experiments were designed to better understand the causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis with transients in solution ionic strength (IS). Saturated packed column experiments were conducted using two sizes of carboxyl modified latex (CML) microspheres (0.1 and 1.1 μm) and microorganisms (coliphage φX174 and E. coli D21g) under various transient solution chemistry conditions, and 360 μm Ottawa sand that was subject to different levels of cleaning, namely, a salt cleaning procedure that removed clay particles, and a salt+acid cleaning procedure that removed clay and reduced microscopic heterogeneities due to metal oxides and surface roughness. Comparison of results from the salt and salt+acid treated sand indicated that microscopic heterogeneity was a major contributor to colloid retention hysteresis. The influence of this heterogeneity increased with IS and decreasing colloid/microbe size on salt treated sand. These trends were not consistent with calculated mean interaction energies (the secondary minima), but could be explained by the size of the electrostatic zone of influence (ZOI) near microscopic heterogeneities. In particular, the depth of local minima in the interaction energy has been predicted to increase with a decrease in the ZOI when the colloid size and/or the Debye length decreased (IS increased). The adhesive interaction was therefore largely irreversible for smaller sized 0.1 μm CML colloids, whereas it was reversible for larger 1.1 μm CML colloids. Similarly, the larger E. coli D21g exhibited greater reversibility in retention than φX174. However, direct comparison of CML colloids and microbes was not possible due to differences in size, shape, and surface properties. Retention and release behavior of CML colloids on salt+acid treated sand was much more consistent with mean interaction energies due to reduction in microscopic heterogeneities.

  3. Causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Kim, Hyunjung

    2012-09-01

    Experiments were designed to better understand the causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis with transients in solution ionic strength (IS). Saturated packed column experiments were conducted using two sizes of carboxyl modified latex (CML) microspheres (0.1 and 1.1 μm) and microorganisms (coliphage φX174 and E. coli D21g) under various transient solution chemistry conditions, and 360 μm Ottawa sand that was subject to different levels of cleaning, namely, a salt cleaning procedure that removed clay particles, and a salt + acid cleaning procedure that removed clay and reduced microscopic heterogeneities due to metal oxides and surface roughness. Comparison of results from the salt and salt + acid treated sand indicated that microscopic heterogeneity was a major contributor to colloid retention hysteresis. The influence of this heterogeneity increased with IS and decreasing colloid/microbe size on salt treated sand. These trends were not consistent with calculated mean interaction energies (the secondary minima), but could be explained by the size of the electrostatic zone of influence (ZOI) near microscopic heterogeneities. In particular, the depth of local minima in the interaction energy has been predicted to increase with a decrease in the ZOI when the colloid size and/or the Debye length decreased (IS increased). The adhesive interaction was therefore largely irreversible for smaller sized 0.1 μm CML colloids, whereas it was reversible for larger 1.1 μm CML colloids. Similarly, the larger E. coli D21g exhibited greater reversibility in retention than φX174. However, direct comparison of CML colloids and microbes was not possible due to differences in size, shape, and surface properties. Retention and release behavior of CML colloids on salt + acid treated sand was much more consistent with mean interaction energies due to reduction in microscopic heterogeneities.

  4. COLLOIDS. Colloidal matter: Packing, geometry, and entropy.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2015-08-28

    Colloidal particles with well-controlled shapes and interactions are an ideal experimental system for exploring how matter organizes itself. Like atoms and molecules, these particles form bulk phases such as liquids and crystals. But they are more than just crude analogs of atoms; they are a form of matter in their own right, with complex and interesting collective behavior not seen at the atomic scale. Their behavior is affected by geometrical or topological constraints, such as curved surfaces or the shapes of the particles. Because the interactions between the particles are often short-ranged, we can understand the effects of these constraints using geometrical concepts such as packing. The geometrical viewpoint gives us a window into how entropy affects not only the structure of matter, but also the dynamics of how it forms.

  5. Decreased Salinity and Actinide Mobility: Colloid-Facilitated Transport or pH Change?

    PubMed

    Haliena, Brian; Zheng, Hangping; Melson, Nathan; Kaplan, Daniel I; Barnett, Mark O

    2016-01-19

    Colloids have been implicated in influencing the transport of actinides and other adsorbed contaminants in the subsurface, significantly increasing their mobility. Such colloid-facilitated transport can be induced by changes in groundwater chemistry that occur, for example, when high ionic strength contaminant plumes are displaced by infiltrating rainwater. We studied the transport and mobility of Th(IV), as an analogue for Pu(IV) and other tetravalent actinides [An(IV)], in saturated columns packed with a natural heterogeneous subsurface sandy sediment. As expected, decreases in ionic strength both promoted the mobilization of natural colloids and enhanced the transport of previously adsorbed Th(IV). However, colloid-facilitated transport played only a minor role in enhancing the transport of Th(IV). Instead, the enhanced transport of Th(IV) was primarily due to the pH-dependent desorption of Th(IV) caused by the change in ionic strength. In contrast, the adsorption of Th(IV) had a marked impact on the surface charge of the sandy sediment, significantly affecting the mobility of the colloids. In the absence of Th(IV), changes in ionic strength were ineffective at releasing colloids while in the presence of Th(IV), decreases in ionic strength liberated significant concentrations of colloids. Therefore, under the conditions of our experiments which mimicked acidic, high ionic strength groundwater contaminant plumes, Th(IV) had a much greater effect on colloid transport than colloids had on Th(IV) transport.

  6. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole–dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single

  7. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Teitelboim, Ayelet; Meir, Noga; Kazes, Miri; Oron, Dan

    2016-05-17

    Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole-dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single photon

  8. Fractal nematic colloids

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, S. M.; Jagodič, U.; Mozaffari, M. R.; Ejtehadi, M. R.; Muševič, I.; Ravnik, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter. PMID:28117325

  9. Fractal nematic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. M.; Jagodič, U.; Mozaffari, M. R.; Ejtehadi, M. R.; Muševič, I.; Ravnik, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter.

  10. Fractal nematic colloids.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, S M; Jagodič, U; Mozaffari, M R; Ejtehadi, M R; Muševič, I; Ravnik, M

    2017-01-24

    Fractals are remarkable examples of self-similarity where a structure or dynamic pattern is repeated over multiple spatial or time scales. However, little is known about how fractal stimuli such as fractal surfaces interact with their local environment if it exhibits order. Here we show geometry-induced formation of fractal defect states in Koch nematic colloids, exhibiting fractal self-similarity better than 90% over three orders of magnitude in the length scales, from micrometers to nanometres. We produce polymer Koch-shaped hollow colloidal prisms of three successive fractal iterations by direct laser writing, and characterize their coupling with the nematic by polarization microscopy and numerical modelling. Explicit generation of topological defect pairs is found, with the number of defects following exponential-law dependence and reaching few 100 already at fractal iteration four. This work demonstrates a route for generation of fractal topological defect states in responsive soft matter.

  11. COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH THE VADOSE ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, Markus

    2003-09-14

    Contaminants have leaked into the vadose zone at the USDOE Hanford reservation. It is important to understand the fate and transport of these contaminants to design remediation strategies and long-term waste management plans at the Hanford reservation. Colloids may play an important role in fate and transport of strongly sorbing contaminants, such as Cs or Pu. This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. The specific objectives addressed are: (1) Determine the structure, composition, and surface charge characteristics of colloidal particles formed under conditions similar to those occurring during leakage of waste typical of Hanford tank supernatants into soils and sediments surrounding the tanks. (2) Characterize the mutual interactions between colloids, contaminant, and soil matrix in batch experiments under various ionic strength and pH conditions. We will investigate the nature of the solid-liquid interactions and the kinetics of the reactions. (3) Evaluate mobility of colloids through soil under different degrees of water saturation and solution chemistry (ionic strength and pH). (4) Determine the potential of colloids to act as carriers to transport the contaminant through the vadose zone and verify the results through comparison with field samples collected under leaking tanks. (5) Improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for implementation into reactive chemical transport models. This project was in part supported by an NSF-IGERT grant to Washington State University. The IGERT grant provided funding for graduate student research and education, and two graduate students were involved in the EMSP project. The IGERT program also supported undergraduate internships. The project is part of a larger EMSP program to study fate and transport of contaminants under leaking Hanford waste tanks. The project has

  12. Colloidal Covalent Organic Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) polymer networks with designed topology and chemical functionality, permanent porosity, and high surface areas. These features are potentially useful for a broad range of applications, including catalysis, optoelectronics, and energy storage devices. But current COF syntheses offer poor control over the material’s morphology and final form, generally providing insoluble and unprocessable microcrystalline powder aggregates. COF polymerizations are often performed under conditions in which the monomers are only partially soluble in the reaction solvent, and this heterogeneity has hindered understanding of their polymerization or crystallization processes. Here we report homogeneous polymerization conditions for boronate ester-linked, 2D COFs that inhibit crystallite precipitation, resulting in stable colloidal suspensions of 2D COF nanoparticles. The hexagonal, layered structures of the colloids are confirmed by small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering, and kinetic characterization provides insight into the growth process. The colloid size is modulated by solvent conditions, and the technique is demonstrated for four 2D boronate ester-linked COFs. The diameter of individual COF nanoparticles in solution is monitored and quantified during COF growth and stabilization at elevated temperature using in situ variable-temperature liquid cell transmission electron microscopy imaging, a new characterization technique that complements conventional bulk scattering techniques. Solution casting of the colloids yields a free-standing transparent COF film with retained crystallinity and porosity, as well as preferential crystallite orientation. Collectively this structural control provides new opportunities for understanding COF formation and designing morphologies for device applications. PMID:28149954

  13. Mobile colloid generation induced by a cementitious plume: mineral surface-charge controls on mobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I; Roberts, Kimberly A; Seaman, John C

    2012-03-06

    Cementitious materials are increasingly used as engineered barriers and waste forms for radiological waste disposal. Yet their potential effect on mobile colloid generation is not well-known, especially as it may influence colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. Whereas previous papers have studied the introduction of cement colloids into sediments, this study examined the influence of cement leachate chemistry on the mobilization of colloids from a subsurface sediment collected from the Savannah River Site, USA. A sharp mobile colloid plume formed with the introduction of a cement leachate simulant. Colloid concentrations decreased to background concentrations even though the aqueous chemical conditions (pH and ionic strength) remained unchanged. Mobile colloids were mainly goethite and to a lesser extent kaolinite. The released colloids had negative surface charges and the mean particle sizes ranged primarily from 200 to 470 nm. Inherent mineralogical electrostatic forces appeared to be the controlling colloid removal mechanism in this system. In the background pH of ~6.0, goethite had a positive surface charge, whereas quartz (the dominant mineral in the immobile sediment) and kaolinite had negative surface charges. Goethite acted as a cementing agent, holding kaolinite and itself onto the quartz surfaces due to the electrostatic attraction. Once the pH of the system was elevated, as in the cementitious high pH plume front, the goethite reversed to a negative charge, along with quartz and kaolinite, then goethite and kaolinite colloids were mobilized and a sharp spike in turbidity was observed. Simulating conditions away from the cementitious source, essentially no colloids were mobilized at 1:1000 dilution of the cement leachate or when the leachate pH was ≤ 8. Extreme alkaline pH environments of cementitious leachate may change mineral surface charges, temporarily promoting the formation of mobile colloids.

  14. Flocking ferromagnetic colloids

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Andreas; Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S.

    2017-01-01

    Assemblages of microscopic colloidal particles exhibit fascinating collective motion when energized by electric or magnetic fields. The behaviors range from coherent vortical motion to phase separation and dynamic self-assembly. Although colloidal systems are relatively simple, understanding their collective response, especially under out-of-equilibrium conditions, remains elusive. We report on the emergence of flocking and global rotation in the system of rolling ferromagnetic microparticles energized by a vertical alternating magnetic field. By combing experiments and discrete particle simulations, we have identified primary physical mechanisms, leading to the emergence of large-scale collective motion: spontaneous symmetry breaking of the clockwise/counterclockwise particle rotation, collisional alignment of particle velocities, and random particle reorientations due to shape imperfections. We have also shown that hydrodynamic interactions between the particles do not have a qualitative effect on the collective dynamics. Our findings shed light on the onset of spatial and temporal coherence in a large class of active systems, both synthetic (colloids, swarms of robots, and biopolymers) and living (suspensions of bacteria, cell colonies, and bird flocks). PMID:28246633

  15. Increasing entropy for colloidal stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Songping; Shao, Xuefeng; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Stability is of paramount importance in colloidal applications. Attraction between colloidal particles is believed to lead to particle aggregation and phase separation; hence, stability improvement can be achieved through either increasing repulsion or reducing attraction by modifying the fluid medium or by using additives. Two traditional mechanisms for colloidal stability are electrostatic stabilization and steric stabilization. However, stability improvement by mixing attractive and unstable particles has rarely been considered. Here, we emphasize the function of mixing entropy in colloidal stabilization. Dispersion stability improvement is demonstrated by mixing suspensions of attractive nanosized titania spheres and platelets. A three-dimensional phase diagram is proposed to illustrate the collaborative effects of particle mixing and particle attraction on colloidal stability. This discovery provides a novel method for enhancing colloidal stability and opens a novel opportunity for engineering applications. PMID:27872473

  16. Equilibrium Shape of Colloidal Crystals.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Ray M; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2015-10-27

    Assembling colloidal particles into highly ordered configurations, such as photonic crystals, has significant potential for enabling a broad range of new technologies. Facilitating the nucleation of colloidal crystals and developing successful crystal growth strategies require a fundamental understanding of the equilibrium structure and morphology of small colloidal assemblies. Here, we report the results of a novel computational approach to determine the equilibrium shape of assemblies of colloidal particles that interact via an experimentally validated pair potential. While the well-known Wulff construction can accurately capture the equilibrium shape of large colloidal assemblies, containing O(10(4)) or more particles, determining the equilibrium shape of small colloidal assemblies of O(10) particles requires a generalized Wulff construction technique which we have developed for a proper description of equilibrium structure and morphology of small crystals. We identify and characterize fully several "magic" clusters which are significantly more stable than other similarly sized clusters.

  17. Increasing entropy for colloidal stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Songping; Shao, Xuefeng; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-11-01

    Stability is of paramount importance in colloidal applications. Attraction between colloidal particles is believed to lead to particle aggregation and phase separation; hence, stability improvement can be achieved through either increasing repulsion or reducing attraction by modifying the fluid medium or by using additives. Two traditional mechanisms for colloidal stability are electrostatic stabilization and steric stabilization. However, stability improvement by mixing attractive and unstable particles has rarely been considered. Here, we emphasize the function of mixing entropy in colloidal stabilization. Dispersion stability improvement is demonstrated by mixing suspensions of attractive nanosized titania spheres and platelets. A three-dimensional phase diagram is proposed to illustrate the collaborative effects of particle mixing and particle attraction on colloidal stability. This discovery provides a novel method for enhancing colloidal stability and opens a novel opportunity for engineering applications.

  18. Colloidal Metamaterials at Optical Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-18

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0184 Colloidal Metamaterials at Optical Frequencies Jennifer Dionne LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV CA Final Report 07/18/2014...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Colloidal Metamaterials at Optical Frequencies Annual Report, June 30, 2014 A. Investigators PI: Jennifer Dionne...team has combined theoretical and experimental methods to produce a colloidally -synthesized metamaterial fluid, or “metafluid,” exhibiting strong

  19. Organized thiol functional groups in mesoporous core shell colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Marchena, Martin H.; Granada, Mara; Bordoni, Andrea V.; Joselevich, Maria; Troiani, Horacio; Williams, Federico J.; Wolosiuk, Alejandro

    2012-03-15

    The co-condensation in situ of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a template results in the synthesis of multilayered mesoporous structured SiO{sub 2} colloids with 'onion-like' chemical environments. Thiol groups were anchored to an inner selected SiO{sub 2} porous layer in a bilayered core shell particle producing different chemical regions inside the colloidal layered structure. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) shows a preferential anchoring of the -SH groups in the double layer shell system, while porosimetry and simple chemical modifications confirm that pores are accessible. We can envision the synthesis of interesting colloidal objects with defined chemical environments with highly controlled properties. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous core shell SiO{sub 2} colloids with organized thiol groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Double shell mesoporous silica colloids templated with CTAB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential deposition of mesoporous SiO{sub 2} layers with different chemistries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XPS shows the selective functionalization of mesoporous layers with thiol groups.

  20. Self-assembly of active colloidal molecules with dynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Golestanian, Ramin

    2015-05-01

    Catalytically active colloids maintain nonequilibrium conditions in which they produce and deplete chemicals and hence effectively act as sources and sinks of molecules. While individual colloids that are symmetrically coated do not exhibit any form of dynamical activity, the concentration fields resulting from their chemical activity decay as 1 /r and produce gradients that attract or repel other colloids depending on their surface chemistry and ambient variables. This results in a nonequilibrium analog of ionic systems, but with the remarkable novel feature of action-reaction symmetry breaking. We study solutions of such chemically active colloids in dilute conditions when they join up to form molecules via generalized ionic bonds and discuss how we can achieve structures with time-dependent functionality. In particular, we study a molecule that adopts a spontaneous oscillatory pattern of conformations and another that exhibits a run-and-tumble dynamics similar to bacteria. Our study shows that catalytically active colloids could be used for designing self-assembled structures that possess dynamical functionalities that are determined by their prescribed three-dimensional structures, a strategy that follows the design principle of proteins.

  1. Colloidal nanocrystals for photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadiyar, Chethana; Loiudice, Anna; Buonsanti, Raffaella

    2017-02-01

    Colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) are among the most modular and versatile nanomaterial platforms for studying emerging phenomena in different fields thanks to their superb compositional and morphological tunability. A promising, yet challenging, application involves the use of colloidal NCs as light absorbers and electrocatalysts for water splitting. In this review we discuss how the tunability of these materials is ideal to understand the complex phenomena behind storing energy in chemical bonds and to optimize performance through structural and compositional modification. First, we describe the colloidal synthesis method as a means to achieve a high degree of control over single material NCs and NC heterostructures, including examples of the role of the ligands in modulating size and shape. Next, we focus on the use of NCs as light absorbers and catalysts to drive both the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), together with some of the challenges related to the use of colloidal NCs as model systems and/or technological solution in water splitting. We conclude with a broader prospective on the use of colloidal chemistry for new material discovery.

  2. Effect of Hydrofracking Fluid on Colloid Transport in the Unsaturated Zone

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is expanding rapidly in the US to meet increasing energy demand and requires high volumes of hydrofracking fluid to displace natural gas from shale. Accidental spills and deliberate land application of hydrofracking fluids, which return to the surface during hydrofracking, are common causes of environmental contamination. Since the chemistry of hydrofracking fluids favors transport of colloids and mineral particles through rock cracks, it may also facilitate transport of in situ colloids and associated pollutants in unsaturated soils. We investigated this by subsequently injecting deionized water and flowback fluid at increasing flow rates into unsaturated sand columns containing colloids. Colloid retention and mobilization was measured in the column effluent and visualized in situ with bright field microscopy. While <5% of initial colloids were released by flushing with deionized water, 32–36% were released by flushing with flowback fluid in two distinct breakthrough peaks. These peaks resulted from 1) surface tension reduction and steric repulsion and 2) slow kinetic disaggregation of colloid flocs. Increasing the flow rate of the flowback fluid mobilized an additional 36% of colloids, due to the expansion of water filled pore space. This study suggests that hydrofracking fluid may also indirectly contaminate groundwater by remobilizing existing colloidal pollutants. PMID:24905470

  3. Effect of hydrofracking fluid on colloid transport in the unsaturated zone.

    PubMed

    Sang, Wenjing; Stoof, Cathelijne R; Zhang, Wei; Morales, Verónica L; Gao, Bin; Kay, Robert W; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Yalei; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2014-07-15

    Hydraulic fracturing is expanding rapidly in the US to meet increasing energy demand and requires high volumes of hydrofracking fluid to displace natural gas from shale. Accidental spills and deliberate land application of hydrofracking fluids, which return to the surface during hydrofracking, are common causes of environmental contamination. Since the chemistry of hydrofracking fluids favors transport of colloids and mineral particles through rock cracks, it may also facilitate transport of in situ colloids and associated pollutants in unsaturated soils. We investigated this by subsequently injecting deionized water and flowback fluid at increasing flow rates into unsaturated sand columns containing colloids. Colloid retention and mobilization was measured in the column effluent and visualized in situ with bright field microscopy. While <5% of initial colloids were released by flushing with deionized water, 32-36% were released by flushing with flowback fluid in two distinct breakthrough peaks. These peaks resulted from 1) surface tension reduction and steric repulsion and 2) slow kinetic disaggregation of colloid flocs. Increasing the flow rate of the flowback fluid mobilized an additional 36% of colloids, due to the expansion of water filled pore space. This study suggests that hydrofracking fluid may also indirectly contaminate groundwater by remobilizing existing colloidal pollutants.

  4. Colloid filtration in surface dense vegetation: experimental results and theoretical predictions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Gao, Bin; Yang, Wen; Pachepsky, Yakov A

    2014-04-01

    Understanding colloid and colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in overland flow through dense vegetation is important to protect water quality in the environment, especially for water bodies receiving agricultural and urban runoff. In previous studies, a single-stem efficiency theory for rigid and clean stem systems was developed to predict colloid filtration by plant stems of vegetation in laminar overland flow. Hence, in order to improve the accuracy of the single-stem efficiency theory to real dense vegetation system, we incorporated the effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on the filtration of colloids by stems. Laboratory dense vegetation flow chamber experiments and model simulations were used to determine the kinetic deposition (filtration) rate of colloids under various conditions. The results show that, in addition to flow hydrodynamics and solution chemistry, steric repulsion afforded by NOM layer on the plants stem surface also plays a significant role in controlling colloid deposition on vegetation in overland flow. For the first time, a refined single-stem efficiency theory with considerations of the NOM effect is developed that describes the experimental data with good accuracy. This theory can be used to not only help construct and refine mathematical models of colloid transport in real vegetation systems in overland flow, but also inform the development of theories of colloid deposition on NOM-coated surfaces in natural, engineered, and biomedical systems.

  5. Paramagnetic particle assemblies as colloidal models for atomic and molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dichuan

    2011-12-01

    Colloidal particles are ideal models for studying the behavior of atomic and molecular systems. They resemble their atomic and molecular analogues in that their dynamics are driven by thermal energy and their equilibrium properties are controlled by inter-particle interactions. Based on this analogy, it is reasonable to construct colloidal chains, where each particle represents a repeat unit, as models for polymers. The advantages of this system over molecular systems are its controllable rigidity, contour length and diameter, as well as the convenience to capture its instantaneous shape and position via video microscopy, which are not trivial to realize in molecular systems. By utilizing the dipolar properties of magnetic colloids, a number of groups have assembled semiflexible and rigid colloidal chains by cross-linking magnetic beads under a magnetic field using polymer linkers. Recently, efforts in constructing colloidal chains led even to anisotropic magnetic colloidal chains that mimic the detailed atomic arrangements of polymers. These properties make colloidal chains possible candidates for the classic bead-spring or bead-rod model systems for semiflexible and rigid polymers. In my thesis, I present a method for generating linear colloidal chain structures by linking surface functionalized paramagnetic particles using DNA. First, I investigate the force interactions between individual magnetic particles under different conditions to optimize the resulting chain stability. A systematic study the bending and rotational diffusion dynamics of the chains and their relationship with the DNA linking chemistry is presented. I then demonstrate their use as a ideal model system to study polymer dynamics In addition, a technique to measure short-range repulsive surface forces between these colloids with high precision was developed. Building on these repulsive force studies, a colloidal system to study 2-D phase transitions was created. This thesis provides insights

  6. Coupling of physical and chemical mechanisms of colloid straining in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Scott A; Torkzaban, Saeed; Walker, Sharon L

    2007-07-01

    Filtration theory does not include the potential influence of pore structure on colloid removal by straining. Conversely, previous research on straining has not considered the possible influence of chemical interactions. Experimental and theoretical studies were therefore undertaken to explore the coupling of physical and chemical mechanisms of colloid straining under unfavorable attachment conditions (pH=10). Negatively charged latex microspheres (1.1 and 3 microm) and quartz sands (360, 240, and 150 microm) were used in packed column studies that encompassed a range in suspension ionic strengths (6-106 mM) and Darcy water velocities (0.1-0.45 cm min(-1)). Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) calculations and torque analysis suggests that attachment of colloids to the solid-water interface was not a significant mechanism of deposition for the selected experimental conditions. Effluent concentration curves and hyperexponential deposition profiles were strongly dependent on the solution chemistry, the system hydrodynamics, and the colloid and collector grain size, with greater deposition occurring for increasing ionic strength, lower flow rates, and larger ratios of the colloid to the median grain diameter. Increasing the solution ionic strength is believed to increase the force and number of colloids in the secondary minimum of the DLVO interaction energy profile. These weakly associated colloids can be funneled to small regions of the pore space formed adjacent to grain-grain junctions. For select systems, the ionic strength of the eluant solution was decreased to 6mM following the recovery of the effluent concentration curve. In this case, only a small portion of the deposited colloids was recovered in the effluent and the majority was still retained in the sand. These observations suggest that the extent of colloid removal by straining is strongly coupled to solution chemistry.

  7. Silver clusters and chemistry in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, T.; Seff, K. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-06-01

    The spectroscopic work done on silver clusters trapped in solid noble gas matrices at low temperature has been extensively reviewed by Ozin, and Henglein has done the same for photochemical studies of colloidal silver particles in solution. This article will review the chemistry of silver in zeolite hosts, including the synthesis and structures of silver clusters. 127 refs.

  8. MOLECULAR DESIGN OF COLLOIDS IN SUPERCRITICAL FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Keith P. Johnston

    2009-04-06

    The environmentally benign, non-toxic, non-flammable fluids water and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the two most abundant and inexpensive solvents on earth. Emulsions of these fluids are of interest in many industrial processes, as well as CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. Until recently, formation of these emulsions required stabilization with fluorinated surfactants, which are expensive and often not environmentally friendly. In this work we overcame this severe limitation by developing a fundamental understanding of the properties of surfactants the CO2-water interface and using this knowledge to design and characterize emulsions stabilized with either hydrocarbon-based surfactants or nanoparticle stabilizers. We also discovered a new concept of electrostatic stabilization for CO2-based emulsions and colloids. Finally, we were able to translate our earlier work on the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanocrystals and nanowires from high temperatures and pressures to lower temperatures and ambient pressure to make the chemistry much more accessible.

  9. Physics of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiping

    Colloidal suspensions are complex fluids that consist of mesoscopic particles suspended in a solvent, e.g. water, oil, etc. In this thesis, the objective is to investigate the four aspects of colloidal suspensions: electrorotation, dielectrophoresis, dielectric dispersion spectrum, and nonlinear alternating current (AC) response. The traditional theories failed to fit the recent experimental data, and hence, for the purpose of a better fitting, we aim to develop new theories. In addition, our theories also predicted some new phenomena which are expected to be verified in experiments. Electrorotation has been increasingly employed as a sensitive tool for non-invasive studies of a broad variety of microparticles, ranging from living cells to spores and seeds, as well as synthetic materials. In order to analyze the abundant experimental data, we extend here the existing theory by taking into account crucial elements, such as inhomogeneities, multipolar interactions, nonspherical shapes as well as many-body (local-field) effects. Good agreement is shown between our theoretical results and the experimental data. Dielectrophoresis is typically used for micromanipulation and separation of biological cellular size particles, and it has recently been successfully applied to submicron size particles as well. Specific applications include diverse problems in medicine, colloidal science and nanotechnology. To analyze the recent experimental observations, we present a theory which includes the effects of both charging and multipolar interactions. Our theoretical results are favorably compared with the recent experimental observations. Recent experiments revealed that the dielectric dispersion spectrum of fission yeast cells in a suspension was mainly composed of two sub-dispersions. The low-frequency sub-dispersion depended on the cell length, while the high-frequency one was independent of it. However, the existing theory does not fit the experimental data. Hence, we here put

  10. Light-structured colloidal assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubret, Antoine; Mena, Youssef; Ramananarivo, Sophie; Sacanna, Stefano; Palacci, Jeremie; Palacci lab Team; Sacanna lab Team

    2016-11-01

    Self-propelled particles (SPP) are a key tool since they are of relative simplicity as compared to biological micro-entities and provide a higher level of control. They can convert an energy source into motion and work, and exhibit surprising non-equilibrium behavior. In our work, we focus on the manipulation of colloids using light. We exploit osmotic and phoretic effects to act on single and ensemble of colloids. The key mechanism relies on the photocatalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using hematite, which triggers the motion of colloids around it when illuminated. We use hematite particles and particles with photocatalytic inclusions (i.e. SPP). We first show that the interactions between hematite and colloidal tracers can be tuned by adjusting the chemical environment. Furthermore, we report a phototaxic behavior (migration in light gradient) of the particles. From this, we explore the effect of spatio-temporal modulation of the light to control the motion of colloids at the single particle level, and to generate self-assembled colloidal structures through time and space. The so-formed structures are maintained by phoretic and hydrodynamic forces resulting from the motion of each particles. Ultimately, a dynamic light modulation may be a route for the creation of active colloidal motion on a collective scale through the synchronization of the individual motions of SPP. This work is supported by NSF CAREER DMR 1554724.

  11. Clathrate colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haixin; Lee, Sangmin; Sun, Lin; Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2017-03-01

    DNA-programmable assembly has been used to deliberately synthesize hundreds of different colloidal crystals spanning dozens of symmetries, but the complexity of the achieved structures has so far been limited to small unit cells. We assembled DNA-modified triangular bipyramids (~250-nanometer long edge, 177-nanometer short edge) into clathrate architectures. Electron microscopy images revealed that at least three different structures form as large single-domain architectures or as multidomain materials. Ordered assemblies, isostructural to clathrates, were identified with the help of molecular simulations and geometric analysis. These structures are the most sophisticated architectures made via programmable assembly, and their formation can be understood based on the shape of the nanoparticle building blocks and mode of DNA functionalization.

  12. Microfluidic control using colloidal devices.

    PubMed

    Terray, Alex; Oakey, John; Marr, David W M

    2002-06-07

    By manipulating colloidal microspheres within customized channels, we have created micrometer-scale fluid pumps and particulate valves. We describe two positive-displacement designs, a gear and a peristaltic pump, both of which are about the size of a human red blood cell. Two colloidal valve designs are also demonstrated, one actuated and one passive, for the direction of cells or small particles. The use of colloids as both valves and pumps will allow device integration at a density far beyond what is currently achievable by other approaches and may provide a link between fluid manipulation at the macro- and nanoscale.

  13. Microfluidic Control Using Colloidal Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terray, Alex; Oakey, John; Marr, David W. M.

    2002-06-01

    By manipulating colloidal microspheres within customized channels, we have created micrometer-scale fluid pumps and particulate valves. We describe two positive-displacement designs, a gear and a peristaltic pump, both of which are about the size of a human red blood cell. Two colloidal valve designs are also demonstrated, one actuated and one passive, for the direction of cells or small particles. The use of colloids as both valves and pumps will allow device integration at a density far beyond what is currently achievable by other approaches and may provide a link between fluid manipulation at the macro- and nanoscale.

  14. Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, R.W.; Hines, J.J.

    1990-11-13

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints. No Drawings

  15. Method of making colloid labeled with radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1991-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  16. Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  17. Engineering colloidal assembly via biological adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiddessen, Amy Lynn

    Due to highly specialized recognition properties, biological receptor-ligand interactions offer valuable tools for engineering the assembly of novel colloidal materials. A unique sub-class of these macromolecules, called selectins, was exploited to develop binary suspensions where particles are programmed to associate reversibly or irreversibly via specific biomolecular cross-linking. Flow cytometry and videomicroscopy were used to examine factors controlling suspension assembly and structure, including biomolecular affinity and density, and individual and total particle volume fractions. By functionalizing small (RA = 0.47 mum) and larger (RB = 2.75 mum) particles with high surface densities of complementary E-selectin/sialyl Lewis X (sLeX) carbohydrate chemistry, a series of structures, from colloidal micelles (large particle coated with smaller particles) and clusters, to rings and elongated chains, was synthesized by decreasing the number ratio, NA/NB, of small (A) to large (B) particles (2 ≤ NA/NB ≤ 200) at low total volume fraction (10-4 ≤ φT ≤ 10-3 ). Using significantly lower surface densities, the low affinity binding between E-selectin and sLeX was exploited to create particles that interact reversibly, and average particle interaction lifetimes were tuned from minutes down to single selectin-carbohydrate bond lifetimes (≈1 s) by reducing sLeX density, a significant step toward assembling ordered microstructures. Particle binding lifetimes were analyzed with a receptor-ligand binding model, yielding estimates for molecular parameters, including on rate, 10-2 s-1 < kon < 10-1 s-1, and unstressed off rate, 0.25 s-1 ≤ kor ≤ 1.0 s-1, that characterize the docking dynamics of particles. Finally, at significantly higher volume fraction (φ T ≥ 10-1) and low number ratio, the rheology of space-filling networks crosslinked by high affinity streptavidin-biotin chemistry was probed to acquire knowledge on bulk properties of biocolloidal suspensions

  18. Colloid Mobilization in a Fractured Soil: Effect of Pore-Water Exchange between Preferential Flow Paths and Soil Matrix.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Saiers, James E; Ryan, Joseph N

    2016-03-01

    Exchange of water and solutes between contaminated soil matrix and bulk solution in preferential flow paths has been shown to contribute to the long-term release of dissolved contaminants in the subsurface, but whether and how this exchange can affect the release of colloids in a soil are unclear. To examine this, we applied rainfall solutions of different ionic strength on an intact soil core and compared the resulting changes in effluent colloid concentration through multiple sampling ports. The exchange of water between soil matrix and the preferential flow paths leading to each port was characterized on the basis of the bromide (conservative tracer) breakthrough time at the port. At individual ports, two rainfalls of a certain ionic strength mobilized different amounts of colloids when the soil was pre-exposed to a solution of lower or higher ionic strength. This result indicates that colloid mobilization depended on rainfall solution history, which is referred as colloid mobilization hysteresis. The extent of hysteresis was increased with increases in exchange of pore water and solutes between preferential flow paths and matrix. The results indicate that the soil matrix exchanged the old water from the previous infiltration with new infiltrating water during successive infiltration and changed the pore water chemistry in the preferential flow paths, which in turn affected the release of soil colloids. Therefore, rainfall solution history and soil heterogeneity must be considered to assess colloid mobilization in the subsurface. These findings have implications for the release of colloids, colloid-associated contaminants, and pathogens from soils.

  19. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles describe techniques for demonstrating corrosion of metallic couples, colloidal dispersion of light, the biodegradability of detergents, the laboratory preparation of chlorine in model electrolytic cells, and the detection of food colorings in candy. (AL)

  20. Colloidal nanomaterial-based immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Teste, Bruno; Descroix, Stephanie

    2012-06-01

    Nanomaterials have been widely developed for their use in nanomedicine, especially for immunoassay-based diagnosis. In this review we focus on the use of nanomaterials as a nanoplatform for colloidal immunoassays. While conventional heterogeneous immunoassays suffer from mass transfer limitations and consequently long assay time, colloidal immunosupports allow target capture in the entire volume, thus speeding up reaction kinetics and shortening assay time. Owing to their wide range of chemical and physical properties, nanomaterials are an interesting candidate for immunoassay development. The most popular colloidal nanomaterials for colloidal immunoassays will be discussed, as well as their influence on immune reactions. Recent advances in nanomaterial applications for different formats of immunoassays will be reported, such as nanomaterial-based indirect immunoassays, optical-based agglutination immunoassays, resonance energy transfer-based immunoassays and magnetic relaxation-based immunoassays. Finally, the future of using nanomaterials for homogeneous immunoassays dedicated to clinical diagnosis will be discussed.

  1. Toward Coordinated Colloids: Site-Selective Growth of Titania on Patchy Silica Particles

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Changdeuck; Kim, Hyunchul; Montero Moreno, Josep M.; Yi, Gi-Ra; Shin, Hyunjung

    2015-01-01

    Rational synthesis of coordinated spherical colloids is reported by site-selective growth of secondary hemispherical patches on primary spherical particles with quasi-defined coordination numbers and positions. We clarify the importance of mass transport phenomena on the site-specific secondary nucleation/growth in nanoparticulate colloidal systems. By comparing ultrasonic and conventional agitation during patch growth, we found that enhanced mass transfer is the key to controlled, homogeneous transport of the molecular precursors in a solvent onto the nanoparticles. With chemically defined nucleation sites, the surfaces of spherical silica particles were modified for use as a new kind of colloid with patches at desired coordination positions. Our observations represent a significant breakthrough in colloidal chemistry and self-assembly. PMID:25797616

  2. Aggregation of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-28

    Patchy colloids are attractive as programmable building blocks for metamaterials. Inverse patchy colloids, in which a charged surface is decorated with patches of the opposite charge, are additionally noteworthy as models for heterogeneously charged biological materials such as proteins. We study the phases and aggregation behavior of a single charged patch in an oppositely charged colloid with a single-site model. This single-patch inverse patchy colloid model shows a large number of phases when varying patch size. For large patch sizes we find ferroelectric crystals, while small patch sizes produce cross-linked gels. Intermediate values produce monodisperse clusters and unusual worm structures that preserve finite ratios of area to volume. The polarization observed at large patch sizes is robust under extreme disorder in patch size and shape. We examine phase-temperature dependence and coexistence curves and find that large patch sizes produce polarized liquids, in contrast to mean-field predictions. Finally, we introduce small numbers of unpatched charged colloids. These can either suppress or encourage aggregation depending on their concentration and the size of the patches on the patched colloids. These effects can be exploited to control aggregation and to measure effective patch size.

  3. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals as charge transporting layers for solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyong; Bai, Sai; Wang, Xin; Dai, Xingliang; Gao, Feng; Sun, Baoquan; Ning, Zhijun; Ye, Zhizhen; Jin, Yizheng

    2017-02-28

    Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals offer a unique combination of excellent low-temperature solution processability, rich and tuneable optoelectronic properties and intrinsic stability, which makes them an ideal class of materials as charge transporting layers in solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells. Developing new material chemistry and custom-tailoring processing and properties of charge transporting layers based on oxide nanocrystals hold the key to boosting the efficiency and lifetime of all-solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells, and thereby realizing an unprecedented generation of high-performance, low-cost, large-area and flexible optoelectronic devices. This review aims to bridge two research fields, chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals and interfacial engineering of optoelectronic devices, focusing on the relationship between chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals, processing and properties of charge transporting layers and device performance. Synthetic chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals, ligand chemistry that may be applied to colloidal oxide nanocrystals and chemistry associated with post-deposition treatments are discussed to highlight the ability of optimizing processing and optoelectronic properties of charge transporting layers. Selected examples of solution-processed solar cells and light-emitting diodes with oxide-nanocrystal charge transporting layers are examined. The emphasis is placed on the correlation between the properties of oxide-nanocrystal charge transporting layers and device performance. Finally, three major challenges that need to be addressed in the future are outlined. We anticipate that this review will spur new material design and simulate new chemistry for colloidal oxide nanocrystals, leading to charge transporting layers and solution-processed optoelectronic devices beyond the state-of-the-art.

  4. An evaluation of acute toxicity of colloidal silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Maneewattanapinyo, Pattwat; Banlunara, Wijit; Thammacharoen, Chuchaat; Ekgasit, Sanong; Kaewamatawong, Theerayuth

    2011-11-01

    Tests for acute oral toxicity, eye irritation, corrosion and dermal toxicity of colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were conducted in laboratory animals following OECD guidelines. Oral administration of AgNPs at a limited dose of 5,000 mg/kg produced neither mortality nor acute toxic signs throughout the observation period. Percentage of body weight gain of the mice showed no significant difference between control and treatment groups. In the hematological analysis, there was no significant difference between mice treated with AgNPs and controls. Blood chemistry analysis also showed no differences in any of the parameter examined. There was neither any gross lesion nor histopathological change observed in various organs. The results indicated that the LD(50) of colloidal AgNPs is greater than 5,000 mg/kg body weight. In acute eye irritation and corrosion study, no mortality and toxic signs were observed when various doses of colloidal AgNPs were instilled in guinea pig eyes during 72 hr observation period. However, the instillation of AgNPs at 5,000 ppm produced transient eye irritation during early 24 hr observation time. No any gross abnormality was noted in the skins of the guinea pigs exposed to various doses of colloidal AgNPs. In addition, no significant AgNPs exposure relating to dermal tissue changes was observed microscopically. In summary, these findings of all toxicity tests in this study suggest that colloidal AgNPs could be relatively safe when administered to oral, eye and skin of the animal models for short periods of time.

  5. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-07-13

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater–bentonite–fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L–1) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10–10 M241Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (kf) of 0.01–0.02 h–1. Am recoveries in each column were 55–60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h–1 in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. As a result, our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill

  6. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater-bentonite-fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L(-1)) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10(-10) M (241)Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (k(f)) of 0.01-0.02 h(-1). Am recoveries in each column were 55-60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h(-1) in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. Our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long distance scales because

  7. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids

    DOE PAGES

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; ...

    2015-07-13

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater–bentonite–fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. Themore » colloidal suspension (100 mg L–1) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10–10 M241Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (kf) of 0.01–0.02 h–1. Am recoveries in each column were 55–60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h–1 in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. As a result, our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long

  8. Colloids in the vicinity of landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, T.; Fruhstorfer, P.; Klein, T.; Niessner, R.

    2003-04-01

    Waste disposals without adequate landfill liner system are a source of contaminants and colloids. In order to assess the effects of the presence of colloids on the transport of heavy metal ions, the colloids at three landfill sites were characterized with regard to their chemical and mineralogical composition, their size distribution, and the concentration of heavy metal ions associated to the colloids. It can be shown that the pattern of the colloids inside and outside of the landfill is different in all examined parameters, e.g. inside of the disposal we find organic colloids and salt particles, whereas the groundwater downstream of the disposal contains mainly iron-colloids and carbonatic particles. Therefore a direct transfer of colloids from the landfill to the aquifer seems unlikely. Changes of the hydrochemical (mainly redox) and hydrodynamic conditions contribute to this behaviour. The association of heavy metal ions to colloids shows an interesting pattern: High concentrations are present in solution and associated to smaller (< 10 nm) and larger (> 1 μm) colloids, whereas the colloids in between show only small concentrations. This finding has some impact on the assessment of colloidal transport processes, since it suggests, that the more mobile colloids do not carry high concentrations of heavy metal ions.

  9. Biophysical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Häussinger, Daniel; Pfohl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Biophysical chemistry at the Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, covers the NMR analysis of protein-protein interaction using paramagnetic tags and sophisticated microscopy techniques investigating the dynamics of biological matter.

  10. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  11. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  12. Chemistry Dashboard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Chemistry Dashboard is part of a suite of dashboards developed by EPA to help evaluate the safety of chemicals. The Chemistry Dashboard provides access to a variety of information on over 700,000 chemicals currently in use.

  13. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  14. Synthesis of monodispersed bimetallic palladium-copper nanoscale colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J.S.; Hill, E.W.; Klein, C. ); Chaudret, B.; Duteil, A. )

    1993-03-01

    Bimetallic clusters have been the subject of many studies of the surface chemistry and catalytic properties of metal crystallites on solid supports. Mixtures of palladium acetate and copper acetate were refluxed in 2-ethoxyethanol in the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) to give 40-[angstrom] alloy nanoclusters. TEM and EDAX analysis showed that the particles were homogeneously bimetallic and crystalline, with a composition determined by the ratio of the metal acetates used. Carbon monoxide adsorbed on the colloidal particles binds reversibly to both metals. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  16. Colloids and Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerson, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the work funded under this grant were to develop a microphotographic technique and use it to monitor the nucleation and growth of crystals of hard colloidal spheres. Special attention is given to the possible need for microgravity studies in future experiments. A number of persons have been involved in this work. A masters student, Keith Davis, began the project and developed a sheet illumination apparatus and an image processing system for detection and analysis. His work on a segmentation program for image processing was sufficient for his master's research and has been published. A post doctoral student Bernie Olivier and a graduate student Yueming He, who originally suggested the sheet illumination, were funded by another source but along with Keith made photographic series of several samples (that had been made by Keith Davis). Data extraction has been done by Keith, Bernie, Yueming and two undergraduates employed on the grant. Results are published in Langmuir. These results describe the sheet lighting technique as one which illuminates not only the Bragg scattering crystal, but all the crystals. Thus, accurate crystal counts can be made for nucleation rate measurements. The strange crystal length scale reduction, observed in small angle light scattering (SALS) studies, following the initial nucleation and growth period, has been observed directly. The Bragg scattering (and dark) crystal size decreases in the crossover region. This could be an effect due to gravitational forces or due to over- compression of the crystal during growth. Direct observations indicate a complex morphology for the resulting hard sphere crystals. The crystal edges are fairly sharp but the crystals have a large degree of internal structure. This structure is a result of (unstable) growth and not aggregation. As yet unpublished work compares growth exponents data with data obtained by SALS. The nucleation rate density is determined over a broad volume fraction range

  17. Fabrication of planar colloidal clusters with template-assisted interfacial assembly.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Christopher L; De Volder, Michael; Vermant, Jan

    2015-02-10

    The synthesis of nanoparticle clusters, also referred to as colloidal clusters or colloidal molecules, is being studied intensively as a model system for small molecule interactions as well as for the directed self-assembly of advanced materials. This paper describes a technique for the interfacial assembly of planar colloidal clusters using a combination of top-down lithographic surface modification and bottom-up Langmuir-Blodgett deposition. Micrometer sized polystyrene latex particles were deposited onto a chemically modified substrate from a decane-water interface with Langmuir-Blodgett deposition. The surface of the substrate contained hydrophilic domains of various size, spacing, and shape, while the remainder of the substrate was hydrophobic. Particles selectively deposited onto hydrophilic regions from the decane-water interface. The number of deposited particles depended on the size of each patch, thereby demonstrating that tuning cluster size is possible by engineering patch geometry. Following deposition, the clusters were permanently bonded with temperature annealing and then removed from the substrate via sonication. The permanently bonded planar colloidal clusters were stable in an aqueous environment and at a decane-water interface laden with isotropic colloidal particles. The method is a simple and fast way to synthesize colloidal clusters with few limitations on particle chemistry, composition, and shape.

  18. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  19. Forensic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF SUB-MICRON AQUEOUS IRON(III) COLLOIDS FORMED IN THE PRESENCE OF PHOSPHATE BY SEDIMENTATION FIELD FLOW FRACTIONATION WITH MULTI-ANGLE LASER LIGHT SCATTERING DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron colloids play a major role in the water chemistry of natural watersheds and of engineered drinking water distribution systems. Phosphate is frequently added to distribution systems to control corrosion problems, so iron-phosphate colloids may form through reaction of iron in...

  1. Selenium Redox Reactivity on Colloidal CdSe Quantum Dot Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the structural and compositional origins of midgap states in semiconductor nanocrystals is a longstanding challenge in nanoscience. Here, we report a broad variety of reagents useful for photochemical reduction of colloidal CdSe quantum dots, and we establish that these reactions proceed via a dark surface prereduction step prior to photoexcitation. Mechanistic studies relying on the specific properties of various reductants lead to the proposal that this surface prereduction occurs at oxidized surface selenium sites. These results demonstrate the use of small-molecule inorganic chemistries to control the physical properties of colloidal QDs and provide microscopic insights into the identities and reactivities of their localized surface species. PMID:27518320

  2. Surface-modified silica colloidal crystals: nanoporous films and membranes with controlled ionic and molecular transport.

    PubMed

    Zharov, Ilya; Khabibullin, Amir

    2014-02-18

    Nanoporous membranes are important for the study of the transport of small molecules and macromolecules through confined spaces and in applications ranging from separation of biomacromolecules and pharmaceuticals to sensing and controlled release of drugs. For many of these applications, chemists need to gate the ionic and molecular flux through the nanopores, which in turn depends on the ability to control the nanopore geometry and surface chemistry. Most commonly used nanoporous membrane materials are based on polymers. However, the nanostructure of polymeric membranes is not well-defined, and their surface is hard to modify. Inorganic nanoporous materials are attractive alternatives for polymers in the preparation of nanoporous membranes. In this Account, we describe the preparation and surface modification of inorganic nanoporous films and membranes self-assembled from silica colloidal spheres. These spheres form colloidal crystals with close-packed face centered cubic lattices upon vertical deposition from colloidal solutions. Silica colloidal crystals contain ordered arrays of interconnected three dimensional voids, which function as nanopores. We can prepare silica colloidal crystals as supported thin films on various flat solid surfaces or obtain free-standing silica colloidal membranes by sintering the colloidal crystals above 1000 °C. Unmodified silica colloidal membranes are capable of size-selective separation of macromolecules, and we can surface-modify them in a well-defined and controlled manner with small molecules and polymers. For the surface modification with small molecules, we use silanol chemistry. We grow polymer brushes with narrow molecular weight distribution and controlled length on the colloidal nanopore surface using atom transfer radical polymerization or ring-opening polymerization. We can control the flux in the resulting surface-modified nanoporous films and membranes by pH and ionic strength, temperature, light, and small molecule

  3. Colloid characterization and quantification in groundwater samples

    SciTech Connect

    K. Stephen Kung

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the work conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory for studying the groundwater colloids for the Yucca Mountain Project in conjunction with the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. Colloidal particle size distributions and total particle concentration in groundwater samples are quantified and characterized. Colloid materials from cavity waters collected near underground nuclear explosion sites by HRMP field sampling personnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were quantified. Selected colloid samples were further characterized by electron microscope to evaluate the colloid shapes, elemental compositions, and mineral phases. The authors have evaluated the colloid size and concentration in the natural groundwater sample that was collected from the ER-20-5 well and stored in a 50-gallon (about 200-liter) barrel for several months. This groundwater sample was studied because HRMP personnel have identified trace levels of radionuclides in the water sample. Colloid results show that even though the water sample had filtered through a series of Millipore filters, high-colloid concentrations were identified in all unfiltered and filtered samples. They had studied the samples that were diluted with distilled water and found that diluted samples contained more colloids than the undiluted ones. These results imply that colloids are probably not stable during the storage conditions. Furthermore, results demonstrate that undesired colloids have been introduced into the samples during the storage, filtration, and dilution processes. They have evaluated possible sources of colloid contamination associated with sample collection, filtrating, storage, and analyses of natural groundwaters. The effects of container types and sample storage time on colloid size distribution and total concentration were studied to evaluate colloid stability by using J13 groundwater. The data suggests that groundwater samples

  4. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  5. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, C. Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-09-01

    Drying suspensions often leave behind complex patterns of particulates, as might be seen in the coffee stains on a table. Here, we consider the dynamics of periodic band or uniform solid film formation on a vertical plate suspended partially in a drying colloidal solution. Direct observations allow us to visualize the dynamics of band and film deposition, where both are made of multiple layers of close packed particles. We further see that there is a transition between banding and filming when the colloidal concentration is varied. A minimal theory of the liquid meniscus motion along the plate reveals the dynamics of the banding and its transition to the filming as a function of the ratio of deposition and evaporation rates. We also provide a complementary multiphase model of colloids dissolved in the liquid, which couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving meniscus to the fluid and particulate flows and the transition from a dilute suspension to a porous plug. This allows us to determine the concentration dependence of the bandwidth and the deposition rate. Together, our findings allow for the control of drying-induced patterning as a function of the colloidal concentration and evaporation rate.

  6. Physics of Colloids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, Dave; Weeks, Eric; Gasser, Urs; Dinsmore, Tony; Mawley, Suliana; Segre, Phil; Cipelletti, Lucia

    2000-01-01

    This talk will present recent results from ground-based research to support the "Physics of Colloids in Space" project which is scheduled to fly in the ISS approximately one year from now. In addition, results supporting future planned flights will be discussed.

  7. Microbial effects on colloidal agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, L.

    1995-11-01

    Colloidal particles are known to enhance the transport of radioactive metals through soil and rock systems. This study was performed to determine if a soil microorganism, isolated from the surface samples collected at Yucca Mountain, NV, could affect the colloidal properties of day particles. The agglomeration of a Wyoming bentonite clay in a sterile uninoculated microbial growth medium was compared to the agglomeration in the medium inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. In a second experiment, microorganisms were cultured in the succinate medium for 50 h and removed by centrifugation. The agglomeration of the clay in this spent was compared to sterile uninoculated medium. In both experiments, the agglomeration of the clay was greater than that of the sterile, uninoculated control. Based on these results, which indicate that this microorganism enhanced the agglomeration of the bentonite clay, it is possible to say that in the presence of microorganisms colloidal movement through a rock matrix could be reduced because of an overall increase in the size of colloidal particle agglomerates. 32 refs.

  8. Impact of dissolved organic matter on colloid transport in the vadose zone: deterministic approximation of transport deposition coefficients from polymeric coating characteristics.

    PubMed

    Morales, Verónica L; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Bin; Lion, Leonard W; Bisogni, James J; McDonough, Brendan A; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2011-02-01

    Although numerous studies have been conducted to discern colloid transport and stability processes, the mechanistic understanding of how dissolved organic matter (DOM) affects colloid fate in unsaturated soils (i.e., the vadose zone) remains unclear. This study aims to bridge the gap between the physicochemical responses of colloid complexes and porous media interfaces to solution chemistry, and the effect these changes have on colloid transport and fate. Measurements of adsorbed layer thickness, density, and charge of DOM-colloid complexes and transport experiments with tandem internal process visualization were conducted for key constituents of DOM, humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA), at acidic, neutral and basic pH and two CaCl(2) concentrations. Polymeric characteristics reveal that, of the two tested DOM constituents, only HA electrosterically stabilizes colloids. This stabilization is highly dependent on solution pH which controls DOM polymer adsorption affinity, and on the presence of Ca(+2) which promotes charge neutralization and inter-particle bridging. Transport experiments indicate that HA improved colloid transport significantly, while FA only marginally affected transport despite having a large effect on particle charge. A transport model with deposition and pore-exclusion parameters fit experimental breakthrough curves well. Trends in deposition coefficients are correlated to the changes in colloid surface potential for bare colloids, but must include adsorbed layer thickness and density for sterically stabilized colloids. Additionally, internal process observations with bright field microscopy reveal that, under optimal conditions for retention, experiments with FA or no DOM promoted colloid retention at solid-water interfaces, while experiments with HA enhanced colloid retention at air-water interfaces, presumably due to partitioning of HA at the air-water interface and/or increased hydrophobic characteristics of HA-colloid complexes.

  9. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  10. Effective Forces Between Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tehver, Riina; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1999-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions have proven to be excellent model systems for the study of condensed matter and its phase behavior. Many of the properties of colloidal suspensions can be investigated with a systematic variation of the characteristics of the systems and, in addition, the energy, length and time scales associated with them allow for experimental probing of otherwise inaccessible regimes. The latter property also makes colloidal systems vulnerable to external influences such as gravity. Experiments performed in micro-ravity by Chaikin and Russell have been invaluable in extracting the true behavior of the systems without an external field. Weitz and Pusey intend to use mixtures of colloidal particles with additives such as polymers to induce aggregation and form weak, tenuous, highly disordered fractal structures that would be stable in the absence of gravitational forces. When dispersed in a polarizable medium, colloidal particles can ionize, emitting counterions into the solution. The standard interaction potential in these charged colloidal suspensions was first obtained by Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek. The DLVO potential is obtained in the mean-field linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approximation and thus has limited applicability. For more precise calculations, we have used ab initio density functional theory. In our model, colloidal particles are charged hard spheres, the counterions are described by a continuum density field and the solvent is treated as a homogeneous medium with a specified dielectric constant. We calculate the effective forces between charged colloidal particles by integrating over the solvent and counterion degrees of freedom, taking into account the direct interactions between the particles as well as particle-counterion, counterion-counterion Coulomb, counterion entropic and correlation contributions. We obtain the effective interaction potential between charged colloidal particles in different configurations. We evaluate two

  11. Colloid particle size-dependent dispersivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C. V.; Katzourakis, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that dispersion coefficients evaluated by fitting advection-dispersion transport models to nonreactive tracer breakthrough curves do not adequately describe colloid transport under the same flow field conditions. Here an extensive laboratory study was undertaken to assess whether the dispersivity, which traditionally has been considered to be a property of the porous medium, is dependent on colloid particle size and interstitial velocity. A total of 49 colloid transport experiments were performed in columns packed with glass beads under chemically unfavorable colloid attachment conditions. Nine different colloid diameters, and various flow velocities were examined. The breakthrough curves were successfully simulated with a mathematical model describing colloid transport in homogeneous, water saturated porous media. The results demonstrated that the dispersivity is positively correlated with colloid particle size, and increases with increasing velocity.

  12. Nonequilibrium interfaces in colloidal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bier, Markus; Arnold, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    The time-dependent structure, interfacial tension, and evaporation of an oversaturated colloid-rich (liquid) phase in contact with an undersaturated colloid-poor (vapor) phase of a colloidal dispersion is investigated theoretically during the early-stage relaxation, where the interface is relaxing towards a local equilibrium state while the bulk phases are still out of equilibrium. Since systems of this type exhibit a clear separation of colloidal and solvent relaxation time scales with typical times of interfacial tension measurements in between, they can be expected to be suitable for analogous experimental studies, too. The major finding is that, irrespective of how much the bulk phases differ from two-phase coexistence, the interfacial structure and the interfacial tension approach those at two-phase coexistence during the early-stage relaxation process. This is a surprising observation since it implies that the relaxation towards global equilibrium of the interface is not following but preceding that of the bulk phases. Scaling forms for the local chemical potential, the flux, and the dissipation rate exhibit qualitatively different leading order contributions depending on whether an equilibrium or a nonequilibrium system is considered. The degree of nonquilibrium between the bulk phases is found to not influence the qualitative relaxation behavior (i.e., the values of power-law exponents), but to determine the quantitative deviation of the observed quantities from their values at two-phase coexistence. Whereas the underlying dynamics differs between colloidal and molecular fluids, the behavior of quantities such as the interfacial tension approaching the equilibrium values during the early-stage relaxation process, during which nonequilibrium conditions of the bulk phases are not changed, can be expected to occur for both types of systems.

  13. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  14. Technetium chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, C.; Bryan, J.; Cotton, F.; Ott, K.; Kubas, G.; Haefner, S.; Barrera, J.; Hall, K.; Burrell, A.

    1996-04-01

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  15. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  16. Colloidal 3-mercaptopropionic acid Capped Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots in a Low Boiling Point Solvent.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Chase C; Johansson, Erik

    2017-04-10

    Colloidal 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) capped lead sulfide quantum dots were prepared in a variety of organic solvents stabilized with a quaternary ammonium halide salt. The stabilized colloids' optical properties were studied through optical absorption and emission spectroscopy and found to be dependent on both the concentration of new ligand and stabilizer, and sample age. Nanocrystal ligand chemistry was studied through a combination of (1)H-NMR and 2-dimensional Nuclear Overhauser Effect Spectroscopy (NOESY) which revealed full displacement of the original oleate ligand to form a dynamically exchanging ligand shell. The colloids were studied optically and via NMR as they aged and revealed a quantitative conversion of monomeric 3-mercaptopropionic acid to its dimer, dithiodipropionic acid (dTdPA).

  17. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystal catalysis by sustained chemically driven ligand displacement.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Jonathan; Van Driessche, Isabel; Martins, José C; Hens, Zeger

    2016-05-01

    Surface chemistry is a key enabler for colloidal nanocrystal applications. In this respect, metal oxide nanocrystals (NCs) stand out from other NCs as carboxylic acid ligands adsorb on their surface by dissociation to carboxylates and protons, the latter proving essential in electron transfer reactions. Here, we show that this binding motif sets the stage for chemically driven ligand displacement where the binding of amines or alcohols to HfO2 NCs is promoted by the conversion of a bound carboxylic acid into a non-coordinating amide or ester. Furthermore, the sustained ligand displacement, following the addition of excess carboxylic acid, provides a catalytic pathway for ester formation, whereas the addition of esters leads to NC-catalysed transesterification. Because sustained, chemically driven ligand displacement leaves the NCs-including their surface composition-unchanged and preserves colloidal stability, metal oxide nanocrystals are thus turned into effective nanocatalysts that bypass the tradeoff between colloidal stability and catalytic activity.

  18. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystal catalysis by sustained chemically driven ligand displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Roo, Jonathan; van Driessche, Isabel; Martins, José C.; Hens, Zeger

    2016-05-01

    Surface chemistry is a key enabler for colloidal nanocrystal applications. In this respect, metal oxide nanocrystals (NCs) stand out from other NCs as carboxylic acid ligands adsorb on their surface by dissociation to carboxylates and protons, the latter proving essential in electron transfer reactions. Here, we show that this binding motif sets the stage for chemically driven ligand displacement where the binding of amines or alcohols to HfO2 NCs is promoted by the conversion of a bound carboxylic acid into a non-coordinating amide or ester. Furthermore, the sustained ligand displacement, following the addition of excess carboxylic acid, provides a catalytic pathway for ester formation, whereas the addition of esters leads to NC-catalysed transesterification. Because sustained, chemically driven ligand displacement leaves the NCs--including their surface composition--unchanged and preserves colloidal stability, metal oxide nanocrystals are thus turned into effective nanocatalysts that bypass the tradeoff between colloidal stability and catalytic activity.

  19. Seeded growth of titania colloids with refractive index tunability and fluorophore-free luminescence.

    PubMed

    Demirörs, Ahmet Faik; Jannasch, Anita; van Oostrum, Peter D J; Schäffer, Erik; Imhof, Arnout; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2011-03-01

    Titania is an important material in modern materials science, chemistry, and physics because of its special catalytic, electric, and optical properties. Here, we describe a novel method to synthesize colloidal particles with a crystalline titania, anatase core and an amorphous titania-shell structure. We demonstrate seeded growth of titania onto titania particles with accurate particle size tunability. The monodispersity is improved to such an extent so that colloidal crystallization of the grown microspheres becomes feasible. Furthermore, seeded growth provides separate manipulation of the core and shell. We tuned the refractive index of the amorphous shell between 1.55 and 2.3. In addition, the particles show luminescence when trace amounts of aminopropyl-triethoxysilane are incorporated into the titania matrix and are calcined at 450 °C. Our novel colloids may be useful for optical materials and technologies such as photonic crystals and optical trapping.

  20. Colloid Straining within Saturated Heterogeneous Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porubcan, A.; Walczak, J.; Xu, S.

    2008-12-01

    A thorough understanding of colloid movement in the subsurface system is critical to the assessment of groundwater pollution by pathogenic bacteria and colloid-bound contaminants. It is increasingly recognized that straining, a process that occurs when the pore space is too small to allow for a particle's passage, represents an important process in colloid immobilization within groundwater systems. Previously published studies have focused on the kinetics of colloid straining within sand packs composed of uniform mineral grains. Natural aquifers, however, are usually characterized by physically heterogeneous sediments. In this study, we conducted column transport experiments with carboxylated latex particles and quartz sand to investigate the impact of sediment texture (i.e., the size distribution of mineral grains) on colloid straining kinetics. The quartz sands used in the experiment were thoroughly cleaned and the strong repulsive interactions between colloid particles and quartz sands resulted in minimal physicochemical deposition so the straining kinetics can be quantified unambiguously. Sand packs of different textures were prepared by mixing sands of various sizes (mesh sizes of 20-25, 35-40 and 60-70). Our results suggested that the ratio of colloid size and the median sand grain size was insufficient to predict colloid straining within heterogeneous sediments. Soil texture, which was related to the size distribution of the sand grains, must be considered. A relationship between colloid straining kinetics and the heterogeneity of porous media that can be useful for the prediction of colloid transport within heterogeneous sediments was presented.

  1. What happens when pharmaceuticals meet colloids.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals (PCs) have been widely detected in natural environment due to agricultural application of reclaimed water, sludge and animal wastes. Their potential risks to various ecosystems and even to human health have caused great concern; however, little was known about their environmental behaviors. Colloids (such as clays, metal oxides, and particulate organics) are kind of substances that are active and widespread in the environment. When PCs meet colloids, their interaction may influence the fate, transport, and toxicity of PCs. This review summarizes the progress of studies on the role of colloids in mediating the environmental behaviors of PCs. Synthesized results showed that colloids can adsorb PCs mainly through ion exchange, complexation and non-electrostatic interactions. During this process the structure of colloids and the stability of PCs may be changed. The adsorbed PCs may have higher risks to induce antibiotic resistance; besides, their transport may also be altered considering they have great chance to move with colloids. Solution conditions (such as pH, ionic strength, and cations) could influence these interactions between PCs and colloids, as they can change the forms of PCs and alter the primary forces between PCs and colloids in the solution. It could be concluded that PCs in natural soils could bind with colloids and then co-transport during the processes of irrigation, leaching, and erosion. Therefore, colloid-PC interactions need to be understood for risk assessment of PCs and the best management practices of various ecosystems (such as agricultural and wetland systems).

  2. Stable colloids in molten inorganic salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Ludwig, Nicholas B.; Han, Gang; Lee, Byeongdu; Vaikuntanathan, Suri; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2017-02-01

    A colloidal solution is a homogeneous dispersion of particles or droplets of one phase (solute) in a second, typically liquid, phase (solvent). Colloids are ubiquitous in biological, chemical and technological processes, homogenizing highly dissimilar constituents. To stabilize a colloidal system against coalescence and aggregation, the surface of each solute particle is engineered to impose repulsive forces strong enough to overpower van der Waals attraction and keep the particles separated from each other. Electrostatic stabilization of charged solutes works well in solvents with high dielectric constants, such as water (dielectric constant of 80). In contrast, colloidal stabilization in solvents with low polarity, such as hexane (dielectric constant of about 2), can be achieved by decorating the surface of each particle of the solute with molecules (surfactants) containing flexible, brush-like chains. Here we report a class of colloidal systems in which solute particles (including metals, semiconductors and magnetic materials) form stable colloids in various molten inorganic salts. The stability of such colloids cannot be explained by traditional electrostatic and steric mechanisms. Screening of many solute–solvent combinations shows that colloidal stability can be traced to the strength of chemical bonding at the solute–solvent interface. Theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics modelling suggest that a layer of surface-bound solvent ions produces long-ranged charge-density oscillations in the molten salt around solute particles, preventing their aggregation. Colloids composed of inorganic particles in inorganic melts offer opportunities for introducing colloidal techniques to solid-state science and engineering applications.

  3. Analytic studies of colloid transport in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.; Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.; Pigford, T.H.

    1989-11-01

    We analyze the interactive migration of radioactive colloids and solute in fractured rock. Two possible interactions between radionuclides as colloids and as solute are considered: solute sorption on nonradioactive colloids to form pseudocolloids, and dissolution of radioactive colloids. Previous studies have discussed the formation and transport of colloids in porous media, including removal of colloids by filtration and sedimentation. Colloids can migrate faster than solute because of weaker sorption on stationary solids and because of hydrochromatography of colloid particles in flow channels. However, the migration of colloids and pseudocolloids can be retarded by the interaction of colloids with solute, and the migration of solute in local equilibrium with colloids can be more rapid than if colloids were not present. Here we present a new quantative analysis to predict the interactive migration of colloids and solute in porous and fractured media. 4 figs.

  4. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Association

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.

    2012-06-18

    Concluding remarks about this paper are: (1) Gravitational settling, zeta potential, and ultrafiltration data indicate the existence of a colloidal phase of both the alpha and beta emitters in the Chancellor water; (2) The low activity combined with high dispersion homogeneity of the Chancellor water indicate that both alpha and beta emitters are not intrinsic colloids; (3) Radionuclides in the Chancellor water, particularly Pu, coexist as dissolved aqueous and sorbed phases - in other words the radionuclides are partitioned between the aqueous phase and the colloidal phase; (4) The presence of Pu as a dissolved species in the aqueous phase, suggests the possibility of Pu in the (V) oxidation state - this conclusion is supported by the similarity of the k{sub d} value of Pu determined in the current study to that determined for Pu(V) sorbed onto smectite colloids, and the similar electrokinetic behavior of the Chancellor water colloids to smectite colloids; (5) About 50% of the Pu(V) is in the aqueous phase and 50% is sorbed on colloids (mass concentration of colloids in the Chancellor water is 0.12 g/L); (6) The k{sub d} of the Pu and the beta emitters (fission products) between aqueous and colloidal phases in the Chancellor water is {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 3} mL/g using two different activity measurement techniques (LSC and alpha spectroscopy); (7) The gravitational settling and size distributions of the association colloids indicate that the properties (at least the physical ones) of the colloids to which the alpha emitters are associated with seem to be different that the properties of the colloids to which the beta emitters are associated with - the beta emitters are associated with very small particles ({approx}50 - 120 nm), while the alpha emitters are associated with relatively larger particles; and (8) The Chancellor water colloids are extremely stable under the natural pH and ionic strength conditions, indicating high potential for transport in the

  5. Analysis of colloids erosion from the bentonite barrier of a high level radioactive waste repository and implications in safety assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missana, Tiziana; Alonso, Ursula; Albarran, Nairoby; García-Gutiérrez, Miguel; Cormenzana, José-Luís

    To investigate the dominant mechanisms of colloid formation from compacted and confined bentonite innovative experiments were conducted. Chemical or physical processes that can affect the erosion of the bentonite surface were analyzed (ionic strength of the water, Ca in the water and in the exchange complex of the clay, dry density of the clay and presence of a water flow rate at the bentonite surface). Hydration, swelling and extrusion of clay into pores or fractures are primary steps for the formation of free colloidal particles in the aqueous phase, and the chemistry of the clay/water system is the most important parameter controlling the generation and stability of colloids. Ca-bentonite formed colloids quantities below the detection limit of our techniques, even in deionised water, but a percentage of Na approximately 20-30% in the clay exchange complex, as that present in the FEBEX bentonite, is enough to allow the formation of colloidal particles in quantities very similar to those produced by the Na-bentonite. The results for bentonite colloid generation obtained at a laboratory scale allowed the estimation of a range of colloid generation rates under different chemical conditions. Results were compared with in situ experimental investigations carried out at the FEBEX gallery emplaced in a granite massif at the Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland). The quantitative analysis of laboratory and in situ data can be used as input for models and performance assessment (PA) of high level radioactive waste (HLRW) repositories.

  6. Designing Colloidal Molecules with Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bingqing; Ricouvier, Joshua; Malloggi, Florent

    2016-01-01

    The creation of new colloidal materials involves the design of functional building blocks. Here, a microfluidic method for designing building blocks one by one, at high throughput, with a broad range of shapes is introduced. The method exploits a coupling between hydrodynamic interactions and depletion forces that controls the configurational dynamics of droplet clusters traveling in microfluidic channels. Droplet clusters can be solidified in situ with UV. By varying the flow parameters, clusters are prescribed a given size, geometry, chemical and/or magnetic heterogeneities enabling local bonding. Compact structures (chains, triangles, diamonds, tetrahedrons,...) and noncompact structures, such as crosses and T, difficult to obtain with current techniques are produced. Size dispersions are small (2%) and throughputs are high (30 000 h−1). The work opens a new pathway, based on microfluidics, for designing colloidal building blocks with a potential to enable the creation of new materials. PMID:27840804

  7. Biaxial ferromagnetic liquid crystal colloids

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingkun; Ackerman, Paul J.; Lubensky, Tom C.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-01-01

    The design and practical realization of composite materials that combine fluidity and different forms of ordering at the mesoscopic scale are among the grand fundamental science challenges. These composites also hold a great potential for technological applications, ranging from information displays to metamaterials. Here we introduce a fluid with coexisting polar and biaxial ordering of organic molecular and magnetic colloidal building blocks exhibiting the lowest symmetry orientational order. Guided by interactions at different length scales, rod-like organic molecules of this fluid spontaneously orient along a direction dubbed “director,” whereas magnetic colloidal nanoplates order with their dipole moments parallel to each other but pointing at an angle to the director, yielding macroscopic magnetization at no external fields. Facile magnetic switching of such fluids is consistent with predictions of a model based on competing actions of elastic and magnetic torques, enabling previously inaccessible control of light. PMID:27601668

  8. Predicting crystals of Janus colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissers, Teun; Preisler, Zdeněk; Smallenburg, Frank; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Sciortino, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    We present a numerical study on the phase diagram for a simple model of Janus colloids, including ordered and disordered structures. Using a range of techniques, we generate a set of crystal structures and investigate their relative stability field in the pressure-temperature and temperature-density planes by means of free-energy calculations and thermodynamic integration schemes. We find that despite the Janus colloids' simple architecture, they form stable crystal structures with complicated bond-topologies on an underlying face-centered-cubic or hexagonal-close-packed lattice. In addition, we find a phase consisting of wrinkled bilayer sheets, competing with both the fluid and the crystal phases. We detect a metastable gas-liquid coexistence which displays a micellization-driven re-entrant behavior.

  9. Electrokinetic properties of polymer colloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micale, F. J.; Fuenmayor, D. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The surface of polymer colloids, especially polystyrene latexes, were modified for the purpose of controlling the electrokinetic properties of the resulting colloids. Achievement required a knowledge of electrical double layer charging mechanism, as a function of the electrolyte conditions, at the polymer/water interface. The experimental approach is to control the recipe formulation in the emulsion polymerization process so as to systematically vary the strong acid group concentration on the surface of the polymer particles. The electrophoretic mobility of these model particles will then be measured as a function of surface group concentration and as a function of electrolyte concentration and type. An effort was also made to evaluate the electrophoretic mobility of polystyrene latexes made in space and to compare the results with latexes made on the ground.

  10. Colloids at Curved Fluid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebe, Kathleen

    2016-11-01

    Fluid interfaces are remarkable sites for colloidal assembly. When a colloid attaches to a fluid interface, it distorts a region around it; this distortion has an associated capillary energy, the product of its area and interfacial tension. The particle's capillary energy depends on the local interface curvature. By molding the interface, we can define curvature fields that drive microparticles along pre-determined paths. This example captures the emergent nature of the interactions. We discuss curvature fields as analogues to external electro-magnetic fields, and define curvatures that drive particles to well-defined locations, and to equilibrium sites far from boundaries. Particle-particle and particle-curvature interactions can guide particles into structures via interaction among many particles. This work demonstrates the potential importance of curvature capillary interactions in schemes to make reconfigurable materials, since interfaces and their associated capillary energy landscapes can be readily reconfigured. Analogies in other soft systems will be described. Support acknowledged from NSF DMR 1607878.

  11. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  12. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Fayolle, Sébastien; Bickel, Thomas; Würger, Alois

    2008-04-01

    Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  13. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, L.; Kaplan, C. Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-11-01

    Evaporating suspensions of colloidal particles lead to the formation of a variety of patterns, ranging from rings left behind a coffee drop to periodic bands or uniform solid films deposited on a substrate suspended vertically in a container of the colloidal solution. To characterize the transition between different types of patterns, we develop minimal models of the liquid meniscus deformation due to the evaporation and colloidal deposition. A complementary multiphase model allows us to investigate the detailed dynamics of patterning in a drying solvent. This approach couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving liquid-air interface to the dynamics inside the suspension, i.e. the liquid flow, local variations of the particle concentration, and the propagation of the deposition front where the solute forms a wet, incompressible porous medium at high concentrations. The results of our theory are in good agreement with direct observations. This research was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) under Award FA9550-09-1-0669-DOD35CAP and the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology at Harvard University.

  14. Three-dimensional colloidal lithography.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hironori; Poteet, Austen; Zhang, Xu A; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2017-03-24

    Light interactions with colloidal particles can generate a variety of complex three-dimensional (3D) intensity patterns, which can be utilized for nanolithography. The study of particle-light interactions can add more types of intensity patterns by manipulating key factors. Here we investigate a novel 3D nanolithography technique using colloidal particles under two-beam coherent illuminations. The fabricated 3D nanostructures are hollow, nested within periodic structures, and possess multiple chamber geometry. The effects of incident angles and particle size on the fabricated nanostructures were examined. The relative phase shift between particle position and interference pattern is identified as another significant parameter influencing the resultant nanostructures. A numerical model has been developed to show the evolution of nanostructure geometry with phase shifts, and experimental studies confirm the simulation results. Through the introduction of single colloidal particles, the fabrication capability of Lloyd's mirror interference can now be extended to fabrication of 3D nanostructure with complex shell geometry. The fabricated hollow nanostructures with grating background could find potential applications in the area of photonics, drug delivery, and nanofluidics.

  15. Three-dimensional colloidal lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Hironori; Poteet, Austen; Zhang, Xu A.; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2017-03-01

    Light interactions with colloidal particles can generate a variety of complex three-dimensional (3D) intensity patterns, which can be utilized for nanolithography. The study of particle–light interactions can add more types of intensity patterns by manipulating key factors. Here we investigate a novel 3D nanolithography technique using colloidal particles under two-beam coherent illuminations. The fabricated 3D nanostructures are hollow, nested within periodic structures, and possess multiple chamber geometry. The effects of incident angles and particle size on the fabricated nanostructures were examined. The relative phase shift between particle position and interference pattern is identified as another significant parameter influencing the resultant nanostructures. A numerical model has been developed to show the evolution of nanostructure geometry with phase shifts, and experimental studies confirm the simulation results. Through the introduction of single colloidal particles, the fabrication capability of Lloyd’s mirror interference can now be extended to fabrication of 3D nanostructure with complex shell geometry. The fabricated hollow nanostructures with grating background could find potential applications in the area of photonics, drug delivery, and nanofluidics.

  16. Colloid transport and retention in fractured deposits. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.; Reimus, P.; Ibaraki, Motomu; Wells, M.J.M.; McKay, L.

    1997-09-01

    dealing with theoretical descriptions of colloid transport in fractures, transport studies at three spatial scales (simple one-dimensional fractures, laboratory columns of intact geological material, and field-scale colloid tracer studies), and computer modeling of colloid transport processes. A continuing iteration among all tasks and experimental scales is envisioned throughout the project. Predictions based on laboratory experiments in simplified artificial fracture systems will be tested in column and field studies, and, likewise, hypothesized interpretations of the results of the column or field studies will be tested and verified in additional laboratory studies. Experimental efforts at all scales will begin with simple binary comparisons (e.g., large vs small colloids with similar surface chemistry), and proceed with increasing complexity (e.g., varying surface properties of colloids or fractures) as understanding is developed. It is only through this parallel iteration at different scales that predictions based on laboratory understanding can be tested in column and in field studies so that additional research-can be conducted to resolve observations that were not consistent with the earlier descriptions of controlling processes.'

  17. Crystallization of DNA-coated colloids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Yodh, Jeremy S.; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-coated colloids hold great promise for self-assembly of programmed heterogeneous microstructures, provided they not only bind when cooled below their melting temperature, but also rearrange so that aggregated particles can anneal into the structure that minimizes the free energy. Unfortunately, DNA-coated colloids generally collide and stick forming kinetically arrested random aggregates when the thickness of the DNA coating is much smaller than the particles. Here we report DNA-coated colloids that can rearrange and anneal, thus enabling the growth of large colloidal crystals from a wide range of micrometre-sized DNA-coated colloids for the first time. The kinetics of aggregation, crystallization and defect formation are followed in real time. The crystallization rate exhibits the familiar maximum for intermediate temperature quenches observed in metallic alloys, but over a temperature range smaller by two orders of magnitude, owing to the highly temperature-sensitive diffusion between aggregated DNA-coated colloids. PMID:26078020

  18. Nanostructured colloidal crystals from forced hydrolysis methods.

    PubMed

    Otal, Eugenio H; Granada, Mara; Troiani, Horacio E; Cánepa, Horacio; Walsöe de Reca, Noemí E

    2009-08-18

    In this work, an original route for ZnO nanostructured spherical colloids and their assembly into colloidal crystals are presented. The temporal evolution of crystal size and shape was followed by X-ray diffraction and the colloids size distribution by scanning electron microscopy. These spherical colloids showed a change in their size dispersion with aging time. Early stage suspensions, with a narrow size distribution, were settled to the bottom and dried with a slow evaporation rate to obtain colloidal crystals. This original route provides a new material for future applications in opalline photonic crystals, with a dielectric constant higher than that of classical materials (silica and latex). Moreover, this route means an improvement of previously reported data from the literature since it involves a one-pot strategy and room-temperature colloid assembly.

  19. Crystallization of DNA-coated colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xiaolong; Ducrot, Étienne; Yodh, Jeremy S.; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J.

    2015-06-01

    DNA-coated colloids hold great promise for self-assembly of programmed heterogeneous microstructures, provided they not only bind when cooled below their melting temperature, but also rearrange so that aggregated particles can anneal into the structure that minimizes the free energy. Unfortunately, DNA-coated colloids generally collide and stick forming kinetically arrested random aggregates when the thickness of the DNA coating is much smaller than the particles. Here we report DNA-coated colloids that can rearrange and anneal, thus enabling the growth of large colloidal crystals from a wide range of micrometre-sized DNA-coated colloids for the first time. The kinetics of aggregation, crystallization and defect formation are followed in real time. The crystallization rate exhibits the familiar maximum for intermediate temperature quenches observed in metallic alloys, but over a temperature range smaller by two orders of magnitude, owing to the highly temperature-sensitive diffusion between aggregated DNA-coated colloids.

  20. Does colloid shape affect detachment of colloids by a moving air-water interface?

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L; Davis, Howard P

    2013-05-14

    Air-water interfaces interact strongly with colloidal particles by capillary forces. The magnitude of the interaction force depends on, among other things, the particle shape. Here, we investigate the effects of particle shape on colloid detachment by a moving air-water interface. We used hydrophilic polystyrene colloids with four different shapes (spheres, barrels, rods, and oblong disks), but otherwise identical surface properties. The nonspherical shapes were created by stretching spherical microspheres on a film of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The colloids were then deposited onto the inner surface of a glass channel. An air bubble was introduced into the channel and passed through, thereby generating a receding followed by an advancing air-water interface. The detachment of colloids by the air-water interfaces was visualized with a confocal microscope, quantified by image analysis, and analyzed statistically to determine significant differences. For all colloid shapes, the advancing air-water interface caused pronounced colloid detachment (>63%), whereas the receding interface was ineffective in colloid detachment (<1.5%). Among the different colloid shapes, the barrels were most readily removed (94%) by the advancing interface, followed by the spheres and oblong disks (80%) and the rods (63%). Colloid detachment was significantly affected by colloid shape. The presence of an edge, as it occurs in a barrel-shaped colloid, promoted colloid detachment because the air-water interface is being pinned at the edge of the colloid. This suggests that the magnitude of colloid mobilization and transport in porous media is underestimated for edged particles and overestimated for rodlike particles when a sphere is used as a model colloid.

  1. Dynamic Colloidal Stabilization by Nanoparticle Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanikas, S.; Louis, A. A.

    2004-12-01

    We explore the conditions under which colloids can be stabilized by the addition of smaller particles. The largest repulsive barriers between colloids occur when the added particles repel each other with soft interactions, leading to an accumulation near the colloid surfaces. At lower densities these layers of mobile particles (nanoparticle halos) result in stabilization, but when too many are added, the interactions become attractive again. We systematically study these effects—accumulation repulsion, reentrant attraction, and bridging—by accurate integral equation techniques.

  2. Transformative Colloidal Nanomaterials for Mid- Infrared Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-11

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The grant focused on the Photoluminescence efficiency of HgTe colloidal quantum dots. The photoluminescence quantum yield...of HgTe colloidal quantum dots was measured from 1800 to 6500 cm-1 . There is a steep drop at low energy consistent with the generic gap law...Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Transformative Colloidal Nanomaterials for Mid- Infrared Devices The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this

  3. Binodal Colloidal Aggregation Test - 4: Polydispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaikin, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Binodal Colloidal Aggregation Test - 4: Polydispersion (BCAT-4-Poly) will use model hard-spheres to explore seeded colloidal crystal nucleation and the effects of polydispersity, providing insight into how nature brings order out of disorder. Crewmembers photograph samples of polymer and colloidal particles (tiny nanoscale spheres suspended in liquid) that model liquid/gas phase changes. Results will help scientists develop fundamental physics concepts previously cloaked by the effects of gravity.

  4. Thermophoresis of colloids by mesoscale simulations.

    PubMed

    Lüsebrink, Daniel; Yang, Mingcheng; Ripoll, Marisol

    2012-07-18

    The motion of a colloid induced by a temperature gradient is simulated by means of multiparticle collision dynamics, a mesoscale simulation technique. Two algorithms to quantify the thermophoretic behavior are employed and contrasted. The validity of the methods is verified as a function of the temperature gradient, system size, and algorithm parameters. The variation of the solvent-colloid interaction from attractive to purely repulsive interestingly results in the change of the colloid behavior from thermophobic to thermophilic.

  5. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test Conducted on Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Monica I.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1999-01-01

    Colloids are tiny (submicron) particles suspended in fluid. Paint, ink, and milk are examples of colloids found in everyday life. The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test (BCAT) is part of an extensive series of experiments planned to investigate the fundamental properties of colloids so that scientists can make colloids more useful for technological applications. Some of the colloids studied in BCAT are made of two different sized particles (binary colloidal alloys) that are very tiny, uniform plastic spheres. Under the proper conditions, these colloids can arrange themselves in a pattern to form crystals. These crystals may form the basis of new classes of light switches, displays, and optical devices. Windows made of liquid crystals are already in the marketplace. These windows change their appearance from transparent to opaque when a weak electric current is applied. In the future, if the colloidal crystals can be made to control the passage of light through them, such products could be made much more cheaply. These experiments require the microgravity environment of space because good quality crystals are difficult to produce on Earth because of sedimentation and convection in the fluid. The BCAT experiment hardware included two separate modules for two different experiments. The "Slow Growth" hardware consisted of a 35-mm camera with a 250- exposure photo film cartridge. The camera was aimed toward the sample module, which contained 10 separate colloid samples. A rack of small lights provided backlighting for the photographs. The BCAT hardware was launched on the shuttle and was operated aboard the Russian space station Mir by American astronauts John Blaha and David Wolf (launched September 1996 and returned January 1997; reflown September 1997 and returned January 1998). To begin the experiment, one of these astronauts would mix the samples to disperse the colloidal particles and break up any crystals that might have already formed. Once the samples were mixed and

  6. Effect of aggregation kinetics on the thermal conductivity of nanoscale colloidal solutions (nanofluid).

    PubMed

    Prasher, Ravi; Phelan, Patrick E; Bhattacharya, Prajesh

    2006-07-01

    The thermal conductivity, k, of nanoscale colloidal suspensions (also known as nanofluid), consisting of nanoparticles suspended in a base liquid, is much higher than the thermal conductivity of the base liquid at very small volume fractions of the nanoparticles. However, experimental results from various groups all across the world have shown various anomalies such as a peak in the enhancement of k with respect to nanoparticle size, an increase as well as a decrease in the ratio of k of these colloidal solutions with the k of the base fluid with increasing temperature, and a dependence of k on pH and time. In this paper, the aggregation kinetics of nanoscale colloidal solutions are combined with the physics of thermal transport to capture the effects of aggregation on k. Results show that the observed anomalies reported in experimental work can be well described by taking aggregation kinetics into account. Finally, we show that colloidal chemistry plays a significant role in deciding the k of colloidal nanosuspensions.

  7. Colloid Titration--A Rapid Method for the Determination of Charged Colloid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ueno, Keihei; Kina, Ken'yu

    1985-01-01

    "Colloid titration" is a volumetric method for determining charged polyelectrolytes in aqueous solutions. The principle of colloid titration, reagents used in the procedure, methods of endpoint detection, preparation of reagent solutions, general procedure used, results obtained, and pH profile of colloid titration are considered. (JN)

  8. Collective motion in populations of colloidal bots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Denis

    One of the origins of active matter physics was the idea that flocks, herds, swarms and shoals could be quantitatively described as emergent ordered phases in self-driven materials. From a somehow dual perspective, I will show how to engineer active materials our of colloidal flocks. I will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors and how to handle them in microfluidic chips. These populations of colloidal bots display a non-equilibrium transition toward collective motion. A special attention will be paid to the robustness of the resulting colloidal flocks with respect to geometrical frustration and to quenched disorder.

  9. Colloid Coalescence with Focused X Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Kim, J. T.; Je, J. H.; Yi, J. M.; Wang, S.; Lee, W.-K.

    2011-07-01

    We show direct evidence that focused x rays enable us to merge polymer colloidal particles at room temperature. This phenomenon is ascribed to the photochemical scission of colloids with x rays, reducing the molecular weight, glass transition temperature, surface tension, and viscosity of colloids. The observation of the neck bridge growth with time shows that the x-ray-induced colloid coalescence is analogous to viscoelastic coalescence. This finding suggests a feasible protocol of photonic nanofabrication by sintering or welding of polymers, without thermal damage, using x-ray photonics.

  10. Gold Nanocups: Colloidal Gold Nanocups with Orientation-Dependent Plasmonic Properties (Adv. Mater. 30/2016).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruibin; Qin, Feng; Liu, Yejing; Ling, Xing Yi; Guo, Jun; Tang, Minghua; Cheng, Si; Wang, Jianfang

    2016-08-01

    On page 6322, J. F. Wang and co-workers report a wet-chemistry method for the preparation of colloidal Au nanocups and their plasmonic properties. The Au nanocups are prepared through single-vertex-initiated Au deposition on PbS nano-octahedrons and subsequent selective dissolution of PbS. Owing to the orientation-dependent coupling strengths, the obtained Au nanocups display orientation-dependent plasmonic properties and Raman enhancements when deposited on substrates.

  11. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, Alfred E.; Huggins, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the outer envelopes of cool evolved stars has become an active area of research. The physical properties of CS envelopes are presented. Observations of many wavelengths bands are relevant. A summary of observations and a discussion of theoretical considerations concerning the chemistry are summarized. Recent theoretical considerations show that the thermal equilibrium model is of limited use for understanding the chemistry of the outer CS envelopes. The theoretical modeling of the chemistry of CS envelopes provides a quantitive test of chemical concepts which have a broader interest than the envelopes themselves.

  12. Effects of precipitation events on colloids in a karst aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevenell, Lisa; McCarthy, John F.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of precipitation events on colloid mobilization were evaluated during several storms from six wells in a karstic aquifer at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in eastern Tennessee (USA). Turbidity increases and rapidly recedes following rain events. Although the magnitude of the turbidity increases are relatively small (≤4.78 NTU), the increased turbidity suggests transient increases in colloid abundance during storm versus non-storm periods. During the larger storms (>19 mm), the increased turbidity is associated with increases in pH, total organic carbon (TOC) and temperature, and with decreases in dissolved oxygen (DO). These larger storms result in flushing of a greater proportion of higher pH, TOC (and lower DO) soil or matrix waters into the fractures and conduits than occurs during smaller storms. Smaller storms also result in increases in turbidity, but show increases in DO and decreases in pH reflecting less influence on the water chemistry from the longer residence time epikarst or and matrix waters, and greater impact from the more dilute, newly recharged waters. Due to the complexity of karst flow and temporal variations in flow and chemistry, controls on turbidity are not consistent through time and space at the wells. During smaller storms, recharge by lower ionic strength waters may promote colloid release and thus contribute to observed increases in turbidity. During larger storms, elevated turbidity may be more related to pH increases resulting from greater influx of matrix and soil waters into fractures and conduits. Chemical factors alone cannot account for the changes in turbidity observed during the various storms. Because of the complicated nature of flow and particle transport in karst aquifers, the presence of colloids during precipitation events is dictated by a complex interplay of chemical reactions and the effects of physical perturbations due to increased flow through the conduits and fractures. Simple trends in water quality

  13. Colloids and organic matter complexation control trace metal concentration-discharge relationships in Marshall Gulch stream waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trostle, Kyle D.; Ray Runyon, J.; Pohlmann, Michael A.; Redfield, Shelby E.; Pelletier, Jon; McIntosh, Jennifer; Chorover, Jon

    2016-10-01

    This study combined concentration-discharge analyses (filtration at 0.45 μm), cascade filtrations (at 1.2, 0.4, and 0.025 μm) and asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation (AF4) to probe the influence of colloidal carriers (dissolved organic matter and inorganic nanoparticles) on observed concentration-discharge relationships for trace metals in a 155 ha forested catchment of the Santa Catalina Mountains Critical Zone Observatory (SCM CZO), Arizona. Many major elements (Na, Mg, Si, K, Ca) show no colloidal influence, and concentration-discharge relationships for these species are explained by previous work. However, the majority of trace metals (Al, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Cu, Y, REE, U) show at least some influence of colloids on chemistry when filtered at the standard 0.45 μm cutoff. Concentration-discharge slopes of trace metals with modest colloidal influence are shallow (˜0.3) similar to that measured for dissolved organic carbon (DOC, 0.24), whereas elements with greater colloidal influence have steeper concentration-discharge slopes approaching that of Al (0.76), the element with the largest colloidal influence in this study (on average 68%). These findings are further supported by AF4 measurements that show distinct and resolvable pools of low hydrodynamic diameter DOC-sized material coexistent with larger diameter inorganic colloids, and the ratio of these carriers changes systematically with discharge because the DOC pool has a concentration-discharge relationship with shallower slope than the inorganic colloidal pool. Together these data sets illustrate that positive concentration-discharge slopes of trace metals in stream waters may be explained as the relative partitioning of trace metals between DOC and inorganic colloids, with contributions of the latter likely increasing as a result of increased prevalence of macropore flow.

  14. Colloid transport in unsaturated porous media: the role of water content and ionic strength on particle straining.

    PubMed

    Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A; van Genuchten, Martinus Th; Walker, Sharon L

    2008-02-19

    Packed column and mathematical modeling studies were conducted to explore the influence of water saturation, pore-water ionic strength, and grain size on the transport of latex microspheres (1.1 microm) in porous media. Experiments were carried out under chemically unfavorable conditions for colloid attachment to both solid-water interfaces (SWI) and air-water interfaces (AWI) using negatively charged and hydrophilic colloids and modifying the solution chemistry with a bicarbonate buffer to pH 10. Interaction energy calculations and complementary batch experiments were conducted and demonstrated that partitioning of colloids to the SWI and AWI was insignificant across the range of the ionic strengths considered. The breakthrough curve and final deposition profile were measured in each experiment indicating colloid retention was highly dependent on the suspension ionic strength, water content, and sand grain size. In contrast to conventional filtration theory, most colloids were found deposited close to the column inlet, and hyper-exponential deposition profiles were observed. A mathematical model, accounting for time- and depth-dependent straining, produced a reasonably good fit for both the breakthrough curves and final deposition profiles. Experimental and modeling results suggest that straining--the retention of colloids in low velocity regions of porous media such as grain junctions--was the primary mechanism of colloid retention under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The extent of stagnant regions of flow within the pore structure is enhanced with decreasing water content, leading to a greater amount of retention. Ionic strength also contributes to straining, because the number of colloids that are held in the secondary energy minimum increases with ionic strength. These weakly associated colloids are prone to be translated to stagnation regions formed at grain-grain junctions, the solid-water-air triple point, and dead-end pores and then becoming

  15. Catalytic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach for making chemistry relevant to everyday life. Involves the study of kinetics using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by vegetable juices. Allows students to design and carry out experiments and then draw conclusions from their results. (JRH)

  16. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  17. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Several ideas are proposed for chemistry teachers to try in their classrooms. Subjects included are polymerization of acrylate, polymerization of styrene, conductivity, pollution, preparation of chlorine, redox equations, chemiluminescence, and molecular sieves. (PS)

  18. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  19. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  20. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  1. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media.

    PubMed

    Leij, Feike J; Bradford, Scott A

    2013-07-01

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the increased risks for disease caused by microorganisms and colloid-associated contaminants. This study presents a model for colloid transport in dual-permeability media that includes reversible and irreversible retention of colloids and first-order exchange between the aqueous phases of the two regions. The model may also be used to describe transport of other reactive solutes in dual-permeability media. Analytical solutions for colloid concentrations in aqueous and solid phases were obtained using Laplace transformation and matrix decomposition. The solutions proved convenient to assess the effect of model parameters on the colloid distribution. The analytical model was used to describe effluent concentrations for a bromide tracer and 3.2- or 1-μm-colloids that were observed after transport through a composite 10-cm long porous medium made up of a cylindrical lens or core of sand and a surrounding matrix with sand of a different grain size. The tracer data were described very well and realistic estimates were obtained for the pore-water velocity in the two flow domains. An accurate description was also achieved for most colloid breakthrough curves. Dispersivity and retention parameters were typically greater for the larger 3.2-μm-colloids while both reversible and irreversible retention rates tended to be higher for the finer sands than the coarser sand. The relatively small sample size and the complex flow pattern in the composite medium made it difficult to reach definitive conclusions regarding transport parameters for colloid transport.

  2. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  3. The hydrodynamics of colloidal gelation.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zsigmond; Wang, Gang; Swan, James

    2015-12-14

    Colloidal gels are formed during arrested phase separation. Sub-micron, mutually attractive particles aggregate to form a system spanning network with high interfacial area, far from equilibrium. Models for microstructural evolution during colloidal gelation have often struggled to match experimental results with long standing questions regarding the role of hydrodynamic interactions. In nearly all models, these interactions are neglected entirely. In the present work, we report simulations of gelation with and without hydrodynamic interactions between the suspended particles executed in HOOMD-blue. The disparities between these simulations are striking and mirror the experimental-theoretical mismatch in the literature. The hydrodynamic simulations agree with experimental observations, however. We explore a simple model of the competing transport processes in gelation that anticipates these disparities, and conclude that hydrodynamic forces are essential. Near the gel boundary, there exists a competition between compaction of individual aggregates which suppresses gelation and coagulation of aggregates which enhances it. The time scale for compaction is mildly slowed by hydrodynamic interactions, while the time scale for coagulation is greatly accelerated. This enhancement to coagulation leads to a shift in the gel boundary to lower strengths of attraction and lower particle concentrations when compared to models that neglect hydrodynamic interactions. Away from the gel boundary, differences in the nearest neighbor distribution and fractal dimension persist within gels produced by both simulation methods. This result necessitates a fundamental rethinking of how dynamic, discrete element models for gelation kinetics are developed as well as how collective hydrodynamic interactions influence the arrest of attractive colloidal dispersions.

  4. Corralled Colloids in Four Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Stephen; Kim, Minsu; Granick, Steve

    2008-03-01

    Three colloidal particles were placed in small corrals and the strong correlations between their translation and rotation were quantified using the optical anisotropy of MOON (Modulated Optical Nanoprobes) particles to simultaneously measure their translation and rotation in an optical microscope. This system represents the simplest system which can capture one of the relevant components of multi-body interactions, the fact that while two particles can freely rotate together (like gears), once a third particle (or gear) is added there is no universally favorable set of rotations. This simple multi-body system provides a paradigm of how rotation influences translation and vice-versa.

  5. Colloidal Electrolytes and the Critical Micelle Concentration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, L. G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes methods for determining the Critical Micelle Concentration of Colloidal Electrolytes; methods described are: (1) methods based on Colligative Properties, (2) methods based on the Electrical Conductivity of Colloidal Electrolytic Solutions, (3) Dye Method, (4) Dye Solubilization Method, and (5) Surface Tension Method. (BR)

  6. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Aspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaikin, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Aspheres (BCAT-5-Aspheres) experiment photographs initially randomized colloidal samples (tiny nanoscale spheres suspended in liquid) in microgravity to determine their resulting structure over time. BCAT-5-Aspheres will study the properties of concentrated systems of small particles when they are identical, but not spherical in microgravity..

  7. Colloid transport in dual-permeability media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been widely reported that colloids can travel faster and over longer distances in natural structured porous media than in uniform structureless media used in laboratory studies. The presence of preferential pathways for colloids in the subsurface environment is of concern because of the incre...

  8. Structural transitions in condensed colloidal virus phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Nathan; Barr, Steve; Udit, Andrew; Gutierrez, Leonardo; Nguyen, Thanh; Finn, M. G.; Luijten, Erik; Wong, Gerard

    2010-03-01

    Analogous to monatomic systems colloidal phase behavior is entirely determined by the interaction potential between particles. This potential can be tuned using solutes such as multivalent salts and polymers with varying affinity for the colloids to create a hierarchy of attractions. Bacteriophage viruses are a naturally occurring type of colloidal particle with characteristics difficult to achieve by laboratory synthesis. They are monodisperse, nanometers in size, and have heterogeneous surface charge distributions. We use the MS2 and Qbeta bacteriophages (diameters 27-28nm) to understand the interplay between different attraction mechanisms on nanometer-sized colloids. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) is used to characterize the inter-particle interaction between colloidal viruses using several polymer species and different salt types.

  9. Optical effects of charges in colloidal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Railing; Chung, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chih-Wei; Chiang, Hai-Pang; Leung, P. T.

    2017-04-01

    The optical response of charged polymeric and metallic colloids is investigated using effective medium theories for composite systems of nanoparticles. Based on the Bohren-Hunt theory for generalized Mie scattering from charged particles, an effective quasi-static dielectric function previously obtained is applied to the present study to characterize the response from the various colloidal particles. It is found that such effects are more prominent for polymeric and nonmetallic colloidal solutions in general. In addition, the effects of clustering among the colloidal particles are also studied via a fractal model available from the literature. Detailed numerical studies of the dependence of these effects on the amount of extraneous charge, as well as on the geometry and volume fraction of the colloidal particles are presented.

  10. Programmable colloidal molecules from sequential capillarity-assisted particle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Songbo; Leemann, Jessica; Buttinoni, Ivo; Isa, Lucio; Wolf, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of artificial nanostructured and microstructured materials which display structures and functionalities that mimic nature’s complexity requires building blocks with specific and directional interactions, analogous to those displayed at the molecular level. Despite remarkable progress in synthesizing “patchy” particles encoding anisotropic interactions, most current methods are restricted to integrating up to two compositional patches on a single “molecule” and to objects with simple shapes. Currently, decoupling functionality and shape to achieve full compositional and geometrical programmability remains an elusive task. We use sequential capillarity-assisted particle assembly which uniquely fulfills the demands described above. This is a new method based on simple, yet essential, adaptations to the well-known capillary assembly of particles over topographical templates. Tuning the depth of the assembly sites (traps) and the surface tension of moving droplets of colloidal suspensions enables controlled stepwise filling of traps to “synthesize” colloidal molecules. After deposition and mechanical linkage, the colloidal molecules can be dispersed in a solvent. The template’s shape solely controls the molecule’s geometry, whereas the filling sequence independently determines its composition. No specific surface chemistry is required, and multifunctional molecules with organic and inorganic moieties can be fabricated. We demonstrate the “synthesis” of a library of structures, ranging from dumbbells and triangles to units resembling bar codes, block copolymers, surfactants, and three-dimensional chiral objects. The full programmability of our approach opens up new directions not only for assembling and studying complex materials with single-particle-level control but also for fabricating new microscale devices for sensing, patterning, and delivery applications. PMID:27051882

  11. Programmable colloidal molecules from sequential capillarity-assisted particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Ni, Songbo; Leemann, Jessica; Buttinoni, Ivo; Isa, Lucio; Wolf, Heiko

    2016-04-01

    The assembly of artificial nanostructured and microstructured materials which display structures and functionalities that mimic nature's complexity requires building blocks with specific and directional interactions, analogous to those displayed at the molecular level. Despite remarkable progress in synthesizing "patchy" particles encoding anisotropic interactions, most current methods are restricted to integrating up to two compositional patches on a single "molecule" and to objects with simple shapes. Currently, decoupling functionality and shape to achieve full compositional and geometrical programmability remains an elusive task. We use sequential capillarity-assisted particle assembly which uniquely fulfills the demands described above. This is a new method based on simple, yet essential, adaptations to the well-known capillary assembly of particles over topographical templates. Tuning the depth of the assembly sites (traps) and the surface tension of moving droplets of colloidal suspensions enables controlled stepwise filling of traps to "synthesize" colloidal molecules. After deposition and mechanical linkage, the colloidal molecules can be dispersed in a solvent. The template's shape solely controls the molecule's geometry, whereas the filling sequence independently determines its composition. No specific surface chemistry is required, and multifunctional molecules with organic and inorganic moieties can be fabricated. We demonstrate the "synthesis" of a library of structures, ranging from dumbbells and triangles to units resembling bar codes, block copolymers, surfactants, and three-dimensional chiral objects. The full programmability of our approach opens up new directions not only for assembling and studying complex materials with single-particle-level control but also for fabricating new microscale devices for sensing, patterning, and delivery applications.

  12. Gel trapping of dense colloids.

    PubMed

    Laxton, Peter B; Berg, John C

    2005-05-01

    Phase density differences in sols, foams, or emulsions often lead to sedimentation or creaming, causing problems for materials where spatial uniformity over extended periods of time is essential. The problem may be addressed through the use of rheology modifiers in the continuous phase. Weak polymer gels have found use for this purpose in the food industry where they appear to be capable of trapping dispersoid particles in a three-dimensional matrix while displaying water-like viscosities at low shear. Attempts to predict sedimentation stability in terms of particle properties (size, shape, density difference) and gel yield stress have led to qualitative success for suspensions of large particles. The effect of particle size, however, in particular the case in which colloidal dimensions are approached, has not been investigated. The present work seeks to determine useful stability criteria for colloidal dispersions in terms of readily accessible viscoelastic descriptors. Results are reported for systems consisting of 12 microm poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres dispersed in aqueous gellan gum. Monovalent salt concentration is varied to control rheological properties, and sedimentation/centrifugation experiments are performed to determine dispersion stability. Necessary conditions for stability consist of a minimum yield stress together with a value of tan delta less than unity.

  13. Synthesis of substantially monodispersed colloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klabunde, Kenneth J. (Inventor); Stoeva, Savka (Inventor); Sorensen, Christopher (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of forming ligated nanoparticles of the formula Y(Z).sub.x where Y is a nanoparticle selected from the group consisting of elemental metals having atomic numbers ranging from 21-34, 39-52, 57-83 and 89-102, all inclusive, the halides, oxides and sulfides of such metals, and the alkali metal and alkaline earth metal halides, and Z represents ligand moieties such as the alkyl thiols. In the method, a first colloidal dispersion is formed made up of nanoparticles solvated in a molar excess of a first solvent (preferably a ketone such as acetone), a second solvent different than the first solvent (preferably an organic aryl solvent such as toluene) and a quantity of ligand moieties; the first solvent is then removed under vacuum and the ligand moieties ligate to the nanoparticles to give a second colloidal dispersion of the ligated nanoparticles solvated in the second solvent. If substantially monodispersed nanoparticles are desired, the second dispersion is subjected to a digestive ripening process. Upon drying, the ligated nanoparticles may form a three-dimensional superlattice structure.

  14. Kinetically guided colloidal structure formation

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Fabian M.; Bausch, Andreas R.

    2016-01-01

    The self-organization of colloidal particles is a promising approach to create novel structures and materials, with applications spanning from smart materials to optoelectronics to quantum computation. However, designing and producing mesoscale-sized structures remains a major challenge because at length scales of 10–100 μm equilibration times already become prohibitively long. Here, we extend the principle of rapid diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) to a multicomponent system of spherical colloidal particles to enable the rational design and production of finite-sized anisotropic structures on the mesoscale. In stark contrast to equilibrium self-assembly techniques, kinetic traps are not avoided but exploited to control and guide mesoscopic structure formation. To this end the affinities, size, and stoichiometry of up to five different types of DNA-coated microspheres are adjusted to kinetically control a higher-order hierarchical aggregation process in time. We show that the aggregation process can be fully rationalized by considering an extended analytical DLCA model, allowing us to produce mesoscopic structures of up to 26 µm in diameter. This scale-free approach can easily be extended to any multicomponent system that allows for multiple orthogonal interactions, thus yielding a high potential of facilitating novel materials with tailored plasmonic excitation bands, scattering, biochemical, or mechanical behavior. PMID:27444018

  15. In-Package Chemistry Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    E. Thomas

    2004-11-09

    breached but the drip shield remains intact, so all of the seepage flow is diverted from the waste package. The chemistry from the vapor influx case is used to determine the stability of colloids and the solubility of radionuclides available for transport by diffusion, and to determine the degradation rates for the waste forms. TSPA-LA uses the water influx case for the seismic scenario, where the waste package has been breached and the drip shield has been damaged such that seepage flow is actually directed into the waste package. The chemistry from the water influx case that is a function of the flow rate is used to determine the stability of colloids and the solubility of radionuclides available for transport by diffusion and advection, and to determine the degradation rates for the CSNF and HLW glass. TSPA-LA does not use this model for the igneous scenario. Outputs from the in-package chemistry model implemented inside TSPA-LA include pH, ionic strength, and total carbonate concentration. These inputs to TSPA-LA will be linked to the following principle factors: dissolution rates of the CSNF and HLWG, dissolved concentrations of radionuclides, and colloid generation.

  16. Engineering novel mesoscopic structures using DNA-programmed colloidal self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Anthony Ji

    Controlling interactions between colloidal suspensions has been a fascinating challenge both experimentally and theoretically. Three-dimensional colloidal crystals assembled from monodisperse colloidal particles have generated a significant interest because of their potential application as photonic band gap materials (PBG), chemical sensors, optical filters, and switches. DNA-mediated colloidal assembly offers a unique tool for controlling the range and magnitude of interparticle interaction to promote novel crystal formation. We try to delimit those conditions under which the DNA-mediated interaction gives rise to well-ordered 3-D colloidal crystals, as well as to discuss the applications, optimization, and ultimate limitations of such DNA-mediated particle self-assembly. There are many unknowns regarding the expected colloidal phase diagram and the strength and kinetics of the DNA-mediated interaction, as well as the nonspecific interactions between colloids with different surface chemistries. We start with the simplest case of one-component system, where every colloid has a DNA-mediated attraction to every other, since the phase behavior and kinetics of one-component dispersions is well understood from previous studies. We determine and model the temperature and DNA-density dependence of the self-assembly phase diagram and kinetics. We find that crystals only form with the sterically stabilized DNA-particles in a rather narrow range of temperatures and have acceptably fast nucleation and growth in a small range of grafted-DNA density. In addition, the phase behavior of binary alloy solid solutions is studied using the same sterically stabilized colloidal particles. A competition between DNA single-base mismatches is used to create energy penalties for the substitution of a few KBTs'. The minority species substitute into the crystal lattice when the pair interaction difference is a fraction of a K BT, however, they exclude from the growing crystal when the pair

  17. Plutonium and Cesium Colloid Mediated Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhalfa, H.; Dittrich, T.; Reimus, P. W.; Ware, D.; Erdmann, B.; Wasserman, N. L.; Abdel-Fattah, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Plutonium and cesium have been released to the environment at many different locations worldwide and are present in spent fuel at significant levels. Accurate understanding of the mechanisms that control their fate and transport in the environment is important for the management of contaminated sites, for forensic applications, and for the development of robust repositories for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. Plutonium, which can be present in the environment in multiple oxidations states and various chemical forms including amorphous oxy(hydr)oxide phases, adsorbs/adheres very strongly to geological materials and is usually immobile in all its chemical forms. However, when associated with natural colloids, it has the potential to migrate significant distances from its point of release. Like plutonium, cesium is not very mobile and tends to remain adhered to geological materials near its release point, although its transport can be enhanced by natural colloids. However, the reactivity of plutonium and cesium are very different, so their colloid-mediated transport might be significantly different in subsurface environments. In this study, we performed controlled experiments in two identically-prepared columns; one dedicated to Pu and natural colloid transport experiments, and the other to Cs and colloid experiments. Multiple flow-through experiments were conducted in each column, with the effluent solutions being collected and re-injected into the same column two times to examine the persistence and scaling behavior of the natural colloids, Pu and Cs. The data show that that a significant fraction of colloids were retained in the first elution through each column, but the eluted colloids collected from the first run transported almost conservatively in subsequent runs. Plutonium transport tracked natural colloids in the first run but deviated from the transport of natural colloids in the second and third runs. Cesium transport tracked natural

  18. A generalized description of aquatic colloidal interactions: The three-colloidal component approach

    SciTech Connect

    Buffle, J.; Wilkinson, K.J.; Stoll, S.; Filella, M.; Zhang, J.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes several possible interactions among the different types of organic and inorganic aquatic colloids, based on present knowledge of their size, electric charge, and conformation. The physico-chemical properties of the different groups of colloids are described. Emphasis is placed on the various types of organic components, including fulvic compounds. Subsequently, the role of each colloid class is discussed with respect to homoaggregation (aggregation within a given colloid class) and heteroaggregation (aggregation among different colloid types). On the basis of a synthesis of literature reports, microscopic observations of natural colloids, experimental results obtained with model systems, and numerical simulations, it is concluded that the formation of aggregates in aquatic systems can be understood by mainly considering the roles of three types of colloids: (1) compact inorganic colloids; (2) large, rigid biopolymers; and (3) either the soil-derived fulvic compounds or their equivalent in pelagic waters, aquagenic refractory organic matter. In most natural aquatic systems, the small fulvic compounds will stabilize the inorganic colloids whereas the rigid biopolymers will destabilize them. The concentration of stable colloids in a particular aquatic system will depend on the relative proportions of these three components.

  19. Fluid-fluid demixing curves for colloid-polymer mixtures in a random colloidal matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annunziata, Mario Alberto; Pelissetto, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    We study fluid-fluid phase separation in a colloid-polymer mixture adsorbed in a colloidal porous matrix close to the θ point. For this purpose we consider the Asakura-Oosawa model in the presence of a quenched matrix of colloidal hard spheres. We study the dependence of the demixing curve on the parameters that characterize the quenched matrix, fixing the polymer-to-colloid size ratio to 0.8. We find that, to a large extent, demixing curves depend only on a single parameter f, which represents the volume fraction which is unavailable to the colloids. We perform Monte Carlo simulations for volume fractions f equal to 40% and 70%, finding that the binodal curves in the polymer and colloid packing-fraction plane have a small dependence on disorder. The critical point instead changes significantly: for instance, the colloid packing fraction at criticality increases with increasing f. Finally, we observe for some values of the parameters capillary condensation of the colloids: a bulk colloid-poor phase is in chemical equilibrium with a colloid-rich phase in the matrix.

  20. Colloid Transport in Saturated Porous Media: Elimination of Attachment Efficiency in a New Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    Landkamer, Lee L.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2013-05-11

    A new colloid transport model is introduced that is conceptually simple but captures the essential features of complicated attachment and detachment behavior of colloids when conditions of secondary minimum attachment exist. This model eliminates the empirical concept of collision efficiency; the attachment rate is computed directly from colloid filtration theory. Also, a new paradigm for colloid detachment based on colloid population heterogeneity is introduced. Assuming the dispersion coefficient can be estimated from tracer behavior, this model has only two fitting parameters: (1) the fraction of colloids that attach irreversibly and (2) the rate at which reversibly attached colloids leave the surface. These two parameters were correlated to physical parameters that control colloid transport such as the depth of the secondary minimum and pore water velocity. Given this correlation, the model serves as a heuristic tool for exploring the influence of physical parameters such as surface potential and fluid velocity on colloid transport. This model can be extended to heterogeneous systems characterized by both primary and secondary minimum deposition by simply increasing the fraction of colloids that attach irreversibly.

  1. Colloidal quantum dots for low-cost MWIR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Anthony J.; Pimpinella, Richard E.; Grein, Christoph H.; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    Monodisperse suspensions of HgTe colloidal quantum dots (CQD) are readily synthesized with infrared energy gaps between 3 and 12 microns. Infrared photodetection using dried films of these CQDs has been demonstrated up to a wavelength of 12 microns, and HgTe CQD single-elemnet devices with 3.6 micron cutoff have bee nreported nad show ogod absorption <(10^4 cm^-1), response time and detectivity (2*10^10 Jones) at at emperature of 175 K; with the potential fo uncooled imaging. The synthesis of CQDs and fabrication of detector devices employ bench-top chemistry techniques, leading to the potential for rapid, wafer-scale manufacture of MWIR imaging devices with low production costs and overhead. The photoconductive, photovoltaic and optical properties of HgTe CQD films will be discussed relative to infrared imaging, along with recent achievements in integrating CQD films with readout integrated circuits to produce CQD-based MWIR focal plane arrays.

  2. Dendronized iron oxide colloids for imaging the sentinel lymph node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouhannaud, J.; Garofalo, A.; Felder-Flesch, D.; Pourroy, G.

    2015-03-01

    Various methods have been used in medicine for more than one century to explore the lymphatic system. Radioactive colloids (RuS labelled with 99mTc) or/and Vital Blue dye are injected around the primary tumour and detected by means of nuclear probe or visual colour inspection respectively. The simultaneous clinical use of both markers (dye and radionuclide) improves the sensitivity of detection close to 100%. Superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) are currently receiving much attention as strong T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents that can be potentially used for preoperative localization of sentinel nodes, but also for peroperative detection of sentinel node using hand-held probes. In that context, we present the elaboration of dendronized iron oxide nanoparticles elaborated at the Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Materials of Strasbourg.

  3. Colloid transport and retention in unsaturated porous media: effect of colloid input concentration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Morales, Verónica L; Cakmak, M Ekrem; Salvucci, Anthony E; Geohring, Larry D; Hay, Anthony G; Parlange, Jean-Yves; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2010-07-01

    Colloids play an important role in facilitating transport of adsorbed contaminants in soils. Recent studies showed that under saturated conditions colloid retention was a function of its concentration. It is unknown if this is the case under unsaturated conditions. In this study, the effect of colloid concentration on colloid retention was investigated in unsaturated columns by increasing concentrations of colloid influents with varying ionic strength. Colloid retention was observed in situ by bright field microscopy and quantified by measuring colloid breakthrough curves. In our unsaturated experiments, greater input concentrations resulted in increased colloid retention at ionic strength above 0.1 mM, but not in deionized water (i.e., 0 mM ionic strength). Bright field microscope images showed that colloid retention mainly occurred at the solid-water interface and wedge-shaped air-water-solid interfaces, whereas the retention at the grain-grain contacts was minor. Some colloids at the air-water-solid interfaces were rotating and oscillating and thus trapped. Computational hydrodynamic simulation confirmed that the wedge-shaped air-water-solid interface could form a "hydrodynamic trap" by retaining colloids in its low velocity vortices. Direct visualization also revealed that colloids once retained acted as new retention sites for other suspended colloids at ionic strength greater than 0.1 mM and thereby could explain the greater retention with increased input concentrations. Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) energy calculations support this concept. Finally, the results of unsaturated experiments were in agreement with limited saturated experiments under otherwise the same conditions.

  4. Polymer-Induced Depletion Interaction and Its Effect on Colloidal Sedimentation in Colloid-Polymer Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Penger

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the polymer-induced depletion attraction and its effect on colloidal sedimentation in colloid-polymer mixtures. We first report a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of the depletion effect in a mixture of hard-sphere-like colloid and non-adsorbing polymer. Then we present results of our recent sedimentation measurements in the same colloid-polymer mixture. A key parameter in controlling the sedimentation of heavy colloidal particles is the interparticle potential U(tau), which is the work required to bring two colloidal particles from infinity to a distance tau under a give solvent condition. This potential is known to affect the average settling velocity of the particles and experimentally one needs to have a way to continuously vary U(tau) in order to test the theory. The interaction potential U(tau) can be altered by adding polymer molecules into the colloidal suspension. In a mixture of colloid and non-adsorbing polymer, the potential U(tau) can develop an attractive well because of the depletion effect, in that the polymer chains are expelled from the region between two colloidal particles when their surface separation becomes smaller than the size of the polymer chains. The exclusion of polymer molecules from the space between the colloidal particles leads to an unbalanced osmotic pressure difference pushing the colloidal particles together, which results in an effective attraction between the two colloidal particles. The polymer-induced depletion attraction controls the phase stability of many colloid-polymer mixtures, which are directly of interest to industry.

  5. Photochemical manipulation of colloidal structures in liquid-crystal colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Tabe, Y.; Yokoyama, H.

    2007-05-01

    We investigated photochemical manipulation of physical properties and colloidal structures in liquid-crystal (LC) colloids containing azobenzene compounds. In a LC suspension where polymeric particles were dispersed in a host LC, we achieved photochemical control of light-scattering properties of the suspension. In a nematic phase, when the suspension was sandwiched with two glass plates, the film became opaque. This would be attributable to an appearance of both multidomain structures of LC alignment and mismatches of refractive indices between the materials. The opaque state turned into a transparent one when a nematic-to-isotropic phase transition was induced by the trans-to-cis photoisomerization of the azo-dye. This will result from a disappearance of both the multidomain structures and the refractive-index mismatches in the isotropic phase. The transparent film went back into the initial opaque film when the nematic phase was obtained by the cis-to-trans photoisomerization. In a LC emulsion in which glycerol or water droplets were dispersed in liquid crystals, we examined photochemical change of defect structures and inter-droplet distances by the photochemical manner. At the initial state, Saturn ring and hedgehog defects were formed around the droplets. For the glycerol droplets, we observed structural transformations between Saturn ring and boojums on irradiation with ultra-violet and visible light. For the water droplets, the inter-droplet distances varied by changing defect size on the irradiation. These phenomena would result from modulation of anchoring conditions of the droplets by the photoisomerization of the azo-dyes.

  6. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  7. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  8. Quantification of hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Nasholm, N.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Colloids play an important role in a wide variety of disciplines, including water and wastewater treatment, subsurface transport of metals and organic contaminants, migration of fines in oil reservoirs, biocolloid (virus and bacteria) transport in subsurface, and are integral to laboratory transport studies. Although the role of hydrophobicity in adhesion and transport of colloids, particularly bacteria, is well known; there is scarcity of literature regarding hydrophobicity measurement of non-bacterial colloids and other micron-sized particles. Here we detail an experimental approach based on differential partitioning of colloids between two liquid phases (hydrocarbon and buffer) as a measure of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids. This assay, known as Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons or MATH, is frequently used in microbiology and bacteriology for quantifying the hydrophobicity of microbes. Monodispersed colloids and particles, with sizes ranging from 1 micron to 33 micron, were used for the experiments. A range of hydrophobicity values were observed for different particles. The hydrophobicity results are also verified against water contact angle measurements of these particles. This liquid-liquid partitioning assay is quick, easy-to-perform and requires minimal instrumentation. Estimation of the hydrophobic interaction affinity of colloids would lead to a better understanding of their adhesion to different surfaces and subsequent transport in porous media.

  9. Structural evolution of Colloidal Gels under Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao; Jamali, Safa

    Colloidal suspensions are ubiquitous in different industrial applications ranging from cosmetic and food industries to soft robotics and aerospace. Owing to the fact that mechanical properties of colloidal gels are controlled by its microstructure and network topology, we trace the particles in the networks formed under different attraction potentials and try to find a universal behavior in yielding of colloidal gels. Many authors have implemented different simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and Brownian dynamics (BD) to capture better picture during phase separation and yielding mechanism in colloidal system with short-ranged attractive force. However, BD neglects multi-body hydrodynamic interactions (HI) which are believed to be responsible for the second yielding of colloidal gels. We envision using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) with modified depletion potential and hydrodynamic interactions, as a coarse-grain model, can provide a robust simulation package to address the gel formation process and yielding in short ranged-attractive colloidal systems. The behavior of colloidal gels with different attraction potentials under flow is examined and structural fingerprints of yielding in these systems will be discussed.

  10. [The colloid milium: An observation associated with trichinosis].

    PubMed

    Okhremchuk, Ilona; Abed, Safia; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Brandone, Nicolas; Morand, Jean-Jacques

    2016-04-01

    The colloid milium has four clinical forms: adult colloid milium, juvenile colloid milium, paracolloid (or nodular colloid degeneration) and pigmented colloid milium. We report the case of an adult colloid milium in a man of 56, who presented episodes of diffuse pruritus associated with myalgia and digestive disorders, indicative of trichinosis. He also developed gradually over the past 10 years, yellowish injuries in the mandibles and neck for whom histology objectified a colloid milium. Etiology and treatment are still unknown; association with a trichinosis is probably coincidental.

  11. Diffusiophoretic Focusing of Suspended Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Nan; Nery-Azevedo, Rodrigo; Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.; Squires, Todd M.

    2016-12-01

    Using a microfluidic system to impose and maintain controlled, steady-state multicomponent p H and electrolyte gradients, we present systems where the diffusiophoretic migration of suspended colloids leads them to focus at a particular position, even in steady-state gradients. We show that naively superpositing effects of each gradient may seem conceptually and qualitatively reasonable, yet is invalid due to the coupled transport of these multicomponent electrolytes. In fact, reformulating the classic theories in terms of the flux of each species (rather than local gradients) reveals rather stringent conditions that are necessary for diffusiophoretic focusing in steady gradients. Either particle surface properties must change as a function of local composition in solution (akin to isoelectric focusing in electrophoresis), or chemical reactions must occur between electrolyte species, for such focusing to be possible. The generality of these findings provides a conceptual picture for understanding, predicting, or designing diffusiophoretic systems.

  12. Oxyhydroxy Silicate Colloids: A New Type of Waterborne Actinide(IV) Colloids

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Stephan; Hennig, Christoph; Brendler, Vinzenz; Ikeda‐Ohno, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At the near‐neutral and reducing aquatic conditions expected in undisturbed ore deposits or in closed nuclear waste repositories, the actinides Th, U, Np, and Pu are primarily tetravalent. These tetravalent actinides (AnIV) are sparingly soluble in aquatic systems and, hence, are often assumed to be immobile. However, AnIV could become mobile if they occur as colloids. This review focuses on a new type of AnIV colloids, oxyhydroxy silicate colloids. We herein discuss the chemical characteristics of these colloids and the potential implication for their environmental behavior. The binary oxyhydroxy silicate colloids of AnIV could be potentially more mobile as a waterborne species than the well‐known mono‐component oxyhydroxide colloids. PMID:27957406

  13. Three-dimensional ultrasonic colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2016-05-01

    Colloidal assembly represents a powerful method for the fabrication of functional materials. In this article, we describe how acoustic radiation forces can guide the assembly of colloidal particles into structures that serve as microscopic elements in novel acoustic metadevices or act as phononic crystals. Using a simple three-dimensional orthogonal system, we show that a diversity of colloidal structures with orthorhombic symmetry can be assembled with megahertz-frequency (MHz) standing pressure waves. These structures allow rapid tuning of acoustic properties and provide a new platform for dynamic metamaterial applications.

  14. Transport in charged colloids driven by thermoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Würger, Alois

    2008-09-05

    We study the thermal diffusion coefficient D{T} of a charged colloid in a temperature gradient, and find that it is to a large extent determined by the thermoelectric response of the electrolyte solution. The thermally induced salinity gradient leads in general to a strong increase with temperature. The difference of the heat of transport of coions and counterions gives rise to a thermoelectric field that drives the colloid to the cold or to the warm, depending on the sign of its charge. Our results provide an explanation for recent experimental findings on thermophoresis in colloidal suspensions.

  15. Linear colloidal crystal arrays by electrohydrodynamic printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, H. F.; Saville, D. A.; Aksay, I. A.

    2008-09-01

    We use electrohydrodynamic jets of colloidal suspensions to produce arrays of colloidal crystalline stripes on surfaces. A critical factor in maintaining a stable jet is the distance of separation between the nozzle and the surface. Colloidal crystalline stripes are produced as two wetting lines of the deployed suspension merge during drying. To ensure that the two wetting lines merge, the "deployed-line-width" to "particle size" ratio is kept below a critical value so that the capillary forces overcome the frictional forces between the particles and the substrate.

  16. Food colloids research: historical perspective and outlook.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Eric

    2011-06-09

    Trends and past achievements in the field of food colloids are reviewed. Specific mention is made of advances in knowledge and understanding in the areas of (i) structure and rheology of protein gels, (ii) properties of adsorbed protein layers, (iii) functionality derived from protein-polysaccharide interactions, and (iv) oral processing of food colloids. Amongst ongoing experimental developments, the technique of particle tracking for monitoring local dynamics and microrheology of food colloids is highlighted. The future outlook offers exciting challenges with expected continued growth in research into digestion processes, encapsulation, controlled delivery, and nanoscience.

  17. Aggregation and Gelation of Anisometric Colloidal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohraz, Ali; Solomon, Michael J.

    2002-11-01

    The quiescent and flow-induced structure and dynamics of colloidal aggregates and gels of anisometric particles are studied by means of static and dynamic light scattering. Ground-based studies of weak gels are possible due to the submicron size of the boehmite rod suspensions investigated; however, microgravity conditions would be required for more general studies. The properties of colloidal rod suspensions are compared to typical properties of spherical particle gels to understand the role of anisotropic excluded volume on gel structure and dynamics. The structure and dynamics of colloidal aggregates and gels have long been of scientific and technological interest; however, most research has focused on suspensions of spherical particles. Yet, aggregates and gels of anisometric particles - colloidal rods and platelets - may exhibit structure and dynamics that are quite different from spherical colloids. For example, suspensions of colloidal rods gel at extremely low volume fractions and form birefringent sediments. The rheology of solutions and gels of colloidal rods and platelets differs dramatically from that of colloidal spheres. Scientifically, studies with anisometric particles offer the opportunity to assess the role of anisotropic excluded volume and particle orientation in aggregates and gels. Technologically, anisometric colloids find use in a wide range of materials such as ceramics, polymer nanocomposites, well-bore drilling fluids and magnetic storage media. Model colloidal boehmite rods of approximately monodisperse dimension and aspect ratio have been synthesized according to the method of Philipse and coworkers. In aqueous solution, these materials undergo gelation upon the addition of divalent salt. By means of a novel grafting reaction and procedure for solvent refractive index matching, the rods have also been dispersed in mixed organic solvents. In this case, gelation is induced by means of depletion interaction. We report the effect of

  18. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  19. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes several chemistry projects, including solubility, formula for magnesium oxide, dissociation of dinitrogen tetroxide, use of 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene, migration of ions, heats of neutralizations, use of pocket calculators, sonic cleaning, oxidation states of manganese, and cell potentials. Includes an extract from Chemical Age on…

  20. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the alkylation of aniline, the preparation and properties of perbromate, using scrap copper in chemistry instruction, a safe method of burning hydrogen, and the use of an ion-charge model as an alternative to the mole concept in secondary school instruction. (AL)

  1. Confectionary Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elise Hilf

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities and demonstrations that enable teachers to use various types of confections as tactile experiences to spark chemistry students' interest and generate enthusiasm for learning. Presents uses of candy in teaching about atomic structure, spontaneous nuclear decay, chemical formulas, fractoluminescence, the effect of a molecular…

  2. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and classroom materials/activities. These include: game for teaching ionic formulas; method for balancing equations; description of useful redox series; computer programs (with listings) for water electrolysis simulation and for determining chemical…

  4. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, experiments, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and information on a variety of chemistry topics including, for example, inert gases, light-induced reactions, calculators, identification of substituted acetophenones, the elements, analysis of copper minerals, extraction of metallic strontium, equilibrium, halogens, and…

  5. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes some laboratory apparatus, chemistry experiments and demonstrations, such as a Kofler block melting point apparatus, chromatographic investigation of the phosphoric acid, x-ray diffraction, the fountain experiment, endothermic sherbet, the measurement of viscosity, ionization energies and electronic configurations. (GA)

  6. A colloidal quantum dot spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jie; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2015-07-01

    Spectroscopy is carried out in almost every field of science, whenever light interacts with matter. Although sophisticated instruments with impressive performance characteristics are available, much effort continues to be invested in the development of miniaturized, cheap and easy-to-use systems. Current microspectrometer designs mostly use interference filters and interferometric optics that limit their photon efficiency, resolution and spectral range. Here we show that many of these limitations can be overcome by replacing interferometric optics with a two-dimensional absorptive filter array composed of colloidal quantum dots. Instead of measuring different bands of a spectrum individually after introducing temporal or spatial separations with gratings or interference-based narrowband filters, a colloidal quantum dot spectrometer measures a light spectrum based on the wavelength multiplexing principle: multiple spectral bands are encoded and detected simultaneously with one filter and one detector, respectively, with the array format allowing the process to be efficiently repeated many times using different filters with different encoding so that sufficient information is obtained to enable computational reconstruction of the target spectrum. We illustrate the performance of such a quantum dot microspectrometer, made from 195 different types of quantum dots with absorption features that cover a spectral range of 300 nanometres, by measuring shifts in spectral peak positions as small as one nanometre. Given this performance, demonstrable avenues for further improvement, the ease with which quantum dots can be processed and integrated, and their numerous finely tuneable bandgaps that cover a broad spectral range, we expect that quantum dot microspectrometers will be useful in applications where minimizing size, weight, cost and complexity of the spectrometer are critical.

  7. Microscale Chemistry and Green Chemistry: Complementary Pedagogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mono M.; Szafran, Zvi; Pike, R. M.

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes the complementary nature of microscale chemistry and green chemistry. Green chemistry emphasizes the concepts of atom economy, source reduction, pathway modification, solvent substitution, and pollution prevention as means of improving the environmental impact of industrial chemistry. Microscale chemistry serves as a tool for incorporating green chemistry ideas across the curriculum in educational institutions. Examples are drawn from microscale laboratory experiments to illustrate the pedagogic connection between the two areas.

  8. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides through the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B.; Zachara, John M.; McCarthy, John F.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2006-05-31

    This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of the role of colloids in facilitating the transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. We focus on three major thrusts: (1) thermodynamic stability and mobility of colloids formed by reactions of sediments with highly alkaline tank waste solutions, (2) colloid-contaminant interactions, and (3) in-situ colloid mobilization and colloid facilitated contaminant transport occurring in both contaminated and uncontaminated Hanford sediments.

  9. Polarity inversion of ζ-potential in concentrated colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla-Granados, Héctor M; Jiménez-Ángeles, Felipe; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2011-10-27

    A concentrated colloidal dispersion is studied by applying an integral equations theory to the colloidal primitive model fluid. Important effects, attributed to large size and charge and to the finite concentration of colloidal particles, are found. We observe a polarity inversion of ζ-potential for concentrated colloidal dispersions, while it is not present for a single colloidal particle at infinite dilution. An excellent qualitative agreement between our theoretical predictions and our computer simulations is observed.

  10. Colloidal Fouling of Nanofiltration Membranes: Development of a Standard Operating Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Al Mamun, Md Abdullaha; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Pernitsky, David; Sadrzadeh, Mohtada

    2017-01-01

    Fouling of nanofiltration (NF) membranes is the most significant obstacle to the development of a sustainable and energy-efficient NF process. Colloidal fouling and performance decline in NF processes is complex due to the combination of cake formation and salt concentration polarization effects, which are influenced by the properties of the colloids and the membrane, the operating conditions of the test, and the solution chemistry. Although numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the influence of these parameters on the performance of the NF process, the importance of membrane preconditioning (e.g., compaction and equilibrating with salt water), as well as the determination of key parameters (e.g., critical flux and trans-membrane osmotic pressure) before the fouling experiment have not been reported in detail. The aim of this paper is to present a standard experimental and data analysis protocol for NF colloidal fouling experiments. The developed methodology covers preparation and characterization of water samples and colloidal particles, pre-test membrane compaction and critical flux determination, measurement of experimental data during the fouling test, and the analysis of that data to determine the relative importance of various fouling mechanisms. The standard protocol is illustrated with data from a series of flat sheet, bench-scale experiments. PMID:28106775

  11. Flow-induced alignment of (100) fcc thin film colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Joy, Midhun; Muangnapoh, Tanyakorn; Snyder, Mark A; Gilchrist, James F

    2015-09-28

    The realization of structural diversity in colloidal crystals obtained by self-assembly techniques remains constrained by thermodynamic considerations and current limits on our ability to alter structure over large scales using imposed fields and confinement. In this work, a convective-based procedure to fabricate multi-layer colloidal crystal films with extensive square-like symmetry is enabled by periodic substrate motion imposed during the continuous assembly. The formation of film-spanning domains of (100) fcc symmetry as a result of added vibration is robust across a range of micron-scale monosized spherical colloidal suspensions (e.g., polystyrene, silica) as well as substrate surface chemistries (e.g., hydrophobic, hydrophilic). The generation of extensive single crystalline (100) fcc domains as large as 15 mm(2) and covering nearly 40% of the colloidal crystalline film is possible by simply tuning coating conditions and multi-layer film thickness. Preferential orientation of the square-packed domains with respect to the direction of deposition is attributed to domain generation based upon a shear-related mechanism. Visualization during assembly gives clues toward the mechanism of this flow-driven self-assembly method.

  12. Colloids in water from a subsurface fracture in granitic rock, Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, C.; Baeyens, B.; Goerlich, W.; Riga, J.; Verbist, J.; Stadelmann, P.

    1989-03-01

    The characterization of colloids from the Grimsel Test Site granitic groundwater has been carried out after concentrating the natural colloids by diaultrafiltration in situ and in the laboratory. A 2-year-long study has shown little variation in the chemistry of the Grimsel water ( T = 285 K, pH = 9.6) and a calculation of saturation indices indicates that quartz and fluorite are slightly oversaturated in the in situ conditions ( log P( CO2)/ atm. = -5.5). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigations indicate a colloid concentration of approximately 10 10 particles (40 to 1000 nm) per litre. On the basis electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS), and laser microprobe mass analysis (LAMMA), the particles are a mixture of organic (C, N, O, (S)) and inorganic (Si, Ca, S and to a lesser extent Mg, Sr and Ba) materials. The alpha specific activity in the colloidal phase is less than 0.5 mBq · 1 -1. The mode of formation is discussed together with the size distribution and the concentration.

  13. Colloidal Fouling of Nanofiltration Membranes: Development of a Standard Operating Procedure.

    PubMed

    Al Mamun, Md Abdullaha; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Pernitsky, David; Sadrzadeh, Mohtada

    2017-01-18

    Fouling of nanofiltration (NF) membranes is the most significant obstacle to the development of a sustainable and energy-efficient NF process. Colloidal fouling and performance decline in NF processes is complex due to the combination of cake formation and salt concentration polarization effects, which are influenced by the properties of the colloids and the membrane, the operating conditions of the test, and the solution chemistry. Although numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the influence of these parameters on the performance of the NF process, the importance of membrane preconditioning (e.g., compaction and equilibrating with salt water), as well as the determination of key parameters (e.g., critical flux and trans-membrane osmotic pressure) before the fouling experiment have not been reported in detail. The aim of this paper is to present a standard experimental and data analysis protocol for NF colloidal fouling experiments. The developed methodology covers preparation and characterization of water samples and colloidal particles, pre-test membrane compaction and critical flux determination, measurement of experimental data during the fouling test, and the analysis of that data to determine the relative importance of various fouling mechanisms. The standard protocol is illustrated with data from a series of flat sheet, bench-scale experiments.

  14. Quantum oscillations in magnetically doped colloidal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Ochsenbein, Stefan T; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2011-02-01

    Progress in the synthesis of colloidal quantum dots has recently provided access to entirely new forms of diluted magnetic semiconductors, some of which may find use in quantum computation. The usefulness of a spin qubit is defined by its Rabi frequency, which determines the operation time, and its coherence time, which sets the error correction window. However, the spin dynamics of magnetic impurity ions in colloidal doped quantum dots remain entirely unexplored. Here, we use pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to demonstrate long spin coherence times of ∼0.9 µs in colloidal ZnO quantum dots containing the paramagnetic dopant Mn(2+), as well as Rabi oscillations with frequencies ranging between 2 and 20 MHz depending on microwave power. We also observe electron spin echo envelope modulations of the Mn(2+) signal due to hyperfine coupling with protons outside the quantum dots, a situation unique to the colloidal form of quantum dots, and not observed to date.

  15. Luminol chemiluminescence catalysed by colloidal platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sheng-Liang; Cui, Hua

    2007-01-01

    Platinum colloids prepared by the reduction of hexachloroplatinic acid with citrate in the presence of different stabilizers were found to enhance the chemiluminescence (CL) of the luminol-H(2)O(2) system, and the most intensive CL signals were obtained with citrate-protected Pt colloids synthesized with citrate as both a reductant and a stabilizer. Light emission was intense and reproducible. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies were conducted before and after the CL reaction to investigate the possible CL enhancement mechanism. It is suggested that this CL enhancement is attributed to the catalysis of platinum nanoparticles, which could accelerate the electron-transfer process and facilitate the CL radical generation in aqueous solution. The effects of Pt colloids prepared by the hydroborate reduction were also investigated. The application of the luminol-H(2)O(2)-Pt colloids system was exploited for the determination of compounds such as uric acid, ascorbic acid, phenols and amino acids.

  16. Computer simulations of charged colloids in confinement.

    PubMed

    Puertas, Antonio M; de las Nieves, F Javier; Cuetos, Alejandro

    2015-02-15

    We study by computer simulations the interaction between two similarly charged colloidal particles confined between parallel planes, in salt free conditions. Both the colloids and ions are simulated explicitly, in a fine-mesh lattice, and the electrostatic interaction is calculated using Ewald summation in two dimensions. The internal energy is measured by setting the colloidal particles at a given position and equilibrating the ions, whereas the free energy is obtained introducing a bias (attractive) potential between the colloids. Our results show that upon confining the system, the internal energy decreases, resulting in an attractive contribution to the interaction potential for large charges and strong confinement. However, the loss of entropy of the ions is the dominant mechanism in the interaction, irrespective of the confinement of the system. The interaction potential is therefore repulsive in all cases, and is well described by the DLVO functional form, but effective values have to be used for the interaction strength and Debye length.

  17. A Course in Colloid and Surface Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scamehorn, John F.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a course for chemical engineers, chemists, and petroleum engineers that focuses on colloid and surface science. Major topic areas in the course include capillarity, surface thermodynamics, adsorption contact angle, micelle formation, solubilization in micelles, emulsions, foams, and applications. (JN)

  18. Self-similarity in active colloid motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constant, Colin; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    The self-similarity of displacements among randomly evolving systems has been used to describe the foraging patterns of animals and predict the growth of financial systems. At micron scales, the motion of colloidal particles can be analyzed by sampling their spatial displacement in time. For self-similar systems in equilibrium, the mean squared displacement increases linearly in time. However, external forces can take the system out of equilibrium, creating active colloidal systems, and making this evolution more complex. A moment scaling spectrum of the distribution of particle displacements quantifies the degree of self-similarity in the colloid motion. We will demonstrate that, by varying the temporal and spatial characteristics of the external forces, one can control the degree of self-similarity in active colloid motion.

  19. Thin film interference of colloidal thin films.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hailin; Cao, Weixiao

    2004-09-14

    A stairlike colloidal crystal thin film composed of poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate-acrylic acid) (P(St-MMA-AA)) monodispersed colloids was fabricated on an inclined silicon substrate. Different bright colors were observed on the various parts of the film with different layers as white light irradiated perpendicularly on it. The relationship between the colors and layers of the film was investigated and discussed according to the principle of thin film interference. On the basis of the phenomenon of thin film interference, a one-layer colloidal film having uniform color was researched and it would display diverse colors before and after swollen by styrene (St). A circular stairlike colloidal film was achieved to mimic the colors of the peacock tail feather.

  20. Hemorrhagic Colloid Cyst Presenting with Acute Hydrocephaly

    PubMed Central

    Akhavan, Reza; Zandi, Behrouz; Pezeshki-Rad, Masoud; Farrokh, Donya

    2017-01-01

    Colloid cysts are benign slow-growing cystic lesions located on the roof of the third ventricle that usually present with symptoms related to gradual rise of intracranial pressure. They mostly remain asymptomatic and sometimes grow progressively and cause diverse symptoms associated with increased intracranial pressure such as headache, diplopia, and sixth cranial nerve palsy. Here we report a 47-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with acute severe headache and nausea/vomiting. On MRI examination acute hydrocephaly due to hemorrhagic colloid cyst was detected. Acute hemorrhage in colloid cysts is extremely rare and may present with symptoms of acute increase in the intracranial pressure. Intracystic hemorrhage is very rarely reported as a complication of colloid cyst presenting with paroxysmal symptoms of acute hydrocephaly. PMID:28210514

  1. Sulfonated nanoporous colloidal films and membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joanna Jane

    The objective of this thesis is to describe the preparation and investigation of a new class of proton-conducting membrane materials, namely, nanoporous colloidal membranes whose proton conductivity results from the nanopore surface modification with organic molecules carrying acid functionalities. Both the proton transport and ion transport were studied in nanoporous silica colloidal crystals that were surface modified with sulfonic groups. First, the transport of ions was studied through sulfonated silica colloidal films that were supported on platinum electrodes using cyclic voltammetry. The surface of self-assembled nanoporous silica colloidal crystalline films was sulfonated using 1,3-propanesultone. We found that the flux of anions through the sulfonated colloidal films is reduced, while the flux of cations is increased, compared to the unmodified colloidal films. Second, the proton transport in free-standing assemblies of surface-sulfonated silica nanospheres, either randomly packed or self-assembled into a close-packed arrangement, were studied. It was demonstrated that colloidal assemblies prepared using surface-sulfonated silica nanospheres posses proton conductivity that depends on the ordering of the material, temperature and relative humidity. Based on the comparison between the close-packed and disordered assemblies made of the same spheres, we conclude that the increase in structural organization of the self-assembled colloidal materials leads to increased proton conductivity and better water retention. Next free-standing colloidal membranes with a relatively large area and no mechanical defects were prepared by sintering silica colloidal films. The sintered membranes were then surface rehydroxylated, which restores the surface silanol groups, and then can be chemically modified. Finally, sintered self-assembled nanoporous silica colloidal crystals were modified with poly(sulfopropyl-methacrylate) (pSPM) and poly(stryrenesulfonic acid) (pSSA) brushes

  2. Colloid Thrusters, Physics, Fabrication and Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-17

    Murray, Paulo Lozano and Manuel Martinez-Sanchez, "Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Colloid Thruster Ion Emission from Selected Propellants", JOURNAL...OF PROPULSION AND POWER Vol. 21, No. 3, May-June 2005. 21. Paulo Lozano and Manuel Martinez-Sanchez, "Ionic liquid ion sources: characterization of...externally wetted emitters", Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 282 (2005) 415-421. 22. Paulo Lozano and Manuel Martinez-Sanchez, "Efficiency

  3. Colloid milium: a rare cutaneous deposition disease.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Simeen Ber; Arfan Ul Bari; Mumtaz, Nadeem

    2008-04-01

    Colloid milium is a rare degenerative skin disorder known by the development of small translucent, yellowish brown pappular nodules or plaques, generally located in sun exposed areas. Clinically they are of two types, adult and juvenile type. We present a case of adult type Colloid milium in a 60 years old female patient with clinical and histological findings unmistakable of the condition. She was treated with IPL. (Intense Pulsed Light) laser following unsatisfactory response with dermabrasion.

  4. Linked topological colloids in a nematic host.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Angel; Hermosillo, Leonardo; Tasinkevych, Mykola; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2015-04-14

    Geometric shape and topology of constituent particles can alter many colloidal properties such as Brownian motion, self-assembly, and phase behavior. Thus far, only single-component building blocks of colloids with connected surfaces have been studied, although topological colloids, with constituent particles shaped as freestanding knots and handlebodies of different genus, have been recently introduced. Here we develop a topological class of colloids shaped as multicomponent links. Using two-photon photopolymerization, we fabricate colloidal microparticle analogs of the classic examples of links studied in the field of topology, the Hopf and Solomon links, which we disperse in nematic fluids that possess orientational ordering of anisotropic rod-like molecules. The surfaces of these particles are treated to impose tangential or perpendicular boundary conditions for the alignment of liquid crystal molecules, so that they generate a host of topologically nontrivial field and defect structures in the dispersing nematic medium, resulting in an elastic coupling between the linked constituents. The interplay between the topologies of surfaces of linked colloids and the molecular alignment field of the nematic host reveals that linking of particle rings with perpendicular boundary conditions is commonly accompanied by linking of closed singular defect loops, laying the foundations for fabricating complex composite materials with interlinking-based structural organization.

  5. Tunable Time-Dependent Colloidal Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Andrew M.; Rogers, W. Benjamin; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    Self-assembly of colloidal particles can be driven by changes in temperature, density, or the concentration of solutes, and it is even possible to program the thermal response and equilibrium phase transitions of such systems. It is still difficult, however, to tune how the self-assembly process varies in time. We demonstrate control over the time-dependence of colloidal interactions, using DNA-functionalized colloidal particles with binding energies that are set by the concentration of a free linker strand in solution. We control the rate at which this free strand is consumed using a catalytic DNA reaction, whose rate is governed by the concentration of a catalyst strand. Varying the concentration of the linker, its competitor, and the catalyst at a fixed temperature, we can tune the rate and degree of the formation of colloidal aggregates and their following disassembly. Close to the colloidal melting point, the timescales of these out-of-equilibrium assembly and disassembly processes are determined by the rate of the catalytic reaction. Far below the colloidal melting point, however, the effects from varying our linker and competitor concentrations dominate.

  6. Self-replication with magnetic dipolar colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Zhang, Rui; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal self-replication represents an exciting research frontier in soft matter physics. Currently, all reported self-replication schemes involve coating colloidal particles with stimuli-responsive molecules to allow switchable interactions. In this paper, we introduce a scheme using ferromagnetic dipolar colloids and preprogrammed external magnetic fields to create an autonomous self-replication system. Interparticle dipole-dipole forces and periodically varying weak-strong magnetic fields cooperate to drive colloid monomers from the solute onto templates, bind them into replicas, and dissolve template complexes. We present three general design principles for autonomous linear replicators, derived from a focused study of a minimalist sphere-dimer magnetic system in which single binding sites allow formation of dimeric templates. We show via statistical models and computer simulations that our system exhibits nonlinear growth of templates and produces nearly exponential growth (low error rate) upon adding an optimized competing electrostatic potential. We devise experimental strategies for constructing the required magnetic colloids based on documented laboratory techniques. We also present qualitative ideas about building more complex self-replicating structures utilizing magnetic colloids.

  7. Inventions Utilizing Microfluidics and Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, David W.; Gong, Tieying; Oakey, John; Terray, Alexander V.; Wu, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Several related inventions pertain to families of devices that utilize microfluidics and/or colloidal particles to obtain useful physical effects. The families of devices can be summarized as follows: (1) Microfluidic pumps and/or valves wherein colloidal-size particles driven by electrical, magnetic, or optical fields serve as the principal moving parts that propel and/or direct the affected flows. (2) Devices that are similar to the aforementioned pumps and/or valves except that they are used to manipulate light instead of fluids. The colloidal particles in these devices are substantially constrained to move in a plane and are driven to spatially order them into arrays that function, variously, as waveguides, filters, or switches for optical signals. (3) Devices wherein the ultra-laminar nature of microfluidic flows is exploited to effect separation, sorting, or filtering of colloidal particles or biological cells in suspension. (4) Devices wherein a combination of confinement and applied electrical and/or optical fields forces the colloidal particles to become arranged into three-dimensional crystal lattices. Control of the colloidal crystalline structures could be exploited to control diffraction of light. (5) Microfluidic devices, incorporating fluid waveguides, wherein switching of flows among different paths would be accompanied by switching of optical signals.

  8. Colloids with high-definition surface structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsien-Yeh; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Gulari, Erdogan; Lahann, Joerg

    2007-07-03

    Compared with the well equipped arsenal of surface modification methods for flat surfaces, techniques that are applicable to curved, colloidal surfaces are still in their infancy. This technological gap exists because spin-coating techniques used in traditional photolithographic processes are not applicable to the curved surfaces of spherical objects. By replacing spin-coated photoresist with a vapor-deposited, photodefinable polymer coating, we have now fabricated microstructured colloids with a wide range of surface patterns, including asymmetric and chiral surface structures, that so far were typically reserved for flat substrates. This high-throughput method can yield surface-structured colloidal particles at a rate of approximately 10(7) to 10(8) particles per operator per day. Equipped with spatially defined binding pockets, microstructured colloids can engage in programmable interactions, which can lead to directed self-assembly. The ability to create a wide range of colloids with both simple and complex surface patterns may contribute to the genesis of previously unknown colloidal structures and may have important technological implications in a range of different applications, including photonic and phononic materials or chemical sensors.

  9. Colloids with high-definition surface structures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsien-Yeh; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Gulari, Erdogan; Lahann, Joerg

    2007-01-01

    Compared with the well equipped arsenal of surface modification methods for flat surfaces, techniques that are applicable to curved, colloidal surfaces are still in their infancy. This technological gap exists because spin-coating techniques used in traditional photolithographic processes are not applicable to the curved surfaces of spherical objects. By replacing spin-coated photoresist with a vapor-deposited, photodefinable polymer coating, we have now fabricated microstructured colloids with a wide range of surface patterns, including asymmetric and chiral surface structures, that so far were typically reserved for flat substrates. This high-throughput method can yield surface-structured colloidal particles at a rate of ≈107 to 108 particles per operator per day. Equipped with spatially defined binding pockets, microstructured colloids can engage in programmable interactions, which can lead to directed self-assembly. The ability to create a wide range of colloids with both simple and complex surface patterns may contribute to the genesis of previously unknown colloidal structures and may have important technological implications in a range of different applications, including photonic and phononic materials or chemical sensors. PMID:17592149

  10. Estuarine mixing behavior of colloidal organic carbon and colloidal mercury in Galveston Bay, Texas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seyong; Han, Seunghee; Gill, Gary A

    2011-06-01

    Mercury (Hg) in estuarine water is distributed among different physical phases (i.e. particulate, colloidal, and truly dissolved). This phase speciation influences the fate and cycling of Hg in estuarine systems. However, limited information exists on the estuarine distribution of colloidal phase Hg, mainly due to the technical difficulties involved in measuring it. In the present study, we determined Hg and organic carbon levels from unfiltered, filtered (<0.45 μm), colloidal (10 kDa-0.45 μm), and truly dissolved (<10 kDa) fractions of Galveston Bay surface water in order to understand the estuarine mixing behavior of Hg species as well as interactions of Hg with colloidal organic matter. For the riverine end-member, the colloidal fraction comprised 43 ± 11% of the total dissolved Hg pool and decreased to 17 ± 8% in brackish water. In the estuarine mixing zone, dissolved Hg and colloidal organic carbon showed non-conservative removal behavior, particularly in the low salinity (<15 ppt) region. This removal may be caused by salt-induced coagulation of colloidal matter and consequent removal of dissolved Hg. The particle-water interaction, K(d) ([particulate Hg (mol kg(-1))]/[dissolved Hg (mol L(-1))]) of Hg decreased as particle concentration increased, while the particle-water partition coefficient based on colloidal Hg and the truly dissolved Hg fraction, K(c) ([colloidal Hg (mol kg(-1))]/[truly dissolved Hg (mol L(-1))]) of Hg remained constant as particle concentration increased. This suggests that the particle concentration effect is associated with the amount of colloidal Hg, increasing in proportion to the amount of suspended particulate matter. This work demonstrates that, colloidal organic matter plays an important role in the transport, particle-water partitioning, and removal of dissolved Hg in estuarine waters.

  11. Polynitrogen Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-24

    4N3, while As(C6H5)4N3 presents a borderline case.23 Theoretical Calculations High-level theoretical studies of nitrogen, oxygen, selenium and...Dixon, D. A.; Christe, K. O., "Thermochemical Properties of Selenium Fluorides, Oxides, and Oxofluorides," Inorganic Chemistry, p. 2472, vol. 51, (2012...34Thermochemical Properties of Selenium Fluorides, Oxides, and Oxofluorides," Inorg. Chem., p. 2472, vol. 51, (2012). 26. K. S. Thanthiriwatte, M. Vasiliu

  12. Computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  13. Colloid's influences on microalgae growth as a potential environmental factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinhuai; Zhang, Zhengbin; Liu, Liansheng

    2003-09-01

    The role of colloid as “colloid pump” in the ocean is well known. The important influence of colloid in seawater on the growth of microalga was found in our 1999 2000 study. Colloid concentrates were obtained by employing a cross-flow filtration system to ultrafilter seawater (which had been pre-filtrated by 0.45 μm acetate cellulose membrane) successively with different membranes. Ultrafiltration retentions (we called them colloid concentrates) together with control sample (seawater without colloid) were then inoculated with two species of microalgae and cultivated in selected conditions. Monitoring of microalgae growth during cultivation showed that all colloid concentrates had obvious influence on the growth of the microalgae studied. Addition of Fe(OH)3 colloid or organic colloid (protein or carbohydrate) to the control sample enhanced the microalgae’s growth.

  14. Measuring Boltzmann's constant through holographic video microscopy of a single colloidal sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnatreya, Bhaskar Jyoti; Colen-Landy, Arielle; Hasebe, Paige; Bell, Breanna A.; Jones, Jasmine R.; Sunda-Meya, Anderson; Grier, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The trajectory of a colloidal sphere diffusing in water records a history of the random forces exerted on the sphere by thermally driven fluctuations in the suspending fluid. The trajectory therefore can be used to characterize the spectrum of thermal fluctuations and thus to obtain an estimate for Boltzmann's constant. We demonstrate how to use holographic video microscopy to track a colloidal sphere's three-dimensional motions with nanometer precision while simultaneously measuring its radius to within a few nanometers. The combination of tracking and characterization data reliably yields Boltzmann's constant to within two percent and also provides the basis for many other useful and interesting measurements in statistical physics, physical chemistry, and materials science.

  15. Statistical thermodynamics of charge-stabilized colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Valderrama, A.

    2008-06-01

    This thesis is a theoretical study of equilibrium statistical thermodynamic properties of colloidal systems in which electrostatic interactions play a dominant role, namely, charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. Such systems are fluids consisting of a mixture of a large number of mesoscopic particles and microscopic ions which interact via the Coulomb force, suspended in a molecular fluid. Quantum statistical mechanics is essential to fully understand the properties and stability of such systems. A less fundamental but for many purposes, sufficient description, is provided by classical statistical mechanics. In such approximation the system is considered as composed of a great number of charged classical particles with additional hard-core repulsions. The kinetic energy or momentum integrals become independent Gaussians, and hence their contribution to the free energy can be trivially evaluated. The contribution of the potential energy to the free energy on the other hand, depends upon the configuration of all the particles and becomes highly non-trivial due to the long-range character of the Coulomb force and the extremely different length scales involved in the problem. Using the microscopic model described above, we focus on the calculation of equilibrium thermodynamic properties (response functions), correlations (structure factors), and mechanical properties (forces and stresses), which can be measured in experiments and computed by Monte Carlo simulations. This thesis is divided into three parts. In part I, comprising chapters 2 and 3, we focus on finite-thickness effects in colloidal platelets and rigid planar membranes. In chapter 2 we study electrolyte-mediated interactions between two of such colloidal objects. Several aspects of these interactions are considered including the nature (attractive or repulsive) of the force between the objects, the osmotic properties for different types of surfaces and image charge effects. In part II, which includes

  16. Colloids and polymers in random colloidal matrices: Demixing under good-solvent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annunziata, Mario Alberto; Pelissetto, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    We consider a simplified coarse-grained model for colloid-polymer mixtures, in which polymers are represented as monoatomic molecules interacting by means of pair potentials. We use it to study polymer-colloid segregation in the presence of a quenched matrix of colloidal hard spheres. We fix the polymer-to-colloid size ratio to 0.8 and consider matrices such that the fraction f of the volume that is not accessible to the colloids due to the matrix is equal to 40%. As in the Asakura-Oosawa-Vrij (AOV) case, we find that binodal curves in the polymer and colloid volume-fraction plane have a small dependence on disorder. As for the position of the critical point, the behavior differs from that observed in the AOV case: While the critical colloid volume fraction is essentially the same in the bulk and in the presence of the matrix, the polymer volume fraction at criticality increases as f increases. At variance with the AOV case, no capillary colloid condensation or evaporation is generically observed.

  17. Colloids and polymers in random colloidal matrices: demixing under good-solvent conditions.

    PubMed

    Annunziata, Mario Alberto; Pelissetto, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    We consider a simplified coarse-grained model for colloid-polymer mixtures, in which polymers are represented as monoatomic molecules interacting by means of pair potentials. We use it to study polymer-colloid segregation in the presence of a quenched matrix of colloidal hard spheres. We fix the polymer-to-colloid size ratio to 0.8 and consider matrices such that the fraction f of the volume that is not accessible to the colloids due to the matrix is equal to 40%. As in the Asakura-Oosawa-Vrij (AOV) case, we find that binodal curves in the polymer and colloid volume-fraction plane have a small dependence on disorder. As for the position of the critical point, the behavior differs from that observed in the AOV case: While the critical colloid volume fraction is essentially the same in the bulk and in the presence of the matrix, the polymer volume fraction at criticality increases as f increases. At variance with the AOV case, no capillary colloid condensation or evaporation is generically observed.

  18. Colloidal Gelation-2 and Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition-2 Investigations Conducted on STS-95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Monica T.

    2000-01-01

    The Colloidal Gelation-2 (CGEL 2) and Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition-2 (CDOT 2) investigations flew on Space Shuttle Discovery mission STS-95 (also known as the John Glenn Mission). These investigations were part of a series of colloid experiments designed to help scientists answer fundamental science questions and reduce the trial and error involved in developing new and better materials. Industries dealing with semiconductors, electro-optics, ceramics, and composites are just a few that may benefit from this knowledge. The goal of the CGEL 2 investigation was to study the fundamental properties of colloids to help scientists better understand their nature and make them more useful for technology. Colloids consist of very small (submicron) particles suspended in a fluid. They play a critical role in the technology of this country, finding uses in materials ranging from paints and coatings to drugs, cosmetics, food, and drink. Although these products are routinely produced and used, there are still many aspects of their behavior about which scientists know little. Understanding their structures may allow scientists to manipulate the physical properties of colloids (a process called "colloidal engineering") to produce new materials and products. Colloid research may even improve the processing of known products to enhance their desirable properties.

  19. Colloids in the River Inn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Baumann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    In the light of an increasing number of technical applications using nanoparticles and reports of adverse effects of engineered nanoparticles, research on the occurrence and stability of particles in all compartments has to be intensified. Colloids in river water represent the geologic setting, environmental conditions, and the anthropogenic use in its catchment. The river not only acts as a sink for nanoparticles but also as the source term due to exchange in the hyporheic zone and in bank filtration setups. The concentration, size distribution and elemental composition of particles in the River Inn were studied from the source in the Swiss Alps to the river mouth at Passau. Samples were collected after each tributary from a sub-catchment and filtered on-site. The elemental composition was determined after acid digestion with ICP/MS. SEM/EDX analyses provided morphological and elemental information for single particles. A complementary chemical analysis of the river water was performed to assess the geochemical stability of indvidual particles. Particles in the upper, rural parts mainly reveal changes in the geological setting of the tributary catchments. Not unexpectedly, particles originating from crystalline rocks, were more stable than particles originating from calcareous rocks. Anthropogenic and industrial influences increase in the lower parts. This went together with a change of the size distribution, an increase of the number of organic particles, and a decrease of the microfauna. Interestingly, specific leisure activities in a sub-catchment, like extensive downhill skiing, manifest itself in the particle composition.

  20. Drying of thin colloidal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routh, Alexander F.

    2013-04-01

    When thin films of colloidal fluids are dried, a range of transitions are observed and the final film profile is found to depend on the processes that occur during the drying step. This article describes the drying process, initially concentrating on the various transitions. Particles are seen to initially consolidate at the edge of a drying droplet, the so-called coffee-ring effect. Flow is seen to be from the centre of the drop towards the edge and a front of close-packed particles passes horizontally across the film. Just behind the particle front the now solid film often displays cracks and finally the film is observed to de-wet. These various transitions are explained, with particular reference to the capillary pressure which forms in the solidified region of the film. The reasons for cracking in thin films is explored as well as various methods to minimize its effect. Methods to obtain stratified coatings through a single application are considered for a one-dimensional drying problem and this is then extended to two-dimensional films. Different evaporative models are described, including the physical reason for enhanced evaporation at the edge of droplets. The various scenarios when evaporation is found to be uniform across a drying film are then explained. Finally different experimental techniques for examining the drying step are mentioned and the article ends with suggested areas that warrant further study.

  1. Evaluation of Colloid Retention Site Dominance in Variably Saturated Porous Media: An All Pores Pore-Scale Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Veronica; Perez-Reche, Francisco; Holzner, Markus; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    It is well accepted that colloid and nanoparticle transport processes in porous media differ substantially between water saturated and unsaturated conditions. Differences are frequently ascribed to particle immobilization by association with interfaces with the gas, as well as to restrictions of the liquid medium through which colloids are transported. Yet, the current understanding of the importance of particle retention at gas interfaces is based on observations of single pores or two-dimensional pore network representations, leaving open the question of their statistical significance when all pores in the medium are considered. In order to address this question, column experiments were performed using a model porous medium of glass beads through which Silver particles were transported for conditions of varying water content and water chemistry. X-ray microtomography was subsequently employed as a non-destructive imaging technique to obtain pore-scale information of the entire column regarding: i) the presence and distribution of the main locations where colloids can become retained (interfaces with the water-solid, air-water, air-solid, and air-water-solid, grain-grain contacts, and the bulk liquid), ii) deposition profiles of colloids along the column classified by the available retention location, and iii) channel widths of 3-dimensional pore-water network representations. The results presented provide a direct statistical evaluation on the significance of colloid retention by attachment to interfaces or by strainig at contact points where multiple interfaces meet.

  2. Self-Pinning by Colloids Confined at a Contact Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal particles suspended in a fluid usually inhibit complete wetting of the fluid on a solid surface and cause pinning of the contact line, known as self-pinning. We show differences in spreading and drying behaviors of pure and colloidal droplets using optical and confocal imaging methods. These differences come from spreading inhibition by colloids confined at a contact line. We propose a self-pinning mechanism based on spreading inhibition by colloids. We find a good agreement between the mechanism and the experimental result taken by directly tracking individual colloids near the contact lines of evaporating colloidal droplets.

  3. Seismic stress mobilization of natural colloids in a porous rock

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Peter M; Abdel-fattah, Amr I

    2008-01-01

    Stress oscillations at 26 Hz enhanced the release of natural micro-particles (colloids) in a porous rock sample. Micron-scale effects were induced by meter-scale wavelengths. The results are attributed to altering the release rate coefficient for colloids trapped in pores. The rate change did not depend on colloid size and thus is not due to altering colloid-pore-wall interactions. Enhanced colloid detachment from pore walls and flushing from dead-end pores are likely mechanisms. This phenomenon could impact a broad range of physical sciences involving colloid dynamics and porous transport.

  4. Processing pathway dependence of amorphous silica nanoparticle toxicity - colloidal versus pyrolytic

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Dunphy, Darren R.; Jiang, Xingmao; Meng, Huan; Sun, Bingbing; Tarn, Derrick; Xue, Min; Wang, Xiang; Lin, Sijie; Ji, Zhaoxia; Li, Ruibin; Garcia, Fred L.; Yang, Jing; Kirk, Martin L.; Xia, Tian; Zink, Jeffrey I; Nel, Andre; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    We have developed structure/toxicity relationships for amorphous silica nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized through low temperature, colloidal (e.g. Stöber silica) or high temperature pyrolysis (e.g. fumed silica) routes. Through combined spectroscopic and physical analyses, we have determined the state of aggregation, hydroxyl concentration, relative proportion of strained and unstrained siloxane rings, and potential to generate hydroxyl radicals for Stöber and fumed silica NPs with comparable primary particle sizes (16-nm in diameter). Based on erythrocyte hemolytic assays and assessment of the viability and ATP levels in epithelial and macrophage cells, we discovered for fumed silica an important toxicity relationship to post-synthesis thermal annealing or environmental exposure, whereas colloidal silicas were essentially non-toxic under identical treatment conditions. Specifically, we find for fumed silica a positive correlation of toxicity with hydroxyl concentration and its potential to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause red blood cell hemolysis. We propose fumed silica toxicity stems from its intrinsic population of strained three-membered rings (3MRs) along with its chain-like aggregation and hydroxyl content. Hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interactions of the silanol surfaces of fumed silica aggregates with the extracellular plasma membrane cause membrane perturbations sensed by the Nalp3 inflammasome, whose subsequent activation leads to secretion of the cytokine IL-1β. Hydroxyl radicals generated by the strained 3MRs in fumed silica but largely absent in colloidal silicas may contribute to the inflammasome activation. Formation of colloidal silica into aggregates mimicking those of fumed silica had no effect on cell viability or hemolysis. This study emphasizes that not all amorphous silica is created equal and that the unusual toxicity of fumed silica compared to colloidal silica derives from its framework and surface chemistry along

  5. (Pesticide chemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1990-09-04

    This report summarizes a trip by L. W. Barnthouse of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), where he participated in the 7th International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry. He chaired a workshop on experimental systems for determining effects of pesticides on nontarget organisms and gave an oral presentation at a symposium on pesticide risk assessment. Before returning to the United States, Dr. Barnthouse visited the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research in Texel, the Netherlands.

  6. Rheological properties of Cubic colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao

    2016-11-01

    Colloidal and non-colloidal suspensions are ubiquitous in many industrial application. There are numerous studies on these systems to understand and relate their complex rheological properties to their microstructural evolution under deformation. Although most of the experimental and simulation studies are centered on spherical particles, in most of the industrial applications the geometry of the colloidal particles deviate from the simple hard sphere and more complex geometries exist. Recent advances in microfabrication paved the way to fabricate colloidal particles with complex geometries for applications in different areas such as drug delivery where the fundamental understanding of their dynamics has remained unexplored. In this study, using dissipative particle dynamics, we investigate the rheological properties of cubic (superball) particles which are modeled as the cluster of core-modified DPD particles. Explicit representation of solvent particles in the DPD scheme will conserve the full hydrodynamic interactions between colloidal particles. Rheological properties of these cubic suspensions are investigated in the dilute and semi-dilute regimes. The Einstein and Huggins coefficients for these particles with different superball exponent will be calculate which represent the effect of single particle's geometry and multibody interactions on viscosity, respectively. The response of these suspensions is investigated under simple shear and oscillatory shear where it is shown that under oscillation these particles tend to form crystalline structure giving rise to stronger shear-thinning behavior recently measured experimentally.

  7. Quasicrystalline tilings with nematic colloidal platelets

    PubMed Central

    Dontabhaktuni, Jayasri; Ravnik, Miha; Žumer, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Complex nematic fluids have the remarkable capability for self-assembling regular colloidal structures of various symmetries and dimensionality according to their micromolecular orientational order. Colloidal chains, clusters, and crystals were demonstrated recently, exhibiting soft-matter functionalities of robust binding, spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, entanglement, shape-driven and topological driven assembly, and even memory imprinting. However, no quasicrystalline structures were found. Here, we show with numerical modeling that quasicrystalline colloidal lattices can be achieved in the form of original Penrose P1 tiling by using pentagonal colloidal platelets in layers of nematic liquid crystals. The tilings are energetically stabilized with binding energies up to 2500 kBT for micrometer-sized platelets and further allow for hierarchical substitution tiling, i.e., hierarchical pentagulation. Quasicrystalline structures are constructed bottom-up by assembling the boat, rhombus, and star maximum density clusters, thus avoiding other (nonquasicrystalline) stable or metastable configurations of platelets. Central to our design of the quasicrystalline tilings is the symmetry breaking imposed by the platelet shape and the surface anchoring conditions at the colloidal platelets, which are misaligning and asymmetric over two perpendicular mirror planes. Finally, the design of the quasicrystalline tilings as platelets in nematic liquid crystals is inherently capable of a continuous variety of length scales of the tiling, ranging over three orders of magnitude in the typical length (from to ), which could allow for the design of quasicrystalline photonics at multiple frequency ranges. PMID:24550269

  8. Colloid-polymer mixtures under slit confinement.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ramírez, Allan; Figueroa-Gerstenmaier, Susana; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2017-03-14

    We report a NVT molecular dynamic study of colloid-polymer mixtures under slit confinement. For this purpose, we are employing the Asakura-Oosawa model for studying colloidal particles, polymer coils, and hard walls as the external confining field. The colloid-polymer size ratio, q, is varied in the range 1⩾q⩾0.4 and the confinement distance, H, in 10σc⩾H⩾3σc, σc being the colloidal diameter. Vapor-liquid coexistence properties are assessed, from which phase diagrams are built. The obtained data fulfill the corresponding states law for a constant H when q is varied. The shift of the polymer and colloidal chemical potentials of coexistence follows a linear relationship with (H-σc)(-1) for H≳4σc. The confined vapor-liquid interfaces can be fitted with a semicircular line of curvature (H-σc)(-1), from which the contact angle can be obtained. We observe complete wetting of the confining walls for reservoir polymer concentrations above and close to the critical value, and partial wetting for reservoir polymer concentrations above and far from it.

  9. Colloids with continuously tunable surface charge.

    PubMed

    van Ravensteijn, Bas G P; Kegel, Willem K

    2014-09-09

    In this paper, we present a robust way to tune the surface potential of polystyrene colloids without changing the pH, ionic strength, etc. The colloids are composed of a cross-linked polystyrene core and a cross-linked vinylbenzyl chloride layer. Besides the chlorine groups, the particle surface contains sulfate/sulfonate groups (arising from the polymerization initiators) that provide a negative surface potential. Performing a Menschutkin reaction on the surface chlorine groups with tertiary amines allows us to introduce quaternary, positively charged amines. The overall charge on the particles is then determined by the ratio between the sulfate/sulfonate moieties and the quaternary amines. Using this process, we were able to invert the charge in a continuous manner without losing colloidal stability upon passing the isoelectric point. The straightforward reaction mechanism together with the fact that the reaction could be quenched rapidly resulted in a colloidal system in which the ζ potential can be tuned between -80 and 45 mV. As proof of principle, the positively charged particles were used in heterocoagulation experiments with nanometer- and micrometer-sized negatively charged silica particles to create geometrically well-defined colloidal (nano) clusters.

  10. Colloid-polymer mixtures under slit confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Ramírez, Allan; Figueroa-Gerstenmaier, Susana; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2017-03-01

    We report a NVT molecular dynamic study of colloid-polymer mixtures under slit confinement. For this purpose, we are employing the Asakura-Oosawa model for studying colloidal particles, polymer coils, and hard walls as the external confining field. The colloid-polymer size ratio, q, is varied in the range 1 ⩾q ⩾0.4 and the confinement distance, H, in 10 σc ⩾H ⩾3 σc , σc being the colloidal diameter. Vapor-liquid coexistence properties are assessed, from which phase diagrams are built. The obtained data fulfill the corresponding states law for a constant H when q is varied. The shift of the polymer and colloidal chemical potentials of coexistence follows a linear relationship with (H-σc ) -1 for H ≳4 σc . The confined vapor-liquid interfaces can be fitted with a semicircular line of curvature (H-σc ) -1, from which the contact angle can be obtained. We observe complete wetting of the confining walls for reservoir polymer concentrations above and close to the critical value, and partial wetting for reservoir polymer concentrations above and far from it.

  11. Interparticle interactions and polarization effects in colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The physics of simple colloidal systems is usually dominated by three independent length scales: the particle size, the average interparticle distance, and the range of the interparticle potential. The dispersed particles typically have characteristic dimensions in the range 5 to 100 nm, often with spherical or cylindrical symmetry. Dispersion densities vary over volume fractions ranging from 0.5 to 10/sup -4/, with the corresponding mean interparticle distances ranging from about 1 to 10 diameters (in spherical systems). The interaction potential may be very short ranged (hard sphere), very long ranged (Coulomb or dipolar), or anywhere in between (screened Coulomb), and the correlations exhibited in the dispersion may be gas-like, liquid-like or crystalline, depending on the range of the potential relative to the interparticle distance. This rich phase behavior is responsible for the remarkable importance of colloidal studies in many areas of condensed matter physics and biophysics, but it poses often intractable problems in developing the statistical mechanical descriptions necessary for an understanding of scattering data from colloids. This paper will review the considerable recent progress in this field, in the context of SANS experiments on colloids in which the potentials are dominated by either screened Coulomb or magnetic dipolar interactions; in the case of magnetic colloids (ferrofluids), the use of polarization analysis will also be discussed. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Method for electrohydrodynamically assembling patterned colloidal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trau, Mathias (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method apparatus is provided for electrophoretically depositing particles onto an electrode, and electrohydrodynamically assembling the particles into crystalline structures. Specifically, the present method and apparatus creates a current flowing through a solution to cause identically charged electrophoretically deposited colloidal particles to attract each other over very large distances (<5 particle diameters) on the surface of electrodes to form two-dimensional colloidal crystals. The attractive force can be created with both DC and AC fields and can modulated by adjusting either the field strength or frequency of the current. Modulating this lateral attraction between the particles causes the reversible formation of two-dimensional fluid and crystalline colloidal states on the electrode surface. Further manipulation allows for the formation of two or three-dimensional colloidal crystals, as well as more complex designed structures. Once the required structures are formed, these three-dimension colloidal crystals can be permanently frozen or glued by controlled coagulation induced by to the applied field to form a stable crystalline structure.

  13. Apparatus for electrohydrodynamically assembling patterned colloidal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trau, Mathias (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method apparatus is provided for electrophoretically depositing particles onto an electrode, and electrohydrodynamically assembling the particles into crystalline structures. Specifically, the present method and apparatus creates a current flowing through a solution to cause identically charged electrophoretically deposited colloidal particles to attract each other over very large distances (<5 particle diameters) on the surface of electrodes to form two-dimensional colloidal crystals. The attractive force can be created with both DC and AC fields and can modulated by adjusting either the field strength or frequency of the current. Modulating this lateral attraction between the particles causes the reversible formation of two-dimensional fluid and crystalline colloidal states on the electrode surface. Further manipulation allows for the formation of two or three-dimensional colloidal crystals, as well as more complex designed structures. Once the required structures are formed, these three-dimension colloidal crystals can be permanently frozen or glued by controlled coagulation induced by to the applied field to form a stable crystalline structure.

  14. Influence of heteroaggregation processes between intrinsic colloids and carrier colloids on cerium(III) mobility through fractured carbonate rocks.

    PubMed

    Tran, Emily; Klein Ben-David, Ofra; Teutch, Nadya; Weisbrod, Noam

    2016-09-01

    Colloid facilitated transport of radionuclides has been implicated as a major transport vector for leaked nuclear waste in the subsurface. Sorption of radionuclides onto mobile carrier colloids such as bentonite and humic acid often accelerates their transport through saturated rock fractures. Here, we employ column studies to investigate the impact of intrinsic, bentonite and humic acid colloids on the transport and recovery of Ce(III) through a fractured chalk core. Ce(III) recovery where either bentonite or humic colloids were added was 7.7-26.9% Ce for all experiments. Greater Ce(III) recovery was observed when both types of carrier colloids were present (25.4-37.4%). When only bentonite colloids were present, Ce(III) appeared to be fractionated between chemical sorption to the bentonite colloid surfaces and heteroaggregation of bentonite colloids with intrinsic carbonate colloids, precipitated naturally in solution. However, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and colloid stability experiments reveal that in suspensions of humic acid colloids, colloid-facilitated Ce(III) migration results only from the latter attachment mechanism rather than from chemical sorption. This observed heteroaggregation of different colloid types may be an important factor to consider when predicting potential mobility of leaked radionuclides from geological repositories for spent fuel located in carbonate rocks.

  15. Colloidal crystallization of colloidal silica modified with ferrocenyl group-contained polymers in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Kohji; Shigeta, Maki; Komune, Seishu; Mouri, Emiko; Nakai, Akemi

    2007-01-15

    Surface modification of colloidal silica with ferrocenyl-grafted polymer and colloidal crystallization of the particles in organic solvent were studied. Poly(methyl methacrylate-co-vinylferrocene)-grafted silica never formed colloidal crystals in polar solvent, such as acetone, acetonitrile, ethanol and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), while poly(methyl methacrylate-co-ferrocenyl acrylate)-grafted silica gave colloidal crystallization in DMF. The particles prepared by grafting of poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-vinylferrocene), with vinylferrocene (Vfc) mole fraction of 1/13 and 1/23, were observed to give the crystallization in ethanol and DMF over particle volume fraction of 0.058. Further, silica modified with copolymer of Vfc and N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone, N-vinylcarbazole or N-isopropylacrylamide formed colloidal crystals in ethanol and DMF. Especially, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-Vfc)-grafted silica, which was composed of the highest mole fraction of vinylferrocene, 1/3, afforded colloidal crystallization in ethanol over particle volume fraction of 0.053. Relatively high polar vinylferrocene copolymer grafting of silica resulted in colloidal polymerization in organic solvents.

  16. Electrochemical reduction of chlorophyll in colloidal solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Suponeva, E.P.; Kadoshnikova, I.G.; Kazakova, A.A.; Kiselev, B.A.

    1986-02-01

    This paper discusses determining the energy yield of the photochemical reaction. The authors investigated the peculiarities of the electrochemical reduction of Chl in the colloidal state, where the elements of the molecular organization of the pigments in the reaction centers of photosynthesis are simulated and, as a result, the lifetime of Chl.- is substantially increased. Polarograms of a colloidal solution of Chl ''a'' in aqueous buffer solution contining less than 5% acetone are presented. The adsorption spectra were measured on a spectrophotometer and the fluorescence spectra were recorded on a setup assembled on the basis of RM-w and FEU-30 monochromators. The results obtained are evidence of the ability of Chl for spontaneous formation of molecular associates in aqueous medium, which are characterized by hindrance of the protonation of Chl.- in comparison with monomeric Chl at a high rate of exchange of an electron between the eletrode and the colloidal particle and between molecules in the volume of the particle.

  17. Spin Dynamics of Charged Colloidal Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, N. P.

    2005-03-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are promising structures for controlling spin phenomena because of their highly size- tunable physical properties, ease of manufacture, and nanosecond-scale spin lifetimes at room temperature. Recent experiments have succeeded in controlling the charging of the lowest electronic state of colloidal quantum dots ootnotetextC. Wang, B. L. Wehrenberg, C. Y. Woo, and P. Guyot-Sionnest, J. Phys. Chem B 108, 9027 (2004).. Here we use time-resolved Faraday rotation measurements in the Voigt geometry to investigate the spin dynamics of colloidal CdSe quantum dot films in both a charged and uncharged state at room temperature. The charging of the film is controlled by applying a voltage in an electrochemical cell and is confirmed by absorbance measurements. Significant changes in the spin precession are observed upon charging, reflecting the voltage- controlled electron occupation of the quantum dot states and filling of surface states.

  18. Targeted delivery of colloids by swimming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumakis, N.; Lepore, A.; Maggi, C.; di Leonardo, R.

    2013-10-01

    The possibility of exploiting motile microorganisms as tiny propellers represents a fascinating strategy for the transport of colloidal cargoes. However, delivery on target sites usually requires external control fields to steer propellers and trigger cargo release. The need for a constant feedback mechanism prevents the design of compact devices where biopropellers could perform their tasks autonomously. Here we show that properly designed three-dimensional (3D) microstructures can define accumulation areas where bacteria spontaneously and efficiently store colloidal beads. The process is stochastic in nature and results from the rectifying action of an asymmetric energy landscape over the fluctuating forces arising from collisions with swimming bacteria. As a result, the concentration of colloids over target areas can be strongly increased or depleted according to the topography of the underlying structures. Besides the significance to technological applications, our experiments pose some important questions regarding the structure of stationary probability distributions in non-equilibrium systems.

  19. Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition (CDOT-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is an image of a colloidal crystal from the CDOT-2 investigation flown on STS-95. There are so many colloidal particles in this sample that it behaves like a glass. In the laboratory on Earth, the sample remained in an amorphous state, showing no sign of crystal growth. In microgravity the sample crystallized in 3 days, as did the other glassy colloidal samples examined in the CDOT-2 experiment. During the investigation, crystallization occurred in samples that had a volume fraction (number of particles per total volume) larger than the formerly reported glass transition of 0.58. This has great implications for theories of the structural glass transition. These crystals were strong enough to survive space shuttle re-entry and landing.

  20. Manipulating semiconductor colloidal stability through doping.

    PubMed

    Fleharty, Mark E; van Swol, Frank; Petsev, Dimiter N

    2014-10-10

    The interface between a doped semiconductor material and electrolyte solution is of considerable fundamental interest, and is relevant to systems of practical importance. Both adjacent domains contain mobile charges, which respond to potential variations. This is exploited to design electronic and optoelectronic sensors, and other enabling semiconductor colloidal materials. We show that the charge mobility in both phases leads to a new type of interaction between semiconductor colloids suspended in aqueous electrolyte solutions. This interaction is due to the electrostatic response of the semiconductor interior to disturbances in the external field upon the approach of two particles. The electrostatic repulsion between two charged colloids is reduced from the one governed by the charged groups present at the particles surfaces. This type of interaction is unique to semiconductor particles and may have a substantial effect on the suspension dynamics and stability.

  1. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly. PMID:27426418

  2. Manipulating colloidal assemblies with active dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramananarivo, Sophie; Palacci, Jeremie

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of a densely packed 2D layer of colloids can be significantly altered upon introducing a small amount of active microparticles. Those motile intruders drive the system out-of-equilibrium, which produces a variety of new complex phenomena such as the accentuation of density heterogeneities or the reorganization of crystalline colloidal structures. We investigate the altered dynamics of the passive spheres, as well as the behavior of micro-swimmers propelling in such crowded environment where interactions with passive obstacles or other active units become important. Ultimately, understanding and controlling such mixed systems could open new routes toward activity-assisted manipulation of colloids, potentially guiding the design of materials able to self-anneal their defects.

  3. Convection of a stratified colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepanov, I. N.; Smorodin, B. L.

    2013-11-15

    The convection of a colloidal suspension, which is a binary mixture of a carrier medium with an admixture of nanoparticles having a large positive thermal diffusion parameter, has been studied for the case of the heating of a horizontal cell from below and periodic conditions at the vertical boundaries corresponding to the experimental situation of ring channels. Bifurcation diagrams have been constructed for vibrational and monotonic regimes of the convection of the colloidal mixture. The time dependences of the maximum stream function and the stream function at a fixed point of the cell, as well as the spatial distributions of the concentration field of the colloid admixture, have been obtained. It has been shown that a stable regime of traveling waves exists in a certain region of the parameters of the problem (Boltzmann and Rayleigh numbers characterizing the gravitational stratification and intensity of the thermal effect, respectively)

  4. Colloids in food: ingredients, structure, and stability.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews progress in the field of food colloids with particular emphasis on advances in novel functional ingredients and nanoscale structuring. Specific aspects of ingredient development described here are the stabilization of bubbles and foams by the protein hydrophobin, the emulsifying characteristics of Maillard-type protein-polysaccharide conjugates, the structural and functional properties of protein fibrils, and the Pickering stabilization of dispersed droplets by food-grade nanoparticles and microparticles. Building on advances in the nanoscience of biological materials, the application of structural design principles to the fabrication of edible colloids is leading to progress in the fabrication of functional dispersed systems-multilayer interfaces, multiple emulsions, and gel-like emulsions. The associated physicochemical insight is contributing to our mechanistic understanding of oral processing and textural perception of food systems and to the development of colloid-based strategies to control delivery of nutrients during food digestion within the human gastrointestinal tract.

  5. Plasmonic films based on colloidal lithography.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bin; Yu, Ye; Möhwald, Helmuth; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Bai

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the field of plasmonic films fabricated by colloidal lithography. Compared with conventional lithography techniques such as electron beam lithography and focused ion beam lithography, the unconventional colloidal lithography technique with advantages of low-cost and high-throughput has made the fabrication process more efficient, and moreover brought out novel films that show remarkable surface plasmon features. These plasmonic films include those with nanohole arrays, nanovoid arrays and nanoshell arrays with precisely controlled shapes, sizes, and spacing. Based on these novel nanostructures, optical and sensing performances can be greatly enhanced. The introduction of colloidal lithography provides not only efficient fabrication processes but also plasmonic films with unique nanostructures, which are difficult to be fabricated by conventional lithography techniques.

  6. Dynamic Assembly of Magnetic Colloidal Vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Mohorič, Tomaž; Kokot, Gašper; Osterman, Natan; Snezhko, Alexey; Vilfan, Andrej; Babič, Dušan; Dobnikar, Jure

    2016-04-29

    Magnetic colloids in external time-dependent fields are subject to complex induced many-body interactions governing their self-assembly into a variety of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium structures such as chains, networks, suspended membranes, and colloidal foams. Here, we report experiments, simulations, and theory probing the dynamic assembly of superparamagnetic colloids in precessing external magnetic fields. Within a range of field frequencies, we observe dynamic large-scale structures such as ordered phases composed of precessing chains, ribbons, and rotating fluidic vortices. We show that the structure formation is inherently coupled to the buildup of torque, which originates from internal relaxation of induced dipoles and from transient correlations among the particles as a result of short-lived chain formation. We discuss in detail the physical properties of the vortex phase and demonstrate its potential in particle-coating applications.

  7. Energy transport velocity in bidispersed magnetic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Hem; Patel, Rajesh; Mehta, R. V.

    2012-07-01

    Study of energy transport velocity of light is an effective background for slow, fast, and diffuse light and exhibits the photonic property of the material. We report a theoretical analysis of magnetic field dependent resonant behavior in forward-backward anisotropy factor, light diffusion constant, and energy transport velocity for bidispersed magnetic colloids. A bidispersed magnetic colloid is composed of micrometer size magnetic spheres dispersed in a magnetic nanofluid consisting of magnetic nanoparticles in a nonmagnetic liquid carrier. Magnetic Mie resonances and reduction in energy transport velocity accounts for the possible delay (longer dwell time) by field dependent resonant light transport. This resonant behavior of light in bidispersed magnetic colloids suggests a novel magnetophotonic material.

  8. Shape-shifting colloids via stimulated dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Mena; Hueckel, Theodore; Yi, Gi-Ra; Sacanna, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The ability to reconfigure elementary building blocks from one structure to another is key to many biological systems. Bringing the intrinsic adaptability of biological systems to traditional synthetic materials is currently one of the biggest scientific challenges in material engineering. Here we introduce a new design concept for the experimental realization of self-assembling systems with built-in shape-shifting elements. We demonstrate that dewetting forces between an oil phase and solid colloidal substrates can be exploited to engineer shape-shifting particles whose geometry can be changed on demand by a chemical or optical signal. We find this approach to be quite general and applicable to a broad spectrum of materials, including polymers, semiconductors and magnetic materials. This synthetic methodology can be further adopted as a new experimental platform for designing and rapidly prototyping functional colloids, such as reconfigurable micro swimmers, colloidal surfactants and switchable building blocks for self-assembly.

  9. Phosphate binding by natural iron-rich colloids in streams.

    PubMed

    Baken, Stijn; Moens, Claudia; van der Grift, Bas; Smolders, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Phosphorus (P) in natural waters may be bound to iron (Fe) bearing colloids. However, the natural variation in composition and P binding strength of these colloids remain unclear. We related the composition of "coarse colloids" (colloids in the 0.1-1.2 μm size range) in 47 Belgian streams to the chemical properties of the streamwater. On average, 29% of the P in filtered (<1.2 μm) samples of these streams is present in coarse colloids. The concentration of Fe-rich colloids in streams decreases with increasing water hardness and pH. The P bearing colloids in these streams mostly consist of Fe hydroxyphosphates and of Fe oxyhydroxides with surface adsorbed P, which is underpinned by geochemical speciation calculations. In waters with molar P:Fe ratios above 0.5, only a minor part of the P is bound to coarse colloids. In such waters, the colloids have molar P:Fe ratios between 0.2 and 1 and are, therefore, nearly saturated with P. Conversely, in streams with molar P:Fe ratios below 0.1, most of the P is bound to Fe-rich colloids. Equilibration of synthetic and natural Fe and P bearing colloids with a zero sink reveals that colloids with low molar P:Fe ratios contain mostly nonlabile P, whereas P-saturated colloids contain mostly labile P which can be released within 7 days. Equilibration at a fixed free orthophosphate activity shows that the Fe-rich colloids may bind only limited P through surface adsorption, in the range of 0.02-0.04 mol P (mol Fe)(-1). The P:Fe ratios measured in naturally occurring Fe and P bearing colloids is clearly higher (between 0.05 and 1). These colloids are therefore likely formed by coprecipitation of P during oxidation of Fe(II), which leads to the formation of Fe hydroxyphosphate minerals.

  10. Highly Elastic and Self-Healing Composite Colloidal Gels.

    PubMed

    Diba, Mani; Wang, Huanan; Kodger, Thomas E; Parsa, Shima; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G

    2017-03-01

    Composite colloidal gels are formed by the pH-induced electrostatic assembly of silica and gelatin nanoparticles. These injectable and moldable colloidal gels are able to withstand substantial compressive and tensile loads, and exhibit a remarkable self-healing efficiency. This study provides new, critical insight into the structural and mechanical properties of composite colloidal gels and opens up new avenues for practical application of colloidal gels.

  11. Why Teach Environmental Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Marjorie H.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching environmental chemistry in secondary school science classes, and outlines five examples of environmental chemistry problems that focus on major concepts of chemistry and have critical implications for human survival and well-being. (JR)

  12. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  13. Colloid straining within saturated heterogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Porubcan, Alexis A; Xu, Shangping

    2011-02-01

    The transport of 0.46 μm, 2.94 μm, 5.1 μm and 6.06 μm latex particles in heterogeneous porous media prepared from the mixing of 0.78 mm, 0.46 mm and 0.23 mm quartz sands was investigated through column transport experiments. It was observed that the 0.46 μm particles traveled conservatively within the heterogeneous porous media, suggesting that under the experimental conditions employed in this research the strong repulsive interactions between the negatively charged latex particles and the clean quartz sands led to minimal colloid immobilization due to physicochemical filtration. The immobilization of the 2.94 μm, 5.1 μm and 6.06 μm latex particles was thus attributed to colloid straining. Experimental results showed that the straining of colloidal particles within heterogeneous sand mixtures increased when the fraction of finer sands increased. The mathematical model that was developed and tested based on results obtained using uniform sands (Xu et al., 2006) was found to be able to describe colloid straining within heterogeneous porous media. Examination of the relationship between the best-fit values of the clean-bed straining rate coefficients (k(0)) and the ratio of colloid diameter (d(p)) and sand grain size (d(g)) indicated that when number-average sizes were used to represent the size of the heterogeneous porous media, there existed a consistent relationship for both uniform sands and heterogeneous sand mixtures. Similarly, the use of the number-averaged sizes for the heterogeneous porous media produced a uniform relationship between the colloid straining capacity term (λ) and the ratio of d(p)/d(g) for all the sand treatments.

  14. Combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  15. Pair Potential of Charged Colloidal Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Addas, K.; Ward, A.; Flynn, N. T.; Velasco, E.; Hagan, M. F.; Dogic, Z.; Fraden, S.

    2009-03-01

    We report on the construction of colloidal stars: 1μm polystyrene beads grafted with a dense brush of 1μm long and 10 nm wide charged semiflexible filamentous viruses. The pair interaction potentials of colloidal stars are measured using an experimental implementation of umbrella sampling, a technique originally developed in computer simulations in order to probe rare events. The influence of ionic strength and grafting density on the interaction is measured. Good agreements are found between the measured interactions and theoretical predictions based upon the osmotic pressure of counterions.

  16. Fabrication of anisotropic multifunctional colloidal carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerri, Huda A.

    The field of colloidal assembly has grown tremendously in recent years, although the direct or template-assisted methods used to fabricate complex colloidal constructions from monodisperse micro- and nanoparticles have been generally demonstrated on model materials. In this work, novel core particle syntheses, particle functionalizations and bottom-up assembly techniques are presented to create functional colloidal devices. Using particle lithography, high-information colloidal vectors have been developed and modified with imaging and targeting agents. Localized nanoscale patches have been reliably positioned on microparticles to serve as foundations for further chemical or physical modifications. Site-specific placement of RGD targeting ligands has been achieved in these lithographed patches. Preferential uptake of these targeted vectors by RGD-specific 3T3 fibroblasts was verified using confocal laser scanning microscopy. A transition was made from the functionalization of model imaging core particles to the lithography of colloidal cartridges, in an effort to construct colloidal syringes with specialized, programmable release profiles. A variety of functional, pH-sensitive fluorescent cores were engineered to respond to solution conditions. When triggered, the diverse composite core microparticles and reservoir microcapsules released embedded fluorescent moieties such as dye molecules, and fluorophore-conjugated nanoparticles. The microcapsules, created using layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte deposition on sacrificial templates, were selectively modified with a robust coating. The pH-responsive anisotropic reservoir microcapsules were extremely stable in solution, and exhibited a "Lazarus" functionality of rehydrating to their original state following desiccation. A snapshot of focused-release of core constituents through the lone opening in colloidal monotremes has been obtained by anisotropically-functionalizing degradable cores with barrier shells. Additionally

  17. Colloidal-gold electrosensor measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Wegner, S.; Harpold, M.A.; McCaffrey, T.M.; Morris, S.E.; Wojciechowski, M.; Zhao, J.; Henkens, R.W.; Naser, N.; O`Daly, J.P.

    1995-11-21

    The present invention provides a new device for use in measuring lead levels in biological and environmental samples. Using square wave coulometry and colloidal gold particles impregnated on carbon electrodes, the present invention provides a rapid, reliable, portable and inexpensive means of detecting low lead levels. The colloidal gold modified electrodes have microelectrode array characteristics and produce significantly higher stripping detection signals for lead than are produced at bulk gold electrode surfaces. The method is effective in determining levels of lead down to at least 5 {micro}g/dL in blood samples as small as 10 {micro}L. 9 figs.

  18. Dynamics of Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Experiments with colloidal solutions of plastic microspheres suspended in a liquid serve as models of how molecules interact and form crystals. For the Dynamics of Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition (CDOT) experiment, Paul Chaikin of Princeton University has identified effects that are attributable to Earth's gravity and demonstrated that experiments are needed in the microgravity of orbit. Space experiments have produced unexpected dendritic (snowflake-like) structures. To date, the largest hard sphere crystal grown is a 3 mm single crystal grown at the cool end of a ground sample. At least two more additional flight experiments are plarned aboard the International Space Station. This image is from a video downlink.

  19. Colloidal-gold electrosensor measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Wegner, Steven; Harpold, Michael A.; McCaffrey, Terence M.; Morris, Susan E.; Wojciechowski, Marek; Zhao, Junguo; Henkens, Robert W.; Naser, Najih; O'Daly, John P.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a new device for use in measuring lead levels in biological and environmental samples. Using square wave coulometry and colloidal gold particles impregnated on carbon electrodes, the present invention provides a rapid, reliable, portable and inexpensive means of detecting low lead levels. The colloidal gold modified electrodes have microelectrode array characteristics and produce significantly higher stripping detection signals for lead than are produced at bulk gold electrode surfaces. The method is effective in determining levels of lead down to at least 5 .mu.g/dL in blood samples as small as 10 .mu.L.

  20. Anisotropic elasticity of experimental colloidal Wigner crystals.

    PubMed

    Russell, Emily R; Spaepen, Frans; Weitz, David A

    2015-03-01

    Colloidal particles interacting via a long-range repulsion can, in contrast to hard-sphere systems, exhibit crystalline ordering at low volume fraction. Here we experimentally investigate the structure and properties of such "colloidal Wigner crystals." We find a body-centered-cubic crystalline phase at volume fractions of ϕ≳15%, which exhibits large fluctuations of individual particles from their average positions. We determine the three independent crystalline elastic constants and find that these crystals are very compliant and highly anisotropic.

  1. Collective sliding states for colloidal molecular crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    We study the driving of colloidal molecular crystals over periodic substrates such as those created with optical traps. The n-merization that occurs in the colloidal molecular crystal states produces a remarkably rich variety of distinct dynamical behaviors, including polarization effects within the pinned phase and the formation of both ordered and disordered sliding phases. Using computer simulations, we map the dynamic phase diagrams as a function of substrate strength for dimers and trimers on a triangular substrate, and correlate features on the phase diagram with transport signatures.

  2. Self-assembly of colloidal surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegel, Willem

    2012-02-01

    We developed colloidal dumbbells with a rough and a smooth part, based on a method reported in Ref. [1]. Specific attraction between the smooth parts occurs upon addition of non-adsorbing polymers of appropriate size. We present the first results in terms of the assemblies that emerge in these systems. [4pt] [1] D.J. Kraft, W.S. Vlug, C.M. van Kats, A. van Blaaderen, A. Imhof and W.K. Kegel, Self-assembly of colloids with liquid protrusions, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 1182, (2009)

  3. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Phase Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Matthew; Weitz, David A.; Lu, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Phase Separation (BCAT-5-PhaseSep) experiment will photograph initially randomized colloidal samples onboard the ISS to determine their resulting structure over time. This allows the scientists to capture the kinetics (evolution) of their samples, as well as the final equilibrium state of each sample. BCAT-5-PhaseSep studies collapse (phase separation rates that impact product shelf-life); in microgravity the physics of collapse is not masked by being reduced to a simple top and bottom phase as it is on Earth.

  4. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Compete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisken, Barbara J.; Bailey, Arthur E.; Weitz, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Compete (BCAT-5-Compete) investigation will photograph andomized colloidal samples onboard the International Space Station (ISS) to determine their resulting structure over time. The use of EarthKAM software and hardware will allow the scientists to capture the kinetics (evolution) of their samples, as well as the final equilibrium state of each sample. BCAT-5-Compete will utilize samples 6 - 8 in the BCAT-5 hardware to study the competition between phase separation and crystallization, which is important in the manufacture of plastics and other materials.

  5. Colloid mobilization and transport during capillary fringe fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead-filled column. We studied four specific conditions: (1) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase, (2) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially wet porous medium, (3) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially dry porous medium, and (4) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase with the presence of a static air bubble. Confocal images confirmed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively charged and hydrophilic positively charged colloids did. Our results demonstrate that capillary fringe fluctuations are an effective means for colloid mobilization.

  6. Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid Crystalline Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-13

    investigation supported by this grant moved beyond past studies of interfacial and colloidal phenomena involving isotropic liquids to explore and understand a...2010 20-May-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid...Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 liquid crystals, interfacial phenomena, colloids , amphiphiles

  7. Colloids in the River Inn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In the light of an increasing number of technical applications using nanoparticles and reports of adverse effects of engineered nanoparticles, research on the occurrence and stability of particles in all compartments has to be intensified. Colloids in river water represent the geologic setting, environmental conditions, and the anthropogenic use in its catchment. The river not only acts as a sink for nanoparticles but also as the source term due to exchange in the hyporheic zone and in bank filtration setups. The concentration, size distribution and elemental composition of particles in the River Inn were studied from the source in the Swiss Alps to the river mouth at Passau from 2008 to 2014. Samples were collected after each tributary from a sub-catchment and filtered on site using a new filtration device for gentle filtration. The elemental composition was determined after acid digestion with ICP/MS. SEM/EDX analysis provided morphological and elemental information for single particles. A complementary chemical analysis of the river water was performed to assess the geochemical stability of individual particles. As presented at EGU 2014, particles in the upper, rural parts mainly reveal changes in the geological setting of the tributary catchments. Not unexpectedly, particles originating from crystalline rocks, were more stable than particles originating from calcareous rocks. Anthropogenic and industrial influences increase in the lower parts. This went together with a change of the size distribution, an increase of the number of organic particles, and a decrease of the microfauna. Interestingly, specific leisure activities in a sub-catchment, like extensive downhill skiing, manifest itself in the particle composition. This general setting was validated in last year's sampling campaigns. An interesting change in on site parameters and hydrochemical composition was seen during all sampling campaigns at an inflow from the valley Kaunertal, Austria. Therefore

  8. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  9. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  10. Colloid Transport in Porous Medium: Impact of High Salinity Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, N.; Magal, E.; Yechieli, Y.; Yakirevich, A.

    2009-12-01

    We explored the transport of colloids suspended in natural saline solutions with a wide range of ionic strengths, up to Dead Sea brines. Migration of latex microspheres through saturated sand columns of different sizes was studied in lab experiments, and colloid transport was simulated with a mathematical model. We have found that latex microspheres were mobile even in the extremely saline brines of the Dead Sea (ionic strength = 100.9 M). At this high ionic strength, according to the common colloid transport theories, no energetic barrier to colloid attachment exists and colloid adsorption was expected to be a favorable process. Apparently, even in that high salinity, colloids adsorption is not complete and ~20% colloids are allowed to transport (through 30-cm long column). Colloid transport was found to be related to the solution salinity, as expected. After 2-3 pore volumes (PV) the relative concentration of colloids at the outlet of 30-cm long columns decreased as the solution ionic strength increased until some critical value (ionic strength greater than 10-1.8 M) and then remained constant as the solution salinity increased. To further explore the sorption of colloids on sand surfaces in Dead Sea brines, breakthrough curves (BTCs) were studied using 7-cm long columns, through which hundreds of PV were introduced. The observed BTCs exhibited a bi-modal shape that suggests different rates of colloid attachment. After initial breakthrough the relative concentration of colloids at the outlet rose to a value of 0.8 (after 1.5 PV), and it remained relatively constant until approximately 17 PV were flushed through the column. After a total flow of about 20 PV, the relative concentration reached a value of one. The colloid migration process was successfully modeled using the limited entrapment model (Pachepsky et al., 2006), assuming the colloid attachment rate is dependent on the concentration of attached colloids.

  11. Measuring colloidal osmotic compressibility of a polymer-crowded colloidal suspension by optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jinxin; Kara, Vural; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Particle interactions determine the stability of nanoparticle suspensions and the phase separation of particle-polymer mixtures. However, due to the small sizes of the dispersed nanoparticles, it is not easy to directly measure interaction forces between particles in a colloidal suspension. In this paper, we propose an ``Optical Bottle'' approach to quantify these particle interactions in a suspension by measuring the colloidal osmotic compressibility of the nanoparticles. Virial expansion of the colloidal osmotic compressibility yields virial coefficients of different orders. The second order virial coefficient of aqueous suspensions of colloidal polystyrene nanospheres in the presence of high-salt (KCl) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) is found to decrease with increasing PEG concentration, suggesting an attractive depletion interaction between the PEG-crowed polystyrene particles.

  12. Size determinations of plutonium colloids using autocorrelation photon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Triay, I.R.; Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Hobart, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Newton, T.W.; Thompson, J.L.

    1989-12-01

    Autocorrelation Photon Spectroscopy (APS) is a light-scattering technique utilized to determine the size distribution of colloidal suspensions. The capabilities of the APS methodology have been assessed by analyzing colloids of known sizes. Plutonium(IV) colloid samples were prepared by a variety of methods including: dilution; peptization; and alpha-induced auto-oxidation of Pu(III). The size of theses Pu colloids was analyzed using APS. The sizes determined for the Pu colloids studied varied from 1 to 370 nanometers. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Preparation of iridescent colloidal crystal coatings with variable structural colors.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hailin; Yu, Bing; Wang, Shaopeng; Qi, Limin; Wang, Jilei; Ma, Yurong

    2013-07-29

    Iridescent colloidal crystal coatings with variable structural colors were fabricated by incorporating carbon black nanoparticles (CB-NPs) into the voids of polystyrene (PS) colloidal crystals. The structural color of the colloid crystal coatings was not only greatly enhanced after the composition but also varied with observation angles. By changing the diameter of monodisperse PS colloids in the composites, colloidal crystal coatings with three primary colors for additive or subtractive combination were obtained. After incorporation of the PS/CB-NPs hybrid coatings into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix, manmade opal jewelry with variable iridescent colors was made facilely.

  14. Quantitative characterization of the colloidal stability of metallic nanoparticles using UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ray, Tyler R; Lettiere, Bethany; de Rutte, Joseph; Pennathur, Sumita

    2015-03-31

    Plasmonic nanoparticles are used in a wide variety of applications over a broad array of fields including medicine, energy, and environmental chemistry. The continued successful development of this material class requires the accurate characterization of nanoparticle stability for a variety of solution-based conditions. Although many characterization methods exists, there is an absence of a unified, quantitative means for assessing the colloidal stability of plasmonic nanoparticles. We present the particle instability parameter (PIP) as a robust, quantitative, and generalizable characterization technique based on UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy to characterize colloidal instability. We validate PIP performance with both traditional and alternative characterization methods by measuring gold nanorod instability in response to different salt (NaCl) concentrations. We further measure gold nanorod stability as a function of solution pH, salt, and buffer (type and concentration), nanoparticle concentration, and concentration of free surfactant. Finally, these results are contextualized within the literature on gold nanorod stability to establish a standardized methodology for colloidal instability assessment.

  15. Green synthesis of colloid silver nanoparticles and resulting biodegradable starch/silver nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Cheviron, Perrine; Gouanvé, Fabrice; Espuche, Eliane

    2014-08-08

    Environmentally friendly silver nanocomposite films were prepared by an ex situ method consisting firstly in the preparation of colloidal silver dispersions and secondly in the dispersion of the as-prepared nanoparticles in a potato starch/glycerol matrix, keeping a green chemistry process all along the synthesis steps. In the first step concerned with the preparation of the colloidal silver dispersions, water, glucose and soluble starch were used as solvent, reducing agent and stabilizing agent, respectively. The influences of the glucose amount and reaction time were investigated on the size and size distribution of the silver nanoparticles. Two distinct silver nanoparticle populations in size (diameter around 5 nm size for the first one and from 20 to 50 nm for the second one) were distinguished and still highlighted in the potato starch/glycerol based nanocomposite films. It was remarkable that lower nanoparticle mean sizes were evidenced by both TEM and UV-vis analyses in the nanocomposites in comparison to the respective colloidal silver dispersions. A dispersion mechanism based on the potential interactions developed between the nanoparticles and the polymer matrix and on the polymer chain lengths was proposed to explain this morphology. These nanocomposite film series can be viewed as a promising candidate for many applications in antimicrobial packaging, biomedicines and sensors.

  16. Photoelectrochromism in Tungsten Trioxide Colloidal Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenthamarakshan, C. R.; Tacconi, N. R. de; Xu, Lucy; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2004-01-01

    Photophysical and photochemical properties of semiconductor metal oxide colloids are studied in the context of photoelectrochemical conversion and storage of solar energy. The experiment teaches the instrumental principles of UV-visible spectrophotometry, spectral acquisition and background subtraction strategies and diode array spectrometers.

  17. Aggregation kinetics of coalescing polymer colloids.

    PubMed

    Gauer, Cornelius; Jia, Zichen; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2009-09-01

    The aggregation behavior of a soft, rubbery colloidal system with a relatively low glass transition temperature, T(g) approximately -20 degrees C, has been investigated. It is found that the average gyration and hydrodynamic radii, R(g) and R(h), measured by light scattering techniques, evolve in time in parallel, without exhibiting the crossover typical of rigid particle aggregation. Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) images reveal sphere-like clusters, indicating that complete coalescence between particles occurs during aggregation. Since coalescence leads to a reduction in the total colloidal surface area, the surfactant adsorption equilibrium, and thus the colloidal stability, change in the course of aggregation. It is found that to simulate the observed kinetic behavior based on the population balance equations, it is necessary to assume that all the clusters are spherical and to account for variations in the colloidal stability of each aggregating particle pair with time. This indicates that, for the given system, the coalescence is very fast, i.e., its time scale is much smaller than that of the aggregation.

  18. Colloid Formation at Waste Plume Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Saiz, Eduardo; Larsen, Joern T.; Zheng, Zuoping; Couture, Rex A.

    2004-05-22

    Highly saline and caustic tank waste solutions containing radionuclides and toxic metals have leaked into sediments at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities such as the Hanford Site (Washington State). Colloid transport is frequently invoked to explain migration of radionuclides and metals in the subsurface. To understand colloid formation during interactions between highly reactive fluids and sediments and its impact on contaminant transport, we simulated tank waste solution (TWS) leakage processes in laboratory columns at ambient and elevated (70 C) temperatures. We found that maximum formation of mobile colloids occurred at the plume fronts (hundreds to thousands times higher than within the plume bodies or during later leaching). Concentrations of suspended solids were as high as 3 mass%, and their particle-sizes ranged from tens of nm to a few {micro}m. Colloid chemical composition and mineralogy depended on temperature. During infiltration of the leaked high Na{sup +} waste solution, rapid and completed Na{sup +} replacement of exchangeable Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} from the sediment caused accumulation of these divalent cations at the moving plume front. Precipitation of supersaturated Ca{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+}-bearing minerals caused dramatic pH reduction at the plume front. In turn, the reduced pH caused precipitation of other minerals. This understanding can help predict the behavior of contaminant trace elements carried by the tank waste solutions, and could not have been obtained through conventional batch studies.

  19. Motile Fluids: Granular, Colloidal and Living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2014-03-01

    My talk will present our recent results from theory, simulation and experiment on flocking, swarming and instabilities in diverse realizations of active systems. The findings I will report include: flocking at a distance in vibrated granular monolayers; the active hydrodynamics of self-propelled solids; clusters, asters and oscillations in colloidal chemotaxis. Supported by a J C Bose Fellowship.

  20. Cobalt-doped cadmium selenide colloidal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Du, Ai Jun; Sun, Qiao; Aljada, Muhsen; Cheng, Li Na; Riley, Mark J; Zhu, Zhong Hua; Cheng, Zhen Xiang; Wang, Xiao Lin; Hall, Jeremy; Krausz, Elmars; Qiao, Shi Zhang; Smith, Sean C; Lu, Gao Qing Max

    2011-11-21

    Co(2+)-doped CdSe colloidal nanowires with tunable size and dopant concentration have been prepared by a solution-liquid-solid (SLS) approach for the first time. These doped nanowires exhibit anomalous photoluminescence temperature dependence in comparison with undoped nanowires.

  1. Electroneutrality and phase behavior of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, A. R.

    2007-11-01

    Several statistical mechanical theories predict that colloidal suspensions of highly charged macroions and monovalent microions can exhibit unusual thermodynamic phase behavior when strongly deionized. Density-functional, extended Debye-Hückel, and response theories, within mean-field and linearization approximations, predict a spinodal phase instability of charged colloids below a critical salt concentration. Poisson-Boltzmann cell model studies of suspensions in Donnan equilibrium with a salt reservoir demonstrate that effective interactions and osmotic pressures predicted by such theories can be sensitive to the choice of reference system, e.g., whether the microion density profiles are expanded about the average potential of the suspension or about the reservoir potential. By unifying Poisson-Boltzmann and response theories within a common perturbative framework, it is shown here that the choice of reference system is dictated by the constraint of global electroneutrality. On this basis, bulk suspensions are best modeled by density-dependent effective interactions derived from a closed reference system in which the counterions are confined to the same volume as the macroions. Lower-dimensional systems (e.g., monolayers, clusters), depending on the strength of macroion-counterion correlations, may be governed instead by density-independent effective interactions tied to an open reference system with counterions dispersed throughout the reservoir, possibly explaining the observed structural crossover in colloidal monolayers and anomalous metastability of colloidal crystallites.

  2. Model colloid system for interfacial sorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salipante, Paul; Hudson, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Adsorption kinetics of nanometer scale molecules, such as proteins at interfaces, is usually determined through measurements of surface coverage. Their small size limits the ability to directly observe individual molecule behavior. To better understand the behavior of nanometer size molecules and the effect on interfacial kinetics, we use micron size colloids with a weak interfacial interaction potential as a model system. Thus, the interaction strength is comparable to many nanoscale systems (less than 10 kBT). The colloid-interface interaction potential is tuned using a combination of depletion, electrostatic, and gravitational forces. The colloids transition between an entropically trapped adsorbed state and a desorbed state through Brownian motion. Observations are made using an LED-based Total Internal Reflection Microscopy (TIRM) setup. The observed adsorption and desorption rates are compared theoretical predictions based on the measured interaction potential and near wall particle diffusivity. This experimental system also allows for the study of more complex dynamics such as nonspherical colloids and collective effects at higher concentrations.

  3. Stratification dynamics in drying colloidal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Howard, Michael P; Nikoubashman, Arash; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2017-03-28

    Stratification in binary colloidal mixtures was investigated using implicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations. For large particle size ratios and film Péclet numbers greater than unity, smaller colloids migrated to the top of the film, while big colloids were pushed to the bottom, creating an "inverted" stratification. This peculiar behavior was observed in recent simulations and experiments conducted by Fortini et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2016, 116, 118301). To rationalize this behavior, particle size ratios and drying rates spanning qualitatively different Péclet number regimes were systematically studied, and the dynamics of the inverted stratification were quantified in detail. The stratified layer of small colloids was found to grow faster and to larger thicknesses for larger size ratios. Interestingly, inverted stratification was observed even at moderate drying rates where the film Péclet numbers were comparable to unity, but the thickness of the stratified layer decreased. A model based on dynamical density functional theory is proposed to explain the observed phenomena.

  4. Forces between colloid particles in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Luke M; Hunter, Keith A; Ducker, William A

    2003-08-01

    The origin and nature of interparticle forces acting on colloid surfaces in natural waters has been examined using an atomic force microscope. Natural colloids were represented by a surface film of iron oxide precipitated onto spherical SiO2 particles, and the effects of adsorbed natural organic matter (NOM), solution pH, and ionic composition on the force-separation curves were investigated. NOM from both riverine and marine environments was strongly adsorbed to the iron oxide surface. Under conditions of low ionic strength, the interparticle forces were dominated by electrostatic repulsion arising from negative functional groups on the NOM, except at very small separations (<10 nm) where repulsive forces arising from steric interference of the NOM molecules were also present. At high ionic strength (e.g., seawater) or low pH, the electrostatic forces were largely absent, allowing steric repulsion forces to dominate. In addition, adhesive bridging between surfaces by adsorbed NOM was observed, creating a strong energy barrier to spontaneous disaggregation of colloid aggregates. Our results demonstrate that adsorbed NOM dominates the surface forces and thus stability with respect to aggregation of natural water colloids.

  5. Colloidal nanophotonics: the emerging technology platform.

    PubMed

    Gaponenko, Sergey; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Seassal, Christian; Woggon, Ulrike

    2016-01-25

    Dating back to decades or even centuries ago, colloidal nanophotonics during the last ten years rapidly extends towards light emitting devices, lasers, sensors and photonic circuitry to manifest itself as an emerging technology platform rather than an entirely academic research field.

  6. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Brown, Dan; Eustace, John

    2015-01-01

    Increment 45 - 46 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-T1) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  7. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ron; Chmiel, Alan J.; Eustace, John; LaBarbera, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Increment 43 - 44 Science Symposium presentation of Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE-H-2) to RPO. The purpose of this event is for Principal Investigators to present their science objectives, testing approach, and measurement methods to agency scientists, managers, and other investigators.

  8. Rheology and dynamics of colloidal superballs.

    PubMed

    Royer, John R; Burton, George L; Blair, Daniel L; Hudson, Steven D

    2015-07-28

    Recent advances in colloidal synthesis make it possible to generate a wide array of precisely controlled, non-spherical particles. This provides a unique opportunity to probe the role that particle shape plays in the dynamics of colloidal suspensions, particularly at higher volume fractions, where particle interactions are important. We examine the role of particle shape by characterizing both the bulk rheology and micro-scale diffusion in a suspension of pseudo-cubic silica superballs. Working with these well-characterized shaped colloids, we can disentangle shape effects in the hydrodynamics of isolated particles from shape-mediated particle interactions. We find that the hydrodynamic properties of isolated superballs are marginally different from comparably sized hard spheres. However, shape-mediated interactions modify the suspension microstructure, leading to significant differences in the self-diffusion of the superballs. While this excluded volume interaction can be captured with a rescaling of the superball volume fraction, we observe qualitative differences in the shear thickening behavior of moderately concentrated superball suspensions that defy simple rescaling onto hard sphere results. This study helps to define the unknowns associated with the effects of shape on the rheology and dynamics of colloidal solutions.

  9. Continuous separation of colloidal particles using dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Nurul Amziah Md; Nili, Hossein; Green, Nicolas G

    2013-04-01

    Dielectrophoresis is the movement of particles in nonuniform electric fields and has been of interest for application to manipulation and separation at and below the microscale. This technique has the advantages of being noninvasive, nondestructive, and noncontact, with the movement of particle achieved by means of electric fields generated by miniaturized electrodes and microfluidic systems. Although the majority of applications have been above the microscale, there is increasing interest in application to colloidal particles around a micron and smaller. This paper begins with a review of colloidal and nanoscale dielectrophoresis with specific attention paid to separation applications. An innovative design of integrated microelectrode array and its application to flow-through, continuous separation of colloidal particles is then presented. The details of the angled chevron microelectrode array and the test microfluidic system are then discussed. The variation in device operation with applied signal voltage is presented and discussed in terms of separation efficiency, demonstrating 99.9% separation of a mixture of colloidal latex spheres.

  10. Preparation and properties of uniform size colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Matijevic, E. )

    1993-04-01

    The achievements and problems in the preparation of uniform colloids by precipitation from homogeneous electrolyte solutions are reviewed. Specifically, the syntheses of [open quotes]monodispersed[close quotes] particles of simple and mixed compositions as well as of coated and hollow particles of different shapes are described, and the physical and chemical mechanisms of their formation are discussed. 126 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  12. Colloid suspension stability and transport through unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, M.A.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1997-04-01

    Contaminant transport is traditionally modeled in a two-phase system: a mobile aqueous phase and an immobile solid phase. Over the last 15 years, there has been an increasing awareness of a third, mobile solid phase. This mobile solid phase, or mobile colloids, are organic or inorganic submicron-sized particles that move with groundwater flow. When colloids are present, the net effect on radionuclide transport is that radionuclides can move faster through the system. It is not known whether mobile colloids exist in the subsurface environment of the Hanford Site. Furthermore, it is not known if mobile colloids would likely exist in a plume emanating from a Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal site. No attempt was made in this study to ascertain whether colloids would form. Instead, experiments and calculations were conducted to evaluate the likelihood that colloids, if formed, would remain in suspension and move through saturated and unsaturated sediments. The objectives of this study were to evaluate three aspects of colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides as they specifically relate to the LLW Performance Assessment. These objectives were: (1) determine if the chemical conditions likely to exist in the near and far field of the proposed disposal site are prone to induce flocculation (settling of colloids from suspension) or dispersion of naturally occurring Hanford colloids, (2) identify the important mechanisms likely involved in the removal of colloids from a Hanford sediment, and (3) determine if colloids can move through unsaturated porous media.

  13. Colloid Mobilization and Transport during Capillary Fringe Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead filled column. Confocal images showed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively-charged and hydrophilic positively-charged colloids did.

  14. Tracking liquid in drying colloidal fluids with polarized light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kun; Park, Jung Soo; Kim, Joon Heon; Weon, Byung Mook

    2014-11-01

    When colloidal fluids dry, tracking liquid surfaces around colloids is difficult with conventional imaging techniques. Here we show that polarized light microscopy (PM) is very useful in tracking liquid surfaces during drying processes of colloidal fluids. In particular, the PM mode is not a new or difficult way but is able to visualize liquid films above colloids in real time. We demonstrate that when liquid films above colloidal particles are broken, the PM patterns appear clearly: this feature is useful to identify the moment of liquid film rupture above colloids in drying colloidal fluids. This result is helpful to improve relevant processes such as inkjet printing, painting, and nanoparticle patterning (K.C. and J.S.P. equally contributed). This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST.

  15. Active structuring of colloidal armour on liquid drops

    PubMed Central

    Dommersnes, Paul; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Mikkelsen, Alexander; Castberg, Rene; Kjerstad, Knut; Hersvik, Kjetil; Otto Fossum, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Adsorption and assembly of colloidal particles at the surface of liquid droplets are at the base of particle-stabilized emulsions and templating. Here we report that electrohydrodynamic and electro-rheological effects in leaky-dielectric liquid drops can be used to structure and dynamically control colloidal particle assemblies at drop surfaces, including electric-field-assisted convective assembly of jammed colloidal ‘ribbons’, electro-rheological colloidal chains confined to a two-dimensional surface and spinning colloidal domains on that surface. In addition, we demonstrate the size control of ‘pupil’-like openings in colloidal shells. We anticipate that electric field manipulation of colloids in leaky dielectrics can lead to new routes of colloidosome assembly and design for ‘smart armoured’ droplets. PMID:23811716

  16. [Preliminary study of colloid osmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Xiang, L; Luo, J

    1996-12-01

    The ideal colloid osmotic pressure is beneficial to decrease the fluid accumulated in the pulmonary and other tissue during cardiopulmonary bypass. Schupbach reported the proper colloidosmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass was 2.1 kPa (16 mmHg). Colloid osmotic pressures of blood and priming fluid during cardiopulmonary bypass were measured in 28 patients with heart disease by using colloid osmotic pressure detection apparatus. The value of colloid osmotic pressure suitable for the designed standard was apparently different among the Gelofusine group and other groups. P value was 0.005. Priming fluid for cardiopulmonary bypass needs to satisfy the quality and the quantity of colloid osmotic pressure. Using Albumin isn't economical. Whole blood and plazma are not suitable for increasing colloid osmotic pressure. Hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine is best choice in priming to get designed standard of colloid osmotic pressure. The ratio of hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine in priming fluid should beyond 1/2.

  17. Introduction to special section on Colloid Transport in Subsurface Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiers, James E.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2006-12-01

    The Water Resources Research special section on Colloid Transport in Subsurface Environments presents new knowledge that is critical to solving problems related to groundwater pollution by microbial pathogens and hazardous chemicals. This introduction to the special section surveys fourteen manuscripts that advance current understanding of the transport of biocolloids (e.g., bacteria, viruses, and protozoa), mineral colloids, and colloid-associated contaminants in the vadose zone and in groundwater. These papers present new techniques for elucidating mechanisms that govern colloid mobility, propose mathematical models appropriate for quantifying colloid and colloid-associated contaminant transport, and report pore-scale and column-scale observations requisite for evaluating these models. Together, the papers of this special section illuminate the complexity of the colloid transport problem and describe progress toward understanding this complexity.

  18. Scattering from correlations in colloidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions typically exhibit spatial correlations over distances of order 10-10/sup 4/ A, corresponding either to the size of individual particles (e.g., polymer chains, surfactant micelles) or to the range of interaction between particles (e.g., charged polymer lattices at low ionic strength). Apart from having fundamental intrinsic interest, such systems are also extremely useful as model systems with which to study, for example, non-Newtonian hydrodynamics, since temporal correlations are generally much longer lived (10/sup -8/-10/sup -3/ sec) than those found in simple atomic or small molecular systems (10/sup -13/-10/sup -10/ sec). Colloids have long been the subject of macroscopic phenomenological research (on rheological properties, for example), but it is only recently that microscopic light, x-ray and neutron scattering techniques have been applied to their study, in large part because of theoretical difficulties in understanding the scattering from dense liquid-like systems of interacting particles. For spherical colloids, such theoretical problems have now been largely overcome, and for anisotropic colloids experimental techniques are being developed which circumvent the intractable theoretical areas. This paper will first review some static light and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) results on colloidal suspensions, both at equilibrium and in steady-state non-equilibrium situations, and will then discuss some dynamic measurements on polymer solutions and melts made using the neutron spin-echo (NSE) technique. Emphasis is placed on experiments which have a possible counterpart in synchrotron radiation studies. In particular, NSE extends the results of photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) to larger momentum transfers and shorter time-scales than are available with visible light, and the extension of PCS to short wavelength on a synchrotron source would be of similar fundamental interest.

  19. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01

    The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface

  20. Infrared detection with colloidal quantum dots based on interband and intraband transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    While much research on colloidal quantum dots is focused on their potential as visible emitter or light harvester, this talk will cover our investigations of the mercury chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots in the thermal mid-infrared ranges of 3-5 microns and 8-12 microns where the atmosphere is transparent. HgTe is a zero-gap semiconductor. As a result, colloidal quantum dots (CQD) of sizes between 10 and 20 nm readily lead to infrared gaps tuning between 3 and 12 microns respectively. It is also very promising that infrared photodetection using dried films of these CQDs has now been demonstrated up to 12 microns. Further improvement through chemistry are likely and will be required to raise the detectivity to the level required to transform thermal infrared detection technology. In contrast to HgTe CQDs which tend to be intrinsic, beta-HgS and HgSe CQDs are naturally n-doped, in the first such instance with CQDs. Furthermore, the doping is modulated by modifying the surface composition, and this effect is attributed to the tuning of the energy level with respect to the environment, via the surface electrostatics. With controlled doping, both HgSe and HgS CQDs have now led to the first operation of mid-infrared CQD photodetector based on the intraband absorption. This is a breakthrough in the field of colloidal quantum dots where interband transitions had been exclusively used for the past 30 years. One challenge with both interband and intraband infrared CQDs will be to reduce the nonradiative recombination, which will improve the detectivity as well as allow to use their infrared luminescence.

  1. Quantum confined colloidal nanorod heterostructures for solar-to-fuel conversion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaifeng; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-07-11

    Solar energy conversion, particularly solar-driven chemical fuel formation, has been intensely studied in the past decades as a potential approach for renewable energy generation. Efficient solar-to-fuel conversion requires artificial photosynthetic systems with strong light absorption, long-lived charge separation and efficient catalysis. Colloidal quantum confined nanoheterostructures have emerged as promising materials for this application because of the ability to tailor their properties through size, shape and composition. In particular, colloidal one-dimensional (1D) semiconductor nanorods (NRs) offer the opportunity to simultaneously maintain quantum confinement in radial dimensions for tunable light absorptions and bulk like carrier transport in the axial direction for long-distance charge separations. In addition, the versatile chemistry of colloidal NRs enables the formation of semiconductor heterojunctions (such as CdSe/CdS dot-in-rod NRs) to separate photogenerated electron-hole pairs and deposition of metallic domains to accept charges and catalyze redox reactions. In this review, we summarize research progress on colloidal NR heterostructures and their applications for solar energy conversion, emphasizing mechanistic insights into the working principle of these systems gained from spectroscopic studies. Following a brief overview of synthesis of various NRs and heterostructures, we introduce their electronic structures and dynamics of exciton and carrier transport and interfacial transfer. We discuss how these exciton and carrier dynamics are controlled by their structures and provide key mechanistic understanding on their photocatalytic performance, including the photo-reduction of a redox mediator (methyl viologen) and light driven H2 generation. We discuss the solar-driven H2 generation mechanism, key efficiency limiting steps, and potential approaches for rational improvement in semiconductor NR/metal heterostructures (such as Pt tipped Cd

  2. EDITORIAL: Colloidal dispersions in external fields Colloidal dispersions in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Colloidal dispersions have long been proven as pivotal model systems for equilibrium phase transition such as crystallization, melting and liquid-gas phase transition. The last decades have revealed that this is also true for nonequilibrium phenomena. In fact, the fascinating possibility to track the individual trajectories of colloidal particles has greatly advanced our understanding of collective behaviour in classical many-body systems and has helped to reveal the underlying physical principles of glass transition, crystal nucleation, and interfacial dynamics (to name just a few typical nonequilibrium effects). External fields can be used to bring colloids out of equilibrium in a controlled way. Different kinds of external fields can be applied to colloidal dispersions, namely shear flow, electric, magnetic and laser-optical fields, and confinement. Typical research areas can be sketched with the by now traditional complexity diagram (figure 1). The complexity of the colloidal system itself as embodied in statistical degrees of freedom is shown on the x-axis while the complexity of the problem posed, namely bulk, an inhomogeneity in equilibrium, steady state nonequilibrium and full time-dependent nonequilibrium are shown on the y-axis. The different external fields which can be imposed are indicated by the different hatched areas. figure1 Figure 1. Diagram of complexity for colloidal dispersions in external fields: while the x-axis shows the complexity of the system, the y-axis shows the complexity of the problem. Regions which can be accessed by different kinds of external fields are indicated. The arrows indicate recent research directions. Active particles are also indicated with a special complexity of internal degrees of freedom [1]. This collection of papers reflects the scientific programme of the International Conference on Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields III (CODEF III) which took place in Bonn-Bad Godesberg from 20-23 March 2012. This was the

  3. Approaches to separations using silica colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignacio-de Leon, Patricia Anne Argana

    This thesis describes the synthesis and properties of free-standing nanoporous silica colloidal membranes where the molecular transport is controlled on the basis of size, charge, and chiral selectivity. To achieve this, free-standing membranes were prepared from colloidal solutions of silica nanospheres and the nanopore size and surface functionality were varied. First, Au-coated membranes were prepared and the transport of neutral and charged small molecules through Au-coated silica colloidal membranes modified with poly(methacrylic acid) was studied. Polymer length was controlled by polymerization time to produce pH- and ion-responsive brushes inside the nanopores. By monitoring the flux of a diffusing species, it was demonstrated that the polyelectrolyte brush undergoes swelling and collapse when the pH is increased and decreased, respectively. We also observed an expansion and contraction in the absence and presence of counterions, respectively. We also studied the transport of enantiomers of a chiral dye molecule through silica colloidal membranes with attached chiral moieties. We used small molecules and polymers of amino acid derivatives and chiral calixarenes capable of chiral recognition as a result of stereochemically dependent noncovalent interactions with the diffusing molecule. We found that the selectivity remains approximately the same for membranes modified with small molecules and with polymers. This suggests that enantiopermselectivity depends primarily on the strength of noncovalent interactions rather than the availability of recognition sites. Next, the transport of various generations of dendrimers through silica colloidal membranes was studied in a proof-of-concept experiment to demonstrate the size-selectivity of our materials. Smaller dendrimers were found to diffuse faster and selectivity is improved by using smaller nanopores. Finally, the transport of proteins through silica colloidal membranes was studied as a function of nanopore size

  4. Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) Science Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Luna, Unique J.; Chaiken, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Andrew; Secanna, Stefano; Weitz, David; Lu, Peter; Yodh, Arjun; Yunker, Peter; Lohr, Matthew; Gratale, Matthew; Lynch, Matthew; Kodger, Thomas; Piazza, Roberto; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Cipelletti, Luca; Schall, Peter; Veen, Sandra; Wegdam, Gerhard; Lee, Chand-Soo; Choi, Chang-Hyung; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J.; Cohen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Colloids Experiment is being conducted on the International Space Station (ISS) using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) in the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR). Work to date will be discussed and future plans and opportunities will be highlighted. The LMM is a microscope facility designed to allow scientists to process, manipulate, and characterize colloidal samples in micro-gravity where the absence of gravitational settling and particle jamming enables scientists to study such things as:a.The role that disordered and ordered-packing of spheres play in the phase diagram and equation of state of hard sphere systems,b.crystal nucleation and growth, growth instabilities, and the glass transition, c.gelation and phase separation of colloid polymer mixtures,d.crystallization of colloidal binary alloys,e.competition between crystallization and phase separation,f.effects of anisotropy and specific interactions on packing, aggregation, frustration and crystallization,g.effects of specific reversible and irreversible interactions mediated in the first case by hybridization of complementary DNA strands attached to separate colloidal particles,h.Lock and key interactions between colloids with dimples and spheres which match the size and shape of the dimples,i.finding the phase diagrams of isotropic and interacting particles,j.new techniques for complex self-assembly including scenarios for self-replication, k.critical Casimir forces,l.biology (real and model systems) in microgravity,m.etc. By adding additional microscopy capabilities to the existing LMM, NASA will increase the tools available for scientists that fly experiments on the ISS enabling scientists to observe directly what is happening at the particle level. Presently, theories are needed to bridge the gap between what is being observed (at a macroscopic level when photographing samples) with what is happening at a particle (or microscopic) level. What is happening at a microscopic level will be directly

  5. Colloid Mobilization in Two Atlantic Coastal Plain Aquifers: Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Joseph N.; Gschwend, Philip M.

    1990-02-01

    The geochemical mechanisms leading to the mobilization of colloids in groundwater were investigated in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey and in rural central Delaware by sampling pairs of wells screened in oxic and anoxic groundwaters in the same geologic formations. Samples were carefully taken at very low flow rates (˜100 mL min-1) to avoid suspending immobilized particles. The colloidal matter was characterized by light-scattering photometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X ray analysis, microelectrophoresis, and Fe, Al, Si, and organic carbon analyses. The colloids, composed primarily of clays, were observed at high concentrations (up to 60 mg colloids/L) in the anoxic groundwaters, while the oxic groundwaters exhibited ≤1 mg colloids/L. Colloidal organic carbon was present in all groundwaters; but under anoxic conditions, one-third to one-half of the total organic carbon was associated with the inorganic colloids. The field evidence indicates that anoxic conditions cause the mobilization of soil colloids by dissolving the ferric oxyhydroxide coatings cementing the clay particles to the aquifer solids. The depletion of oxidized iron on the surfaces of immobile particles and the addition of organic carbon coatings on the soil particles and colloids apparently stabilizes the colloidal suspension in the anoxic groundwaters.

  6. Quantifying colloid retention in partially saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevi, Yuniati; Dathe, Annette; Gao, Bin; Richards, Brian K.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2006-12-01

    The transport of colloid-contaminant complexes and colloid-sized pathogens through soil to groundwater is of concern. Visualization and quantification of pore-scale colloid behavior will enable better description and simulation of retention mechanisms at individual surfaces, in contrast to breakthrough curves which only provide an integrated signal. We tested two procedures for quantifying colloid movement and retention as observed in pore-scale image sequences. After initial testing with static images, three series of images of synthetic microbead suspensions passing through unsaturated sand were examined. The region procedure (implemented in ImageJ) and the Boolean procedure (implemented in KS400) yielded nearly identical results for initial test images and for total colloid-covered areas in three image series. Because of electronic noise resulting in pixel-level brightness fluctuations the Boolean procedure tended to underestimate attached colloid counts and conversely overestimate mobile colloid counts. The region procedure had a smaller overestimation error of attached colloids. Reliable quantification of colloid retention at pore scale can be used to improve current understanding on the transport mechanisms of colloids in unsaturated porous media. For example, attachment counts at individual air/water meniscus/solid interface were well described by Langmuir isotherms.

  7. Sorption of selected endocrine disrupting chemicals to different aquatic colloids.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J L; Liu, R; Wilding, A; Hibberd, A

    2007-01-01

    The sorption of seven endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) to aquatic colloids was determined by cross-flow ultrafiltration (CFUF) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Results show that the colloidal organic carbon normalized sorption coefficient (Kcoc) of EDCs to different aquatic colloids varies by a factor of 6-12 because such colloids are of different origin. Through characterization of colloidal samples, a significant relationship was established between Kcoc values and the molar extinction coefficient of colloids at 280 nm, whereas no other colloidal properties such as elemental ratios were correlated with Kcoc values. The results are consistent with other reports of the importance of the quality of sorbents such as their aromatic carbon content in sorbing various organic pollutants. The presence of a surfactant was found to increase Kcoc values for estrone (El) and 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2). The method was subsequently applied for determining EDC concentrations in field samples, where both conventional and truly dissolved EDCs showed higher concentrations close to sewage outfalls than either upstream or downstream, confirming the sourceconcentration relationship. In addition, the truly dissolved EDC concentrations were lower than the conventional dissolved concentrations, confirming that there were interactions between aquatic colloids and EDCs. It is estimated that between 10 and 29% of EDCs are associated with aquatic colloids. As colloids are highly abundant in rivers and ocean, they will therefore play a significant role in the environmental behavior and fate of EDCs.

  8. Shape recognition of microbial cells by colloidal cell imprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Paunov, Vesselin N.

    2013-08-01

    We have engineered a class of colloids which can recognize the shape and size of targeted microbial cells and selectively bind to their surfaces. These imprinted colloid particles, which we called ``colloid antibodies'', were fabricated by partial fragmentation of silica shells obtained by templating the targeted microbial cells. We successfully demonstrated the shape and size recognition between such colloidal imprints and matching microbial cells. High percentage of binding events of colloidal imprints with the size matching target particles was achieved. We demonstrated selective binding of colloidal imprints to target microbial cells in a binary mixture of cells of different shapes and sizes, which also resulted in high binding selectivity. We explored the role of the electrostatic interactions between the target cells and their colloid imprints by pre-coating both of them with polyelectrolytes. Selective binding occurred predominantly in the case of opposite surface charges of the colloid cell imprint and the targeted cells. The mechanism of the recognition is based on the amplification of the surface adhesion in the case of shape and size match due to the increased contact area between the target cell and the colloidal imprint. We also tested the selective binding for colloid imprints of particles of fixed shape and varying sizes. The concept of cell recognition by colloid imprints could be used for development of colloid antibodies for shape-selective binding of microbes. Such colloid antibodies could be additionally functionalized with surface groups to enhance their binding efficiency to cells of specific shape and deliver a drug payload directly to their surface or allow them to be manipulated using external fields. They could benefit the pharmaceutical industry in developing selective antimicrobial therapies and formulations.

  9. Cotransport of bismerthiazol and montmorillonite colloids in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chongyang; Wang, Hong; Lazouskaya, Volha; Du, Yichun; Lu, Weilan; Wu, Junxue; Zhang, Hongyan; Huang, Yuanfang

    2015-06-01

    While bismerthiazol [N,N‧-methylene-bis-(2-amino-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole)] is one of the most widely used bactericides, the transport of bismerthiazol in subsurface environments is unclear to date. Moreover, natural colloids are ubiquitous in the subsurface environments. The cotransport of bismerthiazol and natural colloids has not been investigated. This study conducted laboratory column experiments to examine the transport of bismerthiazol in saturated sand porous media both in the absence and presence of montmorillonite colloids. Results show that a fraction of bismerthiazol was retained in sand and the retention was higher at pH 7 than at pH 4 and 10. The retention did not change with ionic strength. The retention was attributed to the complex of bismerthiazol with metals/metal oxides on sand surfaces through ligand exchange. The transport of bismerthiazol was enhanced with montmorillonite colloids copresent in the solutions and, concurrently, the transport of montmorillonite colloids was facilitated by the bismerthiazol. The transport of montmorillonite colloids was enhanced likely because the bismerthiazol and the colloids competed for the attachment/adsorption sites on collector surfaces and the presence of bismerthiazol changed the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies between colloids and collectors. The transport of bismerthiazol was inhibited if montmorillonite colloids were pre-deposited in sand because bismerthiazol could adsorb onto the colloid surfaces. The adsorbed bismerthiazol could be co-remobilized with the colloids from primary minima by decreasing ionic strength. Whereas colloid-facilitated transport of pesticides has been emphasized, our study implies that transport of colloids could also be facilitated by the presence of pesticides.

  10. Cotransport of bismerthiazol and montmorillonite colloids in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chongyang; Wang, Hong; Lazouskaya, Volha; Du, Yichun; Lu, Weilan; Wu, Junxue; Zhang, Hongyan; Huang, Yuanfang

    2015-01-01

    While bismerthiazol [N,N'-methylene-bis-(2-amino-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole)] is one of the most widely used bactericides, the transport of bismerthiazol in subsurface environments is unclear to date. Moreover, natural colloids are ubiquitous in the subsurface environments. The cotransport of bismerthiazol and natural colloids has not been investigated. This study conducted laboratory column experiments to examine the transport of bismerthiazol in saturated sand porous media both in the absence and presence of montmorillonite colloids. Results show that a fraction of bismerthiazol was retained in sand and the retention was higher at pH7 than at pH 4 and 10. The retention did not change with ionic strength. The retention was attributed to the complex of bismerthiazol with metals/metal oxides on sand surfaces through ligand exchange. The transport of bismerthiazol was enhanced with montmorillonite colloids copresent in the solutions and, concurrently, the transport of montmorillonite colloids was facilitated by the bismerthiazol. The transport of montmorillonite colloids was enhanced likely because the bismerthiazol and the colloids competed for the attachment/adsorption sites on collector surfaces and the presence of bismerthiazol changed the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies between colloids and collectors. The transport of bismerthiazol was inhibited if montmorillonite colloids were pre-deposited in sand because bismerthiazol could adsorb onto the colloid surfaces. The adsorbed bismerthiazol could be co-remobilized with the colloids from primary minima by decreasing ionic strength. Whereas colloid-facilitated transport of pesticides has been emphasized, our study implies that transport of colloids could also be facilitated by the presence of pesticides.

  11. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  12. Overview of actinide chemistry in the WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean - Francois; Richmann, Michael K; Reed, Donald T; Khaing, Hnin; Swanson, Juliet

    2009-01-01

    inorganic complexants are expected to be carbonate/bicarbonate and hydroxide. There are also organic complexants in TRU waste with the potential to strongly influence actinide solubility. (3) Intrinsic and pseudo-actinide colloid formation - Many actinide species in their expected oxidation states tend to form colloids or strongly associate with non actinide colloids present (e.g., microbial, humic and organic). In this context, the relative importance of actinides, based on the TRU waste inventory, with respect to the potential release of actinides from the WIPP, is greater for plutonium and americium, and to less extent for uranium and thorium. The most important oxidation states for WIPP-relevant conditions are III and IV. We will present an update of the literature on WIPP-specific data, and a summary of the ongoing research related to actinide chemistry in the WIPP performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science (ACRSP) team located in Carlsbad, NM [Reed 2007, Lucchini 2007, and Reed 2006].

  13. Colloidal Dancers: Designing networks of DNA-functionalized colloids for non-random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Emily W.; Rogers, W. Benjamin; Zeravcic, Zorana; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    2014-03-01

    We present experimental developments of a system of DNA-functionalized colloidal particles with the goal of creating directed motion (`dancing') along patterned substrates in response to temperature cycling. We take advantage of toehold exchange in the design of the DNA sequences that mediate the colloidal interactions to produce broadened, flat, or even re-entrant binding and unbinding transitions between the particles and substrate. Using this new freedom of design, we devise systems where, by thermal ratcheting, we can externally control the direction of motion and sequence of steps of the colloidal dancer. In comparison to DNA-based walkers, which move autonomously and whose motion is controlled by the substrate, our colloidal dancers respond to external driving, and their motion can be controlled in situ. Our use of DNA-functionalized colloidal particles instead of pure DNA systems also enables walking on the mesoscale in contrast to the molecular length scales previously demonstrated, allowing for the future prospect of directed transport over larger distances.

  14. Tunable Assembly of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The self-assembly of colloidal particles is a route to designed materials production that combines high flexibility, cost effectiveness, and the opportunity to create ordered structures at length scales ranging from nano- to micrometers. For many practical applications in electronics, photovoltaics, and biomimetic material synthesis, ordered mono- and bilayers are often needed. Here we present a novel and simple way to tune via external parameters the ordering of heterogeneously charged colloids into quasi two-dimensional structures. Depending on the charges of the underlying substrate and of the particles, a rich and versatile assembly scenario takes place, resulting from the complex interplay between directional attractive and repulsive particle–particle and particle–substrate interactions. Upon subtle variations of the relative charge of the system components, emerging via pH modification, reversible changes either from extended aggregates to a monomeric phase or from triangular to square domains are observed. PMID:24842542

  15. Renormalized jellium model for colloidal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García de Soria, María Isabel; Álvarez, Carlos E.; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    In an attempt to quantify the role of polydispersity in colloidal suspensions, we present an efficient implementation of the renormalized jellium model for a mixture of spherical charged colloids. The different species may have different size, charge, and density. Advantage is taken from the fact that the electric potential pertaining to a given species obeys a Poisson's equation that is species independent; only boundary conditions do change from one species to the next. All species are coupled through the renormalized background (jellium) density, that is determined self-consistently. The corresponding predictions are compared to the results of Monte Carlo simulations of binary mixtures, where Coulombic interactions are accounted for exactly, at the primitive model level (structureless solvent with fixed dielectric permittivity). An excellent agreement is found.

  16. Structure and hydrodynamics of colloidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1985-07-01

    Colloidal phases (for example, micellar solutions, latex suspensions, ferrofluids and microemulsions) provide excellent model systems with which to test structural and hydrodynamic theories of the liquid state. Interparticle potentials may be attractive or repulsive, and the experimentalist is often free to control the strength, range and symmetry of the interactions. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small-angle neutron spin-echo (SANSE) provide excellent complementary tools for studying the structure and time-dependence of these systems, where correlation lengths typically vary from about one to several tens of nm. Correlation times are usually in the nsec to ..mu..sec range, but may be of order minutes in certain systems. This paper will review some of the current theories and their recent experimental tests, using colloidal systems in which the direct interaction potentials may have spherical, dipolar or cylindrical symmetry and the hydrodynamic interactions may be weak or strong.

  17. Correlated Clusters in Aging Colloidal Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robe, Dominic; Boettcher, Stefan; Yunker, Peter

    A numerical model of correlated domains in glassy colloids is recreated, following its development by Becker, et. al.. The model is a course grained representation of 2D colloidal systems inspired by record dynamics, and produces emergent dynamic heterogeneity and aging. Results from the original development are reproduced, and compared to the same observables in an experimental system of bidisperse microgel spheres studied by Yunker, et. al.. Basic observables such as particle persistence and mean square displacement are measured at different waiting times to observe aging. Four-point correlation lengths are also examined for signs of dynamic heterogeneity. Results from both the numerical and experimental systems are consistent with the predictions of record dynamics, that aging systems evolve on a logarithmic time scale. This work is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1207431.

  18. Hybrid colloidal plasmonic-photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Sergei G; Korovin, Alexander V; Regensburger, Alois; Peschel, Ulf

    2011-06-17

    We review the recently emerged class of hybrid metal-dielectric colloidal photonic crystals. The hybrid approach is understood as the combination of a dielectric photonic crystal with a continuous metal film. It allows to achieve a strong modification of the optical properties of photonic crystals by involving the light scattering at electronic excitations in the metal component into moulding of the light flow in series to the diffraction resonances occurring in the body of the photonic crystal. We consider different realizations of hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystals based on two- and three-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals in association with flat and corrugated metal films. In agreement with model calculations, different resonance phenomena determine the optical response of hybrid crystals leading to a broadly tuneable functionality of these crystals.

  19. Knot theory realizations in nematic colloids

    PubMed Central

    Čopar, Simon; Tkalec, Uroš; Muševič, Igor; Žumer, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Nematic braids are reconfigurable knots and links formed by the disclination loops that entangle colloidal particles dispersed in a nematic liquid crystal. We focus on entangled nematic disclinations in thin twisted nematic layers stabilized by 2D arrays of colloidal particles that can be controlled with laser tweezers. We take the experimentally assembled structures and demonstrate the correspondence of the knot invariants, constructed graphs, and surfaces associated with the disclination loop to the physically observable features specific to the geometry at hand. The nematic nature of the medium adds additional topological parameters to the conventional results of knot theory, which couple with the knot topology and introduce order into the phase diagram of possible structures. The crystalline order allows the simplified construction of the Jones polynomial and medial graphs, and the steps in the construction algorithm are mirrored in the physics of liquid crystals. PMID:25624467

  20. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter. PMID:27561545

  1. Collective motion in populations of colloidal robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Denis; Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Dauchot, Olivier; Desreumaux, Nicolas

    2014-03-01

    Could the behavior of bacteria swarms, fish schools, and bird flocks be understood within a unified framework? Can one ignore the very details of the interaction mechanisms at the individual level to elucidate how strikingly similar collective motion emerges at the group level in this broad range of motile systems? These seemingly provocative questions have triggered significant advance in the physics and the biology, communities over the last decade. In the physics language these systems, made of motile individuals, can all be though as different realizations of ``active matter.'' In this talk, I will show how to gain more insight into this vivid field using self-propelled colloids as a proxy for motile organism. I will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors. Then, I will demonstrate that these archetypal populations display spontaneous transitions to swarming motion, and to global directed motion with very few density and orientation fluctuations.

  2. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  3. The NASA GSFC MEMS Colloidal Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Eric H.; Jamieson, Brian G.; Norgaard, Peter C.; Chepko, Ariane B.

    2004-01-01

    A number of upcoming missions require different thrust levels on the same spacecraft. A highly scaleable and efficient propulsion system would allow substantial mass savings. One type of thruster that can throttle from high to low thrust while maintaining a high specific impulse is a Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) colloidal thruster. The NASA GSFC MEMS colloidal thruster has solved the problem of electrical breakdown to permit the integration of the electrode on top of the emitter by a novel MEMS fabrication technique. Devices have been successfully fabricated and the insulation properties have been tested to show they can support the required electric field. A computational finite element model was created and used to verify the voltage required to successfully operate the thruster. An experimental setup has been prepared to test the devices with both optical and Time-Of-Flight diagnostics.

  4. Forging Colloidal Nanostructures via Cation Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Among the various postsynthesis treatments of colloidal nanocrystals that have been developed to date, transformations by cation exchange have recently emerged as an extremely versatile tool that has given access to a wide variety of materials and nanostructures. One notable example in this direction is represented by partial cation exchange, by which preformed nanocrystals can be either transformed to alloy nanocrystals or to various types of nanoheterostructures possessing core/shell, segmented, or striped architectures. In this review, we provide an up to date overview of the complex colloidal nanostructures that could be prepared so far by cation exchange. At the same time, the review gives an account of the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic parameters governing these types of reactions, as they are currently understood, and outlines the main open issues and possible future developments in the field. PMID:26891471

  5. Restricted Defect Dynamics in Colloidal Peanut Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbode, Sharon; Lee, Stephanie; John, Bettina; Wolfgang, Angie; Liddell, Chekesha; Escobedo, Fernando; Cohen, Itai

    2008-03-01

    We report that monolayers of hard peanut-shaped colloidal particles consisting of two connected spherical lobes order into a crystalline phase at high area fractions. In this ``lobe-close-packed'' (LCP) crystal, the peanut particle lobes occupy triangular lattice sites, much like close-packed spheres, while the connections between lobe pairs are randomly oriented, uniformly populating the three crystalline directions of the underlying lattice. Using optical microscopy, we directly observe defect nucleation and dynamics in sheared LCP crystals. We find that many particle configurations form obstacles blocking dislocation glide. Consequently, in stark contrast to colloidal monolayers of close-packed spheres, single dislocation pair nucleation is not the only significant energetic barrier to relieving an imposed shear strain. Dislocation propagation beyond such obstructions can proceed only through additional mechanisms such as dislocation reactions. We discuss the implications of such restricted defect mobility for the plasticity of LCP crystals.

  6. Restricted Defect Dynamics in Colloidal Peanut Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbode, Sharon; Lee, Stephanie; John, Bettina; Wolfgang, Angie; Liddell, Chakesha; Escobedo, Fernando; Cohen, Itai

    2008-03-01

    We report that monolayers of hard peanut-shaped colloidal particles consisting of two connected spherical lobes order into a crystalline phase at high area fractions. In this ``lobe- close-packed'' (LCP) crystal, the peanut particle lobes occupy triangular lattice sites, much like close-packed spheres, while the connections between lobe pairs are randomly oriented, uniformly populating the three crystalline directions of the underlying lattice. Using optical microscopy, we directly observe defect nucleation and dynamics in sheared LCP crystals. We find that many particle configurations form obstacles blocking dislocation glide. Consequently, in stark contrast to colloidal monolayers of close-packed spheres, single dislocation pair nucleation is not the only significant energetic barrier to relieving an imposed shear strain. Dislocation propagation beyond such obstructions can proceed only through additional mechanisms such as dislocation reactions. We discuss the implications of such restricted defect mobility for the plasticity of LCP crystals.

  7. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter.

  8. Renormalized jellium model for colloidal mixtures.

    PubMed

    García de Soria, María Isabel; Álvarez, Carlos E; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    In an attempt to quantify the role of polydispersity in colloidal suspensions, we present an efficient implementation of the renormalized jellium model for a mixture of spherical charged colloids. The different species may have different size, charge, and density. Advantage is taken from the fact that the electric potential pertaining to a given species obeys a Poisson's equation that is species independent; only boundary conditions do change from one species to the next. All species are coupled through the renormalized background (jellium) density, that is determined self-consistently. The corresponding predictions are compared to the results of Monte Carlo simulations of binary mixtures, where Coulombic interactions are accounted for exactly, at the primitive model level (structureless solvent with fixed dielectric permittivity). An excellent agreement is found.

  9. Colloidal Nanocrystals Fluoresced by Surface Coordination Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guan; Ji, Jianwei; Zhang, Xinwen; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Qiangbin; You, Xiaozeng; Xu, Xiangxing

    2014-01-01

    Colloidal Nanocrystals (NCs) with fluorescence originating from surface complexes are successfully prepared. The components of these NCs range from insulator, semiconductor to metal, with either pure phase, doped or core/shell structures. The photoluminescence of these NCs can be reversibly tuned across the visible to infrared spectrum, and even allow multi-color emission. A light emitting device is fabricated and a new in vivo cell imaging method is performed to demonstrate the power of this technology for emerging applications. PMID:24970242

  10. Colloidal nanocrystals fluoresced by surface coordination complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guan; Ji, Jianwei; Zhang, Xinwen; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Qiangbin; You, Xiaozeng; Xu, Xiangxing

    2014-06-27

    Colloidal Nanocrystals (NCs) with fluorescence originating from surface complexes are successfully prepared. The components of these NCs range from insulator, semiconductor to metal, with either pure phase, doped or core/shell structures. The photoluminescence of these NCs can be reversibly tuned across the visible to infrared spectrum, and even allow multi-color emission. A light emitting device is fabricated and a new in vivo cell imaging method is performed to demonstrate the power of this technology for emerging applications.

  11. Toward Multispectral Imaging with Colloidal Metasurface Pixels.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jon W; Akselrod, Gleb M; Smith, David R; Mikkelsen, Maiken H

    2017-02-01

    Multispectral colloidal metasurfaces are fabricated that exhibit greater than 85% absorption and ≈100 nm linewidths by patterning film-coupled nanocubes in pixels using a fusion of bottom-up and top-down fabrication techniques over wafer-scale areas. With this technique, the authors realize a multispectral pixel array consisting of six resonances between 580 and 1125 nm and reconstruct an RGB image with 9261 color combinations.

  12. CGEL-2: Structural Studies of Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    These are images of CGEL-2 samples taken during STS-95. They show binary colloidal suspensions that have formed ordered crystalline structures in microgravity. In sample 5, there are more particles therefore, many, many crystallites (small crystals) form. In sample 6, there are less particles therefore, the particles are far apart and few, much larger crystallites form. The white object in the right corner of sample 5 is the stir bar used to mix the sample at the begirning of the mission.

  13. Stabilization of Colloidal Silica Using Small Polyols

    SciTech Connect

    GULLEY, GERALD L.; MARTIN, JAMES E.

    1999-09-07

    We have discovered that small polyols are reasonably effective at stabilizing colloidal silica against aggregation, even under the conditions of high pH and salt concentration. Both quasielastic and elastic light scattering were used to show that these polyols dramatically decrease the aggregation rate of the suspension, changing the growth kinetics from diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation to reaction-limited cluster-cluster aggregation. These polyols maybe useful in the treatment of tank wastes at the Hanford site.

  14. Columnar self-assembly of colloidal nanodisks.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Aaron E; Ghezelbash, Ali; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Sigman, Michael B; Korgel, Brian A

    2006-12-01

    The self-assembly of sterically stabilized colloidal copper sulfide nanodisks, 14-20 nm in diameter and 5-7 nm thick, was studied. The nanodisks were observed by electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering to form columnar arrays when evaporated as thin films from concentrated dispersions. These superstructured nanomaterials might give rise to technologically useful properties, such as anisotropic electrical transport and electrorheological and optical properties.

  15. Influence of biofilms on the movement of colloids in porous media. Implications for colloid facilitated transport in subsurface environments.

    PubMed

    Leon Morales, Carlos Felipe; Strathmann, Martin; Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2007-05-01

    Colloid transport through porous media can be influenced by the presence of biofilms. Sterile and non-sterile sand columns were investigated using Laponite RD as model colloid and a highly mucoid strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as model biofilm former. Laponite RD was marked specifically by fluorescent complexes with rhodamine 6G. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) were used as parameters for determination of colloid transport characteristics. In the sterile columns, the colloid was mobile (collision efficiencies from 0.05 to 0.08) both after the presence of Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions followed by deionised water influent. In the biofilm-grown column, the same treatment did not result in colloid retention in the case of Na(+) exposure, but in altered or enhanced colloid transport. In the case of Ca(2+) ions exposure, colloid retention increased with biofilm age. After 3 weeks, almost complete retention was observed. Similar observations were made in columns packed with material from slow sand filtration units. These data reveal the complex interactions between biofilms, cations and colloid transport. Changes in the electrolyte composition of water percolating the subsurface can frequently occur and will result in different colloid transport characteristics with regard to the dominating species of ions and the relative abundance of microbial biofilms. This has to be considered when modelling colloid transport through the subsurface.

  16. Transport of Intrinsic Plutonium Colloids in Saturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, D.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Boukhalfa, H.; Ware, S. D.; Tarimala, S.; Keller, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    Actinide contaminants were introduced to the subsurface environment as a result of nuclear weapons development and testing, as well as for nuclear power generation and related research activities for defense and civilian applications. Even though most actinide species were believed to be fairly immobile once in the subsurface, recent studies have shown the transport of actinides kilometers away from their disposal sites. For example, the treated liquid wastes released into Mortandad Canyon at the Los Alamos National Laboratory were predicted to travel less than a few meters; however, plutonium and americium have been detected 3.4 km away from the waste outfall. A colloid-facilitated mechanism has been suggested to account for this unexpected transport of these radioactive wastes. Clays, oxides, organic matters, and actinide hydroxides have all been proposed as the possible mobile phase. Pu ions associated with natural colloids are often referred to as pseudo-Pu colloids, in contrast with the intrinsic Pu colloids that consist of Pu oxides. Significant efforts have been made to investigate the role of pseudo-Pu colloids, while few studies have evaluated the environmental behavior of the intrinsic Pu colloids. Given the fact that Pu (IV) has extremely low solubility product constant, it can be inferred that the transport of Pu in the intrinsic form is highly likely at suitable environmental conditions. This study investigates the transport of intrinsic Pu colloids in a saturated alluvium material packed in a cylindrical column (2.5-cm Dia. x 30-cm high) and compares the results to previous data on the transport of pseudo Pu colloids in the same material. A procedure to prepare a stable intrinsic Pu colloid suspension that produced consistent and reproducible electrokinetic and stability data was developed. Electrokinetic properties and aggregation stability were characterized. The Pu colloids, together with trillium as a conservative tracer, were injected into the

  17. General nonequilibrium theory of colloid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-González, Pedro; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2010-12-01

    A nonequilibrium extension of Onsager's canonical theory of thermal fluctuations is employed to derive a self-consistent theory for the description of the statistical properties of the instantaneous local concentration profile n(r,t) of a colloidal liquid in terms of the coupled time-evolution equations of its mean value n(r,t) and of the covariance [Formula in text] of its fluctuations δn(r,t)=n(r,t)-n(r,t). These two coarse-grained equations involve a local mobility function b(r,t) which, in its turn, is written in terms of the memory function of the two-time correlation function [Formula in text]. For given effective interactions between colloidal particles and applied external fields, the resulting self-consistent theory is aimed at describing the evolution of a strongly correlated colloidal liquid from an initial state with arbitrary mean and covariance n(0)(r) and σ(0)(r,r') toward its equilibrium state characterized by the equilibrium local concentration profile n(eq)(r) and equilibrium covariance σ(eq)(r,r'). This theory also provides a general theoretical framework to describe irreversible processes associated with dynamic arrest transitions, such as aging, and the effects of spatial heterogeneities.

  18. Dynamics of Polymers in Colloidal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsieh; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    This research is motivated by recent studies on the von Willebrand factor (vWF), a large multimeric protein that plays an essential role in the initial stages of blood clotting in blood vessels. Recent experiments substantiated the hypothesis that the vWF is activated by shear stress in blood flow that causes its shape to transform from a compact globule to an extended state, and biological function is obtained only in the extended state. Simple simulations (which only consider a single polymer in bulk shear flow) have successfully reproduced the observed dynamics of the vWF. However, a more refined model is still demanding for the better understanding of the behaviors of this biomolecule in the physiological environments. Here we refine the existing model by adding the drifting colloids into the flows to mimic the presence of the blood cells in the bloodstream. Preliminary result shows that colloids greatly influence the dynamics of the polymers. It is observed that the average extensions of polymers along and perpendicular to the shear flow direction are both increased with the presence of the colloids.

  19. Armoring confined bubbles in concentrated colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingxian; Khodaparast, Sepideh; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Encapsulation of a bubble with microparticles is known to significantly improve the stability of the bubble. This phenomenon has recently gained increasing attention due to its application in a variety of technologies such as foam stabilization, drug encapsulation and colloidosomes. Nevertheless, the production of such colloidal armored bubble with controlled size and particle coverage ratio is still a great challenge industrially. We study the coating process of a long air bubble by microparticles in a circular tube filled with a concentrated microparticles colloidal suspension. As the bubble proceeds in the suspension of particles, a monolayer of micro-particles forms on the interface of the bubble, which eventually results in a fully armored bubble. We investigate the phenomenon that triggers and controls the evolution of the particle accumulation on the bubble interface. Moreover, we examine the effects of the mean flow velocity, the size of the colloids and concentration of the suspension on the dynamics of the armored bubble. The results of this study can potentially be applied to production of particle-encapsulated bubbles, surface-cleaning techniques, and gas-assisted injection molding.

  20. Composition of estuarine colloidal material: organic components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigleo, A.C.; Hoering, T.C.; Helz, G.R.

    1982-01-01

    Colloidal material in the size range 1.2 nm to 0.4 ??m was isolated by ultrafiltration from Chesapeake Bay and Patuxent River waters (U.S.A.). Temperature controlled, stepwise pyrolysis of the freeze-dried material, followed by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses of the volatile products indicates that the primary organic components of this polymer are carbohydrates and peptides. The major pyrolysis products at the 450??C step are acetic acid, furaldehydes, furoic acid, furanmethanol, diones and lactones characteristic of carbohydrate thermal decomposition. Pyrroles, pyridines, amides and indole (protein derivatives) become more prevalent and dominate the product yield at the 600??C pyrolysis step. Olefins and saturated hydrocarbons, originating from fatty acids, are present only in minor amounts. These results are consistent with the composition of Chesapeake phytoplankton (approximately 50% protein, 30% carbohydrate, 10% lipid and 10% nucleotides by dry weight). The pyrolysis of a cultured phytoplankton and natural particulate samples produced similar oxygen and nitrogencontaining compounds, although the proportions of some components differ relative to the colloidal fraction. There were no lignin derivatives indicative of terrestrial plant detritus in any of these samples. The data suggest that aquatic microorganisms, rather than terrestrial plants, are the dominant source of colloidal organic material in these river and estuarine surface waters. ?? 1982.

  1. Colloidal solitary waves with temperature dependent compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, A.; Marchant, T. R.

    2014-05-01

    Spatial solitary waves which form in colloidal suspensions of dielectric nanoparticles are considered. The interactions, or compressibility, of the colloidal particles, is modelled using a series in the particle density, or packing fraction, where the virial, or series, coefficients depend on the type of particle interaction model. Both the theoretical hard disk and sphere repulsive models, and a model with temperature dependent compressibility, are considered. Experimental results show that particle interactions can be temperature dependent and either repulsive or attractive in nature, so we model the second virial coefficient using a physically realistic temperature power law. One- and two-dimensional semi-analytical colloidal solitary wave solutions are found. Trial functions, based on the form of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation soliton, are used, together with averaging, to develop the semi-analytical solutions. When the background packing fraction is low, the one-dimensional solitary waves have three solutions branches (with a bistable regime) while the two-dimensional solitary waves have two solution branches, with a single stable branch. The temperature dependent second virial coefficient results in changes to the solitary wave properties and the parameter space, in which multiple solutions branches occur. An excellent comparison is found between the semi-analytical and numerical solutions.

  2. Colloidal competences of any polyethyleneglycol conjugates.

    PubMed

    Jianu, C; Cocan, Ileana; Rujescu, Cristina; Jianu, I

    2008-01-01

    The present paper presents research rely on the knowledge of basic colloidal competences (surface tension, critical micelar concentration, HLB value) of certain new structured lipids by accessing "homogeneous" polyoxyethylene chains (n=3-18) (PEGn) monoderivatized R(NF; EH) during processing by cyanoethylation, hydrolysis, and esterification together with fatty acids (R') isolated and characterized from grape seeds (Vitis vinifera) (S), wild chestnut (Aesculus hyppocastanum) (Ca), wild rose (Rosa Canina) (mn), coriander (Coriandri fructus) (Co) in the architecture of the conjugates about foaming and wetting competences. Basic colloidal characterisation aimed at directing future research to optimagrape seed technological directions for agroalimentary and horticultural processing (and not only) among which these structures through synergic cumulus of defining competences of the polyunsaturated fatty acids (1 delta; 2delta; 3delta), of "homogeneous" derivatised polyethyleneoxy chains (PEO) with monitored degree of oligomerization (n=3-18). We thought it useful to access oligomeric chains PEO processed through adapted Williamson synthesis to clearly quantify its role in the global "colloidal fingerprint" of the studied conjugate. On the other hand, polyunsaturated plant lipid residues we selected constitute a variant of valorification by-products from horticultural and/or agroalimentary processing accessible over worldwide geographical areas with differences due to soil and climate conditions and to the cultivars specific to spontaneous and cultivated flora.

  3. Patchy polymer colloids with tunable anisotropy dimensions.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela J; Hilhorst, Jan; Heinen, Maria A P; Hoogenraad, Mathijs J; Luigjes, Bob; Kegel, Willem K

    2011-06-09

    We present the synthesis of polymer colloids with continuously tunable anisotropy dimensions: patchiness, roughness, and branching. Our method makes use of controlled fusion of multiple protrusions on highly cross-linked polymer particles produced by seeded emulsion polymerization. Carefully changing the synthesis conditions, we can tune the number of protrusions, or branching, of the obtained particles from spheres with one to three patches to raspberry-like particles with multiple protrusions. In addition to that, roughness is generated on the seed particles by adsorption of secondary nucleated particles during synthesis. The size of the roughness relative to the smooth patches can be continuously tuned by the initiator, surfactant, and styrene concentrations. Seed colloids chemically different from the protrusions induce patches of different chemical nature. The underlying generality of the synthesis procedure allows for application to a variety of seed particle sizes and materials. We demonstrate the use of differently sized polyNIPAM (poly-N-isopropylacrylamide), as well as polystyrene and magnetite filled polyNIPAM seed particles, the latter giving rise to magnetically anisotropic colloids. The high yield together with the uniform, anisotropic shape make them interesting candidates for use as smart building blocks in self-assembling systems.

  4. Dense colloidal fluids form denser amorphous sediments

    PubMed Central

    Liber, Shir R.; Borohovich, Shai; Butenko, Alexander V.; Schofield, Andrew B.; Sloutskin, Eli

    2013-01-01

    We relate, by simple analytical centrifugation experiments, the density of colloidal fluids with the nature of their randomly packed solid sediments. We demonstrate that the most dilute fluids of colloidal hard spheres form loosely packed sediments, where the volume fraction of the particles approaches in frictional systems the random loose packing limit, φRLP = 0.55. The dense fluids of the same spheres form denser sediments, approaching the so-called random close packing limit, φRCP = 0.64. Our experiments, where particle sedimentation in a centrifuge is sufficiently rapid to avoid crystallization, demonstrate that the density of the sediments varies monotonically with the volume fraction of the initial suspension. We reproduce our experimental data by simple computer simulations, where structural reorganizations are prohibited, such that the rate of sedimentation is irrelevant. This suggests that in colloidal systems, where viscous forces dominate, the structure of randomly close-packed and randomly loose-packed sediments is determined by the well-known structure of the initial fluids of simple hard spheres, provided that the crystallization is fully suppressed. PMID:23530198

  5. Improving feed slurry rheology by colloidal techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, W.O.; Ternes, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PSN) has investigated three colloidal techniques in the laboratory to improve the sedimentation and flowability of Hanford simulated (nonradioactive) current acid waste (CAW) melter feed slurry: polymer-induced bridging flocculation; manipulating glass former (raw SiO/sub 2/ or frit) particle size; and alteration of nitric acid content. All three methods proved successful in improving the rheology of the simulated CAW feed. This initially had exhibited nearly worst-case flow and clogging properties, but was transformed into a flowable, resuspendable (nonclogging) feed. While each has advantages and disadvantages, the following three specific alternatives proved successful: addition of a polyelectrolyte in 2000 ppM concentration to feed slurry; substitution of a 49 wt % SiO/sub 2/ colloidal suspension (approx. 10-micron particle size) for the -325 mesh (less than or equal to 44-micron particle size) raw-chemical SiO/sub 2/; and increase of nitric acid content from the reference 1.06 M to optimum 1.35 M. The first method, polymer-induced bridging flocculation, results in a high sediment volume, nonclogging CAW feed. The second method, involving the use of colloidal silica particles results in a nonsedimenting feed that when left unagitated forms a gel. The third method, increase in feed acidity, results in a highly resuspendable (nonclogging) melter feed. Further research is therefore required to determine which of the three alternatives is the preferred method of achieving rheological control of CAW melter feeds.

  6. Theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juárez-Maldonado, R.; Medina-Noyola, M.

    2008-05-01

    We present a first-principles theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures based on the multicomponent self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of colloid dynamics [M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 72, 031107 (2005); M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E76, 039902 (2007)]. We illustrate its application with a description of dynamic arrest in two simple model colloidal mixtures: namely, hard-sphere and repulsive Yukawa binary mixtures. Our results include observation of the two patterns of dynamic arrest, one in which both species become simultaneously arrested and the other involving the sequential arrest of the two species. The latter case gives rise to mixed states in which one species is arrested while the other species remains mobile. We also derive the (”bifurcation” or fixed-point”) equations for the nonergodic parameters of the system, which takes the surprisingly simple form of a system of coupled equations for the localization length of the particles of each species. The solution of this system of equations indicates unambiguously which species is arrested (finite localization length) and which species remains ergodic (infinite localization length). As a result, we are able to draw the entire ergodic-nonergodic phase diagram of the binary hard-sphere mixture.

  7. Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Safa; Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao

    2014-03-01

    DPD as a mesoscale method was firstly proposed to study dynamics of suspensions under flow condition. However the proposed method failed to capture shear properties of suspensions because it lacked: first a potential to reproduce lubrication forces and second a clear definition for the colloid surface. Recently we reported a modified DPD method which defines colloidal particles as particles with hard core and a dissipative coat. An additional lubrication force was introduced to include the short-range hydrodynamics that are not captured in original DPD. The model was found to be able to reproduce shear properties of suspensions for a wide range of different systems, from monodisperse to bimodal with different volume fractions, compositions and size ratios. In present work our modified DPD method is employed to study both equilibrium and flow properties of colloidal suspension. Zero shear viscosity of suspension is measured using Green-Kubo expressions and the results are compared to theoretical predictions. Furthermore, structure formation in suspensions is studied in respect to energy landscape of the fluid both at rest and under flow.

  8. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  9. Design and elaboration of colloidal molecules: an overview.

    PubMed

    Duguet, Etienne; Désert, Anthony; Perro, Adeline; Ravaine, Serge

    2011-02-01

    The concept of colloidal molecules was first evoked by van Blaaderen in 2003 for describing small non-spherical colloids made of the aggregation of a small number of particles. He predicted original properties to the complex assemblies of such colloids, in particular in optics. This critical review deals with the different strategies reported for creating robust clusters of spherical particles which could mimic the space-filling models of simple conventional molecules. These routes concern either the controlled clustering of preformed colloids directed by coalescence, physical routes, chemical routes, or 2-D/3-D geometrical confinement, or strategies starting from a single colloid which is decorated by satellite colloids by taking advantage of controlled phase separation or nucleation and growth phenomena. These routes are compared from the viewpoint of the accessible shapes, their tunability and scalability (146 references).

  10. Local elastic response measured near the colloidal glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D.; Schaar, D.; Hentschel, H. G. E.; Hay, J.; Habdas, Piotr; Weeks, Eric R.

    2013-03-01

    We examine the response of a dense colloidal suspension to a local force applied by a small magnetic bead. For small forces, we find a linear relationship between the force and the displacement, suggesting the medium is elastic, even though our colloidal samples macroscopically behave as fluids. We interpret this as a measure of the strength of colloidal caging, reflecting the proximity of the samples' volume fractions to the colloidal glass transition. The strain field of the colloidal particles surrounding the magnetic probe appears similar to that of an isotropic homogeneous elastic medium. When the applied force is removed, the strain relaxes as a stretched exponential in time. We introduce a model that suggests this behavior is due to the diffusive relaxation of strain in the colloidal sample.

  11. Self-pinning by colloids confined at a contact line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung; Je, Jung

    2013-03-01

    Colloidal particles suspended in a fluid usually inhibit complete wetting of the fluid on a solid surface and cause pinning of the contact line, known as self-pinning. We show differences in spreading and drying behaviors of pure and colloidal droplets using optical and confocal imaging methods. These differences come from spreading inhibition by colloids confined at a contact line. We propose a self-pinning mechanism based on spreading inhibition by colloids. We find a good agreement between the mechanism and the experimental result taken by directly tracking individual colloids near the contact lines of evaporating colloidal droplets. This research was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (Functional X-ray Imaging) of MEST/NRF.

  12. Evanescent wave excited luminescence from levitated quantum dot modified colloids.

    PubMed

    Everett, W Neil; Beckham, Richard E; Meissner, Kenith; Bevan, Michael A

    2007-08-14

    Evanescent wave excited luminescence of quantum dot modified polystyrene (QDPS) colloids is investigated to measure potential energy profiles of QDPS colloids electrostatically levitated above a planar glass surface. Luminescence is characterized for three different-sized PS colloids modified with three different-sized QDs using confocal microscopy, emission spectra, flow cytometry, and temporal measurements of levitated and deposited colloids. Colloid-surface potential energy profiles constructed from scattering and luminescence intensity data display excellent agreement with each other, theoretical predictions, and independently measured parameters. QDPS luminescence intensity is indirectly confirmed to have an exponential dependence on height similar to conventional colloidal evanescent wave scattering. Our findings indicate that evanescent wave excited QDPS luminescence could enable total internal reflection microscopy measurements of index-matched hard spheres, multiple specific biomolecular interactions via spectral multiplexing, enhanced morphology-dependent resonance modes, and integrated evanescent wave-video-confocal microscopy experiments not possible with scattering.

  13. Inertial and viscoelastic forces on rigid colloids in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Howard, Michael P; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Nikoubashman, Arash

    2015-06-14

    We perform hybrid molecular dynamics simulations to study the flow behavior of rigid colloids dispersed in a dilute polymer solution. The underlying Newtonian solvent and the ensuing hydrodynamic interactions are incorporated through multiparticle collision dynamics, while the constituent polymers are modeled as bead-spring chains, maintaining a description consistent with the colloidal nature of our system. We study the cross-stream migration of the solute particles in slit-like channels for various polymer lengths and colloid sizes and find a distinct focusing onto the channel center under specific solvent and flow conditions. To better understand this phenomenon, we systematically measure the effective forces exerted on the colloids. We find that the migration originates from a competition between viscoelastic forces from the polymer solution and hydrodynamically induced inertial forces. Our simulations reveal a significantly stronger fluctuation of the lateral colloid position than expected from thermal motion alone, which originates from the complex interplay between the colloid and polymer chains.

  14. Remotely Controlled Mixers for Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Colloid Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurk, Michael A. (Andy)

    2015-01-01

    Developed by NASA Glenn Research Center, the LMM aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is enabling multiple biomedical science experiments. Techshot, Inc., has developed a series of colloid specialty cell systems (C-SPECS) for use in the colloid science experiment module on the LMM. These low-volume mixing devices will enable uniform particle density and remotely controlled repetition of LMM colloid experiments. By automating the experiment process, C-SPECS allow colloid samples to be processed more quickly. In addition, C-SPECS will minimize the time the crew will need to spend on colloid experiments as well as eliminate the need for multiple and costly colloid samples, which are expended after a single examination. This high-throughput capability will lead to more efficient and productive use of the LMM. As commercial launch vehicles begin routine visits to the ISS, C-SPECS could become a significant means to process larger quantities of high-value materials for commercial customers.

  15. A colloidal singularity reveals the crucial role of colloidal stability for nanomaterials in-vitro toxicity testing: nZVI-microalgae colloidal system as a case study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Soledad; Llaneza, Veronica; Pulido-Reyes, Gerardo; Fernández-Piñas, Francisca; Bonzongo, Jean Claude; Leganes, Francisco; Rosal, Roberto; García-Calvo, Eloy; Rodea-Palomares, Ismael

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation raises attention in Nanotoxicology due to its methodological implications. Aggregation is a physical symptom of a more general physicochemical condition of colloidal particles, namely, colloidal stability. Colloidal stability is a global indicator of the tendency of a system to reduce its net surface energy, which may be achieved by homo-aggregation or hetero-aggregation, including location at bio-interfaces. However, the role of colloidal stability as a driver of ENM bioactivity has received little consideration thus far. In the present work, which focuses on the toxicity of nanoscaled Fe° nanoparticles (nZVI) towards a model microalga, we demonstrate that colloidal stability is a fundamental driver of ENM bioactivity, comprehensively accounting for otherwise inexplicable differential biological effects. The present work throws light on basic aspects of Nanotoxicology, and reveals a key factor which may reconcile contradictory results on the influence of aggregation in bioactivity of ENMs.

  16. A Colloidal Singularity Reveals the Crucial Role of Colloidal Stability for Nanomaterials In-Vitro Toxicity Testing: nZVI-Microalgae Colloidal System as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Piñas, Francisca; Bonzongo, Jean Claude; Leganes, Francisco; Rosal, Roberto; García-Calvo, Eloy; Rodea-Palomares, Ismael

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation raises attention in Nanotoxicology due to its methodological implications. Aggregation is a physical symptom of a more general physicochemical condition of colloidal particles, namely, colloidal stability. Colloidal stability is a global indicator of the tendency of a system to reduce its net surface energy, which may be achieved by homo-aggregation or hetero-aggregation, including location at bio-interfaces. However, the role of colloidal stability as a driver of ENM bioactivity has received little consideration thus far. In the present work, which focuses on the toxicity of nanoscaled Fe° nanoparticles (nZVI) towards a model microalga, we demonstrate that colloidal stability is a fundamental driver of ENM bioactivity, comprehensively accounting for otherwise inexplicable differential biological effects. The present work throws light on basic aspects of Nanotoxicology, and reveals a key factor which may reconcile contradictory results on the influence of aggregation in bioactivity of ENMs. PMID:25340509

  17. Colloidal Surfaces with Boundaries, Apex Boojums, and Nested Elastic Self-Assembly of Nematic Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungoh; Liu, Qingkun; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-12-01

    Self-assembly of colloidal particles is poised to become a powerful composite material fabrication technique, but remains challenged by a limited control over the ensuing structures. We develop a new breed of nematic colloids that are physical analogs of a mathematical surface with boundary, interacting with the molecular alignment field without inducing defects when flat. However, made from a thin nanofoil, they can be shaped to prompt formation of self-compensating defects that drive preprogramed elastic interactions mediated by the nematic host. To show this, we wrap the nanofoil on all triangular side faces of a pyramid, except its square base. The ensuing pyramidal cones induce point defects with fractional hedgehog charges of opposite signs, spontaneously align with respect to the far-field director to form elastic dipoles and nested assemblies with tunable spacing. Nanofoils shaped into octahedrons interact as elastic quadrupoles. Our findings may drive realization of low-symmetry colloidal phases.

  18. [Bactericidal activity of colloidal silver against grampositive and gramnegative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Afonina, I A; Kraeva, L A; Tseneva, G Ia

    2010-01-01

    It was shown that colloidal silver solution prepared in cooperation with the A. F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, had significant bactericidal activity. Stable bactericidal effect on gramnegative microorganisms was observed after their 2-hour exposition in the solution of colloidal silver at a concentration of 10 ppm. Grampositive capsule-forming microorganisms were less susceptible to the colloidal silver solution: their death was observed after the 4-hour exposition in the solution.

  19. Influence of Nanoscale Surface Roughness on Colloidal Force Measurements.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Jayasuriya, Sunil; Manke, Charles W; Mao, Guangzhao

    2015-09-29

    Forces between colloidal particles determine the performances of many industrial processes and products. Colloidal force measurements conducted between a colloidal particle AFM probe and particles immobilized on a flat substrate are valuable in selecting appropriate surfactants for colloidal stabilization. One of the features of inorganic fillers and extenders is the prevalence of rough surfaces-even the polymer latex particles, often used as model colloidal systems including the current study, have rough surfaces albeit at a much smaller scale. Surface roughness is frequently cited as the reason for disparity between experimental observations and theoretical treatment but seldom verified by direct evidence. This work reports the effect of nanoscale surface roughness on colloidal force measurements carried out in the presence of surfactants. We applied a heating method to reduce the mean surface roughness of commercial latex particles from 30 to 1 nm. We conducted force measurements using the two types of particles at various salt and surfactant concentrations. The surfactants used were pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether, Pluronic F108, and a styrene/acrylic copolymer, Joncryl 60. In the absence of the surfactant, nanometer surface roughness affects colloidal forces only in high salt conditions when the Debye length becomes smaller than the surface roughness. The adhesion is stronger between colloids with higher surface roughness and requires a higher surfactant concentration to be eliminated. The effect of surface roughness on colloidal forces was also investigated as a function of the adsorbed surfactant layer structure characterized by AFM indentation and dynamic light scattering. We found that when the layer thickness exceeds the surface roughness, the colloidal adhesion is less influenced by surfactant concentration variation. This study demonstrates that surface roughness at the nanoscale can influence colloidal forces significantly and should be taken

  20. Computational Study of Colloidal Droplet Interactions with Three Dimensional Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-18

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The colloidal droplet spreading on and sorption into a porous medium is important to 3D printing technology. In this study... colloidal fluid distribution in the porous structure after sorption of single/multiple droplets in powder beds. The spreading of the droplet on the surface...Feb-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Computational Study of Colloidal Droplet Interactions with Three Dimensional

  1. Exotic crystal superstructures of colloidal crystals in confinement.

    PubMed

    Fontecha, Ana Barreira; Schöpe, Hans Joachim

    2008-06-01

    Colloidal model systems have been used for over three decades for investigating liquids, crystals, and glasses. Colloidal crystal superstructures have been observed in binary systems of repulsive spheres as well as oppositely charged sphere systems showing structures well known from atomic solids. In this work we study the structural transition of colloidal crystals under confinement. In addition to the known sequence of crystalline structures, crystal superstructures with dodecagonal and hexagonal symmetry are observed in one component systems. These structures have no atomic counterpart.

  2. Colloidal crystallization of colloidal silica grafted with iron(0) complex-tethered polymers in organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Kohji; Mouri, Emiko

    2007-09-01

    Incorporation of iron(0) complex into polymer-grafted silica and colloidal crystallization in organic solvent were studied. In this study, zero-valence iron complex, vinylferrocene (Vfc) and iron(0)tricarbonyl(4,4-dimethyl-1,-4-cyclohexadienyl) acrylate (Fe(0)Ac) or methacrylate (Fe(0)Me), were introduced into grafted polymer to prevent from increasing ionic strength in colloidal crystallization system. Poly(methyl methacrylate (MMA)-co-Vfc)-grafted silica never formed colloidal crystals in polar solvent, such as acetone or acetonitrile. However, increasing ferrocenyl group fraction in the polymer resulted in disturbing the crystallization. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm)-co-Vfc)-grafted silica, which was composed of mole fraction of Vfc, 1/3, afforded crystallization in ethanol over the particle fraction of 0.053. In the case of diene-Fe(0)(CO) 3/polymer-grafted silica, poly(MMA-co-Fe(0)Ac)-, poly(NIPAAm-co-Fe(0)Ac)- and poly(N.N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAAm)-co-Fe(0)Ac)-grafted silica gave colloidal crystallization in relatively low polar solvents, DMF, acetone, acetonirile and ethanol, critical volume fraction for which were in the range from 0.054 to 0.117. In the case of copolymer-grafted silica containing Fe(0)Me, poly(MMA-co-FeMe)-grafted silica crystallized in DMF, Interestingly, especially in cases of polymer-grafted silica containing Fe(0)Ac or Fe(0)Me composed of the highest mole fraction Fe(0)Me, 1/2, afforded crystallization in DMF. The iridescence color of the colloidal crystals was changed with the combination of grafted polymer and solvent. The characteristic coloration of the solution from reddish to greenish color is possibly due to absorption of blue light region by diene-Fe(0)(CO) 3 complex and Bragg deflection on colloidal crystals.

  3. USSR Report, Chemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This chemistry Report from the USSR contains articles mainly on Adsorption, Analytical Chemistry, Biochemistry, Catalysis, Chemical Industry, Coal ... Gasification , Electrochemistry, Fertilizers, Food Technology, Inorganic Compounds, Nitrogen Compounds and Organometallic Compounds.

  4. Chemistry for Potters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denio, Allen A.

    1980-01-01

    Relates pottery making to chemistry by providing chemical information about clay, its origin, composition, properties, and changes that occur during firing; also describes glaze compositions, examples of redox chemistry, salt glazing, crystalline glazes, and problems in toxicity. (CS)

  5. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  6. Special Report: Brain Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassner, Michael B.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical actions in the brain result in cognitive, emotional, neuroendocrine, neuromuscular, and/or neurocirculatory effects. Developments in understanding brain chemistry are discussed, considering among others, neurotransmitter chemistry, neuropeptides, drugs and the brain, antidepressants, and actions of minor tranquilizers. (JN)

  7. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  8. Sodium meta-autunite colloids: Synthesis, characterization,stability

    SciTech Connect

    zzuoping@lbl.gov

    2004-04-10

    Waste forms of U such as those in the United States Department of Energy's Hanford Site often contain high concentrations of Na and P. Low solubility sodium uranyl phosphates such as sodium meta-autunite have the potential to form mobile colloids that can facilitate transport of this radionuclide. In order to understand the geochemical behavior of uranyl phosphate colloids, we synthesized sodiummeta-autunite colloids, and characterized their morphology, chemical composition, structure, dehydration, and surface charge. The stability of these synthetic plate-shaped colloids was tested with respect to time and pH. The highest aggregation rate was observed at pH 3, and the rate decreases as pH increases, indicating that higher stability of colloid dispersion under neutral and alkaline pH conditions. The synthetic colloids are all negatively charged and no isoelectric points were found over a pH range of 3 to 9. The zeta-potentials of the colloids in the phosphate solution show a strong pH-dependence in the more acidic range over time, but are relatively constant in the neutral and alkaline pH range. The geochemical behavior of the synthetic colloids can be interpreted using DLVO theory. The results suggest that formation of mobile sodium meta-autunite colloids can enhance the transport of U in some contaminated sediments.

  9. Infrared colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals: synthesis, properties, and photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huiying; Tsang, Sai-Wing

    2012-04-07

    Simple solution phase, catalyst-free synthetic approaches that offer monodispersed, well passivated, and non-aggregated colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals have presented many research opportunities not only for fundamental science but also for technological applications. The ability to tune the electrical and optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals by manipulating the size and shape of the crystals during the colloidal synthesis provides potential benefits to a variety of applications including photovoltaic devices, light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, biological imaging/labeling, and more. Recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals and the achievements in colloidal PbS or PbSe nanocrystals solar cells have demonstrated the promising application of infrared-emitting colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals in photovoltaic devices. Here, we review recent progress in the synthesis and optical properties of colloidal lead chalcogenide nanocrystals. We focus in particular upon the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of PbS, PbSe, and PbTe nanocrystals by using different precursors and various stabilizing surfactants for the growth of the colloidal nanocrystals. We also summarize recent advancements in the field of colloidal nanocrystals solar cells based on colloidal PbS and PbSe nanocrystals.

  10. Tuning Colloid-Interface Interactions by Salt Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everts, J. C.; Samin, S.; van Roij, R.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the interaction of an oil-dispersed colloidal particle with an oil-water interface is highly tunable from attractive to repulsive, either by varying the sign of the colloidal charge via charge regulation or by varying the difference in hydrophilicity between the dissolved cations and anions. In addition, we investigate the yet unexplored interplay between the self-regulated colloidal surface charge distribution with the planar double layer across the oil-water interface and the spherical one around the colloid. Our findings explain recent experiments and have direct relevance for tunable Pickering emulsions.

  11. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Colloids with Carbon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, A. Yu.; Proschenko, D. Yu.; Golik, S. S.; Postnova, I. V.; Shchipunov, Yu. A.; Podlesnyh, A. A.

    Experimentally studied linear and nonlinear characteristics of colloid on the basis of a new class of carbon nanoparticles (CN) synthesized by hydrothermal synthesis. The spectral characteristics of supercontinuum of the colloids with CN in the range 420 - 700 nm were investigated. The effectiveness of excitation of one- and two-photon fluorescence colloids with UN was determined. The anomalous dependence of the nonlinear refractive index of the wavelength of the radiation was revealed. It was installed that the efficiency of spectral transformation of the supercontinuum process in the case of colloid with carbon nanoparticles is less in the anti-stokes region than in case with water.

  12. Zero-valent iron colloid emplacement in sand columns

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1997-05-01

    Application of chemically reactive barriers to mitigate contaminant migration is an active area of research and development. Studies were conducted to evaluate a novel approach of emplacing chemically reactive barriers composed of zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) by injecting suspensions of colloidal-size Fe{sup 0} particles into porous media. The specific objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of influent colloid concentration, rate, and volume of colloidal suspensions on Fe{sup 0} colloid emplacement in sand columns. Relatively even distributions of Fe{sup 0} throughout a sand column were obtained at low influent colloid concentrations and high injection rates. As the concentration of influent suspensions was increased, a point was reached beyond which a significant increase in the filtration of Fe{sup 0} particles near the front of the column was observed. This point was also found to occur at lower influent colloid concentrations as the injection rate was decreased, i.e., there was an interactive effect of influent colloid concentration and injection rate on the extent of filtration that occurred near the front of the column. As the volume of the colloidal suspension injected into the column was increased, the distribution of Fe{sup 0} colloids within the column became increasingly even.

  13. Colloid mobilization by fluid displacement fronts in channels.

    PubMed

    Lazouskaya, Volha; Wang, Lian-Ping; Or, Dani; Wang, Gang; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Jin, Yan

    2013-09-15

    Understanding colloid mobilization during transient flow in soil is important for addressing colloid and contaminant transport issues. While theoretical descriptions of colloid detachment exist for saturated systems, corresponding mechanisms of colloid mobilization during drainage and imbibition have not been considered in detail. In this work, theoretical force and torque analyses were performed to examine the interactive effects of adhesion, drag, friction, and surface tension forces on colloid mobilization and to outline conditions corresponding to the mobilization mechanisms such as lifting, sliding, and rolling. Colloid and substrate contact angles were used as variables to determine theoretical criteria for colloid mobilization mechanisms during drainage and imbibition. Experimental mobilization of hydrophilic and hydrophobic microspheres with drainage and imbibition fronts was investigated in hydrophilic and hydrophobic channels using a confocal microscope. Colloid mobilization differed between drainage and imbibition due to different dynamic contact angles and interfacial geometries on the contact line. Experimental results did not fully follow the theoretical criteria in all cases, which was explained with additional factors not included in the theory such as presence of aggregates and trailing films. Theoretical force and torque analyses resulted in similar mobilization predictions and suggested that all mobilization mechanisms contributed to the observed colloid mobilization.

  14. Study of the stability coated and uncoated nanosilver colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsojo, Respitaningrum, Afrianto, Toto; Sosiati, Harini

    2013-09-01

    The stability of nanosilver colloids made using electrochemical process and chemical process were investigated. In the process using a DC generator cell, two silver electrodes under a DC voltage were used to generate the colloid. In the chemical process the colloid was made using the dilution of AgNO3 in deionized water with the addition of sodium citrate. To increase the stability to this colloid was added polyvinyl alcohol. The stability In those three colloids were investigated using UV-Vis spectrometer. The size of the nano Ag was measured using transmission electron microscope (TEM). The study reveals that within period of two weeks the trend toward a stable colloid is shown by colloid using DC generator. The addition of PVA may stabilize the unstable colloid made using the chemichal process and reduce the size particle to significantly smaller particle compared to the one made using DC generator cell. The condition of obtaining the stable nano colloid silver with smaller particle size was discussed.

  15. Colloid formation and laser-induced bleaching in fluorite

    SciTech Connect

    LeBret, Joel B.; Cramer, Loren P.; Norton, M. Grant; Dickinson, J. T.

    2004-11-08

    Colloid formation and subsequent laser-induced bleaching in fluorite has been studied by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. At high incident electron-beam (e-beam) energies, Ca colloids with diameter {approx}10 nm form a simple cubic superlattice with lattice parameter a{approx}18 nm. The colloids themselves are topotactic with the fluorite matrix forming low-energy interfaces close to a {sigma}=21 special grain boundary in cubic materials. Laser irradiation using {lambda}=532 nm has been shown to effectively bleach the e-beam-irradiated samples returning the fluorite to its monocrystalline state. The bleached samples appear more resistant to further colloid formation.

  16. Statics and dynamics of colloidal particles on optical tray arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Reichardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J

    2009-01-01

    We examine the statics and dynamics of charged colloids interacting with periodic optical trap arrays. In particular we study the regime where more than one colloid is confined in each trap, creating effective dimer, trimer, and higher order states called colloidal molecular crystals. The n-mer states have all effective orientational degree of freedom which can be controlled with an external driving field. In general, the external field causes a polarization effect where the orientation of the n-mers aligns with the external field, similar to liquid crystal systems. Additionally, under a rotating external drive the n-mers can rotate with the drive. In some cases a series of structural transitions in the colloidal crystal states occur in the rotating field due to a competition between the ordering of the colloidal molecular crystals and the polarization effect which orients the n-mers in the direction of the drive. We also show that for some parameters, the n-mers continuously rotate with the drive without witching, that depinning transitions can occur where the colloids jump from well to well, and that there are a number of distinct dynamical transitions between the phases. Finally, we illustrate colloidal orderings at fillings of more than four colloids per trap, indicating that it is possible to create higher order colloidal crystal cluster phases.

  17. Size and density of a /sup 242/Pu colloid

    SciTech Connect

    Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Torstenfelt, N.B.

    1987-01-01

    The size and density of a /sup 242/Pu colloid has been measured by autocorrelation photon spectrometry. The density of the colloid was determined by ultraspeed centrifugation. From the concentration profiles of /sup 242/Pu in the centrifuged test tubes, a standard sedimentation formula was used to calculate the density; the size of the colloid was known from the light scattering experiments. The determined density of the /sup 242/Pu colloid was unexpectedly low compared to the density of crystalline PuO/sub 2/. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  18. School Chemistry vs. Chemistry in Research: An Exploratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habraken, Clarisse L.; Buijs, Wim; Borkent, Hens; Ligeon, Willy; Wender, Harry; Meijer, Marijn

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a study exploring why students are not studying chemistry. Three groups of graduating high school students and their chemistry teachers stayed at a research institute working on molecular modeling and wrote essays on school chemistry versus chemistry in research. Concludes that school chemistry does not convey today's chemistry in…

  19. Cell shape recognition by colloidal cell imprints: Energy of the cell-imprint interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Paunov, Vesselin N.

    2015-09-01

    The results presented in this study are aimed at the theoretical estimate of the interactions between a spherical microbial cell and the colloidal cell imprints in terms of the Derjaguin, Landau, Vervey, and Overbeek (DLVO) surface forces. We adapted the Derjaguin approximation to take into account the geometry factor in the colloidal interaction between a spherical target particle and a hemispherical shell at two different orientations with respect to each other. We took into account only classical DLVO surface forces, i.e., the van der Waals and the electric double layer forces, in the interaction of a spherical target cell and a hemispherical shell as a function of their size ratio, mutual orientation, distance between their surfaces, their respective surface potentials, and the ionic strength of the aqueous solution. We found that the calculated interaction energies are several orders higher when match and recognition between the target cell and the target cell imprint is achieved. Our analysis revealed that the recognition effect of the hemispherical shell towards the target microsphere comes from the greatly increased surface contact area when a full match of their size and shape is produced. When the interaction between the surfaces of the hemishell and the target cell is attractive, the recognition greatly amplifies the attraction and this increases the likelihood of them to bind strongly. However, if the surface interaction between the cell and the imprint is repulsive, the shape and size match makes this interaction even more repulsive and thus decreases the likelihood of binding. These results show that the surface chemistry of the target cells and their colloidal imprints is very important in controlling the outcome of the interaction, while the shape recognition only amplifies the interaction. In the case of nonmonotonous surface-to-surface interaction we discovered some interesting interplay between the effects of shape match and surface chemistry

  20. Chemistry on Stamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreck, James O.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests how postage stamps can be incorporated into chemistry teaching. Categories considered include emergence of chemistry as a science, metric system, atoms (and molecules and ions), stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, matter (gases, liquids, and solids),…

  1. Green Chemistry and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  2. Teaching School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, D. J., Ed.

    This eight-chapter book is intended for use by chemistry teachers, curriculum developers, teacher educators, and other key personnel working in the field of chemical education. The chapters are: (1) "The Changing Face of Chemistry" (J. A. Campbell); (2) "Curriculum Innovation in School Chemistry" (R. B. Ingel and A. M.…

  3. Chemistry and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Martyn

    1999-01-01

    Describes a Chemistry and Art project developed for secondary students and teachers sponsored by the National Gallery and The Royal Society of Chemistry in the United Kingdom. Discusses aspects of the techniques used in creating five paintings as well as the chemistry involved in their making, deterioration, conservation, and restoration.…

  4. Chemistry as General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of different science and chemistry courses for science-major and non-major students, and the question of chemistry's contribution to general education are evaluated. Chemistry and science curriculum are too profession- and consumer-oriented, and to overcome this problem, it is advised that all disciplines must incorporate the major…

  5. Mechanisms in Photographic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews current research interests in photographic chemistry, involving two proposed models for spectral sensitization of crystal defects and impurities in the photolysis reactivity and the mechanisms of development and complexation. Establishment of photographic chemistry in a chemistry curriculum is recommended. (CC)

  6. Chemistry as General Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    Science courses are common in most general education requirements. This paper addresses the role of chemistry classes in meeting these requirements. Chemistry professors have for many years questioned the appropriateness of the standard introductory chemistry course as general education, resulting in the growing popularity of specialized non-majors courses. I suggest that current non-major chemistry courses cover too much consumer chemistry and ignore some of the big contributions of chemistry to human knowledge. Majors chemistry courses, while they prepare students for majoring in science, do not address these issues either. Consequently, chemistry courses are often an ineffective and unpopular way to meet general education science requirements. Part of the reason for this dilemma is the lack of chemists who address the contributions of chemistry to human knowledge in general. I propose that faculty at liberal arts colleges engage in this important task and that non-majors chemistry textbooks incorporate questions and issues that relate chemistry to a broader view of human knowledge. If these things happen, perhaps chemistry courses will become more effective as general education.

  7. Fast microbial reduction of ferrihydrite colloids from a soil effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Andreas; Bosch, Julian; Rennert, Thilo; Heister, Katja; Braunschweig, Juliane; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Totsche, Kai U.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies on the microbial reduction of synthetic iron oxide colloids showed their superior electron accepting property in comparison to bulk iron oxides. However, natural colloidal iron oxides differ in composition from their synthetic counterparts. Besides a potential effect of colloid size, microbial iron reduction may be accelerated by electron-shuttling dissolved organic matter (DOM) as well as slowed down by inhibitors such as arsenic. We examined the microbial reduction of OM- and arsenic-containing ferrihydrite colloids. Four effluent fractions were collected from a soil column experiment run under water-saturated conditions. Ferrihydrite colloids precipitated from the soil effluent and exhibited stable hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 281 (±146) nm in the effluent fraction that was collected first and 100 (±43) nm in a subsequently obtained effluent fraction. Aliquots of these oxic effluent fractions were added to anoxic low salt medium containing diluted suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens. Independent of the initial colloid size, the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids were quickly and completely reduced. The rates of Fe2+ formation ranged between 1.9 and 3.3 fmol h-1 cell-1, and are in the range of or slightly exceeding previously reported rates of synthetic ferrihydrite colloids (1.3 fmol h-1 cell-1), but greatly exceeding previously known rates of macroaggregate-ferrihydrite reduction (0.07 fmol h-1 cell-1). The inhibition of microbial Fe(III) reduction by arsenic is unlikely or overridden by the concurrent enhancement induced by soil effluent DOM. These organic species may have increased the already high intrinsic reducibility of colloidal ferrihydrite owing to quinone-mediated electron shuttling. Additionally, OM, which is structurally associated with the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids, may also contribute to the higher reactivity due to increasing solubility and specific surface area of ferrihydrite. In conclusion, ferrihydrite

  8. Physics of Colloids in Space (PCS): Microgravity Experiment Completed Operations on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Sankaran, Subramanian

    2003-01-01

    Immediately after mixing, the two-phase-like colloid-polymer critical point sample begins to phase separate, or de-mix, into two phases-one that resembles a gas and one that resembles a liquid, except that the particles are colloids and not atoms. The colloid-poor black regions (colloidal gas) grow bigger, and the colloid-rich white regions (colloidal liquid) become whiter as the domains further coarsen. Finally, complete phase separation is achieved, that is, just one region of each colloid-rich (white) and colloid-poor (black) phase. This process was studied over four decades of length scale, from 1 micrometer to 1 centimeter.

  9. Principles of Environmental Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, Ruth A.

    2007-07-01

    Roy M. Harrison, Editor RSC Publishing; ISBN 0854043713; × + 363 pp.; 2006; $69.95 Environmental chemistry is an interdisciplinary science that includes chemistry of the air, water, and soil. Although it may be confused with green chemistry, which deals with potential pollution reduction, environmental chemistry is the scientific study of the chemical and biochemical principles that occur in nature. Therefore, it is the study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in the air, water, and soil environments, and the effect of human activity on them. Environmental chemistry not only explores each of these environments, but also closely examines the interfaces and boundaries where the environments intersect.

  10. DNA hybridization and ligation for directed colloidal assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyr, Margaret

    Colloidal assembly using DNA hybridization has been pursued as a means assemble non-conventional ordered colloidal structures. However, to date it is undetermined whether DNA hybridization can be used to achieve non-FCC colloidal crystals. Using microcontact printing techniques, we have fabricated covalently bound single stranded DNA (ssDNA) two-dimensional arrays on glass surfaces, which were used to direct the assembly of complementary DNA functionalized polystyrene colloids. Two of the hallmarks of DNA hybridization, sequence specificity and thermal reversibility, were demonstrated. Due to the periodicity of these arrays, laser diffraction was used to directly monitor these structures during assembly. To demonstrate the versatility of the 2D colloidal array assembled via DNA hybridization, a catalytic DNA sequence or DNAzyme was incorporated into the colloidal array system. By tethering the enzymatic strand to the patterned glass surface and the substrate strand to polystyrene colloids, we showed that the DNAzyme could prevent the assembly of the arrays when the required Pb2+ cofactor was provided. Attempts to assemble the colloid arrays and disassemble via the Pb2+-DNAzyme induced cleavage were unsuccessful, likely due to the incomplete cleavage of the multitude of hybridized linkages between each colloid and the surface. Since DNA is not only capable of catalyzing reactions, but also capable of being reacted upon by a variety of biological enzymes, we examined the use of DNA ligase as a means to control the assembly of DNA-functionalized colloids. A three-sequence linker system was used for the hybridization mediated assembly of colloids: one sequence was tethered to the surface of the glass slide or colloids, one was tethered to another colloid surface, and the linker sequence hybridizes simultaneously to both tethered sequences. Once hybridized, the two tethered fragments can be ligated using DNA ligase, resulting in a continuous sequence tethered on one end

  11. Thermoelectricity and thermodiffusion in charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Huang, B T; Roger, M; Bonetti, M; Salez, T J; Wiertel-Gasquet, C; Dubois, E; Cabreira Gomes, R; Demouchy, G; Mériguet, G; Peyre, V; Kouyaté, M; Filomeno, C L; Depeyrot, J; Tourinho, F A; Perzynski, R; Nakamae, S

    2015-08-07

    The Seebeck and Soret coefficients of ionically stabilized suspension of maghemite nanoparticles in dimethyl sulfoxide are experimentally studied as a function of nanoparticle volume fraction. In the presence of a temperature gradient, the charged colloidal nanoparticles experience both thermal drift due to their interactions with the solvent and electric forces proportional to the internal thermoelectric field. The resulting thermodiffusion of nanoparticles is observed through forced Rayleigh scattering measurements, while the thermoelectric field is accessed through voltage measurements in a thermocell. Both techniques provide independent estimates of nanoparticle's entropy of transfer as high as 82 meV K(-1). Such a property may be used to improve the thermoelectric coefficients in liquid thermocells.

  12. Trion decay in colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Jha, Praket P; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2009-04-28

    Using charged films of colloidal CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots of approximately 3.5 to 4.5 nm core diameters and 0.6 to 1.2 nm thick CdS shells, the radiative and nonradiative decay of the negatively charged exciton, the trion T-, are measured. The T- radiative rate is faster than the exciton by a factor of 2.2 +/- 0.4 and estimated at approximately 10 ns. The T- lifetime is approximately 0.7-1.5 ns for the samples measured and is longer than the biexciton lifetime by a factor or 7.5 +/- 1.7.

  13. Argyria associated with colloidal silver supplementation.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Jeffrey K; Hull, Christopher M; Zone, John J

    2003-07-01

    A 65-year-old male presented for skin examination and was incidentally noted to have discoloration of the fingernails. These findings were completely asymptomatic. The patient had been taking colloidal silver supplementation (Silverzone 140 ppm silver Gifts of Nature, St. George, UT, USA) for 2 years as therapy for diabetes. He first noticed the onset of nail discoloration 1 year ago. His past medical history included type II diabetes and hypertension. His current medications were metformin, glyburide, and benazepril. Physical examination revealed slate-gray discoloration involving the lunulae of the fingernails (Fig. 1). The skin, mucous membranes, and sclerae were unaffected.

  14. Duration test of an annular colloid thruster.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perel, J.; Mahoney, J. F.; Daley, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    An annular colloid thruster was continuously operated for 1023 hours. Performance was stable with no sparking and negligible drain currents observed. An average thrust of 25.1 micropounds and an average specific impulse of 1160 seconds were obtained at an accelerating voltage of 15 k he thruster exhaust beam was continuously neutralized using electrons and electrostatic vectoring was demonstrated periodically. The only clear trend with time was an increase in specific impulse during the last third of the test period. From these results the thruster lifetime was estimated to be over an order of magnitude greater than the test duration.

  15. Colloidal polymeric nanoparticles and brain drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Najeh Maissar; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara

    2009-07-01

    The blood brain barrier protects the brain from harmful substances in the blood stream and has stopped the development of many powerful and interesting drugs candidates for central nervous system due to the low poor distribution and by efflux mechanisms. Many different approaches have been developed in order to overcome this barrier and the drug gain access to the brain. The polymeric nanoparticles are efficient colloidal systems that have been investigated to the brain drug delivery. This review will focus on the current strategies for brain drug delivery emphasizing the properties and characteristics of polymeric nanoparticles for this purpose.

  16. Crystalline Colloidal Arrays in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunkara, Hari B.; Penn, B. G.; Frazier, D. O.; Ramachandran, N.

    1997-01-01

    Crystalline Colloidal Arrays (CCA, also known as colloidal crystals), composed of aqueous or nonaqueous dispersions of self-assembled nanosized polymer colloidal spheres, are emerging toward the development of advanced optical devices for technological applications. The spontaneous self assembly of polymer spheres in a dielectric medium results from the electrostatic repulsive interaction between particles of uniform size and charge distribution. In a way similar to atomic crystals that diffract X-rays, CCA dispersions in thin quartz cells selectively and efficiently Bragg diffract the incident visible light. The reason for this diffraction is because the lattice (body or face centered cubic) spacing is on the order of the wavelength of visible light. Unlike the atomic crystals that diffract a fixed wavelength, colloidal crystals in principle, depending on the particle size, particle number and charge density, can diffract W, Vis or IR light. Therefore, the CCA dispersions can be used as laser filters. Besides, the diffraction intensity depends on the refractive index mismatch between polymer spheres and dielectric medium; therefore, it is possible to modulate incident light intensities by manipulating the index of either the spheres or the medium. Our interest in CCA is in the fabrication of all-optical devices such as optical switches, limiters, and spatial light modulators for optical signal processing. The two major requirements from a materials standpoint are the incorporation of suitable nonlinear optical materials (NLO) into polymer spheres which will allow us to alter the refractive index of the spheres by intense laser radiation, and preparation of solid CCA filters which can resist laser damage. The fabrication of solid composite filters not only has the advantage that the films are easier to handle, but also the arrays in solid films are more robust than in liquid media. In this paper, we report the photopolymerization process used to trap CCA in polymer

  17. Colloid research for the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, E.A.

    1992-05-01

    Research is needed to understand the role of particulates in the migration of radionuclides away from the sites of nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. The process of testing itself may produce a reservoir of particles to serve as vectors for the transport of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater. Exploratory experiments indicate the presence of numerous particulates in the vicinity of the Cambric test but a much lower loading in a nearby well that has been pumped continuously for 15 years. Recent groundwater colloid research is briefly reviewed to identify sampling and characterization methods that may be applicable at the Nevada Test Site.

  18. Self-diffusiophoresis of chemically active colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Mihail N.; Uspal, William E.; Dietrich, Siegfried

    2016-11-01

    Chemically active colloids locally change the chemical composition of their solvent via catalytic reactions which occur on parts of their surface. They achieve motility by converting the released chemical free energy into mechanical work through various mechanisms, such as phoresis. Here we discuss the theoretical aspects of self-diffusiophoresis, which - despite being one of the simplest motility mechanisms - captures many of the general features characterizing self-phoresis, such as self-generated and maintained hydrodynamic flows "driven" by surface activity induced inhomogeneities in solution. By studying simple examples, which provide physical insight, we highlight the complex phenomenology which can emerge from self-diffusiophoresis.

  19. Lateral optical binding between two colloidal particles

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ming-Tzo; Ng, Jack; Chan, C. T.; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An optical binding force between two nearby colloidal particles trapped by two coherent laser beams is measured by phase-sensitive detection. The binding force is long-range and spatially oscillatory. For identical linearly-polarized incident beams, the oscillation period is equal to the optical wavelength. For mutually perpendicular polarizations, a new force appears with half-wavelength periodicity, caused by double inter-particle scattering. This force is observable only with cross-polarized incident beams, for which the stronger single-scattering forces are forbidden by parity. PMID:27982052

  20. Numerical modeling of colloid facilitated virus transport in porus media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzourakis, Vasileios E.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2013-04-01

    A conceptual mathematical model was developed to describethe simultaneous transport (cotransport) of viruses and colloids in three-dimensional, water saturated, homogeneous porous media with uniform flow. The model accounts for the migration of individual virus and colloid particles as well as viruses attached onto colloids. Viruses can be suspended in the aqueous phase, attached onto suspended colloids and the solid matrix, and attached onto colloids previously attached on the solid matrix. Colloids can be suspended in the aqueous phase or attached on the solid matrix. Viruses in all four phases (suspended in the aqueous phase, attached onto suspended colloid particles, attached onto the solid matrix, and attached onto colloids previously attached on the solid matrix) may undergo inactivation with different inactivation coefficients. The governing coupled partial differential equations were solved numerically by employing finite difference methods, which were implemented explicitly or implicitly so that both stability and accuracy factors were satisfied. Furthermore, available experimental data were used to test the newly developed cotransport model. The model was shown to simulate quite accurately the available experimental data.

  1. Collective behavior in out-of-equilibrium colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranson, Igor S.

    2013-06-01

    Colloidal suspensions, heterogeneous fluids containing solid microscopic particles, play an important role in our everyday life, from food and pharmaceutical industries to medicine and nanotechnology. Colloidal suspensions can be divided in two major classes: equilibrium, and active, i.e. maintained out of thermodynamic equilibrium by external electric or magnetic fields, light, chemical reactions, or hydrodynamic shear flow. While the properties of equilibrium colloidal suspensions are fairly well understood, out-of-equilibrium colloids pose a formidable challenge and the research is in its early exploratory stage. The possibility of dynamic self-assembly, a natural tendency of simple building blocks to organize into complex functional architectures, is one of the most remarkable properties of out-of-equilibrium colloids. Examples range from tunable, self-healing colloidal crystals and membranes to self-assembled microswimmers and robots. In contrast to their equilibrium counterparts, out-of-equilibrium colloidal suspensions may exhibit novel material properties, e.g. reduced viscosity, enhanced self-diffusivity, etc. This work reviews recent developments in the field of self-assembly and collective behavior of out-of-equilibrium colloids, with the focus on the fundamental physical mechanisms.

  2. Feasibility of colloidal silver SERS for rapid bacterial screening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrate-reduced silver colloids have been used extensively for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study and are commonly characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy. In this work, relative standard deviation (RSD) of SERS spectra from silver colloidal suspensions and ratios of SERS peaks from sma...

  3. Fabrication and Characterization of Colloidal Crystal Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, I.; Ramiro-Manzano, F.; Meseguer, F.; Bonet, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment that allows undergraduate or graduate students to get introduced to colloidal crystal research concepts in an interesting way. Moreover, such experiments and studies can also be useful in the field of crystallography or solid-state physics. The work concerns the growth of colloidal crystal thin films obtained…

  4. Colloid adhesive parameters for chemical heterogeneous porous media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple modeling approach was developed to calculate colloid adhesive parameters for chemically heterogeneous porous media. The area of the zone of electrostatic influence between a colloid and solid-water interface (Az) was discretized into a number of equally sized grid cells to capture chemical...

  5. Recent Results from the Physics of Colloids in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, David A.; Bailey, A.; Christianson, R.; Manley, S.; Prasad, V.; Segre, P.; Gasser, U.; Cipelletti, L.; Schoefield, A.; Pusey, P.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space is an experiment which flew in the ISS. Data on several different samples of colloidal particles were obtained. They provided unexpected information about the behavior of the samples in microgravity. The data are currently being analyzed. The most recent findings will be discussed in this talk.

  6. Physics of Colloids in Space: Flight Hardware Operations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Bailey, Arthur E.; Jankovsky, Amy L.; Lorik, Tibor

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space (PCS) experiment was launched on Space Shuttle STS-100 in April 2001 and integrated into EXpedite the PRocess of Experiments to Space Station Rack 2 on the International Space Station (ISS). This microgravity fluid physics investigation is being conducted in the ISS U.S. Lab 'Destiny' Module over a period of approximately thirteen months during the ISS assembly period from flight 6A through flight 9A. PCS is gathering data on the basic physical properties of simple colloidal suspensions by studying the structures that form. A colloid is a micron or submicron particle, be it solid, liquid, or gas. A colloidal suspension consists of these fine particles suspended in another medium. Common colloidal suspensions include paints, milk, salad dressings, cosmetics, and aerosols. Though these products are routinely produced and used, we still have much to learn about their behavior as well as the underlying properties of colloids in general. The long-term goal of the PCS investigation is to learn how to steer the growth of colloidal structures to create new materials. This experiment is the first part of a two-stage investigation conceived by Professor David Weitz of Harvard University (the Principal Investigator) along with Professor Peter Pusey of the University of Edinburgh (the Co-Investigator). This paper describes the flight hardware, experiment operations, and initial science findings of the first fluid physics payload to be conducted on ISS: The Physics of Colloids in Space.

  7. Avalanches, plasticity, and ordering in colloidal crystals under compression.

    PubMed

    McDermott, D; Reichhardt, C J Olson; Reichhardt, C

    2016-06-01

    Using numerical simulations we examine colloids with a long-range Coulomb interaction confined in a two-dimensional trough potential undergoing dynamical compression. As the depth of the confining well is increased, the colloids move via elastic distortions interspersed with intermittent bursts or avalanches of plastic motion. In these avalanches, the colloids rearrange to minimize their colloid-colloid repulsive interaction energy by adopting an average lattice constant that is isotropic despite the anisotropic nature of the compression. The avalanches take the form of shear banding events that decrease or increase the structural order of the system. At larger compression, the avalanches are associated with a reduction of the number of rows of colloids that fit within the confining potential, and between avalanches the colloids can exhibit partially crystalline or anisotropic ordering. The colloid velocity distributions during the avalanches have a non-Gaussian form with power-law tails and exponents that are consistent with those found for the velocity distributions of gliding dislocations. We observe similar behavior when we subsequently decompress the system, and find a partially hysteretic response reflecting the irreversibility of the plastic events.

  8. Composition and cycling of colloids in marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Laodong; Santschi, Peter H.

    1997-02-01

    Colloidal (COM) or macromolecular organic matter makes up a significant portion of the bulk dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool in aquatic environments. Because of their high specific surface areas and complexation capacities, marine colloids are of great importance not only in the global carbon cycle but also in the biogeochemical cycling of many particle-reactive nuclides and trace elements in the ocean. However, the colloidal pool as a whole is still poorly understood and largely uncharacterized. Recently, cross-flow ultrafiltration and other separation techniques, which have been successfully used to isolate marine colloids, combined with a multitracer approach, have greatly advanced our understanding of the cycling of COM and its associated trace elements in marine environments. In this paper we focus on recent developments on isotopic and elemental composition of colloids which allow organic matter cycling in marine environments to be constrained. Major sections review sampling techniques for aquatic colloids, concentrations and distribution of COM, biochemical and elemental (organic and inorganic) characterization, and stable isotopic (13C and 15N) and radioisotopic (14C and 234Th) characterization of marine colloids. We discuss sources and turnover rates of organic matter in the ocean, importance of benthic boundary layer processes in the cycling of DOM, changes in the paradigms of marine organic matter cycling, and research needs for a better understanding of the biogeochemistry of marine colloids.

  9. Stable colloidal solutions of strontium hexaferrite hard magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Trusov, Lev A; Vasiliev, Alexander V; Lukatskaya, Maria R; Zaytsev, Dmitry D; Jansen, Martin; Kazin, Pavel E

    2014-12-04

    Herein we demonstrate an approach to prepare a colloidal solution of strontium hexaferrite via a glass-ceramic route. The as obtained colloids are stable and resistive to aggregation or sedimentation. They reveal outstanding magnetic and magneto-optical properties because of their platelet-like anisotropic shape and high permanent magnetic moment.

  10. Predicting colloid transport through saturated porous media: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Ian L.; Johnson, William P.; Gerhard, Jason I.; Willson, Clinton S.; O'Carroll, Denis M.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding and predicting colloid transport and retention in water-saturated porous media is important for the protection of human and ecological health. Early applications of colloid transport research before the 1990s included the removal of pathogens in granular drinking water filters. Since then, interest has expanded significantly to include such areas as source zone protection of drinking water systems and injection of nanometals for contaminated site remediation. This review summarizes predictive tools for colloid transport from the pore to field scales. First, we review experimental breakthrough and retention of colloids under favorable and unfavorable colloid/collector interactions (i.e., no significant and significant colloid-surface repulsion, respectively). Second, we review the continuum-scale modeling strategies used to describe observed transport behavior. Third, we review the following two components of colloid filtration theory: (i) mechanistic force/torque balance models of pore-scale colloid trajectories and (ii) approximating correlation equations used to predict colloid retention. The successes and limitations of these approaches for favorable conditions are summarized, as are recent developments to predict colloid retention under the unfavorable conditions particularly relevant to environmental applications. Fourth, we summarize the influences of physical and chemical heterogeneities on colloid transport and avenues for their prediction. Fifth, we review the upscaling of mechanistic model results to rate constants for use in continuum models of colloid behavior at the column and field scales. Overall, this paper clarifies the foundation for existing knowledge of colloid transport and retention, features recent advances in the field, critically assesses where existing approaches are successful and the limits of their application, and highlights outstanding challenges and future research opportunities. These challenges and opportunities

  11. Humic colloid-borne natural polyvalent metal ions: dissociation experiment.

    PubMed

    Geckeis, H; Rabung, Th; Ngo Manh, T; Kim, J I; Beck, H P

    2002-07-01

    The natural association nature of the humic colloid-borne trace elements is investigated. Rare earth elements (REE) Th and U are chosen as naturally occurring representatives and chemical homologues for actinides of different oxidation states present in nuclear waste. Tri- and tetravalent elements in two investigated Gorleben groundwaters (Gohy-532 and -2227) almost exclusively occur as humic or fulvic colloid-borne species. Their desorption behavior from colloids is examined in the unperturbed groundwater (pH approximately 8) under anaerobic conditions (Ar/1% CO2) by addition of a chelating cation exchanger resin. Particularly, the dissociation process of naturally occurring Eu(III) in the groundwater is compared with the Eu(III) desorption from its humate complex prepared with purified Aldrich humic acid in a buffered aqueous solution at pH approximately 8. The Eu(III) dissociation from the groundwater colloids is found to be considerably slower than found for the humate complex synthesized in the laboratory. This suggests that under natural aquatic conditions the Eu(III) binding in colloids is chemically different from the simple humate complexation as observed in the laboratory experiment. The colloid characterization bythe size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and the flow field-flow fractionation (FFFF) indicates that natural colloid-borne trace elements are found predominantly in colloids of larger size (>15 nm in size), while Eu(III) in its humate complex is found mainly in colloids of hydrodynamic diameters <5 nm. The slower desorption kinetics and the larger colloid size suggest that the polyvalent metal ion binding in natural humic colloids is associated to polynucleation with other co-present trace metal ions. Radiotracer experiments reveal that isotopic equilibria with the naturally colloid-borne trace elements are not attained within a period of more than 100 days, indicating irreversible binding of at least a part of colloid-borne polyvalent trace

  12. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport: a regulatory perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, W. L.; Pickett, D. A.; Codell, R. B.; Nicholson, T. J.

    2001-12-01

    What hydrogeologic-geochemical-microbial conditions and processes affect migration of radionuclides sorbed onto microparticles or native colloid-sized radionuclide particles? The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for protecting public health, safety, and the environment at numerous nuclear facilities including a potential high-level nuclear waste disposal site. To fulfill these obligations, NRC needs to understand the mechanisms controlling radionuclide release and transport and their importance to performance. The current focus of NRC staff reviews and technical interactions dealing with colloid-facilitated transport relates to the potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. NRC staff performed bounding calculations to quantify radionuclide releases available for ground-water transport to potential receptors from a Yucca Mountain repository. Preliminary analyses suggest insignificant doses of plutonium and americium colloids could be derived from spent nuclear fuel. Using surface complexation models, NRC staff found that colloids can potentially lower actinide retardation factors by up to several orders of magnitude. Performance assessment calculations, in which colloidal transport of plutonium and americium was simulated by assuming no sorption or matrix diffusion, indicated no effect of colloids on human dose within the 10,000 year compliance period due largely to long waste-package lifetimes. NRC staff have identified information gaps and developed technical agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure sufficient information will be presented in any potential future Yucca Mountain license application. DOE has agreed to identify which radionuclides could be transported via colloids, incorporate uncertainties in colloid formation, release and transport parameters, and conceptual models, and address the applicability of field data using synthetic microspheres as colloid analogs. NRC is currently

  13. Nonlinear machine learning and design of reconfigurable digital colloids.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew W; Phillips, Carolyn L; Jankowksi, Eric; Ferguson, Andrew L

    2016-09-14

    Digital colloids, a cluster of freely rotating "halo" particles tethered to the surface of a central particle, were recently proposed as ultra-high density memory elements for information storage. Rational design of these digital colloids for memory storage applications requires a quantitative understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the configurational states within which information is stored. We apply nonlinear machine learning to Brownian dynamics simulations of these digital colloids to extract the low-dimensional intrinsic manifold governing digital colloid morphology, thermodynamics, and kinetics. By modulating the relative size ratio between halo particles and central particles, we investigate the size-dependent configurational stability and transition kinetics for the 2-state tetrahedral (N = 4) and 30-state octahedral (N = 6) digital colloids. We demonstrate the use of this framework to guide the rational design of a memory storage element to hold a block of text that trades off the competing design criteria of memory addressability and volatility.

  14. Optical dispersive shock waves in defocusing colloidal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, X.; Marchant, T. R.; Smyth, N. F.

    2017-03-01

    The propagation of an optical dispersive shock wave, generated from a jump discontinuity in light intensity, in a defocusing colloidal medium is analysed. The equations governing nonlinear light propagation in a colloidal medium consist of a nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the beam and an algebraic equation for the medium response. In the limit of low light intensity, these equations reduce to a perturbed higher order nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Solutions for the leading and trailing edges of the colloidal dispersive shock wave are found using modulation theory. This is done for both the perturbed nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the full colloid equations for arbitrary light intensity. These results are compared with numerical solutions of the colloid equations.

  15. SUBSURFACE MOBILE PLUTONIUM SPECIATION: SAMPLING ARTIFACTS FOR GROUNDWATER COLLOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.; Buesseler, K.

    2010-06-29

    A recent review found several conflicting conclusions regarding colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in groundwater and noted that colloids can both facilitate and retard transport. Given these contrasting conclusions and the profound implications even trace concentrations of plutonium (Pu) have on the calculated risk posed to human health, it is important that the methodology used to sample groundwater colloids be free of artifacts. The objective of this study was: (1) to conduct a field study and measure Pu speciation, ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu for reduced-Pu{sub aq}, oxidized-Pu{sub aq}, reduced-Pu{sub colloid}, and oxidized-Pu{sub colloid}), in a Savannah River Site (SRS) aquifer along a pH gradient in F-Area, (2) to determine the impact of pumping rate on Pu concentration, Pu speciation, and Pu isotopic ratios, (3) determine the impact of delayed sample processing (as opposed to processing directly from the well).

  16. Superlubric-pinned transition in sliding incommensurate colloidal monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelli, Davide; Vanossi, Andrea; Invernizzi, Michele; Paronuzzi, Stella; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) crystalline colloidal monolayers sliding over a laser-induced optical lattice providing the periodic "corrugation" potential recently emerged as a new tool for the study of friction between ideal crystal surfaces. Here, we focus in particular on static friction, the minimal sliding force necessary to depin one lattice from the other. If the colloid and the optical lattices are mutually commensurate, the colloid sliding is always pinned by static friction; however, when they are incommensurate, the presence or absence of pinning can be expected to depend upon the system parameters, like in one-dimensional (1D) systems. If a 2D analogy to the mathematically established Aubry transition of one-dimensional systems were to hold, an increasing periodic corrugation strength U0 should turn an initially free-sliding, superlubric colloid into a pinned state, where the static friction force goes from zero to finite through a well-defined dynamical phase transition. We address this problem by the simulated sliding of a realistic model 2D colloidal lattice, confirming the existence of a clear and sharp superlubric-pinned transition for increasing corrugation strength. Unlike the 1D Aubry transition, which is continuous, the 2D transition exhibits a definite first-order character, with a jump of static friction. With no change of symmetry, the transition entails a structural character, with a sudden increase of the colloid-colloid interaction energy, accompanied by a compensating downward jump of the colloid-corrugation energy. The transition value for the corrugation amplitude U0 depends upon the misalignment angle θ between the optical and the colloidal lattices, superlubricity surviving until larger corrugations for angles away from the energetically favored orientation, which is itself generally slightly misaligned, as shown in recent work. The observability of the superlubric-pinned colloid transition is proposed and discussed.

  17. Colloidal PbS nanocrystals integrated to Si-based photonics for applications at telecom wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humer, M.; Guider, R.; Jantsch, W.; Fromherz, T.

    2013-05-01

    In the last decade, Si based photonics has made major advances in terms of design, fabrication, and device implementation. But due to Silicon's indirect bandgap, it still remains a challenge to create efficient Si-based light emitting devices. In order to overcome this problem, an approach is to develop hybrid systems integrating light-emitting materials into Si. A promising class of materials for this purpose is the class of semiconducting nanocrystal quantum dots (NCs) that are synthesized by colloidal chemistry. As their absorption and emission wavelength depends on the dot size, which can easily be controlled during synthesis, they are extremely attractive as building blocks for nanophotonic applications. For applications in telecom wavelength, Lead chalcogenide colloidal NCs are optimum materials due to their unique optical, electronic and nonlinear properties. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate the integration of PbS nanocrystals into Si-based photonic structures like slot waveguides and ring resonators as optically pumped emitters for room temperature applications. In order to create such hybrid structures, the NCs were dissolved into polymer resists and drop cast on top of the device. Upon optical pumping, intense photoluminescence emission from the resonating modes is recorded at the output of the waveguide with transmission quality factors up to 14000. The polymer host material was investigated with respect to its ability to stabilize the NC's photoluminescence emission against degradation under ambient conditions. The waveguide-ring coupling efficiency was also investigated as function of the NCs concentrations blended into the polymer matrix. The integration of colloidal quantum dots into Silicon photonic structures as demonstrated in this work is a very versatile technique and thus opens a large range of applications utilizing the linear and nonlinear optical properties of PbS NCs at telecom wavelengths.

  18. Colloidal motility and patterning by physical chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacci, Jeremie; Abecassis, Benjamin; Cottin-Bizonne, Cecile; Ybert, Christophe; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2009-11-01

    We developped a microfluidic setup to show the motility of colloids or biomolecules under a controlled salt gradient thanks to the diffusiophoresis phenomenon [1,2]. We can therefore mimic chemotaxis on simple physical basis with thrilling analogies with the biological chemotaxis of E. Coli bacteria: salt dependance of the velocity [3] and log-sensing behavior [4]. In addition with a temporally tunable gradient we show we can generate an effective osmotic potential to trap colloids or DNA. These experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations and an asymptotic ratchet model. Finally, we use these traps to generate various patterns and because concentration gradients are ubiquitous in nature, we question for the role of such a mecanism in morphogenesis [5] or positioning perspectives in cells [6]. [4pt] [1] B. Abecassis, C. Cottin-Bizonne, C. Ybert, A. Ajdari, and L. Bocquet, Nat. Mat., 7(10):785--789, 2008. [2] Anderson, Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech, 21, 1989. [3] Y. L. Qi and J. Adler, PNAS, 86(21):8358--8362, 1989. [4] Y. V. Kalinin, L. L. Jiang, Y. H. Tu, and M. M. Wu, Biophys. J., 96(6):2439--2448, 2009. [4] J. B. Moseley, A. Mayeux, A. Paoletti, and P. Nurse, Nat., 459(7248):857--U8, 2009. [6] L. Wolpert, Dev., 107:3--12, 1989

  19. Sudden collapse of a colloidal gel.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Paul; Teece, Lisa J; Faers, Malcolm A

    2012-02-01

    Metastable gels formed by weakly attractive colloidal particles display a distinctive two-stage time-dependent settling behavior under their own weight. Initially, a space-spanning network is formed that, for a characteristic time, which we define as the lag time τ(d), resists compaction. This solidlike behavior persists only for a limited time. Gels whose age t(w) is greater than τ(d) yield and suddenly collapse. We use a combination of confocal microscopy, rheology, and time-lapse video imaging to investigate both the process of sudden collapse and its microscopic origin in a refractive-index matched emulsion-polymer system. We show that the height h of the gel in the early stages of collapse is well described by the surprisingly simple expression, h(τ)=h(0)-Aτ(3/2), with h(0) the initial height and τ=t(w)-τ(d) the time counted from the instant where the gel first yields. We propose that this unexpected result arises because the colloidal network progressively builds up internal stress as a consequence of localized rearrangement events, which leads ultimately to collapse as thermal equilibrium is reestablished.

  20. Colloidal gelation with variable attraction energy.

    PubMed

    Zaccone, Alessio; Crassous, Jérôme J; Ballauff, Matthias

    2013-03-14

    We present an approximation scheme to the master kinetic equations for aggregation and gelation with thermal breakup in colloidal systems with variable attraction energy. With the cluster fractal dimension df as the only phenomenological parameter, rich physical behavior is predicted. The viscosity, the gelation time, and the cluster size are predicted in closed form analytically as a function of time, initial volume fraction, and attraction energy by combining the reversible clustering kinetics with an approximate hydrodynamic model. The fractal dimension df modulates the time evolution of cluster size, lag time and gelation time, and of the viscosity. The gelation transition is strongly nonequilibrium and time-dependent in the unstable region of the state diagram of colloids where the association rate is larger than the dissociation rate. Only upon approaching conditions where the initial association and the dissociation rates are comparable for all species (which is a condition for the detailed balance to be satisfied) aggregation can occur with df = 3. In this limit, homogeneous nucleation followed by Lifshitz-Slyozov coarsening is recovered. In this limited region of the state diagram the macroscopic gelation process is likely to be driven by large spontaneous fluctuations associated with spinodal decomposition.

  1. Flow of colloidal suspensions and gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Roseanna

    Our recent studies of yield of colloidal gels under shear show that yield in such gels occurs in distinct stages. Under fixed stress, yield follows a finite delay period of slow solid-like creep. Post yield, the gel fluidizes and may undergo long-time viscous flow or, in some cases, may re-solidify. Under imposed strain rate, the transition from equilibrium to long-time flow is characterized by one or more stress overshoots, signifying a yield process here as well. These rheological changes are accompanied by evolution in morphology and dynamics of the gel network. Similar regimes have been observed in gels subjected to gravitational forcing; the gel initially supports its own weight, or perhaps undergoes slow, weak compaction. This may be followed by a sudden transition to rapid compaction or sedimentation. Various models have been put forth to explain these behaviors based on structural evolution, but this detail is difficult to observe in experiment. Here we examine the detailed microstructural evolution and rheology of reversible colloidal gels as they deform under gravity, identifying the critical buoyant force at which yield occurs, the role played by ongoing gel coarsening, and similarities and differences compared to yield under shear. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the NSF XSEDE Computational Resource, the NSF Early CAREER Program, and the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program.

  2. Localized Plastic Deformation in Colloidal Micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Daniel; Hor, Jyo Lyn; Ortiz, Carlos; Lee, Daeyeon; Gianola, Daniel

    When driven beyond yield, many amorphous solids exhibit concentrated regions of large plastic strain referred to as shear bands. Shear bands are the result of localized, cooperative rearrangements of particles known as shear transformations (STs). STs are dilatory: their operation results in an increase of free volume and local softening that leads to spatially concentrated plasticity. However, the evolution of STs into a macroscopic shear band remains poorly understood. To study the process, we perform compression experiments on amorphous colloidal micropillars. The micropillars, which are composed of fluorescent 3 μm PMMA particles, are made freestanding so that shear banding instabilities are not suppressed by confining boundaries. During compression, we observe strong localization of strain in a band of the pillar. As deformation proceeds, the sheared region continues to dilate until it reaches the colloidal glass transition, at which point dilation terminates. We quantify a length scale by measuring the extent of spatial correlations in strain. This length scale decreases gradually with increasing dilation and becomes static beyond the glass transition. Our results reinforce the idea of yield as a stress-induced glass transition in amorphous solids.

  3. Colloidal aggregation and dynamics in anisotropic fluids

    PubMed Central

    Mondiot, Frédéric; Botet, Robert; Snabre, Patrick; Mondain-Monval, Olivier; Loudet, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    We present experiments and numerical simulations to investigate the collective behavior of submicrometer-sized particles immersed in a nematic micellar solution. We use latex spheres with diameters ranging from 190 to 780 nm and study their aggregation properties due to the interplay of the various colloidal forces at work in the system. We found that the morphology of aggregates strongly depends on the particle size, with evidence for two distinct regimes: the biggest inclusions clump together within minutes into either compact clusters or V-like structures that are completely consistent with attractive elastic interactions. On the contrary, the smallest particles form chains elongated along the nematic axis, within comparable timescales. In this regime, Monte Carlo simulations, based on a modified diffusion-limited cluster aggregation model, strongly suggest that the anisotropic rotational Brownian motion of the clusters combined with short-range depletion interactions dominate the system coarsening; elastic interactions no longer prevail. The simulations reproduce the sharp transition between the two regimes on increasing the particle size. We provide reasonable estimates to interpret our data and propose a likely scenario for colloidal aggregation. These results emphasize the growing importance of the diffusion of species at suboptical-wavelength scales and raise a number of fundamental issues. PMID:24715727

  4. Colloidal drug delivery systems in vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Beg, Sarwar; Samad, Abdus; Nazish, Iram; Sultana, Ruksar; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Ahmad, Md Zaki; Akbar, Md

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines play a vital role in the field of community medicine to combat against several diseases of human existence. Vaccines primarily trigger the acquired immune system to develop long-lasting immunity against pathogens. Conventional approaches for vaccine delivery lacks potential to target a particular antigen to develop acquired immunity by specific antibodies. Recent advancements in vaccine delivery showed that inclusion of adjuvants in vaccine formulations or delivery of them in a carrier helps in achieving desired targeting ability, reducing the immunogenicity and significant augmentation in the immune response. Colloidal carriers (liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, proteosomes, virosomes and virus like particles (VLPs), antigen cochleates, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) have been widely explored for vaccine delivery. Further, surface engineering of these carriers with ligands, functional moieties and monoclonal antibodies tend to enhance the immune recognition potential of vaccines by differentiation of antigen specific memory T-cells. The current review, therefore, provides an updated account on the recent advancements in various colloidal delivery systems in vaccine delivery, outlining the mechanism of immune response initiated by them along with potential applications and marketed instances in an explicit manner.

  5. The dielectric response of a colloidal spheroid.

    PubMed

    Chassagne, C; Bedeaux, D

    2008-10-01

    In this article, we present a theory for the dielectric behavior of a colloidal spheroid, based on an improved version of a previously published analytical theory [C. Chassagne, D. Bedeaux, G.J.M. Koper, Physica A 317 (2003) 321-344]. The theory gives the dipolar coefficient of a dielectric spheroid in an electrolyte solution subjected to an oscillating electric field. In the special case of the sphere, this theory is shown to agree rather satisfactorily with the numerical solutions obtained by a code based on DeLacey and White's [E.H.B. DeLacey, L.R. White, J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 2 77 (1981) 2007] for all zeta potentials, frequencies and kappa a1 where kappa is the inverse of the Debye length and a is the radius of the sphere. Using the form of the analytical solution for a sphere we were able to derive a formula for the dipolar coefficient of a spheroid for all zeta potentials, frequencies and kappa a1. The expression we find is simpler and has a more general validity than the analytical expression proposed by O'Brien and Ward [R.W. O'Brien, D.N. Ward, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 121 (1988) 402] which is valid for kappa a > 1 and zero frequency.

  6. Large-scale assembly of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongta

    This study reports a simple, roll-to-roll compatible coating technology for producing three-dimensional highly ordered colloidal crystal-polymer composites, colloidal crystals, and macroporous polymer membranes. A vertically beveled doctor blade is utilized to shear align silica microsphere-monomer suspensions to form large-area composites in a single step. The polymer matrix and the silica microspheres can be selectively removed to create colloidal crystals and self-standing macroporous polymer membranes. The thickness of the shear-aligned crystal is correlated with the viscosity of the colloidal suspension and the coating speed, and the correlations can be qualitatively explained by adapting the mechanisms developed for conventional doctor blade coating. Five important research topics related to the application of large-scale three-dimensional highly ordered macroporous films by doctor blade coating are covered in this study. The first topic describes the invention in large area and low cost color reflective displays. This invention is inspired by the heat pipe technology. The self-standing macroporous polymer films exhibit brilliant colors which originate from the Bragg diffractive of visible light form the three-dimensional highly ordered air cavities. The colors can be easily changed by tuning the size of the air cavities to cover the whole visible spectrum. When the air cavities are filled with a solvent which has the same refractive index as that of the polymer, the macroporous polymer films become completely transparent due to the index matching. When the solvent trapped in the cavities is evaporated by in-situ heating, the sample color changes back to brilliant color. This process is highly reversible and reproducible for thousands of cycles. The second topic reports the achievement of rapid and reversible vapor detection by using 3-D macroporous photonic crystals. Capillary condensation of a condensable vapor in the interconnected macropores leads to the

  7. How colloid-colloid interactions and hydrodynamic effects influence the percolation threshold: A simulation study in alumina suspensions.

    PubMed

    Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Mouas, Mohamed; Videcoq, Arnaud; Cerbelaud, Manuella; Bienia, Marguerite; Bowen, Paul; Ferrando, Riccardo

    2015-11-15

    The percolation behavior of alumina suspensions is studied by computer simulations. The percolation threshold ϕc is calculated, determining the key factors that affect its magnitude: the strength of colloid-colloid attraction and the presence of hydrodynamic interactions (HIs). To isolate the effects of HIs, we compare the results of Brownian Dynamics, which do not include hydrodynamics, with those of Stochastic Rotation Dynamics-Molecular Dynamics, which include hydrodynamics. Our results show that ϕc decreases with the increase of the attraction between the colloids. The inclusion of HIs always leads to more elongated structures during the aggregation process, producing a sizable decrease of ϕc when the colloid-colloid attraction is not too strong. On the other hand, the effects of HIs on ϕc tend to become negligible with increasing attraction strength. Our ϕc values are in good agreement with those estimated by the yield stress model by Flatt and Bowen.

  8. Kinetic analyses and performance of a colloidal magnetic nanoparticle based immunoassay dedicated to allergy diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Teste, Bruno; Kanoufi, Frédéric; Descroix, Stéphanie; Poncet, Pascal; Georgelin, Thomas; Siaugue, Jean-Michel; Petr, Jan; Varenne, Anne; Hennion, Marie-Claire

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to use magnetic nanoparticles as immunosupports for allergy diagnosis. Most immunoassays used for immunosupports and clinical diagnosis are based on a heterogeneous solid-phase system and suffer from mass-transfer limitation. The nanoparticles' colloidal behavior and magnetic properties bring the advantages of homogeneous immunoassay, i.e., species diffusion, and of heterogeneous immunoassay, i.e., easy separation of the immunocomplex and free forms, as well as analyte preconcentration. We thus developed a colloidal, non-competitive, indirect immunoassay using magnetic core-shell nanoparticles (MCSNP) as immunosupports. The feasibility of such an immunoassay was first demonstrated with a model antibody and described by comparing the immunocapture kinetics using macro (standard microtiter plate), micro (microparticles) and nanosupports (MCSNP). The influence of the nanosupport properties (surface chemistry, antigen density) and of the medium (ionic strength, counter ion nature) on the immunocapture efficiency and specificity was then investigated. The performances of this original MCSNP-based immunoassay were compared with a gold standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a microtiter plate. The capture rate of target IgG was accelerated 200-fold and a tenfold lower limit of detection was achieved. Finally, the MCSNP-based immunoassay was successfully applied to the detection of specific IgE from milk-allergic patient's sera with a lower LOD and a good agreement (CV < 6%) with the microtiter plate, confirming the great potential of this analytical platform in the field of immunodiagnosis.

  9. Interaction between colloidal particles on an oil-water interface in dilute and dense phases.

    PubMed

    Parolini, Lucia; Law, Adam D; Maestro, Armando; Buzza, D Martin A; Cicuta, Pietro

    2015-05-20

    The interaction between micron-sized charged colloidal particles at polar/non-polar liquid interfaces remains surprisingly poorly understood for a relatively simple physical chemistry system. By measuring the pair correlation function g(r) for different densities of polystyrene particles at the decane-water interface, and using a powerful predictor-corrector inversion scheme, effective pair-interaction potentials can be obtained up to fairly high densities, and these reproduce the experimental g(r) in forward simulations, so are self consistent. While at low densities these potentials agree with published dipole-dipole repulsion, measured by various methods, an apparent density dependence and long range attraction are obtained when the density is higher. This condition is thus explored in an alternative fashion, measuring the local mobility of colloids when confined by their neighbors. This method of extracting interaction potentials gives results that are consistent with dipolar repulsion throughout the concentration range, with the same magnitude as in the dilute limit. We are unable to rule out the density dependence based on the experimental accuracy of our data, but we show that incomplete equilibration of the experimental system, which would be possible despite long waiting times due to the very strong repulsions, is a possible cause of artefacts in the inverted potentials. We conclude that to within the precision of these measurements, the dilute pair potential remains valid at high density in this system.

  10. Active photonic devices based on colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals and organometallic halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez Alvarez, Isaac

    2016-10-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals have arisen as outstanding materials to develop a new generation of optoelectronic devices. Their fabrication under simple and low cost colloidal chemistry methods results in cheap nanostructures able to provide a wide range of optical functionalities. Their attractive optical properties include a high absorption cross section below the band gap, a high quantum yield emission at room temperature, or the capability of tuning the band-gap with the size or the base material. In addition, their solution process nature enables an easy integration on several substrates and photonic structures. As a consequence, these nanoparticles have been extensively proposed to develop several photonic applications, such as detection of light, optical gain, generation of light or sensing. This manuscript reviews the great effort undertaken by the scientific community to construct active photonic devices based on these nanoparticles. The conditions to demonstrate stimulated emission are carefully studied by comparing the dependence of the optical properties of the nanocrystals with their size, shape and composition. In addition, this paper describes the design of different photonic architectures (waveguides and cavities) to enhance the generation of photoluminescence, and hence to reduce the threshold of optical gain. Finally, semiconductor nanocrystals are compared to organometallic halide perovskites, as this novel material has emerged as an alternative to colloidal nanoparticles.

  11. Microscopic Origin of the Hofmeister Effect in Gelation Kinetics of Colloidal Silica.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Marte; Conchúir, Breanndán O; Spigone, Elisabetta; Niranjan, Arun; Zaccone, Alessio; Cicuta, Pietro

    2015-08-06

    The gelation kinetics of silica nanoparticles is a central process in physical chemistry, yet it is not fully understood. Gelation times are measured to increase by over 4 orders of magnitude, simply changing the monovalent salt species from CsCl to LiCl. This striking effect has no microscopic explanation within current paradigms. The trend is consistent with the Hofmeister series, pointing to short-ranged solvation effects not included in the standard colloidal (DLVO) interaction potential. By implementing a simple form for short-range repulsion within a model that relates the gelation timescale to the colloidal interaction forces, we are able to explain the many orders of magnitude difference in the gelation times at fixed salt concentration. The model allows us to estimate the magnitude of the non-DLVO hydration forces, which dominate the interparticle interactions on the length scale of the hydrated ion diameter. This opens the possibility of finely tuning the gelation time scale of nanoparticles by just adjusting the background electrolyte species.

  12. Photochemical arrays formed by spatial compartmentalization of colloidal nanoparticles in a polymer-based hydrogel

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, M. A.; Rajh, T.; Makarova, O. V.; Seifert, S.; Tiede, D. M.; Thurnauer, M. C.

    2000-01-13

    The development of practical strategies for the assembly of semiconductor and metal colloid nanoparticles into ordered architectures is an area of considerable current interest, since it offers an opportunity for exploiting the optical and electronic properties of these colloids for device development. Prior research has explored creating such organized nanoparticle assemblies by Langmuir-Blodgett techniques or controlled solvent evaporation on suitable substrates. These approaches suffer from several limitations, however, most notably the generation of relatively simple structures and the lack of structural tailorability, preventing full exploitation of these materials. More recently, directed assembly using chemisorption of streptavidin-biotin or thiol-derivatized gold nanoparticles onto substrates has been described. Alternative approaches to achieving two-dimensional confinement of nanoparticles that do not involve substrate-supported materials, but rather organize the nanoparticles into mesoscopically-ordered soft condensed matter, may offer the advantage of enhanced processability and may permit construction of nanocomposite structures based on functional nanoparticles embedded in a processable, polymer-based matrix. This work describes the development of an alternative strategy for constructing 2-D arrays of functional metal and semiconductor nanoparticles. The approach involves directing the organization of nanocrystals into a processable (i.e., by externally applied magnetic and electric fields) polymer-grafted lipid-based complex fluid. By altering the surface chemistry of the nanoparticles, they can be selectively placed into defined regions encapsulating matrix.

  13. New Insight into GO, Cadmium(II), Phosphate Interaction and Its Role in GO Colloidal Behavior.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xuemei; Wu, Qunyan; Xu, Huan; Shao, Dadong; Tan, Xiaoli; Shi, Weiqun; Chen, Changlun; Li, Jiaxing; Chai, Zhifang; Hayat, Tasawar; Wang, Xiangke

    2016-09-06

    This study establishes the relationship between the graphene oxide (GO) colloidal behavior and the co-adsorption of Cd(II) and phosphate (P(V)) on GO. Results reveal that the interactions among GO, Cd(II), and P(V) exhibit a significant dependence on solution chemistry and addition sequences and that these interactions subsequently affect the GO colloidal behavior. The GO aggregation is pH-dependent at pH < 4.0 and depends apparently on the binding ability of Cd(II) to GO at pH > 4.0. When the components were added simultaneously, the presence of P(V) enhances the GO binding capacity toward Cd(II), confirmed by theoretical calculation, resulting in the greater destabilizing influence of Cd(II) + P(V) on GO than Cd(II) at pH 3.0-9.5, while the formation of Cd3(PO4)2 precipitate leads to a lower destabilizing influence of Cd(II) + P(V) on GO than Cd(II) at pH > 9.5. Both pH and addition sequence affect the destabilizing ability of Cd(II) + P(V). These new insights are expected to provide valuable information not only for the application of GO as a potential adsorbent in multicomponent systems for heavy metal ion and oxyanion co-removal but also for the fate and risk assessment of GO after serving as heavy metal ion and oxyanion carrier.

  14. Simplified Model for the Remobilization of Colloids and Nanoparticles in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, B.

    2015-12-01

    When entering the hydrological pathways, natural colloids and engineered nanoparticles may present potential risks to the environment, particularly the soil and groundwater systems. While soils can serve as filter media to immobilize the particles, flow perturbations, such as changes in solution chemistry and flow rate, may remobilize them. Most of the current models on the release of particles in porous media require solving coupled partial different equations that simulate both flow conditions and particle behaviors. This work will present a simple method to model the remobilization of colloids or nanoparticles in porous media. The simplified model assumes that the release of the immobilized particles in the porous media is only controlled by the wet front. It thus can be described by the advection-dispersion equation couple with simple kinetic expressions of particle release. Simulations from the simplified model were tested against experimental data of the remobilization of clay particles in sand column under transient flow conditions. The model results matched the experimental data very well.

  15. Crystals, colloids, or molecules?: Early controversies about the origin of life and synthetic life.

    PubMed

    Deichmann, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Crystals, colloids, and (macro-)molecules have played major roles in theoretical concepts and experimental approaches concerning the generation of life from the mid-19th century on. The notion of the crystallization of life out of a nonliving fluid, a special case of the doctrine of spontaneous generation, was most prominently incorporated into Schleiden's and Schwann's version of cell theory. Refutation at the end of the 19th century of spontaneous generation of life and cells, in particular by Pasteur, Remak, and Virchow, not only gave rise to the flourishing fields of microbiology and cytology, but it also opened up research on synthetic life. These approaches focused on growth and form and colloidal chemistry on the one hand, and on the specificity of organisms' macromolecules and chemical reactions on the other. This article analyzes the contribution of these approaches to synthetic life research and argues that researchers' philosophical predilections and basic beliefs have played important roles in the choice of experimental and theoretical approaches towards synthetic life.

  16. Post-synthetic Anisotropic Wet-Chemical Etching of Colloidal Sodalite ZIF Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Civan; Ariñez-Soriano, Javier; Carné-Sánchez, Arnau; Guillerm, Vincent; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the shape of metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals is important for understanding their crystallization and useful for myriad applications. However, despite the many advances in shaping of inorganic nanoparticles, post-synthetic shape control of MOFs and, in general, molecular crystals remains embryonic. Herein we report using a simple wet-chemistry process at room temperature to control the anisotropic etching of colloidal ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 crystals. Our work enables uniform reshaping of these porous materials into unprecedented morphologies, including cubic and tetrahedral crystals, and even hollow boxes, via acid-base reaction and subsequent sequestration of leached metal ions. Etching tests on these ZIFs reveal that etching occurs preferentially in the crystallographic directions richer in metal-ligand bonds; that, among these directions, the etching rate tends to be faster on the crystal surfaces of higher dimensionality; and that the etching can be modulated by adjusting the pH of the etchant solution. PMID:26458081

  17. Direct Observation of Room-Temperature Polar Ordering in Colloidal GeTe Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Polking, Mark J.; Zheng, Haimei; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.; Chan, Emory; Caldwell, Marissa A.; Raoux, Simone; Kisielowski, Christian F.; Ager III, Joel W.; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Alivisatos, A.P.

    2009-12-07

    Ferroelectrics and other materials that exhibit spontaneous polar ordering have demonstrated immense promise for applications ranging from non-volatile memories to microelectromechanical systems. However, experimental evidence of polar ordering and effective synthetic strategies for accessing these materials are lacking for low-dimensional nanomaterials. Here, we demonstrate the synthesis of size-controlled nanocrystals of the polar material germanium telluride (GeTe) using colloidal chemistry and provide the first direct evidence of room-temperature polar ordering in nanocrystals less than 5 nm in size using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman studies demonstrate a sizeable polar distortion and a reversible size-dependent polar phase transition in these nanocrystals. The stability of polar ordering in solution-processible nanomaterials suggests an economical avenue to Tbit/in2-density non-volatile memory devices and other applications.

  18. Characterization of defects in colloidal CdSe nanocrystals by the modified thermostimulated luminescence technique

    SciTech Connect

    Katsaba, A. V. Fedyanin, V. V.; Ambrozevich, S. A.; Vitukhnovsky, A. G.; Lobanov, A. N.; Selyukov, A. S.; Vasiliev, R. B.; Samatov, I. G.; Brunkov, P. N.

    2013-10-15

    The temperature dependencies of the luminescence spectra of 5-nm-diameter CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals synthesized by colloidal-chemistry methods are investigated. The two bands observed in these spectra around 2.01 and 1.37 eV correspond to band-to-band transitions and luminescence of defect states, respectively. A model explaining the temperature behavior of the luminescence band intensities both upon cooling and heating is put forward. A new modification of spectrally resolved thermostimulated luminescence technique making it possible to determine the activation energies and the character of traps responsible for the temperature dependence of the luminescence intensities is suggested. This technique is used to obtain the activation energies of the emission and capture of electrons at traps (190 and 205 meV, respectively) and to determine the depth of the electron level (57 meV) responsible for luminescence in the 1.37-eV region.

  19. Post-Synthetic Anisotropic Wet-Chemical Etching of Colloidal Sodalite ZIF Crystals.

    PubMed

    Avci, Civan; Ariñez-Soriano, Javier; Carné-Sánchez, Arnau; Guillerm, Vincent; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2015-11-23

    Controlling the shape of metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals is important for understanding their crystallization and useful for myriad applications. However, despite the many advances in shaping of inorganic nanoparticles, post-synthetic shape control of MOFs and, in general, molecular crystals remains embryonic. Herein, we report using a simple wet-chemistry process at room temperature to control the anisotropic etching of colloidal ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 crystals. Our work enables uniform reshaping of these porous materials into unprecedented morphologies, including cubic and tetrahedral crystals, and even hollow boxes, by an acid-base reaction and subsequent sequestration of leached metal ions. Etching tests on these ZIFs reveal that etching occurs preferentially in the crystallographic directions richer in metal-ligand bonds; that, along these directions, the etching rate tends to be faster on the crystal surfaces of higher dimensionality; and that the etching can be modulated by adjusting the pH of the etchant solution.

  20. Highly colloidally stable hyperbranched polyglycerol grafted red fluorescent silicon nanoparticle as bioimaging probe.

    PubMed

    Das, Pradip; Jana, Nikhil R

    2014-03-26

    Here we report a surface modification approach for fluorescent silicon nanoparticle that transforms hydrophobic nanoparticle into water-soluble nanoparticle of high colloidal stability. The approach involves ring-opening polymerization of glycidol at the hydroxyl-terminated nanoparticle surface that results in a hyperbranched polyglycerol grafted silicon nanoparticle (Si-HPG). The resultant Si-HPG has 25 nm hydrodynamic diameter, low surface charge, and broad emission in the range of 450-700 nm with a fluorescence quantum yield of 6-9%. The Si-HPG has been transformed into cyclic RGD peptide functionalized nanoprobe using the conventional bioconjugation chemistry and used for specific targeting to αvβ3 integrin overexpressed cervical cancer cells and glioblastoma cells. Result shows that a silicon nanoparticle-based red fluorescent nanoprobe can be developed for in vitro/in vivo bioimaging applications.