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Sample records for colloidal iron oxide

  1. Nanosized Iron Oxide Colloids Strongly Enhance Microbial Iron Reduction▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Julian; Heister, Katja; Hofmann, Thilo; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial iron reduction is considered to be a significant subsurface process. The rate-limiting bioavailability of the insoluble iron oxyhydroxides, however, is a topic for debate. Surface area and mineral structure are recognized as crucial parameters for microbial reduction rates of bulk, macroaggregate iron minerals. However, a significant fraction of iron oxide minerals in the subsurface is supposed to be present as nanosized colloids. We therefore studied the role of colloidal iron oxides in microbial iron reduction. In batch growth experiments with Geobacter sulfurreducens, colloids of ferrihydrite (hydrodynamic diameter, 336 nm), hematite (123 nm), goethite (157 nm), and akaganeite (64 nm) were added as electron acceptors. The colloidal iron oxides were reduced up to 2 orders of magnitude more rapidly (up to 1,255 pmol h−1 cell−1) than bulk macroaggregates of the same iron phases (6 to 70 pmol h−1 cell−1). The increased reactivity was not only due to the large surface areas of the colloidal aggregates but also was due to a higher reactivity per unit surface. We hypothesize that this can be attributed to the high bioavailability of the nanosized aggregates and their colloidal suspension. Furthermore, a strong enhancement of reduction rates of bulk ferrihydrite was observed when nanosized ferrihydrite aggregates were added. PMID:19915036

  2. Dendronized iron oxide colloids for imaging the sentinel lymph node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouhannaud, J.; Garofalo, A.; Felder-Flesch, D.; Pourroy, G.

    2015-03-01

    Various methods have been used in medicine for more than one century to explore the lymphatic system. Radioactive colloids (RuS labelled with 99mTc) or/and Vital Blue dye are injected around the primary tumour and detected by means of nuclear probe or visual colour inspection respectively. The simultaneous clinical use of both markers (dye and radionuclide) improves the sensitivity of detection close to 100%. Superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) are currently receiving much attention as strong T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents that can be potentially used for preoperative localization of sentinel nodes, but also for peroperative detection of sentinel node using hand-held probes. In that context, we present the elaboration of dendronized iron oxide nanoparticles elaborated at the Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Materials of Strasbourg.

  3. Conquering the Dark Side: Colloidal Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Senpan, Angana; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Rhee, Ilsu; Mauro, Nicholas A.; Pan, Dipanjan; Hu, Grace; Scott, Michael J.; Fuhrhop, Ralph W.; Gaffney, Patrick J.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2009-01-01

    Nanomedicine approaches to atherosclerotic disease will have significant impact on the practice and outcomes of cardiovascular medicine. Iron oxide nanoparticles have been extensively used for nontargeted and targeted imaging applications based upon highly sensitive T2* imaging properties, which typically result in negative contrast effects that can only be imaged 24 or more hours after systemic administration due to persistent blood pool interference. Although recent advances involving MR pulse sequences have converted these dark contrast voxels into bright ones, the marked delays in imaging from persistent magnetic background interference and prominent dipole blooming effects of the magnetic susceptibility remain barriers to overcome. We report a T1-weighted (T1w) theranostic colloidal iron oxide nanoparticle platform, CION, which is achieved by entrapping oleate-coated magnetite particles within a cross-linked phospholipid nanoemulsion. Contrary to expectations, this formulation decreased T2 effects thus allowing positive T1w contrast detection down to low nanomolar concentrations. CION, a vascular constrained nanoplatform administered in vivo permitted T1w molecular imaging 1 hour after treatment without blood pool interference, although some T2 shortening effects on blood, induced by the superparamagnetic particles persisted. Moreover, CION was shown to encapsulate antiangiogenic drugs, like fumagillin, and retained them under prolonged dissolution, suggesting significant theranostic functionality. Overall, CION is a platform technology, developed with generally recognized as safe components, that overcomes the temporal and spatial imaging challenges associated with current iron oxide nanoparticle T2 imaging agents, and which has theranostic potential in vascular diseases for detecting unstable ruptured plaque or treating atherosclerotic angiogenesis. PMID:19908850

  4. The electrokinetic properties of colloidal magnetic iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, I M; Healy, T W

    2012-05-22

    A novel electrokinetic streaming potential technique has been used to determine the ζ potential behavior of three magnetic iron oxides, (Fe(3)O(4), γ-Fe(2)O(3), and CoFe(2)O(4)) as a function of pH and salt concentration. These colloidal materials, (nanosize in one dimension), are held in the form of a plug by means of external magnets. The streaming potential (E) is measured as a function of fluid flow induced by a pressure drop (ΔP) across the plug. The magnetically held plug is found to obey the requirements of the streaming potential technique; in each case an iso-electric point, (iep) independent of salt concentration is observed. However, if one uses the appropriate quantities in the standard formula, the calculated ζ potentials are very much lower than for oxides such as silica, alumina or goethite and other colloidal oxide, latex, etc. particulates in aqueous salt solutions. Furthermore, at a given pH, the measured ζ potentials anomalously increase in magnitude rather than decrease as observed conventionally as the salt concentration is increased. This apparent anomalous behavior could not be eliminated by incorporating surface conductance effects. However by including a conductance pathway, independent of pH or salt concentration, through the magnetic particle network itself, the anomaly was removed. Confirmation of the role of a conductance pathway through the magnetic particle network was obtained by using silica coated magnetic particles which displayed normal electrokinetic behavior. Finally, we have redesigned the plug-electrode assembly to allow measurement of streaming current, a technique know to eliminate contributions from plug network conductances of any kind. The resulting ζ potentials, derived from this streaming current technique are normal.

  5. A functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide colloid as a receptor directed MR contrast agent

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, L.; Groman, E.V.; Menz, E.; Lewis, J.M.; Bengele, H. )

    1990-01-01

    We have synthesized a surface functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide colloid whose clearance from the vascular compartment was inhibited by asialofetuin but not fetuin. Unlike other particulate or colloidal magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents, the agent of the current communication is not withdrawn from the vascular compartment by cells of the macrophage-monocyte phagocytic system, as indicated by its selective increase in hepatic relaxation rates. Because of this we refer to this colloid as a hepatic selective (HS) MR contrast agent. At 20 mumol Fe/kg the HS MR agent darkened MR images of liver. The HS MR agent exhibited no acute toxicity when injected into rats at 1800 mumol Fe/kg. Based on these observations, surface functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide colloids may be the basis of MR contrast agents internalized by receptor mediated endocytosis generally, and by the asialoglycoprotein receptor in particular.

  6. Biocompatible Colloidal Suspensions Based on Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization and Toxicological Profile

    PubMed Central

    Coricovac, Dorina-Elena; Moacă, Elena-Alina; Pinzaru, Iulia; Cîtu, Cosmin; Soica, Codruta; Mihali, Ciprian-Valentin; Păcurariu, Cornelia; Tutelyan, Victor A.; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Dehelean, Cristina-Adriana

    2017-01-01

    The use of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedicine has evolved intensely in the recent years due to the multiple applications of these nanomaterials, mainly in domains like cancer. The aim of the present study was: (i) to develop biocompatible colloidal suspensions based on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as future theranostic tools for skin pathology and (ii) to test their effects in vitro on human keratinocytes (HaCat cells) and in vivo by employing an animal model of acute dermal toxicity. Biocompatible colloidal suspensions were obtained by coating the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles resulted during the solution combustion synthesis with a double layer of oleic acid, as innovative procedure in increasing bioavailability. The colloidal suspensions were characterized in terms of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in vitro effects of these suspensions were tested by means of Alamar blue assay and the noxious effects at skin level were measured using non-invasive methods. The in vitro results indicated a lack of toxicity on normal human cells induced by the iron oxide nanoparticles colloidal suspensions after an exposure of 24 h to different concentrations (5, 10, and 25 μg·mL−1). The dermal acute toxicity test showed that the topical applications of the colloidal suspensions on female and male SKH-1 hairless mice were not associated with significant changes in the quality of barrier skin function. PMID:28400730

  7. Formation of colloidal nanocrystal clusters of iron oxide by controlled ligand stripping.

    PubMed

    Fu, Junxiang; He, Le; Xu, Wenjing; Zhuang, Jianle; Yang, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaozeng; Wu, Mingmei; Yin, Yadong

    2016-01-04

    We report a "ligand stripping" method for the creation of secondary structures of colloidal nanocrystals. Using iron oxide as an example, we demonstrate that the use of diols as "stripping agents" allows the controllable removal of the original capping ligands and induces aggregation of nanocrystals into well-defined clusters.

  8. Response of bacteria and meiofauna to iron oxide colloids in sediments of freshwater microcosms.

    PubMed

    Höss, Sebastian; Frank-Fahle, Béatrice; Lueders, Tillmann; Traunspurger, Walter

    2015-11-01

    The use of colloidal iron oxide (FeOx) in the bioremediation of groundwater contamination implies its increasing release into the environment and requires an assessment of its ecotoxicological risk. Therefore, microcosm experiments were carried out to investigate the impact of ferrihydrite colloids on the bacterial and meiofaunal communities of pristine freshwater sediments. The effects of ferrihydrite colloids were compared with those of ferrihydrite macroaggregates to discriminate between colloid-specific and general FeOx impacts. The influence of ferrihydrite colloids on the toxicity of sediment-bound fluoranthene was also considered. At high concentrations (496 mg Fe kg(-1) sediment dry wt), ferrihydrite colloids had a significant, but transient impact on bacterial and meiofaunal communities. Although bacterial community composition specifically responded to ferrihydrite colloids, a more general FeOx effect was observed for meiofauna. Bacterial activity responded most sensitively (already at 55 mg Fe kg(-1) dry wt) without the potential of recovery. Ferrihydrite colloids did not influence the toxicity of sediment-bound fluoranthene. Significant correlations between bacterial activity and meiofaunal abundances were indicative of trophic interactions between bacteria and meiofauna and therefore of the contribution of indirect food web effects to the observed impacts. The results suggest that the application of ferrihydrite colloids for remediation purposes in the field poses no risk for benthic communities, given that, with the exception of generic bacterial activity, any negative effects on communities were reversible. © 2015 SETAC.

  9. Colloidal Stability and Monodispersible Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Biotechnology Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamili, K.; Rajesh, E. M.; Rajendran, R.; Madhan Shankar, S. R.; Elango, M.; Abitha Devi, N.

    2013-02-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are promising material for various biological applications. In the recent decades, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) have great attention in biomedical applications such as drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). This review focuses on the colloidal stability and monodispersity properties of MNPs, which pay more attention toward biomedical applications. The simplest and the most promising method for the synthesis of MNPs is co-precipitation. The biocompatible MNPs are more interested in MRI application. This review also apportions synthesis, characterization and applications of MNP in biological and biomedical as theranostics and imaging.

  10. Colloidal stability of iron oxide nanocrystals coated with a PEG-based tetra-catechol surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondini, Sara; Drago, Carmelo; Ferretti, Anna M.; Puglisi, Alessandra; Ponti, Alessandro

    2013-03-01

    Long-term colloidal stability of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) is an important goal that has not yet been fully achieved. To make an advance in our understanding of the colloidal stability of iron oxide NPs in aqueous media, we prepared NPs comprising a monodisperse (13 nm) iron oxide core coated with a PEG-based (PEG: polyethyleneglycol) surfactant. This consists of a methoxy-terminated PEG chain (MW = 5000 Da) bearing four catechol groups via a diethylenetriamine linker. The surfactant was grafted onto the nanocrystals by ligand exchange monitored by infrared spectroscopy. The colloidal stability of these nanoparticles was probed by monitoring the time evolution of the Z-average intensity-weighted radius Rh and volume-weighted size distribution Pv obtained from analysis of dynamic light scattering data. The nanoparticles showed no sign of aggregation for four months in deionized water at room temperature and also when subjected to thermal cycling between 25 and 75 °C. In 0.01 M PBS (phosphate buffered saline), aggregation (if any) is slow and partial; after 66 h, about 50% of NPs have not aggregated. Aggregation is more effective in 0.15 M NH4AcO buffer, where isolated particles are not observed after 66 h, and especially in acidic NH4AcO/AcOH buffer, where aggregation is complete within 1 h and precipitation is observed. The differing stability of the NPs in the above aqueous media is closely related to their ζ potential.

  11. Bacteriophage PRD1 and silica colloid transport and recovery in an iron oxide-coated sand aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, J.N.; Elimelech, M.; Ard, R.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Johnson, P.R.

    1999-01-01

    Bacteriophage PRD1 and silica colloids were co-injected into sewage- contaminated and uncontaminated zones of an iron oxide-coated sand aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, and their transport was monitored over distances up to 6 m in three arrays. After deposition, the attached PRD1 and silica colloids were mobilized by three different chemical perturbations (elevated pH, anionic surfactant, and reductant). PRD1 and silica colloids experienced less attenuation in the contaminated zone where adsorbed organic matter and phosphate may be hindering attachment of PRD1 and silica colloids to the iron oxide coatings. The PRD1 collision efficiencies agree well with collision efficiencies predicted by assuming favorable PRD1 deposition on iron oxide coatings for which the surface area coverage was measured by microprobe analysis of sediment thin sections. ?? potentials of the PRD1, silica colloids, and aquifer grains corroborated the transport results, indicating that electrostatic forces dominated the attachment of PRD1 and silica colloids. Elevated pH was the chemical perturbation most effective at mobilizing the attached PRD1 and silica colloids. Elevated surfactant concentration mobilized the attached PRD1 and silica colloids more effectively in the contaminated zone than in the uncontaminated zone.Bacteriophage PRD1 and silica colloids were co-injected into sewage-contaminated and uncontaminated zones of an iron oxide-coated sand aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, and their transport was monitored over distances up to 6 m in three arrays. After deposition, the attached PRD1 and silica colloids were mobilized by three different chemical perturbations (elevated pH, anionic surfactant, and reductant). PRD1 and silica colloids experienced less attenuation in the contaminated zone where adsorbed organic matter and phosphate may be hindering attachment of PRD1 and silica colloids to the iron oxide coatings. The PRD1 collision efficiencies agree well with collision efficiencies predicted by

  12. Influence of iron solubility and charged surface-active compounds on lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters containing association colloids.

    PubMed

    Homma, Rika; Johnson, David R; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2016-05-15

    The impact of iron compounds with different solubilities on lipid oxidation was studied in the presence and absence of association colloids. Iron (III) sulfate only accelerated lipid oxidation in the presence of association colloids while iron (III) oleate accelerated oxidation in the presence and absence of association colloids. Further, iron (III) oxide retarded lipid oxidation both with and without association colloids. The impact of charged association colloids on lipid oxidation in ethyl oleate was also investigated. Association colloids consisting of the anionic surface-active compound dodecyl sulphosuccinate sodium salt (AOT), cationic surface-active compound hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and nonionic surface-active compound 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton X-100) retarded, promoted, and had no effect on lipid oxidation rates, respectively. These results indicate that the polarity of metal compounds and the charge of association colloids play a big role in lipid oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Iron-oxide colloidal nanoclusters: from fundamental physical properties to diagnosis and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulou, Athanasia; Brintakis, Konstantinos; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Angelakeris, Mavroeidis; Vasilakaki, Marianna; Trohidou, Kalliopi; Douvalis, Alexios P.; Psycharakis, Stylianos; Ranella, Anthi; Manna, Liberato; Lappas, Alexandros

    2014-03-01

    Research on magnetic nanocrystals attracts wide-spread interest because of their challenging fundamental properties, but it is also driven by problems of practical importance to the society, ranging from electronics (e.g. magnetic recording) to biomedicine. In that respect, iron oxides are model functional materials as they adopt a variety of oxidation states and coordinations that facilitate their use. We show that a promising way to engineer further their technological potential in diagnosis and therapy is the assembly of primary nanocrystals into larger colloidal entities, possibly with increased structural complexity. In this context, elevated-temperature nanochemistry (c.f. based on a polyol approach) permitted us to develop size-tunable, low-cytotoxicity iron-oxide nanoclusters, entailing iso-oriented nanocrystals, with enhanced magnetization. Experimental (magnetometry, electron microscopy, Mössbauer and NMR spectroscopies) results supported by Monte Carlo simulations are reviewed to show that such assemblies of surface-functionalized iron oxide nanocrystals have a strong potential for innovation. The clusters' optimized magnetic anisotropy (including microscopic surface spin disorder) and weak ferrimagnetism at room temperature, while they do not undermine colloidal stability, endow them a profound advantage as efficient MRI contrast agents and hyperthermic mediators with important biomedical potential.

  14. Plasmon bleaching dynamics in colloidal gold-iron oxide nanocrystal heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Comin, Alberto; Korobchevskaya, Kseniya; George, Chandramohan; Diaspro, Alberto; Manna, Liberato

    2012-02-08

    Colloidal nanocrystal heterodimers composed of a plasmonic and a magnetic domain have been widely studied as potential materials for various applications in nanomedicine, biology, and photocatalysis. One of the most popular nanocrystal heterodimers is represented by a structure made of a Au domain and a iron oxide domain joined together. Understanding the nature of the interface between the two domains in such type of dimer and how this influences the energy relaxation processes is a key issue. Here, we present the first broad-band transient absorption study on gold/iron oxide nanocrystal heterodimers that explains how the energy relaxation is affected by the presence of such interface. We found faster electron-electron and electron-phonon relaxation times for the gold "nested" in the iron oxide domain in the heterodimers with respect to gold "only" nanocrystals, that is, free-standing gold nanocrystals in solution. We relate this effect to the decreased electron screening caused by spill-out of the gold electron distribution at gold/iron oxide interface. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  15. Effect of sonication on the colloidal stability of iron oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode; Aziz, Azlan Abdul

    2015-04-24

    Colloidal stability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles’ (SPION) suspensions, ultrasonically irradiated at various pH was studied. Electrophoresis measurement of the sonicated SPION showed that the shock waves and other unique conditions generated from the acoustic cavitation process (formation, growth and collapse of bubbles) affect the zeta potential value of the suspension. In this work, stabled colloidal suspensions of SPION were prepared and their pH is varied between 3 and 5. Prior to ultrasonic irradiation of the suspensions, their initial zeta potential values were determined. After ultrasonic irradiation of the suspensions, we observed that the sonication process interacts with colloidal stability of the nanoparticles. The results demonstrated that only suspensions with pH less 4 were found stable and able to retain more than 90% of its initial zeta potential value. However, at pH greater than 4, the suspensions were found unstable. The result implies that good zeta potential value of SPION can be sustained in sonochemical process as long as the pH of the mixture is kept below 4.

  16. Applicability of DLVO Approach to Predict Trends in Iron Oxide Colloid Mobility Under Various Physical And Chemical Soil Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian Carstens, Jannis; Bachmann, Jörg; Neuweiler, Insa

    2014-05-01

    In soil and groundwater, highly mobile iron oxide colloids can act as "shuttles" for transport of adsorbed contaminants such as heavy metals and radionuclides. Artificial iron oxide colloids are injected into polluted porous media to accelerate bacterial degradation of pollutants in the context of bioremediation purposes. The mobility of iron oxide colloids is strongly affected by the hydraulic, physical and chemical conditions of the pore space, the solid particle surface properties, the fluid phase, and the colloids themselves. Most pioneering studies focused on iron oxide colloid transport and retention in simplified model systems. The aim of this study is to investigate iron oxide colloid mobility under more complex, soil-typical conditions that have as yet only been applied for model microspheres, i.e. functionalized latex colloids. Among these conditions is the pivotal impact of organic matter, either dissolved or adsorbed onto solid particles, modifying wettability properties. Of particular importance was to determine if effective chemical surface parameters derived from contact angle and zeta potential measurements can be used as a tool to predict general tendencies for iron oxide colloid mobility in porous media. In column breakthrough experiments, goethite colloids (particle size: 200-900 nm) were percolated through quartz sand (grain size: 100-300 µm) at pH 5. The impact of a multitude of conditions on colloid mobility was determined: dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration, ionic strength, flow velocity, flow interruption, partial saturation, and drying with subsequent re-wetting. The solid matrix consisted of either clean sand, organic matter-coated sand, goethite-coated sand, or sand hydrophobized with dichlorodimethylsilane. Additionally, contact angles and zeta potentials of the materials applied in the column experiments were measured. By means of these surface parameters, traditional DLVO interaction energies based on zeta potential as well

  17. BACTERIOPHAGE PRD1 AND SILICA COLLOID TRANSPORT AND RECOVERY IN AN IRON OXIDE-COATED SAND AQUIFER. (R826179)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteriophage PRD1 and silica colloids were co-injected into
    sewage-contaminated and uncontaminated zones of an iron oxide-coated sand
    aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, and their transport was monitored over distances up to
    6 m in three arrays. After deposition, the attache...

  18. BACTERIOPHAGE PRD1 AND SILICA COLLOID TRANSPORT AND RECOVERY IN AN IRON OXIDE-COATED SAND AQUIFER. (R826179)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteriophage PRD1 and silica colloids were co-injected into
    sewage-contaminated and uncontaminated zones of an iron oxide-coated sand
    aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, and their transport was monitored over distances up to
    6 m in three arrays. After deposition, the attache...

  19. Lasing and magnetic microbeads loaded with colloidal quantum dots and iron oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Minxu; You, Guanjun; Wang, Andrew Y; Hu, Wenjia; Wang, Jingkang; Sun, Fengqing; Zhu, Yiming; Henderson, Ron; Xu, Jian

    2013-10-21

    This study investigates the feasibility of loading nanostructured lasing medium and magnetic nanocrystals in the same microbead for potential applications in bio- and chemical sensing. A sequential infiltration process is proposed and tested for the preparation of magnetic and lasing microbeads by incorporating, respectively, iron oxide nanocrystals in the inner cores and colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) in the periphery regions of mesoporous silica microbeads. The co-doped bead structure was confirmed by electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The lasing action of the CQD gain medium in the mesoporous beads was characterized with micro-photoluminescence, revealing sharp whispering gallery mode lasing signatures, whereas the distinguishing superparamagnetic property was measured from the co-doped microbeads with vibrating sample magnetometry.

  20. Synthesis of colloidal silver iron oxide nanoparticles--study of their optical and magnetic behavior.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Singhal, Aditi

    2009-07-22

    Silver iron oxide nanoparticles of fairly small size (average diameter approximately 1 nm) with narrow size distribution have been synthesized by the interaction of colloidal beta- Fe2O3 and silver nanoparticles. The surface morphology and size of these particles have been analyzed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their structural analysis has been carried out by employing x-ray diffraction (XRD), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), optical and infrared (IR) spectroscopic techniques. The ageing of these particles exhibits the formation of self-assembly, possibly involving weak supramolecular interactions between Ag(I)O4 and Fe(III)O4 species. These particles display the onset of absorption in the near-infrared region and have higher absorption coefficient in the visible range compared to that of its precursors. Magnetic measurements reveal an interesting transition in their magnetic behavior from diamagnetic to superparamagnetic. The magnetic moment of these particles attains a limiting value of about 0.19 emu cm(-2), which is more than two times higher than that of colloidal beta- Fe2O3. With enhanced optical and magnetic properties, this system is suggested to have possible applications in optoelectronic and magnetic devices.

  1. Size-sorted anionic iron oxide nanomagnets as colloidal mediators for magnetic hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Jean-Paul; Wilhelm, Claire; Servais, Jacques; Ménager, Christine; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Gazeau, Florence

    2007-03-07

    Iron oxide colloidal nanomagnets generate heat when subjected to an alternating magnetic field. Their heating power, governed by the mechanisms of magnetic energy dissipation for single-domain particles (Brown and Néel relaxations), is highly sensitive to the crystal size, the material, and the solvent properties. This study was designed to distinguish between the contributions of Néel and Brownian mechanisms to heat generation. Anionic nanocrystals of maghemite and cobalt ferrite, differing by their magnetic anisotropy, were chemically synthesized and dispersed in an aqueous suspension by electrostatic stabilization. The particles were size-sorted by successive electrostatic phase separation steps. Parameters governing the efficiency of nanomagnets as heat mediators were varied independently; these comprised the particle size (from 5 to 16.5 nm), the solvent viscosity, magnetic anisotropy, and the magnetic field frequency and amplitude. The measured specific loss powers (SLPs) were in quantitative agreement with the results of a predictive model taking into account both Néel and Brown loss processes and the whole particle size distribution. By varying the carrier fluid viscosity, we found that Brownian friction within the carrier fluid was the main contributor to the heating power of cobalt ferrite particles. In contrast, Néel internal rotation of the magnetic moment accounted for most of the loss power of maghemite particles. Specific loss powers were varied by 3 orders of magnitude with increasing maghemite crystal size (from 4 to 1650 W/g at 700 kHz and 24.8 kA/m). This comprehensive parametric study provides the groundwork for the use of anionic colloidal nanocrystals to generate magnetically induced hyperthermia in various media, including complex systems and biological materials.

  2. Design of Magnetic Gelatine/Silica Nanocomposites by Nanoemulsification: Encapsulation versus in Situ Growth of Iron Oxide Colloids

    PubMed Central

    Allouche, Joachim; Chanéac, Corinne; Brayner, Roberta; Boissière, Michel; Coradin, Thibaud

    2014-01-01

    The design of magnetic nanoparticles by incorporation of iron oxide colloids within gelatine/silica hybrid nanoparticles has been performed for the first time through a nanoemulsion route using the encapsulation of pre-formed magnetite nanocrystals and the in situ precipitation of ferrous/ferric ions. The first method leads to bi-continuous hybrid nanocomposites containing a limited amount of well-dispersed magnetite colloids. In contrast, the second approach allows the formation of gelatine-silica core-shell nanostructures incorporating larger amounts of agglomerated iron oxide colloids. Both magnetic nanocomposites exhibit similar superparamagnetic behaviors. Whereas nanocomposites obtained via an in situ approach show a strong tendency to aggregate in solution, the encapsulation route allows further surface modification of the magnetic nanocomposites, leading to quaternary gold/iron oxide/silica/gelatine nanoparticles. Hence, such a first-time rational combination of nano-emulsion, nanocrystallization and sol-gel chemistry allows the elaboration of multi-component functional nanomaterials. This constitutes a step forward in the design of more complex bio-nanoplatforms. PMID:28344239

  3. Synthesis of ultrasmall magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and study of their colloid and surface chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Goloverda, Galina; Jackson, Barry; Kidd, Clayton; Kolesnichenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles of Fe3O4 (4 nm) were synthesized by high-temperature hydrolysis of chelated iron (II) and (III) diethylene glycol alkoxide complexes in a solution of the parent alcohol (H2DEG) without using capping ligands or surfactants: [Fe(DEG)Cl2]2- + 2[Fe(DEG)Cl3]2- + 2H2O + 2OH- → Fe3O4 + 3H2DEG + 8Cl- The obtained particles were reacted with different small-molecule polydentate ligands, and the resulting adducts were tested for aqueous colloid formation. Both the carboxyl and α-hydroxyl groups of the hydroxyacids are involved in coordination to the nanoparticles’ surface. This coordination provides the major contribution to the stability of the ligand-coated nanoparticles against hydrolysis. PMID:20161232

  4. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles incorporated into silica nanoparticles by inelastic collision via ultrasonic field: Role of colloidal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode; Azlan, Abdul Aziz

    2015-04-24

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION)/Silica composite nanoparticles were prepared by ultrasonically irradiating colloidal suspension of silica and SPION mixture. Both silica and SPION were synthesized independently via co-precipitation and sol-gel method, respectively. Their mixtures were sonicated at different pH between 3 and 5. Electrophoresis measurement and other physicochemical analyses of the products demonstrate that at lower pH SPION was found incorporated into the silica. However, at pH greater than 4, SPION was unstable and unable to withstand the turbulence flow and shock wave from the ultrasonic field. Results suggest that the formation of the SPION/silica composite nanoparticles is strongly related to the inelastic collision induced by ultrasonic irradiation. More so, the formation the composite nanoparticles via the ultrasonic field are dependent on the zeta potential and colloidal stability of the particles.

  5. Thermal and magnetic properties of iron oxide colloids: influence of surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Paula I. P.; Lochte, Frederik; Echeverria, Coro; Pereira, Laura C. J.; Coutinho, Joana T.; Ferreira, Isabel M. M.; Novo, Carlos M. M.; Borges, João P. M. R.

    2015-10-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been extensively studied in the last few decades for several biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic drug delivery and hyperthermia. Hyperthermia is a technique used for cancer treatment which consists in inducing a temperature of about 41-45 °C in cancerous cells through magnetic NPs and an external magnetic field. Chemical precipitation was used to produce iron oxide NPs 9 nm in size coated with oleic acid and trisodium citrate. The influence of both stabilizers on the heating ability and in vitro cytotoxicity of the produced iron oxide NPs was assessed. Physicochemical characterization of the samples confirmed that the used surfactants do not change the particles’ average size and that the presence of the surfactants has a strong effect on both the magnetic properties and the heating ability. The heating ability of Fe3O4 NPs shows a proportional increase with the increase of iron concentration, although when coated with trisodium citrate or oleic acid the heating ability decreases. Cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that both pristine and trisodium citrate Fe3O4 samples do not reduce cell viability. However, oleic acid Fe3O4 strongly reduces cell viability, more drastically in the SaOs-2 cell line. The produced iron oxide NPs are suitable for cancer hyperthermia treatment and the use of a surfactant brings great advantages concerning the dispersion of NPs, also allowing better control of the hyperthermia temperature.

  6. Interaction of niobium with iron-oxide colloids and the role of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Madhusudan; Swain, K K; Verma, Rakesh

    2017-08-10

    In this work, we report the sorption of Nb on iron oxides and the effect of humic acid. Iron oxides viz. goethite, hematite and magnetite were chemically synthesised and characterised by X-ray diffraction, particle size, surface area and zeta potential measurement. The sorption of Nb on all the three iron oxides was low (∼40%) at pH 1, increased to ∼ 90% at pH 8 and decreased marginally above pH 8. The effect of humic acid on the sorption was very small. Thermodynamic parameters viz. activation energy, enthalpy, entropy, free energy and sticking probability were calculated to understand the mechanism of the sorption process. Although the enthalpy was positive, the free energy change was negative i.e. the sorption was entropy driven process. The sorption followed pseudo-second-order kinetics and sticking probability model indicated that the process was chemisorption. This study is important to understand the probable migration of (94)Nb (half life 20300 y) during underground storage of radioactive waste. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A hybridized photocatalysis-microfiltration system with iron oxide-coated membranes for the removal of natural organic matter in water treatment: effects of iron oxide layers and colloids.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ping; Choo, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Moon-Hyeon

    2009-09-01

    A photocatalysis/microfiltration (MF) hybrid system, with the coating of a membrane using iron oxide particles (IOPs), was investigated with respect to natural organic matter (NOM) removal and membrane permeability during the treatment of various surface waters. A comparison of the performance between bare (uncoated) and IOP-coated membranes employed for the photocatalytic hybrid system was made. Due to the additional adsorption of NOM onto IOPs on the membrane surface, the IOP-coated membrane system always achieved greater DOC removal efficiencies during photocatalysis/MF. Particularly, the influence of colloidal particles that were present in different water sources with respect to membrane fouling was explored. Colloidal fouling occurred to both bare and IOP-coated membranes, but the interaction of colloids with IOP coating layers was in close association with the characteristics of colloids, such as size distribution, resulting in opposing fouling behaviors with varying water sources. The IOP-coated membrane was able to control fouling properly when a relatively large size of colloidal particles existed in raw water, but not for the case of small colloids. The IOP coat layer may become denser as small colloids penetrate into it, therefore leading to further fouling. The analysis of the hydraulic filtration resistances revealed that such fouling was virtually reversible in being removed by backwashing processes. Scanning electron microscopic observations, however, visualized the existence of several foulants remaining at the membrane surface after backwashing when feed water, containing a relatively large portion of small-sized colloids, was supplied.

  8. Colloidal titania-silica-iron oxide nanocomposites and the effect from silica thickness on the photocatalytic and bactericidal activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanhom, Padtaraporn; Charoenlap, Nisanart; Tomapatanaget, Boosayarat; Insin, Numpon

    2017-04-01

    New types of colloidal multifunctional nanocomposites that combine superparamagnetic character and high photocatalytic activity were synthesized and investigated. The superparamagnetic nanocomposites composed of anatase titania, silica, and iron oxide nanoparticles (TSI) were synthesized using thermal decomposition method followed by microemulsion method, without calcination at high temperature. Different techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were used to characterize and confirm the structure of the nanocomposites. These nanocomposites showed high photocatalytic activity when used in the photodegradation of methylene blue under irradiation with a black light lamp. Moreover, the nanocomposites exhibited high antibacterial properties. From our study, the nanocomposites can be useful in various applications such as removal of pollutants with readily separation from the environment using an external magnetic field. These composites could effectively photo-degrade the dye at least three cycles without regeneration. The effects of silica shell thickness on the photocatalytic activity was investigated, and the thickness of 6 nm of the silica interlayer is enough for the inhibition of electron translocation between titania and iron oxide nanoparticles and maintaining the efficiency of photocatalytic activity of titania nanoparticles.

  9. Modeling colloid deposition on a protein layer adsorbed to iron-oxide-coated sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Flynn, R.; von der Kammer, F.; Hofmann, T.

    2012-11-01

    Our recent study reported that conformation change of granule-associated Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) may influence the role of the protein controlling colloid deposition in porous media (Flynn et al., 2012). The present study conceptualized the observed phenomena with an ellipsoid morphology model, describing BSA as an ellipsoid taking a side-on or end-on conformation on granular surface, and identified the following processes: (1) at low adsorbed concentrations, BSA exhibited a side-on conformation blocking colloid deposition; (2) at high adsorbed concentrations, BSA adapted to an end-on conformation promoted colloid deposition; and (3) colloid deposition on the BSA layer may progressively generate end-on molecules (sites) by conformation change of side-on BSA, resulting in sustained increasing deposition rates. Generally, the protein layer lowered colloid attenuation by the porous medium, suggesting the overall effect of BSA was inhibitory at the experimental time scale. A mathematical model was developed to interpret the ripening curves. Modeling analysis identified the site generation efficiency of colloid as a control on the ripening rate (declining rate in colloid concentrations), and this efficiency was higher for BSA adsorbed from a more dilute BSA solution.

  10. Colloidal stability of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: influence of natural organic matter and synthetic polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saikat; Jiang, Wei; McClements, Julian D; Xing, Baoshan

    2011-07-05

    The colloidal behavior of natural organic matter (NOM) and synthetic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-coated ferrimagnetic (γFe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated. Humic acid (HA), an important component of NOM, was extracted from a peat soil. Two different molecular weight PAAs were also used for coating. The colloidal stability of the coated magnetic NPs was evaluated as a resultant of the attractive magnetic dipolar and van der Waals forces and the repulsive electrostatic and steric-electrosteric interactions. The conformational alterations of the polyelectrolytes adsorbed on magnetic γFe(2)O(3) NPs and their role in colloidal stability were determined. Pure γFe(2)O(3) NPs were extremely unstable because of aggregation in aqueous solution, but a significant stability enhancement was observed after coating with polyelectrolytes. The steric stabilization factor induced by the polyelectrolyte coating strongly dictated the colloidal stability. The pH-induced conformational change of the adsorbed, weakly charged polyelectrolytes had a significant effect on the colloidal stability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the stretched conformation of the HA molecular chains adsorbed on the γFe(2)O(3) NP surface at pH 9, which enhanced the colloidal stability through long-range electrosteric stabilization. The depletion of the polyelectrolyte during the dilution of the NP suspension decreased the colloidal stability under acidic solution conditions. The conformation of the polyelectrolytes adsorbed on the NP surface was altered as a function of the substrate surface charge as viewed from AFM imaging. The polyelectrolyte coating also led to a reduction in magnetic moments and decreased the coercivity of the coated γFe(2)O(3) NPs. Thus, the enhanced stabilization of the coated maghematite NPs may facilitate their delivery in the groundwater for the effective removal of contaminants. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  11. Colloidal semiconductor/magnetic heterostructures based on iron-oxide-functionalized brookite TiO2 nanorods.

    PubMed

    Buonsanti, Raffaella; Snoeck, Etienne; Giannini, Cinzia; Gozzo, Fabia; Garcia-Hernandez, Mar; Angel Garcia, Miguel; Cingolani, Roberto; Cozzoli, Pantaleo Davide

    2009-05-21

    A flexible colloidal seeded-growth strategy has been developed to synthesize all-oxide semiconductor/magnetic hybrid nanocrystals (HNCs) in various topological arrangements, for which the dimensions of the constituent material domains can be controlled independently over a wide range. Our approach relies on driving preferential heterogeneous nucleation and growth of spinel cubic iron oxide (IO) domains onto brookite TiO2 nanorods (b-TiO2) with tailored geometric parameters, by means of time-programmed delivery of organometallic precursors into a suitable TiO2-loaded surfactant environment. The b-TiO2 seeds exhibit size-dependent accessibility towards IO under diffusion-controlled growth regime, which allows attainment of HNCs individually made of a single b-TiO2 section functionalized with either one or multiple nearly spherical IO domains. In spite of the dissimilarity of the respective crystal-phases, the two materials share large interfacial junctions without significant lattice strain being induced across the heterostructures. The synthetic achievements have been supported by a systematic morphological, compositional and structural characterization of the as-prepared HNCs, offering a mechanistic insight into the specific role of the seeds in the control of heterostructure formation in liquid media. In addition, the impact of the formed b-TiO2/IO heterojunctions on the magnetic properties of IO has also been assessed.

  12. Colloidal Synthesis of Bipolar Off-Stoichiometric Gallium Iron Oxide Spinel-Type Nanocrystals with Near-IR Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Urso, Carmine; Barawi, Mariam; Gaspari, Roberto; Sirigu, Gianluca; Kriegel, Ilka; Zavelani-Rossi, Margherita; Scotognella, Francesco; Manca, Michele; Prato, Mirko; De Trizio, Luca; Manna, Liberato

    2017-01-25

    We report the colloidal synthesis of ∼5.5 nm inverse spinel-type oxide Ga2FeO4 (GFO) nanocrystals (NCs) with control over the gallium and iron content. As recently theoretically predicted, some classes of spinel-type oxide materials can be intrinsically doped by means of structural disorder and/or change in stoichiometry. Here we show that, indeed, while stoichiometric Ga2FeO4 NCs are intrinsic small bandgap semiconductors, off-stoichiometric GFO NCs, produced under either Fe-rich or Ga-rich conditions, behave as degenerately doped semiconductors. As a consequence of the generation of free carriers, both Fe-rich and Ga-rich GFO NCs exhibit a localized surface plasmon resonance in the near-infrared at ∼1000 nm, as confirmed by our pump-probe absorption measurements. Noteworthy, the photoelectrochemical characterization of our GFO NCs reveal that the majority carriers are holes in Fe-rich samples, and electrons in Ga-rich ones, highlighting the bipolar nature of this material. The behavior of such off-stoichiometric NCs was explained by our density functional theory calculations as follows: the substitution of Ga(3+) by Fe(2+) ions, occurring in Fe-rich conditions, can generate free holes (p-type doping), while the replacement of Fe(2+) by Ga(3+) cations, taking place in Ga-rich samples, produces free electrons (n-type doping). These findings underscore the potential relevance of spinel-type oxides as p-type transparent conductive oxides and as plasmonic semiconductors.

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF OXIDANT TYPE ON THE PROPERTIES OF IRON COLLOIDS AND SUSPENSIONS FORMED FROM FERROUS IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Red water" describes the appearance of drinking water that contains suspended particulate iron although the actual suspension color may be light yellow to brown depending on water chemistry and particle properties. Iron can originate from the source water and from distribution ...

  14. THE INFLUENCE OF OXIDANT TYPE ON THE PROPERTIES OF IRON COLLOIDS AND SUSPENSIONS FORMED FROM FERROUS IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Red water" describes the appearance of drinking water that contains suspended particulate iron although the actual suspension color may be light yellow to brown depending on water chemistry and particle properties. Iron can originate from the source water and from distribution ...

  15. Cotransport of microorganisms and metallic colloids in quartz sand or iron oxide-coated sand under real site hydrogeological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tong; Wen, Yujuan; Yang, Xinyao; Yang, Yuesuo

    2017-04-01

    plays an important part in many soil and water processes. The column experiments were carried out using homogeneously charged (quartz sand) and heterogeneously charged (iron oxide-coated sand) porous media. References: Yang, X., Zhang, Y., Chen, F., & Yang, Y. (2015). Interplay of natural organic matter with flow rate and particle size on colloid transport: Experimentation, visualization, and modeling. Environmental science & technology, 49(22), 13385-13393. Yang, X., Yin, Z., Chen, F., Hu, J., & Yang, Y. (2015). Organic matter induced mobilization of polymer-coated silver nanoparticles from water-saturated sand. Science of the Total Environment, 529, 182-190. Wen, Y. J., Yang, Y. S., Ren, H. J., Du, X. Q., Yang, X. Y., Zhang, L. Y., & Wang, X. S. (2015). Chemical-biological hybrid reactive zones and their impact on biodiversity of remediation of the nitrobenzene and aniline contaminated groundwater. Chemical Engineering Journal, 280, 233-240.

  16. Effect of poly(ethylene oxide)-silane graft molecular weight on the colloidal properties of iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Carola; Herrera, Adriana P; Bezares, Nayla; Fachini, Estevão; Olayo-Valles, Roberto; Hinestroza, Juan P; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2012-07-01

    The size, charge, and stability of colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles with narrow size distribution and grafted with poly(ethylene glycol)-silane of different molecular weights were studied in water, biological buffers, and cell culture media. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provided information on the chemical nature of the nanoparticle surface, indicating the particle surfaces consisted of a mixture of amine groups and grafted polymer. The results indicate that the exposure of the amine groups on the surface decreased as the molecular weight of the polymer increased. The hydrodynamic diameters correlated with PEG graft molecular weight and were in agreement with a distributed density model for the thickness of a polymer shell end-grafted to a particle core. This indicates that the particles obtained consist of single iron oxide cores coated with a polymer brush. Particle surface charge and hydrodynamic diameter were measured as a function of pH, ionic strength, and in biological buffers and cell culture media. DLVO theory was used to analyze the particle stability considering electrostatic, magnetic, steric, and van der Waals interactions. Experimental results and colloidal stability theory indicated that stability changes from electrostatically mediated for a graft molecular weight of 750 g/mol to sterically mediated at molecular weights of 1000 g/mol and above. These results indicate that a graft molecular weight above 1000 g/mol is needed to produce particles that are stable in a wide range of pH and ionic strength, and in cell culture media.

  17. Colloidally stable surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles: Preparation, characterization and anti-tumor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macková, Hana; Horák, Daniel; Donchenko, Georgiy Viktorovich; Andriyaka, Vadim Ivanovich; Palyvoda, Olga Mikhailovna; Chernishov, Vladimir Ivanovich; Chekhun, Vasyl Fedorovich; Todor, Igor Nikolaevich; Kuzmenko, Oleksandr Ivanovich

    2015-04-01

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles were obtained by co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides and subsequent oxidation with sodium hypochlorite and coated with poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) [P(DMAAm-AA)]. They were characterized by a range of methods including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), elemental analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements. The effect of superparamagnetic P(DMAAm-AA)-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles on oxidation of blood lipids, glutathione and proteins in blood serum was detected using 2-thiobarbituric acid and the ThioGlo fluorophore. Finally, mice received magnetic nanoparticles administered per os and the antitumor activity of the particles was tested on Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in male mice line C57BL/6 as an experimental in vivo metastatic tumor model; the tumor size was measured and the number of metastases in lungs was determined. Surface-modified γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles showed higher antitumor and antimetastatic activities than commercial CuFe2O4 particles and the conventional antitumor agent cisplatin.

  18. Physicochemical Characterization of Iron Carbohydrate Colloid Drug Products.

    PubMed

    Zou, Peng; Tyner, Katherine; Raw, Andre; Lee, Sau

    2017-07-31

    Iron carbohydrate colloid drug products are intravenously administered to patients with chronic kidney disease for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. Physicochemical characterization of iron colloids is critical to establish pharmaceutical equivalence between an innovator iron colloid product and generic version. The purpose of this review is to summarize literature-reported techniques for physicochemical characterization of iron carbohydrate colloid drug products. The mechanisms, reported testing results, and common technical pitfalls for individual characterization test are discussed. A better understanding of the physicochemical characterization techniques will facilitate generic iron carbohydrate colloid product development, accelerate products to market, and ensure iron carbohydrate colloid product quality.

  19. Nanoparticle films and photonic crystal multilayers from colloidally stable, size-controllable zinc and iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Redel, Engelbert; Mirtchev, Peter; Huai, Chen; Petrov, Srebri; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2011-04-26

    We report a facile sol-gel synthesis of colloidally stable Fe(2)O(3) and ZnO nanoparticles in alcoholic solvents, ROH, where R = methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, isopropyl, and tert-butyl. We show that nanoparticles of ZnO (4-42) nm and Fe(2)O(3) (4-38 nm) monotonically increase in size upon increasing the alkyl chain length and branching of the alcohol solvent. These colloidally stable and size-controllable metal oxide nanoparticles enable the formation of high optical quality films and photonic crystal multilayers whose component layer thickness, refractive index, porosity, and surface area are found to scale with the nature of the alcohol. Utility of these colloidally stable nanoparticles is demonstrated by preparation of one-dimensional porous photonic crystals comprising ncZnO/ncWO(3) and ncFe(2)O(3)/ncWO(3) multilayers whose photonic stop band can be tuned by tailoring nanoparticle size. Myriad applications can be envisaged for these nanoparticle films in, for example, heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis, electrocatalysis, chemical sensors, and solar cells.

  20. Final Report: The Impact of Carbonate on Surface Protonation, Electron Transfer and Crystallization Reactions in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David Adams

    2013-07-02

    This project addresses key issues of importance in the geochemical behavior of iron oxides and in the geochemical cycling of carbon and iron. For Fe, we are specifically studying the influence of carbonate on electron transfer reactions, solid phase transformations, and the binding of carbonate to reactive sites on the edges of particles. The emphasis on carbonate arises because it is widely present in the natural environment, is known to bind strongly to oxide surfaces, is reactive on the time scales of interest, and has a speciation driven by acid-base reactions. The geochemical behavior of carbonate strongly influences global climate change and CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies. Our goal is to answer key questions with regards to specific site binding, electron transfer reactions, and crystallization reactions of iron oxides that impact both the geochemical cycling of iron and CO{sub 2} species. Our work is focused on the molecular level description of carbonate chemistry in solution including the prediction of isotope fractionation factors. We have also done work on critical atmospheric species.

  1. Phosphate binding by natural iron-rich colloids in streams.

    PubMed

    Baken, Stijn; Moens, Claudia; van der Grift, Bas; Smolders, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Phosphorus (P) in natural waters may be bound to iron (Fe) bearing colloids. However, the natural variation in composition and P binding strength of these colloids remain unclear. We related the composition of "coarse colloids" (colloids in the 0.1-1.2 μm size range) in 47 Belgian streams to the chemical properties of the streamwater. On average, 29% of the P in filtered (<1.2 μm) samples of these streams is present in coarse colloids. The concentration of Fe-rich colloids in streams decreases with increasing water hardness and pH. The P bearing colloids in these streams mostly consist of Fe hydroxyphosphates and of Fe oxyhydroxides with surface adsorbed P, which is underpinned by geochemical speciation calculations. In waters with molar P:Fe ratios above 0.5, only a minor part of the P is bound to coarse colloids. In such waters, the colloids have molar P:Fe ratios between 0.2 and 1 and are, therefore, nearly saturated with P. Conversely, in streams with molar P:Fe ratios below 0.1, most of the P is bound to Fe-rich colloids. Equilibration of synthetic and natural Fe and P bearing colloids with a zero sink reveals that colloids with low molar P:Fe ratios contain mostly nonlabile P, whereas P-saturated colloids contain mostly labile P which can be released within 7 days. Equilibration at a fixed free orthophosphate activity shows that the Fe-rich colloids may bind only limited P through surface adsorption, in the range of 0.02-0.04 mol P (mol Fe)(-1). The P:Fe ratios measured in naturally occurring Fe and P bearing colloids is clearly higher (between 0.05 and 1). These colloids are therefore likely formed by coprecipitation of P during oxidation of Fe(II), which leads to the formation of Fe hydroxyphosphate minerals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Generation and behavior of metal oxide colloids in PWR steam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Varsanik, R.G.

    1984-10-01

    This work reviews the curently available literature and research work on the generation and behavior of metal oxide colloids in PWR steam systems. The work of E. Matijevic et al on the generation and adhesion of iron and copper oxides is described. The role of colloid chemistry in the control of plant sludge and corrosion products is described. Factors affecting the adherence and re-entrainment of colloidal metal oxides along with possible methods for the control of metal oxide deposition are reviewed.

  3. Tunable and noncytotoxic PET/SPECT-MRI multimodality imaging probes using colloidally stable ligand-free superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pham, Th Nguyen; Lengkeek, Nigel A; Greguric, Ivan; Kim, Byung J; Pellegrini, Paul A; Bickley, Stephanie A; Tanudji, Marcel R; Jones, Stephen K; Hawkett, Brian S; Pham, Binh Tt

    2017-01-01

    Physiologically stable multimodality imaging probes for positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography (PET/SPECT)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were synthesized using the superparamagnetic maghemite iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles (SPIONs). The SPIONs were sterically stabilized with a finely tuned mixture of diblock copolymers with either methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG) or primary amine NH2 end groups. The radioisotope for PET or SPECT imaging was incorporated with the SPIONs at high temperature. (57)Co(2+) ions with a long half-life of 270.9 days were used as a model for the radiotracer to study the kinetics of radiolabeling, characterization, and the stability of the radiolabeled SPIONs. Radioactive (67)Ga(3+) and Cu(2+)-labeled SPIONs were also produced successfully using the optimized conditions from the (57)Co(2+)-labeling process. No free radioisotopes were detected in the aqueous phase for the radiolabeled SPIONs 1 week after dispersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). All labeled SPIONs were not only well dispersed and stable under physiological conditions but also noncytotoxic in vitro. The ability to design and produce physiologically stable radiolabeled magnetic nanoparticles with a finely controlled number of functionalizable end groups on the SPIONs enables the generation of a desirable and biologically compatible multimodality PET/SPECT-MRI agent on a single T2 contrast MRI probe.

  4. Tunable and noncytotoxic PET/SPECT-MRI multimodality imaging probes using colloidally stable ligand-free superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pham, TH Nguyen; Lengkeek, Nigel A; Greguric, Ivan; Kim, Byung J; Pellegrini, Paul A; Bickley, Stephanie A; Tanudji, Marcel R; Jones, Stephen K; Hawkett, Brian S; Pham, Binh TT

    2017-01-01

    Physiologically stable multimodality imaging probes for positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography (PET/SPECT)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were synthesized using the superparamagnetic maghemite iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles (SPIONs). The SPIONs were sterically stabilized with a finely tuned mixture of diblock copolymers with either methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG) or primary amine NH2 end groups. The radioisotope for PET or SPECT imaging was incorporated with the SPIONs at high temperature. 57Co2+ ions with a long half-life of 270.9 days were used as a model for the radiotracer to study the kinetics of radiolabeling, characterization, and the stability of the radiolabeled SPIONs. Radioactive 67Ga3+ and Cu2+-labeled SPIONs were also produced successfully using the optimized conditions from the 57Co2+-labeling process. No free radioisotopes were detected in the aqueous phase for the radiolabeled SPIONs 1 week after dispersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). All labeled SPIONs were not only well dispersed and stable under physiological conditions but also noncytotoxic in vitro. The ability to design and produce physiologically stable radiolabeled magnetic nanoparticles with a finely controlled number of functionalizable end groups on the SPIONs enables the generation of a desirable and biologically compatible multimodality PET/SPECT-MRI agent on a single T2 contrast MRI probe. PMID:28184160

  5. Characterization of physicochemical and colloidal properties of hydrogel chitosan-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, E.; Di Benedetto, A.

    2017-05-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have recently been investigated for their potential to kill cancer cells with promising results, owing to their ability to be targeted and heated by magnetic fields. In this study, novel hydrogel, chitosan Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized to induce magnetic hyperthermia, and targeted delivering of chemotherapeutics in the cancer microenvironment. The characteristic properties of synthesized bare and CS-MNPs were analyzed by various analytical methods: X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy and Thermo-gravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis. Magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using the co-precipitation method. This synthesis technique resulted in nanoparticles with an average particle size of 16 nm. The pure obtained nanoparticles were then successfully encapsulated with 4-nm-thick chitosan coating. The formation of chitosan on the surface of nanoparticles was confirmed by physicochemical analyses. Heating experiments at safe magnetic field (f = 100 kHz, H =10-20 kA m-1) revealed that the maximum achieved temperature of water stable chitosan-coated nanoparticles (50 mg ml-1) is fully in agreement with cancer therapy and biomedical applications.

  6. Colloidal synthesis of biocompatible iron disulphide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Santos-Cruz, J; Nuñez-Anita, R E; Mayén-Hernández, S A; Martínez-Alvarez, O; Acosta-Torres, L S; de la Fuente-Hernández, J; Campos-González, E; Vega-González, M; Arenas-Arrocena, M C

    2017-08-06

    The aim of this research was to synthesis biocompatible iron disulphide nanocrystals at different reaction temperatures using the colloidal synthesis methodology. Synthesis was conducted at the 220-240 °C range of reaction temperatures at intervals of 5 °C in an inert argon atmosphere. The toxicity of iron disulphide nanocrystals was evaluated in vitro using mouse fibroblast cell line. Two complementary assays were conducted: the first to evaluate cell viability of the fibroblast via an MTT assay and the second to determine the preservation of fibroblast nuclei integrity through DAPI staining, which labels nuclear DNA in fluorescence microscopes. Through TEM and HRTEM, we observed a cubic morphology of pyrite iron disulphide nanocrystals ranging in sizes 25-50 nm (225 °C), 50-70 nm (230 °C) and >70 nm (235 °C). Through X-ray diffraction, we observed a mixture of pyrite and pyrrohotite in the samples synthesized at 225 °C and 240 °C, showing the best photocatalytic activity at 80% and 65%, respectively, for the degradation of methylene blue after 120 minutes. In all experimental groups, iron disulphide nanocrystals were biocompatible, i.e. no statistically significant differences were observed between experimental groups as shown in a one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Based on all of these results, we recommend non-cytotoxic semiconductor iron sulphide nanocrystals for biomedical applications.

  7. Iron Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Amonette, James E.

    2016-09-19

    Abstract: Fe oxides are common clay-sized oxide, oxyhydroxide and hydroxide soil minerals. They are compounds of Fe, O, and H that have structures based on close-packed arrays of O. The octahedral and tetrahedral cavities within these arrays are filled with either Fe3+ or Fe2+ to form Fe(O/OH)6, FeO6, or FeO4 structural units. All of the naturally occurring Fe oxide minerals usually undergo some degree of isomorphous substitution of other metal ions for Fe in their structures. Relatively simple techniques may be used to identify Fe oxides in the field based on their typical colors and magnetic properties. In the laboratory, a variety of instrumental techniques can be used to confirm phase identity and to quantify amount. Of these, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, electron microscopy, thermal analysis, and Mössbauer spectroscopy are the most commonly used techniques. As oxides, the functional groups on their surfaces may have positive, negative, or no charge depending on pH and on the concentration and nature of other ions in the contact solution. A net positive surface charge usually is observed in soils because Fe oxides have a point-of-zero-charge in the neutral or slightly basic pHs. The functional groups on the surface form complexes with cations and anions from the aqueous phase. Their sorption and electron-buffering properties significantly affect the geochemical cycles of almost all elements having agronomic or environmental significance.

  8. Bio-inactivation of human malignant cells through highly responsive diluted colloidal suspension of functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Roberta V.; Silva-Caldeira, Priscila P.; Pereira-Maia, Elene C.; Fabris, José D.; Cavalcante, Luis Carlos D.; Ardisson, José D.; Domingues, Rosana Z.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fluids, more specifically aqueous colloidal suspensions containing certain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), have recently been gaining special interest due to their potential use in clinical treatments of cancerous formations in mammalians. The technological application arises mainly from their hyperthermic behavior, which means that the nanoparticles dissipate heat upon being exposed to an alternating magnetic field (AMF). If the temperature is raised to slightly above 43 °C, cancer cells are functionally inactivated or killed; however, normal cells tend to survive under those same conditions, entirely maintaining their bioactivity. Recent in vitro studies have revealed that under simultaneous exposure to an AMF and magnetic nanoparticles, certain lines of cancer cells are bio-inactivated even without experiencing a significant temperature increase. This non-thermal effect is cell specific, indicating that MNPs, under alternating magnetic fields, may effectively kill cancer cells under conditions that were previously thought to be implausible, considering that the temperature does not increase more than 5 °C, which is also true in cases for which the concentration of MNPs is too low. To experimentally test for this effect, this study focused on the feasibility of inducing K562 cell death using an AMF and aqueous suspensions containing very low concentrations of MNPs. The assay was designed for a ferrofluid containing magnetite nanoparticles, which were obtained through the co-precipitation method and were functionalized with citric acid; the particles had an average diameter of 10 ± 2 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of approximately 40 nm. Experiments were first performed to test for the ability of the ferrofluid to release heat under an AMF. The results show that for concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 1.0 × 103 mg L-1, the maximum temperature increase was actually less than 2 °C. However, the in vitro test results from K562 cells and suspensions

  9. To improve the performance of sediment microbial fuel cell through amending colloidal iron oxyhydroxide into freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan-Li; Yang, Ying; Chen, Mo; Zhao, Zhi-Wei; Jiang, He-Long

    2014-05-01

    Effects of iron oxide amendment into freshwater sediments on performance of sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) were investigated. It was found that amending amorphous bulk ferric oxyhydroxide, and crystalline goethite and magnetite did not affect SMFC operation. However, amendment of the mixed solution including soluble ferric citrate and colloidal iron oxyhydroxide, stably improved SMFC performance with voltage outputs up to threefolds higher than those without amendment. The enhanced voltage production corresponded to lower anode potential, but was not related to organic matter removal in sediments. Further experiments demonstrated that colloidal iron oxyhydroxide instead of soluble ferric iron played an important role in voltage production through maintaining high-concentration ferrous iron in pore water of sediments as electron shuttle and for chemical oxidation on the anode. Thus, colloidal iron oxyhydroxide amendment was a promising strategy to improve power production from SMFC employed in sediments especially with low content of organic matters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of Association Colloids on Lipid Oxidation in Triacylglycerols and Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters.

    PubMed

    Homma, Rika; Suzuki, Karin; Cui, Leqi; McClements, David Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2015-11-25

    The impact of association colloids on lipid oxidation in triacylglycerols and fatty acid ethyl esters was investigated. Association colloids did not affect lipid oxidation of high oleic safflower and high linoleic safflower triacylglycerols, but were prooxidative in fish triacylglycerols. Association colloids retarded aldehyde formation in stripped ethyl oleate, linoleate, and fish oil ethyl esters. Interfacial tension revealed that lipid hydroperoxides were surface active in the presence of the surfactants found in association colloids. The lipid hydroperoxides from ethyl esters were less surface active than triacylglycerol hydroperoxides. Stripping decreased iron and copper concentrations in all oils, but more so in fatty acid ethyl esters. The combination of lower hydroperoxide surface activity and low metal concentrations could explain why association colloids inhibited lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters. This research suggests that association colloids could be used as an antioxidant technology in fatty acid ethyl esters.

  11. Zero-valent iron colloid emplacement in sand columns

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1997-05-01

    Application of chemically reactive barriers to mitigate contaminant migration is an active area of research and development. Studies were conducted to evaluate a novel approach of emplacing chemically reactive barriers composed of zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) by injecting suspensions of colloidal-size Fe{sup 0} particles into porous media. The specific objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of influent colloid concentration, rate, and volume of colloidal suspensions on Fe{sup 0} colloid emplacement in sand columns. Relatively even distributions of Fe{sup 0} throughout a sand column were obtained at low influent colloid concentrations and high injection rates. As the concentration of influent suspensions was increased, a point was reached beyond which a significant increase in the filtration of Fe{sup 0} particles near the front of the column was observed. This point was also found to occur at lower influent colloid concentrations as the injection rate was decreased, i.e., there was an interactive effect of influent colloid concentration and injection rate on the extent of filtration that occurred near the front of the column. As the volume of the colloidal suspension injected into the column was increased, the distribution of Fe{sup 0} colloids within the column became increasingly even.

  12. Particle interactions of polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated iron oxide particles as magnetic drug delivery agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İşçi, Sevim; İşçi, Yavuz; Bekaroğlu, Maide Gökçe

    2017-08-01

    Iron oxide particles have been recently researched for the potential applications of targeted drug delivery due to their magnetic properties. The surfaces of the iron oxide particles must be modified to reduce the toxicity and to load the drug to the particles. Biopolymers are good surface modifiers of colloidal particles such as iron oxide particles. The degree of surface coverage of the colloidal iron oxide particles affects the stability, toxicity, magnetic properties and drug loading efficiency. In this study, the interactions of iron oxide (Fe3O4) particles and PVP were determined according to the colloidal properties. The proper concentration of PVP for the whole coverage of the iron oxide particles was found for the possible magnetic drug delivery applications by controlling the colloidal properties of the dispersions. The magnetic properties and toxicity of the fully covered bioiron oxide was also determined for possible applications.

  13. Quantitative 3D evolution of colloidal nanoparticle oxidation in solution

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Yugang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; ...

    2017-04-21

    Real-time tracking three-dimensional (3D) evolution of colloidal nanoparticles in solution is essential for understanding complex mechanisms involved in nanoparticle growth and transformation. We simultaneously use time-resolved small-angle and wide-angle x-ray scattering to monitor oxidation of highly uniform colloidal iron nanoparticles, enabling the reconstruction of intermediate 3D morphologies of the nanoparticles with a spatial resolution of ~5 Å. The in-situ probing combined with large-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations reveals the transformational details from the solid metal nanoparticles to hollow metal oxide nanoshells via nanoscale Kirkendall process, for example, coalescence of voids upon their growth, reversing of mass diffusion direction depending onmore » crystallinity, and so forth. In conclusion, our results highlight the complex interplay between defect chemistry and defect dynamics in determining nanoparticle transformation and formation.« less

  14. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children: a comparative study of ferrous ascorbate and colloidal iron.

    PubMed

    Yewale, Vijay N; Dewan, Bhupesh

    2013-05-01

    To compare the efficacy of ferrous ascorbate and colloidal iron in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children. Eighty one children, aged 6 mo to 12 y, were screened for iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and those diagnosed with IDA were randomized to receive ferrous ascorbate or colloidal iron for a period of 12 wk, such that each child received elemental iron 3 mg/kg body weight/d. Increase in hemoglobin (Hb) level was the primary outcome measure. Assessment was performed at baseline, wk 4, wk 8 and wk 12. Of 81 children screened, 73 were included in the study. The mean rise in Hb at the end of the 12 wk was significantly higher in ferrous ascorbate group than the colloidal iron group [3.59 ± 1.67 g/dl vs. 2.43 ± 1.73 g/dl; P < 0.01]. Significantly higher proportion of children receiving ferrous ascorbate (64.86 % vs. 31.03 %; P < 0.01) became non-anemic in comparison to colloidal iron. Ferrous ascorbate provides a significantly higher rise in hemoglobin levels in comparison to colloidal iron. The study supports the use of ferrous ascorbate in the pediatric age group, providing evidence for its role as an efficient oral iron supplement in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

  15. The iron-oxidizing proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Hedrich, Sabrina; Schlömann, Michael; Johnson, D Barrie

    2011-06-01

    The 'iron bacteria' are a collection of morphologically and phylogenetically heterogeneous prokaryotes. They include some of the first micro-organisms to be observed and described, and continue to be the subject of a considerable body of fundamental and applied microbiological research. While species of iron-oxidizing bacteria can be found in many different phyla, most are affiliated with the Proteobacteria. The latter can be subdivided into four main physiological groups: (i) acidophilic, aerobic iron oxidizers; (ii) neutrophilic, aerobic iron oxidizers; (iii) neutrophilic, anaerobic (nitrate-dependent) iron oxidizers; and (iv) anaerobic photosynthetic iron oxidizers. Some species (mostly acidophiles) can reduce ferric iron as well as oxidize ferrous iron, depending on prevailing environmental conditions. This review describes what is currently known about the phylogenetic and physiological diversity of the iron-oxidizing proteobacteria, their significance in the environment (on the global and micro scales), and their increasing importance in biotechnology.

  16. Silicon oxide colloidal/polymer nanocomposite films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haifeng; Cao Wenwu; Zhou, Q.F.; Shung, K. Kirk; Huang, Y.H.

    2004-12-13

    The quarter-wavelength ({lambda}/4) acoustic matching layer, a vital component in medical ultrasonic transducer, can bridge the large acoustic impedance mismatch between the piezoelectric material and the human body. Composite materials are widely used as matching materials in order to cover the wide acoustic impedance range that cannot be accomplished by using a single-phase material. At high frequencies (>50 MHz), the {lambda}/4 matching layers become extremely thin so that the fabrication of homogeneous composite material matching layers becomes very challenging. A method is reported in this letter to fabricate sol-gel silicon oxide colloidal/polymer composite film on silicon substrate, in which the particle size of silicon oxide colloidal is between 10 and 40 nm. The acoustic impedance of the nanocomposite films versus aging temperature has been measured at the desired operating frequency.

  17. Silicon oxide colloidal/polymer nanocomposite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haifeng; Cao, Wenwu; Zhou, Q. F.; Shung, K. Kirk; Huang, Y. H.

    2004-12-01

    The quarter-wavelength (λ/4) acoustic matching layer, a vital component in medical ultrasonic transducer, can bridge the large acoustic impedance mismatch between the piezoelectric material and the human body. Composite materials are widely used as matching materials in order to cover the wide acoustic impedance range that cannot be accomplished by using a single-phase material. At high frequencies (>50MHz), the λ /4 matching layers become extremely thin so that the fabrication of homogeneous composite material matching layers becomes very challenging. A method is reported in this letter to fabricate sol-gel silicon oxide colloidal/polymer composite film on silicon substrate, in which the particle size of silicon oxide colloidal is between 10 and 40 nm. The acoustic impedance of the nanocomposite films versus aging temperature has been measured at the desired operating frequency.

  18. Colloidal crystallization of colloidal silica grafted with iron(0) complex-tethered polymers in organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Kohji; Mouri, Emiko

    2007-09-01

    Incorporation of iron(0) complex into polymer-grafted silica and colloidal crystallization in organic solvent were studied. In this study, zero-valence iron complex, vinylferrocene (Vfc) and iron(0)tricarbonyl(4,4-dimethyl-1,-4-cyclohexadienyl) acrylate (Fe(0)Ac) or methacrylate (Fe(0)Me), were introduced into grafted polymer to prevent from increasing ionic strength in colloidal crystallization system. Poly(methyl methacrylate (MMA)-co-Vfc)-grafted silica never formed colloidal crystals in polar solvent, such as acetone or acetonitrile. However, increasing ferrocenyl group fraction in the polymer resulted in disturbing the crystallization. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm)-co-Vfc)-grafted silica, which was composed of mole fraction of Vfc, 1/3, afforded crystallization in ethanol over the particle fraction of 0.053. In the case of diene-Fe(0)(CO) 3/polymer-grafted silica, poly(MMA-co-Fe(0)Ac)-, poly(NIPAAm-co-Fe(0)Ac)- and poly(N.N-dimethylacrylamide (DMAAm)-co-Fe(0)Ac)-grafted silica gave colloidal crystallization in relatively low polar solvents, DMF, acetone, acetonirile and ethanol, critical volume fraction for which were in the range from 0.054 to 0.117. In the case of copolymer-grafted silica containing Fe(0)Me, poly(MMA-co-FeMe)-grafted silica crystallized in DMF, Interestingly, especially in cases of polymer-grafted silica containing Fe(0)Ac or Fe(0)Me composed of the highest mole fraction Fe(0)Me, 1/2, afforded crystallization in DMF. The iridescence color of the colloidal crystals was changed with the combination of grafted polymer and solvent. The characteristic coloration of the solution from reddish to greenish color is possibly due to absorption of blue light region by diene-Fe(0)(CO) 3 complex and Bragg deflection on colloidal crystals.

  19. Mobilization of natural colloids from an iron oxide-coated sand aquifer--Effect of pH and ionic strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunn, Rebecca A.; Magelky, Robin D.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Elimelech, Menachem

    2002-01-01

    Field and laboratory column experiments were performed to assess the effect of elevated pH and reduced ionic strength on the mobilization of natural colloids in a ferric oxyhydroxide-coated aquifer sediment. The field experiments were conducted as natural gradient injections of groundwater amended by sodium hydroxide additions. The laboratory experiments were conducted in columns of undisturbed, oriented sediments and disturbed, disoriented sediments. In the field, the breakthrough of released colloids coincided with the pH pulse breakthrough and lagged the bromide tracer breakthrough. The breakthrough behavior suggested that the progress of the elevated pH front controlled the transport of the mobilized colloids. In the laboratory, about twice as much colloid release occurred in the disturbed sediments as in the undisturbed sediments. The field and laboratory experiments both showed that the total mass of colloid release increased with increasing pH until the concurrent increase in ionic strength limited release. A decrease in ionic strength did not mobilize significant amounts of colloids in the field. The amount of colloids released normalized to the mass of the sediments was similar for the field and the undisturbed laboratory experiments.

  20. Colloid-borne Americium Migration in Gorleben Groundwater: Significance of Iron Secondary Phase Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, T.; Artinger, R.; Bauer, A.; Dardenne, K.; Kim, J.

    2001-12-01

    The relevance of colloidal transport to enhance the actinide mobility in the natural environment depends among other things on the reversibility of metal colloid binding. The influence of the metastable, low crystalline precursor phase 2-line ferrihydrite (2LFh) and the possible structural entrapment of Am(III) in transformation products (thermal treatment at 70° C over 7d) on the colloidal mobility of Am was investigated in batch and column migration experiments. Time-resolved dynamic laser light scattering analysis (PCS) demonstrated a fast 2LFh aggregation (1.8-5.6 mg2LFh/L) in Gorleben groundwater of low humic content (1-7 mgC/L), which can be attributed to surface charge neutralization detected via zeta potential measurements. The column experiments supported the PCS analysis and showed in groundwater with low humic content (GoHy-182) no significant enhancement of humic colloid bond Am recovery (R = 0.5 %). This can be attributed to the filtration of 2LFh aggregates. Contrary to this, in humic rich groundwater (30-90 mgC/L) the 2LFh colloids remained stable and showed an almost fivefold increase of the unretarded Am mobility in the case of transformed 2LFh. The Am mobilization was limited by the mobile 2LFh colloid concentration. Iron oxide/hydroxide selective extractions indicated a strengthening of Am from exchangeable (1M MgCl2 extraction) in 2LFh to NH4-oxalate-oxalic acid extractable in transformed 2LFh. Batch experiments revealed no equilibrium state of 2LFh colloid and Am-241 sorption onto Gorleben sand after 165 days, therefore indicating that metal colloid association/dissociation and colloid sediment attachment kinetics are a key issue for the actinide mobility.

  1. Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II.

    1991-01-01

    This report focuses on the progress made in three areas of research concerned with enzymes involved in respiratory iron oxidation. The three areas are as follows: development of an improved procedure for the routine large scale culture of iron oxidizing chemolithotrophs based on the in-situ electrolysis of the soluble iron in the growth medium; to perform iron oxidation kinetic studies on whole cells using the oxygen electrode; and to identify, separate, purify, and characterize the individual cellular components.

  2. Iron photoreduction and oxidation in an acidic mountain stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, D.M.; Kimball, B.A.; Bencala, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    In a small mountain stream in Colorado that receives acidic mine drainage, photoreduction of ferric iron results in a well-defined increase in dissolved ferrous iron during the day. To quantify this process, an instream injection of a conservative tracer was used to measure discharge at the time that each sample was collected. Daytime production of ferrous iron by photoreduction was almost four times as great as nighttime oxidation of ferrous iron. The photoreduction process probably involves dissolved or colloidal ferric iron species and limited interaction with organic species because concentrations of organic carbon are low in this stream.

  3. Iron photoreduction and oxidation in an acidic mountain stream.

    PubMed

    McKnight, D M; Kimball, B A; Bencala, K E

    1988-04-29

    In a small mountain stream in Colorado that receives acidic mine drainage, photoreduction of ferric iron results in a well-defined increase in dissolved ferrous iron during the day. To quantify this process, an instream injection of a conservative tracer was used to measure discharge at the time that each sample was collected. Daytime production of ferrous iron by photoreduction was almost four times as great as nighttime oxidation of ferrous iron. The photoreduction process probably involves dissolved or colloidal ferric iron species and limited interaction with organic species because concentrations of organic carbon are low in this stream.

  4. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  5. THE CELLULAR TRANSFORMATION OF INJECTED COLLOIDAL IRON COMPLEXES INTO FERRITIN AND HEMOSIDERIN IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Goetz W.

    1959-01-01

    As revealed by electron microscopy and electron diffraction, the physical state of ferric hydroxide micelles contained in iron-dextran, saccharated iron oxide, and hydrous ferric oxide ("ferric hydroxide") differs notably from the state of the ferric hydroxide in ferritin or hemosiderin. By virtue of this difference one can trace the intracellular transformation of colloidal iron, administered parenterally, into ferritin and hemosiderin. One hour after intraperitoneal injection of iron-dextran or saccharated iron oxide into mice, characteristic deposits were present in splenic macrophages, in sinusoidal endothelial cells of spleen and liver, and in vascular endothelial cells of various renal capillaries. Four hours after injection, small numbers of ferritin molecules were identifiable about intracellular aggregates of injected iron compounds; and by the 6th day, ferritin was abundant in close proximity to deposits of injected iron compounds. The latter were frequently situated in cytoplasmic vesicles delimited by single membranes. These vesicles were most frequently found in tissue obtained during the first 6 days after injection; and in certain of the vesicles ferritin molecules surrounded closely packed aggregates of injected material. Much unchanged ferric hydroxide was still present in macrophages and vascular endothelial cells 3 to 4 weeks after injection. While electron microscopy left no doubt about the identity of injected ferric hydroxide on the one hand, and of ferritin or hemosiderin on the other, histochemical tests for iron failed in this respect. Precipitation of ferric hydroxide (hydrous ferric oxide) from stabilized colloidal dispersions of iron-dextran was brought about in vitro by incubation with minced mouse tissue (e.g. liver), but not by incubation with mouse serum or blood. Subcutaneous injections of hydrous gel of ferric oxide into mice initially produced localized extracellular precipitates. Most of the material was still extracellular 16

  6. Study of adsorption process of iron colloid substances on activated carbon by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machekhina, K. I.; Shiyan, L. N.; Yurmazova, T. A.; Voyno, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    The paper reports on the adsorption of iron colloid substances on activated carbon (PAC) Norit SA UF with using ultrasound. It is found that time of adsorption is equal to three hours. High-frequency electrical oscillation is 35 kHz. The adsorption capacity of activated carbon was determined and it is equal to about 0.25 mg iron colloid substances /mg PAC. The iron colloid substances size ranging from 30 to 360 nm was determined. The zeta potential of iron colloid substances which consists of iron (III) hydroxide, silicon compounds and natural organic substances is about (-38mV). The process of destruction iron colloid substances occurs with subsequent formation of a precipitate in the form of Fe(OH)3 as a result of the removal of organic substances from the model solution.

  7. Supported versus colloidal zinc oxide for advanced oxidation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxman, Karthik; Al Rashdi, Manal; Al Sabahi, Jamal; Al Abri, Mohammed; Dutta, Joydeep

    2017-07-01

    Photocatalysis is a green technology which typically utilizes either supported or colloidal catalysts for the mineralization of aqueous organic contaminants. Catalyst surface area and surface energy are the primary factors determining its efficiency, but correlation between the two is still unclear. This work explores their relation and hierarchy in a photocatalytic process involving both supported and colloidal catalysts. In order to do this the active surface areas of supported zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NR's) and colloidal zinc oxide nanoparticles (having different surface energies) were equalized and their phenol oxidation mechanism and capacity was analyzed. It was observed that while surface energy had subtle effects on the oxidation rate of the catalysts, the degradation efficiency was primarily a function of the surface area; which makes it a better parameter for comparison when studying different catalyst forms of the same material. Thus we build a case for the use of supported catalysts, wherein their catalytic efficiency was tested to be unaltered over several days under both natural and artificial light, suggesting their viability for practical applications.

  8. Colloidal stability, surface characterisation and intracellular accumulation of Rhodium(II) citrate coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in breast tumour: a promising platform for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Nunes, Eloiza; Carneiro, Marcella Lemos Brettas; de Oliveira, Ricardo Guirelli Simões; Báo, Sônia Nair; de Souza, Aparecido Ribeiro

    2013-06-01

    The colloidal stability of a rhodium(II) citrate, Rh2(H2cit)4, coating on the surface of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles was studied and compared in different dispersion media. The adsorption of Rh2(H2cit)4 at the water-maghemite interface was evaluated as a function of pH and complex concentration. A slight pH-dependent adsorption of the complex was observed with a maximum at pH 3. The colloidal stability of the functionalised nanoparticles with different amounts of Rh2(H2cit)4 as a function of pH was evaluated using dynamic light scattering measurements. The particles have a mean magnetic core size of 5.6 nm and the hydrodynamic diameters are approximately 60 nm, which remained unchanged in the pH range in which the samples were a stable sol. The tolerance to different dispersion media, which were deionised water, saline, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), foetal bovine serum (FBS) and NaCl solutions with different concentrations, was investigated. At moderate ionic strength, the colloidal stability of the dispersions was similar in saline and in PBS compared to the stability of dispersions diluted in water. Moreover, the intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles in 4T1 breast tumour was examined by ultrastructural analysis performed by transmission electron microscopy. The rhodium(II) citrate-coated nanoparticles were found mostly in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Thus, we suggest that these SPIO nanoparticles functionalized with Rh2(H2Cit)4 can be potential tools for anticancer therapy.

  9. Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes experimental progress in characterizing and identifying redox proteins in a number of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Sections of the paper are entitled (1) In Situ electrolysis was explored to achieve enhanced yields of iron-oxidizing bacteria, (2)Structure/function studies were performed on redox-active biomolecules from Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, (3) Novel redox-active biomolecules were demonstrated in other iron autotrophs, and (4) New probes of metalloprotein electron-transfer reactions were synthesized and characterized.

  10. Iron oxide-based nanomagnets in nanomedicine: fabrication and applications

    PubMed Central

    Meng Lin, Meng; Kim, Hyung-Hwan; Kim, Hyuck; Muhammed, Mamoun; Kyung Kim, Do

    2010-01-01

    Iron oxide-based nanomagnets have attracted a great deal of attention in nanomedicine over the past decade. Down to the nanoscale, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can only be magnetized in the presence of an external magnetic field, which makes them capable of forming stable colloids in a physio-biological medium. Their superparamagnetic property, together with other intrinsic properties, such as low cytotoxicity, colloidal stability, and bioactive molecule conjugation capability, makes such nanomagnets ideal in both in-vitro and in-vivo biomedical applications. In this review, a chemical, physical, and biological synthetic approach to prepare iron oxide-based nanomagnets with different physicochemical properties was illustrated and compared. The growing interest in iron oxide-based nanomagnets with multifunctionalities was explored in cancer diagnostics and treatment, focusing on their combined roles in a magnetic resonance contrast agent, hyperthermia, and magnetic force assisted drug delivery. Iron oxides as magnetic carriers in gene therapy were reviewed with a focus on the sophisticated design and construction of magnetic vectors. Finally, the iron oxide-based nanomagnet also represents a very promising tool in particle/cell interfacing in controlling cellular functionalities, such as adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and cell patterning, in stem cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. PMID:22110854

  11. Colloidal Pumping as a Removal Process of Dissolved Iron: a Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misumi, K.; Burd, A.; Long, M. C.; Moore, J. K.; Lindsay, K. T.; Tsumune, D.; Tsubono, T.

    2016-02-01

    Iron cycle is incorporated in many ocean models as its importance to marine organisms. The models, however, tends to overestimate dissolved iron (dFe) concentrations in large dust deposition areas. Such overestimation can be attributed to inappropriate formulation of iron removal where the rates are calculated as a first order function to the simulated dFe. Although some models assume higher order functions to estimate the removal rates, there is no scientific basis to explain the representations. It is known that adsorption of dissolved thorium (dTh) to colloids and subsequent coagulation (so-called "colloidal pumping") is important to remove dTh. As colloidal iron is observed in various locations, "colloidal pumping" can play an important role on iron scavenging. This study aims to build a new iron scavenging parameterization based on "colloidal pumping". A mechanistic model to calculate a coupled adsorption/coagulation process is described in Burd et al. (2000) and is applied to dTh scavenging. We firstly conducted an experiment using their model to highlight an importance of "colloidal pumping". In this experiment, we suppose an open-ocean box having a typical 238U concentration that produces 234Th by radioactive decay. Colloidal particles (< 1 μm) are continuously added to the box, and the model is run to be a steady state. Increase in colloidal particles results in colloidal coagulation and thus formation of particles. Simulated outgoing 234Th fluxes are mainly seen in diameters larger than 1 μm where the gravitational settling is significant. We then conducted an experiment without adsorption of dTh to colloids, namely turn off "colloidal pumping". As dTh is removed only by adsorption directly to large aggregates, removal efficiency is much decreased and the simulated dTh concentration becomes several times higher. The result suggests that ignoring "colloidal pumping" results in overestimation of dissolved metals in ocean models.

  12. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including the...

  13. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including the...

  14. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including the...

  15. Pilot scale application of nanosized iron oxides as electron acceptors for bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Julian; Fritzsche, Andreas; Frank-Fahle, Beatrice; Lüders, Tilmann; Höss, Sebastian; Eisenmann, Heinrich; Held, Thomas; Totsche, Kai U.; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2014-05-01

    Microbial reduction of ferric iron is a major biogeochemical process in groundwater aquifer ecosystems and often associated with the degradation of organic contaminants, as bacteria couple iron reduction to the oxidation reduced carbon like e.g. BTEX. Yet in general the low bioavailability of natural iron oxides limits microbial reduction rates. However, nanosized iron oxides have an unequally enhanced bioavailability and reactivity compared to their respective bulk, macro-sized, and more crystalline materials. At the same time, nanosized iron oxides can be produced in stable colloidal suspensions, permitting efficient injections into contaminated aquifers. We examined the reactivity of nanosized synthetic colloidal iron oxides in microbial iron reduction. Application of colloidal nanoparticles led to a strong and sustainable enhancement of microbial reaction rates in batch experiments and sediment columns. Toluene oxidation was increased five-fold as compared to bulk, non-colloidal ferrihydrite as electron acceptor. Furthermore, we developed a unique approach for custom-tailoring the subsurface mobility of these particles after being injected into a contaminant plume. In a field pilot application, we injected 18 m3 of an iron oxide nanoparticle solution into a BTEX contaminated aquifer with a maximum excess pressure as low as 0.2 bar. The applied suspension showed a superior subsurface mobility, creating a reactive zone of 4 m height (corresponding to the height of the confined aquifer) and 6 m in diameter. Subsequent monitoring of BTEX, microbial BTEX degradation metabolites, ferrous iron generation, stable isotopes fractionation, microbial populations, and methanogenesis demonstrated the strong impact of our approach. Mathematic processed X-ray diffractograms and FTIR spectra provided a semi-quantitatively estimate of the long-term fate of the iron oxide colloids in the aquifer. Potential environmental risks of the injection itself were monitored with

  16. Dielectric coating of iron particles by electrostatic colloidal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daniel

    Iron is a soft magnetic material widely used in electric motors, generators, and transformers because they demand high permeability and low core loss. The main goal of this project is to develop a commercially viable coating of iron powders for press-and-sinter processing that would enable higher firing temperatures to anneal out magnetic defects, while maintaining high electrical resistivity (˜10,000 muO-cm) and high iron density (>90 %). An alumina-modified colloidal silica (LUDOX CL), was used in early work to make Fe (-)/SiO2 (+) in a wet-pressed route. The highest relative density and resistivity measurements for a wet-pressing route were 87 % and 7300 +/- 1000 muO-cm respectively. Dry-pressed route is favorable over wet-pressed route because it can be commercially viable. About 100-fold increase in resistivity (860,000 muO-cm) was obtained compared to the wet-pressed route, with only a small decrease in density (1 - 2 %). A study was conducted to explore the separate, and possibly interactive, effects of micro-alumina particulate (Sumitomo AKP-50, 0.2 mum) and lubricant (Kenolube, a proprietary metal soap-wax composite lube). Reducing the LUDOX CL, high shear mixing using a coffee grinder, and multimodal packing were studied to improve density. Only 10 % reduction of LUDOX CL dropped the resistivity by over two orders of magnitude with the same relative density. High shear mixing and multimodal packing had little effects to increase density. An unmodified colloidal silica (LUDOX TM) was also explored to make Fe (+) /SiO2 (-) and resistivity of 120,000 muO-cm and 80 % density were obtained. Addition of cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride (PDADMAC) was studied to provide stronger adhesion between LUDOX TM and surface of iron particles. Reducing the amount of LUDOX TM in PDADMAC showed relative density greater than 90 % but resistivity measurements were less than 1500 iU-cm.

  17. Water oxidation: High five iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Costas, Miquel

    2016-03-01

    The oxidation of water is essential to the sustainable production of fuels using sunlight or electricity, but designing active, stable and earth-abundant catalysts for the reaction is challenging. Now, a complex containing five iron atoms is shown to efficiently oxidize water by mimicking key features of the oxygen-evolving complex in green plants.

  18. The concept of delayed nucleation in nanocrystal growthdemonstrated for the case of iron oxide nanodisks

    SciTech Connect

    Casula, Maria F.; Jun, Young-wook; Zaziski, David J.; Chan, EmoryM.; Corrias, Anna; Alivisatos, Paul A.

    2005-09-09

    A comprehensive study of iron oxide nanocrystal growth through non-hydrolitic, surfactant-mediated thermal reaction of iron pentacarbonyl and an oxidizer has been conducted, which includes size control, anisotropic shape evolution, and crystallographic phase transition of monodisperse iron oxide colloidal nanocrystals. The reaction was monitored by in situ UV-Vis spectroscopy taking advantage of the color change accompanying the iron oxide colloid formation allowing measurement of the induction time for nucleation. Features of the synthesis such as the size control and reproducibility are related to the occurrence of the observed delayed nucleation process. As a separate source of iron and oxygen is adopted, phase control could also be achieved by sequential injections of oxidizer.

  19. Iron colloids reduce the bioavailability of phosphorus to the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Baken, Stijn; Nawara, Sophie; Van Moorleghem, Christoff; Smolders, Erik

    2014-08-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a limiting nutrient in many aquatic systems. The bioavailability of P in natural waters strongly depends on its speciation. In this study, structural properties of iron colloids were determined and related to their effect on P sorption and P bioavailability. The freshwater green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata was exposed to media spiked with radiolabelled (33)PO4, and the uptake of (33)P was monitored for 1 h. The media contained various concentrations of synthetic iron colloids with a size between 10 kDa and 0.45 μm. The iron colloids were stabilised by natural organic matter. EXAFS spectroscopy showed that these colloids predominantly consisted of ferrihydrite with small amounts of organically complexed Fe. In colloid-free treatments, the P uptake flux by the algae obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the presence of iron colloids at 9 or 90 μM Fe, corresponding to molar P:Fe ratios between 0.02 and 0.17, the truly dissolved P (<10 kDa) was between 4 and 60% of the total dissolved P (<0.45 μm). These colloids reduced the P uptake flux by R. subcapitata compared to colloid-free treatments at the same total dissolved P concentration. However, the P uptake flux from colloid containing solutions equalled that from colloid-free ones when expressed as truly dissolved P. This demonstrates that colloidal P did not contribute to the P uptake flux. It is concluded that, on the short term, phosphate adsorbed to ferrihydrite colloids is not available to the green alga R. subcapitata. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Colloid-borne americium migration in Gorleben groundwater: significance of iron secondary phase transformation.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Thorsten; Artinger, Robert; Dardenne, Kathy; Bauer, Andreas; Schuessler, Wolfram; Kim, Jae Il

    2003-04-15

    The mobility of actinides in natural water may be enhanced by colloid-mediated transport. In this context the reversibility of actinide colloid interaction is a key factor. Iron is an element that can generate colloids under conditions found in natural waters. In this paper, the impact of hematite and the low-crystalline precursor 2-line ferrihydrite on colloid-mediated transport of americium(III) is investigated. Am(III)-containing iron colloids are generated from two different approaches, namely contact between the two in aqueous solution or coprecipitation of Am(III) during iron colloid generation. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), especially humic substances, has a strong influence on the stability of inorganic colloids. In addition, humic substances interfere in the distribution and kinetics of exchange between groundwater and sediments. Four groundwaters from the Gorleben aquifer system are used with DOC concentrations varying between 0.9 and 81.6 mgC/L together with Pleistocene Aeolian quartz sand from this site. Batch and column experiments are conducted under near-natural conditions (Ar + 1% CO2). To study the influence of kinetics, contact times up to one month are studied. The dynamic light-scattering investigations show that the colloidal stability of the 2-line ferrihydrite increases with increasing DOC concentration. The low-crystalline iron colloids have a marginal influence on the Am(III) transport due to reversibility of americium sorption. Contrary to this, the crystalline hematite generated from coprecipitation of Am(III) leads to an increase of unretarded colloid-mediated Am(III) transport up to a factor of almost five. Chemical characterization of these hematite colloids shows that Am(III) is structurally entrapped in the hematite. The distribution of Am(III) and 2-line ferrihydrite between groundwater and sand sediment remained in disequilibrium even after one month. This shows that the kinetics of Am(III) distribution between the different

  1. Multifunctional iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, M.; Denis, C.; Van Stappen, T.; De Meester, L.; Geukens, N.; Gils, A.; Verbiest, T.

    2015-03-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles have attracted a lot of attention since they can combine interesting properties like magnetism, fluorescence or plasmonic effects. As a core material, iron oxide nanoparticles have been the subject of intensive research. These cost-effective and non-toxic particles are used nowadays in many applications. We developed a heterobifunctional PEG ligand that can be used to introduce functional groups (carboxylic acids) onto the surface of the NP. Via click chemistry, a siloxane functionality was added to this ligand, for a subsequent covalent ligand exchange reaction. The functionalized nanoparticles have an excellent colloidal stability in complex environments like buffers and serum or plasma. Antibodies were coupled to the introduced carboxylic acids and these NP-antibody bioconjugates were brought into contact with Legionella bacteria for magnetic separation experiments.

  2. Dissolution of fine and intermediate sized galena particles and their interactions with iron hydroxide colloids.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yongjun; Grano, Stephen

    2010-07-01

    Dissolution of fine (-10 microm) and intermediate (+10-53 microm) galena particles was studied in the presence and absence of iron hydroxide colloids at pH 9 with nitrogen and oxygen purging. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements and ethylene diamine-tetra acid (EDTA) extraction of the galena particles after dissolution indicate that galena dissolution is strongly dependent on particle size. Fine galena particles produced a much higher amount of lead hydroxide species per surface area than intermediate galena particles. Gas purging only affected galena dissolution slightly. More iron hydroxide colloids adsorbed on fine particles. Zeta potential measurements indicate that galena dissolution enhances the adsorption of iron hydroxide colloids due to the electrostatic attraction between lead hydroxide products and iron hydroxide colloids at pH 9. This explains the stronger affinity of iron hydroxide colloids to fine galena particles than intermediate galena particles. This study has an important implication in sulfide flotation where iron hydroxide colloids play a dominant role in mineral depression.

  3. Underestimation of phosphorus fraction change in the supernatant after phosphorus adsorption onto iron oxides and iron oxide-natural organic matter complexes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinlong; Jiang, Tao; Yao, Ying; Wang, Jun; Cai, Yuanli; Green, Nelson W; Wei, Shiqiang

    2017-05-01

    The phosphorus (P) fraction distribution and formation mechanism in the supernatant after P adsorption onto iron oxides and iron oxide-humic acid (HA) complexes were analyzed using the ultrafiltration method in this study. With an initial P concentration of 20mg/L (I=0.01mol/L and pH=7), it was shown that the colloid (1kDa-0.45μm) component of P accounted for 10.6%, 11.6%, 6.5%, and 4.0% of remaining total P concentration in the supernatant after P adsorption onto ferrihydrite (FH), goethite (GE), ferrihydrite-humic acid complex (FH-HA), goethite-humic acid complex (GE-HA), respectively. The <1kDa component of P was still the predominant fraction in the supernatant, and underestimated colloidal P accounted for 2.2%, 55.1%, 45.5%, and 38.7% of P adsorption onto the solid surface of FH, FH-HA, GE and GE-HA, respectively. Thus, the colloid P could not be neglected. Notably, it could be interpreted that Fe(3+) hydrolysis from the adsorbents followed by the formation of colloidal hydrous ferric oxide aggregates was the main mechanism for the formation of the colloid P in the supernatant. And colloidal adsorbent particles co-existing in the supernatant were another important reason for it. Additionally, dissolve organic matter dissolved from iron oxide-HA complexes could occupy large adsorption sites of colloidal iron causing less colloid P in the supernatant. Ultimately, we believe that the findings can provide a new way to deeply interpret the geochemical cycling of P, even when considering other contaminants such as organic pollutants, heavy metal ions, and arsenate at the sediment/soil-water interface in the real environment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge may...

  5. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge may...

  6. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge may...

  7. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge may...

  8. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform in...

  9. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform in...

  10. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform in...

  11. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform in...

  12. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform in...

  13. Iron oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sunki; Sproull, R.D.

    1991-12-31

    Several investigators have shown that microorganisms are involved in many naturally occurring oxidation processes. At present, microbial leaching, which is the solubilization of metals catalyzed by microorganisms, is widely used commercially to produce copper, and to a lesser extent uranium, from low-grade mining wastes. Microbial leaching can also be used as a pretreatment step in the mining of precious metals, such as gold and silver. In this application, the solubilization of pyrite makes the precious metals more accessible for cyanide leaching. Because ferrous iron oxidation is such an important reaction in microbial leaching operations, this study was undertaken to examine factors affecting the rate of ferrous iron oxidation in the presence of T. ferrooxidans.

  14. Both soluble and colloidal iron phases control dissolved iron variability in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Boyle, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    The size partitioning of dissolved iron (dFe, <0.4 μm) into soluble (sFe, <0.02 μm) and colloidal (0.02 μm < cFe < 0.4 μm) phases was investigated at seven stations in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean, and the results are compared to the dFe size fractionation study of Bergquist et al. (2007) in the same region. Downwind of the North African dust plumes, cFe comprised 80 ± 7% of the surface dFe pool at six stations, supporting the hypothesis that atmospherically-derived Fe is maintained in the colloidal size fraction. At the deep chlorophyll maximum, colloidal Fe had minimum concentrations or was completely absent, suggesting that cFe was either preferentially taken up by microbes and/or scavenged/aggregated at these depths. At remineralization depths, sFe was the dominant fraction both in the subtropical gyre-like stations (76% sFe; [sFe] = 0.42 ± 0.03 nmol/kg) and in the oxygen minimum zone (56% sFe; [sFe] = 0.65 ± 0.03 nmol/kg). Only at remineralization depths of stations with intermediate oxygen concentrations (100-110 μmol/kg) did colloidal Fe dominate (contributing 58% of dFe) , indicating that cFe may be serving as a conduit of dFe loss during mixing of high-Fe OMZ and low-Fe gyre waters. North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) had a typical sFe concentration of 0.34 ± 0.05 nmol/kg. In the deepest samples composed of a NADW/Antarctic Bottom Water mixture where the bottom water may have attained a ∼0.1 nmol/kg hydrothermal Fe input during transit past the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, sFe did not increase coincidentally with dFe, indicating that any potential hydrothermal Fe contribution was colloidal. In general, the results of this study counter the previous hypothesis of Bergquist et al. (2007) that the colloidal Fe fraction predominately controls dFe variability, instead suggesting that both soluble and colloidal Fe are variable, and both contribute to the observed dFe variability throughout the North Atlantic. The nearly 50-50% dFe partitioning into soluble

  15. High temperature oxidation of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires composed of iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, M; Brzozka, K; Lin, W S; Lin, H M; Tokarczyk, M; Borysiuk, J; Kowalski, G; Wasik, D

    2016-02-07

    This work describes an oxidation process of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires at temperatures between 100 °C and 800 °C. The studied nanomaterial was synthesized through a simple chemical reduction of iron trichloride in an external magnetic field under a constant flow of argon. The electron microscopy investigations allowed determining that the as-prepared nanowires were composed of self-assembled iron nanoparticles which were covered by a 3 nm thick oxide shell and separated from each other by a thin interface layer. Both these layers exhibited an amorphous or highly-disordered character which was traced by means of transmission electron microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal oxidation was carried out under a constant flow of argon which contained the traces of oxygen. The first stage of process was related to slow transformations of amorphous Fe and amorphous iron oxides into crystalline phases and disappearance of interfaces between iron nanoparticles forming the studied nanomaterial (range: 25-300 °C). After that, the crystalline iron core and iron oxide shell became oxidized and signals for different compositions of iron oxide sheath were observed (range: 300-800 °C) using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. According to the thermal gravimetric analysis, the nanowires heated up to 800 °C under argon atmosphere gained 37% of mass with respect to their initial weight. The structure of the studied nanomaterial oxidized at 800 °C was mainly composed of α-Fe2O3 (∼ 93%). Moreover, iron nanowires treated above 600 °C lost their wire-like shape due to their shrinkage and collapse caused by the void coalescence.

  16. Stabilization and functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amstad, Esther; Textor, Marcus; Reimhult, Erik

    2011-07-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a rapidly expanding number of research and practical applications in the biomedical field, including magnetic cell labeling separation and tracking, for therapeutic purposes in hyperthermia and drug delivery, and for diagnostic purposes, e.g., as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. These applications require good NP stability at physiological conditions, close control over NP size and controlled surface presentation of functionalities. This review is focused on different aspects of the stability of superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs, from its practical definition to its implementation by molecular design of the dispersant shell around the iron oxide core and further on to its influence on the magnetic properties of the superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs. Special attention is given to the selection of molecular anchors for the dispersant shell, because of their importance to ensure colloidal and functional stability of sterically stabilized superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs. We further detail how dispersants have been optimized to gain close control over iron oxide NP stability, size and functionalities by independently considering the influences of anchors and the attached sterically repulsive polymer brushes. A critical evaluation of different strategies to stabilize and functionalize core-shell superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs as well as a brief introduction to characterization methods to compare those strategies is given.Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a rapidly expanding number of research and practical applications in the biomedical field, including magnetic cell labeling separation and tracking, for therapeutic purposes in hyperthermia and drug delivery, and for diagnostic purposes, e.g., as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. These applications require good NP stability at physiological conditions, close control over NP size and controlled surface

  17. Iron, Oxidative Stress and Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Taifeng; Han, Huijun; Yang, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Both iron deficiency and hyperglycemia are highly prevalent globally for pregnant women. Iron supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to control iron deficiency. The purposes of the review are to assess the oxidative effects of iron supplementation and the potential relationship between iron nutrition and gestational diabetes. High doses of iron (~relative to 60 mg or more daily for adult humans) can induce lipid peroxidation in vitro and in animal studies. Pharmaceutical doses of iron supplements (e.g., 10× RDA or more for oral supplements or direct iron supplementation via injection or addition to the cell culture medium) for a short or long duration will induce DNA damage. Higher heme-iron intake or iron status measured by various biomarkers, especially serum ferritin, might contribute to greater risk of gestational diabetes, which may be mediated by iron oxidative stress though lipid oxidation and/or DNA damage. However, information is lacking about the effect of low dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily) on lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and gestational diabetes. Randomized trials of low-dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily) for pregnant women are warranted to test the relationship between iron oxidative stress and insulin resistance/gestational diabetes, especially for iron-replete women. PMID:25255832

  18. Size-dependent magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsula, Vitalii; Moskvin, Maksym; Dutz, Silvio; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Uniform iron oxide nanoparticles in the size range from 10 to 24 nm and polydisperse 14 nm iron oxide particles were prepared by thermal decomposition of Fe(III) carboxylates in the presence of oleic acid and co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides by ammonium hydroxide followed by oxidation, respectively. While the first method produced hydrophobic oleic acid coated particles, the second one formed hydrophilic, but uncoated, nanoparticles. To make the iron oxide particles water dispersible and colloidally stable, their surface was modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and sucrose, respectively. Size and size distribution of the nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and X-ray diffraction. Surface of the PEG-functionalized and sucrose-modified iron oxide particles was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Magnetic properties were measured by means of vibration sample magnetometry and specific absorption rate in alternating magnetic fields was determined calorimetrically. It was found, that larger ferrimagnetic particles showed higher heating performance than smaller superparamagnetic ones. In the transition range between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism, samples with a broader size distribution provided higher heating power than narrow size distributed particles of comparable mean size. Here presented particles showed promising properties for a possible application in magnetic hyperthermia.

  19. Ultrastructural changes in hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells acutely exposed to colloidal iron.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Mark L; Dahlstrom, Jane E; Taylor, Matthew C; Koina, Mark E; Maxwell, Lesley; Francis, Douglas; Jain, Sanjiv; McLean, Allan J

    2003-07-01

    Hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells form an important interface between the vascular system, represented by the sinusoids, and the space of Disse that surrounds the hepatocyte microvilli. This study aimed to assess the light microscopic and ultrastructural effects of acute exposure of hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells to colloidal iron by injection of rats with iron polymaltose. Eight minutes after a single intravenous injection of iron polymaltose sinusoidal endothelial cells showed defenestration, and thickening and layering as assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Kupffer cells and stellate cells appeared activated. These changes were not observed in control animals, experiments using equivalent doses of maltose, or experiments using colloidal carbon except for Kupffer cell activation due to colloidal carbon. No significant light microscopic changes were seen in study or control animals. The findings indicate that acute exposure to colloidal iron causes changes in hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells, stellate cells and Kupffer cells. This may be the result of a direct toxic effect of iron or increased production of reactive oxygen species. These observations suggest a possible mechanism for defenestration of sinusoidal endothelial cells in ageing and in disease states.

  20. Designed synthesis and surface engineering strategies of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Jiang, Chang Zhong; Roy, Vellaisamy A L

    2016-12-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) hold great promise for future biomedical applications because of their magnetic properties as well as other intrinsic properties such as low toxicity, colloidal stability, and surface engineering capability. Numerous related studies on iron oxide NPs have been conducted. Recent progress in nanochemistry has enabled fine control over the size, crystallinity, uniformity, and surface properties of iron oxide NPs. This review examines various synthetic approaches and surface engineering strategies for preparing naked and functional iron oxide NPs with different physicochemical properties. Growing interest in designed and surface-engineered iron oxide NPs with multifunctionalities was explored in in vitro/in vivo biomedical applications, focusing on their combined roles in bioseparation, as a biosensor, targeted-drug delivery, MR contrast agents, and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. This review outlines the limitations of extant surface engineering strategies and several developing strategies that may overcome these limitations. This study also details the promising future directions of this active research field.

  1. Repeptization by dissolution in a colloidal system of iron(III) pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Y Mikal; Velikov, Krassimir P; Kegel, Willem K

    2012-12-04

    Repeptization (redispersion) from an aggregated state is usually only possible in charge-stabilized colloidal systems if the system is either coagulated in the secondary minimum of the interaction potential or if the system cannot settle completely into the primary minimum. In this work, we analyze the zeta potential, conductivity, and long-term stability of colloidal systems of iron(III) pyrophosphate and surprisingly find that the system seems to defy conventional wisdom as it can be repeptized from its coagulated state regardless of aging time and background ions. Moreover, after having been stored for up to a month in 2 M NaCl, dialysis of iron pyrophosphate will yield a colloidal dispersion that is actually stable for a longer period of time than a fresh system with background electrolyte removed.

  2. Gold and iron oxide associations under supergene conditions: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greffié, Catherine; Benedetti, Marc F.; Parron, Claude; Amouric, Marc

    1996-05-01

    Abstract-The interaction of gold hydroxo-chloro complexes with iron oxides (ferrihydrites, goethites) during coprecipitation experiments is investigated. Chemical analyses of solids and solutions are coupled with a detailed characterization of the iron oxides with various methods, including X-ray diffraction, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. HCl solutions containing varying amounts of AuCl 4- and ferric nitrate were titrated to neutral or alkaline pH, resulting in the coprecipitation of gold and iron oxide phases (ferrihydrite or goethite). Reference titrations were performed in the absence of iron. Most of the gold was removed from solution in the presence of iron oxides whereas gold remained dissolved in the reference samples. In association with iron oxides two forms of gold have been identified by HRTEM and 197Au Mössbauer spectroscopy: metallic gold as well as chloro and/or hydroxo combined gold. This combined gold is in a trivalent state as the primary product which means that a reduction process is not a necessary step for the adsorption of gold species on iron oxides. Metallic gold characterized in these products by means of HRTEM consists mainly of colloids ranging from 3-60 nm in diameter embedded in the ferrihydrite matrix, as isolated particles or as particles associated with goethite laths. The smallest metallic gold particles detected would be almost invisible to classical observation techniques used for solid phases. In our experiments, oxidation-reduction reactions between Fe 2+ and Au 3+ are responsible for the presence of metallic gold observed on the iron phases. Photochemical reactions may also take part in the reduction process. Colloidal gold and gold complexes could be associated to the iron oxides by strong electrostatic interactions. Our results suggest that poorly ordered iron oxides are highly efficient in trapping gold from solutions thanks to their high surface area, and favor gold

  3. Indium Sorption to Iron Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. J.; Sacco, S. A.; Hemond, H.; Hussain, F. A.; Runkel, R. L.; Walton-Day, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Shine, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Indium is an increasingly important metal in semiconductors and electronics, and its use is growing rapidly as a semiconductive coating (as indium tin oxide) for liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and flat panel displays. It also has uses in important energy technologies such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and photovoltaic cells. Despite its rapid increase in use, very little is known about the environmental behavior of indium, and concerns are being raised over the potential health effects of this emerging metal contaminant. One source of indium to the environment is acid mine drainage from the mining of lead, zinc, and copper sulfides. In our previous studies of a stream in Colorado influenced by acid mine drainage from lead and zinc mining activities, indium concentrations were found to be 10,000 times those found in uncontaminated rivers. However, the speciation and mobility of indium could not be reliably modeled because sorption constants to environmental sorbents have not been determined. In this study, we generate sorption constants for indium to ferrihydrite in the laboratory over a range of pHs, sorbent to sorbate ratios, and ionic strengths. Ferrihydrite is one of the most important sorbents in natural systems, and sorption to amorphous iron oxides such as ferrihydrite is thought to be one of the main removal mechanisms of metals from the dissolved phase in aqueous environments. Because of its relatively low solubility, we also find that indium hydroxide precipitation can dominate indium's partitioning at micromolar concentrations of indium. This precipitation may be important in describing indium's behavior in our study stream in Colorado, where modeling sorption to iron-oxides does not explain the complete removal of indium from the dissolved phase when the pH of the system is artificially raised to above 8. This study contributes much-needed data about indium's aqueous behavior, in order to better understand its fate, transport, and impacts in the

  4. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1309-37-1, red-brown to black trigonal crystals). (b) In accordance with § 186.1(b...

  5. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1309-37-1, red-brown to black trigonal crystals). (b) In accordance with § 186.1(b...

  6. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1309-37-1, red-brown to black trigonal crystals). (b) In accordance with § 186.1(b...

  7. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1309-37-1, red-brown to black trigonal crystals). (b) In accordance with § 186.1(b...

  8. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1309-37-1, red-brown to black trigonal crystals). (b) In accordance with § 186.1(b)(1), the ingredient is...

  9. Tannin biosynthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Becerra, R.; Rius, J. L.; Zorrilla, C.

    2010-08-01

    In this work, iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized with gallic acid and tannic acid are characterized using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Its size, form, and structure are compared with nanoparticles obtained previously using alfalfa biomass in order to find a simpler, consistent, and environmentally friendly method in the production of iron oxide nanoparticles.

  10. Enzymatic iron oxidation by Leptothrix discophora: identification of an iron-oxidizing protein.

    PubMed Central

    Corstjens, P L; de Vrind, J P; Westbroek, P; de Vrind-de Jong, E W

    1992-01-01

    An iron-oxidizing factor was identified in the spent culture medium of the iron- and manganese-oxidizing bacterial strain Leptothrix discophora SS-1. It appeared to be a protein, with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 150,000. Its activity could be demonstrated after fractionation of the spent medium by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A spontaneous mutant of L. discophora SS-1 was isolated which excreted neither manganese- nor iron-oxidizing activity, whereas excretion of other proteins seemed to be unaffected. Although the excretion of both metal-oxidizing factors was probably linked, the difference in other properties suggests that manganese and iron oxidation represent two different pathways. With a dot-blot assay, it was established that different bacterial species have different metal-oxidizing capacities. Whereas L. discophora oxidized both iron and manganese, Sphaerotilus natans oxidized only iron and two Pseudomonas spp. oxidized only manganese. Images PMID:1610168

  11. Kinetic Study of Colloidal Birnessite Formation During Oxidation of Chlorinated Solvent by Permanganate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. David; Schwartz, Franklin W.

    2003-03-26

    The use of permanganate for the in situ oxidation of chlorinated ethylenes has shown promise in the remediation of subsurface contamination. The oxidation reaction produces Mn oxide, which causes pore plugging and problems in oxidant delivery. This study utilized batch experiments to explore the feasibility of using phosphate to slow down the formation of colloidal Mn oxide, which may allow Mn oxide to precipitate further away from the zone of oxidation. The results show that phosphate can influence the formation of the colloids. Colloid growth was slow, especially early in the reaction. The rate of the colloid formation decreases linearly with increasing concentrations of phosphate ion. Efforts were made to elucidate the mechanism of the reaction between phosphate and Mn oxide. A model was proposed to describe the reaction process, which is thought to involve the formation of a Mn(IV)-phosphate complex in the aqueous phase before formation of the colloids.

  12. Facile and Sustainable Synthesis of Shaped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Effect of Iron Precursor Salts on the Shapes of Iron Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Farheen N.; Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    A facile and sustainable protocol for synthesis of six different shaped iron oxides is developed. Notably, all the six shapes of iron oxides can be synthesised using exactly same synthetic protocol, by simply changing the precursor iron salts. Several of the synthesised shapes are not reported before. This novel protocol is relatively easy to implement and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining various shaped iron oxides in economical and sustainable manner. PMID:25939969

  13. Facile and sustainable synthesis of shaped iron oxide nanoparticles: effect of iron precursor salts on the shapes of iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Farheen N; Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2015-05-05

    A facile and sustainable protocol for synthesis of six different shaped iron oxides is developed. Notably, all the six shapes of iron oxides can be synthesised using exactly same synthetic protocol, by simply changing the precursor iron salts. Several of the synthesised shapes are not reported before. This novel protocol is relatively easy to implement and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining various shaped iron oxides in economical and sustainable manner.

  14. From molecular to colloidal manganese vanadium oxides for water oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Benjamin; Forster, Johannes; Anjass, Montaha H; Daboss, Sven; Kranz, Christine; Streb, Carsten

    2017-10-09

    The spontaneous, sonication-driven conversion of a molecular manganese vanadium oxide water oxidation catalyst, (n-Bu4N)3[Mn4V4O17(OAc)3] × 3H2O, into colloidal manganese vanadium oxide particles (average particle size ca. 70 nm) together with their stability and chemical water oxidation activity is reported. The nanoparticulate metal oxide colloid (approximate composition: VMn5O10·ca. 6H2O·ca. 0.2nBu4N(+)) is formed spontaneously when the molecular precursor is sonicated in water. The particles show water oxidation activity when combined with Ce(IV) as the oxidant, are stable even under highly acidic reaction conditions and can be recovered and reused.

  15. Platinum Attachments on Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Xu, Yaolin; An, Wei; Turner, C. H.; Bao, Yuping

    2010-04-30

    Platinum nanoparticles supported on metal oxide surfaces have shown great potential as heterogeneous catalysts to accelerate electrochemical processes, such as the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Recently, the use of magnetic supports has become a promising research topic for easy separation and recovery of catalysts using magnets, such as Pt nanoparticles supported on iron oxide nanoparticles. The attachment of Pt on iron oxide nanoparticles is limited by the wetting ability of the Pt (metal) on ceramic surfaces. A study of Pt nanoparticle attachment on iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces in an organic solvent is reported, which addresses the factors that promote or inhibit such attachment. It was discovered that the Pt attachment strongly depends on the capping molecules of the iron oxide seeds and the reaction temperature. For example, the attachment of Pt nanoparticles on oleic acid coated iron oxide nanoparticles was very challenging, because of the strong binding between the carboxylic groups and iron oxide surfaces. In contrast, when nanoparticles are coated with oleic acid/tri-n-octylphosphine oxide or oleic acid/oleylamine, a significant increase in Pt attachment was observed. Electronic structure calculations were then applied to estimate the binding energies between the capping molecules and iron ions, and the modeling results strongly support the experimental observations.

  16. Dietary bioavailability of Cu adsorbed to colloidal hydrous ferric oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, Daniel J.; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The dietary bioavailability of copper (Cu) adsorbed to synthetic colloidal hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was evaluated from the assimilation of 65Cu by two benthic grazers, a gastropod and a larval mayfly. HFO was synthesized, labeled with 65Cu to achieve a Cu/Fe ratio comparable to that determined in naturally formed HFO, and then aged. The labeled colloids were mixed with a food source (the diatom Nitzschia palea) to yield dietary 65Cu concentrations ranging from 211 to 2204 nmol/g (dry weight). Animals were pulse fed the contaminated diet and assimilation of 65Cu from HFO was determined following 1–3 days of depuration. Mass transfer of 65Cu from HFO to the diatom was less than 1%, indicating that HFO was the source of 65Cu to the grazers. Estimates of assimilation efficiency indicated that the majority of Cu ingested as HFO was assimilated (values >70%), implying that colloidal HFO potentially represents a source of dietary Cu to benthic grazers, especially where there is active formation and infiltration of these particles into benthic substrates.

  17. When Density Functional Approximations Meet Iron Oxides.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu; Liu, Xing-Wu; Huo, Chun-Fang; Guo, Wen-Ping; Cao, Dong-Bo; Peng, Qing; Dearden, Albert; Gonze, Xavier; Yang, Yong; Wang, Jianguo; Jiao, Haijun; Li, Yongwang; Wen, Xiao-Dong

    2016-10-11

    Three density functional approximations (DFAs), PBE, PBE+U, and Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof screened hybrid functional (HSE), were employed to investigate the geometric, electronic, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of four iron oxides, namely, α-FeOOH, α-Fe2O3, Fe3O4, and FeO. Comparing our calculated results with available experimental data, we found that HSE (a = 0.15) (containing 15% "screened" Hartree-Fock exchange) can provide reliable values of lattice constants, Fe magnetic moments, band gaps, and formation energies of all four iron oxides, while standard HSE (a = 0.25) seriously overestimates the band gaps and formation energies. For PBE+U, a suitable U value can give quite good results for the electronic properties of each iron oxide, but it is challenging to accurately get other properties of the four iron oxides using the same U value. Subsequently, we calculated the Gibbs free energies of transformation reactions among iron oxides using the HSE (a = 0.15) functional and plotted the equilibrium phase diagrams of the iron oxide system under various conditions, which provide reliable theoretical insight into the phase transformations of iron oxides.

  18. Colloidal Stability of Graphene Oxide Nanosheets in Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guikema, Janice; Wang, Yung-Li; Chen, Kai

    2013-03-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials are increasingly used in commercial products as well as in research and industrial applications. Due to its extraordinary properties, graphene has attracted intense research interest and has been demonstrated in many potential applications including solar cells, conductive ink, and transistors. Graphene oxide has also been studied extensively and has been used to produce biocompatible antibacterial paper. Chemical reduction of graphene oxide is commonly used to produce inexpensive graphene in large quantities. With the increasing use of graphene and graphene oxide in consumer products, these nanomaterials may inevitably be released to aqueous systems, resulting in potential risk to environmental ecosystems and human health. The fate and mobility of graphene and its oxides in aquatic systems is dependent on their colloidal stability. We will discuss our study of the early-stage aggregation kinetics of graphene oxide in aqueous solutions. We prepared a suspension of single-layer graphene oxide nanosheets in water and used time-resolved dynamic light scattering to study the influence of electrolytes and pH on the aggregation kinetics of the nanosheets. Atomic force microscopy was employed to further examine the graphene oxide nanosheets.

  19. Effects of Iron Oxides on the Rheological Properties of Cementitious Slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Chul-Woo; Chun, Jaehun; Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2014-04-02

    Iron oxide has been considered a promising host for immobilizing and encapsulating radioactive 99Tc (t1/2=2.1x105 year), which significantly enhances the stability of 99Tc within a cementitious waste form. However, the flow behavior of cementitious slurry containing iron oxide has never been investigated to ensure its workability, which directly influences the preparation and performance of the cementitious waste form monolith. Variation in the rheological properties of the cementitious slurry were studied using rheometry and ultrasonic wave reflection to understand the effects of various iron oxides (magnetite, hematite, ferrihydrite, and goethite) during the cement setting and stiffening processes. The rheological behavior significantly varied with the addition of different chemical compounds of iron oxides. Complementary microscopic characteristics such as colloidal vibration currents, morphology, and particle size distributions further suggest that the most adverse alteration of cement setting and stiffening behavior caused by the presence of goethite may be attributed to its acicular shape.

  20. On the formation of iron(III) oxides via oxidation of iron(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Bongiovanni, R.; Pelizzetti, E.; Borgarello, E.; Meisel, D.

    1994-09-01

    Formation of iron oxides in aqueous salt solutions is reviewed. The discussion is focused on the oxidation of iron(II) and the following hydrolysis process that leads to the formation of a solid phase from homogeneous solutions. Results from our own studies on the kinetics of the oxidation reactions and the ensuing growth processes are presented.

  1. Effect of iron diagenesis on the transport of colloidal clay in an unconfined sand aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J.N.; Gschwend, P.M. )

    1992-04-01

    The role of Fe diagenesis in the transport of clay colloids was investigated in the Cohansey Sand, an Fe(III) oxide-coated quartz arenite that covers most of the New Jersey Coastal Plain. Based on the authors' past work, they hypothesized that clay had been transported into the sediments, that the clay distribution was controlled by attachment to surface Fe(III) oxides, and that anoxic water infiltrating from a swamp had dissolved Fe(III) oxides and released clay colloids into flowing groundwater. Sediment cores were collected from upland and swamp terrains, and the composition and distribution of the clay-sized and heavy mineral fractions were examined by X-ray diffraction, optical and electron microscopy, separations, and elemental analyses. The clay-sized content of the oxidized sediments was roughly double that of the reduced sediments. Electron microscopy revealed that coatings on the quartz grains had the appearance of infiltrated clay particles. The relationship between clay and surface Fe content indicated that the onset of reducing conditions below the swamp remobilized clay colloids by dissolving Fe(III) oxide cement. Surface Fe(III) oxides were derived from weathering of ilmenite and pseudorutile, Fe-Ti oxides found in the heavy mineral fraction. In the oxidized sediments, Fe was transported from the Fe-Ti oxide grains to quartz surfaces, where it was deposited as surface Fe(III) oxides mixed with kaolinite. Thus, the weathering of Fe-bearing minerals and the formation and dissolution of secondary Fe(III) oxides influenced the mobility of colloidal clay in the Cohansey Sand.

  2. SURFACE CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON COLLOID STABILITY AND TRANSPORT THROUGH NATURAL POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface chemical effects on colloidal stability and transport through porous media were investigated using laboratory column techniques. Approximately 100 nm diameter, spherical, iron oxide particles were synthesized as the mobile colloidal phase. The column packing material was ...

  3. SURFACE CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON COLLOID STABILITY AND TRANSPORT THROUGH NATURAL POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface chemical effects on colloidal stability and transport through porous media were investigated using laboratory column techniques. Approximately 100 nm diameter, spherical, iron oxide particles were synthesized as the mobile colloidal phase. The column packing material was ...

  4. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs): from synthesis to in vivo studies--a summary of the synthesis, characterization, in vitro, and in vivo investigations of SPIONs with particular focus on surface and colloidal properties.

    PubMed

    Petri-Fink, Alke; Hofmann, Heinrich

    2007-12-01

    In this work, we present a short summary of the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and their behavior in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we have used various characterization techniques to deduce the physical particle size as well as magnetic properties. It is shown that the particle properties were significantly improved by a thermochemical treatment and dialysis, obtaining weakly interacting particles with a clear blocking temperature. We also present the interaction of polyvinyl alcohol and vinyl alcohol/vinyl amine copolymer-coated SPIONs with HELA cells. It is shown that the uptake increased significantly in the presence of a magnetic field and that surface functional groups had an impact on particle uptake and metabolic activity. Furthermore, the influences of the varied parameters (polymer type and therefore surface charge, cell medium, and serum) on the agglomeration rate and the cell uptake are presented and discussed. Finally, we briefly describe the intraarticular application of SPIONs in sheep, their uptake by synovial membrane, and their systemic distribution and elimination.

  5. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron..., including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with good manufacturing practice...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron..., including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with good manufacturing practice...

  7. Water soluble dendronized iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Daou, T J; Pourroy, G; Greneche, J M; Bertin, A; Felder-Flesch, D; Begin-Colin, S

    2009-06-21

    The grafting of pegylated dendrons on 9(2) nm and 39(5) nm iron oxide nanoparticles in water, through a phosphonate group as coupling agent has been successfully achieved and its mechanism investigated, with a view to produce biocompatible magnetic nano-objects for biomedical applications. Grafting has been demonstrated to occur by interaction of negatively charged phosphonate groups with positively charged groups and hydroxyl at the iron oxide surface. The isoelectric point of the suspension of dendronized iron oxide nanoparticles is shifted towards lower pH as the amount of dendron increases. It reaches 4.7 for the higher grafting rate and for both particle size. Thus, the grafting of molecules using a phosphonate group allows stabilizing electrostatically the suspensions at physiological pH, a prerequisite for biomedical applications. Moreover the grafting step has been shown to preserve the magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles due to super-super exchange interactions through the phosphonate group.

  8. Ultrasound assisted phytosynthesis of iron oxide nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Sathya, K; Saravanathamizhan, R; Baskar, G

    2017-11-01

    The present work deals with the ultrasound assisted green synthesis of iron oxide nano particle using Coriandrum sativum leaf extract as a reducing agent. The synthesized iron oxide nanoparticle was confirmed by UV spectra. The characterization was done to know more about morphology and size of the particle by SEM analysis which shows spherical particles with size ranging from 20 to 90nm. The antimicrobial activity of the leaf extract and the synthesized nanoparticles was studied against the pathogens Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus niger. The ultrasound assisted iron oxide nanoparticle shows higher scavenging activity and antimicrobial activity compared with iron oxide nanoparticle synthesized by magnetic stirrer and Coriandrum sativum leaf extract. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Interaction between electrical double layers of soil colloids and Fe/Al oxides in suspensions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tao; Xu, Renkou; Tiwari, Diwakar; Zhao, Anzhen

    2007-06-15

    Phyllosilicates with net negative surface charge and Fe/Al oxides with net positive surface charge coexist in variable-charge soils, and the interaction between these oppositely charged particles affects the stability of mixed colloids, aggregation, and even the surface chemical properties of variable-charge soils. The interaction of the diffuse layers of electrical double layers between the negatively charged soil colloidal particles and the positively charged particles of goethite or gamma-Al(2)O(3) was investigated in this article through the comparison of zeta potentials between single-soil colloidal systems and binary systems containing soil colloids and Fe/Al oxides. The results showed that the presence of goethite and gamma-Al(2)O(3) increased the zeta potential of the binary system containing soil colloids and Fe/Al oxides, which clearly suggests the overlapping of the diffuse layers in soil colloids and Fe/Al oxides. The overlapping of the diffuse layers leads to a decrease in the effective negative charge density on soil colloid and thus causes a shift of pH-zeta potential curves toward the more positive-value side. The interaction of the electrical double layers is also related to the charge characteristics on the Fe/Al oxides: the higher the positive charge density on Fe/Al oxides, the stronger the interaction of the electrical double layers between the soil colloid particles and the Fe/Al oxides.

  10. Iron oxide nanoparticles for plant nutrition? A preliminary Mössbauer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homonnay, Z.; Tolnai, Gy.; Fodor, F.; Solti, Á.; Kovács, K.; Kuzmann, E.; Ábrahám, A.; Szabó, E. Gy.; Németh, P.; Szabó, L.; Klencsár, Z.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important micronutrients for plants is iron. We have prepared iron(III) oxyhydroxide and magnetite nanoparticles with the aim to use them as possible nutrition source for plants. The iron(III)-oxide/oxyhydroxide nanoparticles prepared under our experimental conditions as colloidal suspensions proved to be 6-line ferrihydrite nanoparticles as verified by XRD, TEM/SAED and Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements. 57Fe Mössbauer spectra of magnetite nanoparticles prepared under different preparation conditions could be analyzed on the basis of a common model based on the superposition of four sextet components displaying Gaussian-shaped hyperfine magnetic field distributions.

  11. Seasonal Cycling of Dissolved, Soluble and Colloidal Iron in the Celtic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohan, M. C.; Birchill, A.; Milne, A.; Annett, A. L.; Geibert, W.

    2016-02-01

    Shelf sea sediments are an important source of dissolved iron (Fe) to the open ocean, yet at present this source is poorly understood. In particular, very little is known about the relative contribution of soluble and colloidal iron to dissolved Fe in shelf regions. Here, we report the first seasonal study of dissolved, soluble and colloidal Fe cycling in the Celtic Sea. Strong seasonal cycling of all forms of Fe within the Celtic Sea was observed. Winter mixing results in concentrations of dissolved Fe that are homogenously distributed throughout the water column in early spring. The dissolved Fe is typically comprised of 50-60 % cFe. During April the onset of stratification results in the initiation of the spring bloom and during this transitional period the coincident draw down of both soluble Fe and colloidal Fe and nitrate in surface waters were observed. This suggests a biological role for soluble Fe and colloidal Fe and/or a scavenging loss. The observed drawdown of dissolved Fe compared to published values of cellular Fe:N in coastal phytoplankton suggests that Fe must be either efficiently recycled or resupplied to surface waters during this period. During summer and autumn surface water dissolved Fe concentrations were 0.1 nM and alongside low nitrate values limit productivity in this region. After the onset of stratification in mid-April, concentrations of dissolved Fe increase below the thermocline throughout the summer and autumn. This continual build-up of dissolved Fe in deeper waters results from tidal advection and sedimentary release of dissolved Fe after the spring bloom crashes. During this time period colloidal Fe contributed 60-80% of the dissolved Fe indicating the sedimentary release. Understanding the seasonal cycling of Fe in shelf systems is crucial in determining this source to the open ocean.

  12. Structure and Properties of Nanocrystalline Iron Oxide Powder Prepared by the Method of Pulsed Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetlichnyi, V. A.; Shabalina, A. V.; Lapin, I. N.

    2017-04-01

    Colloidal solution of iron oxide nanoparticles is synthesized by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation (Nd:YAG laser, 1064 nm, 7 ns, and 180 mJ) of a metallic iron target in water, and nanocrystalline powder is prepared from this solution by vacuum drying. A composition and structure of the material obtained are investigated by methods of electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and optical spectroscopy. It is established that oxide particles with average size of about 5 nm and Fe3O4 magnetite structure are mainly formed during ablation. Preliminary investigation of magnetic properties of the prepared nanoparticle powders shows that they can be in ferromagnetic and/or superparamagnetic states.

  13. Colloidal metal oxide nanoparticle systems: the new promising way to prevent antibiotic resistance during treatment of local infectious processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasenkov, Y.; Frolov, G.; Pogorelsky, I.; Latuta, N.; Gusev, A.; Kuznetsov, D.; Leont'ev, V.

    2015-11-01

    New bactericidal containing nanoparticles colloids for application in dentistry, maxillofacial surgery, urology, obstetrics, gynaecology, ENT, proctology have been developed. The various water colloidal nanodispersive systems of metals and oxides have been obtained by means of electric impulse - condensation (electroerosion) method. These systems are based pure elements and alloys of argentum (Ag), titanium dioxide (TiO2), iron oxide (Fe2O3), tantalum oxide (TaO), vanadium oxide (VO2), cobalt oxide (CoO), tantalum dioxide TaO2, zinc oxide (ZnO), copper oxide (CuO) and mixed suspensions of titanium, aluminium and molybdenum oxides. The research has been made on culture of dentobacterial plaque and mixed culture issued from gingival spaces. The composition of culture was identified with S.aureus, S.epidermidis and nonfermentable kinds of E.coli. The observation period lasted more than nineteen days. All solutions showed highly prolonged bactericidal activity in dilutions from the whole solution 1-20 mg/L. The bactericidal activity of powder specimen of silica containing Ag and Fe2O3 nanoparticles used as dental filling material and disintegrates of composite materials (produced by “StomaDent” CJSC) have been studied. Tested materials have long (up to 19 days and more) bactericidal activity.

  14. Bovine serum albumin adsorption to iron-oxide coated sands can change microsphere deposition mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Raymond M; Yang, Xinyao; Hofmann, Thilo; von der Kammer, Frank

    2012-03-06

    Particulate colloids often occur together with proteins in sewage-impacted water. Using Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) as a surrogate for protein in sewage, column experiments investigating the capacity of iron-oxide coated sands to remove latex microspheres from water revealed that microsphere attenuation mechanisms depended on antecedent BSA coverage. Dual pulse experiment (DPE) results suggested that where all BSA was adsorbed, subsequent multiple pore volume microsphere breakthrough curves reflected progressively reduced colloid deposition rates with increasing adsorbed BSA content. Modeling colloid responses suggested adsorption of 1 μg BSA generated the same response as blockage by between 7.1 × 10(8) and 2.3 × 10(9) deposited microspheres. By contrast, microsphere responses in DPEs where BSA coverage of the deposition sites approached/reached saturation revealed the coated sand maintained a finite capacity to attenuate microspheres, even when incapable of further BSA adsorption. Subsequent microsphere breakthrough curves demonstrated the matrix's colloid attenuation capacity progressively increased with continued microsphere deposition. Experimental findings suggested BSA adsorption on the sand surface approaching/reaching saturation generated attractive deposition sites for colloids, which became progressively more attractive with further colloid deposition (filter ripening). Results demonstrate that adsorption of a single type of protein may either enhance or inhibit colloid mobility in saturated porous media.

  15. Multidentate oligomeric ligands to enhance the biocompatibility of iron oxide and other metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wentao; Palui, Goutam; Ji, Xin; Aldeek, Fadi; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2014-03-01

    We prepared a set of multi-coordinating and reactive amphiphilic polymer ligands and used them for surface-functionalizing magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The amphiphilic oligomers were prepared by coupling (via one step nucleophilic addition) several dopamine anchoring groups, polyethylene glycol moieties and reactive groups onto a poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic anhydride) chain. The availability of several anchoring groups in the same ligand greatly enhances the ligand affinity to the nanoparticle surfaces, via multiplecoordination, while the hydrophilic and reactive groups promote colloidal stability in buffer media and allow subsequent conjugation to target biomolecules. The hydrophilic nanoparticles capped with these polymers maintain compact size and exhibit great long term colloidal stability.

  16. Gold catalysts supported on nanosized iron oxide for low-temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zheng; Zhang, Weidong; Li, Yi; Huang, Zuming; Guo, Huishan; Wu, Feng; Li, Jinjun

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to optimize synthesis of gold catalyst supported on nanosized iron oxide and to evaluate the activity in oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. Nanosized iron oxide was prepared from a colloidal dispersion of hydrous iron oxide through a dispersion-precipitation method. Gold was adsorbed onto nanosized iron oxide under self-generated basic conditions. Characterization results indicate that the iron oxide consisted of hematite/maghemite composite with primary particle sizes of 6-8 nm. Gold was highly dispersed on the surface of the support. The catalysts showed good activity in the oxidation of airborne carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. The optimal pH for their synthesis was ∼7. The catalytic performance could be enhanced by extending the adsorption time of gold species on the support within 21 h. The optimized catalyst was capable of achieving complete oxidation of 1% carbon monoxide at -20 °C and 33% conversion of 450 ppm formaldehyde at ambient temperature. The catalyst may be applicable to indoor air purification.

  17. The Irony of Iron - Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity.

  18. The Irony of Iron – Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity. PMID:26779157

  19. Exploring Microbial Iron Oxidation in Wetland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Muyzer, G.; Bodelier, P. L. E.; den Oudsten, F.; Laanbroek, H. J.

    2009-04-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and is essential for life. Because of its importance, iron cycling and its interaction with other chemical and microbial processes has been the focus of many studies. Iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) have been detected in a wide variety of environments. Among those is the rhizosphere of wetland plants roots which release oxygen into the soil creating suboxic conditions required by these organisms. It has been reported that in these rhizosphere microbial iron oxidation proceeds up to four orders of magnitude faster than strictly abiotic oxidation. On the roots of these wetland plants iron plaques are formed by microbial iron oxidation which are involved in the sequestering of heavy metals as well organic pollutants, which of great environmental significance.Despite their important role being catalysts of iron-cycling in wetland environments, little is known about the diversity and distribution of iron-oxidizing bacteria in various environments. This study aimed at developing a PCR-DGGE assay enabling the detection of iron oxidizers in wetland habitats. Gradient tubes were used to enrich iron-oxidizing bacteria. From these enrichments, a clone library was established based on the almost complete 16s rRNA gene using the universal bacterial primers 27f and 1492r. This clone library consisted of mainly α- and β-Proteobacteria, among which two major clusters were closely related to Gallionella spp. Specific probes and primers were developed on the basis of this 16S rRNA gene clone library. The newly designed Gallionella-specific 16S rRNA gene primer set 122f/998r was applied to community DNA obtained from three contrasting wetland environments, and the PCR products were used in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. A second 16S rRNA gene clone library was constructed using the PCR products from one of our sampling sites amplified with the newly developed primer set 122f/998r. The cloned 16S rRNA gene

  20. Sedimentation of iron deposits in Nagahama Bay, Satsuma Iwo-jima Island:Precipitation behavior of colloidal particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, T.; Kiyokawa, S.; Ikehara, M.

    2016-12-01

    Satsuma Iwo-Jima Island, with volcanic activities, is located about 40km south of Kyushu Island, Japan. This island is one of the best places to observe a shallow water hydrothermal system. Nagahama Bay, in the south of Satsuma Iwo-Jima Island, is partly separated from open sea. The seawater appears dark reddish brown color due to colloidal iron hydroxide by the mixing of volcanic fluids (pH=5.5, 50-60 degree Celsius) and oceanic water (Ninomiya & kiyokawa, 2009; Kiyokawa et al., 2012; Ueshiba & kiyokawa, 2012). Very high deposition rate (33 cm per year) of iron-rich sediments was observed in the bay (Kiyokawa et al., 2012). However, precipitation behavior of colloidal iron hydroxide has not been clarified. In this study, I report the results of analysis of deposition experiments of the colloidal particles at the Nagahama bay. Since the size of the colloidal particles is 1nm 1μm, single particle cannot be precipitated. This arise from precipitation of the particles in the viscous fluid is according to the Stokes' law. Colloidal iron hydroxide has the property of having the electric charges on the surface. The charge on the colloids is affected by pH of its surrounding seawater and can become more positively or negatively charged due to the gain or loss, respectively, of protons (H+) in the seawater. This property affects the stability of the colloidal dispersion. FE-SEM observation shows that the suspended particles consist of colloidal iron hydroxide (about 0.2μm), on the other hand, the iron-rich sediments are composed of bigger one (>1 μm). This indicates the colloidal iron hydroxide is precipitated by flocculation. We examined the precipitation amount of colloidal iron hydroxide under the various pH environments. The precipitation amount of pH=7.8 seawater 10% higher than that of pH=7.2. This result is roughly follows the theoretical value.

  1. Hydrogen generation by laser irradiation of colloids of iron and beryllium in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, I. A.; Shafeev, G. A.; Barmina, E. V.; Simakin, A. V.; Voronov, V. V.; Uvarov, O. V.

    2017-06-01

    The hydrogen generation under irradiation of aqueous colloids of iron and beryllium nanoparticles by 10-ns pulses of the first harmonic of a Nd : YAG laser with an energy density of about 80 J cm-2 in the solution is experimentally investigated. The partial hydrogen content in the atmosphere above the colloidal solutions of nanoparticles first increases with increasing irradiation time and then reaches a stationary level (400-500 Torr). The hydrogen generation rate, being nonzero in the case of irradiation of pure water, passes through a maximum with an increase in the nanoparticle concentration. The results obtained are discussed in terms of the dissociation of water molecules under a direct electron impact from the optical breakdown plasma formed in the liquid.

  2. Transport of carbon colloid supported nanoscale zero-valent iron in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Busch, Jan; Meißner, Tobias; Potthoff, Annegret; Oswald, Sascha E

    2014-08-01

    Injection of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has recently gained great interest as emerging technology for in-situ remediation of chlorinated organic compounds from groundwater systems. Zero-valent iron (ZVI) is able to reduce organic compounds and to render it to less harmful substances. The use of nanoscale particles instead of granular or microscale particles can increase dechlorination rates by orders of magnitude due to its high surface area. However, classical nZVI appears to be hampered in its environmental application by its limited mobility. One approach is colloid supported transport of nZVI, where the nZVI gets transported by a mobile colloid. In this study transport properties of activated carbon colloid supported nZVI (c-nZVI; d50=2.4μm) are investigated in column tests using columns of 40cm length, which were filled with porous media. A suspension was pumped through the column under different physicochemical conditions (addition of a polyanionic stabilizer and changes in pH and ionic strength). Highest observed breakthrough was 62% of the injected concentration in glass beads with addition of stabilizer. Addition of mono- and bivalent salt, e.g. more than 0.5mM/L CaCl2, can decrease mobility and changes in pH to values below six can inhibit mobility at all. Measurements of colloid sizes and zeta potentials show changes in the mean particle size by a factor of ten and an increase of zeta potential from -62mV to -80mV during the transport experiment. However, results suggest potential applicability of c-nZVI under field conditions.

  3. Magnetic iron oxide nanoclusters with tunable optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulou, Athanasia; Tsiaoussis, Ioannis; Lappas, Alexandros

    2011-04-01

    We have developed a modified synthetic protocol for the growth of monodispersed, superparamagnetic, flower-like colloidal nanoclusters (CNCs), which are consisted of smaller iron oxide nanocrystals with adjustable size. We show that their optical properties can be tuned by applying an external magnetic field. The latter controls the subtle balance of the CNCs’ mutual interactions (magnetic versus electrostatic) and drives their assembly in aqueous media. Spectrophotometric measurements reveal that a diffuse reflectance maximum, in the visible range, is related to the CNCs organization. As the strength of the external magnetic field increases, in the range 160-600 G, the spectral weight of this feature shifts towards the blue region of the spectrum. The induced photonic crystal-like response entails a remarkable magneto-optical behavior, closely associated with the size-dependent characteristics of the CNCs ensemble. Such materials pave the way for promising technological implementations in photonics.

  4. Magneto-optical Properties of Iron Oxide Nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulou, Athanasia; Tsiaoussis, Ioannis; Lappas, Alexandros

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a modified synthetic protocol for the growth of monodispersed, superparamagnetic, flower-like colloidal nanoclusters (CNCs) with 40-120 nm average diameters. Importantly, these are consisted of smaller iron oxide nanocrystals, also with adjustable size (12.2-7.7 nm). We show that their optical properties can be tuned by applying an external magnetic field. Spectrophotometric measurements under these conditions reveal a diffuse reflectance maximum in the visible range, which is related to the CNCs assembly in ordered structures. The increasing field strength leads to a blue shift in the spectral weight when the size of the CNCs is above a critical diameter. The size-dependent characteristics of the CNCs determine their magneto-optical behavior and their potential in photonic crystal based technologies.

  5. Positron Tomographic Imaging Of The Liver With Ga-68 Iron Hydroxide Colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bharath; Miller, Tom R.; Siegel, Barry A.; Mathias, Carla J.; Markham, Joanne; Ehrhardt, Gary J.; Welch, Michael J.

    1980-08-01

    A new radiopharmaceutical, 68Ga-iron hydroxide colloid, for hepatic imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) was prepared from the eluate of a "Ge-68Ga solvent extraction generator. In rats, 84% of the administered dose of colloid localized in the liver and 4.6% accumulated in the spleen. Initial imaging studies in normal dogs showed close correspondence of the findings by PET and transmission computed tomography (CT). PET with 68Ga-colloid was performed in 10 patients with hepatic metastases demonstrated by conventional scintigraphy with 99mTc-sulfur colloid. All focal defects noted on the conventional scintigrams were easily identified and generally seen more clearly by PET. In one patient, lesions not identified on the initial 99mTc-sulfur colloid images were demonstrated by PET. The positron tomographic images were compared with those obtained by CT in 7 patients; the two studies showed comparable findings in 5 patients, whereas PET more clearly showed multiple lesions in 2. Our results suggest that PET is a suitable technique for obtaining high-contrast, cross-sectional images of large abdominal organs. Emission computed tomography with positron-emitting radionuclides shows promise as an important new tool for clinical research (1-4). Unfortunately, wide clinical application of positron-emission tomography (PET) is presently limited by the need for an expensive, hospital-based cyclotron facility and highly trained professional and technical personnel to synthesize the radiopharmaceuticals labeled with the very short-lived radionuclides 11c, 13N, 150 and 18 F that are employed most commonly in such studies. These difficulties may be circumvented in part by the use of a simple generator system that produces the positron-emitting radionuclide 68Ga (T1/2 = 68 min) from the long-lived parent 68Ge (T1/2 = 275 days) (5-7). A large number of radiopharmaceuticals of potential clinical interest may be prepared readily from the eluate of such a generator (6

  6. Thermodynamic constraints on microbial iron oxide reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneville, S.; Behrends, T.; Haese, R.; van Cappellen, P.

    2003-04-01

    Iron oxides are ubiquitous reactive constituents of soils, sediments and aquifers. They exhibit large surface areas which bind trace metals, nutrients and organic molecules. Under suboxic conditions, iron oxides can reductively dissolve via several abiotic and microbial pathways. In particular, they serve as terminal electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic matter by iron reducing bacteria. The aim of our study was to determine the thermodynamic energy yields of dissimilatory iron reduction for different Fe(III) substrates. We used the facultative anaerobic gram-positive bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens as model iron reducing bacterium, with ferrihydrite, hematite, goethite or Fe(III)-salicylate as electron acceptor, and lactate as electron donor. Experiments were conducted in an anaerobic pH-stat batch reactor, equipped with a polarographic electrode to monitor in situ the dissolved ferrous iron activity. The stoichiometry of total Fe(II) production and acid consumption during the experiments indicated that lactate was oxidized to acetate. From the Fe(II) activity and redox potential measurements, free energy yields were calculated for Fe(III) reduction coupled to lactate oxidation. The results showed that the redox potential of the overall reaction was poised by equilibrium between the Fe(III)-substrate and aqueous Fe(II). Hence, the energy yields decreased in the order ferrihydrite > Fe(III)-salicylate > hematite > goethite. Accumulation of Fe(II) in solution only caused small decreases in the energy yields over the course of the experiments. Cessation of iron reduction, which was observed in all experiments, was therefore not due to thermodynamic limitation, but more likely reflected the decline in cell level of activity.

  7. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponthieu, M.; Juillot, F.; Hiemstra, T.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2006-06-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE on a crystallized oxide (i.e., goethite) and on an amorphous oxide (HFO) in an identical way. Here, we use the CD-MUSIC approach in combination with valuable and reliable surface spectroscopy information about the nature of surface complexes of the TE. The other objective of this work is to obtain generic parameters to describe the binding of the following elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) onto both iron oxides for the CD-MUSIC approach. The results show that a consistent description of proton and metal ion binding is possible for goethite and HFO with the same set of model parameters. In general a good prediction of almost all the collected experimental data sets corresponding to metal ion binding to HFO is obtained. Moreover, dominant surface species are in agreement with the recently published surface complexes derived from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data. Until more detailed information on the structure of the two iron oxides is available, the present option seems a reasonable approximation and can be used to describe complex geochemical systems. To improve our understanding and modeling of multi-component systems we need more data obtained at much lower metal ion to iron oxide ratios in order to be able to account eventually for sites that are not always characterized in spectroscopic studies.

  8. Colloidal iron pyrite (FeS2) nanocrystal inks for thin-film photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Puthussery, James; Seefeld, Sean; Berry, Nicholas; Gibbs, Markelle; Law, Matt

    2011-02-02

    Iron pyrite (FeS2) is a promising earth-abundant semiconductor for thin-film solar cells. In this work, phase-pure, single-crystalline, and well-dispersed colloidal FeS2 nanocrystals (NCs) were synthesized in high yield by a simple hot-injection route in octadecylamine and then were subjected to partial ligand exchange with octadecylxanthate to yield stable pyrite NC inks. Polycrystalline pyrite thin films were fabricated by sintering layers of these NCs at 500−600 °C under a sulfur atmosphere.

  9. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles: A short review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasany, S. F.; Rehman, A.; Jose, R.; Ahmed, I.

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been enjoying great importance and wide scale applications during the last two decades due to their specific characteristics and applications. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles with appropriate surface chemistry have been implied in numerous applications such as biomedicine and cancer therapy, catalysis and in magnetic separation techniques. This review summarizes recent commercial, industrial and bio-engineering applications and brief study of the methods for the preparation of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles with a control over the size, morphology and the magnetic properties. Some future applications of microwave irradiation for magnetic particle synthesis are also addressed.

  10. Iron oxides in human spleen.

    PubMed

    Kopáni, Martin; Miglierini, Marcel; Lančok, Adriana; Dekan, Július; Čaplovicová, Mária; Jakubovský, Ján; Boča, Roman; Mrazova, Hedviga

    2015-10-01

    Iron is an essential element for fundamental cell functions and a catalyst for chemical reactions. Three samples extracted from the human spleen were investigated by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectrometry (MS), and SQUID magnetometry. The sample with diagnosis of hemosiderosis (H) differs from that referring to hereditary spherocytosis and the reference sample. SEM reveals iron-rich micrometer-sized aggregate of various structures-tiny fibrils in hereditary spherocytosis sample and no fibrils in hemochromatosis. Hematite and magnetite particles from 2 to 6 μm in TEM with diffraction in all samples were shown. The SQUID magnetometry shows different amount of diamagnetic, paramagnetic and ferrimagnetic structures in the tissues. The MS results indicate contribution of ferromagnetically split sextets for all investigated samples. Their occurrence indicates that at least part of the sample is magnetically ordered below the critical temperature. The iron accumulation process is different in hereditary spherocytosis and hemosiderosis. This fact may be the reason of different iron crystallization.

  11. Catalytic iron oxide for lime regeneration in carbonaceous fuel combustion

    DOEpatents

    Shen, Ming-Shing; Yang, Ralph T.

    1980-01-01

    Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides absorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. It is found that iron oxide present in the spent limestone acts as a catalyst to regenerate the spent limestone in a reducing environment. With only small quantities of iron oxide the calcium can be recycled at a significantly increased rate.

  12. Stabilization through precipitation in a system of colloidal iron(III) pyrophosphate salts.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Y Mikal; Velikov, Krassimir P; Kegel, Willem K

    2012-09-01

    The ionic strength of a solution decreases during the precipitation of an insoluble salt, which can cause an initially unstable colloidal system to stabilize during its formation. We show this effect in the precipitation and aging of colloidal iron(III) pyrophosphate, where we observe two distinct stages in the aggregation process. The first stage is the formation of nanoparticles that immediately aggregate into clusters with sizes on the order of 200 nm. In the second stage these clusters slowly grow in size but remain in dispersion for days, even months for dialyzed systems. Eventually these clusters become macroscopically large and sediment out of dispersion. Noting the clear instability of the nanoparticles, it is interesting to find two stages in their aggregation even without the use of additives such as surface active molecules. This is explained by accounting for the rapid decrease of ionic strength during precipitation, rendering the nanoparticles relatively stable when precipitation is complete. Calculating the interaction potentials for this scenario we find good agreement with the experimental observations. These results indicate that coupling of ionic strength to aggregation state can be significant and should be taken into account when considering colloidal stability of insoluble salts.

  13. Surfactant templating effects on the encapsulation of iron oxide nanoparticles within silica microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tonghua; Pang, Jiebin; Tan, Grace; He, Jibao; McPherson, Gary L; Lu, Yunfeng; John, Vijay T; Zhan, Jingjing

    2007-04-24

    Hollow silica microspheres encapsulating ferromagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by a surfactant-aided aerosol process and subsequent treatment. The cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) played an essential role in directing the structure of the composite. Translation from mesoporous silica particles to hollow particles was a consequence of increased loading of ferric species in the precursor solution and the competitive partitioning of CTAB between silicate and ferric colloids. The hypothesis was that CTAB preferentially adsorbed onto more positively charged ferric colloids under acidic conditions. At a critical Fe/Si ratio, most of the CTAB was adsorbed onto ferric colloids and coagulated the colloids to form larger clusters. During the aerosol process, a silica shell was first formed due to the preferred silicate condensation on the gas-liquid interface of the aerosol droplet. Subsequent drying concentrated the ferric clusters inside the silica shell and resulted in a silica shell/ferric core particle. Thermal treatment of the core shell particle led to encapsulation of a single iron oxide nanoparticle inside each silica hollow microsphere.

  14. The Iron-Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-17

    To assess the importance of iron to hydrazine stability, the study of hydrazine oxidation by nitric acid has been extended to investigate the iron-catalyzed oxidation. This report describes those results.

  15. Defluoridation by Bacteriogenic Iron Oxides: Sorption Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, K.; Ferris, F.

    2009-05-01

    At concentrations above 1 mg/L, fluoride in drinking water can lead to dental and skeletal fluorosis, a disease that causes mottling of the teeth, calcification of ligaments, crippling bone deformities and many other physiological disorders that can, ultimately, lead to death. Conservative estimates are that fluorosis afflicts tens of millions of people worldwide. As there is no treatment for fluorosis, prevention is the only means of controlling the disease. While numerous defluoridation techniques have been explored, no single method has been found to be both effective and inexpensive enough to implement widely. Our research began in India, with a large-scale geochemical study of the groundwater in a fluoride-contaminated region of Orissa. Having developed a better understanding of the geochemical relationships that exist between fluoride and other parameters present in an affected area, as well as the complex relationships that arise among those parameters that can impact the presence of fluoride, we began investigating certain remediation scenarios involving iron oxides. A common approach to remediation involves the partitioning of fluoride from groundwater by sorption onto a variety of materials, one of the most effective of which is iron oxide whose surface area acts as a scavenger for fluoride. In the presence of iron oxidizing bacteria, the oxidation rate of iron has been shown to be ˜6 times greater than in their absence; fluoride should, therefore, be removed from an aqueous environment by bacteriogenic iron oxides (BIOS) much more quickly than by abiotic iron oxides. Most recently, sorption studies have been conducted using both BIOS and synthetic hydrous ferric oxides in order to compare the behavior between biotic and abiotic sorbents. These studies have provided sorption isotherms that allow comparison of fluoride removed by sorption to BIOS versus synthetic iron oxides. Sorption affinity constants have also been determined, which allow for the

  16. Poly(L-lysine)-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for stem cell labeling.

    PubMed

    Babic, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Trchová, Miroslava; Jendelová, Pavla; Glogarová, Katerina; Lesný, Petr; Herynek, Vít; Hájek, Milan; Syková, Eva

    2008-03-01

    New surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles were developed by precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts with ammonium hydroxide and oxidation of the resulting magnetite with sodium hypochlorite, followed by the addition of poly( L-lysine) (PLL) solution. PLL of several molecular weights ranging from 146 ( L-lysine) to 579 000 was tested as a coating to boost the intracellular uptake of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, dynamic light scattering, FTIR, and ultrasonic spectrometry. TEM revealed that the particles were ca. 6 nm in diameter, while FTIR showed that their surfaces were well-coated with PLL. The interaction of PLL-modified iron oxide nanoparticles with DMEM culture medium was verified by UV-vis spectroscopy. Rat bone marrow stromal cells (rMSCs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) were labeled with PLL-modified iron oxide nanoparticles or with Endorem (control). Optical microscopy and TEM confirmed the presence of PLL-modified iron oxide nanoparticles inside the cells. Cellular uptake was very high (more than 92%) for PLL-modified nanoparticles that were coated with PLL (molecular weight 388 00) at a concentration of 0.02 mg PLL per milliliter of colloid. The cellular uptake of PLL-modified iron oxide was facilitated by its interaction with the negatively charged cell surface and subsequent endosomolytic uptake. The relaxivity of rMSCs labeled with PLL-modified iron oxide and the amount of iron in the cells were determined. PLL-modified iron oxide-labeled rMSCs were imaged in vitro and in vivo after intracerebral grafting into the contralateral hemisphere of the adult rat brain. The implanted cells were visible on magnetic resonance (MR) images as a hypointense area at the injection site and in the lesion. In comparison with Endorem, nanoparticles modified with PLL of an optimum molecular weight demonstrated a higher efficiency of intracellular uptake by MSC cells.

  17. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared...

  18. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared...

  19. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared...

  1. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared...

  2. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared...

  3. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared...

  4. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared...

  5. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared...

  6. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared...

  7. Chemical design of biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Ling, Daishun; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2013-05-27

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are one of the most versatile and safe nanomaterials used in medicine. Recent progress in nanochemistry enables fine control of the size, crystallinity, uniformity, and surface properties of iron oxide nanoparticles. In this review, the synthesis of chemically designed biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles with improved quality and reduced toxicity is discussed for use in diverse biomedical applications.

  8. Acid monolayer functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikenberry, Myles

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle functionalization is an area of intensely active research, with applications across disciplines such as biomedical science and heterogeneous catalysis. This work demonstrates the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with a quasi-monolayer of 11-sulfoundecanoic acid, 10-phosphono-1-decanesulfonic acid, and 11-aminoundecanoic acid. The carboxylic and phosphonic moieties form bonds to the iron oxide particle core, while the sulfonic acid groups face outward where they are available for catalysis. The particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), potentiometric titration, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The sulfonic acid functionalized particles were used to catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose at 80° and starch at 130°, showing a higher activity per acid site than the traditional solid acid catalyst Amberlyst-15, and comparing well against results reported in the literature for sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous silicas. In sucrose catalysis reactions, the phosphonic-sulfonic nanoparticles (PSNPs) were seen to be incompletely recovered by an external magnetic field, while the carboxylic-sulfonic nanoparticles (CSNPs) showed a trend of increasing activity over the first four recycle runs. Between the two sulfonic ligands, the phosphonates produced a more tightly packed monolayer, which corresponded to a higher sulfonic acid loading, lower agglomeration, lower recoverability through application of an external magnetic field, and higher activity per acid site for the hydrolysis of starch. Functionalizations with 11-aminoundecanoic acid resulted in some amine groups binding to the surfaces of iron oxide nanoparticles. This amine binding is commonly ignored in iron oxide

  9. Ferrous iron oxidation by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widdel, Friedrich; Schnell, Sylvia; Heising, Silke; Ehrenreich, Armin; Assmus, Bernhard; Schink, Bernhard

    1993-04-01

    NATURAL oxidation of ferrous to ferric iron by bacteria such as Thiobacillus ferrooxidans or Gallionella ferruginea1, or by chemical oxidation2,3 has previously been thought always to involve molecular oxygen as the electron acceptor. Anoxic photochemical reactions4-6 or a photobiological process involving two photosystems7-9 have also been discussed as mechanisms of ferrous iron oxidation. The knowledge of such processes has implications that bear on our understanding of the origin of Precambrian banded iron formations10-14. The reducing power of ferrous iron increases dramatically at pH values higher than 2-3 owing to the formation of ferric hydroxy and oxyhydroxy compounds1,2,15 (Fig. 1). The standard redox potential of Fe3+/Fe2+ (E0 = +0.77 V) is relevant only under acidic conditions. At pH 7.0, the couples Fe(OH)3/Fe2+ (E'0 = -0.236V) or Fe(OH)3 + HCO-3FeCO3 (E'0 = +0.200 V) prevail, matching redox potentials measured in natural sediments9,16,17. It should thus be possible for Fe(n) around pH 7.0 to function as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis. The midpoint potential of the reaction centre in purple bacteria is around +0.45 V (ref. 18). Here we describe purple, non-sulphur bacteria that can indeed oxidize colourless Fe(u) to brown Fe(in) and reduce CO2 to cell material, implying that oxygen-independent biological iron oxidation was possible before the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis.

  10. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes.

  11. Complete oxidation of formaldehyde at ambient temperature over supported Pt/Fe2O3 catalysts prepared by colloid-deposition method.

    PubMed

    An, Nihong; Yu, Qiushi; Liu, Gang; Li, Suying; Jia, Mingjun; Zhang, Wenxiang

    2011-02-28

    The catalytic properties of iron oxide supported platinum catalysts (Pt/Fe(2)O(3)), prepared by a colloid deposition route, were investigated for the complete oxidation of formaldehyde. It is found that all the Pt/Fe(2)O(3) catalysts calcined at different temperatures (200-500°C) were active for the oxidation of formaldehyde. Among them, the catalysts calcined at lower temperatures (i.e., 200 and 300°C) exhibited relatively high catalytic activity and stability, which could completely oxidize HCHO even at room temperature. Based on a variety of physical-chemical characterization results, it is proposed that the presence of suitable interaction between Pt particles and iron oxide supports, which is mainly in the form of Pt-O-Fe bonds, should play a positive role in determining the catalytic activity and stability of the supported Pt/Fe(2)O(3) catalysts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Formulations for iron oxides dissolution

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl P.; Chiarizia, Renato

    1992-01-01

    A mixture of a di- or polyphosphonic acid and a reductant wherein each is present in a sufficient amount to provide a synergistic effect with respect to the dissolution of metal oxides and optionally containing corrosion inhibitors and pH adjusting agents.

  13. The effect of surface oxides on multi-walled carbon nanotube aqueous colloidal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Billy

    Carbonaceous nanomaterials are being produced and integrated into consumer products and specialized applications at an accelerating rate. Recently, however, concerns have increased about the environmental, health and safety risks of these nanomaterials, particularly those chemically functionalized to enhance their aqueous colloidal stability and biocompatibility. In this dissertation research, I have investigated the role that surface-oxide concentration plays in the aqueous colloidal stability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), a prominent class of engineered nanomaterials. To vary the concentration of surface oxides on the MWCNTs' surface, pristine (unmodified) tubes were treated with a wet-chemical oxidant (e.g., HNO3, H2SO4 /HNO3, KMnO4); the concentration of surface oxides imparted was measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In conjunction with XPS, previously developed chemical derivatization techniques were used to determine the distribution of hydroxyl, carboxyl, and carbonyl functional groups present on the MWCNTs' surface. The length distribution and structural integrity of pristine and oxidized MWCNTs were characterized using atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. To examine the aqueous colloidal stability and aggregation properties of oxidized MWCNTs, sedimentation and time-resolved dynamic light scattering (TR-DLS) experiments were conducted on neat (i.e., ideal) suspensions prepared by prolonged sonication of MWCNTs in Milli-Q water. Over a range of environmentally relevant pH values (4--9) and electrolyte (NaCL, CaCl2) concentrations (0.001--1.000 M), the aggregation and colloidal properties of MWCNTs were found to agree with the basic tenants of DLVO theory, in that ( i) more highly oxidized, negatively charged MWCNTs remained stable over a wider range of solution conditions than lowly oxidized tubes, ( ii) oxidized MWCNTs adhered to the empirical Schulze-Hardy rule, and (iii) in early

  14. Planktonic Marine Iron-Oxidizers Drive Iron(III) Mineralization Under Low Oxygen Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, G. W., III; Field, E.; Findlay, A.; MacDonald, D. J.; Chan, C. S. Y.; Kato, S.

    2016-02-01

    Observations of modern microbes have led to several hypotheses on how microbes precipitated the extensive banded iron formations in the geologic record, but we have yet to resolve the exact microbial contributions. An initial hypotheses was that cyanobacteria produced oxygen that oxidized iron(II) abiotically; however, in modern environments such as microbial mats, where Fe(II) and O2 coexist, we commonly find microaerophilic chemolithotrophic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria producing Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. This suggests that such iron-oxidizers could have inhabited niches in ancient coastal oceans where Fe(II) and O2 coexisted, and therefore contributed to iron deposits, but there is currently little evidence for planktonic marine iron-oxidizers in modern analogs. Here, we demonstrate successful cultivation of planktonic microaerophilic iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria from the Chesapeake Bay during seasonal stratification. Iron-oxidizers were associated with low oxygen concentrations and active iron redox cycling in the oxic-anoxic transition zone (<3 µM O2, <0.2 µM H2S). While cyanobacteria were also detected in this transition zone, oxygen concentrations were too low to support significant rates of abiotic iron oxidation. Instead, cyanobacteria may be providing oxygen for microaerophilic iron(II) oxidation through a symbiotic relationship that promotes oxygen consumption rather than build-up. Our results suggest that once oxygenic photosynthesis evolved, microaerophilic chemolithotrophic iron(II)-oxidizers were likely important drivers of iron(III) mineralization in ancient oceans.

  15. Competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of organic matter on iron oxide: II. Displacement and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B; Mehlhorn, T.L.; Liang, Liyuan

    1996-08-01

    The competitive interactions between organic matter compounds and mineral surfaces are poorly understood, yet these interactions may play a significant role in the stability and co-transport of mineral colloids and/or environmental contaminants. In this study, the processes of competitive adsorption, displacement, and transport of Suwannee River natural organic matter (SR-NOM) are investigated with several model organic compounds in packed beds of iron oxide-coated quartz columns. Results demonstrated that strongly-binding organic compounds are competitively adsorbed and displace those weakly-bound organic compounds along the flow path. Among the four organic compounds studied, polyacrylic acid (PAA) appeared to be the most competitive, whereas SR-NOM was more competitive than phthalic and salicylic acids. A diffuse adsorption and sharp desorption front (giving an appearance of irreversible adsorption) of the SR-NOM breakthrough curves are explained as being a result of the competitive time-dependent adsorption and displacement processes between different organic components within the SR-NOM. The stability and transport of iron oxide colloids varied as one organic component competitively displaces another. Relatively large quantities of iron oxide colloids are transported when the more strongly-binding PAA competitively displaces the weakly-binding SR-NOM or when SR-NOM competitively displaces phthalic and salicylic acids. Results of this study suggest that the chemical composition and hence the functional behavior of NOM (e.g., in stabilizing mineral colloids and in complexing contaminants) can change along its flow path as a result of the dynamic competitive interactions between heterogeneous NOM subcomponents. Further studies are needed to better define and quantify these NOM components as well as their roles in contaminant partitioning and transport. 37 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Transformation of graphene oxide by ferrous iron: Environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fanfan; Wang, Fang; Gao, Guandao; Chen, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Abiotic transformation of graphene oxide (GO) in aquatic environments can markedly affect the fate, transport, and effects of GO. The authors observed that ferrous iron (Fe[II])-an environmentally abundant, mild reductant-can significantly affect the physicochemical properties of GO (examined by treating aqueous GO suspensions with Fe(2+) at room temperature, with doses of 0.032 mM Fe(2+)  per mg/L, 0.08 mM Fe(2+)  per mg/L, and 0.32 mM Fe(2+)  per mg/L GO). Microscopy data showed stacking of GO nanosheets on Fe(2+) treatment. Spectroscopy evidence (X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared transmission, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) showed significant changes in GO surface O-functionalities, in terms of loss of epoxy and carbonyl groups but increase of carboxyl group. The reduction mechanisms were verified by treating model organic molecules (styrene oxide, p-benzoquinone, and benzoic acid) resembling O-containing fragments of GO macromolecules with Fe(2+). With sedimentation and adsorption experiments (using bisphenol A as a model contaminant), the authors demonstrated that Fe(2+) reduced GOs still maintained relatively high colloidal stability, whereas their adsorption affinities were significantly enhanced. Thus, reduction of GO by mild reductants might be of greater environmental concerns than by stronger reducing agents (e.g., N2H4 and S(2-)), because the latter can result in too significant losses of surface O-functionalities and colloidal stability of GO. This interesting aspect should be given consideration in the risk assessment of GO. © 2015 SETAC.

  17. Liquid Crystalline Behavior and Related Properties of Colloidal Systems of Inorganic Oxide Nanosheets

    PubMed Central

    Nakato, Teruyuki; Miyamoto, Nobuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic layered crystals exemplified by clay minerals can be exfoliated in solvents to form colloidal dispersions of extremely thin inorganic layers that are called nanosheets. The obtained “nanosheet colloids” form lyotropic liquid crystals because of the highly anisotropic shape of the nanosheets. This system is a rare example of liquid crystals consisting of inorganic crystalline mesogens. Nanosheet colloids of photocatalytically active semiconducting oxides can exhibit unusual photoresponses that are not observed for organic liquid crystals. This review summarizes experimental work on the phase behavior of the nanosheet colloids as well as photochemical reactions observed in the clay and semiconducting nanosheets system.

  18. Surfaces of a colloidal iron nanoparticle in its chemical environment: a DFT description.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Guntram; Poteau, Romuald; Lachaize, Sébastien; Gerber, Iann C

    2014-10-07

    Describing and understanding surface chemistry on the atomic scale is of primary importance in predicting and rationalize nanoparticle morphology as well as their physical and chemical properties. Here we present the results of comprehensive density functional theory studies on the adsorption of several small organic species, representing the major species (H2, Cl2, HCl, NH3, NH4Cl, and CH3COOH), present in the reaction medium during colloidal iron nanoparticle synthesis on various low-index iron surface models, namely, (100), (110), (111), (211), and (310). All of the tested ligands strongly interact with the proposed surfaces. Surface energies are calculated and ligand effects on the morphologies are presented, including temperature effects, based on a thermodynamic approach combined with the Wulff construction scheme. The importance of taking into account vibrational contributions during the calculation of surface energies after adsorption is clearly demonstrated. More importantly, we find that thermodynamic ligand effects can be ruled out as the unique driving force in the formation of recently experimentally observed iron cubic nanoparticles.

  19. Nitric oxide and changes of iron metabolism in exercise.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhong Ming

    2002-11-01

    Accumulated data imply that exercise itself might not lead to a true iron deficiency or 'sport anaemia' in a healthy athlete who has adequate iron intake. The higher prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in younger female athletes might be not due to exercise itself, but probably results from dietary choices, inadequate iron intake and menstruation. These factors can also induce iron deficiency or anaemia in the general population. However, exercise does affect iron metabolism, leading to low or sub-optimal iron status. The underlying mechanism is unknown. In this review, recent advances in the study of the effect of exercise on iron metabolism and nitric oxide, and the relationship between nitric oxide and iron status in exercise are discussed. A hypothesis that increased production of nitric oxide might contribute to sub-optimal iron status in exercise is proposed.

  20. Method for preparing hydrous iron oxide gels and spherules

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L.; Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.

    2003-07-29

    The present invention is directed to methods for preparing hydrous iron oxide spherules, hydrous iron oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form composite sorbents and catalysts, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite of hydrous iron oxide fiber materials, iron oxide fiber materials, hydrous iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, dielectric spherules of barium, strontium, and lead ferrites and mixtures thereof, and composite catalytic spherules of barium or strontium ferrite embedded with oxides of Mg, Zn, Pb, Ce and mixtures thereof. These variations of hydrous iron oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process offer more useful forms of inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters, dielectrics, and ceramics.

  1. Oxidation Potentials in Iron and Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matousek, J. W.

    2013-11-01

    The state of oxidation of a pyrometallurgical process given by the partial pressure of oxygen and the temperature (the oxidation potential) is one of the important properties monitored and controlled in the smelting and refining of iron and the nonferrous metals. Solid electrolyte sensors based on ZrO2 and a reference electrode such as Cr/Cr2O3 to measure the oxygen pressure found early application in the steel industry, followed soon after in copper, nickel, lead, and zinc smelting. Similar devices are installed in automobile postcombustion/exhaust trains as part of emission control systems. The current discussion reviews this technology as applied in the primary steps of iron and steel making and refining.

  2. Optical properties of iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musfeldt, Janice

    2012-02-01

    Magnetoelectric coupling in materials like multiferroics, dilute magnetic semiconductors, and topological insulators has attracted a great deal of attention, although most work has been done in the static limit. Optical spectroscopy offers a way to investigate the dynamics of charge-spin coupling, an area where there has been much less effort. Using these techniques, we discovered that charge fluctuation in LuFe2O4, the prototypical charge ordered multiferroic, has an onset well below the charge ordering transition, supporting the ``order by fluctuation'' mechanism for the development of charge order superstructure. Bragg splitting and large magneto-optical contrast suggest a low temperature monoclinic distortion that can be driven by both temperature and magnetic field. At the same time, dramatic splitting of the LuO2 layer phonon mode is attributed to charge-rich/poor proximity effects, and its temperature dependence reveals the antipolar nature of the W layer pattern. Using optical techniques, we also discovered that α-Fe2O3, a chemically-similar parent compound and one of the world's oldest and most iconic antiferromagnetic materials, appears more red in applied magnetic field than in zero field conditions. This effect is driven by a field-induced reorientation of magnetic order. The oscillator strength lost in the color band is partially transferred to the magnon side band, a process that also reveals a new exciton pattern induced by the modified exchange coupling. Analysis of the exciton pattern exposes C2/c monoclinic symmetry in the high field phase of hematite. Taken together, these findings advance our understanding of iron-based materials under extreme conditions. [4pt] Collaborators include: X. S. Xu, P. Chen, Q. -C. Sun, T. V. Brinzari (Tennessee); S. McGill (NHMFL); J. De Groot, M. Angst, R. P. Hermann (Julich); A. D. Christianson, B. C. Sales, D. Mandrus (ORNL); A. P. Litvinchuk (Houston); J. -W. Kim (Ames); Z. Islam (Argonne); N. Lee, S. -W. Cheong

  3. Characterization of the oleic acid/iron oxide nanoparticle interface by magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masur, S.; Zingsem, B.; Marzi, T.; Meckenstock, R.; Farle, M.

    2016-10-01

    The synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles involves surfactant molecules, which bind to the particle surface and stabilize nanoparticles against aggregation. In many cases these protecting shells also can be used for further functionalization. In this study, we investigated monodisperse single crystalline iron oxide core/shell nanoparticles (FexOy-NPs) in situ covered with an oleic acid layer which showed two electron spin resonance (ESR) signals. The nanoparticles with the ligands attached were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ferro- and paramagnetic resonance (FMR, EPR). Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of the functional groups and revealed that the oleic acid (OA) is chemisorbed as a carboxylate on the iron oxide and is coordinated symmetrically to the oxide atoms. We show that the EPR signal of the OA ligand molecule can be used as a local probe to determine the temperature changes at the surface of the nanoparticle.

  4. Ex vivo assessment of polyol coated-iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI diagnosis applications: toxicological and MRI contrast enhancement effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomati-Miguel, Oscar; Miguel-Sancho, Nuria; Abasolo, Ibane; Candiota, Ana Paula; Roca, Alejandro G.; Acosta, Milena; Schwartz, Simó; Arus, Carles; Marquina, Clara; Martinez, Gema; Santamaria, Jesus

    2014-03-01

    Polyol synthesis is a promising method to obtain directly pharmaceutical grade colloidal dispersion of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Here, we study the biocompatibility and performance as T2-MRI contrast agents (CAs) of high quality magnetic colloidal dispersions (average hydrodynamic aggregate diameter of 16-27 nm) consisting of polyol-synthesized SPIONs (5 nm in mean particle size) coated with triethylene glycol (TEG) chains (TEG-SPIONs), which were subsequently functionalized to carboxyl-terminated meso-2-3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) coated-iron oxide nanoparticles (DMSA-SPIONs). Standard MTT assays on HeLa, U87MG, and HepG2 cells revealed that colloidal dispersions of TEG-coated iron oxide nanoparticles did not induce any loss of cell viability after 3 days incubation with dose concentrations below 50 μg Fe/ml. However, after these nanoparticles were functionalized with DMSA molecules, an increase on their cytotoxicity was observed, so that particles bearing free terminal carboxyl groups on their surface were not cytotoxic only at low concentrations (<10 μg Fe/ml). Moreover, cell uptake assays on HeLa and U87MG and hemolysis tests have demonstrated that TEG-SPIONs and DMSA-SPIONs were well internalized by the cells and did not induce any adverse effect on the red blood cells at the tested concentrations. Finally, in vitro relaxivity measurements and post mortem MRI studies in mice indicated that both types of coated-iron oxide nanoparticles produced higher negative T2-MRI contrast enhancement than that measured for a similar commercial T2-MRI CAs consisting in dextran-coated ultra-small iron oxide nanoparticles (Ferumoxtran-10). In conclusion, the above attributes make both types of as synthesized coated-iron oxide nanoparticles, but especially DMSA-SPIONs, promising candidates as T2-MRI CAs for nanoparticle-enhanced MRI diagnosis applications.

  5. Microanalysis of iron oxidation state in iron oxides using X Ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Delaney, J.; Bajt, S.; Rivers, M. L.; Smith, J. V.

    1993-01-01

    An exploratory application of x ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis using the synchrotron x ray microprobe was undertaken to obtain Fe XANES spectra on individual sub-millimeter grains in conventional polished sections. The experiments concentrated on determinations of Fe valence in a suite of iron oxide minerals for which independent estimates of the iron speciation could be made by electron microprobe analysis and x ray diffraction.

  6. Iron Oxide Deposition from Aqueous Solution and Iron Formations on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catling, David; Moore, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    Iron formations are ancient, laminated chemical sediments containing at least 15 wt% Fe. We discuss possible mechanisms for their formation in aqueous environments on early Mars. Such iron oxide deposits may be detectable today.

  7. Efficient One-Pot Synthesis of Colloidal Zirconium Oxide Nanoparticles for High-Refractive-Index Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Hajagos, Tibor Jacob; Chen, Dustin; Chen, Yi; Kishpaugh, David; Pei, Qibing

    2016-02-01

    Zirconium oxide nanoparticles are promising candidates for optical engineering, photocatalysis, and high-κ dielectrics. However, reported synthetic methods for the colloidal zirconium oxide nanoparticles use unstable alkoxide precursors and have various other drawbacks, limiting their wide application. Here, we report a facile one-pot method for the synthesis of colloidally stable zirconium oxide nanoparticles. Using a simple solution of zirconium trifluoroacetate in oleylamine, highly stable zirconium oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized with high yield, following a proposed amidization-assisted sol-gel mechanism. The nanoparticles can be readily dispersed in nonpolar solvents, forming a long-term stable transparent solution, which can be further used to fabricate high-refractive-index nanocomposites in both monolith and thin-film forms. In addition, the same method has also been extended to the synthesis of titanium oxide nanoparticles, demonstrating its general applicability to all group IVB metal oxide nanoparticles.

  8. The dual effects of carboxymethyl cellulose on the colloidal stability and toxicity of nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haoran; Xie, Yankai; Zeng, Guangming; Tang, Lin; Liang, Jie; He, Qi; Zhao, Feng; Zeng, Yalan; Wu, Yanan

    2016-02-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles are usually modified with surface coating to mitigate the particle stability in water during the environmental application. However, the surface coating may not only influence the particle stabilization but also the particle cytotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the dual effects of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) on the colloidal stability and cytotoxicity of NZVI towards gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and discussed the interrelation between particle stability and cytotoxicity. The effect of CMC concentration, ionic strength (Ca(2+)) and aging treatment on the particle cytotoxicity were also examined. Specifically, the aqueous stability of NZVI suspensions with CMC ratio dose-dependently strengthened within 1 h. The inactivation of E. coli by bare NZVI was significant and concentration- and time-dependent. On the contrary, an increasing reduction in cytotoxicity of NZVI with CMC ratio increasing was observed, even though the particles became more dispersed. TEM analysis demonstrates the membrane disruption and the cellular internalization of nanoparticles after exposure of E. coli to NZVI. However, in the case of CMC-modified NZVI (CNZVI), the bacterial cell wall displays an outer shell of a layer of nanoparticles attached around the outer membrane, but the cell membrane was kept intact. The presence of Ca(2+) can either increase or decrease the cytotoxicity of NZVI and CNZVI, depending on the concentration. The aged NZVI and CNZVI particles did not seem to present obvious bactericidal effect due to the transformation of Fe(0) to the less toxic or non-toxic iron oxides, as indicated by the XRD analysis.

  9. Colloidal polymerization of polymer-coated ferromagnetic nanoparticles into cobalt oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Keng, Pei Yuin; Kim, Bo Yun; Shim, In-Bo; Sahoo, Rabindra; Veneman, Peter E; Armstrong, Neal R; Yoo, Heemin; Pemberton, Jeanne E; Bull, Mathew M; Griebel, Jared J; Ratcliff, Erin L; Nebesny, Kenneth G; Pyun, Jeffrey

    2009-10-27

    The preparation of polystyrene-coated cobalt oxide nanowires is reported via the colloidal polymerization of polymer-coated ferromagnetic cobalt nanoparticles (PS-CoNPs). Using a combination of dipolar nanoparticle assembly and a solution oxidation of preorganized metallic colloids, interconnected nanoparticles of cobalt oxide spanning micrometers in length were prepared. The colloidal polymerization of PS-CoNPs into cobalt oxide (CoO and Co(3)O(4)) nanowires was achieved by bubbling O(2) into PS-CoNP dispersions in 1,2-dichlorobenzene at 175 degrees C. Calcination of thin films of PS-coated cobalt oxide nanowires afforded Co(3)O(4) metal oxide materials. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the formation of interconnected nanoparticles of cobalt oxide with hollow inclusions, arising from a combination of dipolar assembly of PS-CoNPs and the nanoscale Kirkendall effect in the oxidation reaction. Using a wide range of spectroscopic and electrochemical characterization techniques, we demonstrate that cobalt oxide nanowires prepared via this novel methodology were electroactive with potential applications as nanostructured electrodes for energy storage.

  10. The effects of aggregation and protein corona on the cellular internalization of iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Safi, M; Courtois, J; Seigneuret, M; Conjeaud, H; Berret, J-F

    2011-12-01

    Engineered inorganic nanoparticles are essential components in the development of nanotechnologies. For applications in nanomedicine, particles need to be functionalized to ensure a good dispersibility in biological fluids. In many cases however, functionalization is not sufficient: the particles become either coated by a corona of serum proteins or precipitate out of the solvent. In the present paper, we show that by changing the coating of iron oxide nanoparticles from a low-molecular weight ligand (citrate ions) to small carboxylated polymers (poly(acrylic acid)), the colloidal stability of the dispersion is improved and the adsorption/internalization of iron toward living mammalian cells is profoundly affected. Citrate-coated particles are shown to destabilize in all fetal-calf-serum based physiological conditions tested, whereas the polymer coated particles exhibit an outstanding dispersibility as well as a structure devoid of protein corona. The interactions between nanoparticles and human lymphoblastoid cells are investigated by transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. Two types of nanoparticle/cell interactions are underlined. Iron oxides are found either adsorbed on the cellular membranes, or internalized into membrane-bound endocytosis compartments. For the precipitating citrate-coated particles, the kinetics of interactions reveal a massive and rapid adsorption of iron oxide on the cell surfaces. The quantification of the partition between adsorbed and internalized iron was performed from the cytometry data. The results highlight the importance of resilient adsorbed nanomaterials at the cytoplasmic membrane. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Water clustering on nanostructured iron oxide films.

    PubMed

    Merte, Lindsay R; Bechstein, Ralf; Peng, Guowen; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A; Zeuthen, Helene; Knudsen, Jan; Lægsgaard, Erik; Wendt, Stefan; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2014-06-30

    The adhesion of water to solid surfaces is characterized by the tendency to balance competing molecule-molecule and molecule-surface interactions. Hydroxyl groups form strong hydrogen bonds to water molecules and are known to substantially influence the wetting behaviour of oxide surfaces, but it is not well-understood how these hydroxyl groups and their distribution on a surface affect the molecular-scale structure at the interface. Here we report a study of water clustering on a moiré-structured iron oxide thin film with a controlled density of hydroxyl groups. While large amorphous monolayer islands form on the bare film, the hydroxylated iron oxide film acts as a hydrophilic nanotemplate, causing the formation of a regular array of ice-like hexameric nanoclusters. The formation of this ordered phase is localized at the nanometre scale; with increasing water coverage, ordered and amorphous water are found to coexist at adjacent hydroxylated and hydroxyl-free domains of the moiré structure.

  12. Water Clustering on Nanostructured Iron Oxide Films

    SciTech Connect

    Merte, L. R.; Bechstein, Ralf; Peng, Guowen; Rieboldt, Felix; Farberow, Carrie A.; Zeuthen, Helene; Knudsen, Jan; Laegsgaard, E.; Wendt, Stefen; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Fleming

    2014-06-30

    The adhesion of water to solid surfaces is characterized by the tendency to balance competing molecule–molecule and molecule–surface interactions. Hydroxyl groups form strong hydrogen bonds to water molecules and are known to substantially influence the wetting behaviour of oxide surfaces, but it is not well-understood how these hydroxyl groups and their distribution on a surface affect the molecular-scale structure at the interface. Here we report a study of water clustering on a moire´-structured iron oxide thin film with a controlled density of hydroxyl groups. While large amorphous monolayer islands form on the are film, the hydroxylated iron oxide film acts as a hydrophilic nanotemplate, causing the formation of a regular array of ice-like hexameric nanoclusters. The formation of this ordered phase is localized at the nanometre scale; with increasing water coverage, ordered and amorphous water are found to coexist at adjacent hydroxylated and hydroxyl-free domains of the moire´ structure.

  13. Nanoscale assembly of amine-functionalized colloidal iron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barick, K. C.; Aslam, M.; Prasad, Pottumarthi V.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate a single-step facile approach for highly water-stable assembly of amine-functionalized Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles using thermal decomposition of Fe-chloride precursors in ethylene glycol medium in the presence of ethylenediamine. The average size of nanoassemblies is 40±1 nm, wherein the individual nanoparticles are about 6 nm. Amine-functionalized properties are evident from Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), thermal and elemental analyses. The saturation magnetization and spin-echo r2 of the nanoassemblies were measured to be 64.3 emu/g and 314.6 mM -1 s -1, respectively. The higher value of relaxivity ratio ( r2/ r1=143) indicates that nanoassemblies are a promising high-efficiency T2 contrast agent platform.

  14. Phase Formation Behavior in Ultrathin Iron Oxide.

    PubMed

    Jõgi, Indrek; Jacobsson, T Jesper; Fondell, Mattis; Wätjen, Timo; Carlsson, Jan-Otto; Boman, Mats; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2015-11-17

    Nanostructured iron oxides, and especially hematite, are interesting for a wide range of applications ranging from gas sensors to renewable solar hydrogen production. A promising method for deposition of low-dimensional films is atomic layer deposition (ALD). Although a potent technique, ALD of ultrathin films is critically sensitive to the substrate and temperature conditions where initial formation of islands and crystallites influences the properties of the films. In this work, deposition at the border of the ALD window forming a hybrid ALD/pulsed CVD (pCVD) deposition is utilized to obtain a deposition less sensitive to the substrate. A thorough analysis of iron oxide phases formation on two different substrates, Si(100) and SiO2, was performed. Films between 3 and 50 nm were deposited and analyzed with diffraction techniques, high-resolution Raman spectroscopy, and optical spectroscopy. Below 10 nm nominal film thickness, island formation and phase dependent particle crystallization impose constraints for deposition of phase pure iron oxides on non-lattice-matching substrates. Films between 10 and 20 nm thickness on SiO2 could effectively be recrystallized into hematite whereas for the corresponding films on Si(100), no recrystallization occurred. For films thicker than 20 nm, phase pure hematite can be formed directly with ALD/pCVD with very low influence of the substrate on either Si or SiO2. For more lattice matched substrates such as SnO2:F, Raman spectroscopy indicated formation of the hematite phase already for films with 3 nm nominal thickness and clearly for 6 nm films. Analysis of the optical properties corroborated the analysis and showed a quantum confined blue-shift of the absorption edge for the thinnest films.

  15. Iron Oxide Nanozyme: A Multifunctional Enzyme Mimetic for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lizeng; Fan, Kelong; Yan, Xiyun

    2017-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been widely used in many important fields due to their excellent nanoscale physical properties, such as magnetism/superparamagnetism. They are usually assumed to be biologically inert in biomedical applications. However, iron oxide nanoparticles were recently found to also possess intrinsic enzyme-like activities, and are now regarded as novel enzyme mimetics. A special term, “Nanozyme”, has thus been coined to highlight the intrinsic enzymatic properties of such nanomaterials. Since then, iron oxide nanoparticles have been used as nanozymes to facilitate biomedical applications. In this review, we will introduce the enzymatic features of iron oxide nanozyme (IONzyme), and summarize its novel applications in biomedicine. PMID:28900505

  16. Mineral resource of the month: iron oxide pigments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The article discusses iron oxide pigments, which have been used as colorants since human began painting as they resist color change due to sunlight exposure, have good chemical resistance and are stable under normal ambient conditions. Cyprus, Italy and Spain are among the countries that are known for the production of iron oxide pigments. Granular forms of iron oxides and nano-sized materials are cited as developments in the synthetic iron oxide pigment industry which are being used in computer disk drives and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    H.Y. Sohn

    2008-03-31

    The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

  18. Modified iron oxide nanomaterials: Functionalization and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Samira; Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili Muhd

    2016-10-01

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have aroused the interest of researchers of materials' chemistry due to its exceptional properties such as decent magnetic, electric, catalytic, biocompatibility, and low toxicity. However, these magnetic nanoparticles are predisposed towards aggregation and forming larger particles, due to its strong anisotropic dipolar interactions, particularly in the aqueous phase, consequently depriving them of dispersibility and particular properties, ultimately degrading their performance. Hence, this review focuses on modified magnetic nanoparticles that are stable, easily synthesized, possess a high surface area and could be facile-separated via magnetic forces, and are of low toxicity and costs for applications such as catalyst/catalyst support, food security, biomedical, and pollutant remediation.

  19. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystal catalysis by sustained chemically driven ligand displacement.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Jonathan; Van Driessche, Isabel; Martins, José C; Hens, Zeger

    2016-05-01

    Surface chemistry is a key enabler for colloidal nanocrystal applications. In this respect, metal oxide nanocrystals (NCs) stand out from other NCs as carboxylic acid ligands adsorb on their surface by dissociation to carboxylates and protons, the latter proving essential in electron transfer reactions. Here, we show that this binding motif sets the stage for chemically driven ligand displacement where the binding of amines or alcohols to HfO2 NCs is promoted by the conversion of a bound carboxylic acid into a non-coordinating amide or ester. Furthermore, the sustained ligand displacement, following the addition of excess carboxylic acid, provides a catalytic pathway for ester formation, whereas the addition of esters leads to NC-catalysed transesterification. Because sustained, chemically driven ligand displacement leaves the NCs-including their surface composition-unchanged and preserves colloidal stability, metal oxide nanocrystals are thus turned into effective nanocatalysts that bypass the tradeoff between colloidal stability and catalytic activity.

  20. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystal catalysis by sustained chemically driven ligand displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Roo, Jonathan; van Driessche, Isabel; Martins, José C.; Hens, Zeger

    2016-05-01

    Surface chemistry is a key enabler for colloidal nanocrystal applications. In this respect, metal oxide nanocrystals (NCs) stand out from other NCs as carboxylic acid ligands adsorb on their surface by dissociation to carboxylates and protons, the latter proving essential in electron transfer reactions. Here, we show that this binding motif sets the stage for chemically driven ligand displacement where the binding of amines or alcohols to HfO2 NCs is promoted by the conversion of a bound carboxylic acid into a non-coordinating amide or ester. Furthermore, the sustained ligand displacement, following the addition of excess carboxylic acid, provides a catalytic pathway for ester formation, whereas the addition of esters leads to NC-catalysed transesterification. Because sustained, chemically driven ligand displacement leaves the NCs--including their surface composition--unchanged and preserves colloidal stability, metal oxide nanocrystals are thus turned into effective nanocatalysts that bypass the tradeoff between colloidal stability and catalytic activity.

  1. Synthesis and Magneto-Thermal Actuation of Iron Oxide Core-PNIPAM Shell Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kurzhals, Steffen; Zirbs, Ronald; Reimhult, Erik

    2015-09-02

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been proposed for many applications in biotechnology and medicine. In this paper, it is demonstrated how the excellent colloidal stability and magnetic properties of monodisperse and individually densely grafted iron oxide nanoparticles can be used to manipulate reversibly the solubility of nanoparticles with a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)nitrodopamine shell. "Grafting-to" and "grafting-from" methods for synthesis of an irreversibly anchored brush shell to monodisperse, oleic acid coated iron oxide cores are compared. Thereafter, it is shown that local heating by magnetic fields as well as global thermal heating can be used to efficiently and reversibly aggregate, magnetically extract nanoparticles from solution and spontaneously redisperse them. The coupling of magnetic and thermally responsive properties points to novel uses as smart materials, for example, in integrated devices for molecular separation and extraction.

  2. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with a bilayer of oleic acid for magnetic hyperthermia and MRI applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Paula I. P.; Laia, César A. T.; Carvalho, Alexandra; Pereira, Laura C. J.; Coutinho, Joana T.; Ferreira, Isabel M. M.; Novo, Carlos M. M.; Borges, João Paulo

    2016-10-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4, IONPs) are promising candidates for several biomedical applications such as magnetic hyperthermia and as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, their colloidal stability in physiological conditions hinders their application requiring the use of biocompatible surfactant agents. The present investigation focuses on obtaining highly stable IONPs, stabilized by the presence of an oleic acid bilayer. Critical aspects such as oleic acid concentration and pH were optimized to ensure maximum stability. NPs composed of an iron oxide core with an average diameter of 9 nm measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) form agglomerates with an hydrodynamic diameter of around 170 nm when dispersed in water in the presence of an oleic acid bilayer, remaining stable (zeta potential of -120 mV). Magnetic hyperthermia and the relaxivities measurements show high efficiency at neutral pH which enables their use for both magnetic hyperthermia and MRI.

  3. Synthesis and Magneto-Thermal Actuation of Iron Oxide Core–PNIPAM Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been proposed for many applications in biotechnology and medicine. In this paper, it is demonstrated how the excellent colloidal stability and magnetic properties of monodisperse and individually densely grafted iron oxide nanoparticles can be used to manipulate reversibly the solubility of nanoparticles with a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)nitrodopamine shell. “Grafting-to” and “grafting-from” methods for synthesis of an irreversibly anchored brush shell to monodisperse, oleic acid coated iron oxide cores are compared. Thereafter, it is shown that local heating by magnetic fields as well as global thermal heating can be used to efficiently and reversibly aggregate, magnetically extract nanoparticles from solution and spontaneously redisperse them. The coupling of magnetic and thermally responsive properties points to novel uses as smart materials, for example, in integrated devices for molecular separation and extraction. PMID:26270412

  4. Improved functionalization of oleic acid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, Maarten; Brullot, Ward; Luong, Tai Thien; Geukens, Nick; Gils, Ann; Verbiest, Thierry

    2012-09-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can provide multiple benefits for biomedical applications in aqueous environments such as magnetic separation or magnetic resonance imaging. To increase the colloidal stability and allow subsequent reactions, the introduction of hydrophilic functional groups onto the particles' surface is essential. During this process, the original coating is exchanged by preferably covalently bonded ligands such as trialkoxysilanes. The duration of the silane exchange reaction, which commonly takes more than 24 h, is an important drawback for this approach. In this paper, we present a novel method, which introduces ultrasonication as an energy source to dramatically accelerate this process, resulting in high-quality water-dispersible nanoparticles around 10 nm in size. To prove the generic character, different functional groups were introduced on the surface including polyethylene glycol chains, carboxylic acid, amine, and thiol groups. Their colloidal stability in various aqueous buffer solutions as well as human plasma and serum was investigated to allow implementation in biomedical and sensing applications.

  5. A Diatom Ferritin Optimized for Iron Oxidation but Not Iron Storage*

    PubMed Central

    Pfaffen, Stephanie; Bradley, Justin M.; Abdulqadir, Raz; Firme, Marlo R.; Moore, Geoffrey R.; Le Brun, Nick E.; Murphy, Michael E. P.

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin from the marine pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (PmFTN) plays a key role in sustaining growth in iron-limited ocean environments. The di-iron catalytic ferroxidase center of PmFTN (sites A and B) has a nearby third iron site (site C) in an arrangement typically observed in prokaryotic ferritins. Here we demonstrate that Glu-44, a site C ligand, and Glu-130, a residue that bridges iron bound at sites B and C, limit the rate of post-oxidation reorganization of iron coordination and the rate at which Fe3+ exits the ferroxidase center for storage within the mineral core. The latter, in particular, severely limits the overall rate of iron mineralization. Thus, the diatom ferritin is optimized for initial Fe2+ oxidation but not for mineralization, pointing to a role for this protein in buffering iron availability and facilitating iron-sparing rather than only long-term iron storage. PMID:26396187

  6. Effects of coating spherical iron oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Milosevic, Irena; Motte, Laurence; Aoun, Bachir; Li, Tao; Ren, Yang; Sun, Chengjun; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effect of several coatings applied in biomedical applications to iron oxide nanoparticles on the size, structure and composition of the particles. The four structural techniques employed - TEM, DLS, VSM, SAXS and EXAFS - show no significant effects of the coatings on the spherical shape of the bare nanoparticles, the average sizes or the local order around the Fe atoms. The NPs coated with hydroxylmethylene bisphosphonate or catechol have a lower proportion of magnetite than the bare and citrated ones, raising the question whether the former are responsible for increasing the valence state of the oxide on the NP surfaces and lowering the overall proportion of magnetite in the particles. VSM measurements show that these two coatings lead to a slightly higher saturation magnetization than the citrate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazu and Dr. Federica Migliardo.

  7. Transformation of vivianite by anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Miot, J; Benzerara, K; Morin, G; Bernard, S; Beyssac, O; Larquet, E; Kappler, A; Guyot, F

    2009-06-01

    In phosphate-rich environments, vivianite (Fe(II)(3)(PO(4))(2), 8H(2)O) is an important sink for dissolved Fe(II) and is considered as a very stable mineral due to its low solubility at neutral pH. In the present study, we report the mineralogical transformation of vivianite in cultures of the nitrate-reducing iron-oxidizing bacterial strain BoFeN1 in the presence of dissolved Fe(II). Vivianite was first transformed into a greenish phase consisting mostly of an amorphous mixed valence Fe-phosphate. This precipitate became progressively orange and the final product of iron oxidation consisted of an amorphous Fe(III)-phosphate. The sub-micrometer analysis by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy of the iron redox state in samples collected at different stages of the culture indicated that iron was progressively oxidized at the contact of the bacteria and at a distance from the cells in extracellular minerals. Iron oxidation in the extracellular minerals was delayed by a few days compared with cell-associated Fe-minerals. This led to strong differences of Fe redox in between these two types of minerals and finally to local heterogeneities of redox within the sample. In the absence of dissolved Fe(II), vivianite was not significantly transformed by BoFeN1. Whereas Fe(II) oxidation at the cell contact is most probably directly catalyzed by the bacteria, vivianite transformation at a distance from the cells might result from oxidation by nitrite. In addition, processes leading to the export of Fe(III) from bacterial oxidation sites to extracellular minerals are discussed including some involving colloids observed by cryo-transmission electron microscopy in the culture medium.

  8. Effect of surface functionalisation on the interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Aysan, Ayse Beyza; Knejzlík, Zdeněk; Ulbrich, Pavel; Šoltys, Marek; Zadražil, Aleš; Štěpánek, František

    2017-05-01

    The combination of nanoparticles with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can have benefits such as easier sample handling or higher sensitivity, but also drawbacks such as loss of colloidal stability or inhibition of the PCR. The present work systematically investigates the interaction of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) with the PCR in terms of colloidal stability and potential PCR inhibition due to interaction between the PCR components and the nanoparticle surface. Several types of MIONs with and without surface functionalisation by sodium citrate, dextran and 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES) were prepared and characterised by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Colloidal stability in the presence of the PCR components was investigated both at room temperature and under PCR thermo-cycling. Dextran-stabilized MIONs show the best colloidal stability in the PCR mix at both room and elevated temperatures. Citrate- and APTES-stabilised as well as uncoated MIONs show a comparable PCR inhibition near the concentration 0.1mgml(-1) while the inhibition of dextran stabilized MIONs became apparent near 0.5mgml(-1). It was demonstrated that the PCR could be effectively carried out even in the presence of elevated concentration of MIONs up to 2mgml(-1) by choosing the right coating approach and supplementing the reaction mix by critical components, Taq DNA polymerase and Mg(2+) ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Insight into the evolution of the iron oxidation pathways.

    PubMed

    Ilbert, Marianne; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2013-02-01

    Iron is a ubiquitous element in the universe. Ferrous iron (Fe(II)) was abundant in the primordial ocean until the oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere led to its widespread oxidation and precipitation. This change of iron bioavailability likely put selective pressure on the evolution of life. This element is essential to most extant life forms and is an important cofactor in many redox-active proteins involved in a number of vital pathways. In addition, iron plays a central role in many environments as an energy source for some microorganisms. This review is focused on Fe(II) oxidation. The fact that the ability to oxidize Fe(II) is widely distributed in Bacteria and Archaea and in a number of quite different biotopes suggests that the dissimilatory Fe(II) oxidation is an ancient energy metabolism. Based on what is known today about Fe(II) oxidation pathways, we propose that they arose independently more than once in evolution and evolved convergently. The iron paleochemistry, the phylogeny, the physiology of the iron oxidizers, and the nature of the cofactors of the redox proteins involved in these pathways suggest a possible scenario for the timescale in which each type of Fe(II) oxidation pathways evolved. The nitrate dependent anoxic iron oxidizers are likely the most ancient iron oxidizers. We suggest that the phototrophic anoxic iron oxidizers arose in surface waters after the Archaea/Bacteria-split but before the Great Oxidation Event. The neutrophilic oxic iron oxidizers possibly appeared in microaerobic marine environments prior to the Great Oxidation Event while the acidophilic ones emerged likely after the advent of atmospheric O(2). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems.

  10. Bismuth oxide aqueous colloidal nanoparticles inhibit Candida albicans growth and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Delgadillo, Rene; Velasco-Arias, Donaji; Martinez-Sanmiguel, Juan Jose; Diaz, David; Zumeta-Dube, Inti; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Cabral-Romero, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Multiresistance among microorganisms to common antimicrobials has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanomaterials are a new alternative to successfully treat the multiresistant microorganisms. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. Recently, it was demonstrated that the bactericidal activity of zero-valent bismuth colloidal nanoparticles inhibited the growth of Streptococcus mutans; however the antimycotic potential of bismuth nanostructured derivatives has not yet been studied. The main objective of this investigation was to analyze the fungicidal activity of bismuth oxide nanoparticles against Candida albicans, and their antibiofilm capabilities. Our results showed that aqueous colloidal bismuth oxide nanoparticles displayed antimicrobial activity against C. albicans growth (reducing colony size by 85%) and a complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are better than those obtained with chlorhexidine, nystatin, and terbinafine, the most effective oral antiseptic and commercial antifungal agents. In this work, we also compared the antimycotic activities of bulk bismuth oxide and bismuth nitrate, the precursor metallic salt. These results suggest that bismuth oxide colloidal nanoparticles could be a very interesting candidate as a fungicidal agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic. Additionally, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration for the synthesized aqueous colloidal Bi2O3 nanoparticles.

  11. Bismuth oxide aqueous colloidal nanoparticles inhibit Candida albicans growth and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Delgadillo, Rene; Velasco-Arias, Donaji; Martinez-Sanmiguel, Juan Jose; Diaz, David; Zumeta-Dube, Inti; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Cabral-Romero, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Multiresistance among microorganisms to common antimicrobials has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanomaterials are a new alternative to successfully treat the multiresistant microorganisms. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. Recently, it was demonstrated that the bactericidal activity of zero-valent bismuth colloidal nanoparticles inhibited the growth of Streptococcus mutans; however the antimycotic potential of bismuth nanostructured derivatives has not yet been studied. The main objective of this investigation was to analyze the fungicidal activity of bismuth oxide nanoparticles against Candida albicans, and their antibiofilm capabilities. Our results showed that aqueous colloidal bismuth oxide nanoparticles displayed antimicrobial activity against C. albicans growth (reducing colony size by 85%) and a complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are better than those obtained with chlorhexidine, nystatin, and terbinafine, the most effective oral antiseptic and commercial antifungal agents. In this work, we also compared the antimycotic activities of bulk bismuth oxide and bismuth nitrate, the precursor metallic salt. These results suggest that bismuth oxide colloidal nanoparticles could be a very interesting candidate as a fungicidal agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic. Additionally, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration for the synthesized aqueous colloidal Bi2O3 nanoparticles. PMID:23637533

  12. Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles with Variable Size and an Iron Oxidation State as Prospective Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kucheryavy, Pavel; He, Jibao; John, Vijay T.; Maharjan, Pawan; Spinu, Leonard; Goloverda, Galina Z.; Kolesnichenko, Vladimir L.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles in the size range of 3.2-7.5 nm were synthesized in high yields under variable reaction conditions using high-temperature hydrolysis of the precursor iron(II) and iron(III) alkoxides in diethylene glycol solution. The average sizes of the particles were adjusted by changing the reaction temperature and time and by using a sequential growth technique. To obtain γ-iron(III) oxide particles in the same range of sizes, magnetite particles were oxidized with dry oxygen in diethylene glycol at room temperature. The products were characterized by DLS, TEM, X-ray powder diffractometry, TGA, chemical analysis, and magnetic measurements. NMR r1 and r2 relaxivity measurements in water and diethylene glycol (for OH and CH2 protons) have shown a decrease in the r2/r1 ratio with the particle size reduction, which correlates with the results of magnetic measurements on magnetite nanoparticles. Saturation magnetization of the oxidized particles was found to be 20% lower than that for Fe3O4 with the same particle size, but their r1 relaxivities are similar. Because the oxidation of magnetite is spontaneous under ambient conditions, it was important to learn that the oxidation product has no disadvantages as compared to its precursor and therefore may be a better prospective imaging agent because of its chemical stability. PMID:23249219

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF SUB-MICRON AQUEOUS IRON(III) COLLOIDS FORMED IN THE PRESENCE OF PHOSPHATE BY SEDIMENTATION FIELD FLOW FRACTIONATION WITH MULTI-ANGLE LASER LIGHT SCATTERING DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron colloids play a major role in the water chemistry of natural watersheds and of engineered drinking water distribution systems. Phosphate is frequently added to distribution systems to control corrosion problems, so iron-phosphate colloids may form through reaction of iron in...

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF SUB-MICRON AQUEOUS IRON(III) COLLOIDS FORMED IN THE PRESENCE OF PHOSPHATE BY SEDIMENTATION FIELD FLOW FRACTIONATION WITH MULTI-ANGLE LASER LIGHT SCATTERING DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron colloids play a major role in the water chemistry of natural watersheds and of engineered drinking water distribution systems. Phosphate is frequently added to distribution systems to control corrosion problems, so iron-phosphate colloids may form through reaction of iron in...

  15. Battles with Iron: Manganese in Oxidative Stress Protection*

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, J. Dafhne; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2012-01-01

    The redox-active metal manganese plays a key role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress. As a cofactor for manganese superoxide dismutase or through formation of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants, this metal can combat oxidative damage without deleterious side effects of Fenton chemistry. In either case, the antioxidant properties of manganese are vulnerable to iron. Cellular pools of iron can outcompete manganese for binding to manganese superoxide dismutase, and through Fenton chemistry, iron may counteract the benefits of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants. In this minireview, we highlight ways in which cells maximize the efficacy of manganese as an antioxidant in the midst of pro-oxidant iron. PMID:22247543

  16. Uptake And Intracellular Distribution Of Functionalized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panariti, A.; Lettiero, B.; Morjan, I.; Alexandreascu, R.; Wang, D.; Bucci, C.; Miserocchi, G.; Rivolta, I.

    2010-10-01

    Iron oxide Nanoparticles represents promising nanocarrier for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), targeted drug and gene delivery. In our study we investigated the interaction between lung alveolar epithelial cells and iron oxide NPs coated with L-Dihydroxyphenylalanina (L-Dopa)-TRITC. Our data suggest that particles crossed the plasma membrane with an energy-dependent process.

  17. TRACE ELEMENT BINDING DURING STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION IN IRON OXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron (hydr)oxides often control the mobility of inorganic contaminants in soils and sediments. A poorly ordered form of ferrihydrite is commonly produced during rapid oxidation of ferrous iron at sharp redox fronts encountered during discharge of anoxic/suboxic waters into terre...

  18. TRACE ELEMENT BINDING DURING STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION IN IRON OXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron (hydr)oxides often control the mobility of inorganic contaminants in soils and sediments. A poorly ordered form of ferrihydrite is commonly produced during rapid oxidation of ferrous iron at sharp redox fronts encountered during discharge of anoxic/suboxic waters into terre...

  19. Modified Nanoemulsions with Iron Oxide for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongyi; Guo, Rui; Shi, Xiangyang; Allen, Steven; Cao, Zhengyi; Baker, James R.; Wang, Su He

    2016-01-01

    A nanoemulsion (NE) is a surfactant-based, oil-in-water, nanoscale, high-energy emulsion with a mean droplet diameter of 400–600 nm. When mixed with antigen and applied nasally, a NE acts as a mucosal adjuvant and induces mucosal immune responses. One possible mechanism for the adjuvant effect of this material is that it augments antigen uptake and distribution to lymphoid tissues, where the immune response is generated. Biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles have been used as a unique imaging approach to study the dynamics of cells or molecular migration. To study the uptake of NEs and track them in vivo, iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and dispersed in soybean oil to make iron oxide-modified NEs. Our results show that iron oxide nanoparticles can be stabilized in the oil phase of the nanoemulsion at a concentration of 30 µg/μL and the iron oxide-modified NEs have a mean diameter of 521 nm. In vitro experiments demonstrated that iron oxide-modified NEs can affect uptake by TC-1 cells (a murine epithelial cell line) and reduce the intensity of magnetic resonance (MR) images by shortening the T2 time. Most importantly, in vivo studies demonstrated that iron oxide-modified NE could be detected in mouse nasal septum by both transmission electron microscopy and MR imaging. Altogether these experiments demonstrate that iron oxide-modified NE is a unique tool that can be used to study uptake and distribution of NEs after nasal application. PMID:28335351

  20. DNA-Based Synthesis and Assembly of Organized Iron Oxide Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomutov, Gennady B.

    Organized bio-inorganic and hybrid bio-organic-inorganic nanostructures consisting of iron oxide nanoparticles and DNA complexes have been formed using methods based on biomineralization, interfacial and bulk phase assembly, ligand exchange and substitution, Langmuir-Blodgett technique, DNA templating and scaffolding. Interfacially formed planar DNA complexes with water-insoluble amphiphilic polycation or intercalator Langmuir monolayers were prepared and deposited on solid substrates to form immobilized DNA complexes. Those complexes were then used for the synthesis of organized DNA-based iron oxide nanostructures. Planar net-like and circular nanostructures of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were obtained via interaction of cationic colloid magnetite nanoparticles with preformed immobilized DNA/amphiphilic polycation complexes of net-like and toroidal morphologies. The processes of the generation of iron oxide nanoparticles in immobilized DNA complexes via redox synthesis with various iron sources of biological (ferritin) and artificial (FeCl3) nature have been studied. Bulk-phase complexes of magnetite nanoparticles with biomolecular ligands (DNA, spermine) were formed and studied. Novel nano-scale organized bio-inorganic nanostructures - free-floating sheet-like spermine/magnetite nanoparticle complexes and DNA/spermine/magnetite nanoparticle complexes were synthesized in bulk aqueous phase and the effect of DNA molecules on the structure of complexes was discovered.

  1. Ecological succession among iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Emily J; Cetinić, Ivona; Chan, Clara S; Whitney King, D; Emerson, David

    2014-04-01

    Despite over 125 years of study, the factors that dictate species dominance in neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacterial (FeOB) communities remain unknown. In a freshwater wetland, we documented a clear ecological succession coupled with niche separation between the helical stalk-forming Gallionellales (for example, Gallionella ferruginea) and tubular sheath-forming Leptothrix ochracea. Changes in the iron-seep community were documented using microscopy and cultivation-independent methods. Quantification of Fe-oxyhydroxide morphotypes by light microscopy was coupled with species-specific fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes using a protocol that minimized background fluorescence caused by the Fe-oxyhydroxides. Together with scanning electron microscopy, these techniques all indicated that Gallionellales dominated during early spring, with L. ochracea becoming more abundant for the remainder of the year. Analysis of tagged pyrosequencing reads of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rRNA) collected during seasonal progression supported a clear Gallionellales to L. ochracea transition, and community structure grouped according to observed dominant FeOB forms. Axis of redundancy analysis of physicochemical parameters collected from iron mats during the season, plotted with FeOB abundance, corroborated several field and microscopy-based observations and uncovered several unanticipated relationships. On the basis of these relationships, we conclude that the ecological niche of the stalk-forming Gallionellales is in waters with low organic carbon and steep redoxclines, and the sheath-forming L. ochracea is abundant in waters that contain high concentrations of complex organic carbon, high Fe and Mn content and gentle redoxclines. Finally, these findings identify a largely unexplored relationship between FeOB and organic carbon.

  2. Ecological succession among iron-oxidizing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Emily J; Cetinić, Ivona; Chan, Clara S; Whitney King, D; Emerson, David

    2014-01-01

    Despite over 125 years of study, the factors that dictate species dominance in neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacterial (FeOB) communities remain unknown. In a freshwater wetland, we documented a clear ecological succession coupled with niche separation between the helical stalk-forming Gallionellales (for example, Gallionella ferruginea) and tubular sheath-forming Leptothrix ochracea. Changes in the iron-seep community were documented using microscopy and cultivation-independent methods. Quantification of Fe-oxyhydroxide morphotypes by light microscopy was coupled with species-specific fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes using a protocol that minimized background fluorescence caused by the Fe-oxyhydroxides. Together with scanning electron microscopy, these techniques all indicated that Gallionellales dominated during early spring, with L. ochracea becoming more abundant for the remainder of the year. Analysis of tagged pyrosequencing reads of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rRNA) collected during seasonal progression supported a clear Gallionellales to L. ochracea transition, and community structure grouped according to observed dominant FeOB forms. Axis of redundancy analysis of physicochemical parameters collected from iron mats during the season, plotted with FeOB abundance, corroborated several field and microscopy-based observations and uncovered several unanticipated relationships. On the basis of these relationships, we conclude that the ecological niche of the stalk-forming Gallionellales is in waters with low organic carbon and steep redoxclines, and the sheath-forming L. ochracea is abundant in waters that contain high concentrations of complex organic carbon, high Fe and Mn content and gentle redoxclines. Finally, these findings identify a largely unexplored relationship between FeOB and organic carbon. PMID:24225888

  3. Bio-inspired Iron Catalysts for Hydrocarbon Oxidations

    SciTech Connect

    Que, Jr., Lawrence

    2016-03-22

    Stereoselective oxidation of C–H and C=C bonds are catalyzed by nonheme iron enzymes. Inspired by these bioinorganic systems, our group has been exploring the use of nonheme iron complexes as catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons using H2O2 as an environmentally friendly and atom-efficient oxidant in order to gain mechanistic insights into these novel transformations. In particular, we have focused on clarifying the nature of the high-valent iron oxidants likely to be involved in these transformations.

  4. Microbially Induced Iron Oxidation: What, Where, How

    SciTech Connect

    SCHIERMEYER,ELISA M.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; NORTHUP,DIANA E.

    2000-08-15

    From the results of the different bacterial cells seen, it is fairly certain that Gallionella is present because of the bean-shaped cells and twisted stalks found with the TEM. The authors cannot confirm, though, what other iron-oxidizing genera exist in the tubes, since the media was only preferential and not one that isolated a specific genus of bacteria. Based on the environment in which they live and the source of the water, they believe their cultures contain Gallionella, Leptothrix, and possibly Crenothrix and Sphaerotilus. They believe the genus Leptothrix rather than Sphaerotilus exist in the tubes because the water source was fresh, unlike the polluted water in which Sphaerotilus are usually found. The TEM preparations worked well. The cryogenic method rapidly froze the cells in place and allowed them to view their morphology. The FAA method, as stated previously, was the best of the three methods because it gave the best contrast. The gluteraldehyde samples did not come out as well. It is possible that the gluteraldehyde the authors prepared was still too concentrated and did not mix well. Although these bacteria were collected from springs and then cultured in an environment containing a presumably pure iron-bearing metal, it seems the tube already containing Manganese Gradient Medium could be used with a piece of metal containing these bacteria. A small piece of corroding metal could then be inserted into the test tube and cultured to study the bacteria.

  5. Oxidation inhibits iron-induced blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette; Vermeulen, Natasha; Lipinski, Boguslaw

    2013-01-01

    Blood coagulation under physiological conditions is activated by thrombin, which converts soluble plasma fibrinogen (FBG) into an insoluble clot. The structure of the enzymatically-generated clot is very characteristic being composed of thick fibrin fibers susceptible to the fibrinolytic degradation. However, in chronic degenerative diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurological disorders, fibrin clots are very different forming dense matted deposits (DMD) that are not effectively removed and thus create a condition known as thrombosis. We have recently shown that trivalent iron (ferric ions) generates hydroxyl radicals, which subsequently convert FBG into abnormal fibrin clots in the form of DMDs. A characteristic feature of DMDs is their remarkable and permanent resistance to the enzymatic degradation. Therefore, in order to prevent thrombotic incidences in the degenerative diseases it is essential to inhibit the iron-induced generation of hydroxyl radicals. This can be achieved by the pretreatment with a direct free radical scavenger (e.g. salicylate), and as shown in this paper by the treatment with oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide, methylene blue, and sodium selenite. Although the actual mechanism of this phenomenon is not yet known, it is possible that hydroxyl radicals are neutralized by their conversion to the molecular oxygen and water, thus inhibiting the formation of dense matted fibrin deposits in human blood.

  6. Iron oxide nanoparticle enhancement of radiation cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Courtney M.; Tate, Jennifer A.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Gladstone, David J.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been investigated as a promising means for inducing tumor cell-specific hyperthermia. Although the ability to generate and use nanoparticles that are biocompatible, tumor specific, and have the ability to produce adequate cytotoxic heat is very promising, significant preclinical and clinical development will be required for clinical efficacy. At this time it appears using IONP-induced hyperthermia as an adjunct to conventional cancer therapeutics, rather than as an independent treatment, will provide the initial IONP clinical treatment. Due to their high-Z characteristics, another option is to use intracellular IONPs to enhance radiation therapy without excitation with AMF (production of heat). To test this concept IONPs were added to cell culture media at a concentration of 0.2 mg Fe/mL and incubated with murine breast adenocarcinoma (MTG-B) cells for either 48 or 72 hours. Extracellular iron was then removed and all cells were irradiated at 4 Gy. Although samples incubated with IONPs for 48 hrs did not demonstrate enhanced post-irradiation cytotoxicity as compared to the non-IONP-containing cells, cells incubated with IONPs for 72 hours, which contained 40% more Fe than 48 hr incubated cells, showed a 25% decrease in clonogenic survival compared to their non-IONP-containing counterparts. These results suggest that a critical concentration of intracellular IONPs is necessary for enhancing radiation cytotoxicity.

  7. Multiple hearth furnace for reducing iron oxide

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, Mark M [Charlotte, NC; True, Bradford G [Charlotte, NC

    2012-03-13

    A multiple moving hearth furnace (10) having a furnace housing (11) with at least two moving hearths (20) positioned laterally within the furnace housing, the hearths moving in opposite directions and each moving hearth (20) capable of being charged with at least one layer of iron oxide and carbon bearing material at one end, and being capable of discharging reduced material at the other end. A heat insulating partition (92) is positioned between adjacent moving hearths of at least portions of the conversion zones (13), and is capable of communicating gases between the atmospheres of the conversion zones of adjacent moving hearths. A drying/preheat zone (12), a conversion zone (13), and optionally a cooling zone (15) are sequentially positioned along each moving hearth (30) in the furnace housing (11).

  8. Biocompatible multishell architecture for iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wotschadlo, Jana; Liebert, Tim; Clement, Joachim H; Anspach, Nils; Höppener, Stephanie; Rudolph, Tobias; Müller, Robert; Schacher, Felix H; Schubert, Ulrich S; Heinze, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The coating of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with multiple shells is demonstrated by building a layer assembled from carboxymethyldextran and poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride). Three shells are produced stepwise around aggregates of SPIONs by the formation of a polyelectrolyte complex. A growing particle size from 96 to 327 nm and a zeta potential in the range of +39 to -51 mV are measured. Microscopic techniques such as TEM, SEM, and AFM exemplify the core-shell structures. Magnetic force microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer measurements confirm the architecture of the multishell particles. Cell culture experiments show that even nanoparticles with three shells are still taken up by cells.

  9. Artificial meteor ablation studies - Iron oxides.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.

    1972-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on natural minerals composed predominantly of magnetite and hematite by using an arc-heated plasma stream of air. Analysis indicates that most of the ablated debris was composed of two or more minerals. Wustite, a metastable mineral, was found to occur as a common product. The 'magnetite' sample, which was 80% magnetite, 14% hematite, 4% apatite, and 2% quartz, yielded ablated products consisting of more than 12 different minerals. Magnetite occurred in 91% of the specimens examined, hematite in 16%, and wustite in 30%. The 'hematite' sample, which was 96% hematite and 3% quartz, yielded ablated products consisting of more than 13 different minerals. Hematite occurred in 47% of the specimens examined, magnetite in 60%, and wustite in 28%. The more volatile elements (Si, P, and Cl) were depleted by about 50%. This study has shown that artificially created ablation products from iron oxides exhibit unique properties that can be used for identification.

  10. Controlling barrier penetration via exothermic iron oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wood, Daniel G; Brown, Marc B; Jones, Stuart A

    2011-02-14

    Exothermic iron oxidation is an elegant means to generate heat, with the potential to modulate barrier penetration if reaction kinetics can be controlled. This aim of this study was to gain a fundamental understanding of how these temperature change kinetics influenced barrier diffusion rate. Lidocaine transport through a hydrophilic carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) gel was compared using two rapid iron oxidation reactions initiated by water (ExoRap(50), T(max)-47.7 ± 0.6 °C, t(max)-3.3 ± 0.6 min, ExoRap(60), T(max)-60.4 ± 0.3 °C, t(max)-9.3 ± 0.6 min) and a slower reaction initiated by oxygen (ExoSl(45)T(max)-ca. 44 °C, t(max) ca. 240 min). Temperature change induced by the oxygen initiated reaction (ExoSl(45)) was almost double those initiated by water (over 4h), but lidocaine diffusion was approximately 4 times higher for the latter (ExoRap(50), 555.61 ± 22.04 μg/cm(2)/h; ExoRap(60), 663.1 ± 50.95 μg/cm(2)/h; compared to ExoSl(45), 159.36 ± 29.44 μg/cm(2)/h). The large influence of temperature change kinetics on lidocaine diffusion suggested that transport was heavily dependent on temperature induced structural changes of the barrier. CMC, like many polymers adsorbs more water when exposed to moderate increases in temperature and this appeared to be a critical determinant of lidocaine barrier diffusion rate. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin R.; Fiskal, Annika; Sommer, Stefan; Hensen, Christian; Lomnitz, Ulrike; Wuttig, Kathrin; Göttlicher, Jörg; Kossel, Elke; Steininger, Ralph; Canfield, Donald E.

    2016-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface. Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations >300 nM. At the boundary between sulfidic and nitrogenous conditions, iron concentrations dropped sharply to <20 nM coincident with a maximum in particulate iron concentration. Within the iron gradient, we found an increased expression of the key functional marker gene for nitrate reduction (narG). Part of this upregulation was related to the activity of known iron-oxidizing bacteria. Collectively, our data suggest that iron oxidation and removal is induced by nitrate-reducing microbes, either enzymatically through anaerobic iron oxidation or by providing nitrite for an abiotic reaction. Given the important role that iron plays in nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis and respiration, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation likely represents a key-link between the marine biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon.

  12. Effects of phase transfer ligands on monodisperse iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Palma, Susana I C J; Marciello, Marzia; Carvalho, Alexandra; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino; Morales, Maria del Puerto; Roque, Ana C A

    2015-01-01

    Oleic acid coated iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by thermal decomposition in organic medium are highly monodisperse but at the same time are unsuitable for biological applications. Ligand-exchange reactions are useful to make their surface hydrophilic. However, these could alter some structural and magnetic properties of the modified particles. Here we present a comprehensive study and comparison of the effects of employing either citric acid (CA) or meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) ligand-exchange protocols for phase transfer of monodisperse hydrophobic iron oxide nanoparticles produced by thermal decomposition of Fe(acac)3 in benzyl ether. We show the excellent hydrodynamic size distribution and colloidal stability of the hydrophilic particles obtained by the two protocols and confirm that there is a certain degree of oxidation caused by the ligand-exchange. CA revealed to be more aggressive towards the iron oxide surface than DMSA and greatly reduced the saturation magnetization values and initial susceptibility of the resulting particles compared to the native ones. Besides being milder and more straightforward to perform, the DMSA ligand exchange protocol produces MNP chemically more versatile for further functionalization possibilities. This versatility is shown through the covalent linkage of gum Arabic onto MNP-DMSA using carboxyl and thiol based chemical routes and yielding particles with comparable properties.

  13. [Colloid effects on temporal-spatial variability of iron and manganese in shallow groundwater of garbage contaminated sites].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Li, Hai-Ming; Gu, Xiao-Ming; Li, Yun

    2011-03-01

    Simulation tank experiment was conducted to elucidate the temporal-spatial variability of Iron and Manganese in leachate pollution plumes of water-bearing media. Colloid effects on transport and transformation of Fe and Mn in water-bearing media were determined emphatically. Moreover, the mechanism of Fe and Mn transport and transformation were discussed by the convection-dispersion, dissolution and transport-deposition of colloid. The results show that the total Fe and Mn in leachate pollution plume was 2.82 times and 7.51 times of infiltration leachate due to the dissolution of water-bearing medium. Along the flow direction, Fe and Mn pollution plumes spread, and the central region of plumes gradually widened by the convection-dispersion and dissolution. In the presence of colloid, the average transport velocity of Fe and Mn plumes central axis from 1.17 cm/d and 1.75 cm/d increased to 1.83 cm/d and 2.5 cm/d respectively, colloid had obvious facilitation to the migration of Fe and Mn.

  14. Iron-rich colloids as carriers of phosphorus in streams: A field-flow fractionation study.

    PubMed

    Baken, Stijn; Regelink, Inge C; Comans, Rob N J; Smolders, Erik; Koopmans, Gerwin F

    2016-08-01

    Colloidal phosphorus (P) may represent an important fraction of the P in natural waters, but these colloids remain poorly characterized. In this work, we demonstrate the applicability of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to high resolution ICP-MS for the characterization of low concentrations of P-bearing colloids. Colloids from five streams draining catchments with contrasting properties were characterized by AF4-ICP-MS and by membrane filtration. All streams contain free humic substances (2-3 nm) and Fe-bearing colloids (3-1200 nm). Two soft water streams contain primary Fe oxyhydroxide-humic nanoparticles (3-6 nm) and aggregates thereof (up to 150 nm). In contrast, three harder water streams contain larger aggregates (40-1200 nm) which consist of diverse associations between Fe oxyhydroxides, humic substances, clay minerals, and possibly ferric phosphate minerals. Despite the diversity of colloids encountered in these contrasting streams, P is in most of the samples predominantly associated with Fe-bearing colloids (mostly Fe oxyhydroxides) at molar P:Fe ratios between 0.02 and 1.5. The molar P:Fe ratio of the waters explains the partitioning of P between colloids and truly dissolved species. Waters with a high P:Fe ratio predominantly contain truly dissolved species because the Fe-rich colloids are saturated with P, whereas waters with a low P:Fe ratio mostly contain colloidal P species. Overall, AF4-ICP-MS is a suitable technique to characterize the diverse P-binding colloids in natural waters. Such colloids may increase the mobility or decrease the bioavailability of P, and they therefore need to be considered when addressing the transport and environmental effects of P in catchments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of gold oxide in measurements of colloidal force.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Rico F; Morfa, Anthony J; Grieser, Franz; Chan, Derek Y C; Dagastine, Raymond R

    2011-05-17

    Atomic force microscopy, contact-angle, and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were employed to investigate the presence and properties of gold oxide on the surface of gold metal. It was found that, in agreement with available literature, unoxidized gold surfaces were hydrophobic, whereas oxidation rendered the surface highly hydrophilic. The oxide could be removed with ethanol or base but appeared to be stable over long periods in water or salt solutions between pH 3 and 7. After oxidation, the oxide layer thickness, determined using ellipsometry, was consistent with an approximate monolayer of Au-O bonds at the gold surface. The presence of gold oxide was found to alter significantly the electrical double-layer characteristics of the gold surface below pH 6 and may explain the apparent inconsistencies in observed force behavior where gold is employed as well as aiding in design of future microfluidic systems which incorporate gold as a coating.

  16. The coating makes the difference: acute effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Jonas; Köser, Jan; Arndt, Darius; Filser, Juliane

    2014-06-15

    The surface of nanoparticles (NP) is often functionalized with a capping agent to increase their colloidal stability. Having a strong effect on the characteristics of NP, the coating might already determine the risk from NP to organisms and the environment. In this study identical iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP; Ø 5-6nm) were functionalized with four different coatings: ascorbate (ASC-IONP), citrate (CIT-IONP), dextran (DEX-IONP), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-IONP). Ascorbate and citrate stabilize NP via electrostatic repulsion whereas dextran and polyvinylpyrrolidone are steric stabilizers. All IONP were colloidally stable over several weeks. Their acute effects on neonates of the waterflea Daphnia magna were investigated over 96h. The highest immobilizing effect was found for ASC- and DEX-IONP. In the presence of neonates, both agglomerated or flocculated and adsorbed to the carapace and filtering apparatuses, inducing high immobilization. Lower immobilization was found for CIT-IONP. Their effect was hypothesized to partly originate from an increased release of dissolved iron and the ability to form reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, incomplete ecdysis occurred at high concentrations of ASC-, DEX-, and CIT-IONP. PVP-IONP did not induce any negative effect, although high quantities were visibly ingested by the daphnids. PVP-IONP had the highest colloidal stability without any occurring agglomeration, adsorption, or dissolution. Only strong swelling of the PVP coating was observed in medium, highly increasing the hydrodynamic diameter. Each coating caused individual effects. Toxicity cannot be correlated to hydrodynamic diameter or the kind of stabilizing forces. Effects are rather linked to decreasing colloidal stability, the release of ions from the core material or the ability to form ROS, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetically triggered clustering of biotinylated iron oxide nanoparticles in the presence of streptavidinylated enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hodenius, Michael; Hieronymus, Thomas; Zenke, Martin; Becker, Christiane; Elling, Lothar; Bornemann, Jörg; Wong, John E; Richtering, Walter; Himmelreich, Uwe; De Cuyper, Marcel

    2012-09-07

    This work deals with the production and characterization of water-compatible, iron oxide based nanoparticles covered with functional poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-biotin surface groups (SPIO-PEG-biotin). Synthesis of the functionalized colloids occurred by incubating the oleate coated particles used as precursor magnetic fluid with anionic liposomes containing 14 mol% of a phospholipid-PEG-biotin conjugate. The latter was prepared by coupling dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DC(14:0)PE) to activated α-biotinylamido-ω -N-hydroxy-succinimidcarbonyl-PEG (NHS-PEG-biotin). Physical characterization of the oleate and PEG-biotin iron oxide nanocolloids revealed that they appear as colloidal stable clusters with a hydrodynamic diameter of 160 nm and zeta potentials of - 39 mV (oleate coated particles) and - 14 mV (PEG-biotin covered particles), respectively, as measured by light scattering techniques. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurements revealed specific saturation magnetizations of 62-73 emu g(-1) Fe(3)O(4) and no hysteresis was observed at 300 K. MR relaxometry at 3 T revealed very high r(2) relaxivities and moderately high r(1) values. Thus, both nanocolloids can be classified as small, superparamagnetic, negative MR contrast agents. The capacity to functionalize the particles was illustrated by binding streptavidin alkaline phosphatase (SAP). It was found, however, that these complexes become highly aggregated after capturing them on the magnetic filter device during high-gradient magnetophoresis, thereby reducing the accessibility of the SAP.

  18. Magnetically triggered clustering of biotinylated iron oxide nanoparticles in the presence of streptavidinylated enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodenius, Michael; Hieronymus, Thomas; Zenke, Martin; Becker, Christiane; Elling, Lothar; Bornemann, Jörg; Wong, John E.; Richtering, Walter; Himmelreich, Uwe; De Cuyper, Marcel

    2012-09-01

    This work deals with the production and characterization of water-compatible, iron oxide based nanoparticles covered with functional poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-biotin surface groups (SPIO-PEG-biotin). Synthesis of the functionalized colloids occurred by incubating the oleate coated particles used as precursor magnetic fluid with anionic liposomes containing 14 mol% of a phospholipid-PEG-biotin conjugate. The latter was prepared by coupling dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DC14:0PE) to activated α-biotinylamido-ω -N-hydroxy-succinimidcarbonyl-PEG (NHS-PEG-biotin). Physical characterization of the oleate and PEG-biotin iron oxide nanocolloids revealed that they appear as colloidal stable clusters with a hydrodynamic diameter of 160 nm and zeta potentials of - 39 mV (oleate coated particles) and - 14 mV (PEG-biotin covered particles), respectively, as measured by light scattering techniques. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurements revealed specific saturation magnetizations of 62-73 emu g-1 Fe3O4 and no hysteresis was observed at 300 K. MR relaxometry at 3 T revealed very high r2 relaxivities and moderately high r1 values. Thus, both nanocolloids can be classified as small, superparamagnetic, negative MR contrast agents. The capacity to functionalize the particles was illustrated by binding streptavidin alkaline phosphatase (SAP). It was found, however, that these complexes become highly aggregated after capturing them on the magnetic filter device during high-gradient magnetophoresis, thereby reducing the accessibility of the SAP.

  19. Effects of iron chelators, iron salts, and iron oxide nanoparticles on the proliferation and the iron content of oligodendroglial OLN-93 cells.

    PubMed

    Hohnholt, Michaela; Geppert, Mark; Dringen, Ralf

    2010-08-01

    The oligodendroglial cell line OLN-93 was used as model system to investigate the consequences of iron deprivation or iron excess on cell proliferation. Presence of ferric or ferrous iron chelators inhibited the proliferation of OLN-93 cells in a time and concentration dependent manner, while the application of a molar excess of ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) prevented the inhibition of proliferation by the chelator deferoxamine. Proliferation of OLN-93 cells was not affected by incubation with 300 microM iron that was applied in the form of FAC, FeCl(2), ferrous ammonium sulfate or iron oxide nanoparticles, although the cells efficiently accumulated iron during exposure to each of these iron sources. The highest specific iron content was observed for cells that were exposed to the nanoparticles. These data demonstrate that the proliferation of OLN-93 cells depends strongly on the availability of iron and that these cells efficiently accumulate iron from various extracellular iron sources.

  20. Reactive oxygen species-related activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haohao; Yin, Jun-Jie; Wamer, Wayne G; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y Martin

    2014-03-01

    Nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides are among the most widely used engineered and naturally occurring nanostructures, and the increasing incidence of biological exposure to these nanostructures has raised concerns about their biotoxicity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative stress is one of the most accepted toxic mechanisms and, in the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate the ROS-related activities of iron nanostructures. In this review, we summarize activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides in ROS-related redox processes, addressing in detail the known homogeneous and heterogeneous redox mechanisms involved in these processes, intrinsic ROS-related properties of iron nanostructures (chemical composition, particle size, and crystalline phase), and ROS-related bio-microenvironmental factors, including physiological pH and buffers, biogenic reducing agents, and other organic substances. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. New innovative electrocoagulation (EC) treatment technology for BWR colloidal iron utilizing the seeding and filtration electronically (SAFET{sup TM}) system

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, Mark S.; Bostick, William D.

    2007-07-01

    The presence of iron (iron oxide from carbon steel piping) buildup in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) circuits and wastewaters is decades old. In, perhaps the last decade, the advent of precoatless filters for condensate blow down has compounded this problem due to the lack of a solid substrate (e.g., Powdex resin pre-coat) to help drop the iron out of solution. The presence and buildup of this iron in condensate phase separators (CPS) further confounds the problem when the tank is decanted back to the plant. Iron carryover here is unavoidable without further treatment steps. The form of iron in these tanks, which partially settles and is pumped to a de-waterable high integrity container (HIC), is particularly difficult and time consuming to de-water (low shear strength, high water content). The addition upstream from the condensate phase separator (CPS) of chemicals, such as polymers, to carry out the iron, only produces an iron form even more difficult to filter and de-water (even less shear strength, higher water content, and a gel/slime consistency). Typical, untreated colloidal material contains both sub-micron particles up to, let's say 100 micron. It is believed that the sub-micron particles penetrate filters, or sheet filters, thus plugging the pores for what should have been the successful filtration of the larger micron particles. Like BWR iron wastewaters, fuel pools/storage basins (especially in the decon. phase) often contain colloids which make clarity and the resulting visibility nearly impossible. Likewise, miscellaneous, often high conductivity, waste streams at various plants contain such colloids, iron, salts (sometimes seawater intrusion and referred to as Salt Water Collection Tanks), dirt/clay, surfactants, waxes, chelants, etc. Such waste streams are not ideally suited for standard dead-end (cartridges) or cross-flow filtration (UF/RO) followed even by demineralizers. Filter and bed plugging are almost assured. The key to solving these dilemmas

  2. Iron Oxide as an MRI Contrast Agent for Cell Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Korchinski, Daniel J.; Taha, May; Yang, Runze; Nathoo, Nabeela; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide contrast agents have been combined with magnetic resonance imaging for cell tracking. In this review, we discuss coating properties and provide an overview of ex vivo and in vivo labeling of different cell types, including stem cells, red blood cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, we provide examples of applications of cell tracking with iron contrast agents in stroke, multiple sclerosis, cancer, arteriovenous malformations, and aortic and cerebral aneurysms. Attempts at quantifying iron oxide concentrations and other vascular properties are examined. We advise on designing studies using iron contrast agents including methods for validation. PMID:26483609

  3. Defect Chemistry and Plasmon Physics of Colloidal Metal Oxide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lounis, Sebastien D; Runnerstrom, Evan L; Llordés, Anna; Milliron, Delia J

    2014-05-01

    Plasmonic nanocrystals of highly doped metal oxides have seen rapid development in the past decade and represent a class of materials with unique optoelectronic properties. In this Perspective, we discuss doping mechanisms in metal oxides and the accompanying physics of free carrier scattering, both of which have implications in determining the properties of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in these nanocrystals. The balance between activation and compensation of dopants limits the free carrier concentration of the most common metal oxides, placing a ceiling on the LSPR frequency. Furthermore, because of ionized impurity scattering of the oscillating plasma by dopant ions, scattering must be treated in a fundamentally different way in semiconductor metal oxide materials when compared with conventional metals. Though these effects are well-understood in bulk metal oxides, further study is needed to understand their manifestation in nanocrystals and corresponding impact on plasmonic properties, and to develop materials that surpass current limitations in free carrier concentration.

  4. Tunable infrared absorption and visible transparency of colloidal aluminum-doped zinc oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Buonsanti, Raffaella; Llordes, Anna; Aloni, Shaul; Helms, Brett A; Milliron, Delia J

    2011-11-09

    Plasmonic nanocrystals have been attracting a lot of attention both for fundamental studies and different applications, from sensing to imaging and optoelectronic devices. Transparent conductive oxides represent an interesting class of plasmonic materials in addition to metals and vacancy-doped semiconductor quantum dots. Herein, we report a rational synthetic strategy of high-quality colloidal aluminum-doped zinc oxide nanocrystals. The presence of substitutional aluminum in the zinc oxide lattice accompanied by the generation of free electrons is proved for the first time by tunable surface plasmon absorption in the infrared region both in solution and in thin films.

  5. Studies of the kinetics and mechanisms of perfluoroether reactions on iron and oxidized iron surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Napier, Mary E.; Stair, Peter C.

    1992-01-01

    Polymeric perfluoroalkylethers are being considered for use as lubricants in high temperature applications, but have been observed to catalytically decompose in the presence of metals. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to explore the decomposition of three model fluorinated ethers on clean polycrystalline iron surfaces and iron surfaces chemically modified with oxygen. Low temperature adsorption of the model fluorinated ethers on the clean, oxygen modified and oxidized iron surfaces was molecular. Thermally activated defluorination of the three model compounds was observed on the clean iron surface at remarkably low temperatures, 155 K and below, with formation of iron fluoride. Preferential C-F bond scission occurred at the terminal fluoromethoxy, CF3O, of perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy ethane and perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy propane and at CF3/CF2O of perfluoro-1,3-diethoxy propane. The reactivity of the clean iron toward perfluoroalkylether decomposition when compared to other metals is due to the strength of the iron fluoride bond and the strong electron donating ability of the metallic iron. Chemisorption of an oxygen overlayer lowered the reactivity of the iron surface to the adsorption and decomposition of the three model fluorinated ethers by blocking active sites on the metal surface. Incomplete coverage of the iron surface with chemisorbed oxygen results in a reaction which resembles the defluorination reaction observed on the clean iron surface. Perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy ethane reacts on the oxidized iron surface at 138 K, through a Lewis acid assisted cleavage of the carbon oxygen bond, with preferential attack at the terminal fluoromethoxy, CF3O. The oxidized iron surface did not passivate, but became more reactive with time. Perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy propane and perfluoro-1,3-diethoxy propane desorbed prior to the observation of decomposition on the oxidized iron surface.

  6. Magnetization measurements and XMCD studies on ion irradiated iron oxide and core-shell iron/iron-oxide nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; Pearce, Carolyn; McCloy, John S.

    2014-12-02

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) and core-shell iron/iron-oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) nanomaterials prepared by a cluster deposition system were irradiated with 5.5 MeV Si2+ ions and the structures determined by x-ray diffraction as consisting of 100% magnetite and 36/64 wt% Fe/FeO, respectively. However, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) indicates similar surfaces in the two samples, slightly oxidized and so having more Fe3+ than the expected magnetite structure, with XMCD intensity much lower for the irradiated core-shell samples indicating weaker magnetism. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data lack the signature for FeO, but the irradiated core-shell system consists of Fe-cores with ~13 nm of separating oxide crystallite, so it is likely that FeO exists deeper than the probe depth of the XAS (~5 nm). Exchange bias (Hex) for both samples becomes increasingly negative as temperature is lowered, but the irradiated Fe3O4 sample shows greater sensitivity of cooling field on Hex. Loop asymmetries and Hex sensitivities of the irradiated Fe3O4 sample are due to interfaces and interactions between grains which were not present in samples before irradiation as well as surface oxidation. Asymmetries in the hysteresis curves of the irradiated core/shell sample are related to the reversal mechanism of the antiferromagnetic FeO and possibly some near surface oxidation.

  7. Colloidal behavior of aluminum oxide nanoparticles as affected by pH and natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saikat; Mashayekhi, Hamid; Pan, Bo; Bhowmik, Prasanta; Xing, Baoshan

    2008-11-04

    The colloidal behavior of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (NPs) was investigated as a function of pH and in the presence of two structurally different humic acids (HAs), Aldrich HA (AHA) and the seventh HA fraction extracted from Amherst peat soil (HA7). Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to determine the colloidal behavior of the NPs. Influence of pH and HAs on the surface charges of the NPs was determined. zeta-Potential data clearly showed that the surface charge of the NPs decreased with increasing pH and reached the point of zero charge (ZPC) at pH 7.9. Surface charge of the NPs also decreased with the addition of HAs. The NPs tend to aggregate as the pH of the suspension approaches ZPC, where van der Waals attraction forces dominate over electrostatic repulsion. However, the NP colloidal suspension was stable in the pHs far from ZPC. Colloidal stability was strongly enhanced in the presence of HAs at the pH of ZPC or above it, but in acidic conditions NPs showed strong aggregation in the presence of HAs. AFM imaging revealed the presence of long-chain fractions in HA7, which entangled with the NPs to form large aggregates. The association of HA with the NP surface can be assumed to follow a two-step process, possibly the polar fractions of the HA7 sorbed on the NP surface followed by entanglement with the long-chain fractions. Thus, our study demonstrated that the hydrophobic nature of the HA molecules strongly influenced the aggregation of colloidal NPs, possibly through their conformational behavior in a particular solution condition. Therefore, various organic matter samples will result in different colloidal behavior of NPs, subsequently their environmental fate and transport.

  8. Investigation of oxidation process of mechanically activated ultrafine iron powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysenko, E. N.; Nikolaev, E. V.; Vlasov, V. A.; Zhuravkov, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    The oxidation of mechanically activated ultrafine iron powders was studied using X- ray powder diffraction and thermogravimetric analyzes. The powders with average particles size of 100 nm were made by the electric explosion of wire, and were subjected to mechanical activation in planetary ball mill for 15 and 40 minutes. It was shown that a certain amount of FeO phase is formed during mechanical activation of ultrafine iron powders. According to thermogravimetric analysis, the oxidation process of non-milled ultrafine iron powders is a complex process and occurs in three stages. The preliminary mechanical activation of powders considerably changes the nature of the iron powders oxidation, leads to increasing in the temperature of oxidation onset and shifts the reaction to higher temperatures. For the milled powders, the oxidation is more simple process and occurs in a single step.

  9. Nitric Oxide Improves Internal Iron Availability in Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Magdalena; Beligni, María Verónica; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Iron deficiency impairs chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast development. In leaves, most of the iron must cross several biological membranes to reach the chloroplast. The components involved in the complex internal iron transport are largely unknown. Nitric oxide (NO), a bioactive free radical, can react with transition metals to form metal-nitrosyl complexes. Sodium nitroprusside, an NO donor, completely prevented leaf interveinal chlorosis in maize (Zea mays) plants growing with an iron concentration as low as 10 μm Fe-EDTA in the nutrient solution. S-Nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, another NO donor, as well as gaseous NO supply in a translucent chamber were also able to revert the iron deficiency symptoms. A specific NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, blocked the effect of the NO donors. The effect of NO treatment on the photosynthetic apparatus of iron-deficient plants was also studied. Electron micrographs of mesophyll cells from iron-deficient maize plants revealed plastids with few photosynthetic lamellae and rudimentary grana. In contrast, in NO-treated maize plants, mesophyll chloroplast appeared completely developed. NO treatment did not increase iron content in plant organs, when expressed in a fresh matter basis, suggesting that root iron uptake was not enhanced. NO scavengers 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide and methylene blue promoted interveinal chlorosis in iron-replete maize plants (growing in 250 μm Fe-EDTA). Even though results support a role for endogenous NO in iron nutrition, experiments did not establish an essential role. NO was also able to revert the chlorotic phenotype of the iron-inefficient maize mutants yellow stripe1 and yellow stripe3, both impaired in the iron uptake mechanisms. All together, these results support a biological action of NO on the availability and/or delivery of metabolically active iron within the plant. PMID:12481068

  10. Application of novel iron core/iron oxide shell nanoparticles to sentinel lymph node identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, Aidan; Howard, Douglas; Henning, Anna M.; Nelson, Melanie R. M.; Tilley, Richard D.; Thierry, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Current `gold standard' staging of breast cancer and melanoma relies on accurate in vivo identification of the sentinel lymph node. By replacing conventional tracers (dyes and radiocolloids) with magnetic nanoparticles and using a handheld magnetometer probe for in vivo identification, it is believed the accuracy of sentinel node identification in nonsuperficial cancers can be improved due to increased spatial resolution of magnetometer probes and additional anatomical information afforded by MRI road-mapping. By using novel iron core/iron oxide shell nanoparticles, the sensitivity of sentinel node mapping via MRI can be increased due to an increased magnetic saturation compared to traditional iron oxide nanoparticles. A series of in vitro magnetic phantoms (iron core vs. iron oxide nanoparticles) were prepared to simulate magnetic particle accumulation in the sentinel lymph node. A novel handheld magnetometer probe was used to measure the relative signals of each phantom, and determine if clinical application of iron core particles can improve in vivo detection of the sentinel node compared to traditional iron oxide nanoparticles. The findings indicate that novel iron core nanoparticles above a certain size possess high magnetic saturation, but can also be produced with low coercivity and high susceptibility. While some modification to the design of handheld magnetometer probes may be required for particles with large coercivity, use of iron core particles could improve MRI and magnetometer probe detection sensitivity by up to 330 %.

  11. Oxidative Stress and the Homeodynamics of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bresgen, Nikolaus; Eckl, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron and oxygen share a delicate partnership since both are indispensable for survival, but if the partnership becomes inadequate, this may rapidly terminate life. Virtually all cell components are directly or indirectly affected by cellular iron metabolism, which represents a complex, redox-based machinery that is controlled by, and essential to, metabolic requirements. Under conditions of increased oxidative stress—i.e., enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)—however, this machinery may turn into a potential threat, the continued requirement for iron promoting adverse reactions such as the iron/H2O2-based formation of hydroxyl radicals, which exacerbate the initial pro-oxidant condition. This review will discuss the multifaceted homeodynamics of cellular iron management under normal conditions as well as in the context of oxidative stress. PMID:25970586

  12. Oxidation state of iron in plagioclase from lunar basalts.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafner, S. S.; Virgo, D.; Warburton, D.

    1971-01-01

    Determination of the oxidation state of iron in the plagioclase from the coarse-grained basalts 10044 and 12021, using Mossbauer spectroscopy. The location of iron in the crystal structure was also investigated. The spectra show that iron is in the high-spin ferrous state, and they located at least two distinct positions with different coordination numbers. Some excess resonant absorption is probably due to Fe(3+), although the Fe(3+) doublet could not be positively resolved.

  13. Oxidation state of iron in plagioclase from lunar basalts.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafner, S. S.; Virgo, D.; Warburton, D.

    1971-01-01

    Determination of the oxidation state of iron in the plagioclase from the coarse-grained basalts 10044 and 12021, using Mossbauer spectroscopy. The location of iron in the crystal structure was also investigated. The spectra show that iron is in the high-spin ferrous state, and they located at least two distinct positions with different coordination numbers. Some excess resonant absorption is probably due to Fe(3+), although the Fe(3+) doublet could not be positively resolved.

  14. Magnetic Characterization of Iron Oxide Cross Linked Hydro gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senaratne, U.; Powell, N.; Kroll, E.; Tsoi, G.; Naik, R.; Naik, V.; Vaishnava, P. P.; Wenger, L. E.

    2004-03-01

    Magnetic hydro gels have potential applications in drug delivery, cells sorting, sensors, and actuating technologies. Iron oxide alginate nanocomposites were synthesized following the method of Kroll et al^1 by cross linking sodium alginate with Fe^2+ and Fe^3+ in methanol: water. The ion-cross linked alginate hydro gels are oxidized in an alkaline solution. The resulting hydro gel consists of iron oxide cross linked alginate. The alginate hydro gels are inert to the reaction conditions and therefore the reaction sequence can be repeated. The multiple loadings result in an increase in the amount of iron oxide and the size of the iron oxide nanoparticles in the cross linked hydro gels. The third and sixth loaded iron oxide alginate hydro gels were dried and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry. The XRD patterns have characteristic features of γ- Fe_2O3 or Fe_3O4 phases. The average particle size, calculated from the XRD peaks, for third loaded iron oxide alginate was 2 nm. The zero-field-cooled and field-cooled SQUID measurements show the iron oxide nanoparticles are superparamagnetic with blocking temperature (T_B) of approximately 35 K. Above the blocking temperature, the inverse susceptibility versus temperature relationship does not follow the Curie-Weiss law, indicating strong inter-particle interactions. The M vs. H data above the blocking temperature was fitted with a modified Langevin function to obtain additional information about the iron oxide particle size. Details of the relationship between coercive field and temperature as well as the particle size distribution obtained from XRD and TEM measurements will be presented. *Research supported by NSF grant # DGE ˜980720 **Supported by NSF REU grant # EEC-0097736 ^1E. Kroll, F.M. Winnik, and R.F. Ziolo, Chem. Mater, 8, 1594 (1996).

  15. Immobilisation of arsenic by iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, A.; Hohmann, C.; Winkler, E.; Muehe, M.; Morin, G.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic-contaminated groundwater is an environmental problem that affects about 1-2% of the world's population. As arsenic-contaminated water is also used for irrigating rice fields, the uptake of arsenic via rice is in some cases even higher than via drinking water. Arsenic is often of geogenic origin and in many cases bound to iron(III) minerals. Microbial iron(III) reduction leads to dissolution of Fe(III) minerals and thus the arsenic bound to these minerals is released to the environment. In turn, iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to co-precipitate or sorb arsenic during iron(II) oxidation followed by iron(III) mineral formation. Here, we present work on arsenic co-precipitation and immobilization by anaerobic and aerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Co-precipitation batch experiments with pure cultures of nitrate-dependent, phototrophic, and microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are used to quantify the amount of arsenic that can be immobilized during microbial iron mineral precipitation. Iron and arsenic speciation and redox state are determined by X- ray diffraction and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption methods (EXAFS, XANES). Microcosm experiments are set-up either with liquid media or with rice paddy soil amended with arsenic. Rice paddy soil from arsenic contaminated rice fields in China that include a natural population of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms is used as inoculum. Dissolved and solid-phase arsenic and iron are quantified, Arsenic speciation is determined and the iron minerals are identified. Additionally, Arsenic uptake into the rice plant is quantified and a gene expression pattern in rice (Oryza sativa cv Gladia) is determined by microarrays as a response to the presence of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria.

  16. Fast microbial reduction of ferrihydrite colloids from a soil effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Andreas; Bosch, Julian; Rennert, Thilo; Heister, Katja; Braunschweig, Juliane; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Totsche, Kai U.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies on the microbial reduction of synthetic iron oxide colloids showed their superior electron accepting property in comparison to bulk iron oxides. However, natural colloidal iron oxides differ in composition from their synthetic counterparts. Besides a potential effect of colloid size, microbial iron reduction may be accelerated by electron-shuttling dissolved organic matter (DOM) as well as slowed down by inhibitors such as arsenic. We examined the microbial reduction of OM- and arsenic-containing ferrihydrite colloids. Four effluent fractions were collected from a soil column experiment run under water-saturated conditions. Ferrihydrite colloids precipitated from the soil effluent and exhibited stable hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 281 (±146) nm in the effluent fraction that was collected first and 100 (±43) nm in a subsequently obtained effluent fraction. Aliquots of these oxic effluent fractions were added to anoxic low salt medium containing diluted suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens. Independent of the initial colloid size, the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids were quickly and completely reduced. The rates of Fe2+ formation ranged between 1.9 and 3.3 fmol h-1 cell-1, and are in the range of or slightly exceeding previously reported rates of synthetic ferrihydrite colloids (1.3 fmol h-1 cell-1), but greatly exceeding previously known rates of macroaggregate-ferrihydrite reduction (0.07 fmol h-1 cell-1). The inhibition of microbial Fe(III) reduction by arsenic is unlikely or overridden by the concurrent enhancement induced by soil effluent DOM. These organic species may have increased the already high intrinsic reducibility of colloidal ferrihydrite owing to quinone-mediated electron shuttling. Additionally, OM, which is structurally associated with the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids, may also contribute to the higher reactivity due to increasing solubility and specific surface area of ferrihydrite. In conclusion, ferrihydrite

  17. Biogenic Fabrication of Iron/Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; ur Rahman, Aziz; Tajuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-11-01

    Enshrined in this review are the biogenic fabrication and applications of coated and uncoated iron and iron oxide nanoparticles. Depending on their magnetic properties, they have been used in the treatment of cancer, drug delivery system, MRI, and catalysis and removal of pesticides from potable water. The polymer-coated iron and iron oxide nanoparticles are made biocompatible, and their slow release makes them more effective and lasting. Their cytotoxicity against microbes under aerobic/anaerobic conditions has also been discussed. The magnetic moment of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles changes with their interaction with biomolecules as a consequence of which their size decreases. Their biological efficacy has been found to be dependent on the shape, size, and concentration of these nanoparticles.

  18. Enhanced bio-compatibility of ferrofluids of self-assembled superparamagnetic iron oxide-silica core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, T N; Mary, A P Reena; Swalih, P K Anas; Kumar, D Sakthi; Makarov, D; Albrecht, M; Puthumana, Jayesh; Anas, Abdulaziz; Anantharaman, M R

    2011-03-01

    Self-assembled magnetic colloidal suspensions are sought after by material scientists owing to its huge application potential. The biomedical applications of colloidal nanoparticles necessitate that they are biocompatible, non-interacting, monodispersed and hence the synthesis of such nanostructures has great relevance in the realm of nanoscience. Silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles based ferrofluids were prepared using polyethylene glycol as carrier fluid by employing a controlled co-precipitation technique followed by a modified sol-gel synthesis. A plausible mechanism for the formation of stable suspension of SiO2-coated Iron Oxide nanoparticles with a size of about 9 nm dispersed in polyethylene glycol (PEG) is proposed. Core-shell nature of the resultant SiO2-Iron Oxide nanocomposite was verified using transmission electron microscopy. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy studies were carried out to understand the structure and nature of chemical bonds. The result suggests that Iron Oxide exist in an isolated state inside silica matrix. Moreover, the presence of silanol bonds establishes the hydrophilic nature of silica shell confirming the formation of stable ferrofluid with PEG as carrier fluid. The magnetic characterization reveals the superparamagnetic behavior of the nanoparticles with a rather narrow distribution of blocking temperatures. These properties are not seen in ferrofluids prepared from Iron Oxide nanoparticles without SiO2 coating. The latter suggests the successful tuning of the inter-particle interactions preventing agglomeration of nanoparticles. Cytotoxicity studies on citric acid coated water based ferrofluid and silica-coated PEG-based ferrofluid were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium chloride assay and it shows an enhanced compatibility for silica modified nanoparticles.

  19. Design of Fucoidan Functionalized - Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Tran, Khanh Nghia; Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien; Vo, Toi Van; Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to develop an iron oxide nanoparticle drug delivery system utilizing a recent material discovered from ocean, fucoidan. The material has drawn much interest due to many biomedical functions that have been proven for human health. One interesting point herein is that fucoidan is not only a sulfated polysaccharide, a polymer for stabilization of iron oxide nanoparticles, but plays a role of an anticancer agent also. Various approaches were investigated to optimize the high loading efficiency and explain the mechanism of nanoparticle formations. Fucoidan was functionalized on iron oxide nanoparticles by a direct coating or via amine groups. Also, a hydrophobic part of oleic acid was conjugated to the amine groups for a more favorable loading of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs. This study proposed a novel system and an efficient method to functionalize fucoidan on iron oxide nanoparticle systems which will lead to a facilitation of a double strength treatment of cancer.

  20. Dissolution of iron oxide nanoparticles inside polymer nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Möller, Johannes; Cebi, Melek; Schroer, Martin A; Paulus, Michael; Degen, Patrick; Sahle, Christoph J; Wieland, D C Florian; Leick, Sabine; Nyrow, Alexander; Rehage, Heinz; Tolan, Metin

    2011-12-07

    The structure of poly(organosiloxane) nanocapsules partially filled with iron oxide cores of different sizes was revealed by small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction. The nanocapsules are synthesized by the formation of a poly(organosiloxane) shell around iron oxide nanoparticles and the simultaneous partial dissolution of these cores. Due to the high scattering contrast of the iron oxide cores compared to the polymer shell, the particle size distribution of the cores inside the capsules can be measured by small angle X-ray scattering. Additional information can be revealed by X-ray diffraction, which gives insights into the formation of the polymer network and the structure of the iron oxide cores. The study shows how the crystallinity and size of the nanoparticles as well as the shape and width of the size distribution can be altered by the synthesis parameters.

  1. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed. PMID:21749733

  2. Control of photoinduced fluorescence enhancement of colloidal quantum dots using metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Wing, Waylin J.; Patty, Kira; Campbell, Quinn

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that irradiation of colloidal quantum dots can dramatically enhance their emission efficiencies, leading to so-called photoinduced fluorescence enhancement (PFE). This process is the result of the photochemical and photophysical properties of quantum dots and the way they interact with the environment in the presence of light. It has been shown that such properties can be changed significantly using metal oxides. Using spectroscopic techniques, in this paper we investigate emission of different types of quantum dots (with and without shell) in the presence of metal oxides with opposing effects. We observed significant increase of PFE when quantum dots are deposited on about one nanometer of aluminum oxide, suggesting such oxide can profoundly increase quantum yield of such quantum dots. On the other hand, copper oxide can lead to significant suppression of emission of quantum dots, making them nearly completely dark instantly.

  3. Iron oxide surface-catalyzed oxidation of ferrous iron by monochloramine: implications of oxide type and carbonate on reactivity.

    PubMed

    Vikesland, Peter J; Valentine, Richard L

    2002-02-01

    The maintenance of monochloramine residuals in drinking water distribution systems is one technique often used to minimize microbial outbreaks and thereby maintain the safety of the water. Reactions between oxidizable species and monochloramine can however lead to undesirable losses in the disinfectant residual. Previous work has illustrated that the Fe(II) present within distribution systems is one type of oxidizable species that can exert a monochloramine demand. This paper extends this prior work by examining the kinetics of the reactions between Fe(II) and monochloramine in the presence of a variety of iron oxide surfaces. The identity of the iron oxide plays a significant role in the rate of these reactions. Surface area-normalized initial rate coefficients (k(init)) obtained in the presence of each oxide at pH approximately 6.9 exhibit the following trend in catalytic activity: magnetite > goethite > hematite approximately = lepidocrocite > ferrihydrite. The differences in the activity of these oxides are hypothesized to result from variations in the amount of Fe(II) sorbed to each of the oxides and to dissimilarities in the surface site densities of the oxides. The implications of carbonate on Fe(II) sorption to iron oxides are also examined. Comparing Fe(II) sorption isotherms for goethite obtained under differential carbonate concentrations, it is apparent that as the carbonate concentration (C(T,CO3)) increased from 0 to 11.7 mM that the Fe(II) sorption edge (50% sorption) shifts from a pH of approximately 5.8 to a pH of 7.8. This shift is hypothesized to be the result of the formation of aqueous and surface carbonate-Fe(II) complexes and to competition between carbonate and Fe(II) for surface sites. The implications of these changes are then discussed in light of the variable oxide studies.

  4. Long term in vivo biotransformation of iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael; Luciani, Nathalie; Alloyeau, Damien; Elgrabli, Dan; Deveaux, Vanessa; Pechoux, Christine; Chat, Sophie; Wang, Guillaume; Vats, Nidhi; Gendron, François; Factor, Cécile; Lotersztajn, Sophie; Luciani, Alain; Wilhelm, Claire; Gazeau, Florence

    2011-06-01

    The long term outcome of nanoparticles in the organism is one of the most important concerns raised by the development of nanotechnology and nanomedicine. Little is known on the way taken by cells to process and degrade nanoparticles over time. In this context, iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles benefit from a privileged status, because they show a very good tolerance profile, allowing their clinical use for MRI diagnosis. It is generally assumed that the specialized metabolism which regulates iron in the organism can also handle iron oxide nanoparticles. However the biotransformation of iron oxide nanoparticles is still not elucidated. Here we propose a multiscale approach to study the fate of nanomagnets in the organism. Ferromagnetic resonance and SQUID magnetization measurements are used to quantify iron oxide nanoparticles and follow the evolution of their magnetic properties. A nanoscale structural analysis by electron microscopy complements the magnetic follow-up of nanoparticles injected to mice. We evidence the biotransformation of superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles into poorly-magnetic iron species probably stored into ferritin proteins over a period of three months. A putative mechanism is proposed for the biotransformation of iron-oxide nanoparticles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Iron Oxide Nanocrystals for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    PubMed Central

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Brandt, Yekaterina I.; Mathew, Dimple; Yadav, Surabhi; Maestas, Salomon; Rivera, Antonio C.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Withers, Nathan J.; Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Adolphi, Natalie; Monson, Todd C.; Huber, Dale L.; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osiński, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic nanocrystals have been investigated extensively in the past several years for several potential applications, such as information technology, MRI contrast agents, and for drug conjugation and delivery. A specific property of interest in biomedicine is magnetic hyperthermia—an increase in temperature resulting from the thermal energy released by magnetic nanocrystals in an external alternating magnetic field. Iron oxide nanocrystals of various sizes and morphologies were synthesized and tested for specific losses (heating power) using frequencies of 111.1 kHz and 629.2 kHz, and corresponding magnetic field strengths of 9 and 25 mT. Polymorphous nanocrystals as well as spherical nanocrystals and nanowires in paramagnetic to ferromagnetic size range exhibited good heating power. A remarkable 30 °C temperature increase was observed in a nanowire sample at 111 kHz and magnetic field of 25 mT (19.6 kA/m), which is very close to the typical values of 100 kHz and 20 mT used in medical treatments.

  6. Anthropogenic iron oxide aerosols enhance atmospheric heating

    PubMed Central

    Moteki, Nobuhiro; Adachi, Kouji; Ohata, Sho; Yoshida, Atsushi; Harigaya, Tomoo; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Combustion-induced carbonaceous aerosols, particularly black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC), have been largely considered as the only significant anthropogenic contributors to shortwave atmospheric heating. Natural iron oxide (FeOx) has been recognized as an important contributor, but the potential contribution of anthropogenic FeOx is unknown. In this study, we quantify the abundance of FeOx over East Asia through aircraft measurements using a modified single-particle soot photometer. The majority of airborne FeOx particles in the continental outflows are of anthropogenic origin in the form of aggregated magnetite nanoparticles. The shortwave absorbing powers (Pabs) attributable to FeOx and to BC are calculated on the basis of their size-resolved mass concentrations and the mean Pabs(FeOx)/Pabs(BC) ratio in the continental outflows is estimated to be at least 4–7%. We demonstrate that in addition to carbonaceous aerosols the aggregate of magnetite nanoparticles is a significant anthropogenic contributor to shortwave atmospheric heating. PMID:28508863

  7. Stem cell tracking using iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bull, Elizabeth; Madani, Seyed Yazdan; Sheth, Roosey; Seifalian, Amelia; Green, Mark; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are an exciting advancement in the field of nanotechnology. They expand the possibilities of noninvasive analysis and have many useful properties, making them potential candidates for numerous novel applications. Notably, they have been shown that they can be tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and are capable of conjugation with various cell types, including stem cells. In-depth research has been undertaken to establish these benefits, so that a deeper level of understanding of stem cell migratory pathways and differentiation, tumor migration, and improved drug delivery can be achieved. Stem cells have the ability to treat and cure many debilitating diseases with limited side effects, but a main problem that arises is in the noninvasive tracking and analysis of these stem cells. Recently, researchers have acknowledged the use of SPIONs for this purpose and have set out to establish suitable protocols for coating and attachment, so as to bring MRI tracking of SPION-labeled stem cells into common practice. This review paper explains the manner in which SPIONs are produced, conjugated, and tracked using MRI, as well as a discussion on their limitations. A concise summary of recently researched magnetic particle coatings is provided, and the effects of SPIONs on stem cells are evaluated, while animal and human studies investigating the role of SPIONs in stem cell tracking will be explored.

  8. Preventing interfacial recombination in colloidal quantum dot solar cells by doping the metal oxide.

    PubMed

    Ehrler, Bruno; Musselman, Kevin P; Böhm, Marcus L; Morgenstern, Frederik S F; Vaynzof, Yana; Walker, Brian J; Macmanus-Driscoll, Judith L; Greenham, Neil C

    2013-05-28

    Recent research has pushed the efficiency of colloidal quantum dot solar cells toward a level that spurs commercial interest. Quantum dot/metal oxide bilayers form the most efficient colloidal quantum dot solar cells, and most studies have advanced the understanding of the quantum dot component. We study the interfacial recombination process in depleted heterojunction colloidal quantum dot (QD) solar cells formed with ZnO as the oxide by varying (i) the carrier concentration of the ZnO layer and (ii) the density of intragap recombination sites in the QD layer. We find that the open-circuit voltage and efficiency of PbS QD/ZnO devices can be improved by 50% upon doping of the ZnO with nitrogen to reduce its carrier concentration. In contrast, doping the ZnO did not change the performance of PbSe QD/ZnO solar cells. We use X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, transient photovoltage decay measurements, transient absorption spectroscopy, and intensity-dependent photocurrent measurements to investigate the origin of this effect. We find a significant density of intragap states within the band gap of the PbS quantum dots. These states facilitate recombination at the PbS/ZnO interface, which can be suppressed by reducing the density of occupied states in the ZnO. For the PbSe QD/ZnO solar cells, where fewer intragap states are observed in the quantum dots, the interfacial recombination channel does not limit device performance. Our study sheds light on the mechanisms of interfacial recombination in colloidal quantum dot solar cells and emphasizes the influence of quantum dot intragap states and metal oxide properties on this loss pathway.

  9. Photocatalytic water oxidation with iron oxide hydroxide (rust) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Timothy L.; Bensema, Bronwyn L.; Brune, Nicholas K.; Wong, Christopher; Yeh, Max; Osterloh, Frank E.

    2017-01-01

    Hematite has attracted considerable interest as a photoanode material for water oxidation under visible illumination. Here, we explore the limits of photocatalytic water oxidation activity with iron (III) oxide hydroxide nanocrystals and NaIO4 as a sacrificial electron acceptor (E=1.63 V NHE at pH=0.5). The sol was prepared by hydrolysis of FeCl3 in boiling 0.002-M HCl solution and confirmed to mainly consist of ß-FeO(OH) (akaganéite) particles with 5 to 15 nm diameter. From a 0.01 M aqueous NaIO4 solution, the sol evolves between 4.5 and 35.2 μmol O2 h-1, depending on pH, light intensity (>400 nm, 290 to 700 mW cm-2), ß-FeO(OH), and NaIO4 concentration. The activity increases with pH, and depends linearly on light intensity and photocatalyst amount, and it varies with sacrificial electron donor concentration. Under optimized conditions, the apparent quantum efficiency is 0.19% (at 400 nm and 460 mW cm-2), and the turnover number is 2.58 based on total ß-FeO(OH). Overall, the efficiency of the ß-FeO(OH)/NaIO4 photocatalytic system is limited by electron hole recombination and by particle aggregation over longer irradiation times (24 h). Lastly, surface photovoltage measurements on ß-FeO(OH) films on fluorine doped tin oxide substrate confirm a 2.15 eV effective band gap for the material.

  10. Synthesis and heating effect of iron/iron oxide composite and iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y. F.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2007-02-01

    Fe/Fe oxide nanoparticles, in which the core consists of metallic Fe and the shell is composed of Fe oxides, were obtained by reduction of an aqueous solution of FeCl 3 within a NaBH 4 solution, or, using a water-in-oil micro-emulsion with CTAB as the surfactant. The reduction was performed either in an inert atmosphere or in air, and passivation with air was performed to produce the Fe/Fe 3O 4 core/shell composite. Phase identification and particle size were determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. Thermal analysis was performed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The quasistatic magnetic properties were measured using a VSM, and the specific absorption rates (SARs) of both Fe oxide and Fe/Fe 3O 4 composite nanoparticles either dispersed in methanol or in an epoxy resin were measured by Luxtron fiber temperature sensors in an alternating magnetic field of 150 Oe at 250 kHz. It was found that the preparation conditions, including the concentrations of solutions, the mixing procedure and the heat treatment, influence the particle size, the crystal structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the particles. Compared with Fe oxides, the saturation magnetization (MS) of Fe/Fe 3O 4 particles (100-190 emu/g) can be twice as high, and the coercivity (H C) can be tunable from several Oe to several hundred Oe. Hence, the SAR of Fe/Fe 3O 4 composite nanoparticles can be much higher than that of Fe oxides, with a maximum SAR of 345 W/g. The heating behavior is related to the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles.

  11. Synthesis and heating effect of iron/iron oxide composite and iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y.F.; Hoopes, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Fe/Fe oxide nanoparticles, in which the core consists of metallic Fe and the shell is composed of Fe oxides, were obtained by reduction of an aqueous solution of FeCl3 within a NaBH4 solution, or, using a water-in-oil micro-emulsion with CTAB as the surfactant. The reduction was performed either in an inert atmosphere or in air, and passivation with air was performed to produce the Fe/Fe3O4 core/shell composite. Phase identification and particle size were determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. Thermal analysis was performed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The quasistatic magnetic properties were measured using a VSM, and the specific absorption rates (SARs) of both Fe oxide and Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles either dispersed in methanol or in an epoxy resin were measured by Luxtron fiber temperature sensors in an alternating magnetic field of 150 Oe at 250 kHz. It was found that the preparation conditions, including the concentrations of solutions, the mixing procedure and the heat treatment, influence the particle size, the crystal structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the particles. Compared with Fe oxides, the saturation magnetization (MS) of Fe/Fe3O4 particles (100–190 emu/g) can be twice as high, and the coercivity (HC) can be tunable from several Oe to several hundred Oe. Hence, the SAR of Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles can be much higher than that of Fe oxides, with a maximum SAR of 345 W/g. The heating behavior is related to the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles. PMID:25301983

  12. Uniform 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on iron oxides as active catalysts for CO oxidation reaction: Structure-activity relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yu; Senanayake, Sanjaya; Gu, Dong; Jin, Zhao; Du, Pei -Pei; Si, Rui; Xu, Wen -Qian; Huang, Yu -Ying; Tao, Jing; Song, Qi -Sheng; Jia, Chun -Jia; Schueth, Ferdi

    2015-01-12

    Uniform Au nanoparticles (~2 nm) with narrow size-distribution (standard deviation: 0.5–0.6 nm) supported on both hydroxylated (Fe_OH) and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O) have been prepared by either deposition-precipitation (DP) or colloidal-deposition (CD) methods. Different structural and textural characterizations were applied to the dried, calcined and used gold-iron oxide samples. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) described the high homogeneity in the supported Au nanoparticles. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) characterization monitored the electronic and short-range local structure of active gold species. The synchrotron-based in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), together with the corresponding temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen (H₂-TPR), indicated a structural evolution of the iron-oxide supports, correlating to their reducibility. An inverse order of catalytic activity between DP (Au/Fe_OH < Au/Fe_O) and CD (Au/Fe_OH > Au/Fe_O) was observed. Effective gold-support interaction results in a high activity for gold nanoparticles, locally generated by the sintering of dispersed Au atoms on the oxide support in the DP synthesis, while a hydroxylated surface favors the reactivity of externally introduced Au nanoparticles on Fe_OH support for the CD approach. This work reveals why differences in the synthetic protocol translate to differences in the catalytic performance of Au/FeOx catalysts with very similar structural characteristics in CO oxidation.

  13. Uniform 2 nm gold nanoparticles supported on iron oxides as active catalysts for CO oxidation reaction: Structure-activity relationship

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Yu; Senanayake, Sanjaya; Gu, Dong; ...

    2015-01-12

    Uniform Au nanoparticles (~2 nm) with narrow size-distribution (standard deviation: 0.5–0.6 nm) supported on both hydroxylated (Fe_OH) and dehydrated iron oxide (Fe_O) have been prepared by either deposition-precipitation (DP) or colloidal-deposition (CD) methods. Different structural and textural characterizations were applied to the dried, calcined and used gold-iron oxide samples. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) described the high homogeneity in the supported Au nanoparticles. The ex-situ and in-situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) characterization monitored the electronic and short-range local structure of active gold species. The synchrotron-based in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD), together with the corresponding temperature-programmed reductionmore » by hydrogen (H₂-TPR), indicated a structural evolution of the iron-oxide supports, correlating to their reducibility. An inverse order of catalytic activity between DP (Au/Fe_OH < Au/Fe_O) and CD (Au/Fe_OH > Au/Fe_O) was observed. Effective gold-support interaction results in a high activity for gold nanoparticles, locally generated by the sintering of dispersed Au atoms on the oxide support in the DP synthesis, while a hydroxylated surface favors the reactivity of externally introduced Au nanoparticles on Fe_OH support for the CD approach. This work reveals why differences in the synthetic protocol translate to differences in the catalytic performance of Au/FeOx catalysts with very similar structural characteristics in CO oxidation.« less

  14. Chemical aspects of iron colloid plugging in quartz sands and implications for formation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.M.; Dibble, W.E.

    1985-09-01

    A research direction having great potential for better understanding of formation damage is the influence of colloid plugging on fluid flow behavior in porous media. Using flow through experimental equipment, we have explored the dependence of the degree of ferric oxyhydroxide colloid plugging of quartz sand packs on the solution pH and anion type at a constant temperature of 208/sup 0/F (97.7/sup 0/C). At a pH of 5, permeability reductions were greatest in the order PO/sup 3//sub 4/-, SO/sup 2//sub 4/-, and Cl-. This order was reversed at a pH of 9. The results suggest that plugging occurs by two fundamentally different mechanisms. First, flocculation/coagulation of the ferric hydroxide leads to formation of filter cake in the low-pH case. Second, colloid/quartz surface interaction produces a more uniform accumulation of colloid throughout the core at higher pH's.

  15. Iron Oxide Silica Derived from Sol-Gel Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Darmawan, Adi; Smart, Simon; Julbe, Anne; Diniz da Costa, João Carlos

    2011-01-01

    In this work we investigate the effect of iron oxide embedded in silica matrices as a function of Fe/Si molar ratio and sol pH. To achieve homogeneous dispersion of iron oxide particles, iron nitrate nonahydrate was dissolved in hydrogen peroxide and was mixed with tetraethyl orthosilicate and ethanol in a sol-gel synthesis method. Increasing the calcination temperature led to a reduction in surface area, although the average pore radius remained almost constant at about 10 Å, independent of the Fe/Si molar ratio or sol pH. Hence, the densification of the matrix was accompanied by similar reduction in pore volume. However, calcination at 700 °C resulted in samples with similar surface area though the iron oxide content increased from 5% to 50% Fe/Si molar ratio. As metal oxide particles have lower surface area than polymeric silica structures, these results strongly suggest that the iron oxides opposed the silica structure collapse. The effect of sol pH was found to be less significant than the Fe/Si molar ratio in the formation of molecular sieve structures derived from iron oxide silica. PMID:28879999

  16. Iron oxide nanoparticles in geomicrobiology: from biogeochemistry to bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Juliane; Bosch, Julian; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2013-09-25

    Iron oxides are important constituents of soils and sediments and microbial iron reduction is considered to be a significant anaerobic respiration process in the subsurface, however low microbial reduction rates of macroparticulate Fe oxides in laboratory studies led to an underestimation of the role of Fe oxides in the global Fe redox cycle. Recent studies show the high potential of nano-sized Fe oxides in the environment as, for example, electron acceptor for microbial respiration, electron shuttle between different microorganisms, and scavenger for heavy metals. Biotic and abiotic reactivity of iron macroparticles differ significantly from nano-sized Fe oxides, which are usually much more reactive. Factors such as particle size, solubility, ferrous iron, crystal structure, and organic molecules were identified to influence the reactivity. This review discusses factors influencing the microbial reactivity of Fe oxides. It highlights the differences between natural and synthetic Fe oxides especially regarding the presence of organic molecules such as humic acids and natural organic matter. Attention is given to the transport behavior of Fe oxides in laboratory systems and in the environment, because of the high affinity of different contaminants to Fe oxide surfaces and associated co-transport of pollutants. The high reactivity of Fe oxides and their potential as adsorbents for different pollutants are discussed with respect to application and development of remediation technologies. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Influence of fulvic acid on the colloidal stability and reactivity of nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haoran; Ahmad, Kito; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Zhongwu; Chen, Guiqiu; He, Qi; Xie, Yankai; Wu, Yanan; Zhao, Feng; Zeng, Yalan

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of fulvic acid (FA) on the colloidal stability and reactivity of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) at pH 5, 7 and 9. The sedimentation behavior of nZVI differed at different pH. A biphasic model was used to describe the two time-dependent settling processes (i.e., a rapid settling followed by a slower settling) and the settling rates were calculated. Generally, the settling of nZVI was more significant at the point of zero charge (pHpzc), which could be varied in the presence of FA due to the adsorption of FA on the nZVI surface. More FA was adsorbed on the nZVI surface at pH 5-7 than pH 9, resulting in the varying sedimentation behavior of nZVI via influencing the electrostatic repulsion among particles. Moreover, it was found that there was a tradeoff between the stabilization and the reactivity of nZVI as affected by the presence of FA. When FA concentration was at a low level, the adsorption of FA on the nZVI surface could enhance the particle stabilization, and thus facilitating the Cr(VI) reduction by providing more available surface sites. However, when the FA concentrations were too high to occupy the active surface sites of nZVI, the Cr(VI) reduction could be decreased even though the FA enhanced the dispersion of nZVI particles. At pH 9, the FA improved the Cr(VI) reduction by nZVI. Given the adsorption of FA on the nZVI surface was insignificant and its effect on the settling behavior of nZVI particles was minimal, it was proposed that the FA formed soluble complexes with the produced Fe(III)/Cr(III) ions, and thus reducing the degree of passivation on the nZVI surface and facilitating the Cr(VI) reduction.

  18. Iron assimilation and utilization in anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ferousi, Christina; Lindhoud, Simon; Baymann, Frauke; Kartal, Boran; Jetten, Mike Sm; Reimann, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    The most abundant transition metal in biological systems is iron. It is incorporated into protein cofactors and serves either catalytic, redox or regulatory purposes. Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria rely heavily on iron-containing proteins - especially cytochromes - for their energy conservation, which occurs within a unique organelle, the anammoxosome. Both their anaerobic lifestyle and the presence of an additional cellular compartment challenge our understanding of iron processing. Here, we combine existing concepts of iron uptake, utilization and metabolism, and cellular fate with genomic and still limited biochemical and physiological data on anammox bacteria to propose pathways these bacteria may employ. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Colloidal polypyrrole

    DOEpatents

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized aromatic heterocyclic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a vinyl pyridine-containing polymer and dopant anions and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are disclosed.

  20. Design considerations for the synthesis of polymer coated iron oxide nanoparticles for stem cell labelling and tracking using MRI.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Michael; Taylor, Arthur; Murray, Patricia; Rosseinsky, Matthew J; Adams, Dave J

    2015-10-07

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs, sometimes called superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles or SPIONs) have already shown promising results for in vivo cell tracking using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To fully exploit the potential of these materials as contrast agents, there is still a need for a greater understanding of how they react to physiological conditions. A key aspect is the specific nature of the surface coating, which can affect important properties of the IONPs such as colloidal stability, toxicity, magnetism and labelling efficiency. Polymers are widely used as coatings for IONPs as they can increase colloidal stability in hydrophilic conditions, as well as protect the iron oxide core from degradation. In this tutorial review, we will examine the design and synthesis approaches currently being employed to produce polymer coated IONPs as cell tracking agents, and what considerations must be made. We will also give some perspective on the challenges and limitations that remain for polymer coated IONPs as MRI contrast agents for stem cell tracking.

  1. Preparation of a silicon heterojunction photodetector from colloidal indium oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Raid A.; Ali, Abdulrahman K.; Hassoon, Khaleel I.

    2013-10-01

    A colloidal indium oxide (In2O3) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser ablation of indium target in water at room temperature. Optical absorption and x-ray diffraction (XRD) investigation of the prepared samples confirm the formation of In2O3 NPs. A solution-processed silicon heterojunction photodetector, fabricated by drop cast film of colloidal In2O3 NPs onto n-type single crystal silicon wafer, is demonstrated. I-V characteristics of In2O3 NPs/Si heterojunction under dark and illumination conditions confirmed the rectifying behavior and the good photoresponse. The built-in-voltage was determined from the C-V measurements which revealed an abrupt junction.

  2. Iron, oxidative stress, and redox signaling in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Gudjoncik, Aurélie; Guenancia, Charles; Zeller, Marianne; Cottin, Yves; Vergely, Catherine; Rochette, Luc

    2014-08-01

    The redox state of the cell is predominantly dependent on an iron redox couple and is maintained within strict physiological limits. Iron is an essential metal for hemoglobin synthesis in erythrocytes, for oxidation-reduction reactions, and for cellular proliferation. The maintenance of stable iron concentrations requires the coordinated regulation of iron transport into plasma from dietary sources in the duodenum, from recycled senescent red cells in macrophages, and from storage in hepatocytes. The absorption of dietary iron, which is present in heme or nonheme form, is carried out by mature villus enterocytes of the duodenum and proximal jejunum. Multiple physiological processes are involved in maintaining iron homeostasis. These include its storage at the intracellular and extracellular level. Control of iron balance in the whole organism requires communication between sites of uptake, utilization, and storage. Key protein transporters and the molecules that regulate their activities have been identified. In this field, ferritins and hepcidin are the major regulator proteins. A variety of transcription factors may be activated depending on the level of oxidative stress, leading to the expression of different genes. Major preclinical and clinical trials have shown advances in iron-chelation therapy for the treatment of iron-overload disease as well as cardiovascular and chronic inflammatory diseases. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Genomic insights into microbial iron oxidation and iron uptake strategies in extremely acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Bonnefoy, Violaine; Holmes, David S

    2012-07-01

    This minireview presents recent advances in our understanding of iron oxidation and homeostasis in acidophilic Bacteria and Archaea. These processes influence the flux of metals and nutrients in pristine and man-made acidic environments such as acid mine drainage and industrial bioleaching operations. Acidophiles are also being studied to understand life in extreme conditions and their role in the generation of biomarkers used in the search for evidence of existing or past extra-terrestrial life. Iron oxidation in acidophiles is best understood in the model organism Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. However, recent functional genomic analysis of acidophiles is leading to a deeper appreciation of the diversity of acidophilic iron-oxidizing pathways. Although it is too early to paint a detailed picture of the role played by lateral gene transfer in the evolution of iron oxidation, emerging evidence tends to support the view that iron oxidation arose independently more than once in evolution. Acidic environments are generally rich in soluble iron and extreme acidophiles (e.g. the Leptospirillum genus) have considerably fewer iron uptake systems compared with neutrophiles. However, some acidophiles have been shown to grow as high as pH 6 and, in the case of the Acidithiobacillus genus, to have multiple iron uptake systems. This could be an adaption allowing them to respond to different iron concentrations via the use of a multiplicity of different siderophores. Both Leptospirillum spp. and Acidithiobacillus spp. are predicted to synthesize the acid stable citrate siderophore for Fe(III) uptake. In addition, both groups have predicted receptors for siderophores produced by other microorganisms, suggesting that competition for iron occurs influencing the ecophysiology of acidic environments. Little is known about the genetic regulation of iron oxidation and iron uptake in acidophiles, especially how the use of iron as an energy source is balanced with its need to take up

  4. Synthesis of monodisperse iron oxide and iron/iron oxide core/shell nanoparticles via iron-oleylamine complex.

    PubMed

    Yu, S; Chow, G M

    2006-07-01

    Monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles are of great scientific and technical interests. This paper reports a single-step synthesis of monodisperse magnetite nanoparticles with particle size of 8 nm. Iron/maghaemite core/shell nanoparticles with particle size of 11 nm were obtained by reducing the concentration of oleylamine. TEM and in-situ FTIR results suggested that iron-oleylamine intermediate was generated in-situ and decomposed at higher temperature. Oleylamine was also found on the surface of nanoparticles, indicating its role as capping agent which provided steric protection of as-synthesized nanoparticles from agglomeration. Both magnetite and iron/maghaemite core/shell nanoparticles were superparamagnetic at room temperature with a blocking temperature at 80 K and 67 K, respectively.

  5. Controllable synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles in porous NaCl matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurapov, Yury A.; Litvin, Stanislav E.; Romanenko, Sergey M.; Didikin, Gennadii G.; Oranskaya, Elena I.

    2017-03-01

    The paper gives the results of studying the structure of porous condensates of Fe + NaCl composition, chemical and phase compositions and dimensions of nanoparticles produced from the vapor phase by EB-PVD. Iron nanoparticles at fast removal from the vacuum oxidize in air and possess significant sorption capacity relative to oxygen and moisture. At heating in air, reduction of porous condensate weight occurs right to the temperature of 650 °C, primarily, due to desorption of physically sorbed moisture. Final oxidation of Fe3O4 to Fe2O3 proceeds in the range of 380 °C–650 °C, due to the remaining fraction of physically adsorbed oxygen. At iron concentrations of up to 10–15 at%, condensate sorption capacity is markedly increased with increase of iron concentration, i.e. of the quantity of fine particles. Increase of condensation temperature is accompanied by increase of nanoparticle size, resulting in a considerable reduction of the total area of nanoparticle surface, and, hence of their sorption capacity. In addition to condensation temperature, the size and phase composition of nanoparticles can also be controlled by heat treatment of initial condensate, produced at low condensation temperatures. Magnetite nanoparticles can be transferred into stable colloid systems.

  6. Oxidation-Induced Degradable Nanogels for Iron Chelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Yan; Purro, Max; Xiong, May P.

    2016-02-01

    Iron overload can increase cellular oxidative stress levels due to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); untreated, it can be extremely destructive to organs and fatal to patients. Since elevated oxidative stress levels are inherent to the condition in such patients, oxidation-induced degradable nanogels for iron chelation were rationally designed by simultaneously polymerizing oxidation-sensitive host-guest crosslinkers between β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and ferrocene (Fc) and iron chelating moieties composed of deferoxamine (DFO) into the final gel scaffold in reverse emulsion reaction chambers. UV-Vis absorption and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to verify iron chelating capability of nanogels. These materials can degrade into smaller chelating fragments at rates proportional to the level of oxidative stress present. Conjugating DFO reduces the cytotoxicity of the chelator in the macrophage cells. Importantly, the nanogel can effectively reduce cellular ferritin expression in iron overloaded cells and regulate intracellular iron levels at the same time, which is important for maintaining a homeostatic level of this critical metal in cells.

  7. Oxidation-Induced Degradable Nanogels for Iron Chelation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Yan; Purro, Max; Xiong, May P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload can increase cellular oxidative stress levels due to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); untreated, it can be extremely destructive to organs and fatal to patients. Since elevated oxidative stress levels are inherent to the condition in such patients, oxidation-induced degradable nanogels for iron chelation were rationally designed by simultaneously polymerizing oxidation-sensitive host-guest crosslinkers between β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and ferrocene (Fc) and iron chelating moieties composed of deferoxamine (DFO) into the final gel scaffold in reverse emulsion reaction chambers. UV-Vis absorption and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to verify iron chelating capability of nanogels. These materials can degrade into smaller chelating fragments at rates proportional to the level of oxidative stress present. Conjugating DFO reduces the cytotoxicity of the chelator in the macrophage cells. Importantly, the nanogel can effectively reduce cellular ferritin expression in iron overloaded cells and regulate intracellular iron levels at the same time, which is important for maintaining a homeostatic level of this critical metal in cells. PMID:26868174

  8. Photocatalysis over titania on iron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwi Cheol; Han, Chong Soo

    2006-03-01

    Photocatalytic activity of TiO{2} deposited on spherical sub micron-sized Fe{2}O{3} particle was investigated under ultraviolet or visible light. The Fe{2}O{3} particles were prepared using a spray pyrolysis of aqueous Fe(NO{3})3 solution in air flow. TiO{2} was deposited on Fe{2}O{3} particle by irradiation of ultraviolet or visible light to the suspension of Fe{2}O{3} particle and a TiO{2} precursor. When TiO{2} was formed under visible light (TiO{2}/Fe{2}O{3}-VIS), there were reasonable trends in the phase shift of PAS signal and EDX signal of Ti. However, there was no trend for the case of ultra violet irradiation (TiO{2}/Fe{2}O{3}-UV). TiO{2}/Fe{2}O{3}-VIS showed higher rates of decomposition of organic compound, of decrease in contact angle of water drop, and of decrease in the number of E. coli under visible light than TiO{2}/Fe{2}O{3}-UV or TiO{2} film. From the results, it was suggested that TiO{2}/Fe{2}O{3}-VIS had a regular thin layer of TiO{2} compared to TiO{2}/Fe{2}O{3}-UV and the photo-generated carrier(s) in iron oxide migrated to the surface of TiO{2} in the case of TiO{2}/Fe{2}O{3}-VIS.

  9. Solution Chemistry Determines Deposition and Successive Detachment of Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles in Uncoated and Iron Oxide-Coated Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Jin, Y.; Zhou, D.

    2016-12-01

    The deposition and successive detachment of graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) were investigated in saturated columns packed with uncoated and iron oxide-coated sand (U-S and Fe-S) at environmentally-relevant KCl and CaCl2 concentrations. Consistent with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory, elevating ionic strength (IS) resulted in reduced mobility of GONPs. The positively charged iron oxide coating immobilized negatively charged GONPs (pH 7.0), yielding hyperexponential retention profiles of GONPs particularly in CaCl2, due to the synergistic effects between iron oxide and Ca2+ (aggravate straining). A stepwise decreasing in transient IS initiated the detachment of GONPs that were previously retained in the column; and the released mass of GONPs during each detachment step correlated positively with the difference (ΔΦmin2) of secondary minimum at the desired ISs, highlighting that secondary minimum modulated the successive detachment of GONPs. Most of the retained GONPs were reentrained upon lowering pore-water IS in U-S. Conversely, decreasing transient IS released only a small portion of the retained GONPs in Fe-S due to the reservoir role of primary minimum in capturing GONPs; but subsequently injecting 1 mM NaOH (pH 11) released most of the retained GONPs in primary minimum due to the enhanced electrostatic repulsion interactions between GONPs and between GONPs and sand grains. The size of detached GONPs upon injecting NaOH was smaller than those in the influents and retentates, suggesting that disaggregation occurred among retentate populations. The threshold value of the diameter ratio of colloid and sand grain is 0.0013 for sheet-shaped GONPs, above which value the hyperexponential retention profile occurs. Our findings provide new insights into understanding factors and mechanisms determining NPs release with transients in solution chemistry in the environments such as during rainfall events and in the mixing zones between salt-fresh water.

  10. Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals as charge transporting layers for solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyong; Bai, Sai; Wang, Xin; Dai, Xingliang; Gao, Feng; Sun, Baoquan; Ning, Zhijun; Ye, Zhizhen; Jin, Yizheng

    2017-02-28

    Colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals offer a unique combination of excellent low-temperature solution processability, rich and tuneable optoelectronic properties and intrinsic stability, which makes them an ideal class of materials as charge transporting layers in solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells. Developing new material chemistry and custom-tailoring processing and properties of charge transporting layers based on oxide nanocrystals hold the key to boosting the efficiency and lifetime of all-solution-processed light-emitting diodes and solar cells, and thereby realizing an unprecedented generation of high-performance, low-cost, large-area and flexible optoelectronic devices. This review aims to bridge two research fields, chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals and interfacial engineering of optoelectronic devices, focusing on the relationship between chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals, processing and properties of charge transporting layers and device performance. Synthetic chemistry of colloidal oxide nanocrystals, ligand chemistry that may be applied to colloidal oxide nanocrystals and chemistry associated with post-deposition treatments are discussed to highlight the ability of optimizing processing and optoelectronic properties of charge transporting layers. Selected examples of solution-processed solar cells and light-emitting diodes with oxide-nanocrystal charge transporting layers are examined. The emphasis is placed on the correlation between the properties of oxide-nanocrystal charge transporting layers and device performance. Finally, three major challenges that need to be addressed in the future are outlined. We anticipate that this review will spur new material design and simulate new chemistry for colloidal oxide nanocrystals, leading to charge transporting layers and solution-processed optoelectronic devices beyond the state-of-the-art.

  11. The Effect of the Concentration of Oxidant, Cr(VI), on the Iron Oxidation in Saline Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H.; Jo, H. Y.; Ryu, J. H.; Koh, Y. K.

    2014-12-01

    Deep geological disposal is currently considered as the most appropriate method to isolate high level radioactive wastes (HLRWs) from the ecosystem. If groundwater seeps into underground disposal facilities, water molecules can be dissociated to radicals or peroxides, which can oxidize metal canisters and HLRWs. The oxidized radionuclides with a high solubility can be dissolved in the groundwater. Some dissolved radionuclides can act as oxidants. The continuous radiolysis of water molecules, which results from continuous seepage of groundwater, can enable the continuous production of the radioactive oxidants, resulting in an increase in concentration of oxidants. In this study, the effect of oxidant concentration on iron oxidation in the presence of salt was evaluated. Zero valent iron (ZVI) particles were reacted with Cr(VI) solutions with initial Cr(VI) concentrations ranged from 50 to 300 mg/L in reactors. The initial pH and NaCl concentration were fixed at 3 and 0.5 M, respectively. An increase in the initial Cr(VI) concentration caused an increase in the rate and extend of H2 gas production. The decrement of Cr(VI) was increased as the initial Cr(VI) concentration was increased. The penetration of H+ ions in the presence Cl- ions through the passive film on the ZVI particles caused the reaction between H+ ions and ZVI particles, producing H2 gas and Fe2+ ions. The passive film was damaged during the reaction due to the eruption of H2 gas or peptization by Cl- ions. The Fe2+ ions were reacted with Cr(VI) ions in the solution, producing Fe(III)-Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxides on the passive film of ZVI particles or in the solution as colloidal particles. The Fe(III)-Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxides tends to be precipitated as colloidal particles at a high Cr(VI) concentration and precipitated on the passive film at a low Cr(VI) concentration. The passive film was repaired or thickened by additional formation of Fe(III)-Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxides at a lower Cr(VI) concentration.

  12. ISOLATION AND PROPERTIES OF AN IRON-OXIDIZING THIOBACILLUS

    PubMed Central

    Razzell, W. E.; Trussell, P. C.

    1963-01-01

    Razzell, W. E. (British Columbia Research Council, Vancouver, Canada) and P. C. Trussell. Isolation and properties of an iron-oxidizing Thiobacillus. J. Bacteriol. 85:595–603. 1963. — An organism isolated from acidic copper-leaching waters has been shown to oxidize ferrous ions, sulfur, and metallic sulfides but exhibit peculiar responses to thiosulfate. The name Thiobacillus ferrooxidans has been used to describe it. A pH of 2.5 is optimal for growth on iron, sulfur, and metallic sulfides, but cells free from iron can be obtained from growth at pH 1.6, and sulfur cultures adjusted to pH 5.5 readily attain a pH of 1.8. A stationary cultivation procedure appears superior to percolation techniques for studying the oxidation of finely divided metallic sulfides. Concentrations of soluble copper in excess of 1 g per liter were obtained from chalcopyrite in less than 4 weeks. Chalcocite oxidation proceeded in the absence of iron. Sodium chloride inhibits iron oxidation without preventing oxidation of metallic sulfides by the organism. PMID:14042937

  13. Controlled oxidation of iron nanoparticles in chemical vapour synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruusunen, Jarno; Ihalainen, Mika; Koponen, Tarmo; Torvela, Tiina; Tenho, Mikko; Salonen, Jarno; Sippula, Olli; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Lähde, Anna

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, iron oxide nanoparticles (primary particle size of 80-90 nm) with controlled oxidation state were prepared via an atmospheric pressure chemical vapour synthesis (APCVS) method. Iron pentacarbonyl [Fe(CO)5], a precursor material, was thermally decomposed to iron in the APCVS reactor. Subsequently, the iron was oxidized with controlled amount of oxygen in the reactor to produce nearly pure magnetite or haematite particles depending on the oxygen concentration. Size, morphology and crystal structure of the synthesized nanoparticles were studied with scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and computational fluid dynamics model were used to predict the oxidation state of the iron oxides and the reaction conditions during mixing. Aggregates of crystalline particles were formed, determined as magnetite at the oxygen volumetric fraction of 0.1 % and haematite at volumetric fraction of 0.5 %, according to the XRD. The geometric mean electrical mobility diameter of the aggregates increased from 110 to 155 nm when the volumetric fraction of oxygen increased from 0.1 to 0.5 %, determined using the SMPS. The aggregates were highly sintered based on TEM analyses. As a conclusion, APCVS method can be used to produce nearly pure crystalline magnetite or haematite nanoparticles with controlled oxidation in a continuous one-stage gas-phase process.

  14. Synthesis of phase pure praseodymium barium copper iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Konne, Joshua L; Davis, Sean A; Glatzel, Stefan; Hall, Simon R

    2013-06-18

    The control of crystallization of praseodymium barium copper iron oxide, an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell cathode material, has been demonstrated for the first time using a biotemplated sol-gel synthesis technique. The results obtained showed significant improvement in purity, synthesis time, surface area and simplicity over that previously reported.

  15. The Oxidation Of Iron In A Gel Using Consumer Chemicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen W.; Folger, Marsha R.; Quinn, Ryan P.; Sauls, Frederick C.; Krone, Diane

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for the oxidation of iron in a gel using consumer chemicals, which is pertinent to the students' understanding of redox chemistry and of the relative oxidation potentials of various metals. The experiment can be carried out with consumer chemicals that might be purchased at a supermarket and commonly found in the home.

  16. The Oxidation Of Iron In A Gel Using Consumer Chemicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen W.; Folger, Marsha R.; Quinn, Ryan P.; Sauls, Frederick C.; Krone, Diane

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for the oxidation of iron in a gel using consumer chemicals, which is pertinent to the students' understanding of redox chemistry and of the relative oxidation potentials of various metals. The experiment can be carried out with consumer chemicals that might be purchased at a supermarket and commonly found in the home.

  17. Heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of ofloxacin drug by iron alginate support.

    PubMed

    Titouhi, Hana; Belgaied, Jamel-Eddine

    2016-08-01

    A new catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of ofloxacin antibiotic is presented in this work. The removal was achieved using a biodegradable sodium alginate-iron material. Several parameters were studied such as iron content, drying duration of the catalytic support, temperature, solid amount and initial drug concentration. The process showed a strong oxidative ability; at optimum conditions, a nearly complete removal of the drug (around 98%) has been reached after three h of treatment. A relatively low decrease of support activity (around 10%) has been observed after three successive oxidation runs and a low iron leaching has been detected (1.2% of the incorporated quantity). The removal of the substrate has been also examined in the absence of hydrogen peroxide in order to discriminate between the contributions of simple adsorption and oxidation processes in the drug disappearance. We also discussed the influence of the studied experimental parameters on the removal kinetic.

  18. Iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis in aqueous and membrane systems for oxidative degradation of trichloroethylene from water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Minghui; Smuleac, Vasile; Ormsbee, Lindell E.; Sedlak, David L.; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar

    2012-05-01

    The potential for using hydroxyl radical (OH•) reactions catalyzed by iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) to remediate toxic organic compounds was investigated. Iron oxide NPs were synthesized by controlled oxidation of iron NPs prior to their use for contaminant oxidation (by H2O2 addition) at near-neutral pH values. Cross-linked polyacrylic acid (PAA) functionalized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration membranes were prepared by in situ polymerization of acrylic acid inside the membrane pores. Iron and iron oxide NPs (80-100 nm) were directly synthesized in the polymer matrix of PAA/PVDF membranes, which prevented the agglomeration of particles and controlled the particle size. The conversion of iron to iron oxide in aqueous solution with air oxidation was studied based on X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy and BET surface area test methods. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was selected as the model contaminant because of its environmental importance. Degradations of TCE and H2O2 by NP surface generated OH• were investigated. Depending on the ratio of iron and H2O2, TCE conversions as high as 100 % (with about 91 % dechlorination) were obtained. TCE dechlorination was also achieved in real groundwater samples with the reactive membranes.

  19. Iron and oxidative stress in cardiomyopathy in thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Berdoukas, Vasilios; Coates, Thomas D; Cabantchik, Zvi Ioav

    2015-11-01

    With repeated blood transfusions, patients with thalassemia major rapidly become loaded with iron, often surpassing hepatic metal accumulation capacity within ferritin shells and infiltrating heart and endocrine organs. That pathological scenario contrasts with the physiological one, which is characterized by an efficient maintenance of all plasma iron bound to circulating transferrin, due to a tight control of iron ingress into plasma by the hormone hepcidin. Within cells, most of the acquired iron becomes protein-associated, as once released from endocytosed transferrin, it is used within mitochondria for the synthesis of protein prosthetic groups or it is incorporated into enzyme active centers or alternatively sequestered within ferritin shells. A few cell types also express the iron extrusion transporter ferroportin, which is under the negative control of circulating hepcidin. However, that system only backs up the major cell regulated iron uptake/storage machinery that is poised to maintain a basal level of labile cellular iron for metabolic purposes without incurring potentially toxic scenarios. In thalassemia and other transfusion iron-loading conditions, once transferrin saturation exceeds about 70%, labile forms of iron enter the circulation and can gain access to various types of cells via resident transporters or channels. Within cells, they can attain levels that exceed their ability to chemically cope with labile iron, which has a propensity for generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby inducing oxidative damage. This scenario occurs in the heart of hypertransfused thalassemia major patients who do not receive adequate iron-chelation therapy. Iron that accumulates in cardiomyocytes forms agglomerates that are detected by T2* MRI. The labile forms of iron infiltrate the mitochondria and damage cells by inducing noxious ROS formation, resulting in heart failure. The very rapid relief of cardiac dysfunction seen after intensive iron

  20. Interfacial and colloidal aspects of aqueous suspensions containing oxidic powders. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bleier, Alan

    1984-01-01

    This program addressed ceramics and colloid science research needs that underscore the physicochemical principles which govern the processing of oxide ceramic powders. Materials systems emphasized silica, alumina, zirconia, and mullite. The surface charge characteristics of the cited solids were determined using potentiometric techniques. Interfacial chemical reactions were thermodynamically evaluated. Zeta potential trends and values for silica and alumina systems were predicted reasonably well. Some surface behavior of mullite could be predicted from those of the constituent, silicon and aluminum oxides. Guidelines were generated for these problems and for a more complete description of the electrical double layers surrounding oxide ceramic powders in aqueous media. These efforts ultimately indicated that charge regulation is important to the processing of ceramics. A charge regulation model suggests that the electrostatic stabilizing effect of surface charge may critically depend on the volume concentration of powder.

  1. Fabrication of oxidation-resistant Ge colloidal nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation in aqueous HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamanaka, Yasushi; Iwata, Masahiro; Katsuno, Junichi

    2017-06-01

    Spherical Ge nanoparticles with diameters of 20-80 nm were fabricated by laser ablation of a Ge single crystal in water and in aqueous HCl using sub-picosecond laser pulses (1040 nm, 700 fs, 100 kHz, and a pulse energy of 10 µJ). We found that the as-synthesized nanoparticles suffered rapid oxidization followed by dissolution when laser ablation was conducted in pure water. In contrast, oxidation of Ge nanoparticles produced in dilute HCl and stored intact was minimal, and colloidal dispersions of the Ge nanoparticles remained stable up to 7 days. It was elucidated that dangling bonds on the surfaces of the Ge nanoparticles were terminated by Cl, which inhibited oxidation, and that such hydrophilic surfaces might improve the dispersibility of nanoparticles in aqueous solvent.

  2. Effect of green tea on iron status and oxidative stress in iron-loaded rats.

    PubMed

    Ounjaijean, S; Thephinlap, C; Khansuwan, U; Phisalapong, C; Fucharoen, S; Porter, J B; Srichairatanakool, S

    2008-07-01

    Plasma non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI) is potentially toxic and contributes to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), consequently leading to tissue damage and organ dysfunction. Iron chelators and antioxidants are used for treatment of thalassemia patients. Green tea (GT) contains catechins derivatives that have many biological activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the iron-chelating and free-radical scavenging capacities of green tea extract in vivo. Rats were injected ip with ferric citrate together with orally administered GT extract (GTE) for 4 months. Blood was collected monthly for measurement of iron overload and oxidative stress indicators. Plasma iron (PI) and total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) were quantified using bathophenanthroline method. Plasma NTBI was assayed with NTA chelation/HPLC. Plasma malonyldialdehyde (MDA) was determined by using the TBARS method. Erythrocyte oxidative stress was assessed using flow cytometry. Levels of PI, TIBC, NTBI and MDA, and erythrocyte ROS increased in the iron-loaded rats. Intervention with GT extract markedly decreased the PI and TIBC concentrations. It also lowered the transferrin saturation and effectively inhibited formation of NTBI. It also decreased the levels of erythrocyte ROS in week 4, 12 and 16. Therefore, green tea extract can decrease iron in plasma as well as eliminate lipid peroxidation in plasma, and destroy formation of erythrocyte ROS in the rats challenged with iron. The bifunctional effects could be beneficial in alleviating the iron and oxidative stress toxicity. In prospective, these GTE activities should be further examined in thalassemic animals or humans.

  3. Colloids from the aqueous corrosion of uranium nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, M. D.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Mertz, C. J.; Goldberg, M. M.

    2005-12-01

    Colloids may enhance the subsurface transport of radionuclides and potentially compromise the long-term safe operation of the proposed radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Little data is available on colloid formation for the many different waste forms expected to be buried in the repository. This work expands the sparse database on colloids formed during the corrosion of metallic uranium nuclear fuel. We characterized spherical UO 2 and nickel-rich montmorilonite smectite-clay colloids formed during the corrosion of uranium metal fuel under bathtub conditions at 90 °C. Iron and chromium oxides and calcium carbonate colloids were present but were a minor population. The estimated upper concentration of the UO 2 and clays was 4 × 10 11 and 7 × 10 11-3 × 10 12 particles/L, respectively. However, oxygen eventually oxidized the UO 2 colloids, forming long filaments of weeksite K 2(UO 2) 2Si 6O 15 · 4H 2O that settled from solution, reducing the UO 2 colloid population and leaving predominantly clay colloids. The smectite colloids were not affected by oxygen. Plutonium was not directly observed within the UO 2 colloids but partitioned completely to the colloid size fraction. The plutonium concentration in the colloidal fraction was slightly higher than the value used in the viability assessment model, and does not change in concentration with exposure to oxygen. This paper provides conclusive evidence for single-phase radioactive colloids composed of UO 2. However, its impact on repository safety is probably small since oxygen and silica availability will oxidize and effectively precipitate the UO 2 colloids from concentrated solutions.

  4. A chameleon catalyst for nonheme iron-promoted olefin oxidation.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shyam R; Javadi, Maedeh Moshref; Feng, Yan; Hyun, Min Young; Oloo, Williamson N; Kim, Cheal; Que, Lawrence

    2014-11-18

    We report the chameleonic reactivity of two nonheme iron catalysts for olefin oxidation with H2O2 that switch from nearly exclusive cis-dihydroxylation of electron-poor olefins to the exclusive epoxidation of electron-rich olefins upon addition of acetic acid. This switching suggests a common precursor to the nucleophilic oxidant proposed to Fe(III)-η(2)-OOH and electrophilic oxidant proposed to Fe(V)(O)(OAc), and reversible coordination of acetic acid as a switching pathway.

  5. Iron oxide and gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotman, Irena; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.; Gutmanas, Elazar Y.

    2016-08-01

    Continuous research activities in the field of nanomedicine in the past decade have, to a great extent, been focused on nanoparticle technologies for cancer therapy. Gold and iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) are two of the most studied inorganic nanomaterials due to their unique optical and magnetic properties. Both types of NPs are emerging as promising systems for anti-tumor drug delivery and for nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy of cancer. In thermal therapy, localized heating inside tumors or in proximity of tumor cells can be induced, for example, with Au NPs by radiofrequency ablation heating or conversion of photon energy (photothermal therapy) and in iron oxide magnetic NPs by heat generation through relaxation in an alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). Furthermore, the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have led to their use as potent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agents. Surface modification/coating can produce NPs with tailored and desired properties, such as enhanced blood circulation time, stability, biocompatibility and water solubility. To target nanoparticles to specific tumor cells, NPs should be conjugated with targeting moieties on the surface which bind to receptors or other molecular structures on the cell surface. The article presents several approaches to enhancing the specificity of Au and iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor tissue by appropriate surface modification/functionalization, as well as the effect of these treatments on the saturation magnetization value of iron oxide NPs. The use of other nanoparticles and nanostructures in cancer treatment is also briefly reviewed.

  6. Iron oxide and gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gotman, Irena Gutmanas, Elazar Y.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.

    2016-08-02

    Continuous research activities in the field of nanomedicine in the past decade have, to a great extent, been focused on nanoparticle technologies for cancer therapy. Gold and iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) are two of the most studied inorganic nanomaterials due to their unique optical and magnetic properties. Both types of NPs are emerging as promising systems for anti-tumor drug delivery and for nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy of cancer. In thermal therapy, localized heating inside tumors or in proximity of tumor cells can be induced, for example, with Au NPs by radiofrequency ablation heating or conversion of photon energy (photothermal therapy) and in iron oxide magnetic NPs by heat generation through relaxation in an alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). Furthermore, the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have led to their use as potent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agents. Surface modification/coating can produce NPs with tailored and desired properties, such as enhanced blood circulation time, stability, biocompatibility and water solubility. To target nanoparticles to specific tumor cells, NPs should be conjugated with targeting moieties on the surface which bind to receptors or other molecular structures on the cell surface. The article presents several approaches to enhancing the specificity of Au and iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor tissue by appropriate surface modification/functionalization, as well as the effect of these treatments on the saturation magnetization value of iron oxide NPs. The use of other nanoparticles and nanostructures in cancer treatment is also briefly reviewed.

  7. In vitro studies on ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with gummic acid for T2 MRI contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Rabias, I.; Pratsinis, H.; Drossopoulou, G.; Fardis, M.; Maris, T.; Boukos, N.; Tsotakos, N.; Kletsas, D.; Tsilibary, E.; Papavassiliou, G.

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with gummic acid have been investigated as possible constituents of aqueous ferrofluids for biomedical applications and especially for MRI contrast agent. The structural characteristics and the size of the nanoparticles have been analyzed as well as the magnetic properties. In order to evaluate any possible capabilities as a contrast agent, the relaxation time, T2, of hydrogen protons in the colloidal solutions of nanoparticles have been measured in order to gain information on the relaxation behavior compared to other MRI contrast agents. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the obtained magnetic nanoparticles of iron oxide coated with gummic acid was investigated by two separate methods (MTT and FACS analysis) and by using three different normal and transformed cell lines. Our results showed that the synthesized nanoparticles had no toxic effect on any of the cell lines used. PMID:19693403

  8. Cu Binding to Iron Oxide-Organic Matter Coprecipitates in Solid and Dissolved Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, T. M.; Koenigsmark, F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that Cu is released from wetlands following storm events. Assymetrical field flow field fractionation (AF4) analyses as well as total and dissolved metal concentration measurements suggest iron oxide-organic matter complexes control Cu retention and release. Coprecipitation products of Fe oxide and organic matter were prepared under conditions similar to the wetland to assess Cu partitioning to and availability from solid phases that settle from solution as well as phases remaining suspended. Cu coprecipitation and sorption to organomineral precipitation solids formed at different Fe:organic carbon (OC) ratios were compared for net Cu removal and extractability. As more humic acid was present during precipitation of Fe, TEM images indicated smaller Fe oxide particles formed within an organic matrix as expected. In coprecipitation reactions, as the ratio of Fe:OC decreased, more Cu was removed from solution at pH 5.5 and below. However, in sorption reactions, there was an inhibition of Cu removal at low OC concentrations. As the pH increased from 5.5 to 7 and as solution phase OC concentration increased, more Cu remained dissolved in both coprecipitation and sorption reactions. The addition of Ca2+, glycine, histidine and citric acid or lowering the pH resulted in more extractable Cu from the coprecipitation compared with the sorption reactions. The variations in Cu extraction were likely due to a combination of a more amorphous structure in CPT products, and the relative abundance of available Fe oxide or OC binding sites. Suspended Fe oxide-organic matter coprecipitates were assessed using AF4 coupled to online TOC analysis and ICP-MS. In laboratory prepared samples, Cu was observed in a mixture of small 1-5 nm colloids of Fe oxide-organic matter precipitates, but the majority was observed in larger organic matter colloids and were not UV absorbing, suggesting more aliphatic carbon materials. In field samples, up to 60% of the dissolved Cu

  9. Development and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (Part 1): Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lodhia, J; Mandarano, G; Ferris, NJ; Eu, P; Cowell, SF

    2010-01-01

    Contrast agents, such as iron oxide, enhance MR images by altering the relaxation times of tissues in which the agent is present. They can also be used to label targeted molecular imaging probes. Unfortunately, no molecular imaging probe is currently available on the clinical MRI market. A promising platform for MRI contrast agent development is nanotechnology, where superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS) are tailored for MR contrast enhancement, and/or for molecular imaging. SPIONs can be produced using a range of methods and the choice of method will be influenced by the characteristics most important for a particular application. In addition, the ability to attach molecular markers to SPIONS heralds their application in molecular imaging. There are many reviews on SPION synthesis for MRI; however, these tend to be targeted to a chemistry audience. The development of MRI contrast agents attracts experienced researchers from many fields including some researchers with little knowledge of medical imaging or MRI. This situation presents medical radiation practitioners with opportunities for involvement, collaboration or leadership in research depending on their level of commitment and their ability to learn. Medical radiation practitioners already possess a large portion of the understanding, knowledge and skills necessary for involvement in MRI development and molecular imaging. Their expertise in imaging technology, patient care and radiation safety provides them with skills that are directly applicable to research on the development and application of SPIONs and MRI. In this paper we argue that MRI SPIONs, currently limited to major research centres, will have widespread clinical use in the future. We believe that knowledge about this growing area of research provides an opportunity for medical radiation practitioners to enhance their specialised expertise to ensure best practice in a truly multi-disciplinary environment. This review outlines how and

  10. A pentanuclear iron catalyst designed for water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, Masaya; Kondo, Mio; Kuga, Reiko; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi; Hayami, Shinya; Praneeth, Vijayendran K. K.; Yoshida, Masaki; Yoneda, Ko; Kawata, Satoshi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki

    2016-02-01

    Although the oxidation of water is efficiently catalysed by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (refs 1 and 2), it remains one of the main bottlenecks when aiming for synthetic chemical fuel production powered by sunlight or electricity. Consequently, the development of active and stable water oxidation catalysts is crucial, with heterogeneous systems considered more suitable for practical use and their homogeneous counterparts more suitable for targeted, molecular-level design guided by mechanistic understanding. Research into the mechanism of water oxidation has resulted in a range of synthetic molecular catalysts, yet there remains much interest in systems that use abundant, inexpensive and environmentally benign metals such as iron (the most abundant transition metal in the Earth’s crust and found in natural and synthetic oxidation catalysts). Water oxidation catalysts based on mononuclear iron complexes have been explored, but they often deactivate rapidly and exhibit relatively low activities. Here we report a pentanuclear iron complex that efficiently and robustly catalyses water oxidation with a turnover frequency of 1,900 per second, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that of other iron-based catalysts. Electrochemical analysis confirms the redox flexibility of the system, characterized by six different oxidation states between FeII5 and FeIII5; the FeIII5 state is active for oxidizing water. Quantum chemistry calculations indicate that the presence of adjacent active sites facilitates O-O bond formation with a reaction barrier of less than ten kilocalories per mole. Although the need for a high overpotential and the inability to operate in water-rich solutions limit the practicality of the present system, our findings clearly indicate that efficient water oxidation catalysts based on iron complexes can be created by ensuring that the system has redox flexibility and contains adjacent water-activation sites.

  11. A pentanuclear iron catalyst designed for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Masaya; Kondo, Mio; Kuga, Reiko; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi; Hayami, Shinya; Praneeth, Vijayendran K K; Yoshida, Masaki; Yoneda, Ko; Kawata, Satoshi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki

    2016-02-25

    Although the oxidation of water is efficiently catalysed by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (refs 1 and 2), it remains one of the main bottlenecks when aiming for synthetic chemical fuel production powered by sunlight or electricity. Consequently, the development of active and stable water oxidation catalysts is crucial, with heterogeneous systems considered more suitable for practical use and their homogeneous counterparts more suitable for targeted, molecular-level design guided by mechanistic understanding. Research into the mechanism of water oxidation has resulted in a range of synthetic molecular catalysts, yet there remains much interest in systems that use abundant, inexpensive and environmentally benign metals such as iron (the most abundant transition metal in the Earth's crust and found in natural and synthetic oxidation catalysts). Water oxidation catalysts based on mononuclear iron complexes have been explored, but they often deactivate rapidly and exhibit relatively low activities. Here we report a pentanuclear iron complex that efficiently and robustly catalyses water oxidation with a turnover frequency of 1,900 per second, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that of other iron-based catalysts. Electrochemical analysis confirms the redox flexibility of the system, characterized by six different oxidation states between Fe(II)5 and Fe(III)5; the Fe(III)5 state is active for oxidizing water. Quantum chemistry calculations indicate that the presence of adjacent active sites facilitates O-O bond formation with a reaction barrier of less than ten kilocalories per mole. Although the need for a high overpotential and the inability to operate in water-rich solutions limit the practicality of the present system, our findings clearly indicate that efficient water oxidation catalysts based on iron complexes can be created by ensuring that the system has redox flexibility and contains adjacent water-activation sites.

  12. Fabricating Water Dispersible Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications through Ligand Exchange and Direct Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tina; Avti, Pramod K.; Pouliot, Philippe; Maafi, Foued; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Rhéaume, Éric; Lesage, Frédéric; Kakkar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Stable superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), which can be easily dispersed in an aqueous medium and exhibit high magnetic relaxivities, are ideal candidates for biomedical applications including contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. We describe a versatile methodology to render water dispersibility to SPIONs using tetraethylene glycol (TEG)-based phosphonate ligands, which are easily introduced onto SPIONs by either a ligand exchange process of surface-anchored oleic-acid (OA) molecules or via direct conjugation. Both protocols confer good colloidal stability to SPIONs at different NaCl concentrations. A detailed characterization of functionalized SPIONs suggests that the ligand exchange method leads to nanoparticles with better magnetic properties but higher toxicity and cell death, than the direct conjugation methodology.

  13. Strategies to optimize the biocompatibility of iron oxide nanoparticles - ;SPIONs safe by design;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janko, Christina; Zaloga, Jan; Pöttler, Marina; Dürr, Stephan; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Tietze, Rainer; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Various nanoparticle systems have been developed for medical applications in recent years. For constant improvement of efficacy and safety of nanoparticles, a close interdisciplinary interplay between synthesis, physicochemical characterizations and toxicological investigations is urgently needed. Based on combined toxicological data, we follow a ;safe-by design; strategy for our superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION). Using complementary interference-free toxicological assay systems, we initially identified agglomeration tendencies in physiological fluids, strong uptake by cells and improvable biocompatibility of lauric acid (LA)-coated SPIONs (SPIONLA). Thus, we decided to further stabilize those particles by an artificial protein corona consisting of serum albumin. This approach finally lead to increased colloidal stability, augmented drug loading capacity and improved biocompatibility in previous in vitro assays. Here, we show in whole blood ex vivo and on isolated red blood cells (RBC) that a protein corona protects RBCs from hemolysis by SPIONs.

  14. Modeling of iron oxide deposition by reactive ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Puech, Laurent; Dubarry, Christophe; Ravel, Guillaume; Vito, Eric de

    2010-03-15

    An analytic model of deposition is applied on reactive ion beam sputtering to optimize the properties of iron oxide thin films. This model will be able to predict deposition rate and phase contents. Among its hypotheses, we assume oxygen adsorption at the surface of the target to explain variations of deposition rate for oxygen flow. This hypothesis is validated by chemical analyses on iron targets. An ellipsoidal distribution of probability is introduced to model sputtered matter distribution from iron target and to calculate sputtering yield. Comparison between experimental and calculated deposition rates validates previously assumed hypotheses.

  15. Controlled colloidal synthesis of iron pyrite FeS2 nanorods and quasi-cubic nanocrystal agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Leize; Richardson, Beau J.; Yu, Qiuming

    2013-12-01

    Earth-abundant and nontoxic pyrite iron disulfide (FeS2) is very promising for photovoltaic applications but the phase purity and the morphology of iron pyrite nanocrystals (NCs) have a significant impact on the solar cell performance. In this work, we systematically investigated reaction conditions and the local chemical environment on the phase purity and morphology of iron pyrite NCs synthesized via the hot injection method. By using different solvents to dissolve iron and sulfur agents, varying reactant concentrations, and adding trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) or 1,2-hexadecanediol (Diol) into the reaction solution, iron pyrite short, branched and chromosome-like rods were obtained with a diameter of ~10 nm and a length of ~20-30 nm as well as quasi-cubic NC agglomerates with a size of ~200 nm. Our experimental results show that the molar ratio of sulfur to iron and the reaction temperature are two critical factors in determining the crystalline phase of the synthesized materials. A mechanism involving the generation of H2S is proposed to explain the phase purity observed. The as-synthesized iron pyrite NCs can be dispersed well in chloroform, chlorobenzene, toluene, and hexane and thus are promising in solution-processable photovoltaic applications.

  16. Controlled colloidal synthesis of iron pyrite FeS2 nanorods and quasi-cubic nanocrystal agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Leize; Richardson, Beau J; Yu, Qiuming

    2014-01-21

    Earth-abundant and nontoxic pyrite iron disulfide (FeS2) is very promising for photovoltaic applications but the phase purity and the morphology of iron pyrite nanocrystals (NCs) have a significant impact on the solar cell performance. In this work, we systematically investigated reaction conditions and the local chemical environment on the phase purity and morphology of iron pyrite NCs synthesized via the hot injection method. By using different solvents to dissolve iron and sulfur agents, varying reactant concentrations, and adding trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) or 1,2-hexadecanediol (Diol) into the reaction solution, iron pyrite short, branched and chromosome-like rods were obtained with a diameter of ~10 nm and a length of ~20-30 nm as well as quasi-cubic NC agglomerates with a size of ~200 nm. Our experimental results show that the molar ratio of sulfur to iron and the reaction temperature are two critical factors in determining the crystalline phase of the synthesized materials. A mechanism involving the generation of H2S is proposed to explain the phase purity observed. The as-synthesized iron pyrite NCs can be dispersed well in chloroform, chlorobenzene, toluene, and hexane and thus are promising in solution-processable photovoltaic applications.

  17. Safety assessment of chronic oral exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Susana; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Vaquero, María Pilar; Verdoy, Dolores; Salas, Gorka; Luengo, Yurena; Brenes, Agustín; José Teran, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles with engineered physical and biochemical properties are finding a rapidly increasing number of biomedical applications. However, a wide variety of safety concerns, especially those related to oral exposure, still need to be addressed for iron oxide nanoparticles in order to reach clinical practice. Here, we report on the effects of chronic oral exposure to low doses of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in growing chickens. Animal observation, weight, and diet intake reveal no adverse signs, symptoms, or mortality. No nanoparticle accumulation was observed in liver, spleen, and duodenum, with feces as the main excretion route. Liver iron level and duodenal villi morphology reflect the bioavailability of the iron released from the partial transformation of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in the acid gastric environment. Duodenal gene expression studies related to the absorption of iron from γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles indicate the enhancement of a ferric over ferrous pathway supporting the role of mucins. Our findings reveal that oral administration of iron oxide nanoparticles is a safe route for drug delivery at low nanoparticle doses.

  18. Safety assessment of chronic oral exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Susana; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Vaquero, María Pilar; Verdoy, Dolores; Salas, Gorka; Luengo, Yurena; Brenes, Agustín; José Teran, Francisco

    2015-05-22

    Iron oxide nanoparticles with engineered physical and biochemical properties are finding a rapidly increasing number of biomedical applications. However, a wide variety of safety concerns, especially those related to oral exposure, still need to be addressed for iron oxide nanoparticles in order to reach clinical practice. Here, we report on the effects of chronic oral exposure to low doses of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in growing chickens. Animal observation, weight, and diet intake reveal no adverse signs, symptoms, or mortality. No nanoparticle accumulation was observed in liver, spleen, and duodenum, with feces as the main excretion route. Liver iron level and duodenal villi morphology reflect the bioavailability of the iron released from the partial transformation of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in the acid gastric environment. Duodenal gene expression studies related to the absorption of iron from γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles indicate the enhancement of a ferric over ferrous pathway supporting the role of mucins. Our findings reveal that oral administration of iron oxide nanoparticles is a safe route for drug delivery at low nanoparticle doses.

  19. Characterization of iron oxide layers using Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizjak, Milan; Zalar, Anton; Panjan, Peter; Zorko, Benjamin; Praček, Borut

    2007-02-01

    Metals can form several kinds of oxides. Iron forms wustite (FeO), magnetite (FeO + Fe 2O 3 or Fe 3O 4) and haematite (Fe 2O 3). Iron oxides, especially magnetite, are used for insulation between the lamellas of an electromotor made of electromagnetic sheet. In this work, iron oxide layers were characterized on industrial samples of electromagnetic sheet by AES depth profile analysis, and iron oxides with known chemical composition were used as reference samples, i.e. a magnetite mineral and a standard haematite reference sample. The magnetite mineral was chosen because it can be found in nature in a very pure form. The selection of reference samples was also verified on samples with an oxide layer of known composition, which were prepared by sputter deposition. The composition of the sputtered oxide layers was analysed by the weight-gain method and Rutherford backscattering without the use of standard reference materials (SRM), and the results were then compared with those obtained by AES depth profile analysis.

  20. Controlled aggregation and cell uptake of thermoresponsive polyoxazoline-grafted superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kurzhals, Steffen; Gal, Noga; Zirbs, Ronald; Reimhult, Erik

    2017-02-23

    Hydrophilic polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are potential materials for a plethora of applications in the biotechnological field. Typical such polymers, e.g. dextran or poly(ethylene glycol), lack the ability to tailor the biological response to an environmental trigger, while common responsive polymers such as poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) or poly(acrylic acid) are not suitable for biomedical applications. We present the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with thermoresponsive polyoxazoline brushes grafted at unprecedented density using nitrodopamine anchor chemistry. Reversible aggregation/deaggregation is observed in water and biological medium, confirming control over the colloidal stability. Thermal switching of the solubility could only be achieved by global heating of the sample, while local magnetothermal heating did not produce a sufficiently strong temperature gradient through the brush. Varying the polymer composition allows for tuning of the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) as well as the average nanoparticle cluster size obtained upon heating. The LCST of polyoxazolines and the thermal colloidal stability are shown to be greatly affected by ion concentration, by polymer grafting density and also by the presence of serum protein; this shows that transition temperatures of free polymers in water can be very misleading for the design of polymer-coated nanomaterials for biomedical applications. Finally, the thermoresponsive SPION are shown to be non-cytotoxic and with a low cell uptake scaling with the hydration of the polymer brush, which is tuned by the polymer composition. Thus, we demonstrate that pozylated nanoparticles provide the advantages of PEG- and PNIPAM-grafted nanoparticles, but provide a tunable and more easily functionalizable platform for further development.

  1. Manganese- and iron-dependent marine methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Beal, Emily J; House, Christopher H; Orphan, Victoria J

    2009-07-10

    Anaerobic methanotrophs help regulate Earth's climate and may have been an important part of the microbial ecosystem on the early Earth. The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is often thought of as a sulfate-dependent process, despite the fact that other electron acceptors are more energetically favorable. Here, we show that microorganisms from marine methane-seep sediment in the Eel River Basin in California are capable of using manganese (birnessite) and iron (ferrihydrite) to oxidize methane, revealing that marine AOM is coupled, either directly or indirectly, to a larger variety of oxidants than previously thought. Large amounts of manganese and iron are provided to oceans from rivers, indicating that manganese- and iron-dependent AOM have the potential to be globally important.

  2. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Characterization of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, T.; Iacovita, C.; Benea, D.; Turcu, R.

    2017-05-01

    We report X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results on iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle (Fe3O4) synthesized using solvothermal reduction in the presence of polyethylene glycol. The magnetite obtained was employed as precursor for the synthesis of γ-Fe2O3 (by oxygen dissociation) which in turn was transformed into α-Fe2O3. We confirmed the magnetite, maghemite and hematite structure by Fourier Transformed Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The analysis of the XPS core level and valence band (VB) photoemission spectra for all investigated samples is discussed in terms of the degree of iron oxidation. This is of fundamental importance to better understand the electronic structure of the obtained iron oxide nanoparticles in order to control and improve their quality for specific biomedical applications. Moreover, theoretical band structure calculations are performed for magnetite and the separate contributions of Fe in tetragonal and octahedral environment are shown.

  3. Virus-Templated Near-Amorphous Iron Oxide Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sachin N; Khan, Abid A; Espinosa, Ana; Garcia, Miguel A; Nuansing, Wiwat; Ungureanu, Mariana; Heddle, Jonathan G; Chuvilin, Andrey L; Wege, Christina; Bittner, Alexander M

    2016-06-14

    We present a simple synthesis of iron oxide nanotubes, grown under very mild conditions from a solution containing Fe(II) and Fe(III), on rod-shaped tobacco mosaic virus templates. Their well-defined shape and surface chemistry suggest that these robust bionanoparticles are a versatile platform for synthesis of small, thin mineral tubes, which was achieved efficiently. Various characterization tools were used to explore the iron oxide in detail: Electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), magnetometry (SQUID-VSM), diffraction (XRD, TEM-SAED), electron spectroscopies (EELS, EDX, XPS), and X-ray absorption (XANES with EXAFS analysis). They allowed determination of the structure, crystallinity, magnetic properties, and composition of the tubes. The protein surface of the viral templates was crucial to nucleate iron oxide, exhibiting analogies to biomineralization in natural compartments such as ferritin cages.

  4. Modulation of oxidative stress and microinflammatory status by colloids in refractory dialytic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intradialytic hypotension may adversely affect the outcome of chronic hemodialysis. Therapeutic albumin has powerful anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We have recently shown that systematic colloid infusion during hemodialysis sessions improves hemodynamic parameters in most dialysis hypotension-prone patients unresponsive to usual of preventive measures. We postulated that frequent hypotensive episodes may lead to a noxious inflammatory response mediated by oxidative stress induced by ischemia-reperfusion. The aim of this study was therefore to analyze the effect of 20% albumin and 4% gelatin infusions on oxidative stress and microinflammatory status in hypotension-prone patients unresponsive to usual preventive measures. Methods Prospective cross-over study (lasting 20 weeks) of routine infusion of 200 ml of 20% albumin versus 200 ml of 4% gelatin in 10 patients with refractory intradialytic hypotension. We analyzed the effect of 20% albumin and 4% gelatin on microinflammatory status, oxidative stress, serum nitrite and nitrate levels by analysis of variance. Results A significant decrease in serum ceruloplasmin and serum C3 was observed during the albumin period (p < 0.05, repeated measure ANOVA). A significant decrease in serum hydrogen peroxide was seen during albumin and gelatin administration (p < 0.01, repeated measure ANOVA) and a very large decrease in serum lipid peroxides was observed during the albumin period only (p < 0.01, Friedman test). Serum lactoferrin, serum proinflammatory cytokines and serum nitrite and nitrate levels remained stable during the different periods of this pilot trial. Conclusions We conclude that the improvement in microinflammatory status observed during colloid infusion in hypotension-prone dialysis patients may be related to a decrease in ischemia-reperfusion of noble organs, together with a specific reduction in oxidative stress by albumin. Trial registration ISRCTN 20957055 PMID:22013952

  5. Arsenate adsorption onto iron oxide amended rice husk char.

    PubMed

    Cope, Christopher O; Webster, Damon S; Sabatini, David A

    2014-08-01

    In this study, rice husks were charred at 550 °C in a partially sealed ceramic vessel for 30minutes to create a high specific surface area (SSA) rice husk char (RHC). The RHC was then amended with iron oxides using dissolved ferric nitrate, Fe(NO3)3⋅9H2O, to provide a surface chemistry conducive to arsenic adsorption. The 550 °C iron oxide amended rice husk char's (550 IOA-RHC's) SSA was nearly 2.5 orders of magnitude higher and the arsenate adsorptive level was nearly 2 orders of magnitude higher than those reported for iron oxide amended sand, thus indicating a positive relationship between post-amendment SSA and arsenate adsorptive levels. Rice husks were then charred at temperatures ranging from 450 °C to 1050 °C to create an even higher SSA material, which might further increase arsenate adsorptive levels. The 950 °C RHC was chosen for amendment due to its high SSA and feasibility of being produced in the field. Once amended, the 950 °C iron oxide amended rice husk char (950 IOA-RHC) improved the arsenate adsorption capacity by thus confirming a positive relationship, though not a linear relationship, between post-amendment SSA and arsenic adsorptive capacity. Further study demonstrated that post-amendment mesoporous volume and mesoporous surface area appear to be better indicators of arsenic adsorptive capacity than SSA or iron content.

  6. Influence of graphene oxide on the transport and deposition behaviors of colloids in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shengnan; Wu, Dan; Ge, Zhi; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2017-06-01

    The effects of graphene oxide (GO) on the transport and deposition behaviors of colloids with different sizes in packed quartz sand were investigated in both NaCl (10 and 50 mM) and CaCl2 solutions (1 and 5 mM) at pH 6. Fluorescent carboxylate-modified polystyrene latex microspheres (CMLs) with size ranging from 0.2 to 2 μm were utilized as model colloids. Both breakthrough curves and retained profiles of colloids in the presence and absence of GO in suspensions under all examined solution conditions were analyzed. The breakthrough curves of all three different-sized CMLs with GO were higher yet the retained profiles were lower than those without GO at both examined ionic strengths in NaCl solutions. The observation showed that GO increased the transport and decreased the deposition of all three different-sized CMLs in NaCl solutions. However, in CaCl2 solutions, opposite observation was achieved at two different ionic strength conditions. Specifically, the presence of GO increased the transport and decreased the deposition of all three different-sized CMLs in 1 mM CaCl2 solutions, whereas, it decreased the transport and increased the deposition of all three different-sized CMLs in 5 mM CaCl2 solutions. Comparison the breakthrough curves and retained profiles of CMLs versus those of GO yielded that the overall transport and deposition behaviors of all three different-sized CMLs with GO copresent in suspensions agreed well with the transport and deposition behaviors of GO under all examined conditions. The transport and deposition behaviors of CMLs in packed porous media clearly were controlled by those of GO under the conditions investigated in present study due to the adsorption of CMLs onto GO surfaces. Our study showed that once released into natural environment, GO would adsorb (interact with) different types of colloids and thus have significant influence on the fate and transport of colloids in porous media. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Dobbins, Michael S.; Murtha, Marlyn J.

    1983-05-31

    A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

  8. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Leygraf, Christofer H.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  9. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide photochemical diodes

    DOEpatents

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Leygraf, Christofer H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor photochemical diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The photochemical diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  10. Structural changes in iron-cobalt oxide nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishchev, K. N.; Golub'ev, M. A.; Maksimov, Yu. V.; Beglov, V. I.; Kyashkin, V. M.; Panov, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    The structure of binary iron-cobalt oxide nanosystems—precursors of bimetallic catalysts—is studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and small-angle X-ray scattering. The oxide system under study represents a promising material for creating new metallic nanocatalysts for ammonia synthesis. The structural evolution in the composition range 100Fe/0Co-5Fe/95Co is found to correspond to the transition from fine-grained α-Fe2O3 to mixed iron-cobalt spinels of various compositions and degrees of dispersity.

  11. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.; Leygraf, C.H.

    1984-07-17

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  12. Multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: promising tools in cancer theranostics.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Poornima Budime; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar

    2013-08-09

    Iron-oxide nanoparticles of small dimensions that have superparamagnetic properties show immense potential to revolutionize the future of cancer theranostics, the combinatorial diagnosis and therapeutic approach towards cancer. Superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have unique magnetic properties, due to which they show excellent tumor-targeting efficiency, and this paves the way for effective personalized cancer treatment. The aim of this review is to focus on the ability of SPIONs to perform multiple roles in the field of cancer biology, such as in diagnosis, monitoring, targeting and therapy. Also, other topics are discussed, including the synthesis of SPIONs, the challenges and recent advances.

  13. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia: focus on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Sophie; Dutz, Silvio; Häfeli, Urs O; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2011-08-10

    Due to their unique magnetic properties, excellent biocompatibility as well as multi-purpose biomedical potential (e.g., applications in cancer therapy and general drug delivery), superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are attracting increasing attention in both pharmaceutical and industrial communities. The precise control of the physiochemical properties of these magnetic systems is crucial for hyperthermia applications, as the induced heat is highly dependent on these properties. In this review, the limitations and recent advances in the development of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for hyperthermia are presented.

  14. Multifunctional Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Diagnostics, Therapy and Macromolecule Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Swee Kuan; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of either metal (e.g. Au), or magnetic NP (e.g. iron oxide) with other fluorescent components such as quantum dots (QDs) or organic dyes have been emerging as versatile candidate systems for cancer diagnosis, therapy, and macromolecule delivery such as micro ribonucleic acid (microRNA). This review intends to highlight the recent advances in the synthesis and application of multifunctional NPs (mainly iron oxide) in theranostics, an area used to combine therapeutics and diagnostics. The recent applications of NPs in miRNA delivery are also reviewed. PMID:24396508

  15. Mercury mobilization and speciation linked to bacterial iron oxide and sulfate reduction: A column study to mimic reactive transfer in an anoxic aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellal, Jennifer; Guédron, Stéphane; Huguet, Lucie; Schäfer, Jörg; Laperche, Valérie; Joulian, Catherine; Lanceleur, Laurent; Burnol, André; Ghestem, Jean-Philippe; Garrido, Francis; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne

    2015-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) mobility and speciation in subsurface aquifers is directly linked to its surrounding geochemical and microbial environment. The role of bacteria on Hg speciation (i.e., methylation, demethylation and reduction) is well documented, however little data is available on their impact on Hg mobility. The aim of this study was to test if (i) Hg mobility is due to either direct iron oxide reduction by iron reducing bacteria (IRB) or indirect iron reduction by sulfide produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), and (ii) to investigate its subsequent fate and speciation. Experiments were carried out in an original column setup combining geochemical and microbiological approaches that mimic an aquifer including an interface of iron-rich and iron depleted zones. Two identical glass columns containing iron oxides spiked with Hg(II) were submitted to (i) direct iron reduction by IRB and (ii) to indirect iron reduction by sulfides produced by SRB. Results show that in both columns Hg was leached and methylated during the height of bacterial activity. In the column where IRB are dominant, Hg methylation and leaching from the column was directly correlated to bacterial iron reduction (i.e., FeII release). In opposition, when SRB are dominant, produced sulfide induced indirect iron oxide reduction and rapid adsorption of leached Hg (or produced methylmercury) on neoformed iron sulfides (e.g., Mackinawite) or its precipitation as HgS. At the end of the SRB column experiment, when iron-oxide reduction was complete, filtered Hg and Fe concentrations increased at the outlet suggesting a leaching of Hg bound to FeS colloids that may be a dominant mechanism of Hg transport in aquifer environments. These experimental results highlight different biogeochemical mechanisms that can occur in stratified sub-surface aquifers where bacterial activities play a major role on Hg mobility and changes in speciation.

  16. Mercury mobilization and speciation linked to bacterial iron oxide and sulfate reduction: A column study to mimic reactive transfer in an anoxic aquifer.

    PubMed

    Hellal, Jennifer; Guédron, Stéphane; Huguet, Lucie; Schäfer, Jörg; Laperche, Valérie; Joulian, Catherine; Lanceleur, Laurent; Burnol, André; Ghestem, Jean-Philippe; Garrido, Francis; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne

    2015-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) mobility and speciation in subsurface aquifers is directly linked to its surrounding geochemical and microbial environment. The role of bacteria on Hg speciation (i.e., methylation, demethylation and reduction) is well documented, however little data is available on their impact on Hg mobility. The aim of this study was to test if (i) Hg mobility is due to either direct iron oxide reduction by iron reducing bacteria (IRB) or indirect iron reduction by sulfide produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), and (ii) to investigate its subsequent fate and speciation. Experiments were carried out in an original column setup combining geochemical and microbiological approaches that mimic an aquifer including an interface of iron-rich and iron depleted zones. Two identical glass columns containing iron oxides spiked with Hg(II) were submitted to (i) direct iron reduction by IRB and (ii) to indirect iron reduction by sulfides produced by SRB. Results show that in both columns Hg was leached and methylated during the height of bacterial activity. In the column where IRB are dominant, Hg methylation and leaching from the column was directly correlated to bacterial iron reduction (i.e., Fe(II) release). In opposition, when SRB are dominant, produced sulfide induced indirect iron oxide reduction and rapid adsorption of leached Hg (or produced methylmercury) on neoformed iron sulfides (e.g., Mackinawite) or its precipitation as HgS. At the end of the SRB column experiment, when iron-oxide reduction was complete, filtered Hg and Fe concentrations increased at the outlet suggesting a leaching of Hg bound to FeS colloids that may be a dominant mechanism of Hg transport in aquifer environments. These experimental results highlight different biogeochemical mechanisms that can occur in stratified sub-surface aquifers where bacterial activities play a major role on Hg mobility and changes in speciation.

  17. Preparation of oxide particles with ordered macropores by colloidal templating and spray pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Iskandar, Ferry; Shibamoto, Shinji; Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo . E-mail: okuyama@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2004-10-04

    Silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide, aluminium dioxide, zirconium dioxide, and yttrium dioxide particles containing macropores with ordered, hexagonal closed packing structures were produced by spray pyrolysis. A mixture of a solution of the oxide source (nitrous metal) and a colloid comprised of polystyrene latex (PSL) particles was used. The process involved initial drying at low temperature to evaporate the solvent, followed by drying at high temperature to permit the pyrolysis reaction to occur and to decompose the PSL beads. This takes place in a vertical reactor and requires around 1-2 s. This method can, in principle, be used to produce various types of oxide particles containing ordered pores. It allows easy control of the particle size, pore size and space, and the porosity of particles. Bragg reflection of the powdered material was observed under ultraviolet irradiation.

  18. Unprecedented Selective Oxidation of Styrene Derivatives using a Supported Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst in Aqueous Medium

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron oxide nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica-type materials have been successfully utilized in the aqueous selective oxidation of alkenes under mild conditions using hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant. Catalysts could be easily recovered after completion of the reac...

  19. Unprecedented Selective Oxidation of Styrene Derivatives using a Supported Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst in Aqueous Medium

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron oxide nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica-type materials have been successfully utilized in the aqueous selective oxidation of alkenes under mild conditions using hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant. Catalysts could be easily recovered after completion of the reac...

  20. Alteration of the Copper-Binding Capacity of Iron-Rich Humic Colloids during Transport from Peatland to Marine Waters.

    PubMed

    Muller, François L L; Cuscov, Marco

    2017-02-28

    Blanket bogs contain vast amounts of Sphagnum-derived organic substances which can act as powerful chelators for dissolved iron and thus enhance its export to the coastal ocean. To investigate the variations in quantity and quality of these exports, adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) was used to characterize the metal binding properties of molecular weight-fractionated dissolved organic matter (MW-fractionated DOM) in the catchment and coastal plume of a small peat-draining river over a seasonal cycle. Within the plume, both iron- and copper-binding organic ligands showed a linear, conservative distribution with increasing salinity, illustrating the high stability of peatland-derived humic substances (HS). Within the catchment, humic colloids lost up to 50% of their copper-binding capacity, expressed as a molar ratio to organic carbon, after residing for 1 week or more in the main reservoir of the catchment. Immediately downstream of the reservoir, the molar ratio [L2]/[Corg], where L2 was the second strongest copper-binding ligand, was 0.75 × 10(-4) when the reservoir residence time was 5 h but 0.34 × 10(-4) when it was 25 days. Residence time did not affect the carbon specific iron-binding capacity of the humic substances which was [L]/[Corg] = (0.80 ± 0.20) × 10(-2). Our results suggest that the loss of copper-binding capacity with increasing residence time is caused by intracolloidal interactions between iron and HS during transit from peat soil to river mouth.

  1. Recent advances in surface chemistry strategies for the fabrication of functional iron oxide based magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcheniuk, Kostiantyn; Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Kukhar, Valeriy P.; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of superparamagnetic nanostructures, especially iron-oxide based nanoparticles (IONPs), with appropriate surface functional groups has been intensively researched for many high-technological applications, including high density data storage, biosensing and biomedicine. In medicine, IONPs are nowadays widely used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in hyperthermia therapy, but are also exploited for drug and gene delivery, detoxification of biological fluids or immunoassays, as they are relatively non-toxic. The use of magnetic particles in vivo requires IONPs to have high magnetization values, diameters below 100 nm with overall narrow size distribution and long time stability in biological fluids. Due to the high surface energies of IONPs agglomeration over time is often encountered. It is thus of prime importance to modify their surface to prevent aggregation and to limit non-specific adsorption of biomolecules onto their surface. Such chemical modifications result in IONPs being well-dispersed and biocompatible, and allow for targeted delivery and specific interactions. The chemical nature of IONPs thus determines not only the overall size of the colloid, but also plays a significant role for in vivo and in vitro applications. This review discusses the different concepts currently used for the surface functionalization and coating of iron oxide nanoparticles. The diverse strategies for the covalent linking of drugs, proteins, enzymes, antibodies, and nucleotides will be discussed and the chemically relevant steps will be explained in detail.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro biological evaluation of highly stable diversely functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipsikha; Sahu, Sumanta K.; Banerjee, Indranil; Das, Manasmita; Mishra, Debashish; Maiti, Tapas K.; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2011-09-01

    In this article, we report the design and synthesis of a series of well-dispersed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) using chitosan as a surface modifying agent to develop a potential T 2 contrast probe for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The amine, carboxyl, hydroxyl, and thiol functionalities were introduced on chitosan-coated magnetic probe via simple reactions with small reactive organic molecules to afford a series of biofunctionalized nanoparticles. Physico-chemical characterizations of these functionalized nanoparticles were performed by TEM, XRD, DLS, FTIR, and VSM. The colloidal stability of these functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles was investigated in presence of phosphate buffer saline, high salt concentrations and different cell media for 1 week. MRI analysis of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell lines treated with nanoparticles elucidated that the amine-functionalized nanoparticles exhibited higher amount of signal darkening and lower T 2 relaxation in comparison to the others. The cellular internalization efficacy of these functionalized SPIONs was also investigated with HeLa cancer cell line by magnetically activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence microscopy and results established selectively higher internalization efficacy of amine-functionalized nanoparticles to cancer cells. These positive attributes demonstrated that these nanoconjugates can be used as a promising platform for further in vitro and in vivo biological evaluations.

  3. Dispersion-precipitation synthesis of nanosized magnetic iron oxide for efficient removal of arsenite in water.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Xu, Jing; Wang, Yajie; Wu, Feng; Xu, Xiuyan; Li, Jinjun

    2015-05-01

    Nanosized magnetic iron oxide was facilely synthesized by a dispersion-precipitation method, which involved acetone-promoted precipitation of colloidal hydrous iron oxide nanoparticles and subsequent calcination of the precipitate at 250°C. Characterization by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, nitrogen sorption, and vibrating-sample magnetometry revealed that the material was a composite of α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3 with primary particle size of 15-25 nm and specific surface area of 121 m(2)/g, as well as superparamagnetic property. The material was used as adsorbent for the removal of arsenite in water. Batch experiments showed that the adsorption isotherms at pH 3.0-11.0 fit the Langmuir equation and the adsorption obeys pseudo-second-order kinetics. Its maximum sorption capability for arsenite is 46.5 mg/g at pH 7.0. Coexisting nitrate, carbonate, sulfate, chloride, and fluoride have no significant effect on the removal efficiency of arsenite, while phosphate and silicate reduce the removal efficiency to some extent. The As(III) removal mechanism is chemisorption through forming inner-sphere surface complexes. The efficiency of arsenic removal is still maintained after five cycles of regeneration-reuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Specific ion effects on the electrokinetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles: experiments and simulations.

    PubMed

    Vereda, Fernando; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel

    2015-07-14

    We report experimental and simulation studies on ion specificity in aqueous colloidal suspensions of positively charged, bare magnetite nanoparticles. Magnetite has the largest saturation magnetization among iron oxides and relatively low toxicity, which explain why it has been used in multiple biomedical applications. Bare magnetite is hydrophilic and the sign of the surface charge can be changed by adjusting the pH, its isoelectric point being in the vicinity of pH = 7. Electrophoretic mobility of our nanoparticles in the presence of increasing concentrations of different anions showed that anions regarded as kosmotropic are more efficient in decreasing, and even reversing, the mobility of the particles. If the anions were ordered according to the extent to which they reduced the particle mobility, a classical Hofmeister series was obtained with the exception of thiocyanate, whose position was altered. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict the diffuse potential of magnetite in the presence of the same anions. The simulations took into account the ion volume, and the electrostatic and dispersion forces among the ions and between the ions and the solid surface. Even though no fitting parameters were introduced and all input data were estimated using Lifshitz theory of van der Waals forces or obtained from the literature, the predicted diffusion potentials of different anions followed the same order as the mobility curves. The results suggest that ionic polarizabilities and ion sizes are to a great extent responsible for the specific ion effects on the electrokinetic potential of iron oxide particles.

  5. Iron oxides, dissolved silica, and regulation of marine phosphate concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planavsky, N.; Reinhard, C.; Lyons, T.

    2008-12-01

    Phosphorous concentrations in iron oxide-rich sediments reflect orthophosphate levels in the water column from which iron oxides precipitated. Sediment P/Fe ratios are also strongly influenced by the concentrations of dissolved species that inhibit orthophosphate-to-ferrihydrite sorption, most notably silica. It may, therefore, be possible to use P/Fe ratios in iron oxide-rich sediments to estimate past dissolved P concentrations, if one considers the evolution of the silica cycle. A compilation of Fe and P data in iron oxide-rich sediments through time reveals an increase in P/Fe ratios after the Jurassic. We propose that this trend indicates evolution of the iron-oxide phosphate removal mechanism caused by decreasing levels of sorption inhibition by dissolved silica. The large difference in P/Fe ratios in Cenozoic versus older iron-oxide rich sediments can be linked with Si drawdown caused by the proliferation of siliceous plankton in the Cretaceous. There is also a late Mesozoic or Cenozoic increase in V/Fe ratios, which provides additional evidence for lower ferrihydrite anion sorption efficiency prior to diatom radiation. P/Fe ratios in iron oxide-rich sediments from the early and middle Phanerozoic are comparable to the ratios in iron formations previously presented as evidence for an early Precambrian phosphate crisis (Bjerrum and Canfield, 2002, Nature, 417:159-162). Given the compelling evidence for higher Si concentrations in the Precambrian compared to the Phanerozoic and dissolved P concentrations comparable to modern levels throughout the Phanerozoic, the presented trend of P/Fe ratios suggests dissolved P concentrations were higher in Precambrian than Phanerozoic oceans. High dissolved P levels in the Precambrian may have been linked to inhibited carbonate fluorapatite (CFA) formation as a result of persistently high levels of carbonate supersaturation. Carbonate ion substitution into CFA scales with the ambient carbonate ion activity and increases

  6. DETERMINATION OF THE RATES AND PRODUCTS OF FERROUS IRON OXIDATION IN ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED POND WATER.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved ferrous iron and arsenic in the presence of insufficient oxygenated ground water is released into a pond. When the mixing of ferrous iron and oxygenated water within the pond occurs, the ferrous iron is oxidized and precipitated as an iron oxide. Groups of experiments...

  7. Effect of the nanoparticle synthesis method on dendronized iron oxides as MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Basly, Brice; Popa, Gabriela; Fleutot, Solenne; Pichon, Benoit P; Garofalo, Antonio; Ghobril, Cynthia; Billotey, Claire; Berniard, Aurélie; Bonazza, Pauline; Martinez, Hervé; Felder-Flesch, Delphine; Begin-Colin, Sylvie

    2013-02-14

    Aqueous suspensions of dendronized iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been obtained after functionalization, with two types of dendrons, of NPs synthesized either by coprecipitation (leading to naked NPs in water) or by thermal decomposition (NPs in situ coated by oleic acid in an organic solvent). Different grafting strategies have been optimized depending on the NPs synthetic method. The size distribution, the colloidal stability in isoosmolar media, the surface complex nature as well as the preliminary biokinetic studies performed with optical imaging, and the contrast enhancement properties evaluated through in vitro and in vivo MRI experiments, have been compared as a function of the nature of both dendrons and NPs. All functionalized NPs displayed good colloidal stability in water, however the ones bearing a peripheral carboxylic acid function gave the best results in isoosmolar media. Whereas the grafting rates were similar, the nature of the surface complex depended on the NPs synthetic method. The in vitro contrast enhancement properties were better than commercial products, with a better performance of the NPs synthesized by coprecipitation. On the other hand, the NPs synthesized by thermal decomposition were more efficient in vivo. Furthermore, they both displayed good biodistribution with renal and hepatobiliary elimination pathways and no consistent RES uptake.

  8. Oleate coating of iron oxide nanoparticles in aqueous systems: the role of temperature and surfactant concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Hans-Christian; Schwaminger, Sebastian; Fraga García, Paula; Ritscher, Jonathan; Berensmeier, Sonja

    2016-04-01

    Coating magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with sodium oleate (SO) is known to be an excellent method to create biocompatible, stable colloids with a narrow size distribution. However, the mechanism of oleate adsorption on the MNP surface in aqueous systems, as well as its influence on colloidal stability, is not yet fully understood. In this context, we present here a physico-chemical study to provide a deeper understanding of surfactant interaction mechanisms with nanoparticles. We examined the effect of temperature and the SO/MNP ratio (w/w) on the adsorption process in water and observed the existence of a maximum for the adsorbed oleate amount at lower temperatures, whereas at higher temperatures, the isotherm can be adapted to the Langmuir model with constant capacity after saturation. The oleate load on the MNP surface was quantified using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography measurements of samples in solution. The thermogravimetric analyses of the solid residues together with infrared spectroscopy analyses indicate a bilayer-similar structure at the MNP/water interface even for low oleate loads. The oleate interacts with the iron oxide surface through a bidentate coordination of the carboxyl group. Zeta potential measurements demonstrate the high stability of the coated system. The maximal oleate load per unit mass of MNPs reaches approximately 0.35 goleate g MNP -1 .

  9. Nitric oxide ameliorates the damaging effects of oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Manish Singh; Srivastava, Meenakshi; Srivastava, Alka; Singh, Anumeha; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2016-11-01

    In cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120, iron deficiency leads to oxidative stress with unavoidable consequences. Nitric oxide reduces pigment damage and supported the growth of Anabaena 7120 in iron-deficient conditions. Elevation in nitric oxide accumulation and reduced superoxide radical production justified the role of nitric oxide in alleviating oxidative stress in iron deficiency. Increased activities of antioxidative enzymes and higher levels of ROS scavengers (ascorbate, glutathione and thiol) in iron deficiency were also observed in the presence of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide also supported the membrane integrity of Anabaena cells and reduces protein and DNA damage caused by oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency. Results suggested that nitric oxide alleviates the damaging effects of oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

  10. The fate of arsenic adsorbed on iron oxides in the presence of arsenite-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhennan; Yin, Naiyi; Du, Huili; Cai, Xiaolin; Cui, Yanshan

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a redox-active metalloid whose toxicity and mobility in soil depend on its oxidation state. Arsenite [As(III)] can be oxidized by microbes and adsorbed by minerals in the soil. However, the combined effects of these abiotic and biotic processes are not well understood. In this study, the fate of arsenic in the presence of an isolated As(III)-oxidizing bacterium (Pseudomonas sp. HN-1, 10(9) colony-forming units (CFUs)·ml(-1)) and three iron oxides (goethite, hematite, and magnetite at 1.6 g L(-1)) was determined using batch experiments. The total As adsorption by iron oxides was lower with bacteria present and was higher with iron oxides alone. The total As adsorption decreased by 78.6%, 36.0% and 79.7% for goethite, hematite and magnetite, respectively, due to the presence of bacteria. As(III) adsorbed on iron oxides could also be oxidized by Pseudomonas sp. HN-1, but the oxidation rate (1.3 μmol h(-1)) was much slower than the rate in the aqueous phase (96.2 μmol h(-1)). Therefore, the results of other studies with minerals only might overestimate the adsorptive capacity of solids in natural systems; the presence of minerals might hinder As(III) oxidation by microbes. Under aerobic conditions, in the presence of iron oxides and As(III)-oxidizing bacteria, arsenic is adsorbed onto iron oxides within the adsorption capacity, and As(V) is the primary form in the solid and aqueous phases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Deposition rates of oxidized iron on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    The reddened oxidized surface of Mars is indicative of temporal interactions between the Martian atmosphere and its surface. During the evolution of the Martian regolith, primary ferromagnesian silicate and sulfide minerals in basaltic rocks apparently have been oxidized to secondary ferric-bearing assemblages. To evaluate how and when such oxidized deposits were formed on Mars, information about the mechanisms and rates of chemical weathering of Fe(2+)-bearing minerals has been determined. In this paper, mechanisms and rates of deposition of ferric oxide phases on the Martian surface are discussed.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast of iron oxide nanoparticles developed for hyperthermia is dominated by iron content

    PubMed Central

    Wabler, Michele; Zhu, Wenlian; Hedayati, Mohammad; Attaluri, Anilchandra; Zhou, Haoming; Mihalic, Jana; Geyh, Alison; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Ivkov, Robert; Artemov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) are used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hyperthermia for cancer treatment. The relationship between MRI signal intensity and cellular iron concentration for many new formulations, particularly MNPs having magnetic properties designed for heating in hyperthermia, is lacking. In this study, we examine the correlation between MRI T2 relaxation time and iron content in cancer cells loaded with various MNP formulations. Materials and methods Human prostate carcinoma DU-145 cells were loaded with starch-coated bionised nanoferrite (BNF), iron oxide (Nanomag® D-SPIO), Feridex™, and dextran-coated Johns Hopkins University (JHU) particles at a target concentration of 50 pg Fe/cell using poly-D-lysine transfection reagent. T2-weighted MRI of serial dilutions of these labelled cells was performed at 9.4 T and iron content quantification was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Clonogenic assay was used to characterise cytotoxicity. Results No cytotoxicity was observed at twice the target intracellular iron concentration (~100 pg Fe/cell). ICP-MS revealed highest iron uptake efficiency with BNF and JHU particles, followed by Feridex and Nanomag-D-SPIO, respectively. Imaging data showed a linear correlation between increased intracellular iron concentration and decreased T2 times, with no apparent correlation among MNP magnetic properties. Conclusions This study demonstrates that for the range of nanoparticle concentrations internalised by cancer cells the signal intensity of T2-weighted MRI correlates closely with absolute iron concentration associated with the cells. This correlation may benefit applications for cell-based cancer imaging and therapy including nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery and hyperthermia. PMID:24773041

  13. Iron as a catalyst of human low-density lipoprotein oxidation: Critical factors involved in its oxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Lapenna, Domenico; Ciofani, Giuliano; Obletter, Gabriele

    2017-05-01

    Iron-induced human LDL oxidation, which is relevant to atherosclerosis, has not yet been properly investigated. We addressed such issue using iron(II) and (III) basically in the presence of phosphates, which are present in vivo and influence iron oxidative properties, at pH 4.5 and 7.4, representative, respectively, of the lysosomal and plasma environment. In 10mM phosphate buffered saline (PBS), iron(II) induces substantial LDL oxidation at pH 4.5 at low micromolar concentrations, while at pH 7.4 has low oxidative effects; iron(III) promotes small LDL oxidation only at pH 4.5. In 10mM sodium acetate/NaCl buffer, pH 4.5, iron-induced LDL oxidation is far higher than in PBS, highlighting the relevance of phosphates in the inhibitory modulation of iron-induced LDL oxidation. LDL oxidation is related to iron binding to the protein and lipid moiety of LDL, and requires the presence of iron(II) bound to LDL together with iron(III). Chemical modification of LDL carboxyl groups, which could bind iron especially at pH 4.5, decreases significantly iron binding to LDL and iron-induced LDL oxidation. Hydroxyl radical scavengers are ineffective on iron-induced LDL oxidation, which is inhibited by metal chelation, scavengers of alkoxyl/peroxyl radicals, or removal of LDL lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH). Overall, substantial human LDL oxidation is induced LOOH-dependently by iron(II) at pH 4.5 even in the presence of phosphates, suggesting the occurrence of iron(II)-induced LDL oxidation in vivo within lysosomes, where pH is about 4.5, iron(II) and phosphates coexist, plasma with its antioxidants is absent, and glutathione peroxidase is poorly expressed resulting in LOOH accumulation.

  14. Ultrasmall mixed ferrite colloids as multidimensional magnetic resonance imaging, cell labeling, and cell sorting agents.

    PubMed

    Groman, Ernest V; Bouchard, Jacqueline C; Reinhardt, Christopher P; Vaccaro, Dennis E

    2007-01-01

    One area that has been overlooked in the evolution of magnetic nanoparticle technology is the possibility of introducing informational atoms into the iron oxide core of the coated colloid. Introduction of suitable atoms into the iron oxide core offers an opportunity to produce a quantifiable probe, thereby adding one or more dimensions to the magnetic colloid's informational status. Lanthanide-doped iron oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized to introduce informational atoms through the formation of colloidal mixed ferrites. These colloids are designated ultrasmall mixed ferrite iron oxides (USMIOs). USMIOs containing 5 mol % europium exhibit superparamagnetic behavior with an induced magnetization of 56 emu/g Fe at 1.5 T, a powder X-ray diffraction pattern congruent with magnetite, and R1 and R2 relaxivity values of 15.4 (mM s) (-1) and 33.9 (mM s) (-1), respectively, in aqueous solution at 37 degrees C and 0.47 T. USMIO can be detected by five physical methods, combining the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) qualities of iron with the sensitive and quantitative detection of lanthanide metals by neutron activation analysis (NA), time-resolved fluorescence (TRF), X-ray fluorescence, along with detection by electron microscopy (EM). In addition to quantitative detection using neutron activation analysis, the presence of lanthanides in the iron oxide matrix confers attractive optical properties for long-term multilabeling studies with europium and terbium. These USMIOs offer high photostability, a narrow emission band, and a broad absorption band combining the high sensitivity of time-resolved fluorescence with the high spatial resolution of MRI. USMIO nanoparticles are prepared through modifications of traditional magnetite-based iron oxide colloid synthetic methods. A 5 mol % substitution of ferric iron with trivalent europium yielded a colloid with nearly identical magnetic, physical, and chemical characteristics to its magnetite colloid parent.

  15. Synthesis, characterization, applications, and challenges of iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Attarad; Zafar, Hira; Zia, Muhammad; ul Haq, Ihsan; Phull, Abdul Rehman; Ali, Joham Sarfraz; Hussain, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Recently, iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted much consideration due to their unique properties, such as superparamagnetism, surface-to-volume ratio, greater surface area, and easy separation methodology. Various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted to synthesize magnetic NPs with suitable surface chemistry. This review summarizes the methods for the preparation of iron oxide NPs, size and morphology control, and magnetic properties with recent bioengineering, commercial, and industrial applications. Iron oxides exhibit great potential in the fields of life sciences such as biomedicine, agriculture, and environment. Nontoxic conduct and biocompatible applications of magnetic NPs can be enriched further by special surface coating with organic or inorganic molecules, including surfactants, drugs, proteins, starches, enzymes, antibodies, nucleotides, nonionic detergents, and polyelectrolytes. Magnetic NPs can also be directed to an organ, tissue, or tumor using an external magnetic field for hyperthermic treatment of patients. Keeping in mind the current interest in iron NPs, this review is designed to report recent information from synthesis to characterization, and applications of iron NPs. PMID:27578966

  16. Three-dimensional patterning of solid microstructures through laser reduction of colloidal graphene oxide in liquid-crystalline dispersions.

    PubMed

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Behabtu, Natnael; Martinez, Angel; Lee, Taewoo; Tsentalovich, Dmitri E; Ceriotti, Gabriel; Tour, James M; Pasquali, Matteo; Smalyukh, Ivan I

    2015-05-21

    Graphene materials and structures have become an essential part of modern electronics and photovoltaics. However, despite many production methods, applications of graphene-based structures are hindered by high costs, lack of scalability and limitations in spatial patterning. Here we fabricate three-dimensional functional solid microstructures of reduced graphene oxide in a lyotropic nematic liquid crystal of graphene oxide flakes using a pulsed near-infrared laser. This reliable, scalable approach is mask-free, does not require special chemical reduction agents, and can be implemented at ambient conditions starting from aqueous graphene oxide flakes. Orientational ordering of graphene oxide flakes in self-assembled liquid-crystalline phases enables laser patterning of complex, three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide structures and colloidal particles, such as trefoil knots, with 'frozen' orientational order of flakes. These structures and particles are mechanically rigid and range from hundreds of nanometres to millimetres in size, as needed for applications in colloids, electronics, photonics and display technology.

  17. Distribution Behavior of Phosphorus and Metallization of Iron Oxide in Carbothermic Reduction of High-Phosphorus Iron Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Ji-Whoe; Kim, Dong-Yuk; Jung, Sung-Mo

    2015-10-01

    Distribution behavior of phosphorus and metallization of iron ore in the carbothermic reduction of high-phosphorus iron ore were investigated. Reduction degree of the iron oxide was evaluated by quadruple mass spectrometry connected to thermogravimetric analysis. The distribution of some elements including phosphorus was examined by electron probe micro-analyzer mapping analyses. The reduction behavior of high-phosphorus iron ore was evaluated as a function of reduction temperature, C/O molar ratio, and CaO addition. High reduction temperature accelerated the reduction of both iron oxide and hydroxylapatite, and high C/O molar ratio also promotes both of them. Those were contradictory to the targets of higher reduction degree of iron oxide and of lower one of hydroxylapatite. It was confirmed that appropriate amount of CaO addition could enhance the reduction of iron oxide, and regulate the reduction of hydroxylapatite.

  18. Iron Partitioning and Oxidation State in Earth's Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piet, H.; Badro, J.; Nabiei, F.; Dennenwaldt, T.; Shim, S. H. D.; Cantoni, M.; Hébert, C.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    Valence state and concentrations of iron in lower mantle phases have strong effects on their chemical and physical properties. Experimental studies have reported stark differences in iron partitioning between bridgmanite (Brg) and ferropericlase (Fp) for San Carlos olivine [1] and pyrolite [2] systems. We recently performed experiments at lower mantle conditions for an Al-rich olivine system [3] and observed an iron enrichment of the silicate phase very similar to that in pyrolite. Mössbauer studies [4] have shown that in the presence of aluminum non negligible amounts of Fe3+ could be incorporated in bridgmanite explaining the observed iron enrichment. Non negligible amounts of Fe3+ in the lower mantle could influence transport properties of the phases [5]. The evaluation of ferrous and ferric iron concentrations in lower mantle mineral assemblages is then key to a thorough understanding of geophysical observations and associated mantle dynamics. We used electron energy loss spectroscopy technique to quantify the proportions of Fe2+ and Fe3+ iron in Brg and Fp phases previously synthesized from Al-rich olivine composition [3]. The oxidation state of iron in the lower mantle will be discussed as well as ensuing implications on transport properties for relevant lower mantle compositions. References [1] Sakai et al., 2009 [2] Prescher et al., 2014 [3] Piet et al., submitted [4] McCammon et al., 1996 [5] Xu et al., 1998

  19. Characterization and Functionalization of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles for Use as Potential Agents for Cancer Thermotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Nora

    This thesis presents experimental studies of iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis, functionalization, and intracellular hyperthermal effects on murine macrophages as a model in vitro system. Colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are of particular interest in Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH). Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have garnered great interest as economical, biocompatible hyperthermia agents due to their superparamagnetic activity. Here we seek to optimize the synthetic reproducibility and in vitro utilization of IONPs for application in MFH. We compared aqueous synthetic protocols and various protective coating techniques using various analytical techniques and in vitro assays to assess the biocompatibility and feasibility of the various preparations of nanoparticles. Using a co-precipitation of iron salts methodology, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) with an average diameter of 6-8nm were synthesized and stabilized with carboxylates. By performing calorimetry measurements in an oscillating magnetic field (OMF) with a frequency of 500 kHz and field strength of 0.008Tesla the superparamagnetic behavior of these particles was confirmed. To further investigate these IONPs in a biological application, citric acid-stabilized particles, in conjunction with heat generated by these IONPs when exposed to an OMF, were assessed to determine their effects on cell viability in a RAW 267.4 murine macrophage model system. Our results show that 91.5-97% of cells that have ingested IONPs die follow exposure to an OMF. Importantly, neither the IONPs (at applicable concentrations) nor the OMF show cytotoxic effects. These particular particles have promising preliminary results as hyperthermic agents in both the current literature and simple, proof-of-concept experiments in our laboratory setting. We present experimental results for the synthesis, characterization, and utilization of iron oxide nanoparticles in MFH. Our results show that while IONPs have

  20. Facile Synthesis of Iron Oxide/Graphene Nanocomposites Using Liquid Phase Plasma Method.

    PubMed

    Lee, H; Park, Y K; Kim, S J; Kim, B J; An, K H; Kim, B H; Jung, S C

    2016-05-01

    Liquid phase plasma (LPP) method was applied, for the first time, to the impregnation of iron oxide nanoparticles onto graphene sheet. Iron oxide nanoparticles with the size of 50 nm were precipitated with uniform dispersion on the surface of graphene sheet. The amount of iron oxide nanoparticles precipitated on graphene sheets increased with increasing LPP process times. The XPS, Raman and EDX analyses showed that the iron oxide/graphene composites synthesized by the LPP process.

  1. Uptake and metabolism of iron oxide nanoparticles in brain cells.

    PubMed

    Petters, Charlotte; Irrsack, Ellen; Koch, Michael; Dringen, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are used for various applications in biomedicine, for example as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging, for cell tracking and for anti-tumor treatment. However, IONPs are also known for their toxic effects on cells and tissues which are at least in part caused by iron-mediated radical formation and oxidative stress. The potential toxicity of IONPs is especially important concerning the use of IONPs for neurobiological applications as alterations in brain iron homeostasis are strongly connected with human neurodegenerative diseases. Since IONPs are able to enter the brain, potential adverse consequences of an exposure of brain cells to IONPs have to be considered. This article describes the pathways that allow IONPs to enter the brain and summarizes the current knowledge on the uptake, the metabolism and the toxicity of IONPs for the different types of brain cells in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Potential artifacts in interpretation of differential breakthrough of colloids and dissolved tracers in the context of transport in a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, P.; Johnson, W.P.; Piana, M.J.; Fuller, C.C.; Naftz, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Many published studies have used visual comparison of the timing of peak breakthrough of colloids versus conservative dissolved tracers (hereafter referred to as dissolved tracers or tracers) in subsurface media to determine whether they are advected differently, and to elucidate the mechanisms of differential advection. This purely visual approach of determining differential advection may have artifacts, however, due to the attachment of colloids to subsurface media. The attachment of colloids to subsurface media may shift the colloidal peak breakthrough to earlier times, causing an apparent "faster" peak breakthrough of colloids relative to dissolve tracers even though the transport velocities for the colloids and the dissolved tracers may actually be equivalent. In this paper, a peak shift analysis was presented to illustrate the artifacts associated with the purely visual approach in determining differential advection, and to quantify the peak shift due to colloid attachment. This peak shift analysis was described within the context of microsphere and bromide transport within a zero-valent iron (ZVI) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) located in Fry Canyon, Utah. Application of the peak shift analysis to the field microsphere and bromide breakthrough data indicated that differential advection of the microspheres relative to the bromide occurred in the monitoring wells closest to the injection well in the PRB. It was hypothesized that the physical heterogeneity at the grain scale, presumably arising from differences in inter- versus intra-particle porosity, contributed to the differential advection of the microspheres versus the bromide in the PRB. The relative breakthrough (RB) of microspheres at different wells was inversely related to the ionic strength of ground water at these wells, in agreement with numerous studies showing that colloid attachment is directly related to solution ionic strength.

  3. From iron coordination compounds to metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Iacob, Mihail; Racles, Carmen; Tugui, Codrin; Stiubianu, George; Bele, Adrian; Sacarescu, Liviu; Timpu, Daniel; Cazacu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Various types, shapes and sizes of iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained depending on the nature of the precursor, preparation method and reaction conditions. The mixed valence trinuclear iron acetate, [Fe2(III)Fe(II)O(CH3COO)6(H2O)3]·2H2O (FeAc1), μ3-oxo trinuclear iron(III) acetate, [Fe3O(CH3COO)6(H2O)3]NO3∙4H2O (FeAc2), iron furoate, [Fe3O(C4H3OCOO)6(CH3OH)3]NO3∙2CH3OH (FeF), iron chromium furoate, FeCr2O(C4H3OCOO)6(CH3OH)3]NO3∙2CH3OH (FeCrF), and an iron complex with an original macromolecular ligand (FePAZ) were used as precursors for the corresponding oxide nanoparticles. Five series of nanoparticle samples were prepared employing either a classical thermal pathway (i.e., thermal decomposition in solution, solvothermal method, dry thermal decomposition/calcination) or using a nonconventional energy source (i.e., microwave or ultrasonic treatment) to convert precursors into iron oxides. The resulting materials were structurally characterized by wide-angle X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared, Raman, energy-dispersive X-ray, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopies, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. The morphology was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The parameters were varied within each route to fine tune the size and shape of the formed nanoparticles.

  4. From iron coordination compounds to metal oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Iacob, Mihail; Racles, Carmen; Tugui, Codrin; Stiubianu, George; Bele, Adrian; Sacarescu, Liviu; Timpu, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Various types, shapes and sizes of iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained depending on the nature of the precursor, preparation method and reaction conditions. The mixed valence trinuclear iron acetate, [Fe2 IIIFeIIO(CH3COO)6(H2O)3]·2H2O (FeAc1), μ3-oxo trinuclear iron(III) acetate, [Fe3O(CH3COO)6(H2O)3]NO3∙4H2O (FeAc2), iron furoate, [Fe3O(C4H3OCOO)6(CH3OH)3]NO3∙2CH3OH (FeF), iron chromium furoate, FeCr2O(C4H3OCOO)6(CH3OH)3]NO3∙2CH3OH (FeCrF), and an iron complex with an original macromolecular ligand (FePAZ) were used as precursors for the corresponding oxide nanoparticles. Five series of nanoparticle samples were prepared employing either a classical thermal pathway (i.e., thermal decomposition in solution, solvothermal method, dry thermal decomposition/calcination) or using a nonconventional energy source (i.e., microwave or ultrasonic treatment) to convert precursors into iron oxides. The resulting materials were structurally characterized by wide-angle X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared, Raman, energy-dispersive X-ray, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopies, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. The morphology was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The parameters were varied within each route to fine tune the size and shape of the formed nanoparticles. PMID:28144555

  5. Behavior of iron aluminides in oxidizing and sulfidizing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    To date, use of iron aluminides based on Fe/sub 3/Al (less than or equal to30 at. % Al) or FeAl (30--50 at. % Al) for structural applications has been limited by their low ductility and poor fracture toughness at room temperature and inadequate strength above 600/degree/C. However, in recent years, a renewed effort has been devoted to the development of ductile iron aluminides with increased strength, particularly in view of their good potential for use in hostile environments. While it is expected that such aluminides will be able to form oxide scales for corrosion protection in oxidizing high temperature environments, resistance to degradation in oxidizing salt or oxidizing/sulfidizing gas environments has not been adequately addressed as a function of compositional and microstructural changes. This paper reviews and extends results for iron aluminides exposed to an oxidizing/sulfidizing gas and presents the first data for corrosion of this class of materials by an aggressive oxidizing molten nitrate salt of 48.5NaNO/sub 3/--50.5KNO/sub 3/--1Na/sub 2/O/sub 2/. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Oxidation resistant iron and nickel alloys for high temperature use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, V. L.; Misra, S. K.; Wheaton, H. L.

    1970-01-01

    Iron-base and nickel-base alloys exhibit good oxidation resistance and improved ductility with addition of small amounts of yttrium, tantalum /or hafnium/, and thorium. They can be used in applications above the operating temperatures of the superalloys, if high strength materials are not required.

  7. New Perspectives on Biomedical Applications of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Magro, Massimiliano; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; de Almeida Roger, Jessica; Vianello, Fabio

    2017-06-16

    Iron oxide nanomaterials are considered promising tools for improved therapeutic efficacy and diagnostic applications in biomedicine. Accordingly, engineered iron oxide nanomaterials are increasingly proposed in biomedicine, and the interdisciplinary researches involving physics, chemistry, biology (nanotechnology) and medicine have led to exciting developments in the last decades. The progresses of the development of magnetic nanoparticles with tailored physico-chemical and surface properties produced a variety of clinically relevant applications, spanning from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), drug delivery, magnetic hyperthermia, to in vitro diagnostics. Notwithstanding the well-known conventional synthetic procedures and their wide use, recent advances in the synthetic methods open the door to new generations of naked iron oxide nanoparticles possessing peculiar surface chemistries, suitable for other competitive biomedical applications. New abilities to rationally manipulate iron oxides and their physical, chemical, and biological properties, allow the emersion of additional possibilities for designing novel nanomaterials for theranostic applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35) is...

  9. A predictive model of iron oxide nanoparticles flocculation tuning Z-potential in aqueous environment for biological application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldassarre, Francesca; Cacciola, Matteo; Ciccarella, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are the most used magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical and biotechnological field because of their nontoxicity respect to the other metals. The investigation of iron oxide nanoparticles behaviour in aqueous environment is important for the biological applications in terms of polydispersity, mobility, cellular uptake and response to the external magnetic field. Iron oxide nanoparticles tend to agglomerate in aqueous solutions; thus, the stabilisation and aggregation could be modified tuning the colloids physical proprieties. Surfactants or polymers are often used to avoid agglomeration and increase nanoparticles stability. We have modelled and synthesised iron oxide nanoparticles through a co-precipitation method, in order to study the influence of surfactants and coatings on the aggregation state. Thus, we compared experimental results to simulation model data. The change of Z-potential and the clusters size were determined by Dynamic Light Scattering. We developed a suitable numerical model to predict the flocculation. The effects of Volume Mean Diameter and fractal dimension were explored in the model. We obtained the trend of these parameters tuning the Z-potential. These curves matched with the experimental results and confirmed the goodness of the model. Subsequently, we exploited the model to study the influence of nanoparticles aggregation and stability by Z-potential and external magnetic field. The highest Z-potential is reached up with a small external magnetic influence, a small aggregation and then a high suspension stability. Thus, we obtained a predictive model of Iron oxide nanoparticles flocculation that will be exploited for the nanoparticles engineering and experimental setup of bioassays.

  10. Formation of water-soluble iron oxide nanoparticles derived from iron storage protein.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Masato; Han, Li; Wang, Lingyan; Maye, Mathew M; Luo, Jin; Kariuki, Nancy; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2004-09-01

    This paper reports novel findings of an investigation of the formation of water-soluble iron oxide nanoparticles from iron-storage protein ferritin. The strategy couples thermal removal of the protein shell on a planar substrate and subsequent sonication in aqueous solution under controlled temperature. Advantages of using ferritin as a precursor include well-defined core size, core composition, water-solubility and processibility. The formation of the nanoparticles was characterized using TEM, UV-Vis and FTIR techniques. Iron oxide nanoparticles in the size range of 5-20 nm diameters were produced. In addition to thermal treatment conditions, the sonication temperature of the nanoparticles in water was found to play an important role in determining the resulting particle size. This simple and effective route has important implications to the design of composite nanoparticles for potential magnetic, catalytic, biomedical sensing and other nanotechnological applications.

  11. Iron Kinetics and Evolution of Microbial Populations in Low-pH, Ferrous Iron-Oxidizing Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rose M; Johnson, D Barrie

    2016-08-02

    Iron-rich, acidic wastewaters are commonplace pollutants associated with metal and coal mining. Continuous-flow bioreactors were commissioned and tested for their capacities to oxidize ferrous iron in synthetic and actual acid mine drainage waters using (initially) pure cultures of the recently described acidophilic, iron-oxidizing heterotrophic bacterium Acidithrix ferrooxidans grown in the presence of glucose and yeast extract. The bioreactors became rapidly colonized by this bacterium, which formed macroscopic streamer growths in the flowing waters. Over 97% of ferrous iron in pH 2.0-2.2 synthetic mine water was oxidized (at up to 225 mg L(-1) h(-1)) at dilution rates (D) of 0.6 h(-1). Rates of iron oxidation decreased with pH but were still significant, with influent liquors as low as pH 1.37. When fed with actual mine water, >90% of ferrous iron was oxidized at D values of 0.4 h(-1), and microbial communities within the bioreactors changed over time, with Atx. ferrooxidans becoming increasingly displaced by the autotrophic iron-oxidizing acidophiles Ferrovum myxofaciens, Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans (which were all indigenous to the mine water), although this did not have a negative impact on net ferrous-iron oxidation. The results confirmed the potential of using a heterotrophic acidophile to facilitate the rapid commissioning of iron-oxidizing bioreactors and illustrated how microbial communities within them can evolve without compromising the performances of the bioreactors.

  12. Oxidative stress, HDL functionality and effects of intravenous iron administration in women with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Meroño, Tomás; Dauteuille, Carolane; Tetzlaff, Walter; Martín, Maximiliano; Botta, Eliana; Lhomme, Marie; Saez, María Soledad; Sorroche, Patricia; Boero, Laura; Arbelbide, Jorge; Chapman, M John; Kontush, Anatol; Brites, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) affects around 20-30% of adults worldwide. An association between IDA and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been reported. Oxidative stress, inflammation and low concentration of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) were implicated on endothelial dysfunction and CVD in IDA. We studied the effects of iron deficiency and of an intravenous iron administration on oxidative stress and HDL characteristics in IDA women. Two studies in IDA women are presented: a case-control study, including 18 patients and 18 age-matched healthy women, and a follow-up study 72hr after the administration of intravenous iron (n = 16). Lipids, malondialdehyde, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) and HDL chemical composition and functionality (cholesterol efflux and antioxidative activity) were measured. Cell cholesterol efflux from iron-deficient macrophages to a reference HDL was also evaluated. IDA patients showed higher triglycerides and CETP activity and lower HDL-C than controls (all p < 0.001). HDL particles from IDA patients showed higher triglyceride content (+30%,p < 0.05) and lower antioxidative capacity (-23%,p < 0.05). Although HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux was similar between the patients and controls, iron deficiency provoked a significant reduction in macrophage cholesterol efflux (-25%,p < 0.05). Arylesterase activity of PON-1 was significantly lower in IDA patients than controls (-16%,p < 0.05). The intravenous administration of iron was associated with a decrease in malondialdehyde levels and an increase in arylesterase activity of PON-1 (-22% and +18%, respectively, p < 0.05). IDA is associated with oxidative stress and functionally deficient HDL particles. It remains to be determined if such alterations suffice to impair endothelial function in IDA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  13. Simultaneous reductive dissolution of iron oxide and oxidation of iodide in ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kitae; Choi, Wonyong

    2015-04-01

    Iron is an important trace element controlling the metabolism and growth of all kinds of living species. Especially, the bio-availability of iron has been regarded as the limiting factor for primary productivity in HNLC (High Nutrients Low Chlorophyll) regions including Southern ocean. The dissolution of iron oxide provides enhanced the bio-availability of iron for phytoplankton growth. The halogen chemistry in polar regions is related to various important environmental processes such as Antarctic Ozone Depletion Event(ODE), mercury depletion, oxidative processes in atmosphere, and the formation of CCN (Cloud Condensation Nuclei). In this study, we investigated the reductive dissolution of iron oxide particles to produce Fe(II)aq and simultaneous oxidation of I- (iodide) to I3- (tri-iodide) in ice phase under UV irradiation or dark condition. The reductive generation of Fe(II)aq from iron oxides and oxidation of iodide to I3- were negligible in water but significantly accelerated in frozen solution both in the presence and absence of light. The enhanced reductive generation of Fe(II)aq and oxidative formation of I3- in ice were observed regardless of the various types of iron oxides [hematite (α-Fe2O3) maghemite (γ- Fe2O3), goethite (α-FeOOH), lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and, magnetite (Fe3O4)]. We explained that the enhanced redox production of Fe(II)aq and I3- in ice is contributed to the freeze concentration of iodides, protons, and dissolved oxygen in the unfrozen solution. When the concentration of both iodides and protons were raised by 10-fold each, the formation of Fe(II)aq in water under UV irradiation was approached to those in ice. The outdoor experiments were carried out under ambient solar radiation in winter season of mid-latitude (Pohang, Korea: 36°N latitude) and also confirmed that the production of Fe(II)aq via reductive dissolution of iron oxide and I3- generation via I- oxidation were enhanced in frozen solution. These results suggest that iron

  14. Iron oxide nanotubes synthesized via template-based electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jin-Hee; Min, Seong-Gi; Malkinski, Leszek; Wiley, John B.

    2014-04-01

    Considerable effort has been invested in the development of synthetic methods for the preparation iron oxide nanostructures for applications in nanotechnology. While a variety of structures have been reported, only a few studies have focused on iron oxide nanotubes. Here, we present details on the synthesis and characterization of iron oxide nanotubes along with a proposed mechanism for FeOOH tube formation. The FeOOH nanotubes, fabricated via a template-based electrodeposition method, are found to exhibit a unique inner-surface. Heat treatment of these tubes under oxidizing or reducing atmospheres can produce either hematite (α-Fe2O3) or magnetite (Fe3O4) structures, respectively. Hematite nanotubes are composed of small nanoparticles less than 20 nm in diameter and the magnetization curves and FC-ZFC curves show superparamagnetic properties without the Morin transition. In the case of magnetite nanotubes, which consist of slightly larger nanoparticles, magnetization curves show ferromagnetism with weak coercivity at room temperature, while FC-ZFC curves exhibit the Verwey transition at 125 K.Considerable effort has been invested in the development of synthetic methods for the preparation iron oxide nanostructures for applications in nanotechnology. While a variety of structures have been reported, only a few studies have focused on iron oxide nanotubes. Here, we present details on the synthesis and characterization of iron oxide nanotubes along with a proposed mechanism for FeOOH tube formation. The FeOOH nanotubes, fabricated via a template-based electrodeposition method, are found to exhibit a unique inner-surface. Heat treatment of these tubes under oxidizing or reducing atmospheres can produce either hematite (α-Fe2O3) or magnetite (Fe3O4) structures, respectively. Hematite nanotubes are composed of small nanoparticles less than 20 nm in diameter and the magnetization curves and FC-ZFC curves show superparamagnetic properties without the Morin transition

  15. Copper-assisted shape control in colloidal synthesis of indium oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selishcheva, Elena; Parisi, Jürgen; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna

    2012-02-01

    Indium oxide is an important n-type transparent semiconductor, finding application in solar cells, sensors, and optoelectronic devices. We present here a novel non-injection synthesis route for the preparation of colloidal indium oxide nanocrystals by using oleylamine (OLA) as ligand and as solvent. Indium oxide with cubic crystallographic structure is formed in a reaction between indium acetate and OLA, the latter is converted to oleylamide during the synthesis. The shape of the nanocrystals can be influenced by the addition of copper ions. When only indium (III) acetate is used as precursor flower-shaped indium oxide nanoparticles are obtained. Addition of copper salts such as copper (I) acetate, copper (II) acetate, copper (II) acetylacetonate, or copper (I) chloride, under otherwise identical reaction conditions changes the shape of nanoparticles to quasi-spherical or elongated. The anions, except for chloride, do not influence the shape of the resulting nanocrystals. This finding suggests that adsorption of copper ions on the In2O3 surface during the nanoparticles growth is responsible for shape control, whereas changes in the reactivity of the In cations caused by the presence of different anions play a secondary role. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and UV-Vis-absorption spectroscopy are used to characterize the samples.

  16. Partitioning of dissolved iron and iron isotopes into soluble and colloidal phases along the GA03 GEOTRACES North Atlantic Transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Carrasco, Gonzalo G.; Wu, Jingfeng; Roshan, Saeed; Hatta, Mariko; Measures, Christopher I.; Conway, Tim M.; John, Seth G.; Boyle, Edward A.

    2015-06-01

    The size partitioning of dissolved Fe (dFe<0.2 μm) into soluble (sFe<0.02 μm) and colloidal (0.02 μmcolloidal size fraction, while cFe disappeared completely at the deep chlorophyll maximum, presumably a result of preferential cFe biological uptake and/or scavenging. In the intermediate and deep ocean, however, dFe was evenly partitioned ~50:50% into sFe and cFe phases, which we hypothesize results from a "steady state" of dFe exchange reactions during and following remineralization including ligand exchange, sorption/desorption, and aggregation/disaggregation. There were only two exceptions to this constant partitioning in the intermediate/deep ocean. First, cFe dominated (82-96%) at and downstream of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal system. Also, along Line W between Woods Hole and Bermuda the dFe partitioning favored ~60-80% cFe, with the excess cFe likely resulting from inorganic cFe inputs from the margin. Thus, in the North Atlantic Ocean we propose a new model of dFe size partitioning where a "steady state" of dFe exchange reactions during and following remineralization re-partitions intermediate and deep ocean dFe into constantly fractionated sFe and cFe pools, while in the upper ocean, downstream of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and along Line W, sFe and cFe appear to cycle more independently, since either not enough time has passed to reach a new dFe exchange steady state or one of the dFe phases is non-labile to dFe exchange. This surface-subsurface decoupling model of North Atlantic dFe size partitioning is supported by Fe isotope ratio analyses of the sFe and dFe size fractions, which recorded isotopically heavy sFe (δ56Fe of +1.3‰ to +1.5‰) relative to dFe (δ56Fe~+0.5‰) in the surface ocean where sFe and cFe cycle

  17. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  18. The Molecular Mechanism of Iron(III) Oxide Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Scheck, Johanna; Wu, Baohu; Drechsler, Markus; Rosenberg, Rose; Van Driessche, Alexander E S; Stawski, Tomasz M; Gebauer, Denis

    2016-08-18

    A molecular understanding of the formation of solid phases from solution would be beneficial for various scientific fields. However, nucleation pathways are still not fully understood, whereby the case of iron (oxyhydr)oxides poses a prime example. We show that in the prenucleation regime, thermodynamically stable solute species up to a few nanometers in size are observed, which meet the definition of prenucleation clusters. Nucleation then is not governed by a critical size, but rather by the dynamics of the clusters that are forming at the distinct nucleation stages, based on the chemistry of the linkages within the clusters. This resolves a longstanding debate in the field of iron oxide nucleation, and the results may generally apply to oxides forming via hydrolysis and condensation. The (molecular) understanding of the chemical basis of phase separation is paramount for, e.g., tailoring size, shape and structure of novel nanocrystalline materials.

  19. Deep reduction behavior of iron oxide and its effect on direct CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Changqing; Liu, Xinglei; Qin, Wu; Lu, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Shi, Simo; Yang, Yongping

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of metal oxide oxygen carrier has been attractive for direct CO oxidation and CO2 separation. To investigate the reduction behaviors of iron oxide prepared by supporting Fe2O3 on γ-Al2O3 and its effect on CO oxidation, fluidized-bed combustion experiments, thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) experiments, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out. Gas yield (γCO2) increases significantly with the increase of temperature from 693 K to 1203 K, while carbon deposition decreases with the increase of temperature from 743 K to 1203 K, where temperature is a very important factor for CO oxidation by iron oxide. Further, it were quantitatively detected that the interaction between CO and Fe2O3, breakage of O-Fe bonds and formation of new C-O bonds, and effect of reduction degree were quantitatively detected. Based on adsorptions under different temperatures and reducing processes from Fe3+ into Fe2+, Fe+ and then into Fe, it was found that Fe2+ → Fe+ was the reaction-controlling step and the high oxidation state of iron is active for CO oxidation, where efficient partial reduction of Fe2O3 into FeO rather than complete reduction into iron may be more energy-saving for CO oxidation.

  20. Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO)-based liposomes as magnetic resonance imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Frascione, Daniela; Diwoky, Clemens; Almer, Gunter; Opriessnig, Peter; Vonach, Caroline; Gradauer, Kerstin; Leitinger, Gerd; Mangge, Harald; Stollberger, Rudolf; Prassl, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnetic liposomes (MLs) are phospholipid vesicles that encapsulate magnetic and/or paramagnetic nanoparticles. They are applied as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MLs have an advantage over free magnetic nanocores, in that various functional groups can be attached to the surface of liposomes for ligand-specific targeting. We have synthesized PEG-coated sterically-stabilized magnetic liposomes (sMLs) containing ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs) with the aim of generating stable liposomal carriers equipped with a high payload of USPIOs for enhanced MRI contrast. Methods Regarding iron oxide nanoparticles, we have applied two different commercially available surface-coated USPIOs; sMLs synthesized and loaded with USPIOs were compared in terms of magnetization and colloidal stability. The average diameter size, morphology, phospholipid membrane fluidity, and the iron content of the sMLs were determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence polarization, and absorption spectroscopy, respectively. A colorimetric assay using potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) was performed to evaluate the encapsulation efficiency (EE%) to express the amount of iron enclosed into a liposome. Subsequently, MRI measurements were carried out in vitro in agarose gel phantoms to evaluate the signal enhancement on T1- and T2-weighted sequences of sMLs. To monitor the biodistribution and the clearance of the particles over time in vivo, sMLs were injected in wild type mice. Results DLS revealed a mean particle diameter of sMLs in the range between 100 and 200 nm, as confirmed by TEM. An effective iron oxide loading was achieved just for one type of USPIO, with an EE% between 74% and 92%, depending on the initial Fe concentration (being higher for lower amounts of Fe). MRI measurements demonstrated the applicability of these nanostructures as MRI probes. Conclusion Our results show that the development of

  1. Colloidal processing of chemically prepared zinc oxide varistors. Part 1, milling and dispersion of powder.

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, Steven John; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Voigt, James A.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Dimos, Duane Brian

    2003-07-01

    Chemically prepared zinc oxide powders are fabricated for the production of high aspect ratio varistor components. Colloidal processing was performed to reduce agglomerates to primary particles, form a high solids loadingslurry, and prevent dopant migration. The milled and dispersed powder exhibited a viscoelastic to elastic behavioral transition at a volume loading of 43-46%. The origin of this transition was studied using acoustic spectroscopy, zeta potential measurements, and oscillatory rheology. The phenomenon occurs due to a volume fraction solids dependent reduction in the zeta potential of the solid phase. It is postulated to result from divalent ion binding within the polyelectrolyte dispersant chain and was mitigated using a polyethylene glycol plasticizing additive. This allowed for increased solids loading in the slurry and a green body fabrication study to be presented in our companion paper.

  2. Colloid Mobilization in Two Atlantic Coastal Plain Aquifers: Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Joseph N.; Gschwend, Philip M.

    1990-02-01

    The geochemical mechanisms leading to the mobilization of colloids in groundwater were investigated in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey and in rural central Delaware by sampling pairs of wells screened in oxic and anoxic groundwaters in the same geologic formations. Samples were carefully taken at very low flow rates (˜100 mL min-1) to avoid suspending immobilized particles. The colloidal matter was characterized by light-scattering photometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X ray analysis, microelectrophoresis, and Fe, Al, Si, and organic carbon analyses. The colloids, composed primarily of clays, were observed at high concentrations (up to 60 mg colloids/L) in the anoxic groundwaters, while the oxic groundwaters exhibited ≤1 mg colloids/L. Colloidal organic carbon was present in all groundwaters; but under anoxic conditions, one-third to one-half of the total organic carbon was associated with the inorganic colloids. The field evidence indicates that anoxic conditions cause the mobilization of soil colloids by dissolving the ferric oxyhydroxide coatings cementing the clay particles to the aquifer solids. The depletion of oxidized iron on the surfaces of immobile particles and the addition of organic carbon coatings on the soil particles and colloids apparently stabilizes the colloidal suspension in the anoxic groundwaters.

  3. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  4. Effects of Mesoporous Silica Coating and Post-Synthetic Treatment on the Transverse Relaxivity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Katie R.; Lin, Yu-Shen; Zhang, Jinjin; Egger, Sam M.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles have the capacity to load and deliver therapeutic cargo and incorporate imaging modalities, making them prominent candidates for theranostic devices. One of the most widespread imaging agents utilized in this and other theranostic platforms is nanoscale superparamagnetic iron oxide. Although several core-shell magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles presented in the literature have provided high T2 contrast in vitro and in vivo, there is ambiguity surrounding which parameters lead to enhanced contrast. Additionally, there is a need to understand the behavior of these imaging agents over time in biologically relevant environments. Herein, we present a systematic analysis of how the transverse relaxivity (r2) of magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles is influenced by nanoparticle diameter, iron oxide nanoparticle core synthesis, and the use of a hydrothermal treatment. This work demonstrates that samples which did not undergo a hydrothermal treatment experienced a drop in r2 (75% of original r2 within 8 days of water storage), while samples with hydrothermal treatment maintained roughly the same r2 for over 30 days in water. Our results suggest that iron oxide oxidation is the cause of the r2 loss, and this oxidation can be prevented both during synthesis and storage by the use of deoxygenated conditions during nanoparticle synthesis. The hydrothermal treatment also provides colloidal stability, even in acidic and highly salted solutions, and a resistance against acid degradation of the iron oxide nanoparticle core. The results of this study show the promise of multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles but will also likely inspire further investigation into multiples types of theranostic devices, taking into consideration their behavior over time and in relevant biological environments. PMID:23814377

  5. Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Deborah; Crocket, Kirsty; Brand, Tim; Stutter, Marc; Wilson, Clare; Schröder, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Linking carbon and iron cycles by investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids from peat-draining rivers - Scotland as model for high-latitude rivers Wood, D.A¹, Crocket, K², Brand, T², Stutter, M³, Wilson, C¹ & Schröder, C¹ ¹Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA ²Scottish Association for Marine Science, University of the Highlands and Islands, Dunbeg, Oban, PA37 1QA ³James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH The biogeochemical iron cycle exerts significant control on the carbon cycle¹. Iron is a limiting nutrient in large areas of the world's oceans and its bioavailability controls CO2 uptake by marine photosynthesizing microorganisms. While atmospheric iron inputs to the open ocean have been extensively measured, global river inputs have likely been underestimated because most major world rivers exhibit extensive iron removal by flocculation and sedimentation during seawater mixing. Iron minerals and organic matter mutually stabilise each other², which results in a 'rusty carbon sink' in sediments³ on the one hand but may also enhance transport beyond the salinity gradient on the other. Humic-rich, high latitude rivers have a higher iron-carrying capacity⁴-⁶ but are underrepresented in iron flux calculations. The West Coast sea lochs in Scotland are fed by predominantly peatland drainage catchments, and the rivers entering the sea lochs carry a high load of organic matter. The short distance between many of these catchments and the coastal ocean facilitates source-to-sea research investigating transport, fate and mineralogy of iron-bearing colloids providing a good analogue for similar high latitude fjordic systems. We use SeaFAST+ICP-MS and Mössbauer spectroscopy to survey trace metal concentrations, with emphasis on iron concentrations, speciation and mineralogy, across salinity gradients. In combination with ultra-filtration techniques, this allows

  6. Theoretical study of the morphology of self-assembled amphoteric oxide colloid nanocrystals in weak electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfimov, A. V.; Aryslanova, E. M.; Chivilikhin, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    The present paper is devoted to the theoretical study of the morphology of nanocrystals formed through self-assembly of amphoteric oxide colloidal nanoparticles in weak electrolytes. A mathematical model of multi-particle colloidal interaction was developed within the framework of the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeak (DLVO) theory. This model accounts for the surface charge regulation during the multi-particle interaction and reveals the presence of orientation effects during nanoparticle aggregation. These effects are presumed to affect the morphology of the self-assembled nanocrystals and may present the means of controlling the structure of synthesised nanomaterials.

  7. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part II. The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2006-04-15

    The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composite pellets with hydrogen at 900{sup o}C to 1000{sup o}C was studied. Compared to hydrogen, the reduction by carbon was negligible at 900 degrees C and below. However, significant carbon oxidation of the iron oxide/graphite pellets by H{sub 2O generated from the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by H-2 was observed. At higher temperatures, reduction by carbon complicates the overall reduction mechanism, with the iron oxide/graphite composite pellet found to be more reactive than the iron oxide/char composite pellet. From the scanning electron micrographs, partially reduced composite pellets showed a typical topochemical interface with an intermediate region between an oxygen-rich unreacted core and an iron-rich outer shell. To determine the possibility of reduction by volatiles, a layer of iron oxide powders was spread on top of a high volatile containing bituminous coal and heated inside a reactor using infra-red radiation. By separating the individual reactions involved for an iron oxide/coal mixture where a complex set of reactions occur simultaneously, it was possible to determine the sole effect of volatile reduction. It was found that the light reducing gases evolve initially and react with the iron oxide, with complex hydrocarbons evolving at the later stages. The volatiles caused about 20 to 50% reduction of the iron oxide.

  8. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part II. The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composite pellets with hydrogen at 900 °C to 1000 °C was studied. Compared to hydrogen, the reduction by carbon was negligible at 900 °C and below. However, significant carbon oxidation of the iron oxide/graphite pellets by H2O generated from the reduction of Fe2O3 by H2 was observed. At higher temperatures, reduction by carbon complicates the overall reduction mechanism, with the iron oxide/graphite composite pellet found to be more reactive than the iron oxide/char composite pellet. From the scanning electron micrographs, partially reduced composite pellets showed a typical topochemical interface with an intermediate region between an oxygen-rich unreacted core and an iron-rich outer shell. To determine the possibility of reduction by volatiles, a layer of iron oxide powders was spread on top of a high volatile containing bituminous coal and heated inside a reactor using infra-red radiation. By separating the individual reactions involved for an iron oxide/coal mixture where a complex set of reactions occur simultaneously, it was possible to determine the sole effect of volatile reduction. It was found that the light reducing gases evolve initially and react with the iron oxide, with complex hydrocarbons evolving at the later stages. The volatiles caused about 20 to 50 pct reduction of the iron oxide.

  9. Chronic exposure to iron oxide, chromium oxide, and nickel oxide fumes of metal dressers in a steelworks

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J. Graham; Warner, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    Graham Jones, J., and Warner, C. G. (1972).Brit. J. industr. Med.,29, 169-177. Chronic exposure to iron oxide, chromium oxide, and nickel oxide fumes of metal dressers in a steelworks. Occupational and medical histories, smoking habits, respiratory symptoms, chest radiographs, and ventilatory capacities were studied in 14 steelworkers employed as deseamers of steel ingots for periods of up to 16 years. The men were exposed for approximately five hours of each working shift to fume concentrations ranging from 1·3 to 294·1 mg/m3 made up mainly of iron oxide with varying proportions of chromium oxide and nickel oxide. Four of the men, with 14 to 16 years' exposure, showed radiological evidence of pneumoconiosis classified as ILO categories 2 or 3. Of these, two had pulmonary function within the normal range and two had measurable loss of function, moderate in one case and mild in the other. Many observers would diagnose these cases as siderosis but the authors consider that this term should be reserved for cases exposed to pure iron compounds. The correct diagnosis is mixed-dust pneumoconiosis and the loss of pulmonary function is caused by the effects of the mixture of metallic oxides. It is probable that inhalation of pure iron oxide does not cause fibrotic pulmonary changes, whereas the inhalation of iron oxide plus certain other substances obviously does. Images PMID:5021996

  10. Nitrative and oxidative modifications of enolase are associated with iron in iron-overload rats and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Naihao; Li, Xueli; Li, Jinyang; Xu, Wenjing; Li, Hailing; Gao, Zhonghong

    2011-03-01

    Iron overload is one of the most common iron-related toxicities, and liver is the major organ that is injured. Although oxidative stress is well accepted in the pathological mechanism of iron overload, nitrative modification in liver and the role of iron are relatively unknown. In this work, the nitrative and oxidative stress in liver was investigated in an iron-overload rat model. It was found that after 15 weeks of iron dextran administration, consistent with the increase of iron content in rat liver, both protein tyrosine nitration and protein oxidation were clearly elevated. By means of immunoprecipitation analysis, it was found that enolase nitration and oxidation status were significantly increased in iron-overload liver, whereas both α-enolase expression and activity were clearly decreased. The effects of different forms of iron on NaNO(2)-H(2)O(2)- and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))-dependent enolase nitration and oxidation were further investigated in vitro to elucidate the possible role of iron in enolase dysfunction in vivo. Compared with EDTA-Fe(III), ferric citrate, and ferritin, heme (hemin and hemoglobin) showed higher efficiency in catalyzing protein nitration in both models. Besides the major contribution of free iron (Fe(2+) and Fe(3+)) to catalyze protein oxidation, Fe(2+) also directly acted as a competitive inhibitor and produced a significant decrease in enzyme activity. These results suggest that the existence of various forms of iron is an important contributing factor to the elevated nitrative/oxidative modifications and diminished activity of α-enolase in the development and progress of iron-overload-associated syndromes.

  11. The oxidation behavior of ODS iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, B.A.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-05-01

    Oxide-dispersed Fe-28at.%Al-2%Cr alloys were produced by a powder metallurgy technique followed by hot extrusion. A variety of stable oxides were added to the base alloy to assess the effect of these dopants on the oxidation behavior at 1200{degrees}C in air and O{sub 2}. An Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion flattened the {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, but produced none of the other reactive element effects and had an adverse influence on the long-term oxidation behavior. A Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion improved the alumina scale adhesion relative to a Zr alloy addition at 1200{degrees} and 1300{degrees}C. However, the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion was not as effective in improving scale adhesion in Fe{sub 3}Al as it is in FeCrAl. This inferior performance is attributed to a larger amount of interfacial void formation on ODS Fe{sub 3}Al.

  12. THE EFFECT OF PH AND DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON ON THE PROPERTIES OF IRON COLLOIDAL SUSPENSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discolored water resulting from suspended iron particles is a relatively common drinking water consumer complaint. These particles result from the oxygenation of Fe(II), and this study shows that pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) have important effects on their properties....

  13. The Production and Export of Bioavailable Iron from Ice Sheets - the Importance of Colloidal and Nanoparticulate Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkings, J.; Wadham, J. L.; Tranter, M.; Raiswell, R.; Benning, L. G.; Statham, P. J.; Tedstone, A.; Nienow, P. W.; Telling, J.; Bagshaw, E.

    2013-12-01

    Glaciers cover approximately 10% of the world's land surface at present, but our knowledge of biogeochemical processes occurring beneath them is still limited, as is our understanding of their impact on downstream ecosystems via the export of nutrients in runoff. Recent work has suggested that glaciers are a primary source of nutrients to near coastal areas(1). For example, macronutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, and micronutrients, such as iron, may support primary production(2,3). Nutrient limitation of primary producers is known to be prevalent in large sectors of the world's oceans and iron is a significant limiting nutrient in Polar waters(4,5). Significantly, large oceanic algal blooms have been observed in polar areas where glacial influence is large(6,7). Our knowledge of iron speciation, concentrations and export dynamics in glacial meltwater is limited due, in part, to problems associated with collecting trace measurements in remote field locations. For example, recent work has indicated large uncertainty in 'dissolved' meltwater iron concentrations (0.2 - 4000 μM(8,9)). There is currently a dearth of information about labile nanoparticulate iron in glacial meltwaters, as well as export dynamics from large ice sheet catchments. Existing research has focused on small catchment examples(8,10), which behave differently to larger catchments(11). Presented here is the first time series of daily variations in meltwater iron concentrations (dissolved, filterable colloidal/nanoparticulate and bioavailable suspended sediment bound) from two large contrasting glacial catchments in Greenland over the 2012 and 2013 summer melt seasons. We also present the first estimates of iron concentrations in Greenlandic icebergs, which have been identified as hot spots of biological activity in the open ocean(12,13). Budgets for ice sheets based on our data demonstrate the importance of glaciers in global nutrient cycles, and reveal a large and previously under

  14. Control of photophysical and photochemistry of colloidal quantum dots via metal and metal-oxide coated substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. M.; Nejat, A.

    2013-03-01

    We studied how deposition of a very thin layer of gold or chromium oxide on glass substrates can modify the way irradiation changes the fluorescence of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. We found that the gold layer tends to shield the quantum dots from the substrate, preventing photoinduced fluorescence enhancement caused by the Coulomb blockage. In this case the emission of the quantum dots did not show also any broadening but rather a slight red shift, independent of the irradiation time. In the case of the chromium-oxide coated substrates we observed significant broadening and blue shift, indicating such oxide could enhance photo-oxidation of colloidal quantum dots significantly.

  15. Ethylene diamine-assisted synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles in high-boiling polyolys.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Darius; Zielasek, Volkmar; Dreher, Wolfgang; Bäumer, Marcus

    2014-03-01

    The decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate in high-boiling polyols such as diethylene glycole is an efficient way to produce water-soluble iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) with small sizes. We present an extension of this method by introducing ethylene diamine (EDA) or diethylene triamine (DTA) as a structure-directing agent and adding polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizing agent. The synthesis was studied with respect to effects of the chain length of the polyol used as solvent, the chain length of the structure-directing agent, the presence of PVP, the heating rate, and the nature of the precursor. By varying these parameters, we were able to show, that probably an interplay of the structure-directing agent and the polyol plays an important role for the stabilization and growth of the different facets of the IONP crystal. The chain length of the polyol used as solvent alters the influence of EDA or DTA as stabilizer of {111} facets, leading to IONPs with spherical, tetrahedral, or nanoplate morphology and mean diameters ranging from 4 nm up to 25 nm. PVP in the reaction medium narrows down particle size and shape distributions and promotes the formation of very stable, water-based colloidal solutions. The saturation magnetization of the particles was determined by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and their ability to act as a T2-contrast agent was tested by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Iron oxidation kinetics and autotrophic bacteria in acidified environments

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    Iron oxidation in the presence of lake sediment collected from an acidic alpine lake was three orders of magnitude faster than in filtered lakewater without sediment. When kinetic rates in the presence of sediment were normalized on a surface area basis, they fell within a narrow range, and the assumption of a first order dependence of rate on surface area was supported. The relative influence on heterogeneous rate of ferrous iron oxidation of the five metal oxides studied can be ranked SiO[sub 2] [approx] Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] [much lt] Fe[sub 2] O[sub 3] [approx] MnO[sub 2] [approx] TiO[sub 2], with a difference of three orders of magnitude separating the aluminum and iron oxides. The rate constants on a surface area basis were, respectively, 1.8 [times] 10[sup 10], 4.6 [times] 10[sup 10], 1.4 [times] 10[sup 13], 2.3 [times] 10[sup 13] and 5.3 [times] 10[sup 13]M[sup [minus]2] atm[sup [minus]1] sec[sup [minus]1]m[sup [minus]2]. Studies at low oxygen concentrations suggested that at low pO[sub 2] oxygenation may not be first order with respect to oxygen concentration. Biological processes were found to enhance oxidation kinetics by two orders of magnitude on a surface area basis in comparison with a gamma irradiated control. Oxidation rate in the presence of irradiated sediment was in turn approximately 130 times greater than for oxidation in deionized water. The importance of biological activity in environments exhibiting photoreduction of iron was further studied by development of a polyclonal antibody test for the detection of the iron oxidizing autotroph Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. T. ferrooxidans was found in the Snake River and its tributaries in the Colorado Rocky mountains. Tests for T. ferrooxidans in samples collected at Lake Cristallina, Canton Ticino, Switzerland and McDonalds Branch, Lebanon State Forest, New Jersey were negative.

  17. Intratumoral Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Hyperthermia and Radiation Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hoopes, Pj; Strawbridge, Rr; Gibson, Uj; Zeng, Q; Pierce, Ze; Savellano, M; Tate, Ja; Ogden, Ja; Baker, I; Ivkov, R; Foreman, Ar

    2007-02-13

    The potential synergism and benefit of combined hyperthermia and radiation for cancer treatment is well established, but has yet to be optimized clinically. Specifically, the delivery of heat via external arrays /applicators or interstitial antennas has not demonstrated the spatial precision or specificity necessary to achieve appropriate a highly positive therapeutic ratio. Recently, antibody directed and possibly even non-antibody directed iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia has shown significant promise as a tumor treatment modality. Our studies are designed to determine the effects (safety and efficacy) of iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and external beam radiation in a murine breast cancer model. MTG-B murine breast cancer cells (1 × 10(6)) were implanted subcutaneous in 7 week-old female C3H/HeJ mice and grown to a treatment size of 150 mm(3) +/- 50 mm(3). Tumors were then injected locally with iron oxide nanoparticles and heated via an alternating magnetic field (AMF) generator operated at approximately 160 kHz and 400 - 550 Oe. Tumor growth was monitored daily using standard 3-D caliper measurement technique and formula. specific Mouse tumors were heated using a cooled, 36 mm diameter square copper tube induction coil which provided optimal heating in a 1 cm wide region in the center of the coil. Double dextran coated 80 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (Triton Biosystems) were used in all studies. Intra-tumor, peri-tumor and rectal (core body) temperatures were continually measured throughout the treatment period. Preliminary in vivo nanoparticle-AMF hyperthermia (167 KHz and 400 or 550 Oe) studies demonstrated dose responsive cytotoxicity which enhanced the effects of external beam radiation. AMF associated eddy currents resulted in nonspecific temperature increases in exposed tissues which did not contain nanoparticles, however these effects were minor and not injurious to the mice. These studies also suggest that iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia

  18. Intratumoral iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and radiation cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, P. J.; Strawbridge, R. R.; Gibson, U. J.; Zeng, Q.; Pierce, Z. E.; Savellano, M.; Tate, J. A.; Ogden, J. A.; Baker, I.; Ivkov, R.; Foreman, A. R.

    2007-02-01

    The potential synergism and benefit of combined hyperthermia and radiation for cancer treatment is well established, but has yet to be optimized clinically. Specifically, the delivery of heat via external arrays /applicators or interstitial antennas has not demonstrated the spatial precision or specificity necessary to achieve appropriate a highly positive therapeutic ratio. Recently, antibody directed and possibly even non-antibody directed iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia has shown significant promise as a tumor treatment modality. Our studies are designed to determine the effects (safety and efficacy) of iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and external beam radiation in a murine breast cancer model. Methods: MTG-B murine breast cancer cells (1 x 106) were implanted subcutaneous in 7 week-old female C3H/HeJ mice and grown to a treatment size of 150 mm3 +/- 50 mm3. Tumors were then injected locally with iron oxide nanoparticles and heated via an alternating magnetic field (AMF) generator operated at approximately 160 kHz and 400 - 550 Oe. Tumor growth was monitored daily using standard 3-D caliper measurement technique and formula. specific Mouse tumors were heated using a cooled, 36 mm diameter square copper tube induction coil which provided optimal heating in a 1 cm wide region in the center of the coil. Double dextran coated 80 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (Triton Biosystems) were used in all studies. Intra-tumor, peri-tumor and rectal (core body) temperatures were continually measured throughout the treatment period. Results: Preliminary in vivo nanoparticle-AMF hyperthermia (167 KHz and 400 or 550 Oe) studies demonstrated dose responsive cytotoxicity which enhanced the effects of external beam radiation. AMF associated eddy currents resulted in nonspecific temperature increases in exposed tissues which did not contain nanoparticles, however these effects were minor and not injurious to the mice. These studies also suggest that iron oxide nanoparticle

  19. Biogenic nanosized iron oxides obtained from cultivation of iron bacteria from the genus Leptothrix.

    PubMed

    Nedkov, I; Slavov, L; Angelova, R; Blagoev, B; Kovacheva, D; Abrashev, M V; Iliev, M; Groudeva, V

    2016-10-01

    A detailed investigation of nanostructured iron oxides/(oxy)hydroxides gathered after cultivation of bacteria from the genus Leptothrix as iron (II) oxidizers is presented. A specific type of medium is selected for the cultivation of the bacteria. Results for sediment powder and bio-film on glass substrate samples from the same media are discussed. XRD, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, and TEM images and PPMS measurements are used to prove the exact composition of the biogenic products and to interpret the oxidation process. Analysis of the data collected shows that around 80 % of the iron (II) from the growth medium has been transformed into iron (III) in the form of different (oxy)hydroxides, with the rest found to be in a mixed 2,5 valence in magnetite. Our investigation shows that the bio-film sample has a phase content different from that of the powdered biomass and that lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) is the predominant and the initial biogenic phase in both samples. Magnetite nanoparticles are a secondary product in the bio-film, part of which possesses a defective quasi-maghemite surface layer. In the powdered biomass, the oxidation steps are not fully completed. The initial products are non-stoichiometric and due to the mixed ferric and ferrous ions present, they develop into: (i) lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) as a basic sediment, (ii) magnetite (Fe3O4) and (iii) goethite (α-FeOOH) in small quantities. The average size of all iron-bearing particles is found to be below 30 nm. The magnetic measurements performed show a superparamagnetic behavior of the material at room temperature.

  20. Synthesis of iron oxide/manganese oxide composite particles and their magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Aladin; Hohenberger, Stefan; Özden, Ayberk; Horn, Siegfried

    2014-08-01

    We have investigated the synthesis and structural as well as magnetic properties of composite nanoparticles, including core-shell particles, consisting of iron and manganese oxides. The synthesis is based on thermal decomposition of suitable metal oleates in a high boiling solvent. Seed particles are used to avoid homogeneous nucleation and to initiate the formation of heterogeneous systems. The as-synthesized particles were characterized by energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and SQUID magnetometry. The synthesized nanoparticles had diameters between 10 and 20 nm and consisted of manganese oxide and iron oxide.

  1. Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation. Progress report, March 1990--November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II

    1991-12-31

    This report focuses on the progress made in three areas of research concerned with enzymes involved in respiratory iron oxidation. The three areas are as follows: development of an improved procedure for the routine large scale culture of iron oxidizing chemolithotrophs based on the in-situ electrolysis of the soluble iron in the growth medium; to perform iron oxidation kinetic studies on whole cells using the oxygen electrode; and to identify, separate, purify, and characterize the individual cellular components.

  2. Oxidative effect of several intravenous iron complexes in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bailie, George R; Schuler, Catherine; Leggett, Robert E; Li, Hsin; Li, Hsin-Dat; Patadia, Hiten; Levin, Robert

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the oxidative stress induced in rat internal organs by the administration of the following clinically used intravenous (IV) iron (Fe) containing compounds: iron sucrose (IS), iron dextran (ID), ferric carboxymaltose and ferumoxytol. Groups of six adult rats received 1 mg/kg of each compound weekly for 5 doses. Seven days following the last dose, animals were euthanized and tissue samples of heart, lung, liver, and kidney were obtained, washed in warmed saline and frozen under liquid nitrogen and stored at -80 °C for analysis for nitrotyrosine (NT) and dinitro phenyl (DNP) as markers of oxidative stress. All tissues showed a similar pattern of oxidative stress. All Fe products stimulated an increase in the tissue concentration of both NT and DNP. In general, DNP was stimulated significantly less than NT except for IS. DNP was stimulated to an equal degree except for ID where NT was significantly higher than the NT concentrations in all other Fe compounds. ID produced over 10-fold the concentration of NT than any other Fe. IV Fe compounds present a risk of oxidative stress to a variety of internal organs. However, we found that IS was the least damaging and ID was the worst.

  3. Iron oxide nanotubes synthesized via template-based electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jin-Hee; Min, Seong-Gi; Malkinski, Leszek; Wiley, John B

    2014-05-21

    Considerable effort has been invested in the development of synthetic methods for the preparation iron oxide nanostructures for applications in nanotechnology. While a variety of structures have been reported, only a few studies have focused on iron oxide nanotubes. Here, we present details on the synthesis and characterization of iron oxide nanotubes along with a proposed mechanism for FeOOH tube formation. The FeOOH nanotubes, fabricated via a template-based electrodeposition method, are found to exhibit a unique inner-surface. Heat treatment of these tubes under oxidizing or reducing atmospheres can produce either hematite (α-Fe2O3) or magnetite (Fe3O4) structures, respectively. Hematite nanotubes are composed of small nanoparticles less than 20 nm in diameter and the magnetization curves and FC-ZFC curves show superparamagnetic properties without the Morin transition. In the case of magnetite nanotubes, which consist of slightly larger nanoparticles, magnetization curves show ferromagnetism with weak coercivity at room temperature, while FC-ZFC curves exhibit the Verwey transition at 125 K.

  4. Niobian iron oxides as heterogeneous Fenton catalysts for environmental remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Diana Q. L.; Oliveira, Luiz C. A.; Murad, Enver; Fabris, José D.; Silva, Adilson C.; de Menezes, Lucas Morais

    2010-01-01

    Heterogeneous Fenton or Fenton-like reagents consist of a mixture of an iron-containing solid matrix and a liquid medium with H2O2. The Fenton system is based on the reaction between Fe2 + and H2O2 to produce highly reactive intermediate hydroxyl radicals ( • OH), which are able to oxidize organic contaminants, whereas the Fenton-like reaction is based on the reaction between Fe3 + and H2O2. These heterogeneous systems offer several advantages over their homogeneous counterparts, such as no sludge formation, operation at near-neutral pH and the possibility of recycling the iron promoter. Some doping transition cations in the iron oxide structure are believed to enhance the catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of organic substrates in water. In this work, goethites synthesized in presence of niobium served as precursors for the preparation of magnetites (niobian magnetites) via chemical reduction with hydrogen at 400°C. These materials were used as Fenton-like catalysts. Both groups of (Nb, Fe)-oxide samples were characterized by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy at 298 K. The results show that increasing niobium contents raise the catalytic potential for decomposition of methylene blue, which was, in this work, used as a model molecule for organic substrates in water.

  5. Synthesis and properties of magnetic iron oxide/platinum nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serga, V.; Maiorov, M.; Kulikova, L.; Krumina, A.; Karashanova, D.

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide/platinum nanocomposites have been synthesized by the extractive-pyrolytic method (EPM) involving gradual decomposition of iron capronate and n-trioctylammonium hexachloroplatinate initially produced by solvent extraction. The content of platinum in the composites was 1.2 wt%, 2.4 wt% and 4.8 wt%. Phase composition, morphology and magnetic properties of the produced materials were investigated. XRD analysis and magnetic measurements show that the magnetic phase (magnetite Fe3O4) dominates in a carrier sample produced by the pyrolysis of iron carboxylate, but hematite α-Fe2O3 exists there as an admixture. Referring to the TEM results, the produced composites contain ultra-disperse platinum particles on the carrier, and the mean size of these varies from 3 nm to 9 nm.

  6. Iron-mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane in brackish coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Egger, Matthias; Rasigraf, Olivia; Sapart, Célia J; Jilbert, Tom; Jetten, Mike S M; Röckmann, Thomas; van der Veen, Carina; Bândă, Narcisa; Kartal, Boran; Ettwig, Katharina F; Slomp, Caroline P

    2015-01-06

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and its biological conversion in marine sediments, largely controlled by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), is a crucial part of the global carbon cycle. However, little is known about the role of iron oxides as an oxidant for AOM. Here we provide the first field evidence for iron-dependent AOM in brackish coastal surface sediments and show that methane produced in Bothnian Sea sediments is oxidized in distinct zones of iron- and sulfate-dependent AOM. At our study site, anthropogenic eutrophication over recent decades has led to an upward migration of the sulfate/methane transition zone in the sediment. Abundant iron oxides and high dissolved ferrous iron indicate iron reduction in the methanogenic sediments below the newly established sulfate/methane transition. Laboratory incubation studies of these sediments strongly suggest that the in situ microbial community is capable of linking methane oxidation to iron oxide reduction. Eutrophication of coastal environments may therefore create geochemical conditions favorable for iron-mediated AOM and thus increase the relevance of iron-dependent methane oxidation in the future. Besides its role in mitigating methane emissions, iron-dependent AOM strongly impacts sedimentary iron cycling and related biogeochemical processes through the reduction of large quantities of iron oxides.

  7. Curcumin Attenuates Iron Accumulation and Oxidative Stress in the Liver and Spleen of Chronic Iron-Overloaded Rats

    PubMed Central

    Badria, Farid A.; Ibrahim, Ahmed S.; Badria, Adel F.; Elmarakby, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Iron overload is now recognized as a health problem in industrialized countries, as excessive iron is highly toxic for liver and spleen. The potential use of curcumin as an iron chelator has not been clearly identified experimentally in iron overload condition. Here, we evaluate the efficacy of curcumin to alleviate iron overload-induced hepatic and splenic abnormalities and to gain insight into the underlying mechanisms. Design and Methods Three groups of male adult rats were treated as follows: control rats, rats treated with iron in a drinking water for 2 months followed by either vehicle or curcumin treatment for 2 more months. Thereafter, we studied the effects of curcumin on iron overload-induced lipid peroxidation and anti-oxidant depletion. Results Treatment of iron-overloaded rats with curcumin resulted in marked decreases in iron accumulation within liver and spleen. Iron-overloaded rats had significant increases in malonyldialdehyde (MDA), a marker of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide (NO) in liver and spleen when compared to control group. The effects of iron overload on lipid peroxidation and NO levels were significantly reduced by the intervention treatment with curcumin (P<0.05). Furthermore, the endogenous anti-oxidant activities/levels in liver and spleen were also significantly decreased in chronic iron overload and administration of curcumin restored the decrease in the hepatic and splenic antioxidant activities/levels. Conclusion Our study suggests that curcumin may represent a new horizon in managing iron overload-induced toxicity as well as in pathological diseases characterized by hepatic iron accumulation such as thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, and myelodysplastic syndromes possibly via iron chelation, reduced oxidative stress derived lipid peroxidation and improving the body endogenous antioxidant defense mechanism. PMID:26230491

  8. Low Temperature CO oxidation over Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Decorating Internal Structures of a Mesoporous Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Il Hee; Seo, Hyun Ook; Park, Eun Ji; Han, Sang Wook; Kim, Young Dok

    2017-01-01

    Using a chemical vapor deposition method with regulated sample temperatures under ambient pressure conditions, we were able to fully decorate the internal structure of a mesoporous Al2O3 bead (~1 mm in particle diameter) with iron oxide nanoparticles (with a mean lateral size of less than 1 nm). The iron oxide-decorated Al2O3 showed a high CO oxidation reactivity, even at room temperature. Very little deactivation of the CO oxidation activity was observed with increasing reaction time at ~100 °C. Additionally, this catalyst showed high CO oxidation activity, even after annealing at ~900 °C under atmospheric conditions (i.e., the structure of the catalysts could be maintained under very harsh treatment conditions). We show that our catalysts have potential for application as oxidation catalysts in industrial processes due to the simplicity of their fabrication process as well as the high and stable catalytic performance.

  9. Low Temperature CO oxidation over Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Decorating Internal Structures of a Mesoporous Alumina

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il Hee; Seo, Hyun Ook; Park, Eun Ji; Han, Sang Wook; Kim, Young Dok

    2017-01-01

    Using a chemical vapor deposition method with regulated sample temperatures under ambient pressure conditions, we were able to fully decorate the internal structure of a mesoporous Al2O3 bead (~1 mm in particle diameter) with iron oxide nanoparticles (with a mean lateral size of less than 1 nm). The iron oxide-decorated Al2O3 showed a high CO oxidation reactivity, even at room temperature. Very little deactivation of the CO oxidation activity was observed with increasing reaction time at ~100 °C. Additionally, this catalyst showed high CO oxidation activity, even after annealing at ~900 °C under atmospheric conditions (i.e., the structure of the catalysts could be maintained under very harsh treatment conditions). We show that our catalysts have potential for application as oxidation catalysts in industrial processes due to the simplicity of their fabrication process as well as the high and stable catalytic performance. PMID:28091561

  10. Production of crystalline refractory metal oxides containing colloidal metal precipitates and useful as solar-effective absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Narayan, Jagdish; Chen, Yok

    1983-01-01

    This invention is a new process for producing refractory crystalline oxides having improved or unusual properties. The process comprises the steps of forming a doped-metal crystal of the oxide; exposing the doped crystal in a bomb to a reducing atmosphere at superatmospheric pressure and a temperature effecting precipitation of the dopant metal in the crystal lattice of the oxide but insufficient to effect net diffusion of the metal out of the lattice; and then cooling the crystal. Preferably, the cooling step is effected by quenching. The process forms colloidal precipitates of the metal in the oxide lattice. The process may be used, for example, to produce thermally stable black MgO crystalline bodies containing magnetic colloidal precipitates consisting of about 99% Ni. The Ni-containing bodies are solar-selective absorbers, having a room-temperature absorptivity of about 0.96 over virtually all of the solar-energy spectrum and exhibiting an absorption edge in the region of 2 .mu.m. The process parameters can be varied to control the average size of the precipitates. The process can produce a black MgO crystalline body containing colloidal Ni precipitates, some of which have the face-centered-cubic structure and others of which have the body-centered cubic structure. The products of the process are metal-precipitate-containing refractory crystalline oxides which have improved or unique optical, mechanical, magnetic, and/or electronic properties.

  11. Iron oxide and iron carbide particles produced by the polyol method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Y.; Shimizu, R.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Iron oxide ( γ-Fe2O3) and iron carbide (Fe3C) particles were produced by the polyol method. Ferrocene, which was employed as an iron source, was decomposed in a mixture of 1,2-hexadecandiol, oleylamine, and 1-octadecene. Particles were characterized using Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that oleylamine acted as a capping reagent, leading to uniform-sized (12-16 nm) particles consisting of γ-Fe 2O3. On the other hand, 1-octadecene acted as a non-coordinating solvent and a carbon source, which led to particles consisting of Fe3C and α-Fe with various sizes.

  12. Iron oxide particles as a catalyst in chemical oxidation of organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Gurol, M.D.; Lin, S.S.; Bhat, N.

    1995-12-31

    This research addresses the use of ozone and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of iron oxide particles which provide a catalytic surface for conversion to hydroxyl free radical. N-butylchloride (BuCl) and monochlorobenzene (MCB) were oxidized using goethite as the catalyst. The effect of varying the dosage of hydrogen peroxide or ozone, the mass and the size of the geothite particles, the mixing speed, and the gas flow rate for ozonation was investigated. The effect of water quality in terms of pH, carbonate alkalinity and initial organic concentration on reaction rates was addressed as well. Experimental observations showed that varying the stirring speed in the reactor or the size of the iron oxide particles did not have any significant effect on the oxidation rates, indicating that the rate was controlled by the intrinsic reaction rates on iron oxide surfaces. The presence of hydrogen peroxide significantly increased the removal of BuCl, and higher dosages caused considerably higher removal. Results also demonstrated a strong dependence of BuCl removal on the iron oxide dosage. MCB adsorbed strongly on goethite, but was oxidized effectively by ozone. Hydrogen peroxide decomposed rapidly in the presence of goethite at a rate directly proportional to the rate of BuCl oxidation. These results indicate that the interaction of hydrogen peroxide with goethite particles leads to the formation of hydroxyl free radical, which is responsible for oxidation of BuCl. Similarly, ozone decomposed in the presence of goethite. The oxidation efficiency for hydrogen peroxide/goethite remained unaffected when the pH and the alkalinity were varied. Furthermore, the ozone/goethite system provided mineralization as measured by the removal of the total organic carbon. Hence, both of these oxidation processes promise to be effective in oxidation of organic compounds, and may not suffer from the limitations of other radical processes.

  13. Copper Iron Conversion Coating for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grolig, Jan Gustav; Alnegren, Patrik; Froitzheim, Jan; Svensson, Jan-Erik

    2015-11-01

    A conversion coating of iron and copper was investigated with the purpose of increasing the performance of Sanergy HT as a potential SOFC interconnect material. Samples were exposed to a simulated cathode atmosphere (air, 3 % H2O) for durations of up to 1000 h at 850 °C. Their performance in terms of corrosion, chromium evaporation and electrical resistance (ASR) was monitored and compared to uncoated and cobalt-coated Sanergy HT samples. The copper iron coating had no negative effects on corrosion protection and decreased chromium evaporation by about 80%. An Area Specific Resistance (ASR) of 10 mΩcm2 was reached after 1000 h of exposure. Scanning Electron Microscopy revealed well adherent oxide layers comprised of an inner chromia layer and an outer spinel oxide layer.

  14. Promising iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical engineering.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien; Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh; Vo, Toi Van; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2012-12-01

    For the past few decades biomedical engineering has imprinted its significant impact on the map of science through its wide applications on many other fields. An important example obviously proving this fact is the versatile application of magnetic nanoparticles in theranostics. Due to preferable properties such as biocompatibility, non-toxicity compared to other metal derivations, iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles was chosen to be addressed in this review. Aim of this review is to give the readers a whole working window of these magnetic nanoparticles in the current context of science. Thus, preparation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the so-far techniques, methods of characterizing the nanoparticles as well as their most recent biomedical applications will be stated.

  15. Porous Iron oxide nanorods and their photothermal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, George; Huang, Weijie; Zhao, Yiping; Hunyadi Murph, Simona E.

    2016-09-01

    Iron oxide is a unique semiconductor material, either as a single nanoparticle, or as a component of multifunctional nanoparticles. Its desirable properties, abundance, non-toxicity, and excellent magnetic properties make it a valuable for many applications. Porous iron oxide nanorods are able to transduce light into heat through the photothermal effect. Photothermal heating arises from the energy dissipated during light absorption leading to rapid temperature rise in close proximity to the surface of the nanoparticle. The heating effect can be efficiently harnessed to drive/promote different physical phenomena. In this report, we describe the synthesis and properties of porous Fe3O4 for photothermal applications. We then demonstrate their use as photothermally enhanced and recyclable materials for environmental remediation through sorption processes.

  16. Linear-chain assemblies of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhak, Prasanta; Kim, Min-Kwan; Lee, Jae Hyeok; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2017-07-01

    We synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles using a simple hydrothermal approach and found several types of segments of their linear-chain self-assemblies as observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements confirm a well-defined single-phase FCC structure. Vibrating sample magnetometry measurements exhibit a ferromagnetic behavior. Micromagnetic numerical simulations show magnetic vortex states in the nanosphere model. Also, calculations of binding energies for different numbers of particles in the linear-chain assemblies explain a possible mechanism responsible for the self-assemblies of segments of the linear chains of nanoparticles. This work offers a step towards linear-chain self-assemblies of iron oxide nanoparticles and the effect of magnetic vortex states in individual nanoparticles on their binding energy.

  17. Iron aluminide alloy container for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie Reagan; Singh, Prabhakar; Sikka, Vinod Kumar

    2000-01-01

    A container for fuel cells is made from an iron aluminide alloy. The container alloy preferably includes from about 13 to about 22 weight percent Al, from about 2 to about 8 weight percent Cr, from about 0.1 to about 4 weight percent M selected from Zr and Hf, from about 0.005 to about 0.5 weight percent B or from about 0.001 to about 1 weight percent C, and the balance Fe and incidental impurities. The iron aluminide container alloy is extremely resistant to corrosion and metal loss when exposed to dual reducing and oxidizing atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The alloy is particularly useful for containment vessels for solid oxide fuel cells, as a replacement for stainless steel alloys which are currently used.

  18. Exchange Bias Effects in Iron Oxide-Based Nanoparticle Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Manh-Huong; Alonso, Javier; Khurshid, Hafsa; Lampen-Kelley, Paula; Chandra, Sayan; Stojak Repa, Kristen; Nemati, Zohreh; Das, Raja; Iglesias, Óscar; Srikanth, Hariharan

    2016-11-23

    The exploration of exchange bias (EB) on the nanoscale provides a novel approach to improving the anisotropic properties of magnetic nanoparticles for prospective applications in nanospintronics and nanomedicine. However, the physical origin of EB is not fully understood. Recent advances in chemical synthesis provide a unique opportunity to explore EB in a variety of iron oxide-based nanostructures ranging from core/shell to hollow and hybrid composite nanoparticles. Experimental and atomistic Monte Carlo studies have shed light on the roles of interface and surface spins in these nanosystems. This review paper aims to provide a thorough understanding of the EB and related phenomena in iron oxide-based nanoparticle systems, knowledge of which is essential to tune the anisotropic magnetic properties of exchange-coupled nanoparticle systems for potential applications.

  19. Exchange Bias Effects in Iron Oxide-Based Nanoparticle Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Phan, Manh-Huong; Alonso, Javier; Khurshid, Hafsa; ...

    2016-11-23

    The exploration of exchange bias (EB) on the nanoscale provides a novel approach to improving the anisotropic properties of magnetic nanoparticles for prospective applications in nanospintronics and nanomedicine. However, the physical origin of EB is not fully understood. Recent advances in chemical synthesis provide a unique opportunity to explore EB in a variety of iron oxide-based nanostructures ranging from core/shell to hollow and hybrid composite nanoparticles. Experimental and atomistic Monte Carlo studies have shed light on the roles of interface and surface spins in these nanosystems. This review paper aims to provide a thorough understanding of the EB and relatedmore » phenomena in iron oxide-based nanoparticle systems, knowledge of which is essential to tune the anisotropic magnetic properties of exchange-coupled nanoparticle systems for potential applications.« less

  20. Reflection spectra and magnetochemistry of iron oxides and natural surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic properties and spectral characteristics of iron oxides are distinctive. Diagnostic features in reflectance spectra (0.5 to 2.4 micron) for alpha Fe2O3, gamma Fe2O3, and FeOOH include location of Fe3(+) absorption features, intensity ratios at various wavelengths, and the curve shape between 1.2 micron and 2.4 micron. The reflection spectrum of natural rock surfaces are seldom those of the bulk rock because of weathering effects. Coatings are found to be dominated by iron oxides and clay. A simple macroscopic model of rock spectra (based on concepts of stains and coatings) is considered adequate for interpretation of LANDSAT data. The magnetic properties of materials associated with specific spectral types and systematic changes in both spectra and magnetic properties are considered.

  1. Potential toxicity of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neenu; Jenkins, Gareth J.S.; Asadi, Romisa; Doak, Shareen H.

    2010-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are being widely used for various biomedical applications, for example, magnetic resonance imaging, targeted delivery of drugs or genes, and in hyperthermia. Although, the potential benefits of SPION are considerable, there is a distinct need to identify any potential cellular damage associated with these nanoparticles. Besides focussing on cytotoxicity, the most commonly used determinant of toxicity as a result of exposure to SPION, this review also mentions the importance of studying the subtle cellular alterations in the form of DNA damage and oxidative stress. We review current studies and discuss how SPION, with or without different surface coating, may cause cellular perturbations including modulation of actin cytoskeleton, alteration in gene expression profiles, disturbance in iron homeostasis and altered cellular responses such as activation of signalling pathways and impairment of cell cycle regulation. The importance of protein-SPION interaction and various safety considerations relating to SPION exposure are also addressed. PMID:22110864

  2. Exchange Bias Effects in Iron Oxide-Based Nanoparticle Systems

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Manh-Huong; Alonso, Javier; Khurshid, Hafsa; Lampen-Kelley, Paula; Chandra, Sayan; Stojak Repa, Kristen; Nemati, Zohreh; Das, Raja; Iglesias, Óscar; Srikanth, Hariharan

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of exchange bias (EB) on the nanoscale provides a novel approach to improving the anisotropic properties of magnetic nanoparticles for prospective applications in nanospintronics and nanomedicine. However, the physical origin of EB is not fully understood. Recent advances in chemical synthesis provide a unique opportunity to explore EB in a variety of iron oxide-based nanostructures ranging from core/shell to hollow and hybrid composite nanoparticles. Experimental and atomistic Monte Carlo studies have shed light on the roles of interface and surface spins in these nanosystems. This review paper aims to provide a thorough understanding of the EB and related phenomena in iron oxide-based nanoparticle systems, knowledge of which is essential to tune the anisotropic magnetic properties of exchange-coupled nanoparticle systems for potential applications. PMID:28335349

  3. Nanovectors for anticancer agents based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Douziech-Eyrolles, Laurence; Marchais, Hervé; Hervé, Katel; Munnier, Emilie; Soucé, Martin; Linassier, Claude; Dubois, Pierre; Chourpa, Igor

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade, the application of nanotechnologies for anticancer drug delivery has been extensively explored, hoping to improve the efficacy and to reduce side effects of chemotherapy. The present review is dedicated to a certain kind of anticancer drug nanovectors developed to target tumors with the help of an external magnetic field. More particularly, this work treats anticancer drug nanoformulations based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with biocompatible polymers. The major purpose is to focus on the specific requirements and technological difficulties related to controlled delivery of antitumoral agents. We attempt to state the problem and its possible perspectives by considering the three major constituents of the magnetic therapeutic vectors: iron oxide nanoparticles, polymeric coating and anticancer drug. PMID:18203422

  4. Colloidal polyaniline

    DOEpatents

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized amino-substituted aromatic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a random copolymer containing amino-benzene type moieties as side chain constituents, and dopant anions, and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are provided.

  5. Enhanced colloidal stability of nanoscale zero valent iron particles in the presence of sodium silicate water glass.

    PubMed

    Honetschlägerová, Lenka; Janouškovcová, Petra; Kubal, Martin; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    A method for the stabilization of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) particles using silica was developed. Stabilization can significantly improve the performance characteristics of currently available nZVI products containing agglomerated particles. In the first step of the method, the agglomerates were broken using a sonication. A subsequent stabilizing effect was brought about by the deposition of silica onto the surface of the nZVI particles. The method was tested on three commercially available nZVI suspensions which formed agglomerates with mean sizes ranging from 1000 to 5000 nm. The application of the method resulted in a significant reduction of the mean size of the agglomerates to the values from 100 to 200 nm. The stabilizing effect of silica was also evidenced using scanning electron microscopy, zeta potential measurements and sedimentation analysis. The introduction of typical groundwater ions did not significantly affect the colloidal stability of the treated nZVI suspensions. The results of this study indicate that the silica coating have the potential to protect nZVI against agglomeration.

  6. Colloidal properties and stability of graphene oxide nanomaterials in the aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Indranil; Duch, Matthew C; Mansukhani, Nikhita D; Hersam, Mark C; Bouchard, Dermont

    2013-06-18

    While graphene oxide (GO) has been found to be the most toxic graphene-based nanomaterial, its environmental fate is still unexplored. In this study, the aggregation kinetics and stability of GO were investigated using time-resolved dynamic light scattering over a wide range of aquatic chemistries (pH, salt types (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2), ionic strength) relevant to natural and engineered systems. Although pH did not have a notable influence on GO stability from pH 4 to 10, salt type and ionic strength had significant effects on GO stability due to electrical double layer compression, similar to other colloidal particles. The critical coagulation concentration (CCC) values of GO were determined to be 44 mM NaCl, 0.9 mM CaCl2, and 1.3 mM MgCl2. Aggregation and stability of GO in the aquatic environment followed colloidal theory (DLVO and Schulze-Hardy rule), even though GO's shape is not spherical. CCC values of GO were lower than reported fullerene CCC values and higher than reported carbon nanotube CCC values. CaCl2 destabilized GO more aggressively than MgCl2 and NaCl due to the binding capacity of Ca(2+) ions with hydroxyl and carbonyl functional groups of GO. Natural organic matter significantly improved the stability of GO in water primarily due to steric repulsion. Long-term stability studies demonstrated that GO was highly stable in both natural and synthetic surface waters, although it settled quickly in synthetic groundwater. While GO remained stable in synthetic influent wastewater, effluent wastewater collected from a treatment plant rapidly destabilized GO, indicating GO will settle out during the wastewater treatment process and likely accumulate in biosolids and sludge. Overall, our findings indicate that GO nanomaterials will be stable in the natural aquatic environment and that significant aqueous transport of GO is possible.

  7. Fluorometric estimation of amino acids interaction with colloidal suspension of FITC functionalized graphene oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Kashyap; Dhayal, Marshal

    2017-02-01

    A hydrosol approach developed to synthesize fluorescence quenched fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) functionalized colloidal suspension of graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONP). UV-vis spectroscopic measurements showed characteristic peak at 236 nm and 300 nm due to pi-pi* interaction in Cdbnd C and n-pi* transition in Cdbnd O bond of GONP, respectively. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra showed reduced intensity of 1429 cm-1 IR band of GONP due to the electrostatic and pi-pi interactions of FITC with GONP in FITC-GONP. ATR-FTIR spectra of different amino acid co-functionalised FITC-GONP showed an increase in the FTIR band intensity at 1429 cm-1 which was significantly reduced due to electrostatic/pi-pi interactions of FITC with GONP in the absence of the amino acids. A peak at 1084 cm-1 in ATR-FTIR spectra appears which confirms the interaction between amine group of amino acids and sbnd COO- groups at GONP surface. The FITC interaction with GONP lead to fluorescence resonance energy transfers (FRET) and resulted in a liner decrease in the FITC fluorescence with an increase of GONP concentration. An increase in the reappearance of FITC fluorescence observed while the amino acid concentration was increased in co-functionalised FITC-GONP. The quantified amount of reappeared fluorescence of FITC in amino acid co-functionalised FITC-GONP depends on the concentration, polar and non-polar nature of amino acids. The reappearance of FITC from the surface of FITC-GONP with the addition of amino acid was found to be consistent with the organic substitute, size of amino acids and their functionalities. Therefore, FRET based method using FITC-GONP colloidal suspension may have potential application in determining the binding nature of biomolecules with GONP for biomedical applications.

  8. Stabilization and oxidation kinetics of iron in hydrothermal plumes above the East Scotia Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, J.; Connelly, D.; Achterberg, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    Two hydrothermal vent fields were recently discovered along the East Scotia Ridge (a back arc basin spreading centre) in the Southern Ocean. These are the most southerly high-temperature vents discovered to date. End-member fluids and the associated hydrothermal plumes were sampled for total, dissolved and 'soluble' (<0.02μm) iron, manganese and copper. This study evaluates the speciation and size fractionation of iron in the plume samples, and considers the implications of iron stabilization in the Southern Ocean, and other ocean settings. Iron is an important micronutrient and in the formation of oxyhydroxide particles is involved in the scavenging of many elements including phosphorous and the rare earth elements. The study of the fate of hydrothermally sourced, unstable Fe(II) is therefore crucial to the understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of iron and other elements in the ocean. We present the first combined results of both size fractionation and natural ligand complexation of Fe(III) in the plume samples, using a combination of ICP-MS analysis and competitive ligand exchange cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-CSV) experiments. In doing so, we present a first evaluation of the relationship between ligand and colloid stabilization mechanisms in hydrothermal plume settings. Plume samples are discussed in relation to the end-member fluid chemistry of the vent fields, which have relatively low dissolved metal concentrations (~1 mM Fe) and very high H2S:Fe ratios (~8) compared with typical mid-ocean ridge settings. The bottom water oxygen concentration is 175 μM (c.f. North Atlantic: 250 μM, North Pacific: 104 μM), and background dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations are ~43 μM. Ambient seawater temperature at plume depth (~2200m) is close to 0°C. All of these features may play a part in the observed Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and Fe(III) stabilization and therefore the impact of hydrothermal Fe input on Southern Ocean biogeochemistry. The

  9. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle uptake alters M2 macrophage phenotype, iron metabolism, migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Rojas, José M; Sanz-Ortega, Laura; Mulens-Arias, Vladimir; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Pérez-Yagüe, Sonia; Barber, Domingo F

    2016-05-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have shown promise as contrast agents and nanocarriers for drug delivery. Their impact on M2-polarised macrophages has nonetheless not been well studied. Here we explored the effects of SPIONs coated with dimercaptosuccinic acid, aminopropyl silane or aminodextran in two M2 macrophage models (murine primary IL-4-activated bone marrow-derived macrophages and human M2-like differentiated THP-1 cells). All SPIONs were internalised and no cell toxicity was observed. SPION treatment produced reactive oxygen species and activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AKT pathways. After 24-h SPION incubation, M2 macrophages switched their iron metabolism towards an iron-replete state. SPION treatment in both M2 macrophage models altered their M2 activation profiles, promoted IL-10 production, and stimulated protease-dependent invasion. These results highlight the need to evaluate the interactions between SPIONs and cells to take full advantage of the intrinsic properties of these nanoparticles in biological systems. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have been used as an MRI contrast agent in many experimental studies. The authors here investigated the effects of these nanoparticles on M2 macrophages after cellular uptake. The findings of cell activation further enhanced our current knowledge on the interaction of SPIONS with macrophages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reducing arsenic accumulation in rice grain through iron oxide amendment.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Eric M; Wang, Jianmin; Burken, Joel G; Shi, Honglan; Yan, Wengui; Yang, John; Hua, Bin; Deng, Baolin

    2015-08-01

    Effects of soil-arsenic (As), phosphorus and iron oxide on As accumulation in rice grain were investigated. Cultivars that have significantly different sensitivity to As, straighthead-resistant Zhe 733 and straighthead-susceptible Cocodrie, were used to represent different cultivar varieties. The grain accumulation of other elements of concern, selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), and cadmium (Cd) was also monitored. Results demonstrated that high soil-As not only resulted in high grain-As, but could also result in high grain-Se, and Zhe 733 had significantly less grain-As than Cocodrie did. However, soil-As did not impact grain-Mo and Cd. Among all elements monitored, iron oxide amendment significantly reduced grain-As for both cultivars, while the phosphate application only reduced grain-Se for Zhe 733. Results also indicated that cultivar type significantly impacted grain accumulation of all monitored trace elements. Therefore, applying iron oxide to As-contaminated land, in addition to choosing appropriate rice cultivar, can effectively reduce the grain accumulation of As.

  11. Gentamicin coated iron oxide nanoparticles as novel antibacterial agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Proma; Neogi, Sudarsan

    2017-09-01

    Applications of different types of magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical purposes started a long time back. The concept of surface functionalization of the iron oxide nanoparticles with antibiotics is a novel technique which paves the path for further application of these nanoparticles by virtue of their property of superparamagnetism. In this paper, we have synthesized novel iron oxide nanoparticles surface functionalized with Gentamicin. The average size of the particles, concluded from the HR-TEM images, came to be around 14 nm and 10 nm for unmodified and modified nanoparticles, respectively. The magnetization curve M(H) obtained for these nanoparticles are typical of superparamagnetic nature and having almost zero values of coercivity and remanance. The release properties of the drug coated nanoparticles were studied; obtaining an S shaped profile, indicating the initial burst effect followed by gradual sustained release. In vitro investigations against various gram positive and gram negative strains viz Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis indicated significant antibacterial efficiency of the drug-nanoparticle conjugate. The MIC values indicated that a small amount like 0.2 mg ml‑1 of drug capped particles induce about 98% bacterial death. The novelty of the work lies in the drug capping of the nanoparticles, which retains the superparamagnetic nature of the iron oxide nanoparticles and the medical properties of the drug simultaneously, which is found to extremely blood compatible.

  12. Modulated self-reversed magnetic hysteresis in iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ji; Chen, Kezheng

    2017-02-01

    The steadfast rule of a ferromagnetic hysteresis loop claims its saturation positioned within the first and third quadrants, whereas its saturation positioned in the second and fourth quadrants (named as self-reversed magnetic hysteresis) is usually taken as an experimental artifact and is always intentionally ignored. In this report, a new insight in this unique hysteresis phenomenon and its modulation were discussed in depth. Different iron oxides (magnetite, maghemite and hematite) with varying dimensions were soaked in FeCl3 aqueous solution and absorbed Fe3+ cations due to their negative enough surface zeta potentials. These iron oxides@Fe3+ core-shell products exhibit well pronounced self-reversed magnetic hysteresis which concurrently have typical diamagnetic characteristics and essential ferromagnetic features. The presence of pre-magnetized Fe3+ shell and its negatively magnetic exchange coupling with post-magnetized iron-oxide core is the root cause for the observed phenomena. More strikingly, this self-reversed magnetic hysteresis can be readily modulated by changing the core size or by simply controlling Fe3+ concentration in aqueous solution. It is anticipated that this work will shed new light on the development of spintronics, magnetic recording and other magnetically-relevant fields.

  13. Modulated self-reversed magnetic hysteresis in iron oxides

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ji; Chen, Kezheng

    2017-01-01

    The steadfast rule of a ferromagnetic hysteresis loop claims its saturation positioned within the first and third quadrants, whereas its saturation positioned in the second and fourth quadrants (named as self-reversed magnetic hysteresis) is usually taken as an experimental artifact and is always intentionally ignored. In this report, a new insight in this unique hysteresis phenomenon and its modulation were discussed in depth. Different iron oxides (magnetite, maghemite and hematite) with varying dimensions were soaked in FeCl3 aqueous solution and absorbed Fe3+ cations due to their negative enough surface zeta potentials. These iron oxides@Fe3+ core-shell products exhibit well pronounced self-reversed magnetic hysteresis which concurrently have typical diamagnetic characteristics and essential ferromagnetic features. The presence of pre-magnetized Fe3+ shell and its negatively magnetic exchange coupling with post-magnetized iron-oxide core is the root cause for the observed phenomena. More strikingly, this self-reversed magnetic hysteresis can be readily modulated by changing the core size or by simply controlling Fe3+ concentration in aqueous solution. It is anticipated that this work will shed new light on the development of spintronics, magnetic recording and other magnetically-relevant fields. PMID:28220793

  14. Modulated self-reversed magnetic hysteresis in iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji; Chen, Kezheng

    2017-02-21

    The steadfast rule of a ferromagnetic hysteresis loop claims its saturation positioned within the first and third quadrants, whereas its saturation positioned in the second and fourth quadrants (named as self-reversed magnetic hysteresis) is usually taken as an experimental artifact and is always intentionally ignored. In this report, a new insight in this unique hysteresis phenomenon and its modulation were discussed in depth. Different iron oxides (magnetite, maghemite and hematite) with varying dimensions were soaked in FeCl3 aqueous solution and absorbed Fe(3+) cations due to their negative enough surface zeta potentials. These iron oxides@Fe(3+) core-shell products exhibit well pronounced self-reversed magnetic hysteresis which concurrently have typical diamagnetic characteristics and essential ferromagnetic features. The presence of pre-magnetized Fe(3+) shell and its negatively magnetic exchange coupling with post-magnetized iron-oxide core is the root cause for the observed phenomena. More strikingly, this self-reversed magnetic hysteresis can be readily modulated by changing the core size or by simply controlling Fe(3+) concentration in aqueous solution. It is anticipated that this work will shed new light on the development of spintronics, magnetic recording and other magnetically-relevant fields.

  15. Magnetic Signatures of Several Synthetic Iron Oxides Alteration Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyodo, Y.; Ona-Nguema, G.; Bonville, P.; Lagroix, F.

    2009-05-01

    The alteration of naturally occurring iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, under the influence of varying environmental conditions, including micro-environments and biological activity, is an important research topic because their connection to past climate variations remains to be elucidated. One approach to this subject matter is to perform laboratory experiments using synthetic iron oxides (sensus lato) subjected to specific physical and bio-chemical conditions. In our presentation, we will report on alteration experiments performed on synthetic lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) particles. A first approach consists in using the starting materials as electron acceptors in bio-reduction experiments involving the iron- reducing bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens and leading to the formation of magnetite (Fe3O4) particles. In a parallel approach, the starting materials are converted to magnetite by slow heating in CO/CO2 atmosphere. Further alteration can be done by slow heating in air, this time inducing aging and oxidation of the material. At various stages of our experiments, the samples are characterized using both magnetic (low-temperature, low-field and high-field magnetic measurements, Mossbaüer spectroscopy, etc.) and non-magnetic techniques (XRD, HRTEM, etc.). The various experiments conducted on these samples will allow us to study different pathways of magnetite formation and alteration in the environment, including solid-state conversion, partial or total dissolution/precipitation, and particles aggregation.

  16. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles synthesized by atmospheric microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Kaur, Parvin; Tan, Augustine Tuck Lee; Singh, Rajveer; Lee, Paul Choon Keat; Springham, Stuart Victor; Ramanujan, Raju V.; Rawat, R. S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles using the atmospheric microplasma (AMP). The properties of iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized using AMP are compared with particles (i) formed in as-prepared solution and (ii) prepared using thermal decomposition method. Iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by all the 3 treatment methods exhibit quite soft ferromagnetic properties with coercivities less than 10 G. The AMP synthesis technique was found to be more efficient and better than thermal decomposition method due to ultra-shorter experiment time (around 2.5 min) as compared to 90 min required for thermal decomposition method. Moreover, AMP synthesized nanoparticles are better isolated and of smaller size than thermal decomposition ones. The effect of plasma discharge timings on synthesized nanoparticles has also been studied in this work. Coercivity of synthesized nanoparticles decreases with the increasing plasma discharge timings from 3 to 10 min. The nanoparticles synthesized using plasma discharge timing of 10 min exhibit the smallest coercivity of around 3 G. This suggests a high possibility of achieving super-paramagnetic nanoparticles by optimizing the plasma discharge timings of AMP.

  17. Extensive Characterization of Oxide-Coated Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles Synthesized by Laser Ablation in Liquid.

    PubMed

    Intartaglia, Romuald; Rodio, Marina; Abdellatif, Mohamed; Prato, Mirko; Salerno, Marco

    2016-09-14

    Colloidal gold nanoparticles are a widespread nanomaterial with many potential applications, but their aggregation in suspension is a critical issue which is usually prevented by organic surfactants. This solution has some drawbacks, such as material contamination and modifications of its functional properties. The gold nanoparticles presented in this work have been synthesized by ultra-fast laser ablation in liquid, which addresses the above issues by overcoating the metal nanoparticles with an oxide layer. The main focus of the work is in the characterization of the oxidized gold nanoparticles, which were made first in solution by means of dynamic light scattering and optical spectroscopy, and then in dried form by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and finally by surface potential measurements with atomic force microscopy. The light scattering assessed the nanoscale size of the formed particles and provided insight in their stability. The nanoparticles' size was confirmed by direct imaging in transmission electron microscopy, and their crystalline nature was disclosed by X-ray diffraction. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed measurements compatible with the presence of surface oxide, which was confirmed by the surface potential measurements, which are the novel point of the present work. In conclusion, the method of laser ablation in liquid for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles has been presented, and the advantage of this physical approach, consisting of coating the nanoparticles in situ with gold oxide which provides the required morphological and chemical stability without organic surfactants, has been confirmed by using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy for the first time.

  18. Electron uptake by iron-oxidizing phototrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, A; Gardel, EJ; Vidoudez, C; Parra, EA; Girguis, PR

    2014-02-26

    Oxidation-reduction reactions underlie energy generation in nearly all life forms. Although most organisms use soluble oxidants and reductants, some microbes can access solid-phase materials as electron-acceptors or -donors via extracellular electron transfer. Many studies have focused on the reduction of solid-phase oxidants. Far less is known about electron uptake via microbial extracellular electron transfer, and almost nothing is known about the associated mechanisms. Here we show that the iron-oxidizing photoautotroph Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 accepts electrons from a poised electrode, with carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source/electron acceptor. Both electron uptake and ruBisCo form I expression are stimulated by light. Electron uptake also occurs in the dark, uncoupled from photosynthesis. Notably, the pioABC operon, which encodes a protein system essential for photoautotrophic growth by ferrous iron oxidation, influences electron uptake. These data reveal a previously unknown metabolic versatility of photoferrotrophs to use extracellular electron transfer for electron uptake.

  19. Electron uptake by iron-oxidizing phototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bose, A; Gardel, E J; Vidoudez, C; Parra, E A; Girguis, P R

    2014-02-26

    Oxidation-reduction reactions underlie energy generation in nearly all life forms. Although most organisms use soluble oxidants and reductants, some microbes can access solid-phase materials as electron-acceptors or -donors via extracellular electron transfer. Many studies have focused on the reduction of solid-phase oxidants. Far less is known about electron uptake via microbial extracellular electron transfer, and almost nothing is known about the associated mechanisms. Here we show that the iron-oxidizing photoautotroph Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 accepts electrons from a poised electrode, with carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source/electron acceptor. Both electron uptake and ruBisCo form I expression are stimulated by light. Electron uptake also occurs in the dark, uncoupled from photosynthesis. Notably, the pioABC operon, which encodes a protein system essential for photoautotrophic growth by ferrous iron oxidation, influences electron uptake. These data reveal a previously unknown metabolic versatility of photoferrotrophs to use extracellular electron transfer for electron uptake.

  20. Evidence for an oxygen evolving iron-oxo-cerium intermediate in iron-catalysed water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Codolà, Zoel; Gómez, Laura; Kleespies, Scott T; Que, Lawrence; Costas, Miquel; Lloret-Fillol, Julio

    2015-01-22

    The non-haem iron complex α-[Fe(II)(CF3SO3)2(mcp)] (mcp=(N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-cis-diaminocyclohexane) reacts with Ce(IV) to oxidize water to O2, representing an iron-based functional model for the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. Here we trap an intermediate, characterized by cryospray ionization high resolution mass spectrometry and resonance Raman spectroscopy, and formulated as [(mcp)Fe(IV)(O)(μ-O)Ce(IV)(NO3)3](+), the first example of a well-characterized inner-sphere complex to be formed in cerium(IV)-mediated water oxidation. The identification of this reactive Fe(IV)-O-Ce(IV) adduct may open new pathways to validate mechanistic notions of an analogous Mn(V)-O-Ca(II) unit in the oxygen evolving complex that is responsible for carrying out the key O-O bond forming step.

  1. Effects of green tea on iron accumulation and oxidative stress in livers of iron-challenged thalassemic mice.

    PubMed

    Saewong, T; Ounjaijean, S; Mundee, Y; Pattanapanyasat, K; Fucharoen, S; Porter, J B; Srichairatanakool, S

    2010-03-01

    Liver is affected by secondary iron overload in transfusions dependent b-thalassemia patients. The redox iron can generate reactive oxidants that damage biomolecules, leading to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Iron chelators are used to treat thalassemias to achieve negative iron balance and relieve oxidant-induced organ dysfunctions. Green tea (GT) (Camellia sinensis) catechins exhibit anti-oxidation, the inhibition of carcinogenesis, the detoxification of CYP2E1-catalyzed HepG2 cells and iron chelation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of GT in iron-challenged thalassemic mice. Heterozygous BKO type-thalassemia (BKO) mice (C57BL/6) experienced induced iron overload by being fed a ferrocene-supplemented diet (Fe diet) for 8 weeks, and by orally being given GT extract (300 mg/kg) and deferiprone (DFP) (50 mg/kg) for a further 8 weeks. Liver iron content (LIC) was analyzed by TPTZ colorimetric and Perl's staining techniques. Concentrations of liver reduced glutathione (GSH), collagen and malondialdehyde (MDA) were also measured. Dosages of the GT extract and DFP lowered LIC in the Fe diet-fed BKO mice effectively. The extract did not change any concentrations of liver glutathione, collagen and MDA in the BKO mice. Histochemical examination showed leukocyte infiltration in the near by hepatic portal vein and high iron accumulation in the livers of the iron-loaded BKO mice, however GT treatment lowered the elevated iron deposition. In conclusion, green tea inhibits or delays the deposition of hepatic iron in regularly iron-loaded thalassemic mice effectively. This will prevent the iron-induced generation of free radicals via Haber-Weiss and Fenton reactions, and consequently liver damage and fibrosis. Combined chelation with green tea would be investigated in beta-thalassemia patients with iron overload.

  2. Evaluation of iron oxide nanoparticle biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Hanini, Amel; Schmitt, Alain; Kacem, Kamel; Chau, François; Ammar, Souad; Gavard, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an exciting field of investigation for the development of new treatments for many human diseases. However, it is necessary to assess the biocompatibility of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo before considering clinical applications. Our characterization of polyol-produced maghemite γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles showed high structural quality. The particles showed a homogeneous spherical size around 10 nm and could form aggregates depending on the dispersion conditions. Such nanoparticles were efficiently taken up in vitro by human endothelial cells, which represent the first biological barrier to nanoparticles in vivo. However, γ-Fe(2)O(3) can cause cell death within 24 hours of exposure, most likely through oxidative stress. Further in vivo exploration suggests that although γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles are rapidly cleared through the urine, they can lead to toxicity in the liver, kidneys and lungs, while the brain and heart remain unaffected. In conclusion, γ-Fe(2)O(3) could exhibit harmful properties and therefore surface coating, cellular targeting, and local exposure should be considered before developing clinical applications.

  3. Alleviation of iron induced oxidative stress by the grape fruit flavanone naringin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Reddy, Tiyagura Koti

    2011-04-25

    Iron is an essential element that participates in several metabolic activities of cells; however, excess iron is a major cause of iron-induced oxidative stress and several human diseases. The protective effect of naringin, a grape fruit flavanone, was studied in iron overloaded isolated mouse liver mitochondria, where the isolated mitochondrial fraction was incubated with various concentrations of naringin before ferric ion loading. Iron overloading of mitochondrial fraction resulted in an increase in lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and DNA damage, whereas iron overload reduced the glutathione (GSH) concentration, glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. Pretreatment of mitochondrial fraction with naringin inhibited iron-induced lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and DNA damage. Conversely, naringin supplementation arrested iron-induced depletion in the GSH contents, GSHPx, GST, SOD and catalase activities significantly. Ferric iron reduction assay revealed that naringin could not reduce ferric iron into ferrous iron indicating that it did not exhibit prooxidant activity. Iron free coordination site assay indicated that naringin was unable to occupy all the active sites of iron indicating that naringin did not completely chelate iron. Our study demonstrates that naringin was able to share the burden of endogenous oxidants by inhibiting the iron-induced depletion of all important antioxidant enzymes as well as GSH and may act as a good antioxidant.

  4. Evaluation of Characterization Techniques for Iron Pipe Corrosion Products and Iron Oxide Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Borch, Thomas; Camper, Anne K.; Biederman, Joel A.; Butterfield, Phillip; Gerlach, Robin; Amonette, James E.

    2008-10-01

    A common problem faced by drinking water studies is that of properly characterizing the corrosion products (CP) in iron pipescor synthetic Fe (hydr)oxides used to simulate the iron pipe used in municipal drinking-water systems. The present work compares the relative applicability of a suite of imaging and analytical techniques for the characterization of CPs and synthetic Fe oxide thin films and provide an overview of the type of data that each instrument can provide as well as their limitations to help researchers and consultants choose the best technique for a given task. Crushed CP from a water distribution system and synthetic Fe oxide thin films formed on glass surfaces were chosen as test samples for this evaluation. The CP and synthetic Fe oxide thin films were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), grazing incident diffractometry (GID), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared, Mössbauer spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller N2 adsorption and Fe concentration was determined by the ferrozine method. XRD and GID were found to be the most suitable techniques for identification of the mineralogical composition of CP and synthetic Fe oxide thin films, respectively. AFM and a combined ToF-SIMS-AFM approach proved excellent for roughness and depth profiling analysis of synthetic Fe oxide thin films, respectively. Corrosion products were difficult to study by AFM due to their surface roughness, while synthetic Fe oxide thin films resisted most spectroscopic methods due to their limited thickness (118 nm). XPS analysis is not recommended for mixtures of Fe (hydr)oxides due to their spectral similarities. SEM and TEM provided great detail on mineralogical morphology.

  5. Accumulation of iron oxide nanoparticles by cultured primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Petters, Charlotte; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are frequently used for biomedical applications. Although nanoparticles can enter the brain, little is known so far on the uptake of IONPs in neurons and on their neurotoxic potential. Hence, we applied dimercaptosuccinate (DMSA)-coated IONPs to cultured primary rat cerebellar granule neurons. These IONPs had average hydrodynamic diameters of around 80 nm and 120 nm when dispersed in incubation medium in the absence and the presence of 10% fetal calf serum, respectively. Acute exposure of neurons with IONPs for up to 6 h did neither alter the cell morphology nor compromise cell viability, although neurons accumulated large amounts of IONPs in a time- and concentration-dependent manner which caused delayed toxicity. For the first 30 min of incubation of neurons at 37 °C with IONPs the cellular iron content increased proportionally to the concentration of IONPs applied irrespective of the absence and the presence of serum. IONP-exposure in the absence of serum generated maximal cellular iron contents of around 3000 nmol iron/mg protein after 4 h of incubation, while the accumulation in the presence of 10% serum was slower and reached already within 1 h maximal values of around 450 nmol iron/mg protein. For both incubation conditions was the increase in cellular iron contents significantly lowered by reducing the incubation temperature to 4 °C. Application of inhibitors of endocytotic pathways did not affect neuronal IONP accumulation in the absence of serum, while inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis lowered significantly the IONP accumulation in the presence of serum. These data demonstrate that DMSA-coated IONPs are not acutely toxic to cultured neurons and that a protein corona around the particles strongly affects their interaction with neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Iron isotope fractionation during photo-oxidation of aqueous ferrous iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staton, S.; Amskold, L.; Gordon, G.; Anbar, A.; Konhauser, K.

    2006-05-01

    The classic interpretation of banded iron formations (BIFs) presumes the presence of dissolved O2 in the surface ocean to oxidize ferrous Fe. However, at least two alternative oxidation mechanisms are possible: UV photo-oxidation; and the activity of anaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizing photosynthetic bacteria. We are investigating Fe isotope fractionation as a means of differentiating amongst these mechanisms. Photo-oxidation has been examined at pH ~ 3 and 41°C in the absence of ligands other than H2O, OH-, and Cl- using UVA (316-400 nm) and UVC (200-280 nm) light sources. In these experiments, ferrous Fe was oxidized and precipitated as ferric oxyhydroxide. We find that isotopically heavy Fe was preferentially removed from solution. The fractionation factor (α) for the overall reaction is ~ 1.0025. This value is comparable to the α between Fe2+ and Fe3+ hexaquo complexes, but larger than the effect seen during the overall process of ferrous Fe oxidation and precipitation at near-neutral pH. The magnitude of isotope fractionation is likely to change at higher pH for two reasons. First, ferric oxyhydroxide precipitation, which may impart a kinetic isotope effect, is faster at higher pH. Second, the major UV-absorbing ferrous species in the ocean is the ferrous hydroxide ion [Fe(OH)+], the concentration of which is strongly pH dependent. Photo-oxidation experiments at realistic seawater pH are under current investigation.

  7. New Insight into Microbial Iron Oxidation as Revealed by the Proteomic Profile of an Obligate Iron-Oxidizing Chemolithoautotroph

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David; Sylvan, Jason B.; Orcutt, Beth N.; Jacobson Meyers, Myrna E.; Ramírez, Gustavo A.; Zhong, John D.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2015-01-01

    Microaerophilic, neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) grow via the oxidation of reduced Fe(II) at or near neutral pH, in the presence of oxygen, making them relevant in numerous environments with elevated Fe(II) concentrations. However, the biochemical mechanisms for Fe(II) oxidation by these neutrophilic FeOB are unknown, and genetic markers for this process are unavailable. In the ocean, microaerophilic microorganisms in the genus Mariprofundus of the class Zetaproteobacteria are the only organisms known to chemolithoautotrophically oxidize Fe and concurrently biomineralize it in the form of twisted stalks of iron oxyhydroxides. The aim of this study was to identify highly expressed proteins associated with the electron transport chain of microaerophilic, neutrophilic FeOB. To this end, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1 was cultivated, and its proteins were extracted, assayed for redox activity, and analyzed via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for identification of peptides. The results indicate that a cytochrome c4, cbb3-type cytochrome oxidase subunits, and an outer membrane cytochrome c were among the most highly expressed proteins and suggest an involvement in the process of aerobic, neutrophilic bacterial Fe oxidation. Proteins associated with alternative complex III, phosphate transport, carbon fixation, and biofilm formation were abundant, consistent with the lifestyle of Mariprofundus. PMID:26092463

  8. New Insight into Microbial Iron Oxidation as Revealed by the Proteomic Profile of an Obligate Iron-Oxidizing Chemolithoautotroph.

    PubMed

    Barco, Roman A; Emerson, David; Sylvan, Jason B; Orcutt, Beth N; Jacobson Meyers, Myrna E; Ramírez, Gustavo A; Zhong, John D; Edwards, Katrina J

    2015-09-01

    Microaerophilic, neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) grow via the oxidation of reduced Fe(II) at or near neutral pH, in the presence of oxygen, making them relevant in numerous environments with elevated Fe(II) concentrations. However, the biochemical mechanisms for Fe(II) oxidation by these neutrophilic FeOB are unknown, and genetic markers for this process are unavailable. In the ocean, microaerophilic microorganisms in the genus Mariprofundus of the class Zetaproteobacteria are the only organisms known to chemolithoautotrophically oxidize Fe and concurrently biomineralize it in the form of twisted stalks of iron oxyhydroxides. The aim of this study was to identify highly expressed proteins associated with the electron transport chain of microaerophilic, neutrophilic FeOB. To this end, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1 was cultivated, and its proteins were extracted, assayed for redox activity, and analyzed via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for identification of peptides. The results indicate that a cytochrome c4, cbb3-type cytochrome oxidase subunits, and an outer membrane cytochrome c were among the most highly expressed proteins and suggest an involvement in the process of aerobic, neutrophilic bacterial Fe oxidation. Proteins associated with alternative complex III, phosphate transport, carbon fixation, and biofilm formation were abundant, consistent with the lifestyle of Mariprofundus.

  9. Comparison of the Effects of Iron Oxide, as a New Form of Iron Supplement, and Ferrous Sulfate on the Blood Levels of Iron and Total Iron-Binding Globulin in the Rabbit.

    PubMed

    Kheiri, Reyhaneh; Koohi, Mohammad Kazem; Sadeghi-Hashjin, Goudarz; Nouri, Hadiseh; Khezli, Noushin; Hassan, Mohsen Aghamohammad; Hoomani, Fatemeh; Shams, Gholamreza; Rasouli, Ali; Motaghinejad, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Iron oxide is an important biological agent that has a key role in medical processes; however, the mechanism whereby it provides iron for human and animal cells and its biological uses remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effects of oral iron oxide on serum iron status and compare the results with those of iron sulfate as a reference salt. Fifteen adult rabbits were divided into 3 groups of 5 each: control group, iron sulfate group, and iron oxide group. The groups received doses of 3.3, 10, and 33 mg/kg in 3 experiments. Venous blood samples were obtained just before the oral administration of iron sulfate and iron oxide (3.3 mg/kg). More blood samples were taken 3 times at the time points of 1, 6, and 12 hours after the administration of the solutions. Serum was separated for the measurement of iron (Fe) and total iron-binding globulin (TIBG) with routine methods. One week later, the same experiment was repeated with 10 mg/kg of iron sulfate and iron oxide; and 1 week later after the second experiment, again the same experiment was repeated with 33 mg/kg of iron sulfate and iron oxide. The results showed that 33 mg/kg of iron sulfate 1 hour after treatment caused a significant difference in the Fe and TIBG levels between all the groups (P=0.014 for Fe and P=0.027 for TIBG). Our data showed that the absorption of iron oxide was similar to that of ferrous sulfate and in high doses was as useful as iron supplement.

  10. Comparison of the Effects of Iron Oxide, as a New Form of Iron Supplement, and Ferrous Sulfate on the Blood Levels of Iron and Total Iron-Binding Globulin in the Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Kheiri, Reyhaneh; Koohi, Mohammad Kazem; Sadeghi-Hashjin, Goudarz; Nouri, Hadiseh; Khezli, Noushin; Hassan, Mohsen Aghamohammad; Hoomani, Fatemeh; Shams, Gholamreza; Rasouli, Ali; Motaghinejad, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Iron oxide is an important biological agent that has a key role in medical processes; however, the mechanism whereby it provides iron for human and animal cells and its biological uses remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effects of oral iron oxide on serum iron status and compare the results with those of iron sulfate as a reference salt. Fifteen adult rabbits were divided into 3 groups of 5 each: control group, iron sulfate group, and iron oxide group. The groups received doses of 3.3, 10, and 33 mg/kg in 3 experiments. Venous blood samples were obtained just before the oral administration of iron sulfate and iron oxide (3.3 mg/kg). More blood samples were taken 3 times at the time points of 1, 6, and 12 hours after the administration of the solutions. Serum was separated for the measurement of iron (Fe) and total iron-binding globulin (TIBG) with routine methods. One week later, the same experiment was repeated with 10 mg/kg of iron sulfate and iron oxide; and 1 week later after the second experiment, again the same experiment was repeated with 33 mg/kg of iron sulfate and iron oxide. The results showed that 33 mg/kg of iron sulfate 1 hour after treatment caused a significant difference in the Fe and TIBG levels between all the groups (P=0.014 for Fe and P=0.027 for TIBG). Our data showed that the absorption of iron oxide was similar to that of ferrous sulfate and in high doses was as useful as iron supplement. PMID:28293054

  11. Casein-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for high MRI contrast enhancement and efficient cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Wang, Liya; Lin, Run; Wang, Andrew Y; Yang, Lily; Kuang, Min; Qian, Weiping; Mao, Hui

    2013-06-12

    Surface properties, as well as inherent physicochemical properties, of the engineered nanomaterials play important roles in their interactions with the biological systems, which eventually affect their efficiency in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here we report a new class of MRI contrast agent based on milk casein protein-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (CNIOs) with a core size of 15 nm and hydrodynamic diameter ~30 nm. These CNIOs exhibited excellent water-solubility, colloidal stability, and biocompatibility. Importantly, CNIOs exhibited prominent T2 enhancing capability with a transverse relaxivity r2 of 273 mM(-1) s(-1) at 3 tesla. The transverse relaxivity is ~2.5-fold higher than that of iron oxide nanoparticles with the same core but an amphiphilic polymer coating. CNIOs showed pH-responsive properties, formed loose and soluble aggregates near the pI (pH ~4.0). The aggregates could be dissociated reversibly when the solution pH was adjusted away from the pI. The transverse relaxation property and MRI contrast enhancing effect of CNIOs remained unchanged in the pH range of 2.0-8.0. Further functionalization of CNIOs can be achieved via surface modification of the protein coating. Bioaffinitive ligands, such as a single chain fragment from the antibody of epidermal growth factor receptor (ScFvEGFR), could be readily conjugated onto the protein coating, enabling specific targeting to MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells overexpressing EGFR. T2-weighted MRI of mice intravenously administered with CNIOs demonstrated strong contrast enhancement in the liver and spleen. These favorable properties suggest CNIOs as a class of biomarker targeted magnetic nanoparticles for MRI contrast enhancement and related biomedical applications.

  12. Development of a lauric acid/albumin hybrid iron oxide nanoparticle system with improved biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Janko, Christina; Nowak, Johannes; Matuszak, Jasmin; Knaup, Sabine; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Tietze, Rainer; Unterweger, Harald; Friedrich, Ralf P; Duerr, Stephan; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Baum, Eva; Cicha, Iwona; Dörje, Frank; Odenbach, Stefan; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Alexiou, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The promising potential of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in various nanomedical applications has been frequently reported. However, although many different synthesis methods, coatings, and functionalization techniques have been described, not many core-shell SPION drug delivery systems are available for clinicians at the moment. Here, bovine serum albumin was adsorbed onto lauric acid-stabilized SPIONs. The agglomeration behavior, zeta potential, and their dependence on the synthesis conditions were characterized with dynamic light scattering. The existence and composition of the core-shell-matrix structure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements. We showed that the iron oxide cores form agglomerates in the range of 80 nm. Moreover, despite their remarkably low tendency to aggregate even in a complex media like whole blood, the SPIONs still maintained their magnetic properties and were well attractable with a magnet. The magnetic properties were quantified by vibrating sample magnetometry and a superconducting quantum interference device. Using flow cytometry, we further investigated the effects of the different types of nanoparticle coating on morphology, viability, and DNA integrity of Jurkat cells. We showed that by addition of bovine serum albumin, the toxicity of nanoparticles is greatly reduced. We also investigated the effect of the particles on the growth of primary human endothelial cells to further demonstrate the biocompatibility of the particles. As proof of principle, we showed that the hybrid-coated particles are able to carry payloads of up to 800 μg/mL of the cytostatic drug mitoxantrone while still staying colloidally stable. The drug-loaded system exhibited excellent therapeutic potential in vitro, exceeding that of free mitoxantrone. In conclusion, we have synthesized a biocompatible ferrofluid that shows great potential for clinical

  13. Refinement of adsorptive coatings for fluorescent riboflavin-receptor-targeted iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, Yoanna; Beztsinna, Nataliia; Jayapaul, Jabadurai; Weiler, Marek; Arns, Susanne; Shi, Yang; Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is a riboflavin derivative that can be exploited to target the riboflavin transporters (RFTs) and the riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) in cells with high metabolic activity. In this study we present the synthesis of different FMN-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) and their efficiency as targeting contrast agents. Since FMN alone cannot stabilize the nanoparticles, we used adenosine phosphates--AMP, ADP and ATP--as spacers to obtain colloidally stable nanoparticles. Nucleotides with di- and triphosphate groups were intended to increase the USPIO charge and thus improve zeta potential and stability. However, all nanoparticles formed negatively charged clusters with similar properties in terms of zeta potential (-28 ± 2 mV), relaxivity (228-259 mM(-1) s(-1) at 3 T) and hydrodynamic radius (53-85 nm). Molecules with a higher number of phosphate groups, such as ADP and ATP, have a higher adsorption affinity towards iron oxide, which, instead of providing more charge, led to partial desorption and replacement of FMN. Hence, we obtained USPIOs carrying different amounts of targeting agent, which significantly influenced the nanoparticles' uptake. The nanoparticles' uptake by different cancer cells and HUVECs was evaluated photometrically and with MR relaxometry, showing that the cellular uptake of the USPIOs increases with the FMN amount on their surface. Thus, for USPIOs targeted with riboflavin derivatives the use of spacers with increasing numbers of phosphate groups does not improve either zeta potential or the particles' stability, but rather detaches the targeting moieties from their surface, leading to lower cellular uptake.

  14. Synthesis and surface engineering of iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Mona

    2005-06-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) with appropriate surface chemistry have been widely used experimentally for numerous in vivo applications such as magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement, tissue repair, immunoassay, detoxification of biological fluids, hyperthermia, drug delivery and in cell separation, etc. All these biomedical and bioengineering applications require that these nanoparticles have high magnetization values and size smaller than 100 nm with overall narrow particle size distribution, so that the particles have uniform physical and chemical properties. In addition, these applications need special surface coating of the magnetic particles, which has to be not only non-toxic and biocompatible but also allow a targetable delivery with particle localization in a specific area. To this end, most work in this field has been done in improving the biocompatibility of the materials, but only a few scientific investigations and developments have been carried out in improving the quality of magnetic particles, their size distribution, their shape and surface in addition to characterizing them to get a protocol for the quality control of these particles. Nature of surface coatings and their subsequent geometric arrangement on the nanoparticles determine not only the overall size of the colloid but also play a significant role in biokinetics and biodistribution of nanoparticles in the body. The types of specific coating, or derivatization, for these nanoparticles depend on the end application and should be chosen by keeping a particular application in mind, whether it be aimed at inflammation response or anti-cancer agents. Magnetic nanoparticles can bind to drugs, proteins, enzymes, antibodies, or nucleotides and can be directed to an organ, tissue, or tumour using an external magnetic field or can be heated in alternating magnetic fields for use in hyperthermia. This review discusses the synthetic chemistry, fluid stabilization and

  15. Development of a lauric acid/albumin hybrid iron oxide nanoparticle system with improved biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Zaloga, Jan; Janko, Christina; Nowak, Johannes; Matuszak, Jasmin; Knaup, Sabine; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Tietze, Rainer; Unterweger, Harald; Friedrich, Ralf P; Duerr, Stephan; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Baum, Eva; Cicha, Iwona; Dörje, Frank; Odenbach, Stefan; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Alexiou, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The promising potential of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in various nanomedical applications has been frequently reported. However, although many different synthesis methods, coatings, and functionalization techniques have been described, not many core-shell SPION drug delivery systems are available for clinicians at the moment. Here, bovine serum albumin was adsorbed onto lauric acid-stabilized SPIONs. The agglomeration behavior, zeta potential, and their dependence on the synthesis conditions were characterized with dynamic light scattering. The existence and composition of the core-shell-matrix structure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements. We showed that the iron oxide cores form agglomerates in the range of 80 nm. Moreover, despite their remarkably low tendency to aggregate even in a complex media like whole blood, the SPIONs still maintained their magnetic properties and were well attractable with a magnet. The magnetic properties were quantified by vibrating sample magnetometry and a superconducting quantum interference device. Using flow cytometry, we further investigated the effects of the different types of nanoparticle coating on morphology, viability, and DNA integrity of Jurkat cells. We showed that by addition of bovine serum albumin, the toxicity of nanoparticles is greatly reduced. We also investigated the effect of the particles on the growth of primary human endothelial cells to further demonstrate the biocompatibility of the particles. As proof of principle, we showed that the hybrid-coated particles are able to carry payloads of up to 800 μg/mL of the cytostatic drug mitoxantrone while still staying colloidally stable. The drug-loaded system exhibited excellent therapeutic potential in vitro, exceeding that of free mitoxantrone. In conclusion, we have synthesized a biocompatible ferrofluid that shows great potential for clinical

  16. Ceruloplasmin protects injured spinal cord from iron-mediated oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Khizr I; Kerr, Bradley J; Redensek, Adriana; López-Vales, Rubèn; Jeong, Suh Young; Ponka, Prem; David, Samuel

    2008-11-26

    CNS injury-induced hemorrhage and tissue damage leads to excess iron, which can cause secondary degeneration. The mechanisms that handle this excess iron are not fully understood. We report that spinal cord contusion injury (SCI) in mice induces an "iron homeostatic response" that partially limits iron-catalyzed oxidative damage. We show that ceruloplasmin (Cp), a ferroxidase that oxidizes toxic ferrous iron, is important for this process. SCI in Cp-deficient mice demonstrates that Cp detoxifies and mobilizes iron and reduces secondary tissue degeneration and functional loss. Our results provide new insights into how astrocytes and macrophages handle iron after SCI. Importantly, we show that iron chelator treatment has a delayed effect in improving locomotor recovery between 3 and 6 weeks after SCI. These data reveal important aspects of the molecular control of CNS iron homeostasis after SCI and suggest that iron chelator therapy may improve functional recovery after CNS trauma and hemorrhagic stroke.

  17. Iron deficiency suppresses ileal nitric oxide synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, M I; Choi, S H; Swartz-Basile, D A; Nakeeb, A; Sarna, S K; Pitt, H A

    2001-01-01

    Intestinal motility disorders are more common in women of childbearing age who are prone to iron deficiency anemia. The neurotransmitters nitric oxide (NO) and acetylcholine (ACh) play a key role in ileal smooth muscle relaxation and contraction, respectively. Iron-containing heme is known to be a cofactor for nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the enzyme responsible for NO production. Therefore we tested the hypothesis that iron deficiency would downregulate ileal NOS activity without affecting the ileum's response to ACh. Twelve adult female prairie dogs were fed either an iron-supplemented (Fe+) (200 ppm) (n = 6) or an iron-deficient (Fe-) (8 ppm) (n = 6) diet for 8 weeks. Ileal circular muscle strips were harvested to measure responses to ACh and electrical field stimulation. Under nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC) conditions, Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an NOS inhibitor, and VIP(10-28), a vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) inhibitor, were added prior to electrical field stimulation. NANC inhibitory responses are expressed as a percentage of optimal relaxation from EDTA. The excitatory response to ACh was similar in both groups (1.1 +/- 0.3 N/cm(2) vs. 1.5 +/- 0.3 N/cm(2), P = 0.45). The inhibitory response to electrical field stimulation under NANC conditions was greater in the Fe+ group (34.7 +/- 2.9%) compared to the Fe- group (23.9 +/- 3.2%; P<0.01). L-NNA eliminated the inhibitory response in the Fe+ group (0.02 +/- 0.02%) but not in the Fe- group (8.38 +/- 2.15%; P <0.01). VIP(10-28) led to greater relaxation in the Fe+ animals (45.8 +/- 6.6%) than in the Fe- animals (23.4 +/- 5.8%; P <0.05). Both L-NNA and VIP(10-28) had no inhibitory response (0.02 +/- 0.02%) in the Fe+ animals, whereas the Fe- animals had some residual inhibition (2.54 +/- 1.04%; P <0.05). These data suggest that ileal NANC relaxation is due to NOS and that iron deficiency results in (1) decreased NANC relaxation, (2) a compensatory relaxation due to a non-NOS, non-VIP mechanism, and

  18. Particle phase distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in stormwater--Using humic acid and iron nano-sized colloids as test particles.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Katrine; Kalmykova, Yuliya; Strömvall, Ann-Margret; Baun, Anders; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-11-01

    The distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in different particulate fractions in stormwater: Total, Particulate, Filtrated, Colloidal and Dissolved fractions, were examined and compared to synthetic suspensions of humic acid colloids and iron nano-sized particles. The distribution of low-molecular weight PAHs (LMW PAHs), middle-molecular weight PAHs (MMW PAHs) and high-molecular weight PAHs (HMW PAHs) among the fractions was also evaluated. The results from the synthetic suspensions showed that the highest concentrations of the PAHs were found in the Filtrated fractions and, surprisingly, high loads were found in the Dissolved fractions. The PAHs identified in stormwater in the Particulate fractions and Dissolved fractions follow their hydrophobic properties. In most samples >50% of the HMW PAHs were found in the Particulate fractions, while the LMW and MMW PAHs were found to a higher extent in the Filtrated fractions. The highest concentrations of PAHs were present in the stormwater with the highest total suspended solids (TSS); the relative amount of the HMW PAHs was highest in the Particulate fractions (particles>0.7 μm). The highest concentration of PAHs in the Colloidal fraction was found in the sample with occurrence of small nano-sized particles (<10nm). The results show the importance of developing technologies that both can manage particulate matter and effectively remove PAHs present in the Colloidal and Dissolved fractions in stormwater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Review of world literature finds iron oxides noncarcinogenic

    SciTech Connect

    Stokinger, H.E.

    1984-02-01

    Iron oxide appeared in the first list of 154 Threshold Limit Values adopted by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists at its April 1949 annual meeting. It was set to control dust and fume at the recommended value of 15 mg/M/sup 3/, at the time, the limit for an inert or ''nuisance'' dust, and was based on studies of welders made earlier by the US Dept. of Labor and by Drinker and Nelson. By 1964, the TLV was tentatively reduced to 10 mg/M/sup 3/ after a considerable body of literature had accumulated not only on the health experience of welders, but of other occupations involving iron oxides as well. As a group, these studies indicated that 15 mg/M/sup 3/ permitted too great accumulations of iron pigmentation in the lung whose chronic retention effects were not known with certainty. Also, an occasional report of cancer of the lungs appeared particulary among British hematite miners, although these findings were immediately questioned on statistical grounds. In seeming confirmation of these early reports of cancer, an alarming number of reports of cancer of the lung and respiratory tract among welders and foundrymen began to appear by 1970, reaching a crescendo by the end of that decade. As past chairman of the TLV Committee, the author decided to examine the bases of these findings. This review is the result of this examination.

  20. Crystal structure of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesized from ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krispin, Michael; Ullrich, Aladin; Horn, Siegfried

    2012-02-01

    We have investigated the crystal structure of nanosized iron-oxide by X-ray diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements at the iron K-edge as well as by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Iron-oxide nanoparticles were produced by thermal treatment of horse spleen ferritin molecules. The structure of these particles was compared to α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3 nanopowder references. The thermal treatment of a submonolayer film of ferritin molecules results in pure γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, while for films above a certain thickness α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3 coexist, exhibiting two different crystallite sizes. TEM shows a characteristic particle diameter of 7 nm for γ-Fe2O3 resulting from thermal treatment of monolayers, consistent with the crystallite size of the γ-phase as obtained from XRD measurements on multi-layered samples. XRD shows the α-Fe2O3 phase to be characterized by a crystallite size of 34 nm.

  1. Mercury removal in wastewater by iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, E.; Campillo, G. E.; Morales, G.; Hincapié, C.; Osorio, J.; Arnache, O.; Uribe, J. I.; Jaramillo, F.

    2016-02-01

    Mercury is one of the persistent pollutants in wastewater; it is becoming a severe environmental and public health problem, this is why nowadays its removal is an obligation. Iron oxide nanoparticles are receiving much attention due to their properties, such as: great biocompatibility, ease of separation, high relation of surface-area to volume, surface modifiability, reusability, excellent magnetic properties and relative low cost. In this experiment, Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized using iron salts and NaOH as precipitation agents, and Aloe Vera as stabilizing agent; then these nanoparticles were characterized by three different measurements: first, using a Zetasizer Nano ZS for their size estimation, secondly UV-visible spectroscopy which showed the existence of resonance of plasmon at λmax∼360 nm, and lastly by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to determine nanoparticles form. The results of this characterization showed that the obtained Iron oxides nanoparticles have a narrow size distribution (∼100nm). Mercury removal of 70% approximately was confirmed by atomic absorption spectroscopy measurements.

  2. Reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents by zero-valent iron, iron oxide and iron sulfide minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P.

    1996-10-01

    The degradation of chlorinated solvents by reduction at the surface of zero-valent metals and bimetallic systems has emerged as an important approach to the in-situ remediation of ground water. Reduction by iron metal was studied in batch and column systems to develop a mechanistic understanding of the reaction chemistry and to determine the factors that affect dechlorination rate and long term performance in field applications.

  3. Synthesis and Reactive Properties of Iron Oxide-Coated Nanoaluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplowitz, Daniel A.; Jian, Guoqiang; Gaskell, Karen; Jacob, Rohit; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2014-04-01

    A homogeneous coating of Fe3O4 on in situ-generated nanoaluminum was accomplished by thermal decomposition of Fe(CO)5 in an aluminum aerosol stream and subsequent oxidation of iron by air bleed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation revealed that oxygen penetrated through this coating, and Fe3O4 facilitated the formation of an expanded aluminum oxide layer compared to an uncoated aluminum case. Closed cell combustion tests displayed a minor decrease in pressure response for the coated product, which was attributed to the increased aluminum oxide layer. The critical ignition temperature was reduced for the coated product in T-jump fine-wire combustion tests.

  4. Low-temperature formation of magnetic iron oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Chr. Bender; Madsen, M. B.

    1992-01-01

    Elemental analysis and magnetic measurements of the surface of Mars have indicated the presence of an iron oxide with a considerable magnetic moment. Identification of the oxide phase(s) is an important subject as this may be used to identify the process of weathering on the martian surface as well as the composition of the Mars regolith itself. Consequently, interest was in evidence of new formation of strongly magnetic phases (e.g., magnetite, maghemite, feroxyhyte) in terrestrially derived Mars sample analogs. Within the group of Mars sample analogs derived from low-temperature weathering of basalts in Arctic regions, evidence of magnetic oxides formed at the outermost weathering rind was never observed. However, in one instance where the weathering products accumulating in a crack of a basaltic stone were investigated, evidence of magnetite was found. The experimental details are presented.

  5. Low-temperature formation of magnetic iron oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Chr. Bender; Madsen, M. B.

    1992-01-01

    Elemental analysis and magnetic measurements of the surface of Mars have indicated the presence of an iron oxide with a considerable magnetic moment. Identification of the oxide phase(s) is an important subject as this may be used to identify the process of weathering on the martian surface as well as the composition of the Mars regolith itself. Consequently, interest was in evidence of new formation of strongly magnetic phases (e.g., magnetite, maghemite, feroxyhyte) in terrestrially derived Mars sample analogs. Within the group of Mars sample analogs derived from low-temperature weathering of basalts in Arctic regions, evidence of magnetic oxides formed at the outermost weathering rind was never observed. However, in one instance where the weathering products accumulating in a crack of a basaltic stone were investigated, evidence of magnetite was found. The experimental details are presented.

  6. Synthesis and Evaluation of Nanostructured Gold-Iron Oxide Catalysts for the Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Cyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peng

    Shape-controlled iron oxide and gold-iron oxide catalysts with a cubic inverse spinel structure were studied in this thesis for the oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane. The structure of iron oxide and gold-iron oxide catalysts has no major impact on their oxidative dehydrogenation activity. However, the product selectivity is influenced. Both cyclohexene and benzene are formed on bare iron oxide nanoshapes, while benzene is the only dehydrogenation product in the presence of gold. The selectivity of benzene over CO2 depends strongly on the stability of the iron oxide support and the gold-support interaction. The highest benzene yield has been observed on gold-iron oxide octahedra. {111}-bound nanooctahedra are highly stable in reaction conditions at 300 °C, while {100}-bound nanocubes start to sinter above 250 °C. The highest benzene yield has been observed on gold-iron oxide nanooctahedra, which are likely to have gold atoms, and few-atom gold clusters strongly-bound on their surface. Cationic gold appears to be the active site for benzene formation. An all-organic method to prepare Au-FeOx nano-catalysts is needed due to the inconvenience of the half-organic, half-inorganic synthesis process discussed above. Several methods from the literature to prepare gold-iron oxide nanocomposites completely in organic solvents were reviewed and followed. FeOx Au synthesis procedures in literatures are initially designed for a Au content of over 70%. This approach was tried here to prepare composites with a much lower Au content (2-5 atom. %). Heat treatment is required to bond Au and FeOx NPs in the organic-phase syntheses. Au-FeOx-4 was obtained as a selective catalyst for the ODH of cyclohexane. A Audelta+ peak is observed in the UV-Vis spectrum of sample Au-FeOx-4. This different Au delta+ form may be cationic Au nano-clusters interacting with the FeOx support. It has been demonstrated that cationic gold is responsible for dehydrogenation behavior. Furthermore, the

  7. Pulsed-laser deposition of nanostructured iron oxide catalysts for efficient water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Michele; Caramori, Stefano; Ronconi, Federico; Bignozzi, Carlo A; El Koura, Zakaria; Bazzanella, Nicola; Meda, Laura; Miotello, Antonio

    2014-05-14

    Amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) for functionalization of indium-tin oxide surfaces, resulting in electrodes capable of efficient catalysis in water oxidation. These electrodes, based on earth-abundant and nonhazardous iron metal, are able to sustain high current densities (up to 20 mA/cm2) at reasonably low applied potential (1.64 V at pH 11.8 vs reversible hydrogen electrode) for more than 1 h when employed as anodes for electrochemical water oxidation. The good catalytic performance proves the validity of PLD as a method to prepare nanostructured solid-state materials for catalysis, enabling control over critical properties such as surface coverage and morphology.

  8. GAS-PHASE FLAME SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF MAGNETIC IRON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES WITH REDUCED OXIDATION STATE

    PubMed Central

    Kumfer, Benjamin M; Shinoda, Kozo; Jeyadevan, Balachandran; Kennedy, Ian M

    2010-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles of reduced oxidation state, mainly in the form of magnetite, have been synthesized utilizing a new continuous, gas-phase, nonpremixed flame method using hydrocarbon fuels. This method takes advantage of the characteristics of the inverse flame, which is produced by injection of oxidizer into a surrounding flow of fuel. Unlike traditional flame methods, this configuration allows for the iron particle formation to be maintained in a more reducing environment. The effects of flame temperature, oxygen-enrichment and fuel dilution (i.e. the stoichiometric mixture fraction), and fuel composition on particle size, Fe oxidation state, and magnetic properties are evaluated and discussed. The crystallite size, Fe(II) fraction, and saturation magnetization were all found to increase with flame temperature. Flames of methane and ethylene were used, and the use of ethylene resulted in particles containing metallic Fe(0), in addition to magnetite, while no Fe(0) was present in samples synthesized using methane. PMID:20228941

  9. Anoxic photochemical oxidation of siderite generates molecular hydrogen and iron oxides

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J. Dongun; Yee, Nathan; Nanda, Vikas; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    Photochemical reactions of minerals are underappreciated processes that can make or break chemical bonds. We report the photooxidation of siderite (FeCO3) by UV radiation to produce hydrogen gas and iron oxides via a two-photon reaction. The calculated quantum yield for the reaction suggests photooxidation of siderite would have been a significant source of molecular hydrogen for the first half of Earth’s history. Further, experimental results indicate this abiotic, photochemical process may have led to the formation of iron oxides under anoxic conditions. The reaction would have continued through the Archean to at least the early phases of the Great Oxidation Event, and provided a mechanism for oxidizing the atmosphere through the loss of hydrogen to space, while simultaneously providing a key reductant for microbial metabolism. We propose that the photochemistry of Earth-abundant minerals with wide band gaps would have potentially played a critical role in shaping the biogeochemical evolution of early Earth. PMID:23733945

  10. Selective Inhibition of the Oxidation of Ferrous Iron or Sulfur in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Harahuc, Lesia; Lizama, Hector M.; Suzuki, Isamu

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation of either ferrous iron or sulfur by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was selectively inhibited or controlled by various anions, inhibitors, and osmotic pressure. Iron oxidation was more sensitive than sulfur oxidation to inhibition by chloride, phosphate, and nitrate at low concentrations (below 0.1 M) and also to inhibition by azide and cyanide. Sulfur oxidation was more sensitive than iron oxidation to the inhibitory effect of high osmotic pressure. These differences were evident not only between iron oxidation by iron-grown cells and sulfur oxidation by sulfur-grown cells but also between the iron and sulfur oxidation activities of the same iron-grown cells. Growth experiments with ferrous iron or sulfur as an oxidizable substrate confirmed the higher sensitivity of iron oxidation to inhibition by phosphate, chloride, azide, and cyanide. Sulfur oxidation was actually stimulated by 50 mM phosphate or chloride. Leaching of Fe and Zn from pyrite (FeS2) and sphalerite (ZnS) by T. ferrooxidans was differentially affected by phosphate and chloride, which inhibited the solubilization of Fe without significantly affecting the solubilization of Zn. PMID:10698768

  11. Biological iron oxidation by Gallionella spp. in drinking water production under fully aerated conditions.

    PubMed

    de Vet, W W J M; Dinkla, I J T; Rietveld, L C; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2011-11-01

    Iron oxidation under neutral conditions (pH 6.5-8) may be a homo- or heterogeneous chemically- or a biologically-mediated process. The chemical oxidation is supposed to outpace the biological process under slightly alkaline conditions (pH 7-8). The iron oxidation kinetics and growth of Gallionella spp. - obligatory chemolithotrophic iron oxidizers - were assessed in natural, organic carbon-containing water, in continuous lab-scale reactors and full-scale groundwater trickling filters in the Netherlands. From Gallionella cell numbers determined by qPCR, balances were made for all systems. The homogeneous chemical iron oxidation occurred in accordance with the literature, but was retarded by a low water temperature (13 °C). The contribution of the heterogeneous chemical oxidation was, despite the presence of freshly formed iron oxyhydroxides, much lower than in previous studies in ultrapure water. This could be caused by the adsorption of natural organic matter (NOM) on the iron oxide surfaces. In the oxygen-saturated natural water with a pH ranging from 6.5 to 7.7, Gallionella spp. grew uninhibited and biological iron oxidation was an important, and probably the dominant, process. Gallionella growth was not even inhibited in a full-scale filter after plate aeration. From this we conclude that Gallionella spp. can grow under neutral pH and fully aerated conditions when the chemical iron oxidation is retarded by low water temperature and inhibition of the autocatalytic iron oxidation.

  12. The effect of cationic polymer treatment on adhesion of iron oxide to eyelashes.

    PubMed

    Ko, S; Roh, Y H; Choo, J H; Jang, S H; Han, S H; Jang, H G

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of iron oxide application on improving the volume of eyelashes. Iron oxide, having a negative surface charge in its natural form, was coated with commercial cationic polymers to increase its adhesion. The iron oxides coated with different types and concentrations of these polymers were incorporated into a basic mascara formula to test their volume effects by means of the weight difference of eyelashes.The results indicated that the type and concentration of coating materials affect the surface zeta potential and particle cluster size of iron oxides. The type of cationic polymer, especially, was shown to modify both factors of iron oxide. The obtained results also suggested that the volume effect of mascara increases with a higher positive surface zeta potential and a smaller particle cluster size of the coated iron oxides.

  13. RGD-conjugated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S W; Huang, M; Hong, R Y; Deng, S M; Cheng, L F; Gao