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Sample records for colon cancer growth

  1. VEGF and colon cancer growth beyond angiogenesis: does VEGF directly mediate colon cancer growth via a non-angiogenic mechanism?

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Amrita; Jones, Michael K; Matysiak-Budnik, Tamara; Tarnawski, Andrzej S

    2014-01-01

    In this article we review the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in colon cancer growth and the underlying mechanisms. Angiogenesis, the growth of new capillary blood vessels in the body, is critical for tissue injury healing and cancer growth. In 1971, Judah Folkman proposed the concept that tumor growth beyond 2 mm is critically dependent on angiogenesis. Tumors including colon cancers release angiogenic growth factors that stimulate blood vessels to grow into the tumors thus providing oxygen and nutrients that enable exponential growth. VEGF is the most potent angiogenic growth factor. Several studies have highlighted the role of VEGF in colon cancer, specifically in the stimulation of angiogenesis. This role of VEGF is strongly supported by studies showing that inhibition of VEGF using the blocking antibody, bevacizumab, results in decreased angiogenesis and abrogation of cancer growth. In the United States, bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy is FDA approved for the treatment of metastatic colon cancer. However, the source of VEGF in colon cancer tissue, the mechanisms of VEGF generation in colon cancer cells and the molecular pathways involved in VEGF mediated angiogenesis in colon cancer are not fully known. The possibility that VEGF directly stimulates cancer cell growth in an autocrine manner has not been explored in depth.

  2. ERRα metabolic nuclear receptor controls growth of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bernatchez, Gérald; Giroux, Véronique; Lassalle, Thomas; Carpentier, André C; Rivard, Nathalie; Carrier, Julie C

    2013-10-01

    The estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) is a nuclear receptor that acts primarily as a regulator of metabolic processes, particularly in tissues subjected to high-energy demand. In addition to its control of energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis, ERRα has recently been associated with cancer progression. Notably, increased expression of ERRα has been shown in several cancerous tissues, including breast, ovary and colon. However, additional studies are required to gain insight into the action of ERRα in cancer biology, particularly in non-endocrine-related cancers. Therefore, using a short hairpin RNA-mediated approach, we investigated whether ERRα is required for the rapid growth of colon cancer cells and to maintain their neoplastic metabolic state. Results show that silencing ERRα significantly impaired colon cancer cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro as well as their in vivo tumorigenic capacity. A pronounced delay in G1-to-S cell cycle phase transition was observed in ERRα-depleted cells in association with reduced cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity and hyperphosphorylated state of the retinoblastoma protein along with disturbed expression of several cell cycle regulators, including p15 and p27. Interestingly, ERRα-depleted HCT116 cells also displayed significant reduction in expression of a large set of key genes to glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle and lipid synthesis. Furthermore, using (14)C isotope tracer analysis, ERRα depletion in colon cancer cells resulted in reduced glucose incorporation and glucose-mediated lipogenesis in these cells. These findings suggest that ERRα coordinates colon cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenic capacity with energy metabolism. Thus, ERRα could represent a promising therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  3. SRPK2 promotes the growth and migration of the colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wu, Hai-Feng; Shen, Wei; Xu, Dong-Yan; Ruan, Ting-Yan; Tao, Guo-Qing; Lu, Pei-Hua

    2016-07-15

    Colon cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related death in the world. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying this malignancy will facilitate the diagnosis and treatment. Serine-arginine protein kinase 2 (SRPK2) has been reported to be upregulated in several cancer types. However, its expression and functions in colon cancer remains unknown. In this study, it was found that the expression of SRPK2 was up-regulated in the clinical colon cancer samples. Overexpression of SRPK2 promoted the growth and migration of colon cancer cells, while knocking down the expression of SRPK2 inhibited the growth, migration and tumorigenecity of colon cancer cells. Molecular mechanism studies revealed that SRPK2 activated ERK signaling in colon cancer cells. Taken together, our study demonstrated the tumor promoting roles of SRPK2 in colon cancer cells and SRPK2 might be a promising therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells enhance growth and metastasis of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Kei; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Tanaka, Miwako; Sumida, Tomonori; Kodama, Michiyo; Higashi, Yukihito; Tanaka, Shinji; Yasui, Wataru; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2010-11-15

    Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were reported to migrate to tumor stroma as well as injured tissue. We examined the role of human MSCs in tumor stroma using an orthotopic nude mice model of KM12SM colon cancer. In in vivo experiments, systemically injected MSCs migrated to the stroma of orthotopic colon tumors and metastatic liver tumors. Orthotopic transplantation of KM12SM cells mixed with MSCs resulted in greater tumor weight than did transplantation of KM12SM cells alone. The survival rate was significantly lower in the mixed-cell group, and liver metastasis was seen only in this group. Moreover, tumors resulting from transplantation of mixed cells had a significantly higher proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index, significantly greater microvessel area and significantly lower apoptotic index. Splenic injection of KM12SM cells mixed with MSCs, in comparison to splenic injection of KM12SM cells alone, resulted in a significantly greater number of liver metastases. MSCs incorporated into the stroma of primary and metastatic tumors expressed α-smooth muscle actin and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β as carcinoma-associated fibroblast (CAF) markers. In in vitro experiments, KM12SM cells recruited MSCs, and MSCs stimulated migration and invasion of tumor cells through the release of soluble factors. Collectively, MSCs migrate and differentiate into CAFs in tumor stroma, and they promote growth and metastasis of colon cancer by enhancing angiogenesis, migration and invasion and by inhibiting apoptosis of tumor cells.

  5. Adipocytes activate mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and autophagy to promote tumor growth in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yang-An; Xing, Xiaopeng; Harris, Jennifer W; Zaytseva, Yekaterina Y; Mitov, Mihail I; Napier, Dana L; Weiss, Heidi L; Mark Evers, B; Gao, Tianyan

    2017-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and mortality of a wide variety of human cancers including colorectal cancer. However, the molecular mechanism by which adipocytes regulate the metabolism of colon cancer cells remains elusive. In this study, we showed that adipocytes isolated from adipose tissues of colon cancer patients have an important role in modulating cellular metabolism to support tumor growth and survival. Abundant adipocytes were found in close association with invasive tumor cells in colon cancer patients. Co-culture of adipocytes with colon cancer cells led to a transfer of free fatty acids that released from the adipocytes to the cancer cells. Uptake of fatty acids allowed the cancer cells to survive nutrient deprivation conditions by upregulating mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation. Mechanistically, co-culture of adipocytes or treating cells with fatty acids induced autophagy in colon cancer cells as a result of AMPK activation. Inhibition of autophagy attenuated the ability of cancer cells to utilize fatty acids and blocked the growth-promoting effect of adipocytes. In addition, we found that adipocytes stimulated the expression of genes associated with cancer stem cells and downregulated genes associated with intestinal epithelial cell differentiation in primary colon cancer cells and mouse tumor organoids. Importantly, the presence of adipocytes promoted the growth of xenograft tumors in vivo. Taken together, our results show that adipocytes in the tumor microenvironment serve as an energy provider and a metabolic regulator to promote the growth and survival of colon cancer cells. PMID:28151470

  6. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... THERAPY Targeted treatment zeroes in on specific targets (molecules) in cancer cells. These targets play a role ... colon cancer. Some studies have reported that NSAIDs (aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib) may help reduce the ...

  7. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, inhibits colon cancer cell growth and cancer xenografts in C57BL/6 mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Data indicate that methylselenol is a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo but its role in colon cancer prevention remains to be characterized. This study tested the hypothesis that methylselenol inhibits the growth of colon cancer cells and tumors. We found that submicr...

  8. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  9. PGE{sub 2}-induced colon cancer growth is mediated by mTORC1

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, Marc Faes, Seraina Dormond-Meuwly, Anne Demartines, Nicolas Dormond, Olivier

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • PGE{sub 2} activates mTORC1 in colon cancer cells. • Inhibition of mTORC1 blocks PGE{sub 2} induced colon cancer cell growth. • mTORC1 is a signaling intermediary in PGE{sub 2} induced colon cancer cell responses. - Abstract: The inflammatory prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) cytokine plays a key role in the development of colon cancer. Several studies have shown that PGE{sub 2} directly induces the growth of colon cancer cells and furthermore promotes tumor angiogenesis by increasing the production of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The signaling intermediaries implicated in these processes have however not been fully characterized. In this report, we show that the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays an important role in PGE{sub 2}-induced colon cancer cell responses. Indeed, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE{sub 2} increased mTORC1 activity as observed by the augmentation of S6 ribosomal protein phosphorylation, a downstream effector of mTORC1. The PGE{sub 2} EP{sub 4} receptor was responsible for transducing the signal to mTORC1. Moreover, PGE{sub 2} increased colon cancer cell proliferation as well as the growth of colon cancer cell colonies grown in matrigel and blocking mTORC1 by rapamycin or ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR abrogated these effects. Similarly, the inhibition of mTORC1 by downregulation of its component raptor using RNA interference blocked PGE{sub 2}-induced LS174T cell growth. Finally, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE{sub 2} increased VEGF production which was also prevented by mTORC1 inhibition. Taken together, these results show that mTORC1 is an important signaling intermediary in PGE{sub 2} mediated colon cancer cell growth and VEGF production. They further support a role for mTORC1 in inflammation induced tumor growth.

  10. Targeting the neurokinin-1 receptor inhibits growth of human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Agnès; Vykoukal, Jody; Hubertus, Jochen; Alt, Eckhard; von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Kappler, Roland; Berger, Michael; Ilmer, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The substance P (SP)/neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) complex and the Wnt cascade are pivotal signaling pathways in the regulation of cell growth and hence, potent targets for future anticancer therapies. However, while the Wnt cascade has long been associated with colon cancer, little is known about the expression of the NK1R complex as a potential target in this tumor and its molecular basis in tumorigenesis in general. We treated the human colon cancer cell lines LiM6 and DLD1 with the NK1R antagonist and the clinical drug aprepitant (AP) and analyzed both growth response and downstream mechanisms using MTT-assay, reverse phase protein array (RPPA), western blot, Super TOP/FOP, confocal microscopy, and sphere formation ability (SFA) assays. Following NK1R blockage, we found significant growth inhibition of both colon cancer cell lines. When analyzing downstream mechanisms, we found a striking inhibition of the canonical Wnt pathway represented by decreased Super TOP/FOP and increased membrane stabilization of β-catenin. This effect was independent from baseline Wnt activity and mutational status of β-catenin. Further, treatment of colon cancer cells grown under cancer stem cell (CSC) conditions reduced sphere formation in both number and size after a single treatment period. We show that the NK1R can be a potent anticancer target in colon cancer and that NK1R antagonists could potentially serve as future anticancer drugs. This effect was seen not only in primary cancer cells but, for the first time, also in CSC-like cells, potentially including these cells in a therapeutic effect. Also, we describe the robust inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling through targeting the SP/NK1R signaling cascade. These findings give important insight into the molecular mechanisms of the SP/NK1R complex as a critical component in tumorigenesis and could help to identify future anticancer therapies for colon and other Wnt-activated cancers.

  11. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, inhibits colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity. Submicromolar methylselenol exposure inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in the G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase, and an induction of apoptosis in cancerous colon HCT11...

  12. Vasohibin-1 suppresses colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Han, Bing; Zhang, Qunyuan; Dou, Jie; Wang, Fang; Lin, Wenli; Sun, Yuping; Peng, Guangyong

    2015-01-01

    Vasohibin-1 (VASH1) is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor. However, the clinical relevance of VASH1 in colon cancer and its regulations on cancer angiogenesis and cancer cell biological characteristics are still unknown. Here we showed that stromal VASH1 levels were negatively correlated with tumor size, advanced clinical stage and distant metastases in colon cancer patients. Overexpression of VASH1 in colon cancer cells induced apoptosis and senescence, inhibiting cancer cell growth and colony formation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. In addition, knockdown of VASH1 in cancer cells promoted cell growth, adhesion and migration in vitro, and enhanced tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. PMID:25797264

  13. DAC can restore expression of NALP1 to suppress tumor growth in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Wang, B; Sun, J; Na, H; Chen, Z; Zhu, Z; Yan, L; Ren, S; Zuo, Y

    2015-01-22

    Despite recent progress in the identification of genetic and molecular alternations in colorectal carcinoma, the precise molecular pathogenesis remains unclear. NALP1 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 1) is a member of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family of proteins that are key organization proteins in the inflammasome. It is reported that NALP1 plays a central role in cell apoptosis, pyroptosis, inflammatory reactions and autoimmune diseases. DAC (5-aza-2-deoxycytidine) is an antitumor drug useful to lung cancer, myelodysplastic disorders, myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, we examined the expression of NALP1 in human normal and cancerous colon tissues using tissue microarray, western blot and quantitative real-time PCR and we measured the expression of NALP1 in three kinds of colon cancer cell lines and animal models before and after treatment with DAC. Furthermore, we examined the treatment effects of DAC on colon cancer in our animal model. Our data indicate that NALP1 is expressed low in human colorectal tumoral tissues relative to paratumoral tissues and was associated with the survival and tumor metastasis of patients. The expression of NALP1 increased after treatment with DAC both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, DAC suppressed the growth of colon cancer and increased lifespan in mouse model. Therefore, we conclude that NALP1 is expressed low in colon cancer and associated with the survival and tumor metastasis of patients, and treatment with DAC can restore NALP1 levels to suppress the growth of colon cancer.

  14. Sulindac sulfide inhibits colon cancer cell growth and downregulates specificity protein transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Pathi, Satya S; Safe, Stephen

    2015-12-16

    Specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors play pivotal roles in maintaining the phenotypes of many cancers. We hypothesized that the antineoplastic effects of sulindac and its metabolites were due, in part, to targeting downregulation of Sp transcription factors. The functional effects of sulindac, sulindac sulfone and sulindac sulfide on colon cancer cell proliferation were determined by cell counting. Effects of these compounds on expression of Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes were determined by western blot analysis of whole cell lysates and in transient transfection assays using GC-rich constructs. Sulindac and its metabolites inhibited RKO and SW480 colon cancer cell growth and the order of growth inhibitory potency was sulindac sulfide>sulindac sulfone>sulindac. Treatment of SW480 and RKO cells with sulindac sulfide downregulated expression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins. Sulindac sulfide also decreased expression of several Sp-regulated genes that are critical for cancer cell survival, proliferation and angiogenesis and these include survivin, bcl-2, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cyclin D1, p65 subunit of NFκB and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Sulindac sulfide also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased the level of microRNA-27a in colon cancer cells, which resulted in the upregulation of the Sp-repressor ZBTB10 and this resulted in downregulation of Sp proteins. The results suggest that the cancer chemotherapeutic effects of sulindac in colon cancer cells are due, in part, to its metabolite sulindac sulfide which downregulates Sp transcription factors and Sp-regulated pro-oncogenic gene products.

  15. beta-Catenin regulates vascular endothelial growth factor expression in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Easwaran, Vijay; Lee, Sang H; Inge, Landon; Guo, Lida; Goldbeck, Cheryl; Garrett, Evelyn; Wiesmann, Marion; Garcia, Pablo D; Fuller, John H; Chan, Vivien; Randazzo, Filippo; Gundel, Robert; Warren, Robert S; Escobedo, Jaime; Aukerman, Sharon L; Taylor, Robert N; Fantl, Wendy J

    2003-06-15

    To evaluate whether beta-catenin signaling has a role in the regulation of angiogenesis in colon cancer, a series of angiogenesis-related gene promoters was analyzed for beta-catenin/TCF binding sites. Strikingly, the gene promoter of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, or VEGF-A) contains seven consensus binding sites for beta-catenin/TCF. Analysis of laser capture microdissected human colon cancer tissue indicated a direct correlation between up-regulation of VEGF-A expression and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutational status (activation of beta-catenin signaling) in primary tumors. In metastases, this correlation was not observed. Analysis by immunohistochemistry of intestinal polyps in mice heterozygous for the multiple intestinal neoplasia gene (Min/+) at 5 months revealed an increase and redistribution of VEGF-A in proximity to those cells expressing nuclear beta-catenin with a corresponding increase in vessel density. Transfection of normal colon epithelial cells with activated beta-catenin up-regulated levels of VEGF-A mRNA and protein by 250-300%. When colon cancer cells with elevated beta-catenin levels were treated with beta-catenin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, VEGF-A expression was reduced by more than 50%. Taken together, our observations indicate a close link between beta-catenin signaling and the regulation of VEGF-A expression in colon cancer.

  16. Walnut Phenolic Extract and Its Bioactive Compounds Suppress Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Regulating Colon Cancer Stemness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jisoo; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Lee, JaeHwan; Heo, Seung Chul; Lee, Kook Lae; Choi, Sang-Woon; Kim, Yuri

    2016-07-21

    Walnut has been known for its health benefits, including anti-cardiovascular disease and anti-oxidative properties. However, there is limited evidence elucidating its effects on cancer stem cells (CSCs) which represent a small subset of cancer cells that provide resistance against chemotherapy. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-CSCs potential of walnut phenolic extract (WPE) and its bioactive compounds, including (+)-catechin, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid, and gallic acid. In the present study, CD133⁺CD44⁺ cells were isolated from HCT116 cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and then treated with WPE. As a result, survival of the CD133⁺CD44⁺ HCT116 cells was inhibited and cell differentiation was induced by WPE. In addition, WPE down-regulated the CSC markers, CD133, CD44, DLK1, and Notch1, as well as the β-catenin/p-GSK3β signaling pathway. WPE suppressed the self-renewal capacity of CSCs. Furthermore, the WPE exhibited stronger anti-CSC effects than its individual bioactive compounds. Finally, the WPE inhibited specific CSC markers in primary colon cancer cells isolated from primary colon tumor. These results suggest that WPE can suppress colon cancer by regulating the characteristics of colon CSCs.

  17. Walnut Phenolic Extract and Its Bioactive Compounds Suppress Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Regulating Colon Cancer Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jisoo; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Lee, JaeHwan; Heo, Seung Chul; Lee, Kook Lae; Choi, Sang-Woon; Kim, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Walnut has been known for its health benefits, including anti-cardiovascular disease and anti-oxidative properties. However, there is limited evidence elucidating its effects on cancer stem cells (CSCs) which represent a small subset of cancer cells that provide resistance against chemotherapy. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-CSCs potential of walnut phenolic extract (WPE) and its bioactive compounds, including (+)-catechin, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid, and gallic acid. In the present study, CD133+CD44+ cells were isolated from HCT116 cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and then treated with WPE. As a result, survival of the CD133+CD44+ HCT116 cells was inhibited and cell differentiation was induced by WPE. In addition, WPE down-regulated the CSC markers, CD133, CD44, DLK1, and Notch1, as well as the β-catenin/p-GSK3β signaling pathway. WPE suppressed the self-renewal capacity of CSCs. Furthermore, the WPE exhibited stronger anti-CSC effects than its individual bioactive compounds. Finally, the WPE inhibited specific CSC markers in primary colon cancer cells isolated from primary colon tumor. These results suggest that WPE can suppress colon cancer by regulating the characteristics of colon CSCs. PMID:27455311

  18. Stages of Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... for information about colorectal cancer in children. Health history affects the risk of developing colon cancer. Anything ... colorectal cancer include the following: Having a family history of colon or rectal cancer in a first- ...

  19. SARI inhibits angiogenesis and tumour growth of human colon cancer through directly targeting ceruloplasmin

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lei; Cui, Xueliang; Zhang, Xin; Cheng, Lin; Liu, Yi; Yang, Yang; Fan, Ping; Wang, Qingnan; Lin, Yi; Zhang, Junfeng; Li, Chunlei; Mao, Ying; Wang, Qin; Su, Xiaolan; Zhang, Shuang; Peng, Yong; Yang, Hanshuo; Hu, Xun; Yang, Jinliang; Huang, Meijuan; Xiang, Rong; Yu, Dechao; Zhou, Zongguang; Wei, Yuquan; Deng, Hongxin

    2016-01-01

    SARI, also called as BATF2, belongs to the BATF family and has been implicated in cancer cell growth inhibition. However, the role and mechanism of SARI in tumour angiogenesis are elusive. Here we demonstrate that SARI deficiency facilitates AOM/DSS-induced colonic tumorigenesis in mice. We show that SARI is a novel inhibitor of colon tumour growth and angiogenesis in mice. Antibody array and HUVEC-related assays indicate that VEGF has an essential role in SARI-controlled inhibition of angiogenesis. Furthermore, Co-IP/PAGE/mass spectrometry indicates that SARI directly targets ceruloplasmin (Cp), and induces protease degradation of Cp, thereby inhibiting the activity of the HIF-1α/VEGF axis. Tissue microarray results indicate that SARI expression inversely correlates with poor clinical outcomes in colon cancer patients. Collectively, our results indicate that SARI is a potential target for therapy by inhibiting angiogenesis through the reduction of VEGF expression and is a prognostic indicator for patients with colon cancer. PMID:27353863

  20. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (P<0.01), cleaved caspase 3, and the caspase-cleaved product of cytokeratin 18. Decreased levels of VEGF (P<0.01) and reduced vessel size (P<0.05) were also observed, the latter only in the ZM198,615-pretreatment group. Furthermore, we performed a series of in vitro studies using the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  1. CysLT1R Antagonists Inhibit Tumor Growth in a Xenograft Model of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21WAF/Cip1 (P<0.01), cleaved caspase 3, and the caspase-cleaved product of cytokeratin 18. Decreased levels of VEGF (P<0.01) and reduced vessel size (P<0.05) were also observed, the latter only in the ZM198,615-pretreatment group. Furthermore, we performed a series of in vitro studies using the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells. PMID:24039952

  2. The organotelluride catalyst LAB027 prevents colon cancer growth in the mice.

    PubMed

    Coriat, R; Marut, W; Leconte, M; Ba, L B; Vienne, A; Chéreau, C; Alexandre, J; Weill, B; Doering, M; Jacob, C; Nicco, C; Batteux, F

    2011-08-11

    Organotellurides are newly described redox-catalyst molecules with original pro-oxidative properties. We have investigated the in vitro and in vivo antitumoral effects of the organotelluride catalyst LAB027 in a mouse model of colon cancer and determined its profile of toxicity in vivo. LAB027 induced an overproduction of H(2)O(2) by both human HT29 and murine CT26 colon cancer cell lines in vitro. This oxidative stress was associated with a decrease in proliferation and survival rates of the two cell lines. LAB027 triggered a caspase-independent, ROS-mediated cell death by necrosis associated with mitochondrial damages and autophagy. LAB027 also synergized with the cytotoxic drug oxaliplatin to augment its cytostatic and cytotoxic effects on colon cancer cell lines but not on normal fibroblasts. The opposite effects of LAB027 on tumor and on non-transformed cells were linked to differences in the modulation of reduced glutathione metabolism between the two types of cells. In mice grafted with CT26 tumor cells, LAB027 alone decreased tumor growth compared with untreated mice, and synergized with oxaliplatin to further decrease tumor development compared with mice treated with oxaliplatin alone. LAB027 an organotelluride catalyst compound synergized with oxaliplatin to prevent both in vitro and in vivo colon cancer cell proliferation while decreasing the in vivo toxicity of oxaliplatin. No in vivo adverse effect of LAB027 was observed in this model.

  3. A sulfated polysaccharide of Ecklonia cava inhibits the growth of colon cancer cells by inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ginnae; Lee, WonWon; Kim, Kil-Nam; Lee, Ji-Hyeok; Heo, Soo-Jin; Kang, Nalae; Lee, Seung-Hong; Ahn, Chang-Bum; Jeon, You-Jin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated anticancer effects of the crude polysaccharides (CPs) isolated from Ecklonia cava enzymatic extracts using AMG, Viscozyme, Protamex, and Alcalase enzyme against a colon cancer cell line, CT26 cells. Among them, the CP of Protamex extract (PCP) contained the highest fucose and sulfated group contents and showed the highest growth inhibitory effect against CT-26 cells. In addition, PCP dose-dependently increased the formation of apoptotic body and the percentage of Sub-G1 DNA contents. Also, PCP activated caspase 9 and PARP as regulating the expressions of Bax and Bcl-2. Moreover, PPP2, a fraction purified from PCP showed the highest growth inhibitory effect against CT 26 cells with the increased fucose and sulfated group contents. The results demonstrate that the isolated SP containing plentiful fucose and sulfated group contents has the anticancer effect on colon cancer cells via regulation of Bcl-2/Bax signal pathway. PMID:26417363

  4. Treatment with Insulin Analog X10 and IGF-1 Increases Growth of Colon Cancer Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Hvid, Henning; Blouin, Marie-José; Birman, Elena; Damgaard, Jesper; Poulsen, Fritz; Fels, Johannes Josef; Fledelius, Christian; Hansen, Bo Falck; Pollak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with an increased risk for development of certain forms of cancer, including colon cancer. The publication of highly controversial epidemiological studies in 2009 raised the possibility that use of the insulin analog glargine increases this risk further. However, it is not clear how mitogenic effects of insulin and insulin analogs measured in vitro correlate with tumor growth-promoting effects in vivo. The aim of this study was to examine possible growth-promoting effects of native human insulin, insulin X10 and IGF-1, which are considered positive controls in vitro, in a short-term animal model of an obesity- and diabetes-relevant cancer. We characterized insulin and IGF-1 receptor expression and the response to treatment with insulin, X10 and IGF-1 in the murine colon cancer cell line (MC38 cells) in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we examined pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and monitored growth of MC38 cell allografts in mice with diet-induced obesity treated with human insulin, X10 and IGF-1. Treatment with X10 and IGF-1 significantly increased growth of MC38 cell allografts in mice with diet-induced obesity and we can therefore conclude that supra-pharmacological doses of the insulin analog X10, which is super-mitogenic in vitro and increased the incidence of mammary tumors in female rats in a 12-month toxicity study, also increase growth of tumor allografts in a short-term animal model. PMID:24260289

  5. KIT Signaling Promotes Growth of Colon Xenograft Tumors in Mice and Is Up-Regulated in a Subset of Human Colon Cancers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Evan C; Karl, Taylor A; Kalisky, Tomer; Gupta, Santosh K; O'Brien, Catherine A; Longacre, Teri A; van de Rijn, Matt; Quake, Stephen R; Clarke, Michael F; Rothenberg, Michael E

    2015-09-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors have advanced colon cancer treatment. We investigated the role of the RTK KIT in development of human colon cancer. An array of 137 patient-derived colon tumors and their associated xenografts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to measure levels of KIT and its ligand KITLG. KIT and/or KITLG was stably knocked down by expression of small hairpin RNAs from lentiviral vectors in DLD1, HT29, LS174T, and COLO320 DM colon cancer cell lines, and in UM-COLON#8 and POP77 xenografts; cells transduced with only vector were used as controls. Cells were analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, single-cell gene expression analysis, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and functional assays. Xenograft tumors were grown from control and KIT-knockdown DLD1 and UM-COLON#8 cells in immunocompromised mice and compared. Some mice were given the RTK inhibitor imatinib after injection of cancer cells; tumor growth was measured based on bioluminescence. We assessed tumorigenicity using limiting dilution analysis. KIT and KITLG were expressed heterogeneously by a subset of human colon tumors. Knockdown of KIT decreased proliferation of colon cancer cell lines and growth of xenograft tumors in mice compared with control cells. KIT knockdown cells had increased expression of enterocyte markers, decreased expression of cycling genes, and, unexpectedly, increased expression of LGR5 associated genes. No activating mutations in KIT were detected in DLD1, POP77, or UM-COLON#8 cells. However, KITLG-knockdown DLD1 cells formed smaller xenograft tumors than control cells. Gene expression analysis of single CD44(+) cells indicated that KIT can promote growth via KITLG autocrine and/or paracrine signaling. Imatinib inhibited growth of KIT(+) colon cancer organoids in culture and growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Cancer cells with endogenous KIT expression were more tumorigenic in mice. KIT and

  6. Non-coding effects of circular RNA CCDC66 promote colon cancer growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Kuei-Yang; Lin, Ya-Chi; Gupta, Sachin Kumar; Chang, Ning; Yen, Laising; Sun, H Sunny; Tsai, Shaw-Jenq

    2017-03-01

    Circular RNA (circRNA) is a class of non-coding RNA whose functions remain mostly unknown. Recent studies indicate circRNA may be involved in disease pathogenesis, but direct evidence is scarce. Here we characterize the functional role of a novel circRNA, circCCDC66, in colorectal cancer (CRC). RNA-Seq data from matched normal and tumor colon tissue samples identified numerous circRNAs specifically elevated in cancer cells, several of which were verified by quantitative RT-PCR. CircCCDC66 expression was elevated in polyps and colon cancer and was associated with poor prognosis. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies in CRC cell-lines demonstrated that circCCDC66 controlled multiple pathological processes, including cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and anchorage-independent growth. In-depth characterization revealed that circCCDC66 exerts its function via regulation of a subset of oncogenes, and knockdown of circCCDC66 inhibited tumor growth and cancer invasion in xenograft and orthotopic mouse models, respectively. Taken together, these findings highlight a novel oncogenic function of circRNA in cancer progression and metastasis.

  7. Learning about Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top of page Is there a test for hereditary colon cancer? Gene testing can identify individuals who ... Top of page Current NHGRI Clinical Research on Hereditary Colon Cancer Currently, NHGRI is not conducting clinical ...

  8. α-TEA inhibits the growth and motility of human colon cancer cells via targeting RhoA/ROCK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jialin; Gao, Peng; Xu, Yang; Li, Zhaozhu

    2016-01-01

    Colon or colorectal cancer is a common type of human cancer, which originates in the intestine crassum or the rectum. In the United States, colorectal cancer has one of the highest rates of cancer-related mortality. Investigating novel chemotherapeutic approaches is significant in the treatment of cancers, such as colorectal cancer. α-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid (α-TEA) is a potent anticancer agent in multiple types of human cancer. However, its effect remains to be determined in colon cancer. In this study, HCT116 and SW480 human colon cancer cells were used to investigate the anticancer role of α-TEA. It was demonstrated that α-TEA inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, it was shown that α-TEA downregulated the activity of RhoA and phosphorylated Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) substrate myosin light chain (MLC) using a pull-down assay and western blotting, respectively, implying that the RhoA/ROCK pathway is involved in α-TEA-mediated cell growth and motility inhibition. In order to confirm this hypothesis a RhoA inhibitor (clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme), a ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) and RhoA small interfering (si)RNA were applied to block RhoA/ROCK signaling. This resulted in the attenuation of MLC phosphorylation, and augmentation of α-TEA-mediated growth and motility inhibition in colon cancer cells. In conclusion, these results indicate that α-TEA inhibits growth and motility in colon cancer cells possibly by targeting RhoA/ROCK signaling. Moreover, combined with RhoA or ROCK inhibitors, α-TEA may exhibit a more effective inhibitory role in colon cancer. PMID:27432222

  9. α-TEA inhibits the growth and motility of human colon cancer cells via targeting RhoA/ROCK signaling.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jialin; Gao, Peng; Xu, Yang; Li, Zhaozhu

    2016-09-01

    Colon or colorectal cancer is a common type of human cancer, which originates in the intestine crassum or the rectum. In the United States, colorectal cancer has one of the highest rates of cancer‑related mortality. Investigating novel chemotherapeutic approaches is significant in the treatment of cancers, such as colorectal cancer. α-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid (α-TEA) is a potent anticancer agent in multiple types of human cancer. However, its effect remains to be determined in colon cancer. In this study, HCT116 and SW480 human colon cancer cells were used to investigate the anticancer role of α-TEA. It was demonstrated that α-TEA inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, it was shown that α-TEA downregulated the activity of RhoA and phosphorylated Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) substrate myosin light chain (MLC) using a pull-down assay and western blotting, respectively, implying that the RhoA/ROCK pathway is involved in α-TEA-mediated cell growth and motility inhibition. In order to confirm this hypothesis a RhoA inhibitor (clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme), a ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) and RhoA small interfering (si)RNA were applied to block RhoA/ROCK signaling. This resulted in the attenuation of MLC phosphorylation, and augmentation of α-TEA-mediated growth and motility inhibition in colon cancer cells. In conclusion, these results indicate that α-TEA inhibits growth and motility in colon cancer cells possibly by targeting RhoA/ROCK signaling. Moreover, combined with RhoA or ROCK inhibitors, α-TEA may exhibit a more effective inhibitory role in colon cancer.

  10. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  11. Insulin-like growth factor II-producing metastatic colon cancer with recurrent hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Teramae, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Muguruma, Naoki; Okada, Yasuyuki; Goji, Takahiro; Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Kimura, Masako; Bando, Yoshimi; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-02-01

    A 45-year-old man was referred to our hospital and found to have a tubular adenocarcinoma of the descending colon with multiple liver metastases. During hospitalization, the patient suffered recurrent hypoglycemic attacks that required intravenous 50% glucose infusion. He was diagnosed with non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH) because the colon cancer tissue obtained by biopsy was strongly stained for insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) by immunohistochemistry. He received chemotherapy with oxaliplatin, 5-FU and leucovorin (FOLFOX) plus bevacizumab (Bmab), and showed a partial response. As the metastatic lesions decreased in size, the hypoglycemic attacks gradually disappeared. Subsequently, he received outpatient chemotherapy and maintained a high quality of life for about 10 months. Western blot analysis of IGF-II in serum at the time of admission showed a high-molecular-weight form of IGF-II, which was considered to have caused hypoglycemia. This patient presents a very rare case of colorectal cancer associated with NICTH syndrome due to production of high-molecular-weight IGF-II by cancer cells. It is important to investigate IGF-II expression in cancer tissues for establishing the diagnosis of NICTH in cases with intractable hypoglycemia complicated by advanced cancer.

  12. Cyclosporin A inhibits colon cancer cell growth independently of the calcineurin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Werneck, Miriam B.F.; Hottz, Eugênio; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Viola, João P.B.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for the development of colon cancer, providing genotoxic insults, growth and pro-angiogenic factors that can promote tumorigenesis and tumor growth. Immunomodulatory agents can interfere with the inflammation that feeds cancer, but their impact on the transformed cell is poorly understood. The calcium/calcineurin signaling pathway, through activation of NFAT, is essential for effective immune responses, and its inhibitors cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506 are used in the clinics to suppress immunity. Moreover, the kinases GSK3β and mTOR, modulated by PI-3K/Akt, can inhibit NFAT activity, suggesting a cross-talk between the calcium and growth factor signaling pathways. Both NFAT and mTOR activity have been associated with tumorigenesis. We therefore investigated the impact of calcineurin and PI-3K/mTOR inhibition in growth of human colon carcinoma cells. We show that despite the efficient inhibition of NFAT1 activity, FK506 promotes tumor growth, whereas CsA inhibits it due to a delay in cell cycle progression and induction of necroptosis. We found NFκB activation and mTORC1 activity not to be altered by CsA or FK506. Similarly, changes to mitochondrial homeostasis were equivalent upon treatment with these drugs. We further show that, in our model, NFAT1 activation is not modulated by PI3K/mTOR. We conclude that CsA slows cell cycle progression and induces necroptosis of human carcinoma cell lines in a TGFβ-, NFAT-, NFκB- and PI3K/mTOR-independent fashion. Nevertheless, our data suggest that CsA, in addition to its anti-inflammatory capacity, may target transformed colon and esophagus carcinoma cells without affecting non-transformed cells, promoting beneficial tumoristatic effects. PMID:22992618

  13. MiR-34a inhibits colon cancer proliferation and metastasis by inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor receptor α.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Wang, Yulin; Lu, Shuming; Zhang, Zhuqing; Meng, Hua; Liang, Lina; Zhang, Yan; Song, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The microRNA (miRNA), miR‑34a is significant in colon cancer progression. In the present study, the role of miR‑34a in colon cancer cell proliferation and metastasis was investigated. It was found that the expression of miR‑34a in colon cancer tissues and cell lines was lower when compared with that of normal tissues and cells. Further research demonstrated that miR‑34a inhibited cell proliferation, induced G1 phase arrest, and suppressed metastasis and epithelial mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells. Bioinformatic prediction indicated that platelet‑derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) was a potential target gene of miR‑34a and a luciferase assay identified that PDGFRA was a novel direct target gene of miR‑34a. In addition, assays of western blot analyses and quantitative reverse‑transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed that miR‑34a decreased PDGFRA mRNA expression and protein levels in colon cancer cells. Assessment of cellular function indicated that miR‑34a inhibited colon cancer progression via PDGFRA. These findings demonstrate that miR‑34a may act as a negative regulator in colon cancer by targeting PDGFRA.

  14. Niclosamide-conjugated polypeptide nanoparticles inhibit Wnt signaling and colon cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Ren, Xiu-Rong; Mook, Robert A; Wang, Jiangbo; Spasojevic, Ivan; Premont, Richard T; Li, Xinghai; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Chen, Wei

    2017-08-31

    Abnormal Wnt activity is a major mechanism responsible for many diseases, including cancer. Previously, we reported that the anthelmintic drug Niclosamide (NIC) inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling and suppresses colon cancer cell growth. Although the pharmacokinetic properties of NIC are appropriate for use as an anthelmintic agent, its low solubility, low bioavailability and low systemic exposure limit its usefulness in treating systemic diseases. To overcome these limitations, we conjugated NIC to recombinant chimeric polypeptides (CPs), and the CP-NIC conjugate spontaneously self-assembled into sub-100 nm near-monodisperse nanoparticles. CP-NIC nanoparticles delivered intravenously act as a pro-drug of NIC to dramatically increase exposure of NIC compared to dosing with free NIC. CP-NIC improved anti-tumor activity compared to NIC in a xenograft model of human colon cancer. Because NIC has multiple biological activities, CP-NIC could be used for treatment of multiple diseases, including cancer, bacterial and viral infection, type II diabetes, NASH and NAFLD.

  15. Consumption of lycopene inhibits the growth and progression of colon cancer in a mouse xenograft model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A previous study indicated that lycopene could significantly inhibit the proliferation of human colon cancer cells in vitro. However, the in vivo anticancer effects of lycopene against colon cancer have not been demonstrated yet. Therefore, this study investigated whether consumption of lycopene cou...

  16. Functional Changes in the Gut Microbiome Contribute to Transforming Growth Factor β-Deficient Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Scott G; Ball, Corbie L; Besselsen, David G; Doetschman, Tom; Hurwitz, Bonnie L

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most treatable cancers, with a 5-year survival rate of ~64%, yet over 50,000 deaths occur yearly in the United States. In 15% of cases, deficiency in mismatch repair leads to null mutations in transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) type II receptor, yet genotype alone is not responsible for tumorigenesis. Previous work in mice shows that disruptions in TGF-β signaling combined with Helicobacter hepaticus cause tumorigenesis, indicating a synergistic effect between genotype and microbial environment. Here, we examine functional shifts in the gut microbiome in CRC using integrated -omics approaches to untangle the role of host genotype, inflammation, and microbial ecology. We profile the gut microbiome of 40 mice with/without deficiency in TGF-β signaling from a Smad3 (mothers against decapentaplegic homolog-3) knockout and with/without inoculation with H. hepaticus. Clear functional differences in the microbiome tied to specific bacterial species emerge from four pathways related to human colon cancer: lipopolysaccharide (LPS) production, polyamine synthesis, butyrate metabolism, and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Specifically, an increase in Mucispirillum schaedleri drives LPS production, which is associated with an inflammatory response. We observe a commensurate decrease in butyrate production from Lachnospiraceae bacterium A4, which could promote tumor formation. H. hepaticus causes an increase in OXPHOS that may increase DNA-damaging free radicals. Finally, multiple bacterial species increase polyamines that are associated with colon cancer, implicating not just diet but also the microbiome in polyamine levels. These insights into cross talk between the microbiome, host genotype, and inflammation could promote the development of diagnostics and therapies for CRC. IMPORTANCE Most research on the gut microbiome in colon cancer focuses on taxonomic changes at the genus level using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Here, we

  17. Inhibition of growth and induction of differentiation of colon cancer cells by peach and plum phenolic compounds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The action of extracts from anthocyanin-enriched plums and peaches on growth and differentiation was studied with human colon cancer cells. Growth inhibitory effects were observed in Caco-2, SW1116, HT29 and NCM460 cells. In Caco-2 cells but not in the other cells studied there was evidence for incr...

  18. Activin Type 2 Receptor Restoration in MSI-H Colon Cancer Suppresses Growth and Enhances Migration With Activin

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, BARBARA H.; BECK, STAYCE E.; CABRAL, JENNIFER; CHAU, EDDY; CABRERA, BETTY L.; FIORINO, ANTONIO; SMITH, E. JULIETA; BOCANEGRA, MELANIE; CARETHERS, JOHN M.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Colon cancers with high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H) develop frameshift mutations in tumor suppressors as part of their pathogenesis. ACVR2 is mutated at its exon 10 polyadenine tract in >80% of MSI-H colon cancers, coinciding with loss of protein. ACVR2 transmits the growth effects of activin via phosphorylation of SMAD proteins to affect gene transcription. The functional effect of activin in colon cancers has not been studied. We developed and characterized a cell model in which we studied how activin signaling affects growth. Methods hMLH1 and ACVR2 mutant HCT116 cells were previously stably transferred with chromosome 2 (HCT116+chr2), restoring a single regulated copy of wild-type ACVR2 but not hMLH1. Both HCT116+chr2 and parental HCT116 cells (as well as HEC59 and ACVR2 and hMSH2 complemented HEC59+chr2 cells) were assessed for genetic complementation and biologic function. Results HCT116+chr2 cells and HEC59+chr2 cells, but not ACVR2-mutant HCT116 or HEC59 cells, acquired wild-type ACVR2 as well as expression of ACVR2 wild-type messenger RNA. Complemented ACVR2 protein complexed with ACVR1 with activin treatment, generating nuclear phosphoSMAD2 and activin-specific gene transcription. ACVR2-restored cells showed decreased growth and reduced S phase but increased cellular migration following activin treatment. ACVR2 small interfering RNA reversed these effects in complemented cells. Conclusions ACVR2-complemented MSI-H colon cancers restore activin-SMAD signaling, decrease growth, and slow their cell cycle following ligand stimulation but show increased cellular migration. Activin is growth suppressive and enhances migration similar to transforming growth factor β in colon cancer, indicating that abrogation of the effects of activin contribute to the pathogenesis of MSI-H colon cancers. PMID:17258738

  19. Garcinia benzophenones inhibit the growth of human colon cancer cells and synergize with sulindac sulfide and turmeric.

    PubMed

    Einbond, Linda Saxe; Mighty, Jason; Kashiwazaki, Ryota; Figueroa, Mario; Jalees, Filza; Acuna, Ulyana Munoz; Le Gendre, Onica; Foster, David A; Kennelly, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies indicate that extracts and purified components from Garcinia species inhibit the growth of human colon cancer cells. Garcinia benzophenones activate the expression of genes in the endoplasmic reticulum and cellular energy stress (mTOR) pathways. This study examines the growth inhibitory and synergistic effects of Garcinia benzophenones, alone or combined with chemopreventive agents, on human colon cancer cells. To find optimal combination treatments, HT29 colon cancer cells were treated with benzophenones alone, or combined with chemopreventive agents, and cell growth measured using the MTT assay. To reveal effects on signaling pathways, we assessed effects of the MEK inhibitor U0126 and the ER IP3 receptor antagonist heparin, as well as effects on the phosphorylation of 4E-BP-1 (mTOR pathway), using Western blot analysis. New and known benzophenones from Garcinia intermedia inhibited the growth of human colon cancer cells; an alcohol extract of Garcinia xanthochymus, as well as purified guttiferones (guttiferone E and xanthochymol), preferentially inhibited the growth of colon cancer versus nonmalignant intestinal epithelial cells. Guttiferone E exhibited synergy with the NSAID sulindac sulfide and xanthochymol, with the spice turmeric. Guttiferone A did not alter phosphorylation of 4E-BP-1, indicating that the mTORC1 pathway is not involved in its action. The effects of xanthochymol were enhanced by U0126, at low doses, and were blocked by heparin, indicating that the MEK pathway is involved, while the ER IP3 receptor is critical for its action. These studies indicate the potential of benzophenones, alone or combined with sulindac sulfide or turmeric, to prevent and treat colon cancer.

  20. O-1602, an atypical cannabinoid, inhibits tumor growth in colitis-associated colon cancer through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kargl, Julia; Haybaeck, Johannes; Stančić, Angela; Andersen, Liisa; Marsche, Gunther; Heinemann, Akos; Schicho, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    Cannabinoids have antiinflammatory and antitumorigenic properties. Some cannabinoids, such as O-1602, have no or only little affinity to classical cannabinoid receptors but exert cannabinoid-like antiinflammatory effects during experimental colitis. Here, we investigated whether O-1602 shows antitumorigenic effects in colon cancer cells and whether it could reduce tumorigenesis in the colon in vivo. The colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and SW480 were used to study the effect of O-1602 on viability and apoptosis. The effect of O-1602 on tumor growth in vivo was studied in a colitis-associated colon cancer mouse model. O-1602 decreased viability and induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner (0.1-10 μM). In the mouse model, treatment with O-1602 (3 mg/kg, i.p., 12×) reduced tumor area by 50 % and tumor incidence by 30 %. Histological scoring revealed a significant decrease in tumor load. In tumor tissue, O-1602 decreased levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), activation of oncogenic transcription factors STAT3 and NFκB p65, and expression of TNF-α while levels for proapoptotic markers, such as p53 and BAX, increased. The in vivo effects of O-1602 on PCNA, BAX, and p53 were also observed in colon cancer cells. The data provide a novel insight into antitumorigenic mechanisms of atypical cannabinoids. O-1602 exerts antitumorigenic effects by targeting colon cancer cells as well as proinflammatory pathways known to promote colitis-associated tumorigenesis. Due to its lack of central sedation, O-1602 could be an interesting compound for the treatment of colon and possibly other cancers.

  1. Phenolic extract from oleaster (Olea europaea var. Sylvestris) leaves reduces colon cancer growth and induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Zeriouh, Wafa; Nani, Abdelhafid; Belarbi, Meriem; Dumont, Adélie; de Rosny, Charlotte; Aboura, Ikram; Ghanemi, Fatima Zahra; Murtaza, Babar; Patoli, Danish; Thomas, Charles; Apetoh, Lionel; Rébé, Cédric; Delmas, Dominique; Akhtar Khan, Naim; Ghiringhelli, François; Rialland, Mickael; Hichami, Aziz

    2017-01-01

    Dietary polyphenols, derived from natural products, have received a great interest for their chemopreventive properties against cancer. In this study, we investigated the effects of phenolic extract of the oleaster leaves (PEOL) on tumor growth in mouse model and on cell death in colon cancer cell lines. We assessed the effect of oleaster leaf infusion on HCT116 (human colon cancer cell line) xenograft growth in athymic nude mice. We observed that oleaster leaf polyphenol-rich infusion limited HCT116 tumor growth in vivo. Investigations of PEOL on two human CRC cell lines showed that PEOL induced apoptosis in HCT116 and HCT8 cells. We demonstrated an activation of caspase-3, -7 and -9 by PEOL and that pre-treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-fmk), prevented PEOL-induced cell death. We observed an involvement of the mitochondrial pathway in PEOL-induced apoptosis evidenced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, a decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential, and cytochrome c release. Increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration induced by PEOL represents the early event involved in mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and apoptosis induced by PEOL, as ruthenium red, an inhibitor of mitochondrial calcium uptake inhibited apoptotic effect of PEOL, BAPTA/AM inhibited PEOL-induced ROS generation and finally, N-acetyl-L-cysteine reversed ER stress and apoptotic effect of PEOL. These results demonstrate that polyphenols from oleaster leaves might have a strong potential as chemopreventive agent in colorectal cancer.

  2. Phenolic extract from oleaster (Olea europaea var. Sylvestris) leaves reduces colon cancer growth and induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Belarbi, Meriem; Dumont, Adélie; de Rosny, Charlotte; Aboura, Ikram; Ghanemi, Fatima Zahra; Murtaza, Babar; Patoli, Danish; Thomas, Charles; Apetoh, Lionel; Rébé, Cédric; Delmas, Dominique; Akhtar Khan, Naim; Ghiringhelli, François; Rialland, Mickael; Hichami, Aziz

    2017-01-01

    Dietary polyphenols, derived from natural products, have received a great interest for their chemopreventive properties against cancer. In this study, we investigated the effects of phenolic extract of the oleaster leaves (PEOL) on tumor growth in mouse model and on cell death in colon cancer cell lines. We assessed the effect of oleaster leaf infusion on HCT116 (human colon cancer cell line) xenograft growth in athymic nude mice. We observed that oleaster leaf polyphenol-rich infusion limited HCT116 tumor growth in vivo. Investigations of PEOL on two human CRC cell lines showed that PEOL induced apoptosis in HCT116 and HCT8 cells. We demonstrated an activation of caspase-3, -7 and -9 by PEOL and that pre-treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-fmk), prevented PEOL-induced cell death. We observed an involvement of the mitochondrial pathway in PEOL-induced apoptosis evidenced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, a decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential, and cytochrome c release. Increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration induced by PEOL represents the early event involved in mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and apoptosis induced by PEOL, as ruthenium red, an inhibitor of mitochondrial calcium uptake inhibited apoptotic effect of PEOL, BAPTA/AM inhibited PEOL-induced ROS generation and finally, N-acetyl-L-cysteine reversed ER stress and apoptotic effect of PEOL. These results demonstrate that polyphenols from oleaster leaves might have a strong potential as chemopreventive agent in colorectal cancer. PMID:28212423

  3. High-fat Western diet-induced obesity contributes to increased tumor growth in mouse models of human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Ann Marie; Burrington, Christine M; Gillaspie, Erin A; Lynch, Darin T; Horsman, Melissa J; Greene, Michael W

    2016-12-01

    Strong epidemiologic evidence links colon cancer to obesity. The increasing worldwide incidence of colon cancer has been linked to the spread of the Western lifestyle, and in particular consumption of a high-fat Western diet. In this study, our objectives were to establish mouse models to examine the effects of high-fat Western diet-induced obesity on the growth of human colon cancer tumor xenografts, and to examine potential mechanisms driving obesity-linked human colon cancer tumor growth. We hypothesize that mice rendered insulin resistant due to consumption of a high-fat Western diet will show increased and accelerated tumor growth. Homozygous Rag1(tm1Mom) mice were fed either a low-fat Western diet or a high-fat Western diet (HFWD), then human colon cancer xenografts were implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically. Tumors were analyzed to detect changes in receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling and expression of inflammatory-associated genes in epididymal white adipose tissue. In both models, mice fed an HFWD weighed more and had increased intra-abdominal fat, and tumor weight was greater compared with in the low-fat Western diet-fed mice. They also displayed significantly higher levels of leptin; however, there was a negative correlation between leptin levels and tumor size. In the orthotopic model, tumors and adipose tissue from the HFWD group displayed significant increases in both c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 expression, respectively. In conclusion, this study suggests that human colon cancer growth is accelerated in animals that are obese and insulin resistant due to the consumption of an HFWD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor (SC-58125) Blocks Growth of Established Human Colon Cancer Xenografts1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher S; Hongmiao, Sheng; Brockman, Jeffrey A; Armandla, Radhika; Shao, Jinyi; Washington, M Kay; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Dubois, Raymond N

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Selective COX-2 inhibitors reduce adenoma formation and cancer progression in rodent models of colorectal cancer. To assess the therapeutic activity of selective COX-2 inhibitors, we tested the effect of SC-58125 treatment on the growth of human colon carcinoma cells in nude mice. Delaying treatment by 2, 4, or 7 weeks following implantation of the carcinoma cells resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth. Furthermore, short-term (48 hours) treatment with SC-58125 was sufficient to attenuate tumor growth for up to 15 days. SC-58125 treatment did not alter the rate at which cells underwent apoptosis, but did result in a delayed progression through the cell cycle at the G2/M transition. Accordingly, p34cdc2 protein levels and activity were decreased following SC-58125 treatment. We conclude that SC-58125 primarily exerts a cytostatic effect in vivo, which is likely to be mediated through inhibition of progression through the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. PMID:11687954

  5. Understanding your colon cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    Colon cancer - prevention; Colon cancer - screening ... We do not know what causes colon cancer, but we do know some of the things that may increase the risk of getting it, such as: Age. Your risk increases after ...

  6. Pancratistatin selectively targets cancer cell mitochondria and reduces growth of human colon tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Carly; Karnik, Aditya; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2011-01-01

    The naturally occurring Amaryllidaceae alkaloid pancratistatin exhibits potent apoptotic activity against a large panel of cancer cells lines and has an insignificant effect on noncancerous cell lines, although with an elusive cellular target. Many current chemotherapeutics induce apoptosis via genotoxic mechanisms and thus have low selectivity. The observed selectivity of pancratistatin for cancer cells promoted us to consider the hypothesis that this alkaloid targets cancer cell mitochondria rather than DNA or its replicative machinery. In this study, we report that pancratistatin decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and induced apoptotic nuclear morphology in p53-mutant (HT-29) and wild-type p53 (HCT116) colorectal carcinoma cell lines, but not in noncancerous colon fibroblast (CCD-18Co) cells. Interestingly, pancratistatin was found to be ineffective against mtDNA-depleted (ρ(0)) cancer cells. Moreover, pancratistatin induced cell death in a manner independent of Bax and caspase activation, and did not alter β-tubulin polymerization rate nor cause double-stranded DNA breaks. For the first time we report the efficacy of pancratistatin in vivo against human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts. Intratumor administration of pancratistatin (3 mg/kg) caused significant reduction in the growth of subcutaneous HT-29 tumors in Nu/Nu mice (n = 6), with no apparent toxicity to the liver or kidneys as indicated by histopathologic analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. Altogether, this work suggests that pancratistatin may be a novel mitochondria-targeting compound that selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells and significantly reduces tumor growth.

  7. Intratumoral Heterogeneity for Expression of Tyrosine Kinase Growth Factor Receptors in Human Colon Cancer Surgical Specimens and Orthotopic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kuwai, Toshio; Nakamura, Toru; Kim, Sun-Jin; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Langley, Robert R.; Fan, Dominic; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2008-01-01

    The design of targeted therapy, particularly patient-specific targeted therapy, requires knowledge of the presence and intratumoral distribution of tyrosine kinase receptors. To determine whether the expression of such receptors is constant or varies between and within individual colon cancer neoplasms, we examined the pattern of expression of the ligands, epidermal growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor-B as well as their respective receptors in human colon cancer surgical specimens and orthotopic human colon cancers growing in the cecal wall of nude mice. The expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor on tumor cells and stromal cells, including tumor-associated endothelial cells, was heterogeneous in surgical specimens and orthotopic tumors. In some tumors, the receptor was expressed on both tumor cells and stromal cells, and in other tumors the receptor was expressed only on tumor cells or only on stromal cells. In contrast, the platelet-derived growth factor receptor was expressed only on stromal cells in both surgical specimens and orthotopic tumors. Examination of receptor expression in both individual surgical specimens and orthotopic tumors revealed that the platelet-derived growth factor receptor was expressed only on stromal cells and that the patterns of epidermal growth factor receptor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 expression differed between tumor cells. This heterogeneity in receptor expression among different tumor cells suggests that targeting a single tyrosine kinase may not yield eradication of the disease. PMID:18202197

  8. Early stage colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2013-12-14

    Evidence has now accumulated that colonoscopy and removal of polyps, especially during screening and surveillance programs, is effective in overall risk reduction for colon cancer. After resection of malignant pedunculated colon polyps or early stage colon cancers, long-term repeated surveillance programs can also lead to detection and removal of asymptomatic high risk advanced adenomas and new early stage metachronous cancers. Early stage colon cancer can be defined as disease that appears to have been completely resected with no subsequent evidence of involvement of adjacent organs, lymph nodes or distant sites. This differs from the clinical setting of an apparent "curative" resection later pathologically upstaged following detection of malignant cells extending into adjacent organs, peritoneum, lymph nodes or other distant sites, including liver. This highly selected early stage colon cancer group remains at high risk for subsequent colon polyps and metachronous colon cancer. Precise staging is important, not only for assessing the need for adjuvant chemotherapy, but also for patient selection for continued surveillance. With advanced stages of colon cancer and a more guarded outlook, repeated surveillance should be limited. In future, novel imaging technologies (e.g., confocal endomicroscopy), coupled with increased pathological recognition of high risk markers for lymph node involvement (e.g., "tumor budding") should lead to improved staging and clinical care.

  9. Pharmacological inhibition of Mdm2 triggers growth arrest and promotes DNA breakage in mouse colon tumors and human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Rigatti, Marc J.; Verma, Rajeev; Belinsky, Glenn S.; Rosenberg, Daniel W.; Giardina, Charles

    2011-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein performs a number of cellular functions, ranging from the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis to effects on DNA repair. Modulating p53 activity with Mdm2 inhibitors is a promising approach for treating cancer; however, it is presently unclear how the in vivo application of Mdm2 inhibitors impact the myriad processes orchestrated by p53. Since approximately half of all colon cancers (predominately cancers with microsatellite instability) are p53-normal, we assessed the anticancer activity of the Mdm2 inhibitor Nutlin-3 in the mouse azoxymethane (AOM) colon cancer model, in which p53 remains wild type. Using a cell line derived from an AOM-induced tumor, we found that four daily exposures to Nutlin-3 induced persistent p53 stabilization and cell cycle arrest without significant apoptosis. A four day dosing schedule in vivo generated a similar response in colon tumors; growth arrest without significantly increased apoptosis. In adjacent normal colon tissue, Nutlin-3 treatment reduced both cell proliferation and apoptosis. Surprisingly, Nutlin-3 induced a transient DNA damage response in tumors but not in adjacent normal tissue. Nutlin-3 likewise induced a transient DNA damage response in human colon cancer cells in a p53-dependent manner, and enhanced DNA strand breakage and cell death induced by doxorubicin. Our findings indicate that Mdm2 inhibitors not only trigger growth arrest, but may also stimulate p53’s reported ability to slow homologous recombination repair. The potential impact of Nutlin-3 on DNA repair in tumors suggests that Mdm2 inhibitors may significantly accentuate the tumoricidal actions of certain therapeutic modalities. PMID:21557332

  10. Targeting FGF19 inhibits tumor growth in colon cancer xenograft and FGF19 transgenic hepatocellular carcinoma models.

    PubMed

    Desnoyers, L R; Pai, R; Ferrando, R E; Hötzel, K; Le, T; Ross, J; Carano, R; D'Souza, A; Qing, J; Mohtashemi, I; Ashkenazi, A; French, D M

    2008-01-03

    Although fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) can promote liver carcinogenesis in mice its involvement in human cancer is not well characterized. Here we report that FGF19 and its cognate receptor FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4) are coexpressed in primary human liver, lung and colon tumors and in a subset of human colon cancer cell lines. To test the importance of FGF19 for tumor growth, we developed an anti-FGF19 monoclonal antibody that selectively blocks the interaction of FGF19 with FGFR4. This antibody abolished FGF19-mediated activity in vitro and inhibited growth of colon tumor xenografts in vivo and effectively prevented hepatocellular carcinomas in FGF19 transgenic mice. The efficacy of the antibody in these models was linked to inhibition of FGF19-dependent activation of FGFR4, FRS2, ERK and beta-catenin. These findings suggest that the inactivation of FGF19 could be beneficial for the treatment of colon cancer, liver cancer and other malignancies involving interaction of FGF19 and FGFR4.

  11. Stromal Hedgehog signalling is downregulated in colon cancer and its restoration restrains tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Gerling, Marco; Büller, Nikè V. J. A.; Kirn, Leonard M.; Joost, Simon; Frings, Oliver; Englert, Benjamin; Bergström, Åsa; Kuiper, Raoul V.; Blaas, Leander; Wielenga, Mattheus C. B.; Almer, Sven; Kühl, Anja A.; Fredlund, Erik; van den Brink, Gijs R.; Toftgård, Rune

    2016-01-01

    A role for Hedgehog (Hh) signalling in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been proposed. In CRC and other solid tumours, Hh ligands are upregulated; however, a specific Hh antagonist provided no benefit in a clinical trial. Here we use Hh reporter mice to show that downstream Hh activity is unexpectedly diminished in a mouse model of colitis-associated colon cancer, and that downstream Hh signalling is restricted to the stroma. Functionally, stroma-specific Hh activation in mice markedly reduces the tumour load and blocks progression of advanced neoplasms, partly via the modulation of BMP signalling and restriction of the colonic stem cell signature. By contrast, attenuated Hh signalling accelerates colonic tumourigenesis. In human CRC, downstream Hh activity is similarly reduced and canonical Hh signalling remains predominantly paracrine. Our results suggest that diminished downstream Hh signalling enhances CRC development, and that stromal Hh activation can act as a colonic tumour suppressor. PMID:27492255

  12. Inhibition of Growth and Metastasis of Colon Cancer by Delivering 5-Fluorouracil-loaded Pluronic P85 Copolymer Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pengxi; Zhao, Naping; Sheng, Dandan; Hou, Jing; Hao, Chong; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Bing; Zhang, Shanshan; Han, Zhipeng; Wei, Lixin; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic metastasis is the leading cause of mortality of colon cancer, which is still lack of an effective therapy. A new delivery system, pluronic P85 block copolymers, conveying chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) for inhibiting growth and metastasis of colon cancer was designed and developed. In this study, we demonstrated that 5-Fu produce strong pesticide effect at lower doses in the present of pluronic P85 compared with control groups. The migration and invasion of HCT116 cells and RKO cells were examined and the results showed that migration and invasion capacities of HCT116 cells and RKO cells were reduced by administering 5-Fu/P85 copolymer micelles in vitro and in vivo which indicating an effectively activity. Interestingly, the content of CD133 + CXCR4+ cells in HCT116 cancer cells and RKO cells treated by 5-Fu/P85 copolymer micelles was decreased. Importantly, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of CD133 + CXCR4+ cells, which was strongly associated with liver metastasis of colon cancer, was also suppressed by giving 5-Fu/P85 copolymer micelles. The results indicated that 5-Fu/P85 copolymer micelles could inhibit the growth and metastasis of colon cancer, which could be attributed to the decrease of the content of CD133 + CXCR4+ cells and suppression of EMT of CD133 + CXCR4+ cells. PMID:26864651

  13. Cholesterol metabolism and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Broitman, S A; Cerda, S; Wilkinson, J

    1993-01-01

    While epidemiologic and concordant experimental data indicate a direct relationship between dietary fat (and presumably caloric) intake and the development of colon cancer, the effect of dietary cholesterol on this disease is still not clear. However, there appears to be a developing literature concerning an inverse relationship between serum and plasma cholesterol levels, and the risk for colon cancer. Findings that low serum cholesterol levels are apparent as early as ten years prior to the detection of colon cancer implies that sub clinical disease is probably not involved initially in this process. The possibility of low serum cholesterol as a bio-marker was considered in epidemiologic studies which focused upon obese men with lower than normal serum cholesterol levels who were found to be at increased risk to colon cancer. While the relationship between low serum cholesterol and colonic or intestinal cholesterol metabolism is presently not understood, current genetic studies provide a promising though as yet unexplored potential association. Alterations which occur during the developmental progression of colonic cancer include changes in chromosome 5, which also carries two genes vital to the biosynthesis and regulation of systemic and cellular cholesterol metabolism, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCoA R). Regulation of cholesterol metabolism in intestinal cells in vivo and in vitro varies from that seen in normal fibroblasts or hepatocytes in terms of exogenous sources of cholesterol and how these sources regulate internal synthesis. Colonic cancer cells have been used to assess small bowel enterocyte cholesterol metabolism, which has been possible because of their ability to differentiate in culture, however information regarding true colonic enterocyte cholesterol metabolism is relatively scarce. Colonic cancer cells have been shown to possess a diminished or nonexistent ability to use

  14. CXCL13-CXCR5 axis promotes the growth and invasion of colon cancer cells via PI3K/AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Xukui; Guo, Hongliang; Fu, Ling; Pan, Ganlin; Sun, Yinggang

    2015-02-01

    CXCL13, an inflammatory factor in the microenvironment, plays a vital role in the progression of inflammatory diseases and tumors. CXCL13 and its receptor CXCR5 have been reported to be associated with poor prognosis of advanced colon cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of CXCL13-CXCR5 axis in colon cancer remain elusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of CXCR5-CXCL13 axis in the growth and invasion of colon cancer cells. Our results showed that CXCL13 promoted the growth, migration, and matrigel invasion of colon cancer cells. Furthermore, CXCL13 increased the expression and secretion of MMP-13, and stimulated the activation of PI3K/AKT pathway. After knockdown of CXCR5 by siRNA, the biological functions of colon cancer cells regulated by CXCL13 were significantly inhibited. In addition, inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway by specific inhibitor LY294002 suppressed the CXCL13-mediated growth, migration, and invasion of colon cancer cells. Together, our findings suggest that CXCL13-CXCR5 axis promotes the growth, migration, and invasion of colon cancer cells, probably via PI3K/AKT pathway. Thus, CXCL13 may be a useful biomarker for the detection and treatment of colon cancer.

  15. Histone hypoacetylation contributes to CXCL12 downregulation in colon cancer: impact on tumor growth and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Romain, Benoît; Benbrika-Nehmar, Radhia; Marisa, Laetitia; Legrain, Michèle; Lobstein, Viviane; Oravecz, Attila; Poidevin, Laetitia; Bour, Cyril; Freund, Jean-Noël; Duluc, Isabelle; Guenot, Dominique; Pencreach, Erwan

    2017-06-13

    CXCL12 has been shown to be involved in colon cancer metastasis, but its expression level and molecular mechanisms regulating its expression remain controversial. We thus evaluated CXCL12 expression in a large cohort of colon adenomas and carcinomas, investigated for an epigenetic mechanism controlling its expression and evaluated the impact of CXCL12 levels on cell migration and tumor growth. CXCL12 expression was measured in human colon adenomas and carcinomas with transcriptome array and RT-qPCR. The promoter methylation was analyzed with whole-genome DNA methylation chips and protein expression by immunohistochemistry. We confirm a reduced expression of CXCL12 in 75% of MSS carcinomas and show that the decrease is an early event as already present in adenomas. The methylome analysis shows that the CXCL12 promoter is methylated in only 30% of microsatellite-stable tumors. In vitro, treatments with HDAC inhibitors, butyrate and valproate restored CXCL12 expression in three colon cell lines, increased acetylation of histone H3 within the CXCL12 promoter and inhibited cell migration. In vivo, valproate diminished (65%) the number of intestinal tumors in APC mutant mice, slowed down xenograft tumor growth concomitant to restored CXCL12 expression. Finally we identified loss of PCAF expression in tumor samples and showed that forced expression of PCAF in colon cancer cell lines restored CXCL12 expression. Thus, reduced PCAF expression may participate to CXCL12 promoter hypoacetylation and its subsequent loss of expression. Our study is of potential clinical interest because agents that promote or maintain histone acetylation through HDAC inhibition and/or HAT stimulation, may help to lower colon adenoma/carcinoma incidence, especially in high-risk families, or could be included in therapeutic protocols to treat advanced colon cancer.

  16. [Molecular targets in colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Borner, M M

    2006-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in Switzerland. The nihilism that dominated the treatment of these patients for decades has been replaced by a measure of enthusiasm, given recent therapeutic advances. New anticancer drugs such as irinotecan and oxaliplatin have changed the standard chemotherapy treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, the real hype has come from molecular targeted therapy. Identification of cellular processes characteristic of colon cancer has permitted therapeutic targeting with favorable therapeutic index. Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor in the clinic has provided proof of principle that interruption of signal transduction cascades in patients has therapeutic potential. Angiogenesis, especially the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway, has been proven to be another highly successful molecular target. In this article, we will review molecular targets, which are under active clinical investigation in colon cancer.

  17. Colon cancer - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100157.htm Colon cancer - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  18. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Retinoid-Chalcones as Inhibitors of Colon Cancer Cell Growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Based on the observed anticancer activity of chalcones and retinoids, a novel class of retinoid-chalcone hybrids were designed and synthesized. As part of our ongoing studies to discover natural product based anticancer compounds, the retinoid-chalcone hybrids were tested against the colon cancer ce...

  19. Carotenoids and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Slattery, M L; Benson, J; Curtin, K; Ma, K N; Schaeffer, D; Potter, J D

    2000-02-01

    Carotenoids have numerous biological properties that may underpin a role for them as chemopreventive agents. However, except for beta-carotene, little is known about how dietary carotenoids are associated with common cancers, including colon cancer. The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between dietary alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-cryptoxanthin and the risk of colon cancer. Data were collected from 1993 case subjects with first primary incident adenocarcinoma of the colon and from 2410 population-based control subjects. Dietary data were collected from a detailed diet-history questionnaire and nutrient values for dietary carotenoids were obtained from the US Department of Agriculture-Nutrition Coordinating Center carotenoid database (1998 updated version). Lutein was inversely associated with colon cancer in both men and women [odds ratio (OR) for upper quintile of intake relative to lowest quintile of intake: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.66, 1.04; P = 0.04 for linear trend]. The greatest inverse association was observed among subjects in whom colon cancer was diagnosed when they were young (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.92; P = 0.02 for linear trend) and among those with tumors located in the proximal segment of the colon (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.51, 0.91; P < 0.01 for linear trend). The associations with other carotenoids were unremarkable. The major dietary sources of lutein in subjects with colon cancer and in control subjects were spinach, broccoli, lettuce, tomatoes, oranges and orange juice, carrots, celery, and greens. These data suggest that incorporating these foods into the diet may help reduce the risk of developing colon cancer.

  20. [Expression and clinical significance of kisspeptin-1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor in tissue of colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhui; Qi, Yuanling; Xu, Qian; Ren, Haipeng

    2016-03-01

    To detect the expression of kisspeptin-1 (KISS-1), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the tissue of colon cancer, and analyze the relativity between KISS-1, MMP-2, VEGF and pathological characteristics of colon cancer. A total of 60 colon cancer patients and 60 patients with benign colorectal disease who received surgical treatment in our hospital from January 2009 to June 2010 were selected as observation group and control group respectively. The cancer tissue samples and excision samples collected from them were used to detect KISS-1, MMP-2 and VEGF with immunohistochemistry. The positive rates of KISS-1, MMP-2 and VEGF were 31.7%, 58.3% and 78.3% in observation group, and 73.3%, 16.7% and 33.3% in control group. The positive rate of KISS-1 in observation group was lower than that in control group (χ(2)=23.489, P<0.001), and the positive rates of MMP-2 and VEGF in observation group were higher than those in control group (χ(2)=27.469, P<0.001; χ(2)=25.817, P<0.001). The expressions of KISS-1, MMP-2 and VEGF were significantly related with the histological grade and TNM stage of colon cancer (χ(2)=8.997, P=0.011; χ(2)=6.163, P=0.013; χ(2)=8.519, P=0.014; χ(2)=9.160, P=0.002; χ(2)=16.577, P<0.001; χ(2)=10.523, P=0.001). It is helpful to understand the differentiation and clinical stage of colon cancer and provide evidence for clinical diagnosis and prognosis prediction by detecting KISS-1, MMP-2 and VEGF.

  1. Anticancer effect of icaritin inhibits cell growth of colon cancer through reactive oxygen species, Bcl-2 and cyclin D1/E signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaofeng; Peng, Weichao; Song, Xin; Wang, Qian; Wang, Wenyue

    2016-11-01

    Icaritin has an advantage in enhancing immunity. Besides, with its anticancer effect, it may be of great help in cancer treatment and recovery of cancer patients. As a result, icaritin is likely to become a novel anticancer drug. However, the anticancer effect of icaritin against colon cancer has not been elucidated thus far. The present study investigated the latent anticancer effect of icaritin on the inhibition of colon cancer cell growth by regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS), B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and cyclin D1/E signaling. The COLO-205 colon cancer cell line was used as a colon cancer cell model in the present study. First, cell growth and apoptosis were measured to analyze the anticancer effect of icaritin against colon cancer. Next, the possible mechanism of icaritin against colon cancer, including ROS, Bcl-2, cyclin D1, cyclin E and caspase-3/9, was explored. The results revealed that icaritin could inhibit cell growth and induce the apoptosis of COLO-205 cells. In addition, icaritin significantly induced ROS generation, suppressed Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and cyclin E protein expression, and activated caspase-3/9 activity in COLO-205 cells. The present findings demonstrated that icaritin exerted antiproliferative and anticancer effects against colon cancer through the activation of ROS generation and the suppression of Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and cyclin E signaling.

  2. Anticancer effect of icaritin inhibits cell growth of colon cancer through reactive oxygen species, Bcl-2 and cyclin D1/E signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaofeng; Peng, Weichao; Song, Xin; Wang, Qian; Wang, Wenyue

    2016-01-01

    Icaritin has an advantage in enhancing immunity. Besides, with its anticancer effect, it may be of great help in cancer treatment and recovery of cancer patients. As a result, icaritin is likely to become a novel anticancer drug. However, the anticancer effect of icaritin against colon cancer has not been elucidated thus far. The present study investigated the latent anticancer effect of icaritin on the inhibition of colon cancer cell growth by regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS), B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and cyclin D1/E signaling. The COLO-205 colon cancer cell line was used as a colon cancer cell model in the present study. First, cell growth and apoptosis were measured to analyze the anticancer effect of icaritin against colon cancer. Next, the possible mechanism of icaritin against colon cancer, including ROS, Bcl-2, cyclin D1, cyclin E and caspase-3/9, was explored. The results revealed that icaritin could inhibit cell growth and induce the apoptosis of COLO-205 cells. In addition, icaritin significantly induced ROS generation, suppressed Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and cyclin E protein expression, and activated caspase-3/9 activity in COLO-205 cells. The present findings demonstrated that icaritin exerted antiproliferative and anticancer effects against colon cancer through the activation of ROS generation and the suppression of Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and cyclin E signaling. PMID:27900033

  3. Inhibitory effects of different forms of tocopherols, tocopherol phosphates, and tocopherol quinones on growth of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dolfi, Sonia C; Yang, Zhihong; Lee, Mao-Jung; Guan, Fei; Hong, Jungil; Yang, Chung S

    2013-09-11

    Tocopherols are the major source of dietary vitamin E. In this study, the growth inhibitory effects of different forms of tocopherols (T), tocopheryl phosphates (TP), and tocopherol quinones (TQ) on human colon cancer HCT116 and HT29 cells were investigated. δ-T was more active than γ-T in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth, decreasing cancer cell colony formation, and inducing apoptosis; however, α-T was rather ineffective. Similarly, the rate of cellular uptake also followed the ranking order δ-T > γ-T ≫ α-T. TP and TQ generally had higher inhibitory activities than their parent compounds. Interestingly, the γ forms of TP and TQ were more active than the δ forms in inhibiting cancer cell growth, whereas the α forms were the least effective. The potencies of γ-TQ and δ-TQ (showing IC50 values of ∼0.8 and ∼2 μM on HCT116 cells after a 72 h incubation, respectively) were greater than 100-fold and greater than 20-fold higher, respectively, than those of their parent tocopherols. Induction of cancer cell apoptosis by δ-T, γ-TP, and γ-TQ was characterized by the cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP1 and DNA fragmentation. These studies demonstrated the higher growth inhibitory activity of δ-T than γ-T, the even higher activities of the γ forms of TP and TQ, and the ineffectiveness of the α forms of tocopherol and their metabolites against colon cancer cells.

  4. Inhibitory effects of different forms of tocopherols, tocopherol phosphates and tocopherol quinones on growth of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dolfi, Sonia C.; Yang, Zhihong; Lee, Mao-Jung; Guan, Fei; Hong, Jungil; Yang, Chung S.

    2013-01-01

    Tocopherols are the major source of dietary vitamin E. In this study, the growth inhibitory effects of different forms of tocopherols, tocopheryl phosphates (TP) and tocopherol quinones (TQ) on human colon cancer HCT116 and HT29 cells were investigated. δ-T was more active than γ-T in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth, decreasing cancer cell colony formation and inducing apoptosis; however α-T was rather ineffective. Similarly, the rate of cellular uptake also followed the ranking order δ-T > γ-T ≫ α-T. TP and TQ generally had higher inhibitory activities than their parent compounds. Interestingly, the γ-forms of TP and TQ were more active than the δ-forms in inhibiting cancer cell growth; whereas the α-forms were the least effective. The potencies of γ-TQ and δ-TQ (showing IC50 of ~0.8 and ~2 μM on HCT116 cells after a 72-h incubation, respectively) were >100 and >20 fold higher, respectively, than those of their parent tocopherols. Induction of cancer cell apoptosis by δ-T, γ-TP and γ-TQ was characterized by the cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP1 and DNA fragmentation. These studies demonstrated the higher growth inhibitory activity of δ-T than γ-T, the even higher activities of the γ-forms of TP and TQ, and the ineffectiveness of the α-forms of tocopherol and their metabolites against colon cancer cells. PMID:23898832

  5. [Colon cancer in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mathonnet, M; Fermeaux, V

    2003-09-01

    Colon cancers arise only rarely in the course of a pregnancy. Yet colon obstruction, perforation and metastatic spread seem to occur more frequently in this setting than with the average colon cancer. Perhaps this is due to the immunotolerance which accompanies pregnancy. No case of epidermoid (squamous cell) cancer of the colon has been previously described in a pregnant woman. This conjunction has a catastrophic prognosis: the diagnosis of colon tumor is delayed since symptoms are masked by the pregnancy, and epidermoid colon cancer is a particularly aggressive lesion. A major sub-diaphragmatic surgical procedure can be performed with reasonable safety to mother and fetus. Radiotherapy is contraindicated. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy can be administered although the risks to the fetus are not well known. During the first trimester, a therapeutic abortion can be proposed to optimise the treatment of the mother. During the second and third trimesters, treatment of the mother exposes the fetus to the risk of malformations or premature delivery; delay in maternal treatment in hopes of prolonging the pregnancy in order to obtain a viable neonate diminish the chances of maternal survival.

  6. Inflammation and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Terzić, Janos; Grivennikov, Sergei; Karin, Eliad; Karin, Michael

    2010-06-01

    The connection between inflammation and tumorigenesis is well-established and in the last decade has received a great deal of supporting evidence from genetic, pharmacological, and epidemiological data. Inflammatory bowel disease is an important risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Inflammation is also likely to be involved with other forms of sporadic as well as heritable colon cancer. The molecular mechanisms by which inflammation promotes cancer development are still being uncovered and could differ between colitis-associated and other forms of colorectal cancer. Recent work has elucidated the role of distinct immune cells, cytokines, and other immune mediators in virtually all steps of colon tumorigenesis, including initiation, promotion, progression, and metastasis. These mechanisms, as well as new approaches to prevention and therapy, are discussed in this review.

  7. Abrogation of Gli3 expression suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells via activation of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Han Na; Oh, Sang Cheul; Kim, Jun Suk

    2012-03-10

    p53, the major human tumor suppressor, appears to be related to sonic hedgehog (Shh)-Gli-mediated tumorigenesis. However, the role of p53 in tumor progression by the Shh-Gli signaling pathway is poorly understood. Herein we investigated the critical regulation of Gli3-p53 in tumorigenesis of colon cancer cells and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the mRNA level of Shh and Gli3 in colon tumor tissues was significantly higher than corresponding normal tissues (P < 0.001). The inhibition of Gli3 by treatment with Gli3 siRNA resulted in a clear decrease in cell proliferation and enhanced the level of expression of p53 proteins compared to treatment with control siRNA. The half-life of p53 was dramatically increased by treatment with Gli3 siRNA. In addition, treatment with MG132 blocked MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation, and led to accumulation of p53 in Gli3 siRNA-overexpressing cells. Importantly, ectopic expression of p53 siRNA reduced the ability of Gli3 siRNA to suppress proliferation of those cells compared with the cells treated with Gli3 siRNA alone. Moreover, Gli3 siRNA sensitized colon cancer cells to treatment with anti-cancer agents (5-FU and bevacizumab). Taken together, our studies demonstrate that loss of Gli3 signaling leads to disruption of the MDM2-p53 interaction and strongly potentiate p53-dependent cell growth inhibition in colon cancer cells, indicating a basis for the rational use of Gli3 antagonists as a novel treatment option for colon cancer.

  8. Aged black garlic extract inhibits HT29 colon cancer cell growth via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Dong, Menghua; Yang, Guiqing; Liu, Hanchen; Liu, Xiaoxu; Lin, Sixiang; Sun, Dongning; Wang, Yishan

    2014-03-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that aged black garlic extract (ABGE) may prove beneficial in preventing or inhibiting oncogenesis; however, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of ABGE on the proliferation and apoptosis of HT29 colon cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that ABGE inhibited HT29 cell growth via the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. We further investigated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) signal transduction pathway and the molecular mechanisms underlying the ABGE-induced inhibition of HT29 cell proliferation. We observed that ABGE may regulate the function of the PI3K/Akt pathway through upregulating PTEN and downregulating Akt and p-Akt expression, as well as suppressing its downstream target, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1, at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathway is crucial for the development of colon cancer. ABGE inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis in HT29 cells through the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway, suggesting that ABGE may be effective in the prevention and treatment of colon cancer in humans.

  9. Keep Colon Cancer At Bay

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164231.html Keep Colon Cancer at Bay Colonoscopy best way to detect disease ... 22, 2017 WEDNESDAY, March 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Colon cancer can be treated and cured if it's diagnosed ...

  10. Growth hormone is permissive for neoplastic colon growth

    PubMed Central

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zonis, Svetlana; Zhou, Cuiqi; Recouvreux, Maria Victoria; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Araki, Takako; Barrett, Robert; Workman, Michael; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Ljubimov, Vladimir A.; Uhart, Magdalena; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) excess in acromegaly is associated with increased precancerous colon polyps and soft tissue adenomas, whereas short-stature humans harboring an inactivating GH receptor mutation do not develop cancer. We show that locally expressed colon GH is abundant in conditions predisposing to colon cancer and in colon adenocarcinoma-associated stromal fibroblasts. Administration of a GH receptor (GHR) blocker in acromegaly patients induced colon p53 and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), reversing progrowth GH signals. p53 was also induced in skin fibroblasts derived from short-statured humans with mutant GHR. GH-deficient prophet of pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1 (Prop1)−/− mice exhibited induced colon p53 levels, and cross-breeding them with Apcmin+/− mice that normally develop intestinal and colon tumors resulted in GH-deficient double mutants with markedly decreased tumor number and size. We also demonstrate that GH suppresses p53 and reduces apoptosis in human colon cell lines as well as in induced human pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, and confirm in vivo that GH suppresses colon mucosal p53/p21. GH excess leads to decreased colon cell phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), increased cell survival with down-regulated APC, nuclear β-catenin accumulation, and increased epithelial–mesenchymal transition factors and colon cell motility. We propose that GH is a molecular component of the “field change” milieu permissive for neoplastic colon growth. PMID:27226307

  11. Growth hormone is permissive for neoplastic colon growth.

    PubMed

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zonis, Svetlana; Zhou, Cuiqi; Recouvreux, Maria Victoria; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Araki, Takako; Barrett, Robert; Workman, Michael; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Ljubimov, Vladimir A; Uhart, Magdalena; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-06-07

    Growth hormone (GH) excess in acromegaly is associated with increased precancerous colon polyps and soft tissue adenomas, whereas short-stature humans harboring an inactivating GH receptor mutation do not develop cancer. We show that locally expressed colon GH is abundant in conditions predisposing to colon cancer and in colon adenocarcinoma-associated stromal fibroblasts. Administration of a GH receptor (GHR) blocker in acromegaly patients induced colon p53 and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), reversing progrowth GH signals. p53 was also induced in skin fibroblasts derived from short-statured humans with mutant GHR. GH-deficient prophet of pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1 (Prop1)(-/-) mice exhibited induced colon p53 levels, and cross-breeding them with Apc(min+/-) mice that normally develop intestinal and colon tumors resulted in GH-deficient double mutants with markedly decreased tumor number and size. We also demonstrate that GH suppresses p53 and reduces apoptosis in human colon cell lines as well as in induced human pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, and confirm in vivo that GH suppresses colon mucosal p53/p21. GH excess leads to decreased colon cell phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), increased cell survival with down-regulated APC, nuclear β-catenin accumulation, and increased epithelial-mesenchymal transition factors and colon cell motility. We propose that GH is a molecular component of the "field change" milieu permissive for neoplastic colon growth.

  12. Protein expression following gamma-irradiation relevant to growth arrest and apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Daniella; Wallin, Asa; Holmlund, Birgitta; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2009-11-01

    To study expression of proteins previously connected to radiotherapy response in rectal cancer patients, namely, p53, TAp73, DeltaNp73, survivin and PRL-3, after irradiation in colon cancer cells to gain standing ground for further studies of pathways and mechanisms. Three colon cancer cell lines (KM12C, KM12SM and KM12L4a) with one origin were radiated with gamma-radiation. Radiosensitivity was determined with cell cycle, survival fraction at 5 Gy (SF5) and apoptosis analysis and protein expression by Western blot. Following irradiation, KM12C showed no cell cycle arrest, and low SF5 and apoptosis, whilst KM12L4a showed high SF5 and apoptosis. KM12SM had moderate radiosensitivity. After irradiation, the anti-apoptotic DeltaNp73 and mitosis-factor PRL-3 increased in KM12C and the radioresistance factor survivin increased in KM12L4a. The cell lines seem to have evolved different protein patterns regarding the studied proteins and partly therefore developed different resistance mechanisms, less apoptosis for KM12C and continued proliferation for KM12L4a, after gamma-irradiation.

  13. Insulin-like growth factors and their binding proteins in human colonocytes: preferential degradation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 in colonic cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Michell, N. P.; Langman, M. J.; Eggo, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    We have compared the expression of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) in ten paired samples of normal and tumour colonic tissue with regard to both mRNA and protein. We have compared sensitivity of these tissues to IGF-I using primary cultures of epithelial cells of colonic mucosa, and we have examined the production of IGFs and IGFBPs by these cells. In the tissues, IGFBP-2 mRNA was expressed in all normal and cancer samples but other IGFBPs showed variable expression. mRNAs for IGF-I were expressed in all normal and cancer tissues but IGF-II mRNA was only detected in cancer tissue (3 out of 10). Immunostaining of sections of normal and cancer tissue was negative for IGF-I and IGF-II; IGFBP-2 was positive in 2 out of 10 cancer tissues and 7 out of 10 normal tissues; IGFBP-3 was positive in 7 out of 10 cancer tissues and 7 out of 10 normal tissues; and IGFBP-4 was positive in 5 out of 10 cancer tissues and 6 out of 10 normal tissues. In the cells in culture, cancer cells showed increased incorporation of [35S]methionine into protein and [3H]thymidine into DNA (P < 0.02) when treated with IGF-I. Western blotting of serum-free conditioned media from cells in culture showed that 8 out of 10 normal and 3 out of 10 cancer cultures produced a 32-kDa immunoreactive IGFBP-2. No IGFBP-3 was secreted by any culture but 24-kDa IGFBP-4 was found in 3 out of 10 normal and 5 out of 10 cancer tissues. Because of the discrepancy between mRNA and protein expression for IGFBP-2, degradation of native IGFBPs was assessed using tissue extracts. Colon cancer extracts were able to degrade exogenous IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-4, whereas normal tissue extracts were without effect on IGFBP-2. We conclude that IGFBPs are synthesized and secreted by cells of the colonic mucosa but that proteolysis of secreted IGFBP-2 occurs in colon cancer tissue. This selective degradation may confer a growth advantage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5

  14. Colon cancer and the epidermal growth factor receptor: Current treatment paradigms, the importance of diet, and the role of chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Pabla, Baldeep; Bissonnette, Marc; Konda, Vani J

    2015-10-10

    Colorectal cancer represents the third most common and the second deadliest type of cancer for both men and women in the United States claiming over 50000 lives in 2014. The 5-year survival rate for patients diagnosed with metastatic colon and rectal cancer is < 15%. Early detection and more effective treatments are urgently needed to reduce morbidity and mortality of patients afflicted with this disease. Here we will review the risk factors and current treatment paradigms for colorectal cancer, with an emphasis on the role of chemoprevention as they relate to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) blockade. We will discuss how various EGFR ligands are upregulated in the presence of Western diets high in saturated and N-6 polyunsaturated fats. We will also outline the various mechanisms of EGFR inhibition that are induced by naturally occurring chemopreventative agents such as ginseng, green tea, and curcumin. Finally, we will discuss the current role of targeted chemotherapy in colon cancer and outline the limitations of our current treatment options, describing mechanisms of resistance and escape.

  15. Advances in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Levin, Mark

    2003-06-01

    From May 29 to June 5, 2003, the American Society of Clinical Oncology held its 39th Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A. The meeting was devoted to the presentation of advances in clinical sciences, diagnosis, prevention and management of malignant disorders, and brings together investigators, clinicians, policy makers and other professionals interested in the science and impact of cancer worldwide. This report will be presented in two parts, the first focusing of colon cancer, and the second on breast cancer will be published in the next issue of Drug News & Perspectives.

  16. 5-Geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin inhibits colon cancer (SW480) cells growth by inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Jaiprakash R; Jayaprakasha, Guddadarangavvanahally K; Kim, Jinhee; Murthy, Kotamballi N Chidambara; Chetti, Mahadev B; Nam, Sang-Yong; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2013-03-01

    For the first time, three coumarins were isolated from the hexane extract of limes (Citrus aurantifolia) and purified by flash chromatography. The structures were identified by NMR (1D, 2D) and mass spectral analyses as 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin, limettin, and isopimpinellin. These compounds inhibited human colon cancer (SW-480) cell proliferation, with 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin showing the highest inhibition activity (67 %) at 25 µM. Suppression of SW480 cell proliferation by 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin was associated with induction of apoptosis, as evidenced by annexin V staining and DNA fragmentation. In addition, 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin arrested cells at the G0/G1 phase, and induction of apoptosis was demonstrated through the activation of tumour suppressor gene p53, caspase8/3, regulation of Bcl2, and inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These findings suggest that 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin has potential as a cancer preventive agent. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Gallotannin inhibits NFĸB signaling and growth of human colon cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Al-Halabi, Racha; Bou Chedid, Mirella; Abou Merhi, Raghida; El-Hajj, Hiba; Zahr, Hind; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Bazarbachi, Ali; Gali-Muhtasib, Hala

    2011-07-01

    Gallotannin (GT), the polyphenolic hydrolyzable tannin, exhibits anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Several effects modulated by GT have been shown to be linked to interference with inflammatory mediators. Considering the central role of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-ĸB) in inflammation and cancer, we investigated the effect of GT on NF-ĸB signaling in HT-29 and HCT-116 human colon cancer cells. DNA binding assays revealed significant suppression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α)-induced NFĸB activation which correlated with the inhibition of IĸBα phosphorylation and degradation. Sequentially, p65 nuclear translocation and DNA binding were inhibited. GT also down-regulated the expression of NFĸB-regulated inflammatory cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1α) and caused cell cycle arrest and accumulation of cells in pre-G 1 phase. In vivo, GT (25 mg/kg body weight) injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) prior to or after tumor inoculation significantly decreased the volume of human colon cancer xenografts in NOD/SCID mice. GT-treated xenografts showed significantly lower microvessel density (CD31) as well as lower mRNA expression levels of IL-6, TNF-α and IL-1α and of the proliferation (Ki-67) and angiogenesis (VEGFA) proteins, which may explain GTs in vivo anti-tumorigenic effects. Overall, our results indicate that the anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities of GT may be mediated in part through the suppression of NF-ĸB activation.

  18. Blockade of the chemokine receptor, CCR5, reduces the growth of orthotopically injected colon cancer cells via limiting cancerassociated fibroblast accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Yamato; Sasaki, Soichiro; Mukaida, Naofumi; Baba, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) accumulate at tumor sites through the interaction between a chemokine, CCL3, and its receptor, CCR5, in the late phase of colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis. Here we examined the effect of a CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc, on tumor growth arising from the orthotopic injection of mouse or human colon cancer cell lines into the cecal wall by focusing on CAFs. Orthotopic injection of either cell line caused tumor formation together with leukocyte infiltration and fibroblast accumulation. Concomitant oral administration of maraviroc reduced tumor formation with few effects on leukocyte infiltration. In contrast, maraviroc reduced the intratumor number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive fibroblasts, which express epidermal growth factor, a crucial growth factor for colon cancer cell growth. These observations suggest that maraviroc or other CCR5 antagonists might act as novel anti-CRC drugs to dampen CAFs, an essential cell component for tumor progression. PMID:27340784

  19. Neuropilin-1 in Human Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Alexander A.; Fan, Fan; Liu, Wen Biao; Ahmad, Syed A.; Stoeltzing, Oliver; Reinmuth, Niels; Bielenberg, Diane; Bucana, Corazon D.; Klagsbrun, Michael; Ellis, Lee M.

    2004-01-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1), a recently identified co-receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor, is expressed by several nongastrointestinal tumor types and enhances prostate cancer angiogenesis and growth in preclinical models. We investigated the expression and regulation of NRP-1 and the effect of NRP-1 overexpression on angiogenesis and growth of human colon adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. NRP-1 was expressed in 20 of 20 human colon adenocarcinoma specimens but not in the adjacent nonmalignant colonic mucosa. By reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis, NRP-1 mRNA was expressed in seven of seven colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Subcutaneous xenografts of stably transfected KM12SM/LM2 human colon cancer cells overexpressing NRP-1 led to increased tumor growth and angiogenesis in nude mice. In in vitro assays, conditioned medium from NRP-1-transfected cell lines led to an increase in endothelial cell migration, but did not affect endothelial cell growth. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) led to induction of NRP-1 in human colon adenocarcinoma cells and selective blockade of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) decreased constitutive and EGF-induced NRP-1 expression. Blockade of the Erk 1/2 and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways also led to a decrease in constitutive and EGF-induced NRP-1 expression. These findings demonstrate the ubiquitous expression of NRP-1 in human colon cancer and suggest that NRP-1 may contribute to colon cancer angiogenesis and growth. This study also suggests that EGF and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways play an important role in NRP-1 regulation in colon cancer cells. PMID:15161648

  20. Anti-cancer effect of bee venom on colon cancer cell growth by activation of death receptors and inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Lee, Hye Lim; Ham, Young Wan; Song, Ho Sueb; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    Bee venom (BV) has been used as a traditional medicine to treat arthritis, rheumatism, back pain, cancerous tumors, and skin diseases. However, the effects of BV on the colon cancer and their action mechanisms have not been reported yet. We used cell viability assay and soft agar colony formation assay for testing cell viability, electro mobility shift assay for detecting DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and Western blotting assay for detection of apoptosis regulatory proteins. We found that BV inhibited growth of colon cancer cells through induction of apoptosis. We also found that the expression of death receptor (DR) 4, DR5, p53, p21, Bax, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-8, and cleaved caspase-9 was increased by BV treatment in a dose dependent manner (0–5 μg/ml). Consistent with cancer cell growth inhibition, the DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was also inhibited by BV treatment. Besides, we found that BV blocked NF-κB activation by directly binding to NF-κB p50 subunit. Moreover, combination treatment with BV and p50 siRNA or NF-κB inhibitor augmented BV-induced cell growth inhibition. However, p50 mutant plasmid (C62S) transfection partially abolished BV-induced cell growth inhibiton. In addition, BV significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, these results suggested that BV could inhibit colon cancer cell growth, and these anti-proliferative effects may be related to the induction of apoptosis by activation of DR4 and DR5 and inhibition of NF-κB. PMID:26561202

  1. Neurotensin-induced Erk1/2 phosphorylation and growth of human colonic cancer cells are independent from growth factors receptors activation

    SciTech Connect

    Massa, Fabienne; Tormo, Aurelie; Beraud-Dufour, Sophie; Coppola, Thierry; Mazella, Jean

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} We compare intracellular pathways of NT and EGF in HT29 cells. {yields} NT does not transactivate EGFR. {yields} Transactivation of EGFR is not a general rule in cancer cell growth. -- Abstract: Neurotensin (NT) promotes the proliferation of human colonic cancer cells by undefined mechanisms. We already demonstrated that, in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29, the effects of NT were mediated by a complex formed between the NT receptor-1 (NTSR1) and-3 (NTSR3). Here we examined cellular mechanisms that led to NT-induced MAP kinase phosphorylation and growth factors receptors transactivation in colonic cancer cells and proliferation in HT29 cells. With the aim to identify upstream signaling involved in NT-elicited MAP kinase activation, we found that the stimulatory effects of the peptide were totally independent from the activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) both in the HT29 and the HCT116 cells. NT was unable to promote phosphorylation of EGFR and to compete with EGF for its binding to the receptor. Pharmacological approaches allowed us to differentiate EGF and NT signaling in HT29 cells since only NT activation of Erk1/2 was shown to be sensitive to PKC inhibitors and since only NT increased the intracellular level of calcium. We also observed that NT was not able to transactivate Insulin-like growth factor receptor. Our findings indicate that, in the HT29 and HCT116 cell lines, NT stimulates MAP kinase phosphorylation and cell growth by a pathway which does not involve EGF system but rather NT receptors which transduce their own intracellular effectors. These results indicate that depending on the cell line used, blocking EGFR is not the general rule to inhibit NT-induced cancer cell proliferation.

  2. Natural product (–)-gossypol inhibits colon cancer cell growth by targeting RNA-binding protein Musashi-1

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Lan; Appelman, Carl; Smith, Amber R.; Yu, Jia; Larsen, Sarah; Marquez, Rebecca T.; Liu, Hao; Wu, Xiaoqing; Gao, Philip; Roy, Anuradha; Anbanandam, Asokan; Gowthaman, Ragul; Karanicolas, John; De Guzman, Roberto N.; Rogers, Steven; Aubé, Jeffrey; Ji, Min; Cohen, Robert S.; Neufeld, Kristi L.; Xu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Musashi-1 (MSI1) is an RNA-binding protein that acts as a translation activator or repressor of target mRNAs. The best-characterized MSI1 target is Numb mRNA, whose encoded protein negatively regulates Notch signaling. Additional MSI1 targets include the mRNAs for the tumor suppressor protein APC that regulates Wnt signaling and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P21WAF-1. We hypothesized that increased expression of NUMB, P21 and APC, through inhibition of MSI1 RNA-binding activity might be an effective way to simultaneously downregulate Wnt and Notch signaling, thus blocking the growth of a broad range of cancer cells. We used a fluorescence polarization assay to screen for small molecules that disrupt the binding of MSI1 to its consensus RNA binding site. One of the top hits was (–)-gossypol (Ki = 476 ± 273 nM), a natural product from cottonseed, known to have potent anti-tumor activity and which has recently completed Phase IIb clinical trials for prostate cancer. Surface plasmon resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance studies demonstrate a direct interaction of (–)-gossypol with the RNA binding pocket of MSI1. We further showed that (–)-gossypol reduces Notch/Wnt signaling in several colon cancer cell lines having high levels of MSI1, with reduced SURVIVIN expression and increased apoptosis/autophagy. Finally, we showed that orally administered (–)-gossypol inhibits colon cancer growth in a mouse xenograft model. Our study identifies (–)-gossypol as a potential small molecule inhibitor of MSI1-RNA interaction, and suggests that inhibition of MSI1's RNA binding activity may be an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:25933687

  3. A polysaccharide from Lentinus edodes inhibits human colon cancer cell proliferation and suppresses tumor growth in athymic nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinglin; Li, Weiyong; Huang, Xiao; Liu, Ying; Li, Qiang; Zheng, Ziming; Wang, Kaiping

    2017-01-01

    The antitumor effect of Lentinan is thought rely on the activation of immune responses; however, little is known about whether Lentinan also directly attacks cancer cells. We therefore investigated the direct antitumor activity of SLNT (a water-extracted polysaccharide from Lentinus edodes) and its probable mechanism. We showed that SLNT significantly inhibited proliferation of HT-29 colon cancer cells and suppressed tumor growth in nude mice. Annxein V-FITC/PI, DAPI, AO/EB and H&E staining assays all showed that SLNT induced cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. SLNT induced apoptosis by activating Caspase-3 via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, which presented as the activation of Caspases-9 and -8, upregulation of cytochrome c and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, downregulation of NF-κB, and overproduction of ROS and TNF-α in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment with the caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO or antioxidant NAC blocked SLNT-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that SLNT exerts direct antitumor effects by inducing cell apoptosis via ROS-mediated intrinsic and TNF-α-mediated extrinsic pathways. SLNT may thus represent a useful candidate for colon cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:27888812

  4. Phospho-sulindac (OXT-922) inhibits the growth of human colon cancer cell lines: a redox/polyamine-dependent effect.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liqun; Zhu, Caihua; Sun, Yu; Xie, Gang; Mackenzie, Gerardo G; Qiao, George; Komninou, Despina; Rigas, Basil

    2010-11-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as sulindac are promising chemoprevention agents against colon cancer, but their weak potency and side effects limit their use for both chemoprevention and chemotherapy. Here, we evaluated the effect of a new sulindac derivative, phospho-sulindac or OXT-922, on the growth of human cancer cell lines and its mechanism of action. OXT-922 inhibited the growth of human cancer cell lines originating from colon, pancreas and breast ~11- to 30-fold more potently than sulindac. This effect was mediated by a strong cytokinetic effect. Compared with control, OXT-922 inhibited cell proliferation by up to 67%, induced apoptosis 4.1-fold over control and blocked the G(1) to S cell cycle phase transition. OXT-922 suppressed the levels of cell cycle regulating proteins, including cyclins D(1) and D(3) and Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) 4 and 6. The levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially those of mitochondrial O₂ⁱ⁻, were markedly elevated (5.5-fold) in response to OXT-922. ROS collapsed the mitochondrial membrane potential and triggered apoptosis, which was largely abrogated by antioxidants. OXT-922 suppressed nuclear factor-kappaB activation and downregulated thioredoxin-1 expression. It also suppressed the production of prostaglandin E(2) and decreased cyclooxygenase-1 expression. Similar to sulindac, OXT-922 enhanced spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase activity, reduced the cellular polyamine content and synergized with difluoromethylornithine to inhibit cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. Our results suggest that OXT-922 possesses promising anticancer properties and deserves further evaluation.

  5. A variant of Smurf2 protects mice against colitis-associated colon cancer by inducing transforming growth factor β signaling.

    PubMed

    Dornhoff, Heike; Becker, Christoph; Wirtz, Stefan; Strand, Dennis; Tenzer, Stefan; Rosfa, Susanne; Neufert, Clemens; Mudter, Jonas; Markl, Jürgen; Siebler, Jürgen; Neurath, Markus F

    2012-05-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling, which is down-regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Smad ubiquitin regulating factor 2 (Smurf2), promotes development of cancer. We identified a splice variant of Smurf2 (ΔE2Smurf2) and investigated its role in colon carcinogenesis in mice. Colitis-associated colon cancer was induced in mice by administration of azoxymethane, followed by 3 cycles of oral administration of dextran sodium sulfate. Messenger RNA levels of Smurf2 in colon tumors and control tissue were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction; lymphocyte and cytokine levels were measured in tumor and tissue samples. Tumor-infiltrating CD4(+) cells expressed higher levels of ΔE2Smurf2 than CD4(+) cells from nontumor tissues of wild-type mice. T cell-specific overexpression of ΔE2Smurf2 increased TGF-β signaling by suppressing protein levels of Smurf2, accompanied by an increase in levels of TGF-β receptor type II. Transgenic mice that overexpress ΔE2Smurf2 were protected against development of colitis-associated tumors and down-regulated proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6. Patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease had a significantly lower ratio of Smurf2/ΔE2Smurf2 than control individuals. T cell-specific ΔE2Smurf2 degrades wild-type Smurf2 and controls intestinal tumor growth in mice by up-regulating TGF-β receptor type II, reducing proliferation and production of proinflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition of colon cancer cell growth by nanoemulsion carrying gold nanoparticles and lycopene.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rwei-Fen S; Wei, Yi-Jun; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Lycopene (LP), an important functional compound in tomatoes, and gold nanoparticles (AN), have received considerable attention as potential candidates for cancer therapy. However, the extreme instability and poor bioavailability of LP limits its in vivo application. This study intends to develop a nanoemulsion system incorporating both LP and AN, and to study the possible synergistic effects on the inhibition of the HT-29 colon cancer cell line. LP-nanogold nanoemulsion containing Tween 80 as an emulsifier was prepared, followed by characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and zeta potential analysis. The particle size as determined by TEM and DLS was 21.3±3.7 nm and 25.0±4.2 nm for nanoemulsion and 4.7±1.1 nm and 3.3±0.6 nm for AN, while the zeta potential of nanoemulsion and AN was -32.2±1.8 mV and -48.5±2.7 mV, respectively. Compared with the control treatment, both the combo (AN 10 ppm plus LP 12 μM) and nanoemulsion (AN 0.16 ppm plus LP 0.4 μM) treatments resulted in a five- and 15-fold rise in early apoptotic cells of HT-29, respectively. Also, the nanoemulsion significantly reduced the expressions of procaspases 8, 3, and 9, as well as PARP-1 and Bcl-2, while Bax expression was enhanced. A fivefold decline in the migration capability of HT-29 cells was observed for this nanoemulsion when compared to control, with the invasion-associated markers being significantly reversed through the upregulation of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and downregulation of Akt, nuclear factor kappa B, pro-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and active MMP-9 expressions. The TEM images revealed that numerous nanoemulsion-filled vacuoles invaded cytosol and converged into the mitochondria, resulting in an abnormally elongated morphology with reduced cristae and matrix contents, demonstrating a possible passive targeting effect. The nanoemulsion containing vacuoles were engulfed and

  7. Inhibition of colon cancer cell growth by nanoemulsion carrying gold nanoparticles and lycopene

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rwei-Fen S; Wei, Yi-Jun; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Lycopene (LP), an important functional compound in tomatoes, and gold nanoparticles (AN), have received considerable attention as potential candidates for cancer therapy. However, the extreme instability and poor bioavailability of LP limits its in vivo application. This study intends to develop a nanoemulsion system incorporating both LP and AN, and to study the possible synergistic effects on the inhibition of the HT-29 colon cancer cell line. LP–nanogold nanoemulsion containing Tween 80 as an emulsifier was prepared, followed by characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and zeta potential analysis. The particle size as determined by TEM and DLS was 21.3±3.7 nm and 25.0±4.2 nm for nanoemulsion and 4.7±1.1 nm and 3.3±0.6 nm for AN, while the zeta potential of nanoemulsion and AN was −32.2±1.8 mV and −48.5±2.7 mV, respectively. Compared with the control treatment, both the combo (AN 10 ppm plus LP 12 μM) and nanoemulsion (AN 0.16 ppm plus LP 0.4 μM) treatments resulted in a five- and 15-fold rise in early apoptotic cells of HT-29, respectively. Also, the nanoemulsion significantly reduced the expressions of procaspases 8, 3, and 9, as well as PARP-1 and Bcl-2, while Bax expression was enhanced. A fivefold decline in the migration capability of HT-29 cells was observed for this nanoemulsion when compared to control, with the invasion-associated markers being significantly reversed through the upregulation of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and downregulation of Akt, nuclear factor kappa B, pro-matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and active MMP-9 expressions. The TEM images revealed that numerous nanoemulsion-filled vacuoles invaded cytosol and converged into the mitochondria, resulting in an abnormally elongated morphology with reduced cristae and matrix contents, demonstrating a possible passive targeting effect. The nanoemulsion containing vacuoles were engulfed

  8. Alternative splicing of TIA-1 in human colon cancer regulates VEGF isoform expression, angiogenesis, tumour growth and bevacizumab resistance.

    PubMed

    Hamdollah Zadeh, Maryam A; Amin, Elianna M; Hoareau-Aveilla, Coralie; Domingo, Enric; Symonds, Kirsty E; Ye, Xi; Heesom, Katherine J; Salmon, Andrew; D'Silva, Olivia; Betteridge, Kai B; Williams, Ann C; Kerr, David J; Salmon, Andrew H J; Oltean, Sebastian; Midgley, Rachel S; Ladomery, Michael R; Harper, Steven J; Varey, Alexander H R; Bates, David O

    2015-01-01

    The angiogenic capability of colorectal carcinomas (CRC), and their susceptibility to anti-angiogenic therapy, is determined by expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) isoforms. The intracellular protein T-cell Intracellular Antigen (TIA-1) alters post-transcriptional RNA processing and binds VEGF-A mRNA. We therefore tested the hypothesis that TIA-1 could regulate VEGF-A isoform expression in colorectal cancers. TIA-1 and VEGF-A isoform expression was measured in colorectal cancers and cell lines. We discovered that an endogenous splice variant of TIA-1 encoding a truncated protein, short TIA-1 (sTIA-1) was expressed in CRC tissues and invasive K-Ras mutant colon cancer cells and tissues but not in adenoma cell lines. sTIA-1 was more highly expressed in CRC than in normal tissues and increased with tumour stage. Knockdown of sTIA-1 or over-expression of full length TIA-1 (flTIA-1) induced expression of the anti-angiogenic VEGF isoform VEGF-A165b. Whereas flTIA-1 selectively bound VEGF-A165 mRNA and increased translation of VEGF-A165b, sTIA-1 prevented this binding. In nude mice, xenografted colon cancer cells over-expressing flTIA-1 formed smaller, less vascular tumours than those expressing sTIA-1, but flTIA-1 expression inhibited the effect of anti-VEGF antibodies. These results indicate that alternative splicing of an RNA binding protein can regulate isoform specific expression of VEGF providing an added layer of complexity to the angiogenic profile of colorectal cancer and their resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Upregulation of DNA methyltransferase-mediated gene silencing, anchorage-independent growth, and migration of colon cancer cells by interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Foran, Eilis; Garrity-Park, Megan M; Mureau, Coralie; Newell, John; Smyrk, Thomas C; Limburg, Paul J; Egan, Laurence J

    2010-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by chronic inflammation which predisposes to colorectal cancer. The mechanisms by which inflammation promotes tumorigenesis are not fully known. We aimed to investigate the links between colonic inflammation and tumorigenesis via epigenetic gene silencing. Colon cancer specimens were assessed for the expression of DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT-1) using immunohistochemistry. Colorectal carcinoma cell lines were assessed for DNMT1 expression, methylcytosine content, promoter methylation, gene expression, and tumorigenesis in response to interleukin (IL)-6. DNMT1 was expressed at higher levels in both the peritumoral stroma and tumor in inflammatory bowel disease-associated cancers compared with sporadic colon cancers. IL-6 treatment of colon cancer cells resulted in an increase in DNMT1 expression, independent of de novo gene expression. IL-6 increased the methylation of promoter regions of genes associated with tumor suppression, adhesion, and apoptosis resistance. Expression of a subset of these genes was downregulated by IL-6, an effect that was prevented by preincubation with 5-azadeoxycytidine, a DNMT1 inhibitor. Anchorage-independent growth and migration of colon cancer cells was also increased by IL-6 in a 5-azadeoxycytidine-sensitive manner. Our results indicate that DNMT-mediated gene silencing may play a role in inflammation-associated colon tumorigenesis.

  10. EGCG inhibits activation of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor in human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Masahito; Deguchi, Atsuko; Hara, Yukihiko; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Weinstein, I. Bernard . E-mail: ibw1@columbia.edu

    2005-09-02

    The IGF/IGF-1R system, which includes the IGF, IGF-1R, and IGFBPs proteins, plays an important role in the development and growth of colorectal cancer. We previously reported that in the HT29 human colon cancer cell line EGCG, the major biologically active component of green tea, inhibits activation of the RTKs EGFR, HER2, and HER3, and that this is associated with inhibition of multiple downstream signaling pathways. Since IGF-1R is also a RTK, in this study we examined the effects of EGCG on the activity of IGF/IGF-1R system in human colon cancer cells. We found that the colon cancer cell lines Caco2, HT29, SW837, and SW480 express high levels of the IGF-1R receptor, and that both SW837 and SW480 cells display constitutive activation of this receptor. Treatment of SW837 cells with 20 {mu}g/ml of EGCG (the IC{sub 50} concentration for growth inhibition) caused within 6 h a decrease in the phosphorylated (i.e., activated) form of the IGF-1R protein. At 12 h, there was a decrease in the levels of both IGF-1 protein and mRNA and within 3-6 h there was an increase in the levels of both IGFBP-3 protein and mRNA. The increased expression of the latter protein was sustained for at least 48 h. When SW837 cells were treated with EGCG for a longer time, i.e., 96 h, a very low concentration (1.0 {mu}g/ml) of EGCG also caused inhibition of activation of IGF-1R, a decrease in the IGF-1 protein, and an increase in the IGFBP-3 protein. EGCG also caused a decrease in the levels of mRNAs that encode MMPs-7 and -9, proteins that proteolyze IGFBP-3. In addition, treatment with EGCG caused a transient increase in the expression of TGF-{beta}2, an inducer of IGFBP-3 expression. These findings expand the roles of EGCG as an inhibitor of critical RTKs involved in cell proliferation, providing further evidence that EGCG and related compounds may be useful in the chemoprevention or treatment of colorectal cancer.

  11. Hinokitiol inhibits cell growth through induction of S-phase arrest and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells and suppresses tumor growth in a mouse xenograft experiment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn-Sun; Choi, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Wonkyun; Jeon, Young-Soo; Lee, Yong-Moon; Hong, Jin-Tae; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Yoo, Hwan-Soo

    2013-12-27

    Hinokitiol (1), a tropolone-related natural compound, induces apoptosis and has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor activities. In this study, the inhibitory effects of 1 were investigated on human colon cancer cell growth and tumor formation of xenograft mice. HCT-116 and SW-620 cells derived from human colon cancers were found to be similarly susceptible to 1, with IC50 values of 4.5 and 4.4 μM, respectively. Compound 1 induced S-phase arrest in the cell cycle progression and decreased the expression levels of cyclin A, cyclin E, and Cdk2. Conversely, 1 increased the expression of p21, a Cdk inhibitor. Compound 1 decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased the expression of Bax, and cleaved caspase-9 and -3. The effect of 1 on tumor formation when administered orally was evaluated in male BALB/c-nude mice implanted intradermally separately with HCT-116 and SW-620 cells. Tumor volumes and tumor weights in the mice treated with 1 (100 mg/kg) were decreased in both cases. These results suggest that the suppression of tumor formation by compound 1 in human colon cancer may occur through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  12. CT Findings of Colonic Complications Associated with Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang-Jin

    2010-01-01

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer. PMID:20191069

  13. CT findings of colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang-Jin

    2010-01-01

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

  14. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, plays a critical role in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity. In this study, submicromolar methylselenol was generated by incubating methionase with seleno-L methionine, and both colon-cancer-derived HCT-116 cells and noncancerous colon NCM460 cells were exposed to...

  15. Regulation by vascular endothelial growth factor of human colon cancer tumorigenesis in a mouse model of experimental liver metastasis.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R S; Yuan, H; Matli, M R; Gillett, N A; Ferrara, N

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between angiogenesis and hepatic tumorigenesis, we examined the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in 8 human colon carcinoma cell lines and in 30 human colorectal cancer liver metastases. Abundant message for VEGF was found in all tumors, localized to the malignant cells within each neoplasm. Two receptors for VEGF, KDR and flt1, were also demonstrated in most of the tumors examined. KDR and flt1 mRNA were limited to tumor endothelial cells and were more strongly expressed in the hepatic metastases than in the sinusoidal endothelium of the surrounding liver parenchyma. VEGF monoclonal antibody administration in tumor-bearing athymic mice led to a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of growth of subcutaneous xenografts and to a marked reduction in the number and size of experimental liver metastases. In hepatic metastases of VEGF antibody-treated mice, neither blood vessels nor expression of the mouse KDR homologue flk-1 could be demonstrated. These data indicate that VEGF is a commonly expressed angiogenic factor in human colorectal cancer metastases, that VEGF receptors are up-regulated as a concomitant of hepatic tumorigenesis, and that modulation of VEGF gene expression or activity may represent a potentially effective antineoplastic therapy in colorectal cancer. Images PMID:7535799

  16. Methylselenol, a Selenium Metabolite, Plays Common and Different Roles in Colonic Cancer and Nontumorigenic Colonic Cell Growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is increasing evidence for the efficacy of certain forms of selenium (Se) as cancer-chemopreventive compounds, and methylselenol has been hypothesized to be a critical selenium metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. To determine differential chemopreventive effects of methylselenol on col...

  17. Lap colectomy and robotics for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Parra-Davila, Eduardo; Ramamoorthy, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Robotic approaches have seen significant growth in the last 5 years. Taking advantage of three-dimensional visualization, improved articulation, and multiple operating arms provides theoretical and real advantages in colorectal cancer surgery. This article reviews the potential advantages and disadvantages, current outcomes, and future directions for robotic approaches to colon cancer surgery. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Detection of vascular endothelial growth factor in colon cancer xenografts using bevacizumab based near infrared fluorophore conjugate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop the near infrared fluorescence (NIRF)-based imaging agent for the visualization of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in colon cancer. AlexaFluor 750 conjugating with bevacizumab, and injected intravenously into nude mice bearing VEGF over-expressing HT29 human colorectal cancer. Optical imaging was performed at 15 min, 24 h and 48 h post injection. Immunofluorescences staining of the tumor sections were performed. HT29 colorectal cancer xenografts were clearly visualized with bevacizumab-AlexaFluor 750. Results Ex vivo analysis showed 2.1 ± 0.4%, 37.6 ± 6.3% and 38.5 ± 6.2% injected dose/g accumulated in the tumors at 15 min, 24 h and 48 h respectively. Tumor uptake was significantly decreased in pretreated with excess of bevacizumab (p = 0.002). Immunofluorescence analysis showed strong staining of anti-CD 31 antibody around the blood vessels. Anti-VEGF-A and bevacizumab showed heterogeneous expression throughout the tumor. Conclusions Current study successfully detected the VEGF expression in HT29 colorectal cancer xenografts, signifying as a potential agent for non-invasive imaging of VEGF expression, which may be applied in clinical practice. PMID:24780003

  19. Methyl Sartortuoate Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Inducing Apoptosis and G2/M-Phase Arrest.

    PubMed

    Lan, Qiusheng; Li, Shoufeng; Lai, Wei; Xu, Heyang; Zhang, Yang; Zeng, Yujie; Lan, Wenjian; Chu, Zhonghua

    2015-08-17

    The potential anti-neoplastic activity of terpenoids is of continued interest. In this study, we investigate whether methyl sartortuoate, a terpenoid isolated from soft coral, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a human colon cancer cell line. Culture studies found that methyl sartortuoate inhibited colon cancer cell (LoVo and RKO) growth and caused apoptotic death in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, by activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, p53 and Bax, and inactivation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) apoptosis regulating proteins. Methyl sartortuoate treatment led to reduced expression of cdc2 and up-regulated p21 and p53, suggesting that Methyl sartortuoate induced G2-M arrest through modulation of p53/p21/cdc2 pathways. Methyl sartortuoate also up-regulated phospho-JNK and phospho-p38 expression levels. This resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G2-M phase and apoptosis in LoVo and RKO cells. Treatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 prevented methyl sartortuoate-induced apoptosis in LoVo cells. Moreover, methyl sartortuoate also prevented neoplasm growth in NOD-SCID nude mice inoculated with LoVo cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that methyl sartortuoate is capable of leading to activation of caspase-8, -9, -3, increasing p53 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio apoptosis through MAPK-dependent apoptosis and results in G2-M phase arrest in LoVo and RKO cells. Thus, methyl sartortuoate may be a promising anticancer candidate.

  20. Tea catechins inhibit hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET kinase) activity in human colon cancer cells: kinetic and molecular docking studies

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Christine A.; Bisson, William H.; Dashwood, Roderick H.

    2009-01-01

    Most cancer deaths result from spread of the primary tumor to distant sites (metastasis). MET is an important protein for metastasis in multiple tumor types. Here we report on the ability of tea catechins to suppress MET activation in human colon cancer cells, and propose a mechanism by which they might compete for the kinase domain of the MET protein. PMID:19839593

  1. Knockdown of TCTN1 Strongly Decreases Growth of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoyu; Dong, Mingjun; Yu, Hua; Xie, Yangyang; Yu, Yongming; Cao, Yisheng; Kong, Zhenfang; Zhou, Baofeng; Xu, Yidong; Yang, Tong; Li, Keqiang

    2017-01-01

    Background Tectonic family member 1 (TCTN1), a member of the tectonic family, is involved in several developmental processes and is aberrantly expressed in multiple solid tumors. However, the expression and regulation of TCTN1 in human colorectal cancer (CRC) is still not clear. Material/Methods The expression of TCTN1 mRNA was first explored by using Oncomine microarray datasets. TCTN1 expression was silenced in human CRC cell lines HCT116 and SW1116 via RNA interference (RNAi). Furthermore, we investigated the effect of TCTN1 depletion on CRC cell growth by MTT, colony formation, and flow cytometry in vitro. Results In this study, meta-analysis showed that the expressions of TCTN1 mRNA in CRC specimens were significantly higher than that in normal specimens. Knockdown of TCTN1 expression potently inhibited the abilities of cell proliferation and colony formation as determined. Flow cytometry analysis showed that depletion of TCTN1 could cause cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. In addition, Annexin V/7-AAD double-staining indicated that TCTN1 silencing promoted cell apoptosis through down-regulation of caspase 3 and Bcl-2 and upregulation of cleaved caspase 3 and PARP. Conclusions Our results indicate that TCTN1 may be crucial for CRC cell growth, providing a novel alternative to target therapies of CRC. Further research on this topic is warranted. PMID:28123172

  2. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, modulates p53 pathway and inhibits the growth of colon cancer xenografts in Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Johnson, Luann K

    2013-05-01

    It is has been hypothesized that methylselenol is a critical selenium metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. In this study, we used a protein array which contained 112 different antibodies known to be involved in the p53 pathway to investigate the molecular targets of methylselenol in human HCT116 colon cancer cells. The array analysis indicated that methylselenol exposure changed the expression of 11 protein targets related to the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis. Subsequently, we confirmed these proteins with the Western blotting approach, and found that methylselenol increased the expression of GADD 153 and p21 but reduced the level of c-Myc, E2F1 and Phos p38 MAP kinase. Similar to our previous report on human HCT116 colon cancer cells, methylselenol also inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in S-phase in mouse colon cancer MC26 cells. When the MC26 cells were transplanted to their immune-competent Balb/c mice, methylselenol-treated MC26 cells had significantly less tumor growth potential than that of untreated MC26 cells. Taken together, our data suggest that methylselenol modulates the expression of key genes related to cell cycle and apoptosis and inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Overexpression of protein kinase C in HT29 colon cancer cells causes growth inhibition and tumor suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, P M; Tchou-Wong, K M; Weinstein, I B

    1990-01-01

    By using a retrovirus-derived vector system, we generated derivatives of the human colon cancer cell line HT29 that stably overexpress a full-length cDNA encoding the beta 1 isoform of rat protein kinase C (PKC). Two of these cell lines, PKC6 and PKC7, displayed an 11- to 15-fold increase in PKC activity when compared with the C1 control cell line that carries the vector lacking the PKC cDNA insert. Both of the overexpresser cell lines exhibited striking alterations in morphology when exposed to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Following exposure to TPA, PKC6 and PKC7 cells displayed increased doubling time, decreased saturation density, and loss of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar; but these effects were not seen with the C1 cells. Also, in contrast to the control cells, the PKC-overproducing cells failed to display evidence of differentiation, as measured by alkaline phosphatase activity, when exposed to sodium butyrate. In addition, the PKC-overexpresser cells displayed decreased tumorigenicity in nude mice, even in the absence of treatment with TPA. These results provide the first direct evidence that PKC can inhibit tumor cell growth. Thus, in some tumors, PKC might act as a growth-suppressor gene. Images PMID:2388620

  4. Application of in vitro soft agar techniques for growth of tumor cells to the study of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Buick, R N; Fry, S E; Salmon, S E

    1980-03-15

    An in vitro assay to measure the clonogenic or colony-forming capability of cancer cells present in biopsy samples has recently been applied to study the biology and drug-sensitivity of a variety of human neoplasms. This approach appears to be suitable for study of the tumor stem or progenitor cells present in malignant effusions from patients with colonic carcinoma. In our preliminary studies, morphology of the tumor colonies by inverted microscopy and with Papanicolaou staining of dried agar plating layers as well as immunofluorescent localization with a specific antiserum to human carcinoembrionic antigen have been used as markers of the neoplastic origin of colon tumor colony-forming cells. Successful application of this assay to colonic solid tumors will require improvement in techniques for disaggregation of viable clonogenic cells. We anticipate that short term clonal assays will have increasing use for clinical and biological studies of human colon cancer.

  5. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P N; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5mM at 24h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential.

  6. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by NOSH-aspirin: COX inhibition and modeling☆

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Federica; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Rao, Praveen P.N.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the synthesis of NOSH-aspirin, a novel hybrid that releases both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). In NOSH-aspirin, the two moieties that release NO and H2S are covalently linked at the 1, 2 positions of acetyl salicylic acid, i.e. ortho-NOSH-aspirin (o-NOSH-aspirin). In the present study, we compared the effects of the positional isomers of NOSH-ASA (o-NOSH-aspirin, m-NOSH-aspirin and p-NOSH-aspirin) to that of aspirin on growth of HT-29 and HCT 15 colon cancer cells, belonging to the same histological subtype, but with different expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes; HT-29 express both COX-1 and COX-2, whereas HCT 15 is COX-null. We also analyzed the effect of these compounds on proliferation and apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Since the parent compound aspirin, inhibits both COX-1 and COX-2, we also evaluated the effects of these compounds on COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme activities and also performed modeling of the interactions between the positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. We observed that the three positional isomers of NOSH aspirin inhibited the growth of both colon cancer cell lines with IC50s in the nano-molar range. In particular in HT-29 cells the IC50s for growth inhibition were: o-NOSH-ASA, 0.04±0.011 µM; m-NOSH-ASA, 0.24±0.11 µM; p-NOSH-ASA, 0.46±0.17 µM; and in HCT 15 cells the IC50s for o-NOSH-ASA, m-NOSH-ASA, and p-NOSH-ASA were 0.062 ±0.006 µM, 0.092±0.004 µM, and 0.37±0.04 µM, respectively. The IC50 for aspirin in both cell lines was >5 mM at 24 h. The reduction of cell growth appeared to be mediated through inhibition of proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. All 3 positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin preferentially inhibited COX-1 over COX-2. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of NOSH-aspirin have the same biological actions, but that o-NOSH-ASA displayed the strongest anti-neoplastic potential. PMID:26319435

  7. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  8. Colon cancer associated transcripts in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yincong; Xie, Haibiao; Gao, Qunjun; Zhan, Hengji; Xiao, Huizhong; Zou, Yifan; Zhang, Fuyou; Liu, Yuchen; Li, Jianfa

    2017-08-02

    Long non-coding RNAs serve as important regulators in complicated cellular activities, including cell differentiation, proliferation and death. Dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs occurs in the formation and progression of cancers. The family of colon cancer associated transcripts, long non-coding RNAs colon cancer associated transcript-1 and colon cancer associated transcript-2 are known as oncogenes involved in various cancers. Colon cancer associated transcript-1 is a novel lncRNA located in 8q24.2, and colon cancer associated transcript-2 maps to the 8q24.21 region encompassing rs6983267. Colon cancer associated transcripts have close associations with clinical characteristics, such as lymph node metastasis, high TNM stage and short overall survival. Knockdown of them can reverse the malignant phenotypes of cancer cells, including proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis. Moreover, they can increase the expression level of c-MYC and oncogenic microRNAs via activating a series of complex mechanisms. In brief, the family of colon cancer associated transcripts may serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for human cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Sulindac sulfide inhibits epidermal growth factor-induced phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 and Bad in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rice, Pamela L; Washington, Michele; Schleman, Shea; Beard, K Scott; Driggers, Linda J; Ahnen, Dennis J

    2003-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including sulindac are promising chemopreventive agents for colorectal cancer. Sulindac and selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors cause regression of colonic polyps in familial polyposis patients. Sulindac induces apoptotic cell death in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In tumor cells, activation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 results in phosphorylation of several ERK1/2 effectors, including the proapoptotic protein Bad. Phosphorylation of Ser112 by ERK1/2 inactivates Bad and protects the tumor cell from apoptosis. Sulindac metabolites and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs selectively inhibit ERK1/2 phosphorylation in human colon cancer cells. In this study we show that epidermal growth factor (EGF) strongly induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Bad in HT29 colon cancer cells. EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK and Bad is blocked by pretreatment with U0126, a selective MAP kinase kinase (MKK)1/2 inhibitor. Similarly, pretreatment with sulindac sulfide blocks the ability of EGF to induce ERK1/2 and Bad phosphorylation, but also down-regulates total Bad but not ERK1/2 protein levels. The ability of sulindac to block ERK1/2 signaling by the EGF receptor may account for at least part of its potent growth-inhibitory effects against cancer cells.

  10. Effect of Sterols Isolated from Myrtillocactus geometrizans on Growth Inhibition of Colon and Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolaños-Carrillo, Mario Augusto; Ventura-Gallegos, Jose Luis; Saldivar-Jiménez, Arturo David; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Martínez-Vázquez, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore the effect of peniocerol and macdougallin on HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and PARP cleavage. Methods. HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells were treated with various concentrations of peniocerol and macdougallin (10–80 μM) during 24 or 48 h. Crystal Violet Assay was used to evaluate the inhibition effect. Cell cycle regulation was examined by a propidium iodide method. Cell apoptosis was detected through both Annexin–V FLUOS/PI double-labeled cytometry assays and Western blot was applied to assess PARP cleavage. Results. Peniocerol and macdougallin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in vitro in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, peniocerol and macdougallin induced arrest of cell cycle-dependent manner and increased the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase. PARP cleavage in HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells was induced by treatment with peniocerol and macdougallin after 36 hours. Conclusions. Our results showed that the mechanism of cytotoxicity displayed by peniocerol and macdougallin is related to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in both cell lines. This is a significant observation because it helps to understand the way some oxysterols isolated from Myrtillocactus geometrizans develop their biological activities against cancer cells. PMID:26113867

  11. Effect of Sterols Isolated from Myrtillocactus geometrizans on Growth Inhibition of Colon and Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Bolaños-Carrillo, Mario Augusto; Ventura-Gallegos, Jose Luis; Saldivar-Jiménez, Arturo David; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Martínez-Vázquez, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore the effect of peniocerol and macdougallin on HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and PARP cleavage. Methods. HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells were treated with various concentrations of peniocerol and macdougallin (10-80 μM) during 24 or 48 h. Crystal Violet Assay was used to evaluate the inhibition effect. Cell cycle regulation was examined by a propidium iodide method. Cell apoptosis was detected through both Annexin-V FLUOS/PI double-labeled cytometry assays and Western blot was applied to assess PARP cleavage. Results. Peniocerol and macdougallin induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in vitro in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, peniocerol and macdougallin induced arrest of cell cycle-dependent manner and increased the proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase. PARP cleavage in HCT-15 and MCF-7 cells was induced by treatment with peniocerol and macdougallin after 36 hours. Conclusions. Our results showed that the mechanism of cytotoxicity displayed by peniocerol and macdougallin is related to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in both cell lines. This is a significant observation because it helps to understand the way some oxysterols isolated from Myrtillocactus geometrizans develop their biological activities against cancer cells.

  12. Selenium, Folate, and Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Connelly-Frost, Alexandra; Poole, Charles; Satia, Jessie A.; Kupper, Lawrence L.; Millikan, Robert C.; Sandler, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Selenium is an essential trace element which has been implicated in cancer risk; however, study results have been inconsistent with regard to colon cancer. Our objectives were to 1) investigate the association between selenium and colon cancer 2) evaluate possible effect measure modifiers and 3) evaluate potential biases associated with the use of post-diagnostic serum selenium measures Methods The North Carolina Colon Cancer Study is a large population-based, case-control study of colon cancer in North Carolina between 1996 and 2000 (n=1,691). Nurses interviewed patients about diet and lifestyle and drew blood specimens which were used to measure serum selenium. Results Individuals who had both high serum selenium (>140 mcg/L) and high reported folate (>354 mcg/day), had a reduced relative risk of colon cancer (OR=0.5, 95% CI=0.4,0.8). The risk of colon cancer for those with high selenium and low folate was approximately equal to the risk among those with low selenium and low folate (OR=1.1, 95% CI=0.7,1.5) as was the risk for those with low selenium and high folate (OR=0.9, 95% CI=0.7–1.2). We did not find evidence of bias due to weight loss, stage at diagnosis, or time from diagnosis to selenium measurement. Conclusion High levels of serum selenium and reported folate jointly were associated with a substantially reduced risk of colon cancer. Folate status should be taken into account when evaluating the relation between selenium and colon cancer in future studies. Importantly, weight loss, stage at diagnosis, or time from diagnosis to blood draw did not appear to produce strong bias in our study. PMID:19235033

  13. Cathelicidin suppresses colon cancer development by inhibition of cancer associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Michelle; Ho, Samantha; Yoo, Jun Hwan; Tran, Deanna Hoang-Yen; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Su, Bowei; Tran, Diana Hoang-Ngoc; Kubota, Yuzu; Ichikawa, Ryan; Koon, Hon Wai

    2015-01-01

    Background Cathelicidin (LL-37 in humans and mCRAMP in mice) represents a family of endogenous antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides. Cancer-associated fibroblasts can promote the proliferation of colon cancer cells and growth of colon cancer tumors. Methods We examined the role of cathelicidin in the development of colon cancer, using subcutaneous human HT-29 colon-cancer-cell-derived tumor model in nude mice and azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-mediated colon cancer model in C57BL/6 mice. We also determined the indirect antitumoral mechanism of cathelicidin via the inhibition of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) of colon cancer cells and fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Results Intravenous administration of cathelicidin expressing adeno-associated virus significantly reduced the size of tumors, tumor-derived collagen expression, and tumor-derived fibroblast expression in HT-29-derived subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. Enema administration of the mouse cathelicidin peptide significantly reduced the size and number of colonic tumors in azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-treated mice without inducing apoptosis in tumors and the adjacent normal colonic tissues. Cathelicidin inhibited the collagen expression and vimentin-positive fibroblast expression in colonic tumors. Cathelicidin did not directly affect HT-29 cell viability, but did significantly reduce tumor growth factor-β1-induced EMT of colon cancer cells. Media conditioned by the human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts promoted human colon cancer HT-29 cell proliferation. Cathelicidin pretreatment inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation mediated by media conditioned by human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts. Cathelicidin disrupted tubulin distribution in colonic fibroblasts. Disruption of tubulin in fibroblasts reduced fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Conclusion Cathelicidin effectively inhibits colon cancer development by interfering with EMT and fibroblast

  14. Concomitant consumption of lycopene and fish oil inhibits tumor growth and progression in a mouse xenograft model of colon cancer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our previous report showed that concomitant supplementation of lycopene and eicosa-pentaenoic acid synergistically inhibited the proliferation of human colon cancer HT-29 cells in vitro. To validate our findings, the present study investigated whether consumption of lycopene and fish oil would help ...

  15. Methylglyoxal suppresses human colon cancer cell lines and tumor growth in a mouse model by impairing glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells associated with down-regulation of c-Myc expression.

    PubMed

    He, Tiantian; Zhou, Huaibin; Li, Chunmei; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Xiaowan; Li, Chenli; Mao, Jiating; Lyu, Jianxin; Meng, Qing H

    2016-09-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a highly reactive dicarbonyl compound exhibiting anti-tumor activity. The anti-tumor effects of MG have been demonstrated in some types of cancer, but its role in colon cancer and the mechanisms underlying this activity remain largely unknown. We investigated its role in human colon cancer and the underlying mechanism using human colon cancer cells and animal model. Viability, proliferation, and apoptosis were quantified in DLD-1 and SW480 colon cancer cells by using the Cell Counting Kit-8, plate colony formation assay, and flow cytometry, respectively. Cell migration and invasion were assessed by wound healing and transwell assays. Glucose consumption, lactate production, and intracellular ATP production also were assayed. The levels of c-Myc protein and mRNA were quantitated by western blot and qRT-PCR. The anti-tumor role of MG in vivo was investigated in a DLD-1 xenograft tumor model in nude mice. We demonstrated that MG inhibited viability, proliferation, migration, and invasion and induced apoptosis of DLD-1 and SW480 colon cancer cells. Treatment with MG reduced glucose consumption, lactate production, and ATP production and decreased c-Myc protein levels in these cells. Moreover, MG significantly suppressed tumor growth and c-Myc expression in vivo. Our findings suggest that MG plays an anti-tumor role in colon cancer. It inhibits cancer cell growth by altering the glycolytic pathway associated with downregulation of c-Myc protein. MG has therapeutic potential in colon cancer by interrupting cancer metabolism.

  16. A benign cultured colon adenoma bears three genetically altered colon cancer oncogenes, but progresses to tumorigenicity and transforming growth factor-beta independence without inactivating the p53 tumor suppressor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, S D; Myeroff, L; Cooper, M J; Traicoff, J; Kochera, M; Lutterbaugh, J; Swiriduk, M; Willson, J K

    1994-01-01

    We describe the spontaneous progression of a colon adenoma cell line to tumorigenicity and growth factor independence. This system allows direct comparison of biologic stages of malignant progression with alterations of colon cancer suppressor genes and oncogenes. VACO-235, a human colon adenoma cell line, is at early passages nontumorigenic in the nude mouse, unable to grow in soft agar, growth stimulated by serum and EGF, and growth inhibited by TGF-beta. VACO-235 daughter passages 93 and higher have in culture spontaneously progressed to being weakly tumorigenic, but retain all other growth characteristics of VACO-235 early passages. A mouse xenograft from late passage VACO-235 was reestablished in culture as the granddaughter cell line, VACO-411. VACO-411 is highly tumorigenic, clones in soft agar, and is unresponsive to serum, EGF, and TGF-beta. Early passage VACO-235 bears a mutant K-ras allele, bears only mutant APC alleles, expresses no DCC transcripts, and expresses only wild type p53 transcripts. VACO-411 retains the identical genotype, still expressing only wild type p53. Colonic cells after ras mutation, APC mutation, and DCC inactivation remain nontumorigenic and growth factor dependent. Malignant progression involves at least two additional steps, and in VACO-411 can proceed by a novel pathway not requiring p53 inactivation. Images PMID:8132740

  17. Impact of sodium butyrate on the network of adhesion/growth-regulatory galectins in human colon cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Katzenmaier, Eva-Maria; André, Sabine; Kopitz, Jürgen; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-01

    The physiological compound sodium butyrate can induce differentiation in colon cancer cells in vitro. Due to the role of galectins in growth control we explored its effect on this network beyond galectins-1 and -3, with deliberate consideration of the status of microsatellite stability, for nine cell lines. Microscopical monitoring and measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity ascertained butyrate's impact on cells. Monitoring by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting with galectin-type-specific probes characterized galectin expression. Controlled by expectable strong up-regulation of galectin-1 and comparatively small effects on galectin-3 regulation for galectins-4, -7, -8 and -9 were reported with no obvious association to microsatellite stability status. Neoexpression of the GAL-12 gene was observed in eight out of nine tested lines. Butyrate affects the galectin network beyond galectins-1 and -3, warranting further cell biological and histochemical studies. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Beta-escin inhibits colonic aberrant crypt foci formation in rats and regulates the cell cycle growth by inducing p21(waf1/cip1) in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Patlolla, Jagan M R; Raju, Jayadev; Swamy, Malisetty V; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2006-06-01

    Extracts of Aesculus hippocastanum (horse chestnut) seed have been used in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, edema, and hemorrhoids. Most of the beneficial effects of horse chestnut are attributed to its principal component beta-escin or aescin. Recent studies suggest that beta-escin may possess anti-inflammatory, anti-hyaluronidase, and anti-histamine properties. We have evaluated the chemopreventive efficacy of dietary beta-escin on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF). In addition, we analyzed the cell growth inhibitory effects and the induction of apoptosis in HT-29 human colon cancer cell line. To evaluate the inhibitory properties of beta-escin on colonic ACF, 7-week-old male F344 rats were fed experimental diets containing 0%, 0.025%, or 0.05% beta-escin. After 1 week, the rats received s.c. injections of azoxymethane (15 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for 2 weeks) or an equal volume of normal saline (vehicle). Rats were continued on respective experimental diets and sacrificed 8 weeks after the azoxymethane treatment. Colons were evaluated histopathologically for ACF. Administration of dietary 0.025% and 0.05% beta-escin significantly suppressed total colonic ACF formation up to approximately 40% (P < 0.001) and approximately 50% (P < 0.0001), respectively, when compared with control diet group. Importantly, rats fed beta-escin showed dose-dependent inhibition (approximately 49% to 65%, P < 0.0001) of foci containing four or more aberrant crypts. To understand the growth inhibitory effects, HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell lines were treated with various concentrations of beta-escin and analyzed by flow cytometry for apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Beta-escin treatment in HT-29 cells induced growth arrest at the G1-S phase, which was associated with the induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1), and this correlated with reduced phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. Results also indicate that

  19. A novel chronic stress-induced shift in the Th1 to Th2 response promotes colon cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ni; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Lingyu; Zhao, Xiaoge; Li, Zongfang; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2013-10-04

    Epidemiological data have shown that stress and other psychological factors might influence cancer onset and progression. However, to date, the mechanisms are not well understood. In the present study, we used chronic exposure to a scream as a novel form of sound stress to explore the influence of the chronic stress burden on colon cancer progression, and changes in the immune system were observed. Chronic exposure to scream sound stress induced freezing behavior in the mice and decreased the bodyweight gain. It also caused changes in the adrenal gland and increased serum corticosterone and norepinephrine levels. Cytokine microarray analysis showed changes in the levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. The chronic scream sound stress caused a shift from the Th1 to the Th2 response both in the circulation and in tumor-infiltrated lymphocytes, and it promoted colon cancer progression significantly. Taken together, chronic scream sound stress can be conveniently used as a novel chronic stress model. Chronic stress contributes to colon cancer progression and induces a Th1/Th2 imbalance in the mouse immune system, which is considered critical during cancer progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bacterial Infection of Smad3/Rag2 Double-Null Mice with Transforming Growth Factor-β Dysregulation as a Model for Studying Inflammation-Associated Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maggio-Price, Lillian; Treuting, Piper; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Seamons, Audrey; Drivdahl, Rolf; Zeng, Weiping; Lai, LapHin; Huycke, Mark; Phelps, Susan; Brabb, Thea; Iritani, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in genes encoding transforming growth factor-β-signaling components contribute to colon cancer in humans. Similarly, mice deficient in the transforming growth factor-β signaling molecule, Smad3, develop colon cancer, but only after a bacterial trigger occurs, resulting in chronic inflammation. To determine whether Smad3-null lymphocytes contribute to increased cancer susceptibility, we crossed Smad3-null mice with mice deficient in both B and T lymphocytes (Rag2−/− mice). Helicobacter-infected Smad3/Rag2-double knockout (DKO) mice had more diffuse inflammation and increased incidence of adenocarcinoma compared with Helicobacter-infected Smad3−/− or Rag2−/− mice alone. Adoptive transfer of WT CD4+CD25+ T-regulatory cells provided significant protection of Smad3/Rag2-DKO from bacterial-induced typhlocolitis, dysplasia, and tumor development, whereas Smad3−/− T-regulatory cells provided no protection. Immunohistochemistry, real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analyses of colonic tissues from Smad3/Rag2-DKO mice 1 week after Helicobacter infection revealed an influx of macrophages, enhanced nuclear factor-κB activation, increased BclXL/Bcl-2 expression, increased c-Myc expression, accentuated epithelial cell proliferation, and up-regulated IFN-γ, IL-1α, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 transcription levels. These results suggest that the loss of Smad3 increases susceptibility to colon cancer by at least two mechanisms: deficient T-regulatory cell function, which leads to excessive inflammation after a bacterial trigger; and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines, enhanced nuclear factor-κB activation, and increased expression of both pro-oncogenic and anti-apoptotic proteins that result in increased cell proliferation/survival of epithelial cells in colonic tissues. PMID:19119184

  1. Translation initiation factor eIF3b expression in human cancer and its role in tumor growth and lung colonization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Ru, Yuanbin; Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Wang, Xuejiao; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Theodorescu, Dan

    2013-06-01

    Discovery transcriptomic analyses suggest eukaryotic initiation factor 3b (eIF3b) is elevated in human bladder and prostate cancer, yet its role as a prognostic factor or its requirement in the maintenance or progression of human cancer is not established. Here, we determine the therapeutic potential of eIF3b by examining the clinical relevance of its expression in human cancer tissues and its role in experimental tumor models. We examined mRNA expression of eIF3b in bladder (N = 317) and prostate (N = 566) tissue samples and protein expression by immunohistochemistry in 143 bladder tumor samples as a function of clinicopathologic features. The impact of eIF3b depletion by siRNA in human cancer lines was evaluated in regard to in vitro cell growth, cell cycle, migration, in vivo subcutaneous tumor growth, and lung colonization. eIF3b mRNA expression correlated to tumor grade, stage, and survival in human bladder and prostate cancer. eIF3b protein expression stratified survival in human bladder cancer. eIF3b depletion reduced in vitro cancer cell growth; inhibited G1-S cell-cycle transition by changing protein but not RNA expression of cyclin A, E, Rb, and p27Kip1; inhibited migration; and disrupted actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions. These changes were associated with decreased protein expression of integrin α5. Integrin α5 depletion phenocopied effects observed with eIF3b. eIF3b-depleted bladder cancer cells formed fewer subcutaneous tumors that grew more slowly and had reduced lung colonization. eIF3b expression relates to human bladder and prostate cancer prognosis, is required for tumor growth, and thus a candidate therapeutic target. ©2013 AACR

  2. Positional Isomers of Aspirin Are Equally Potent in Inhibiting Colon Cancer Cell Growth: Differences in Mode of Cyclooxygenase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kodela, Ravinder; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Goswami, Satindra; Gan, Zong Yuan; Rao, Praveen P. N.; Nia, Kamran V.; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the differential effects of positional isomers of acetylsalicylic acid (o-ASA, m-ASA, and p-ASA) on cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition, gastric prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cell growth inhibition, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell-cycle progression. We also evaluated the gastric toxicity exerted by ASA isomers. All ASA isomers inhibit COX enzymes, but only the o-ASA exerted an irreversible inhibitory profile. We did not observe a significant difference between ASA isomers in their ability to decrease the in vivo synthesis of PGE2 and SOD activity. Furthermore, all isomers increased the levels of gastric and TNF-α when administered orally at equimolar doses. We observed a dose-dependent cell growth inhibitory effect; the order of potency was p-ASA > m-ASA ≈ o-ASA. There was a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis, with a concomitant Go/G1 arrest. The ulcerogenic profile of the three ASA isomers showed a significant difference between o-ASA (aspirin) and its two positional isomers when administered orally at equimolar doses (1 mmol/kg); the ulcer index (UI) for o-ASA indicated extensive mucosal injury (UI = 38), whereas m-ASA and p-ASA produced a significantly decreased toxic response (UI = 12 and 8, respectively) under the same experimental conditions. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of ASA exert practically the same biologic profile in vitro and in vivo but showed different safety profiles. The mechanism of gastric ulcer formation exerted by aspirin and its two isomers warrants a more detailed and thorough investigation. PMID:23349335

  3. Positional isomers of aspirin are equally potent in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth: differences in mode of cyclooxygenase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kodela, Ravinder; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Goswami, Satindra; Gan, Zong Yuan; Rao, Praveen P N; Nia, Kamran V; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2013-04-01

    We compared the differential effects of positional isomers of acetylsalicylic acid (o-ASA, m-ASA, and p-ASA) on cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition, gastric prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cell growth inhibition, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell-cycle progression. We also evaluated the gastric toxicity exerted by ASA isomers. All ASA isomers inhibit COX enzymes, but only the o-ASA exerted an irreversible inhibitory profile. We did not observe a significant difference between ASA isomers in their ability to decrease the in vivo synthesis of PGE2 and SOD activity. Furthermore, all isomers increased the levels of gastric and TNF-α when administered orally at equimolar doses. We observed a dose-dependent cell growth inhibitory effect; the order of potency was p-ASA > m-ASA ≈ o-ASA. There was a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis, with a concomitant Go/G1 arrest. The ulcerogenic profile of the three ASA isomers showed a significant difference between o-ASA (aspirin) and its two positional isomers when administered orally at equimolar doses (1 mmol/kg); the ulcer index (UI) for o-ASA indicated extensive mucosal injury (UI = 38), whereas m-ASA and p-ASA produced a significantly decreased toxic response (UI = 12 and 8, respectively) under the same experimental conditions. These results suggest that the three positional isomers of ASA exert practically the same biologic profile in vitro and in vivo but showed different safety profiles. The mechanism of gastric ulcer formation exerted by aspirin and its two isomers warrants a more detailed and thorough investigation.

  4. Disruption of thioredoxin metabolism enhances the toxicity of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) inhibition in KRAS-mutated colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hrabe, Jennifer E.; O’Leary, Brianne R.; Fath, Melissa A.; Rodman, Samuel N.; Button, Anna M.; Domann, Frederick E.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Mezhir, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is critical for survival of many KRAS mutated colorectal cancer cells, and TAK1 inhibition with 5Z-7-oxozeaenol has been associated with oxidative stress leading to tumor cell killing. When SW 620 and HCT 116 human colon cancer cells were treated with 5 µM 5Z-7-oxozeaenol, cell viability, growth, and clonogenic survival were significantly decreased. Consistent with TAK1 inhibition being causally related to thiol-mediated oxidative stress, 10 mM N-acetylcysteine (NAC) partially reversed the growth inhibitory effects of 5Z-7-oxozeaenol. In addition, 5Z-7-oxozeaenol also increased steady-state levels of H2DCFDA oxidation as well as increased levels of total glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Interestingly, depletion of GSH using buthionine sulfoximine did not significantly potentiate 5Z-7-oxozeaenol toxicity in either cell line. In contrast, pre-treatment of cells with auranofin (Au) to inhibit thioredoxin reductase activity significantly increased levels of oxidized thioredoxin as well as sensitized cells to 5Z-7-oxozeaenol-induced growth inhibition and clonogenic cell killing. These results were confirmed in SW 620 murine xenografts, where treatment with 5Z-7-oxozeaenol or with Au plus 5Z-7-oxozeaenol significantly inhibited growth, with Au plus 5Z-7-oxozeaenol trending toward greater growth inhibition compared to 5Z-7-oxozeaenol alone. These results support the hypothesis that thiol-mediated oxidative stress is causally related to TAK1-induced colon cancer cell killing. In addition, these results support the hypothesis that thioredoxin metabolism is a critical target for enhancing colon cancer cell killing via TAK1 inhibition and could represent an effective therapeutic strategy in patients with these highly resistant tumors. PMID:26114584

  5. Preventing Second Cancers in Colon Cancer Survivors

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III trial, people who have had curative surgery for colon cancer will be randomly assigned to take sulindac and a placebo, eflornithine and a placebo, both sulindac and eflornithine, or two placebo pills for 36 months.

  6. Novel ent-Kaurane Diterpenoid from Rubus corchorifolius L. f. Inhibits Human Colon Cancer Cell Growth via Inducing Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuexiang; Wu, Xian; Ouyang, Wen; Gu, Min; Gao, Zili; Song, Mingyue; Chen, Yunjiao; Lin, Yanyin; Cao, Yong; Xiao, Hang

    2017-03-01

    The tender leaves of Rubus corchorifolius L. f. have been consumed as tea for drinking in China since ancient times. In this study, a novel ent-kaurane diterpenoid was isolated and identified from R. corchorifolius L. f. leaves as ent-kaur-2-one-16β,17-dihydroxy-acetone-ketal (DEK). DEK suppressed the growth of HCT116 human colon cancer cells with an IC50 value of 40 ± 0.21 μM, while it did not cause significant growth inhibition on CCD-18Co human colonic myofibroblasts at up to100 μM. Moreover, DEK induced extensive apoptosis and S phase cell cycle arrest in the colon cancer cells. Accordingly, DEK caused profound effects on multiple signaling proteins associated with cell proliferation, cell death, and inflammation. DEK significantly upregulated the expression levels of pro-apoptotic proteins such as cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved PARP, p53, Bax, and tumor suppressor p21(Cip1/Waf1), downregulated the levels of cell cycle regulating proteins such as cyclinD1, CDK2, and CDK4 and carcinogenic proteins such as EGFR and COX-2, and suppressed the activation of Akt. Overall, our results provide a basis for using DEK as a potential chemopreventive agent against colon carcinogenesis.

  7. Inhibition of in vitro growth and arrest in the G0/G1 phase of HCT8 line human colon cancer cells by kaempferide triglycoside from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    PubMed

    Martineti, Valentina; Tognarini, Isabella; Azzari, Chiara; Carbonell Sala, Silvia; Clematis, Francesca; Dolci, Marcello; Lanzotti, Virginia; Tonelli, Francesco; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Curir, Paolo

    2010-09-01

    The effects of phytoestrogens have been studied in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and in various non-gonadal targets. Epidemiologic and experimental evidence indicates a protective effect of phytoestrogens also in colorectal cancer. The mechanism through which estrogenic molecules control colorectal cancer tumorigenesis could possibly involve estrogen receptor beta, the predominantly expressed estrogen receptor subtype in colon mucosa.To validate this hypothesis, we therefore used an engineered human colon cancer cell line induced to overexpress estrogen receptor beta, beside its native cell line, expressing very low levels of ERbeta and not expressing ERalpha; as a phytoestrogenic molecule, we used kaempferide triglycoside, a glycosylated flavonol from a Dianthus caryophyllus cultivar. The inhibitory properties of this molecule toward vegetal cell growth have been previously demonstrated: however, no data on its activity on animal cell or information about the mechanism of this activity are available. Kaempferide triglycoside proved to inhibit the proliferation of native and estrogen receptor beta overexpressing colon cancer cells through a mechanism not mediated by ligand binding dependent estrogen receptor activation. It affected HCT8 cell cycle progression by increasing the G(0)/G(1) cell fraction and in estrogen receptor beta overexpressing cells increased two antioxidant enzymes. Interestingly, the biological effects of this kaempferide triglycoside were strengthened by the presence of high levels of estrogen receptor beta.Pleiotropic molecular effects of phytoestrogens may explain their protective activity against colorectal cancer and may represent an interesting area for future investigation with potential clinical applications.

  8. Synergistic inhibition of colon cancer growth by the combination of methylglyoxal and silencing of glyoxalase I mediated by the STAT1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gefei; Zhang, Jiali; Li, Changxi; Ma, Mengni; Guan, Chen; Bai, Fumao; Lyu, Jianxin; Meng, Qing H.

    2017-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG), an extremely reactive glucose metabolite, exhibits antitumor activity. Glyoxalase I (GLOI), which catalyzes MG metabolism, is associated with the progression of human malignancies. While the roles of MG or GLOI have been demonstrated in some types of cancer, their effects in colon cancer and the mechanisms underlying these effects remain largely unknown. For this study, MG and GLOI levels were manipulated in colon cancer cells and the effects on their viability, proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion in vitro were quantified by Cell Counting Kit-8, colony formation assay, flow cytometry, and transwell assays. The expression levels of STAT1 pathway–associated proteins and mRNAs in these cells were quantified by western blot and qRT-PCR, respectively. The antitumor effects of MG and silencing of GLOI were investigated in vivo in a SW620 colon cancer xenograft model in BALB/c nude mice. Our findings demonstrate that MG in combination with silencing of GLOI synergistically inhibited the cancer cells’ proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion and induced apoptosis in vitro compared with the controls. Furthermore, these treatments up-regulated STAT1 and Bax while down-regulating Bcl-2 in vitro. MG treatment alone or in combination with silencing of GLOI also reduced the growth of the SW620 tumors in mice by up-regulation of STAT1 and Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2. Taken together, our findings suggest that MG in combination with silencing of GLOI merits further evaluation as a targeted therapeutic strategy for colon cancer.

  9. A role for the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier as a repressor of the Warburg Effect and colon cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Schell, John C.; Olson, Kristofor A.; Jiang, Lei; Hawkins, Amy J.; Van Vranken, Jonathan G.; Xie, Jianxin; Egnatchik, Robert A.; Earl, Espen G.; Deberardinis, Ralph J.; Rutter, Jared

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cancer cells are typically subject to profound metabolic alterations, including the Warburg effect wherein cancer cells oxidize a decreased fraction of the pyruvate generated from glycolysis. We show herein that the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC), composed of the products of the MPC1 and MPC2 genes, modulates fractional pyruvate oxidation. MPC1 is deleted or underexpressed in multiple cancers and correlates with poor prognosis. Cancer cells re-expressing MPC1 and MPC2 display increased mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation, with no changes in cell growth in adherent culture. MPC re-expression exerted profound effects in anchorage-independent growth conditions, however, including impaired colony formation in soft agar, spheroid formation, and xenograft growth. We also observed a decrease in markers of stemness and traced the growth effects of MPC expression to the stem cell compartment. We propose that reduced MPC activity is an important aspect of cancer metabolism, perhaps through altering the maintenance and fate of stem cells. PMID:25458841

  10. Titanocene–Gold Complexes Containing N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligands Inhibit Growth of Prostate, Renal, and Colon Cancers in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report on the synthesis, characterization, and stability studies of new titanocene complexes containing a methyl group and a carboxylate ligand (mba = −OC(O)-p-C6H4-S−) bound to gold(I)–N-heterocyclic carbene fragments through the thiolate group: [(η5-C5H5)2TiMe(μ-mba)Au(NHC)]. The cytotoxicities of the heterometallic compounds along with those of novel monometallic gold–N-heterocyclic carbene precursors [(NHC)Au(mbaH)] have been evaluated against renal, prostate, colon, and breast cancer cell lines. The highest activity and selectivity and a synergistic effect of the resulting heterometallic species was found for the prostate and colon cancer cell lines. The colocalization of both titanium and gold metals (1:1 ratio) in PC3 prostate cancer cells was demonstrated for the selected compound 5a, indicating the robustness of the heterometallic compound in vitro. We describe here preliminary mechanistic data involving studies on the interaction of selected mono- and bimetallic compounds with plasmid (pBR322) used as a model nucleic acid and the inhibition of thioredoxin reductase in PC3 prostate cancer cells. The heterometallic compounds, which are highly apoptotic, exhibit strong antimigratory effects on the prostate cancer cell line PC3. PMID:27182101

  11. Transforming growth factor-beta suppresses nonmetastatic colon cancer through Smad4 and adaptor protein ELF at an early stage of tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi; Katuri, Varalakshmi; Srinivasan, Radhika; Fogt, Franz; Redman, Robert; Anand, Girish; Said, Anan; Fishbein, Thomas; Zasloff, Michael; Reddy, E Premkumar; Mishra, Bibhuti; Mishra, Lopa

    2005-05-15

    Although transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is both a suppressor and promoter of tumorigenesis, its contribution to early tumor suppression and staging remains largely unknown. In search of the mechanism of early tumor suppression, we identified the adaptor protein ELF, a beta-spectrin from stem/progenitor cells committed to foregut lineage. ELF activates and modulates Smad4 activation of TGF-beta to confer cell polarity, to maintain cell architecture, and to inhibit epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Analysis of development of colon cancer in (adult) elf+/-/Smad4+/-, elf+/-, Smad4+/-, and gut epithelial cells from elf-/- mutant mouse embryos pinpoints the defect to hyperplasia/adenoma transition. Further analysis of the role of ELF in human colorectal cancer confirms reduced expression of ELF in Dukes' B1 stage tissues (P < 0.05) and of Smad4 in advanced colon cancers (P < 0.05). This study indicates that by modulating Smad 4, ELF has a key role in TGF-beta signaling in the suppression of early colon cancer.

  12. Isorhamnetin suppresses colon cancer cell growth through the PI3K‑Akt‑mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Yang, Xi; Chen, Cheng; Cai, Shaoxin; Hu, Junbo

    2014-03-01

    Isorhamnetin, a flavonoid isolated from the fruits of herbal medicinal plants, such as Hippophae rhamnoides L., exerts anticancer effects similar to other flavonoids. However, the effect of isorhamnetin on colorectal cancer (CRC) and the underlying molecular mechanism are unclear. This study aimed to determine the effect of isorhamnetin on the proliferation of cells from the human CRC cell lines, HT‑29, HCT116 and SW480. It was demonstrated that isorhamnetin suppressed the proliferation of cells from all three cell lines, induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and suppressed cell proliferation by inhibiting the PI3K‑Akt‑mTOR pathway. Isorhamnetin also reduced the phosphorylation levels of Akt (ser473), phosph‑p70S6 kinase and phosph‑4E‑BP1 (t37/46) protein, and enhanced the expression of Cyclin B1 protein. Therefore, this compound was revealed to be a selective PI3K‑Akt‑mTOR pathway inhibitor, and may be a potent anticancer agent for the treatment of CRC, as it restrains the proliferation of CRC cells.

  13. Surgical treatment of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mastalier, B.; Tihon, C.; Ghita, B.; Botezatu, C.; Deaconescu, V.; Mandisodza, P.; Draghici, C.; Simion, S.

    2012-01-01

    Most patients with colon cancer are surgically treated, with postoperative association of chemotherapy and possibly immunotherapy in advanced cases. Surgical treatment is chosen depending on the evolution stage, tumor topography and the existence of complications, colonic surgery being dictated by colonic vascularization. The radical character of the surgical intervention can be assured only in the early stages of the tumor. Colostomy is rarely necessary in patients with colon cancer. In the period of the last 5 years (2007-2011), 307 patients with colon cancer were operated in “Colentina” Surgical Clinic, radical intervention being possible only in 219 cases. 48 cases were emergency interventions for occlusion or perforation with peritonitis. Every time the mechanical preparation of the bowel was not possible, the intraoperative washout technique was used. Postoperative complications were met in 27 cases, being represented by bleeding (3 cases), peritoneal abscess (5 cases), anastomotic fistula (7 cases), abdominal wound infection (12 cases). In 5 cases the operation was done laparoscopically. Preoperative mortality was of 13 cases. Postoperative chemotherapy was done in the great majority of cases. PMID:23144667

  14. Colon cancer mesenchymal stem cells modulate the tumorigenicity of colon cancer through interleukin 6.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Tsun; Wang, Jeng-Yi; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Chen, Hong-Chang; Chang, Tung-Hao; Su, Bi-Wen; Chang, Pey-Jium

    2013-08-15

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated from several tumors and are implicated to play critical roles to increase malignant cell growth, invasion and metastasis. Here, we show that the MSC-like cells were isolated from human colon cancer tissues. These isolated hCC-MSCs (human colon cancer-derived mesenchymal stem cells) shared similar characteristic features with bone marrow-derived MSCs, which include cell morphology, surface antigens and specific gene expression. Additionally, the hCC-MSCs could differentiate into osteocytes or adipocytes under appropriate culture conditions. The conditioned medium collected from the cultured hCC-MSCs was shown to enhance the migration and invasive activity of HCT-116 colon cancer cells in vitro. Besides, transplantation of HCT-116 cells along with hCC-MSCs in nude mice increased the tumor growth and metastasis. Further study revealed that IL-6 present in the hCC-MSC-conditioned medium sufficiently induced the levels of Notch-1 and CD44 in HCT-116 and HT-29 cells, which contribute to enhance tumorigenic activity of HCT-116 and HT-29 cells. By using immunohistochemical staining, the intense co-expression of IL-6, Notch-1 and CD44 was predominantly detected in human colon cancer tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest the importance of the IL-6/Notch-1/CD44 signaling axis in the interaction between hCC-MSCs and colon cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cholesterol excretion and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Broitman, S A

    1981-09-01

    Populations consuming diets high in fat and cholesterol exhibit a greater incidence of colon cancer than those consuming less fat and cholesterol. Lowering elevated serum cholesterol levels experimentally or clinically is associated with increased large-bowel tumorigenesis. Thus, cholesterol lost to the gut, either dietary or endogenously synthesized, appears to have a role in large-bowel cancer. Whether the effect(s) is mediated by increases in fecal bile acid excretion or some other mechanism is not clear.

  16. Role of dietary factors in cell replication and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R

    1988-09-01

    Human studies and experimental data from animals suggest that high rates of colonic epithelial cell replication enhance the development of colon cancer. Vegetarians and individuals following a prudent diet have lower rates of colorectal cell proliferation than subjects at high risk for colon cancer. Animal studies show that colonic cell proliferation is stimulated by feeding in general and specifically by a number of dietary fibers, fats, bile acids, and short-chain fatty acids. Many of these growth factors also increase the induction of experimental tumorigenesis. On the other hand factors that reduce cell growth, including ascorbic acid and butylated hydroxyanisole, inhibit colon carcinogenesis. These results support the concept that dietary chemoprevention is feasible and could significantly reduce the rate of colon cancer development in high risk populations.

  17. Decursin inhibits growth of human bladder and colon cancer cells via apoptosis, G1-phase cell cycle arrest and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wun-Jae; Lee, Se-Jung; Choi, Young Deuk; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2010-04-01

    Decursin, a pyranocoumarin isolated from the Korean Angelica gigas root, has demonstrated anti-cancer properties. In the present study, we found that decursin inhibited cell viability in cultured human urinary bladder cancer 235J cells and colon cancer HCT116 cells. The inhibited proliferation was due to apoptotic induction, because both cells treated with decursin dose-dependently showed a sub-G1 phase accumulation and an increased cytoplasmic DNA-histone complex. Cell death caused by decursin was also associated with the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 and the up-regulation of pro-apoptotic molecules cytochrome c, caspase 3 and Bax. Treatment of both types of cancer cells with decursin resulted in G1-phase cell cycle arrest, as revealed by FACS analyses. In addition, decursin increased protein levels of p21WAF1 with a decrease in cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). Furthermore, decursin induced the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) in both cancer cell lines, with the notable exceptions of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase. Finally, pretreatment with ERK-specific inhibitor PD98059 reversed decursin-induced p21WAF1 expression and decursin-inhibited cell growth. Thus, these findings suggest that decursin has potential therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of bladder and colon cancer.

  18. Colon cancer: cancer stem cells markers, drug resistance and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kozovska, Zuzana; Gabrisova, Veronika; Kucerova, Lucia

    2014-10-01

    Malignant tumours consist of heterogeneous populations of tumour cells. Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a population of cells within a tumour with highly tumorigenic and chemoresistant properties. These cells may be identified by the expression of CSC markers. There are several key stem cells markers specified for colon cancer: CD133, CD44, ALDH1, ALCAM. These days, a major obstacle to effective cancer management is development of a multidrug resistance (MDR). The principal mechanism responsible for development of MDR phenotype is the over-expression of ABC transporters. Tumours and relapsing tumours after therapy are drived by subpopulations of tumour cells with aggressive phenotype resistant to chemotherapeutics. These cells are called CSC or tumour-initiating cells (TIC). Here we outline recent information about MDR of colon cancer and CSC markers. We have focused on novel therapeutic strategies which have been developed to prevent or overcome MDR. One such strategy is a combination of chemotherapy and modulators of MDR pumps or chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF. Colon cancer is characterized by the presence of colon CSC expressing specific stem cell markers. The divergent presence of these markers can help to adjust personalized therapy. The review provides a detailed overview of resistance of colon cancer cells and discusses how the presence of CSC markers can influence therapy and prognosis of patients.

  19. Polyamines and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Wallace, H M; Caslake, R

    2001-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major health problem in the western world and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Diet makes a significant contribution to the disease, with high fat, low fibre diets correlating positively with a high incidence of colorectal cancer. Intracellular polyamine concentrations and ornithine decarboxylase activity are both increased in colorectal cancer tissue and in premalignant polyps. Measurement of the polyamine content of serum and urine of individuals has been proposed as a diagnostic marker of malignancy but a number of false positives make this idea untenable. There may, however, still be a role for the measurement of urinary polyamine content as a means of monitoring the efficacy of therapy. Inhibition of polyamine metabolism by polyamine analogues or by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be useful in the chemotherapy and/or chemoprevention of colorectal cancer. Preliminary results suggest that a low polyamine diet might be helpful as part of a health care plan for cancer patients.

  20. Strawberry-Tree Honey Induces Growth Inhibition of Human Colon Cancer Cells and Increases ROS Generation: A Comparison with Manuka Honey.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Sadia; Forbes-Hernandez, Tamara Y; Gasparrini, Massimiliano; Bompadre, Stefano; Quiles, José L; Sanna, Gavino; Spano, Nadia; Giampieri, Francesca; Battino, Maurizio

    2017-03-11

    Honey is a natural product known to modulate several biological activities including cancer. The aim of the present study was to examine the phytochemical content and the antioxidant activity of Strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) honey (STH) and its cytotoxic properties against human colon adenocarcinoma (HCT-116) and metastatic (LoVo) cell lines in comparison with Manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) honey (MH). Several unifloral STH and MH were analyzed for their phenolic, flavonoid, amino acid and protein contents, as well as their radical scavenging activities. STH from the Berchidda area showed the highest amount of phenolic, flavonoid, amino acid and protein content, and antioxidant capacity compared to MH. Both STH and MH induced cytotoxicity and cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HCT-116 and LoVo cells, with less toxicity on non-cancer cells. Compared to MH, STH showed more effect at lower concentrations on HCT-116 and LoVo cells. In addition, both honeys increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In HCT-116 cells, STH and MH induced similar ROS production but in LoVo cells STH induced a higher percentage of ROS compared to MH. Our results indicate that STH and MH can induce cell growth inhibition and ROS generation in colon adenocarcinoma and metastatic cells, which could be due to the presence of phytochemicals with antioxidant properties. These preliminary results are interesting and suggest a potential chemopreventive action which could be useful for further studies in order to develop chemopreventive agents for colon cancer.

  1. 8-methoxypsoralen reduces AKT phosphorylation, induces intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways, and suppresses cell growth of SK-N-AS neuroblastoma and SW620 metastatic colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bartnik, Magdalena; Sławińska-Brych, Adrianna; Żurek, Aleksandra; Kandefer-Szerszeń, Martyna; Zdzisińska, Barbara

    2017-07-31

    8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) is a furanocoumarin and an active compound of a traditional Egyptian medicinal plant Ammi majus L, whose juice/fruit has been used for many years in folk phototherapy for the treatment of vitiligo or a hyperproliferative skin disorder, psoriasis. 8-MOP together with UVA light is also used as an anticancer drug for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. However, furanocoumarins exert anticancer activity even without UV irradiation. Evaluation UV-independent anticancer activity of 8-MOP in human cancer cell lines and identification of the mechanisms involved in this action. Results could provide new data about a potential role of 8-MOP in prevention and growth suppression in a broad spectrum of cancers. 8-MOP (99%, HPLC/MS assay) was isolated from A. majus fruits by chromatographic methods. The effect of 8-MOP on cell viability was evaluated by the MTT test in several human cancer cell lines. Anti-proliferative activity of 8-MOP was evaluated by the BrdU assay in neuroblastoma (SK-N-AS) and metastatic colon cancer (SW620) cells. The Hoechst/PI staining was used for morphological analysis of cell death. An annexin V-FITC/PI double labelling and Cell Death Detection ELISA kit were used to detect apoptosis. The expression of apoptosis-associated proteins and the AKT activation status were determined by Western blot analysis. 8-MOP inhibited cell growth in several cancer cell lines. The SK-N-AS and SW620 cells were the most sensitive to the compound. 8-MOP reduced the phosphorylation of AKT(308), decreased the expression of Bcl-2, increased the Bax protein level, and activated caspases -8, -9, and -3 in both cell lines. 8-MOP impairs the PI3K/AKT signalling pathway and, independently of photoactivation, can inhibit the growth of neuroblastoma and colon cancer cells by induction of apoptosis via intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A high-fat diet increases angiogenesis, solid tumor growth, and lung metastasis of CT26 colon cancer cells in obesity-resistant BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Heesook; Kim, Minhee; Kwon, Gyoo Taik; Lim, Do Young; Yu, Rina; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Ki Won; Daily, James W; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated whether high-fat diet (HFD), in the absence of increased calorie intake, increases colon cancer growth and metastasis. Four-week-old male BALB/c mice were fed on an HFD (60 kcal% fat) or control diet (10 kcal% fat) for 16 wk, after which CT26 colon cancer cells were subcutaneously injected into the right flank. Solid tumor growth and the number and volume of tumor nodules in the lung were increased markedly in the HFD group with only a slight increase in body weight (5.9%). HFD feeding increased tumor tissue levels of Ki67, cyclin A, cyclin D1, CDK2, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-2; reduced p53 levels and TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells; increased the levels of CD45, CD68, CD31, VEGF, P-VEGF receptor-2, iNOS, and COX-2 as well as hemoglobin content; and increased the levels of HIF-1α, P-STAT3-Y705, P-STAT3-S727, P-IκB-α, P-p65, p65, P-c-Jun, P-Akt, P-ERK1/2, P-p38, and P-SAPK/JNK. HFD feeding increased the serum levels of EGF, insulin, IGF-I, IFN-γ, leptin, RANTES, MCP-1, IL-1ra, and SDF-1α and media conditioned by epididymal fat tissue explants from HFD-fed mice caused an increase in microvessel outgrowth from the mouse aorta and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. These results indicate that the chronic consumption of an HFD increases colon cancer cell proliferation, tumor angiogenesis, and lung metastasis in mice in the absence of discernible weight gain. HFD feeding increases the levels of growth factors which activate transcription factors, thereby inducing the expression of many genes involved in the stimulation of inflammation, angiogenesis, and cellular proliferation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Clustering asian and north african countries according to trend of colon and rectum cancer mortality rates: an application of growth mixture models.

    PubMed

    Zayeri, Farid; Sheidaei, Ali; Mansouri, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death with half a million deaths per year. Incidence and mortality rates have demonstrated notable changes in Asian and African countries during the last few decades. In this study, we first aimed to determine the trend of colorectal cancer mortality rate in each Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) region, and then re-classify them to find more homogenous classes. Our study population consisted of 52 countries of Asia and North Africa in six IHME pre-defined regions for both genders and age-standardized groups from 1990 to 2010.We first applied simple growth models for pre-defined IHME regions to estimate the intercepts and slopes of mortality rate trends. Then, we clustered the 52 described countries using the latent growth mixture modeling approach for classifying them based on their colorectal mortality rates over time. Statistical analysis revealed that males and people in high income Asia pacific and East Asia countries were at greater risk of death from colon and rectum cancer. In addition, South Asia region had the lowest rates of mortality due to this cancer. Simple growth modeling showed that majority of IHME regions had decreasing trend in mortality rate of colorectal cancer. However, re-classification these countries based on their mortality trend using the latent growth mixture model resulted in more homogeneous classes according to colorectal mortality trend. In general, our statistical analyses showed that most Asian and North African countries had upward trend in their colorectal cancer mortality. We therefore urge the health policy makers in these countries to evaluate the causes of growing mortality and study the interventional programs of successful countries in managing the consequences of this cancer.

  4. DNA testing and molecular screening for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Carethers, John M

    2014-03-01

    Colon cancer develops and progresses as a consequence of abnormal cellular molecular changes, many of which result in mutant DNA. Modern molecular techniques allow examination of individual patient genetic data that ascribe risk, predict outcome, and/or modify an approach to therapy. DNA testing and molecular screening are in use today and are becoming a critical and necessary part of routine patient care. Assessing at-risk patients for hereditary colon cancer is predicted to move from individual gene testing that is commonly performed today to whole exome or whole genome sequencing, providing additional vast information of the patient's genome that might not be related to the colon cancer syndrome. Detecting mutant DNA from shed tumor cells in fecal material for colon cancer screening will increase in diagnostic accuracy over time, with improvements in the panel of mutant DNA being examined and through clinical testing. DNA mutations and other molecular changes detected directly from within the colon cancer help to inform and guide the physician for the best approach for optimal patient care and outcome. The use of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy in advanced colon cancer patients requires knowledge of the mutation status for KRAS and BRAF genes, and knowing the mutational status of PIK3CA may predict how patients respond to aspirin to prevent colon cancer recurrence. Biologically driven decision-making, or precision medicine, is becoming increasingly adopted for optimal care and outcome for colon cancer patients. Gastroenterologists will need to be increasingly aware.

  5. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    PubMed

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs.

  6. Diallyl trisulfide inhibits migration, invasion and angiogenesis of human colon cancer HT-29 cells and umbilical vein endothelial cells, and suppresses murine xenograft tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kuang-Chi; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Yang, Jai-Sing; Yu, Chien-Chih; Lein, Jin-Cherng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-02-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors are beneficial for the prevention and treatment of angiogenesis-dependent diseases including cancer. We examined the cytotoxic, anti-metastatic, anti-cancer and anti-angiogenic effects of diallyl trisulfide (DATS). In HT29 cells, DATS inhibited migration and invasion through the inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 which was associated with inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases-2, -7 and -9 and VEGF. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), DATS inhibited the migration and angiogenesis through FAK, Src and Ras. DATS also inhibited the secretion of VEGF. The capillary-like tube structure formation and migration by HUVEC was inhibited by DATS. The chicken egg chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay indicated that DATS treatment inhibited ex-vivo angiogenesis. We investigated the anti-tumour effects of DATS against human colon cancer xenografts in BALB/c(nu/nu) mice and its anti-angiogenic activity in vivo. In this in-vivo study, DATS also inhibited the tumour growth, tumour weight and angiogenesis (decreased the levels of haemoglobin) in HT29 cells. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the inhibition of angiogenesis may be an important mechanism in colon cancer chemotherapy by DATS. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  7. Diallyl trisulfide inhibits migration, invasion and angiogenesis of human colon cancer HT-29 cells and umbilical vein endothelial cells, and suppresses murine xenograft tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Kuang-Chi; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Yang, Jai-Sing; Yu, Chien-Chih; Lein, Jin-Cherng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors are beneficial for the prevention and treatment of angiogenesis-dependent diseases including cancer. We examined the cytotoxic, anti-metastatic, anti-cancer and anti-angiogenic effects of diallyl trisulfide (DATS). In HT29 cells, DATS inhibited migration and invasion through the inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 which was associated with inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases-2, -7 and -9 and VEGF. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), DATS inhibited the migration and angiogenesis through FAK, Src and Ras. DATS also inhibited the secretion of VEGF. The capillary-like tube structure formation and migration by HUVEC was inhibited by DATS. The chicken egg chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay indicated that DATS treatment inhibited ex-vivo angiogenesis. We investigated the anti-tumour effects of DATS against human colon cancer xenografts in BALB/cnu/nu mice and its anti-angiogenic activity in vivo. In this in-vivo study, DATS also inhibited the tumour growth, tumour weight and angiogenesis (decreased the levels of haemoglobin) in HT29 cells. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the inhibition of angiogenesis may be an important mechanism in colon cancer chemotherapy by DATS. PMID:25403643

  8. Developmental pathways in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Fred E.; Angus, C. William; Partis, William J.; Sigounas, George

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of cancer is reactivation/alteration of pathways that control cellular differentiation during developmental processes. Evidence indicates that WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways have a role in normal epithelial cell differentiation, and that alterations in these pathways accompany establishment of the tumorigenic state. Interestingly, there is recent evidence that these pathways are intertwined at the molecular level, and these nodes of intersection may provide opportunities for effective targeted therapies. This review will highlight the role of the WNT, Notch, BMP and Hedgehog pathways in colon cancer. PMID:23032367

  9. Adjuvant treatment strategies for early colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Waterston, Ashita M; Cassidy, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Colon cancer remains a major cause of death; however, in the last 3 years a number of trials have been published that have led to changes in the treatment of patients with this disease. Initially, the adjuvant treatment of patients following curative resection was based on their Dukes staging; this is now being refined by consideration of other pathological factors, as well as the investigation of newer prognostic markers such as p53, Ki67 and a number of genes on chromosome 18. Tumours generally develop from the progressive accumulation of genetic events, although some develop through mutation or inactivation of DNA mismatch repair proteins leading to microsatellite instability; this is particularly important in Lynch's syndrome. The loss of gene expression can occur by deletion or mutation of genes or by aberrant methylation of CpG islands. In patients with Dukes C colon cancer the standard of care for adjuvant chemotherapy was previously based on bolus fluorouracil (5-fluorouracil) and folinic acid (leucovorin) administered 5 days per month or weekly for 6 months. Recent studies with a combination of infusional fluorouracil, folinic acid and oxaliplatin have been found to be superior. A further study replacing fluorouracil with oral capecitabine has also demonstrated equivalent disease-free survival. Although some debate remains regarding the benefit of adjuvant treatment for patients with Dukes B colon cancer, the emerging consensus is that, for those patients who are younger and have high-risk features, chemotherapy should be discussed. A number of large vaccine trials have also been conducted in the adjuvant setting and, overall, these have been disappointing. This is a rapidly advancing area of therapy and the results of new trials are awaited to determine whether additional benefits can be achieved with biological therapies such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and anti-epithelial growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies, which have already

  10. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  11. Effect of combination therapy of siRNA targeting growth hormone receptor and 5-fluorouracil in hepatic metastasis of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, DONG; ZHANG, YI; LIANG, DAOMING; YUAN, YONG; ZENG, DEMIAO; CHEN, JIAYONG; YANG, JIE

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting human growth hormone receptor (hGHR) combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on the hepatic metastasis of colon cancer. The animal model of liver metastases using human SW480 colon cancer cells was established on BALB/c mice and the siRNA interfering plasmid targeting hGHR gene was constructed. The tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into the saline control, plasmid, growth hormone (GH), 5-FU, 5-FU+plasmid and 5-FU+plasmid+GH groups. The liver metastasis in each group was observed. All the animals showed liver metastases and using siRNA-interfering plasmid treatment the incidence of liver metastases was significantly reduced in the tumor groups compared to the saline or GH group. The combined treatment of interfering plasmid and 5-FU slightly decreased the incidence of liver metastases in the tumor groups compared to the plasmid alone or 5-FU alone treatment, although the findings were not statistically significant. On the basis of the combination of interfering plasmid and 5-FU, the additional GH did not increase the incidence of liver metastases (P>0.05), but improved the weight loss of the mice (P<0.05) induced by the inhibition of GHR and toxicity of 5-FU. The present results showed that siRNA targeting hGHR is able to reduce the incidence of liver metastases of human SW480 colon cancer cells in mice. Thus, GHR may be important in tumor metastasis. PMID:26788158

  12. Colorectal Cancers Mimic Structural Organization of Normal Colonic Crypts

    PubMed Central

    Cernat, Laura; Blaj, Cristina; Jackstadt, Rene; Brandl, Lydia; Engel, Jutta; Hermeking, Heiko; Jung, Andreas; Kirchner, Thomas; Horst, David

    2014-01-01

    Colonic crypts are stereotypical structures with distinct stem cell, proliferating, and differentiating compartments. Colorectal cancers derive from colonic crypt epithelia but, in contrast, form morphologically disarrayed glands. In this study, we investigated to which extent colorectal cancers phenocopy colonic crypt architecture and thus preserve structural organization of the normal intestinal epithelium. A subset of colon cancers showed crypt-like compartments with high WNT activity and nuclear β-Catenin at the leading tumor edge, adjacent proliferation, and enhanced Cytokeratin 20 expression in most differentiated tumor epithelia of the tumor center. This architecture strongly depended on growth conditions, and was fully reproducible in mouse xenografts of cultured and primary colon cancer cells. Full crypt-like organization was associated with low tumor grade and was an independent prognostic marker of better survival in a collection of 221 colorectal cancers. Our findings suggest that full activation of preserved intestinal morphogenetic programs in colon cancer requires in vivo growth environments. Furthermore, crypt-like architecture was linked with less aggressive tumor biology, and may be useful to improve current colon cancer grading schemes. PMID:25111606

  13. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  14. Restoration of caveolin-1 expression suppresses growth, membrane-type-4 metalloproteinase expression and metastasis-associated activities in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nimri, Lili; Barak, Hossei; Graeve, Lutz; Schwartz, Betty

    2013-11-01

    Caveolin-1 (cav-1) and flotillin-1 are two major structural proteins associated with lipid rafts in mammalian cells. The membrane-type matrix metalloproteinases (MT-MMPs) are expressed at the cell surface, hydrolyze extracellular matrix, and play an important role in cancer cell migration and metastasis. Expression of cav-1, flotillin-1, and MT4-MMP in lysates and lipid rafts of LS174T and HM-7 colon cancer cells was determined. The impact of restoration of cav-1 expression on proliferation, adhesion, motility in vitro, and growth of implanted tumors in vivo was characterized. Cav-1 is not expressed in lipid rafts of the highly metastatic colon cancer cell line (HM-7), but expressed in cytosolic fractions of the parental lower metastatic cell line (LS174T). In contrast, MT4-MMP was expressed in lipid rafts of HM-7 cells but not in LS174T cells. Overexpression of cav-1 in HM-7 cells down-regulate proliferation, viability, wound closure, adhesion to laminin, invasion, and development of filopodial and lamellipodial structures in a dose-dependent manner. Cav-1 positive HM-7 clones ceased to express MT4-MMP in their lipid rafts. Comparative proteomic analyses of lipid rafts from cav-1 positive and cav-1 negative cells demonstrated de novo expression of flotillin-1 only on the cells expressing cav-1. Xenografting control cells devoid of cav-1 in nude mice induced development of bigger tumors expressing higher levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen as compared to mice injected with cells expressing the highest cav-1 levels. We conclude that cav-1 orchestrates and reorganize several proteins in lipid rafts, activities directly associated with reduced tumorigenic and metastatic ability of colon cancer cells.

  15. Outcomes of colon resection in patients with metastatic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Hanna, Mark H; Hwang, Grace; Mills, Steven; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J; Carmichael, Joseph C

    2016-08-01

    Patients with advanced colorectal cancer have a high incidence of postoperative complications. We sought to identify outcomes of patients who underwent resection for colon cancer by cancer stage. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to evaluate all patients who underwent colon resection with a diagnosis of colon cancer from 2012 to 2014. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate patient outcomes by cancer stage. A total of 7,786 colon cancer patients who underwent colon resection were identified. Of these, 10.8% had metastasis at the time of operation. Patients with metastatic disease had significantly increased risks of perioperative morbidity (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.44, P = .01) and mortality (AOR: 3.72, P = .01). Patients with metastatic disease were significantly younger (AOR: .99, P < .01) had a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists score (AOR: 1.29, P < .2) and had a higher rate of emergent operation (AOR: 1.40, P < .01). Overall, 10.8% of patients undergoing colectomy for colon cancer have metastatic disease. Postoperative morbidity and mortality are significantly higher than in patients with localized disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Tomatine-containing green tomato extracts inhibit growth of human breast, colon, liver, and stomach cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel; Levin, Carol E; Lee, Seung-Un; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Lee, In-Seon; Byun, Jae-Oke; Kozukue, Nobuyuki

    2009-07-08

    Tomato plants ( Lycopersicon esculentum ) synthesize the glycoalkaloids dehydrotomatine and alpha-tomatine, possibly as a defense against bacteria, fungi, viruses, and insects. Six green and three red tomato extracts were investigated for their ability to induce cell death in human cancer and normal cells using a microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Compared to untreated controls, the high-tomatine green tomato extracts strongly inhibited the following human cancer cell lines: breast (MCF-7), colon (HT-29), gastric (AGS), and hepatoma (liver) (HepG2), as well as normal human liver cells (Chang). There was little inhibition of the cells by the three low-tomatine red tomato extracts. Cell death induced by the pure glycoalkaloids dehydrotomatine and alpha-tomatine isolated from green tomatoes and characterized by HPLC, GC, and GC-MS, as well as their respective aglycones tomatidenol and tomatidine, was also evaluated. alpha-Tomatine was highly effective in inhibiting all of the cell lines. Dehydrotomatine, tomatidenol, and tomatidine had little, if any, effect on cell inhibition. The results show that the susceptibility to destruction varies with the nature of the alkaloid and plant extract and the type of cancer cell. These findings extend related observations on the anticarcinogenic potential of glycoalkaloids and suggest that consumers may benefit by eating not only high-lycopene red tomatoes but also green tomatoes containing glycoalkaloids. Possible mechanisms of the anticarcinogenic and other beneficial effects and the significance of the cited observations for breeding improved tomatoes and for the human diet are discussed.

  17. Effective inhibition of colon cancer cell growth with MgAl-layered double hydroxide (LDH) loaded 5-FU and PI3K/mTOR dual inhibitor BEZ-235 through apoptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Shao, Renfu; Li, Li; Xu, Zhi Ping; Gu, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is the third most common cancer and the third largest cause of cancer-related death. Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the front-line chemotherapeutic agent for colon cancer. However, its response rate is less than 60%, even in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. The side effects of 5-FU also limit its application. Nanoparticles have been used to deliver 5-FU, to increase its effectiveness and reduce side effects. Another common approach for colon cancer treatment is targeted therapy against the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) pathway. A recently-invented inhibitor of this pathway, BEZ-235, has been tested in several clinical trials and has shown effectiveness and low side effects. Thus, it is a very promising drug for colon cancer treatment. The combination of these two drugs, especially nanoparticle-packed 5-FU and BEZ-235, has not been studied. In the present study, we demonstrated that nanoparticles of layered double hydroxide (LDH) loaded with 5-FU were more effective than a free drug at inhibiting colon cancer cell growth, and that a combination treatment with BEZ-235 further increased the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to the treatment of LDH-packed 5-FU (LDH-5-FU). BEZ-235 alone can decrease colon cancer HCT-116 cell viability to 46% of the control, and the addition of LDH-5-FU produced a greater effect, reducing cell survival to 8% of the control. Our data indicate that the combination therapy of nanodelivered 5-FU with a PI3K/Akt inhibitor, BEZ-235, may promise a more effective approach for colon cancer treatment.

  18. GAIP-Interacting Protein, C-Terminus Is Involved in the Induction of Zinc-Finger Protein 143 in Response to Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paek, A Rome; You, Hye Jin

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we reported that the expression of zinc-finger protein 143 (ZNF143) was induced by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) via reactive oxygen species (ROS)- and phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3-kinase)-linked pathways in colon cancer cells. Here, we investigated whether GAIP-interacting protein, C-terminus (GIPC), a binding partner of IGF-1R, is involved in ZNF143 expression through IGF-1 and IGF-1R signaling in colon cancer cells. The knockdown of GIPC in colon cancer cells reduced ZNF143 expression in response to IGF-1. IGF-1 signaling through its receptor, leading to the phosphorylation and activation of the PI3-kinase-Akt pathway and mitogenactivated protein kinases (MAPKs) was unaffected by the knockdown of GIPC, indicating the independence of the GIPC-linked pathway from PI3-kinase- and MAPK-linked signaling in IGF-1-induced ZNF143 expression. In accordance with previous results in breast cancer cells (Choi et al., 2010), the knockdown of GIPC reduced ROS production in response to IGF-1 in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, the knockdown of GIPC reduced the expression of Rad51, which is regulated by ZNF143, in response to IGF-1 in colon cancer cells. Taken together, these data suggest that GIPC is involved in IGF-1 signaling leading to ZNF143 expression through the regulation of ROS production, which may play a role for colon cancer tumorigenesis. PMID:21909943

  19. GAIP-interacting protein, C-terminus is involved in the induction of zinc-finger protein 143 in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Paek, A Rome; You, Hye Jin

    2011-11-01

    Previously, we reported that the expression of zinc-finger protein 143 (ZNF143) was induced by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) via reactive oxygen species (ROS)- and phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3-kinase)-linked pathways in colon cancer cells. Here, we investigated whether GAIP-interacting protein, C-terminus (GIPC), a binding partner of IGF-1R, is involved in ZNF143 expression through IGF-1 and IGF-1R signaling in colon cancer cells. The knockdown of GIPC in colon cancer cells reduced ZNF143 expression in response to IGF-1. IGF-1 signaling through its receptor, leading to the phosphorylation and activation of the PI3-kinase-Akt pathway and mitogenactivated protein kinases (MAPKs) was unaffected by the knockdown of GIPC, indicating the independence of the GIPC-linked pathway from PI3-kinase- and MAPK-linked signaling in IGF-1-induced ZNF143 expression. In accordance with previous results in breast cancer cells (Choi et al., 2010), the knockdown of GIPC reduced ROS production in response to IGF-1 in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, the knockdown of GIPC reduced the expression of Rad51, which is regulated by ZNF143, in response to IGF-1 in colon cancer cells. Taken together, these data suggest that GIPC is involved in IGF-1 signaling leading to ZNF143 expression through the regulation of ROS production, which may play a role for colon cancer tumorigenesis.

  20. Positional isomerism markedly affects the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells by nitric oxide-donating aspirin in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kashfi, Khosrow; Borgo, Simona; Williams, Jennie L; Chen, Jie; Gao, Jianjun; Glekas, Athanasios; Benedini, Francesca; Del Soldato, Piero; Rigas, Basil

    2005-03-01

    NO-donating aspirin (NO-ASA), a novel pharmacological agent currently undergoing clinical testing, consists of ASA to which a nitrate group is covalently linked via a spacer molecule. We synthesized the three positional isomers of NO-ASA with respect to the -CH(2)ONO(2) group (ortho, meta, and para) and examined whether this isomerism affects the biological activity of NO-ASA on HT-29 human colon cancer cells. The ortho- and para-isomers showed similar IC(50) values (1-5 microM) for cell growth inhibition over 72 h, whereas the IC(50) of the meta-isomer was 200 to 500 microM. The ortho- and para-isomers inhibited cell proliferation more potently than the meta-isomer. All three induced apoptosis but the ortho- and para-isomers also induced atypical cells (they maintain their shape but have diminished or absent nuclear material). Treatment for 3 weeks of Min (Apc(min)(/+)) mice, a model of intestinal cancer, with equimolar amounts of meta- and para-NO-ASA decreased the number of tumors in the small intestine by 36 and 59% (P < 0.01), respectively, compared with vehicle-treated controls, thus confirming their in vitro differences in potency. A structure-activity study of the three isomers revealed that substituting an aliphatic for the aromatic spacer or removing the -ONO(2) group profoundly diminished NO-ASA's ability to inhibit cell growth, whereas removal of the acetyl group on the ASA moiety did not affect cell growth inhibition. Thus, positional isomerism is critical for the pharmacological properties of NO-ASA against colon cancer and it should be taken into consideration in rational drug design.

  1. Strawberry-Tree Honey Induces Growth Inhibition of Human Colon Cancer Cells and Increases ROS Generation: A Comparison with Manuka Honey

    PubMed Central

    Afrin, Sadia; Forbes-Hernandez, Tamara Y.; Gasparrini, Massimiliano; Bompadre, Stefano; Quiles, José L.; Sanna, Gavino; Spano, Nadia; Giampieri, Francesca; Battino, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Honey is a natural product known to modulate several biological activities including cancer. The aim of the present study was to examine the phytochemical content and the antioxidant activity of Strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo) honey (STH) and its cytotoxic properties against human colon adenocarcinoma (HCT-116) and metastatic (LoVo) cell lines in comparison with Manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) honey (MH). Several unifloral STH and MH were analyzed for their phenolic, flavonoid, amino acid and protein contents, as well as their radical scavenging activities. STH from the Berchidda area showed the highest amount of phenolic, flavonoid, amino acid and protein content, and antioxidant capacity compared to MH. Both STH and MH induced cytotoxicity and cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HCT-116 and LoVo cells, with less toxicity on non-cancer cells. Compared to MH, STH showed more effect at lower concentrations on HCT-116 and LoVo cells. In addition, both honeys increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In HCT-116 cells, STH and MH induced similar ROS production but in LoVo cells STH induced a higher percentage of ROS compared to MH. Our results indicate that STH and MH can induce cell growth inhibition and ROS generation in colon adenocarcinoma and metastatic cells, which could be due to the presence of phytochemicals with antioxidant properties. These preliminary results are interesting and suggest a potential chemopreventive action which could be useful for further studies in order to develop chemopreventive agents for colon cancer. PMID:28287469

  2. Glycoalkaloids and metabolites inhibit the growth of human colon (HT29) and liver (HepG2) cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kap-Rang; Kozukue, Nobuyuki; Han, Jae-Sook; Park, Joon-Hong; Chang, Eun-Young; Baek, Eun-Jung; Chang, Jong-Sun; Friedman, Mendel

    2004-05-19

    As part of an effort to improve plant-derived foods such as potatoes, eggplants, and tomatoes, the antiproliferative activities against human colon (HT29) and liver (HepG2) cancer cells of a series of structurally related individual compounds were examined using a microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The objective was to assess the roles of the carbohydrate side chain and aglycon part of Solanum glycosides in influencing inhibitory activities of these compounds. Evaluations were carried out with four concentrations each (0.1, 1, 10, and 100 microg/mL) of the the potato trisaccharide glycoalkaloids alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine; the disaccharides beta(1)-chaconine, beta(2)-chaconine, and beta(2)-solanine; the monosaccharide gamma-chaconine and their common aglycon solanidine; the tetrasaccharide potato glycoalkaloid dehydrocommersonine; the potato aglycon demissidine; the tetrasaccharide tomato glycoalkaloid alpha-tomatine, the trisaccharide beta(1)-tomatine, the disaccharide gamma-tomatine, the monosaccharide delta-tomatine, and their common aglycon tomatidine; the eggplant glycoalkaloids solamargine and solasonine and their common aglycon solasodine; and the nonsteroidal alkaloid jervine. All compounds were active in the assay, with the glycoalkaloids being the most active and the hydrolysis products less so. The effectiveness against the liver cells was greater than against the colon cells. Potencies of alpha-tomatine and alpha-chaconine at a concentration of 1 microg/mL against the liver carcinoma cells were higher than those observed with the anticancer drugs doxorubicin and camptothecin. Because alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine, and alpha-tomatine also inhibited normal human liver HeLa (Chang) cells, safety considerations should guide the use of these compounds as preventative or therapeutic treatments against carcinomas.

  3. Microbes, Microbiota and Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Cynthia L.; Garrett, Wendy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Colorectal cancer (CRC) presents a considerable disease burden worldwide. The human colon is also an anatomical location with the largest number of microbes. It is natural therefore to anticipate a role for microbes, particularly bacteria, in colorectal carcinogenesis. The increasing accessibility of microbial meta’omics is fueling a surge in our understanding of the role that microbes and the microbiota play in CRC. In this review, we will discuss recent insights into contributions of the microbiota to CRC and explore conceptual frameworks for evaluating the role of microbes in cancer causation. We also highlight new findings on candidate CRC-potentiating species and current knowledge gaps. Finally, we explore the roles of microbial metabolism as it relates to bile acids, xenobiotics, and diet in the etiology and therapeutics of CRC. PMID:24629338

  4. Annexin II binds progastrin and gastrin-like peptides, and mediates growth factor effects of autocrine and exogenous gastrins on colon cancer and intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, P; Wu, H; Clark, C; Owlia, A

    2007-01-18

    We and others have reported the presence of novel progastrin (PG)/gastrin receptors on normal and cancerous intestinal cells. We had earlier reported the presence of 33-36 kDa gastrin-binding proteins on cellular membranes of colon cancer cells. The goal of the current study was to identify the protein(s) in the 33-36 kDa band, and analyse its functional significance. A carbodiimide crosslinker was used for crosslinking radio-labeled gastrins to membrane proteins from gastrin/PG responsive cell lines. Native membrane proteins, crosslinked to the ligand, were solubulized and enriched by >1000-fold, and analysed by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry. The peptide masses were researched against the NCBInr database using the ProFound search engine. Annexin II (ANX II) was identified, and confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry. As HCT-116 cells express autocrine PG, the in situ association of PG with ANX II was demonstrated in pulldown assays. Direct binding of PG with ANX II was confirmed in an in vitro binding assay. In order to confirm a functional importance of these observations, sense and anti-sense (AS) ANX II RNA-expressing clones of intestinal epithelial (IEC-18) and human colon cancer (HCT-116) cell lines were generated. AS clones demonstrated a significant loss in the growth response to exogenous (IEC-18) and autocrine (HCT-116) PG. We have thus discovered that membrane-associated ANX II binds PG/gastrins, and partially mediates growth factor effects of the peptides.

  5. Protein-bound polysaccharide from Phellinus linteus inhibits tumor growth, invasion, and angiogenesis and alters Wnt/β-catenin in SW480 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyoung-Sub; Li, Ge; Kim, Jong-Seok; Jing, Kaipeng; Kim, Tae-Dong; Kim, Jin-Pyo; Seo, Seung-Bo; Yoo, Jae-Kuk; Park, Hae-Duck; Hwang, Byung-Doo; Lim, Kyu; Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2011-07-22

    Polysaccharides extracted from the Phellinus linteus (PL) mushroom are known to possess anti-tumor effects. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the anti-tumor properties of PL remain to be explored. Experiments were carried out to unravel the anticancer effects of PL. The anti-cancer effects of PL were examined in SW480 colon cancer cells by evaluating cell proliferation, invasion and matrix metallo-proteinase (MMP) activity. The anti-angiogenic effects of PL were examined by assessing human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation and capillary tube formation. The in vivo effect of PL was evaluated in an athymic nude mouse SW480 tumor engraft model. PL (125-1000 μg/mL) significantly inhibited cell proliferation and decreased β-catenin expression in SW480 cells. Expression of cyclin D1, one of the downstream-regulated genes of β-catenin, and T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancer binding factor (TCF/LEF) transcription activity were also significantly reduced by PL treatment. PL inhibited in vitro invasion and motility as well as the activity of MMP-9. In addition, PL treatment inhibited HUVEC proliferation and capillary tube formation. Tumor growth of SW480 cells implanted into nude mice was significantly decreased as a consequence of PL treatment, and tumor tissues from treated animals showed an increase in the apoptotic index and a decrease in β-catenin expression. Moreover, the proliferation index and microvessel density were significantly decreased. These data suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth, invasion, and angiogenesis through the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in certain colon cancer cells.

  6. Protein-bound polysaccharide from Phellinus linteus inhibits tumor growth, invasion, and angiogenesis and alters Wnt/β-catenin in SW480 human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polysaccharides extracted from the Phellinus linteus (PL) mushroom are known to possess anti-tumor effects. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the anti-tumor properties of PL remain to be explored. Experiments were carried out to unravel the anticancer effects of PL. Methods The anti-cancer effects of PL were examined in SW480 colon cancer cells by evaluating cell proliferation, invasion and matrix metallo-proteinase (MMP) activity. The anti-angiogenic effects of PL were examined by assessing human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation and capillary tube formation. The in vivo effect of PL was evaluated in an athymic nude mouse SW480 tumor engraft model. Results PL (125-1000 μg/mL) significantly inhibited cell proliferation and decreased β-catenin expression in SW480 cells. Expression of cyclin D1, one of the downstream-regulated genes of β-catenin, and T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancer binding factor (TCF/LEF) transcription activity were also significantly reduced by PL treatment. PL inhibited in vitro invasion and motility as well as the activity of MMP-9. In addition, PL treatment inhibited HUVEC proliferation and capillary tube formation. Tumor growth of SW480 cells implanted into nude mice was significantly decreased as a consequence of PL treatment, and tumor tissues from treated animals showed an increase in the apoptotic index and a decrease in β-catenin expression. Moreover, the proliferation index and microvessel density were significantly decreased. Conclusions These data suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth, invasion, and angiogenesis through the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in certain colon cancer cells. PMID:21781302

  7. Colon Cancer Risk Assessment - Gauss Program

    Cancer.gov

    An executable file (in GAUSS) that projects absolute colon cancer risk (with confidence intervals) according to NCI’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (CCRAT) algorithm. GAUSS is not needed to run the program.

  8. Amphiregulin acts as an autocrine growth factor in two human polarizing colon cancer lines that exhibit domain selective EGF receptor mitogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Damstrup, L; Kuwada, S K; Dempsey, P J; Brown, C L; Hawkey, C J; Poulsen, H S; Wiley, H S; Coffey, R J

    1999-01-01

    Colonic enterocytes, like many epithelial cells in vivo, are polarized with functionally distinct apical and basolateral membrane domains. The aims of this study were to characterize the endogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like ligands expressed in two polarizing colon cancer cell lines, HCA-7 Colony 29 (HCA-7) and Caco-2, and to examine the effects of cell polarity on EGF receptor-mediated mitogenesis. HCA-7 and Caco-2 cells were grown on plastic, or as a polarized monolayer on Transwell filters. Cell proliferation was measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation and EGF receptor (EGFR) binding was assessed by Scatchard analysis. EGFR ligand expression was determined by Northern blot analysis, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, metabolic labelling and confocal microscopy. We found that amphiregulin (AR) was the most abundant EGFR ligand expressed in HCA-7 and Caco-2 cells. AR was localized to the basolateral surface and detected in basolateral-conditioned medium. Basolateral administration of neutralizing AR antibodies significantly reduced basal DNA replication. A single class of high-affinity EGFRs was detected in the basolateral compartment, whereas the apical compartment of polarized cells, and cells cultured on plastic, displayed two classes of receptor affinity. Basolateral administration of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α) or an EGFR neutralizing antibody also resulted in a dose-dependent stimulation or attenuation, respectively, of DNA replication. However, no mitogenic response was observed when these agents were added to the apical compartment or to confluent cells cultured on plastic. We conclude that amphiregulin acts as an autocrine growth factor in HCA-7 and Caco-2 cells, and EGFR ligand-induced proliferation is influenced by cellular polarity. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10362109

  9. Metformin: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Recurrent Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Yu, Yingjie; Vasudevan, Anita; Farhana, Lulu; Rajendra, Sindhu G.; Levi, Edi; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metformin, a biguanide class of anti-diabetic drugs, possesses anti-cancer properties. However, most of the studies to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of metformin have been on primary cancer. No information is available whether metformin could be effectively used for recurrent cancer, specifically colorectal cancer (CRC) that affects up to 50% of patients treated by conventional chemotherapies. Although the reasons for recurrence are not fully understood, it is thought to be due to re-emergence of chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem/stem-like cells (CSCs/CSLCs). Therefore, development of non-toxic treatment strategies targeting CSCs would be of significant therapeutic benefit. In the current investigation, we have examined the effectiveness of metformin, in combination with 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin (FuOx), the mainstay of colon cancer therapeutics, on survival of chemo-resistant colon cancer cells that are highly enriched in CSCs/CSLCs. Our data show that metformin acts synergistically with FuOx to (a) induce cell death in chemo resistant (CR) HT-29 and HCT-116 colon cancer cells, (b) inhibit colonospheres formation and (c) enhance colonospheres disintegration. In vitro cell culture studies have further demonstrated that the combinatorial treatment inhibits migration of CR colon cancer cells. These changes were associated with increased miRNA 145 and reduction in miRNA 21. Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was also down-regulated indicating its pivotal role in regulating the growth of CR colon cancer cells. Data from SCID mice xenograft model of CR HCT-116 and CR HT-29 cells show that the combination of metformin and FuOX is highly effective in inhibiting the growth of colon tumors as evidenced by ∼50% inhibition in growth following 5 weeks of combination treatment, when compared with the vehicle treated controls. Our current data suggest that metformin together with conventional chemotherapy could be an effective treatment

  10. Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Phosphorylation on Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells Leads to Treatment of Orthotopic Human Colon Cancer in Nude Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takamitsu; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Nakamura, Toru; Kim, Jang-Seong; Tsan, Rachel Z; Kuwai, Toshio; Langley, Robert R; Fan, Dominic; Kim, Sun-Jin; Fidler, Isaiah J

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine whether the dual inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) signaling pathways in tumor-associated endothelial cells can inhibit the progressive growth of human colon carcinoma in the cecum of nude mice. SW620CE2 human colon cancer cells growing in culture and orthotopically in the cecum of nude mice expressed a high level of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) but were negative for EGFR, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and VEGFR. Double immunofluorescence staining revealed that tumor-associated endothelial cells expressed EGFR, VEGFR2, phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR), and phosphorylated VEGFR (pVEGFR). Treatment of mice with either 7H-pyrrolo [2,3-d]-pyrimidine lead scaffold (AEE788; an inhibitor of EGFR and VEGFR tyrosine kinase) or CPT-11 as single agents significantly inhibited the growth of cecal tumors (P < .01); this decrease was even more pronounced with AEE788 combined with CPT-11 (P < .001). AEE788 alone or combined with CPT-11 also inhibited the expression of pEGFR and pVEGFR on tumor-associated endothelial cells, significantly decreased vascularization and tumor cell proliferation, and increased the level of apoptosis in both tumor-associated endothelial cells and tumor cells. These data demonstrate that targeting EGFR and VEGFR signaling on tumor-associated endothelial cells provides a viable approach for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:18084614

  11. Colon and Rectal Cancer Survival by Tumor Location and Microsatellite Instability: The Colon Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Amanda I.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Baron, John A.; Win, Aung Ko; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancers in the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum are frequently studied together; however, there are biological differences in cancers across these sites, particularly in the prevalence of microsatellite instability. Objective We assessed differences in survival by colon or rectal cancer site, considering the contribution of microsatellite instability to such differences. Design This is a population-based prospective cohort study for cancer survival. Settings This study was conducted within the Colon Cancer Family Registry, an international consortium. Participants were identified from population-based cancer registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Patients Information on tumor site, microsatellite instability, and survival after diagnosis was available for 3284 men and women diagnosed with incident invasive colon or rectal cancer between 1997–2002, with ages at diagnosis ranging from 18–74. Main Outcome Measures Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios for the association between all-cause mortality and tumor location, overall and by microsatellite instability status. Results Distal colon (hazard ratio=0.59, 95% confidence interval: 0.49–0.71) and rectal cancers (hazard ratio=0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.57–0.81) were associated with lower mortality than proximal colon cancer overall. Compared specifically to cases with proximal colon cancer exhibiting no/low microsatellite instability, cases with distal colon and rectal cancers experienced lower mortality, regardless of microsatellite instability status; cases with proximal colon cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability had the lowest mortality. Limitations Study limitations include the absence of stage at diagnosis and cause of death information for all but a subset of study participants. Some case groups defined jointly by tumor site and microsatellite instability status are subject to small numbers. Conclusion Proximal colon cancer survival

  12. Colon and rectal cancer survival by tumor location and microsatellite instability: the Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Amanda I; Lindor, Noralane M; Jenkins, Mark A; Baron, John A; Win, Aung Ko; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert; Newcomb, Polly A

    2013-08-01

    Cancers in the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum are frequently studied together; however, there are biological differences in cancers across these sites, particularly in the prevalence of microsatellite instability. We assessed the differences in survival by colon or rectal cancer site, considering the contribution of microsatellite instability to such differences. This is a population-based prospective cohort study for cancer survival. This study was conducted within the Colon Cancer Family Registry, an international consortium. Participants were identified from population-based cancer registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Information on tumor site, microsatellite instability, and survival after diagnosis was available for 3284 men and women diagnosed with incident invasive colon or rectal cancer between 1997 and 2002, with ages at diagnosis ranging from 18 to 74. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios for the association between all-cause mortality and tumor location, overall and by microsatellite instability status. Distal colon (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.49-0.71) and rectal cancers (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.57-0.81) were associated with lower mortality than proximal colon cancer overall. Compared specifically with patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting no/low microsatellite instability, patients with distal colon and rectal cancers experienced lower mortality, regardless of microsatellite instability status; patients with proximal colon cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability had the lowest mortality. Study limitations include the absence of stage at diagnosis and cause-of-death information for all but a subset of study participants. Some patient groups defined jointly by tumor site and microsatellite instability status are subject to small numbers. Proximal colon cancer survival differs from survival for distal colon and rectal cancer in a manner apparently dependent on microsatellite instability status. These

  13. Right colon cancer: Left behind.

    PubMed

    Gervaz, P; Usel, M; Rapiti, E; Chappuis, P; Neyroud-Kaspar, I; Bouchardy, C

    2016-09-01

    Prognosis of colon cancer (CC) has steadily improved during the past three decades. This trend, however, may vary according to proximal (right) or distal (left) tumor location. We studied if improvement in survival was greater for left than for right CC. We included all CC recorded at the Geneva population-based registry between 1980 and 2006. We compared patients, tumor and treatment characteristics between left and right CC by logistic regression and compared CC specific survival by Cox models taking into account putative confounders. We also compared changes in survival between CC location in early and late years of observation. Among the 3396 CC patients, 1334 (39%) had right-sided and 2062 (61%) left-sided tumors. In the early 1980s, 5-year specific survival was identical for right and left CCs (49% vs. 48%). During the study period, a dramatic improvement in survival was observed for patients with left-sided cancers (Hazard ratio [HR]: 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.29-0.62, p < 0.001) but not for right CC patients (HR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.50-1.14, p = 0.69). As a consequence, patients with distal CC have a better outcome than patients with proximal CC (HR for left vs. right CC: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.72-0.90, p < 0.001). Our data indicate that, contrary to left CC, survival of patients with right CC did not improve since 1980. Of all colon cancer patients, those with right-sided lesions have by far the worse prognosis. Change of strategic management in this subgroup is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sclareol induces apoptosis in human HCT116 colon cancer cells in vitro and suppression of HCT116 tumor growth in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dimas, Konstantinos; Hatziantoniou, Sophia; Tseleni, Sophia; Khan, Humaira; Georgopoulos, Aristidis; Alevizopoulos, Konstantinos; Wyche, James H; Pantazis, Panayotis; Demetzos, Costas

    2007-04-01

    Labd-14-ene-8, 13-diol (sclareol) is a labdane-type diterpene, which has demonstrated significant cytotoxic activity against human leukemic cell lines, but its effect on solid tumor-derived cells is uknown. Here, we demonstrate that addition of sclareol to cultures of human colon cancer HCT116 cells results in inhibition of DNA synthesis, arrest of cells at the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, activation of caspases-8, -9, PARP degradation, and DNA fragmentation, events characteristic of induction of apoptosis. Intraperitoneal (ip) administration of sclareol alone, at the maximum tolerated dose, was unable to induce suppression of growth of HCT116 tumors established as xenografts in immunodeficient SCID mice. In contrast, ip administration of liposome-encapsulated sclareol, following a specific schedule, induced suppression of tumor growth by arresting tumor cell proliferation as assessed by detecting the presence of the cell proliferation-associated nuclear protein, Ki67, in thin tumor sections. These findings suggest that sclareol incorporated into liposomes may possess chemotherapeutic potential for the treatment of colorectal and other types of human cancer.

  15. Idelalisib induces PUMA-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shida; Zhu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Ning; Yao, Zhicheng

    2017-01-24

    Idelalisib, a PI3K inhibitor, specifically targeting p110δ, has been approved for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. However, the mechanisms of action of idelalisib in colon cancer cells are not well understood. We investigated how idelalisib suppresses colon cancer cells growth and potentiates effects of other chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, we found that idelalisib treatment induces PUMA in colon cancer cells irrespective of p53 status through the p65 pathway following AKT inhibition and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activation. PUMA is necessary for idelalisib-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Idelalisib also synergized with 5-FU or regorafenib to induce marked apoptosis via PUMA in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, PUMA deficiency suppressed apoptosis and antitumor effect of idelalisib in xenograft model. These results demonstrate a critical role of PUMA in mediating the anticancer effects of idelalisib in colon cancer cells and suggest that PUMA induction can be used as an indicator of idelalisib sensitivity, and also have important implications for it clinical applications.

  16. Idelalisib induces PUMA-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shida; Zhu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Ning; Yao, Zhicheng

    2017-01-01

    Idelalisib, a PI3K inhibitor, specifically targeting p110δ, has been approved for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. However, the mechanisms of action of idelalisib in colon cancer cells are not well understood. We investigated how idelalisib suppresses colon cancer cells growth and potentiates effects of other chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, we found that idelalisib treatment induces PUMA in colon cancer cells irrespective of p53 status through the p65 pathway following AKT inhibition and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activation. PUMA is necessary for idelalisib-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Idelalisib also synergized with 5-FU or regorafenib to induce marked apoptosis via PUMA in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, PUMA deficiency suppressed apoptosis and antitumor effect of idelalisib in xenograft model. These results demonstrate a critical role of PUMA in mediating the anticancer effects of idelalisib in colon cancer cells and suggest that PUMA induction can be used as an indicator of idelalisib sensitivity, and also have important implications for it clinical applications. PMID:28008149

  17. Colon cancer stem cells: implications in carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Matthew A.; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell model was described for hematologic malignancies in 1997 and since then evidence has emerged to support it for many solid tumors as well, including colon cancer. This model proposes that certain cells within the tumor mass are pluripotent and capable of self-renewal and have an enhanced ability to initiate distant metastasis. The cancer stem cell model has important implications for cancer treatment, since most current therapies target actively proliferating cells and may not be effective against the cancer stem cells that are responsible for recurrence. In recent years great progress has been made in identifying markers of both normal and malignant colon stem cells. Proteins proposed as colon cancer stem cell markers include CD133, CD44, CD166, ALDH1A1, Lgr5, and several others. In this review we consider the evidence for these proteins as colon cancer stem cell markers and as prognostic indicators of colon cancer survival. Additionally, we discuss potential functions of these proteins and the implications this may have for development of therapies that target colon cancer stem cells. PMID:21196254

  18. PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase is a target of the fucoidan from brown alga Fucus evanescens in the prevention of EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation and colon cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Ermakova, Svetlana P.; Xiao, JuanJuan; Lu, Tao; Xue, PeiPei; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N.; Xiong, Hua; Shao, Chen; Yan, Wei; Duan, Qiuhong; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The fucoidan with high anticancer activity was isolated from brown alga Fucus evanescens. The compound effectively prevented EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation through inhibition of TOPK/ERK1/2/MSK 1 signaling axis. In vitro studies showed that the fucoidan attenuated mitogen-activated protein kinases downstream signaling in a colon cancer cells with different expression level of TOPK, resulting in growth inhibition. The fucoidan exerts its effects by directly interacting with TOPK kinase in vitro and ex vivo and inhibits its kinase activity. In xenograft animal model, oral administration of the fucoidan suppressed HCT 116 colon tumor growth. The phosphorylation of TOPK downstream signaling molecules in tumor tissues was also inhibited by the fucoidan. Taken together, our findings support the cancer preventive efficacy of the fucoidan through its targeting of TOPK for the prevention of neoplastic cell transformation and progression of colon carcinomas in vitro and ex vivo. PMID:26936995

  19. PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase is a target of the fucoidan from brown alga Fucus evanescens in the prevention of EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation and colon cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Vishchuk, Olesia S; Sun, Huimin; Wang, Zhe; Ermakova, Svetlana P; Xiao, JuanJuan; Lu, Tao; Xue, PeiPei; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N; Xiong, Hua; Shao, Chen; Yan, Wei; Duan, Qiuhong; Zhu, Feng

    2016-04-05

    The fucoidan with high anticancer activity was isolated from brown alga Fucus evanescens. The compound effectively prevented EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation through inhibition of TOPK/ERK1/2/MSK 1 signaling axis. In vitro studies showed that the fucoidan attenuated mitogen-activated protein kinases downstream signaling in a colon cancer cells with different expression level of TOPK, resulting in growth inhibition. The fucoidan exerts its effects by directly interacting with TOPK kinase in vitro and ex vivo and inhibits its kinase activity. In xenograft animal model, oral administration of the fucoidan suppressed HCT 116 colon tumor growth. The phosphorylation of TOPK downstream signaling molecules in tumor tissues was also inhibited by the fucoidan. Taken together, our findings support the cancer preventive efficacy of the fucoidan through its targeting of TOPK for the prevention of neoplastic cell transformation and progression of colon carcinomas in vitro and ex vivo.

  20. Shed syndecan-2 enhances tumorigenic activities of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sojoong; Choi, Youngsil; Jun, Eunsung; Kim, In-San; Kim, Seong-Eun; Jung, Sung-Ae; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Because earlier studies showed the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan, syndecan-2, sheds from colon cancer cells in culture, the functional roles of shed syndecan-2 were assessed. A non-cleavable mutant of syndecan-2 in which the Asn148-Leu149 residues were replaced with Asn148-Ile149, had decreased shedding, less cancer-associated activities of syndecan-2 in vitro, and less syndecan-2-mediated metastasis of mouse melanoma cells in vivo, suggesting the importance of shedding on syndecan-2-mediated pro-tumorigenic functions. Indeed, shed syndecan-2 from cancer-conditioned media and recombinant shed syndecan-2 enhanced cancer-associated activities, and depletion of shed syndecan-2 abolished these effects. Similarly, shed syndecan-2 was detected from sera of patients from advanced carcinoma (625.9 ng/ml) and promoted cancer-associated activities. Furthermore, a series of syndecan-2 deletion mutants showed that the tumorigenic activity of shed syndecan-2 resided in the C-terminus of the extracellular domain and a shed syndecan-2 synthetic peptide (16 residues) was sufficient to establish subcutaneous primary growth of HT29 colon cancer cells, pulmonary metastases (B16F10 cells), and primary intrasplenic tumor growth and liver metastases (4T1 cells). Taken together, these results demonstrate that shed syndecan-2 directly enhances colon cancer progression and may be a promising therapeutic target for controlling colon cancer development. PMID:25686828

  1. Colon Cancer Metastatic to the Biliary Tree.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Alexandra T; Clayton, Steven B; Markow, Michael; Mamel, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma is commonly found in the lung, liver, or peritoneum. Common bile duct (CBD) tumors related to adenomas from familial adenomatous polyposis metastasizing from outside of the gastrointestinal tract have been reported. We report a case of biliary colic due to metastatic colon adenocarcinoma to the CBD. Obstructive jaundice with signs of acalculous cholecystitis on imaging in a patient with a history of colon cancer should raise suspicion for metastasis to CBD.

  2. Valproic acid enhances bosutinib cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mologni, Luca; Cleris, Loredana; Magistroni, Vera; Piazza, Rocco; Boschelli, Frank; Formelli, Franca; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2009-04-15

    Unbalanced histone deacetylase (HDAC) hyperactivity is a common feature of tumor cells. Inhibition of HDAC activity is often associated with cancer cell growth impairment and death. Valproic acid (VPA) is a HDAC inhibitor used for the treatment of epilepsy. It has recently been recognized as a promising anticancer drug. We investigated the effects of VPA on growth and survival of colon cancer cells. VPA caused growth inhibition and programmed cell death that correlated with histone hyperacetylation. VPA modulated the expression of various factors involved in cell cycle control and apoptosis and induced caspase activation. Interestingly, VPA induced downregulation of c-Src and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of the c-Src inhibitor bosutinib, both in vitro and in vivo. The combination of sublethal doses of VPA and bosutinib led to massive apoptosis of colon cancer cells, irrespective of their genetic background. These results suggest that VPA may be employed as a positive modulator of bosutinib antitumor activity in colorectal cancer.

  3. Redefining Adjuvant Therapy for Colon Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with resected stage III colon cancer are being randomly assigned to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy for either 3 or 6 months and to take either a pill called celecoxib or a matching placebo pill for 3 years.

  4. Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction (TRF) Suppresses the Growth of Human Colon Cancer Xenografts in Balb/C Nude Mice by the Wnt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Shu; Zhang, Shu-Jing; Li, Qian; Liu, Ying-Hua; He, Ning; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Peng-Hui; Li, Min; Guan, Tong; Liu, Jia-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Tocotrienols have been shown many biologic functions such as antioxidant, anti-cancer, maintaining fertility and regulating the immune system and so on. In this study, after feeding with tocotrienol-rich fraction from palm oil (TRF) for 2 weeks, Balb/c nude mice were inoculated human colon SW620 cancer cell and then continued to feed TRF for 4 weeks. At termination of experiments, xenografts were removed and determined the expression of Wnt-pathways related protein by immunohistochemistry or western blotting. Liver tissues were homogenated for determining the levels of antioxidative enzymes activity or malondialdehyde (MDA). The results showed that TRF significantly inhibited the growth of xenografts in nude mice. TRF also affected the activity of antioxidative enzymes in the liver tissue of mice. These changes were partly contributed to activation of wnt pathways or affecting their related protein. Thus, these finding suggested that the potent anticancer effect of TRF is associated with the regulation of Wnt signal pathways. PMID:25807493

  5. Urotensin-II receptor is over-expressed in colon cancer cell lines and in colon carcinoma in humans.

    PubMed

    Federico, Alessandro; Zappavigna, Silvia; Romano, Marco; Grieco, Paolo; Luce, Amalia; Marra, Monica; Gravina, Antonietta Gerarda; Stiuso, Paola; D'Armiento, Francesco Paolo; Vitale, Giovanni; Tuccillo, Concetta; Novellino, Ettore; Loguercio, Carmela; Caraglia, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Urotensin (U)-II receptor (UTR) has been previously reported to be over-expressed in a number of tumours. Whether UTR-related pathway plays a role in colon carcinogenesis is unknown. We evaluated UTR protein and mRNA expression in human epithelial colon cancer cell lines and in normal colon tissue, adenomatous polyps and colon cancer. U-II protein expression was assessed in cancer cell lines. Moreover, we evaluated the effects of U-II(4-11) (an UTR agonist), antagonists and knockdown of UTR protein expression through a specific shRNA, on proliferation, invasion and motility of human colon cancer cells. Cancer cell lines expressed U-II protein and UTR protein and mRNA. By immunohistochemistry, UTR was expressed in 5-30% of epithelial cells in 45 normal controls, in 30-48% in 21 adenomatous polyps and in 65-90% in 48 colon adenocarcinomas. UTR mRNA expression was increased by threefold in adenomatous polyps and eightfold in colon cancer, compared with normal colon. U-II(4-11) induced a 20-40% increase in cell growth while the blockade of the receptor with specific antagonists caused growth inhibition of 20-40%. Moreover, the knock down of UTR with a shRNA or the inhibition of UTR with the antagonist urantide induced an approximately 50% inhibition of both motility and invasion. UTR appears to be involved in the regulation of colon cancer cell invasion and motility. These data suggest that UTR-related pathway may play a role in colon carcinogenesis and that UTR may function as a target for therapeutic intervention in colon cancer. © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  6. Comparison of basic fibroblast growth factor levels in clone A human colon cancer cells in vitro with levels in xenografted tumours.

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, L. P.; Karr, S. M.; Harris, B. Z.; Michelson, S. G.; Leith, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    We measured levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) in human colon cancer cells (clone A) in vitro and in xenografted solid tumours using a commercial enzyme-linked immunoassay. In Vitro, levels in unfed plateau phase or exponentially growing cells were low, averaging respectively about 2 and 8 pg 10(-6) cells. However, when solid tumours (average volumes 787 mm3) were cut into halves and either enzymatically disaggregated to obtain a cellular fraction or extracted in toto, levels were much higher. In the cellular fraction, values averaged 110 pg 10(-6) cells, while in whole tumour extracts, average values were 24 pg mg-1 tumour tissue. These results indicate that growth factor levels in solid neoplasms may differ markedly from those predicted from in vitro measurements. We hypothesise that the apparent increase in FGF-2 levels in vivo results primarily from the presence of a significant fraction of host cells (in particular, macrophages, which may contain high levels of FGF-2) within xenografted clone A neoplasms. PMID:7599036

  7. Colon Cancer Worry in Appalachia.

    PubMed

    Attarabeen, Omar F; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Larkin, Kevin T; Kelly, Kimberly M

    2017-07-06

    Appalachia has a higher incidence of and mortality from colon cancer (CC) than other regions of the United States; thus, it is important to know the potential impact of elevated risk on cancer worry. Guided by the Self-regulation model, we investigated the association of demographic, cultural (e.g., fatalism, religious commitment), and psychological factors (e.g., perceived risk, general mood) with CC worry among a sample of Appalachian women. A mixed method design was utilized. Appalachian women completed surveys in the quantitative section (n = 134) and semi-structured interviews in the qualitative section (n = 24). Logistic regression was employed to calculate odds ratios (OR) for quantitative data, and immersion/crystallization was utilized to analyze qualitative data. In the quantitative section, 45% of the participants expressed some degree of CC worry. CC worry was associated with higher than high school education (OR 3.63), absolute perceived risk for CC (OR 5.82), high anxiety (OR 4.68), and awareness of easy access (OR 3.98) or difficult access (OR 3.18) to health care specialists as compared to not being aware of the access. there was no association between CC worry and adherence to CC screening guidelines. The qualitative section revealed fear, disengagement, depression, shock, and worry. Additionally, embarrassment, discomfort, and worry were reported with regard to CC screening. Fears included having to wear a colostomy bag and being a burden on family. CC worry was common in Appalachians and associated with higher perceptions of risk for CC and general anxiety, but not with adherence to screening guidelines. The mixed method design allowed for enhanced understanding of CC-related feelings, especially CC worry, including social/contextual fears.

  8. Nuclear Matrix Proteins in Human Colon Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesee, Susan K.; Meneghini, Marc D.; Szaro, Robert P.; Wu, Ying-Jye

    1994-03-01

    The nuclear matrix is the nonchromatin scaffolding of the nucleus. This structure confers nuclear shape, organizes chromatin, and appears to contain important regulatory proteins. Tissue specific nuclear matrix proteins have been found in the rat, mouse, and human. In this study we compared high-resolution two-dimensional gel electropherograms of nuclear matrix protein patterns found in human colon tumors with those from normal colon epithelia. Tumors were obtained from 18 patients undergoing partial colectomy for adenocarcinoma of the colon and compared with tissue from 10 normal colons. We have identified at least six proteins which were present in 18 of 18 colon tumors and 0 of 10 normal tissues, as well as four proteins present in 0 of 18 tumors and in 10 of 10 normal tissues. These data, which corroborate similar findings of cancer-specific nuclear matrix proteins in prostate and breast, suggest that nuclear matrix proteins may serve as important markers for at least some types of cancer.

  9. The ellagic acid derivative 4,4'-di-O-methylellagic acid efficiently inhibits colon cancer cell growth through a mechanism involving WNT16.

    PubMed

    Ramírez de Molina, Ana; Vargas, Teodoro; Molina, Susana; Sánchez, Jenifer; Martínez-Romero, Jorge; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Sánchez-Martínez, Ruth; Gómez de Cedrón, Marta; Dávalos, Alberto; Calani, Luca; Del Rio, Daniele; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Espín, Juan Carlos; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Reglero, Guillermo

    2015-05-01

    Ellagic acid (EA) and some derivatives have been reported to inhibit cancer cell proliferation, induce cell cycle arrest, and modulate some important cellular processes related to cancer. This study aimed to identify possible structure-activity relationships of EA and some in vivo derivatives in their antiproliferative effect on both human colon cancer and normal cells, and to compare this activity with that of other polyphenols. Our results showed that 4,4'-di-O-methylellagic acid (4,4'-DiOMEA) was the most effective compound in the inhibition of colon cancer cell proliferation. 4,4'-DiOMEA was 13-fold more effective than other compounds of the same family. In addition, 4,4'-DiOMEA was very active against colon cancer cells resistant to the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluoracil, whereas no effect was observed in nonmalignant colon cells. Moreover, no correlation between antiproliferative and antioxidant activities was found, further supporting that structure differences might result in dissimilar molecular targets involved in their differential effects. Finally, microarray analysis revealed that 4,4'-DiOMEA modulated Wnt signaling, which might be involved in the potential antitumor action of this compound. Our results suggest that structural-activity differences between EA and 4,4'-DiOMEA might constitute the basis for a new strategy in anticancer drug discovery based on these chemical modifications.

  10. Preparation of carotenoid extracts and nanoemulsions from Lycium barbarum L. and their effects on growth of HT-29 colon cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, H. J.; Huang, R. F.; Kao, T. H.; Inbaraj, B. S.; Chen, B. H.

    2017-03-01

    Lycium barbarum L., a traditional Chinese herb widely used in Asian countries, has been demonstrated to be protective against chronic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. The objectives of this study were to determine the carotenoid content in L. barbarum by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, followed by preparation of a carotenoid nanoemulsion to evaluate the mechanism of inhibition on HT-29 colon cancer cells. The highest extraction yield of carotenoids was attained by employing a solvent system of hexane-ethanol-acetone (1:1:1, v/v/v). Nine carotenoids, including neoxanthin (4.47 μg g-1), all-trans-zeaxanthin and its cis-isomers (1666.3 μg g-1), all-trans-β-cryptoxanthin (51.69 μg g-1), all-trans-β-carotene and its cis-isomers (20.11 μg g-1), were separated within 45 min and quantified using a YMC C30 column and a gradient mobile phase of methanol-water (9:1, v/v) (A) and methylene chloride (B). A highly stable carotenoid nanoemulsion composed of CapryolTM 90, Transcutol®HP, Tween 80 and deionized water was prepared with a mean particle size of 15.1 nm. Characterization of zeaxanthin standard, blank nanoemulsion, carotenoid extract and carotenoid nanoemulsion by differential scanning calorimetry curves and Fourier transform infrared spectra revealed a good dispersion of zeaxanthin-dominated carotenoid extract with no significant chemical change after incorporation into nanoemulsion. The in vitro release kinetic study showed a higher release profile at pH 5.2 than at physiological pH 7.4, suggesting a rapid release of carotenoids in the acidic environment (pH 4.5-6.5) characteristic of tumors. Both the carotenoid nanoemulsion and the extract were effective at inhibiting growth of HT-29 colon cancer cells, with an IC50 of 4.5 and 4.9 μg ml-1, respectively. Also, both treatments could up-regulate p53 and p21 expression and down-regulate CDK2, CDK1, cyclin A and cyclin B expression and arrest the cell cycle at G2/M. The

  11. Preparation of carotenoid extracts and nanoemulsions from Lycium barbarum L. and their effects on growth of HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H J; Huang, R F; Kao, T H; Inbaraj, B S; Chen, B H

    2017-03-07

    Lycium barbarum L., a traditional Chinese herb widely used in Asian countries, has been demonstrated to be protective against chronic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. The objectives of this study were to determine the carotenoid content in L. barbarum by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, followed by preparation of a carotenoid nanoemulsion to evaluate the mechanism of inhibition on HT-29 colon cancer cells. The highest extraction yield of carotenoids was attained by employing a solvent system of hexane-ethanol-acetone (1:1:1, v/v/v). Nine carotenoids, including neoxanthin (4.47 μg g(-1)), all-trans-zeaxanthin and its cis-isomers (1666.3 μg g(-1)), all-trans-β-cryptoxanthin (51.69 μg g(-1)), all-trans-β-carotene and its cis-isomers (20.11 μg g(-1)), were separated within 45 min and quantified using a YMC C30 column and a gradient mobile phase of methanol-water (9:1, v/v) (A) and methylene chloride (B). A highly stable carotenoid nanoemulsion composed of Capryol(TM) 90, Transcutol(®)HP, Tween 80 and deionized water was prepared with a mean particle size of 15.1 nm. Characterization of zeaxanthin standard, blank nanoemulsion, carotenoid extract and carotenoid nanoemulsion by differential scanning calorimetry curves and Fourier transform infrared spectra revealed a good dispersion of zeaxanthin-dominated carotenoid extract with no significant chemical change after incorporation into nanoemulsion. The in vitro release kinetic study showed a higher release profile at pH 5.2 than at physiological pH 7.4, suggesting a rapid release of carotenoids in the acidic environment (pH 4.5-6.5) characteristic of tumors. Both the carotenoid nanoemulsion and the extract were effective at inhibiting growth of HT-29 colon cancer cells, with an IC50 of 4.5 and 4.9 μg ml(-1), respectively. Also, both treatments could up-regulate p53 and p21 expression and down-regulate CDK2, CDK1, cyclin A and cyclin B expression and arrest the cell

  12. Benzylidene derivatives of andrographolide inhibit growth of breast and colon cancer cells in vitro by inducing G1 arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jada, S R; Matthews, C; Saad, M S; Hamzah, A S; Lajis, N H; Stevens, M F G; Stanslas, J

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Andrographolide, the major phytoconstituent of Andrographis paniculata, was previously shown by us to have activity against breast cancer. This led to synthesis of new andrographolide analogues to find compounds with better activity than the parent compound. Selected benzylidene derivatives were investigated for their mechanisms of action by studying their effects on the cell cycle progression and cell death. Experimental approach: Microculture tetrazolium, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and sulphorhodamine B (SRB) assays were utilized in assessing the in vitro growth inhibition and cytotoxicity of compounds. Flow cytometry was used to analyse the cell cycle distribution of control and treated cells. CDK1 and CDK4 levels were determined by western blotting. Apoptotic cell death was assessed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Key results: Compounds, in nanomolar to micromolar concentrations, exhibited growth inhibition and cytotoxicity in MCF-7 (breast) and HCT-116 (colon) cancer cells. In the NCI screen, 3,19-(2-bromobenzylidene) andrographolide (SRJ09) and 3,19-(3-chloro-4-fluorobenzylidene) andrographolide (SRJ23) showed greater cytotoxic potency and selectivity than andrographolide. SRJ09 and SRJ23 induced G1 arrest and apoptosis in MCF-7 and HCT-116 cells, respectively. SRJ09 downregulated CDK4 but not CDK1 level in MCF-7 cells. Apoptosis induced by SRJ09 and SRJ23 in HCT-116 cells was confirmed by annexin V-FITC/PI flow cytometry analysis. Conclusion and implications: The new benzylidene derivatives of andrographolide are potential anticancer agents. SRJ09 emerged as the lead compound in this study, exhibiting anticancer activity by downregulating CDK4 to promote a G1 phase cell cycle arrest, coupled with induction of apoptosis. PMID:18806812

  13. Benzylidene derivatives of andrographolide inhibit growth of breast and colon cancer cells in vitro by inducing G(1) arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jada, S R; Matthews, C; Saad, M S; Hamzah, A S; Lajis, N H; Stevens, M F G; Stanslas, J

    2008-11-01

    Andrographolide, the major phytoconstituent of Andrographis paniculata, was previously shown by us to have activity against breast cancer. This led to synthesis of new andrographolide analogues to find compounds with better activity than the parent compound. Selected benzylidene derivatives were investigated for their mechanisms of action by studying their effects on the cell cycle progression and cell death. Microculture tetrazolium, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and sulphorhodamine B (SRB) assays were utilized in assessing the in vitro growth inhibition and cytotoxicity of compounds. Flow cytometry was used to analyse the cell cycle distribution of control and treated cells. CDK1 and CDK4 levels were determined by western blotting. Apoptotic cell death was assessed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Compounds, in nanomolar to micromolar concentrations, exhibited growth inhibition and cytotoxicity in MCF-7 (breast) and HCT-116 (colon) cancer cells. In the NCI screen, 3,19-(2-bromobenzylidene) andrographolide (SRJ09) and 3,19-(3-chloro-4-fluorobenzylidene) andrographolide (SRJ23) showed greater cytotoxic potency and selectivity than andrographolide. SRJ09 and SRJ23 induced G(1) arrest and apoptosis in MCF-7 and HCT-116 cells, respectively. SRJ09 downregulated CDK4 but not CDK1 level in MCF-7 cells. Apoptosis induced by SRJ09 and SRJ23 in HCT-116 cells was confirmed by annexin V-FITC/PI flow cytometry analysis. The new benzylidene derivatives of andrographolide are potential anticancer agents. SRJ09 emerged as the lead compound in this study, exhibiting anticancer activity by downregulating CDK4 to promote a G(1) phase cell cycle arrest, coupled with induction of apoptosis.

  14. Melanosis coli in patients with colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Biernacka-Wawrzonek, Dorota; Stępka, Michał; Tomaszewska, Alicja; Ehrmann-Jóśko, Agnieszka; Chojnowska, Natalia; Muszyński, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Melanosis coli is a benign lesion affecting the mucosa of the large intestine. There is a relationship between the presence of melanosis and anthraquinone laxative use. Melanosis coli is also observed in patients with colon cancer, but there is doubt whether these two conditions are related. Aim To analyze the correlation between melanosis and colon cancer. Material and methods We analyzed retrospectively 436 patients undergoing colon cancer surgery. There were 246 women and 190 men. Patients were divided into three age groups: under 50 years, between 51 and 65 years, and over 66 years. We analyzed sections of the cancer and intestinal mucosa from the tumor’s proximal (2–5 cm) and distal (8–10 cm) zone. Results Melanosis coli was present in 52 patients, which represents 11.9% of patients with colon cancer. More often it was present in women. The most common location of melanosis and colon cancer was the terminal part of the large intestine. In patients below 50 years of age in both sexes melanosis coli did not occur. In men, melanosis was more common in the age group over 66 years. Intensity of pigmentation was higher in the tumor’s distal zone. Conclusions The incidence of melanosis coli increases with age, similar to that of colon cancer. Melanosis was not present inside tumors, in almost half of the cases it was not present in the proximal zone, and the degree of pigmentation increased in distal zone. The cause-effect relationship between melanosis coli and colon cancer remains uncertain. PMID:28337232

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... colon. The colon is part of the body’s digestive system . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, ... pass waste material out of the body. The digestive system is made up of the esophagus , stomach , and ...

  16. Colon resection for ovarian cancer: intraoperative decisions.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Mitchel S; Zervose, Emmanuel

    2008-11-01

    To discuss the benefits and morbidity of and indications for colon resection during cytoreductive operations for ovarian cancer. The history of cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer is discussed, with special attention to the incorporation of colon resection. Literature regarding cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer is then reviewed, again with attention to the role of colon resection. The focus of the review is directed at broad technical considerations and rationales, for both primary and secondary cytoreduction. Over the past 15 to 20 years the standard cytoreductive operation for ovarian cancer has shifted from an abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and omentectomy to an en bloc radical resection of the pelvic tumor and an omentectomy, and more recently to include increasing use of extensive upper abdominal surgery. En bloc pelvic resection frequently includes rectosigmoid resection, almost always accompanied by a primary anastomosis. Other portions of the colon are at risk for metastatic involvement and sometimes require resection in order to achieve optimal cytoreduction. The data regarding colon resection for the purpose of surgical cytoreduction of ovarian cancer are conflicting (in terms of benefit) and all retrospective. However, the preponderance of information supports a benefit in terms of survival when cytoreduction is clearly optimal. Similar to primary surgery, benefit from secondary cytoreduction of ovarian cancer occurs when only a small volume of disease is left behind. The preponderance of data suggests that colon resection to achieve optimal cytoreduction has a positive impact on survival. In order to better understand the role of colon resection as well as other extensive cytoreductive procedures for ovarian cancer, it will be important to continue to improve our understanding of prognostic variables such as the nuances of metastatic bowel involvement in order to better guide appropriate surgical management.

  17. How to improve colon cancer screening rates

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Luiz Ronaldo; Garcia, Diego Paim Carvalho; Coelho, Debora Lucciola; De Lima, David Correa Alves; Petroianu, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a common cause of death throughout the world and may be prevented by routine control, which can detect precancerous neoplasms and early cancers before they undergo malignant transformation or metastasis. Three strategies may improve colon cancer screening rates: convince the population about the importance of undergoing a screening test; achieve higher efficacy in standard screening tests and make them more available to the community and develop new more sensitive and efficacious screening methods and make them available as routine tests. In this light, the present study seeks to review these three means through which to increase colon cancer screening rates. PMID:26688708

  18. How to improve colon cancer screening rates.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Luiz Ronaldo; Garcia, Diego Paim Carvalho; Coelho, Debora Lucciola; De Lima, David Correa Alves; Petroianu, Andy

    2015-12-15

    Colorectal carcinoma is a common cause of death throughout the world and may be prevented by routine control, which can detect precancerous neoplasms and early cancers before they undergo malignant transformation or metastasis. Three strategies may improve colon cancer screening rates: convince the population about the importance of undergoing a screening test; achieve higher efficacy in standard screening tests and make them more available to the community and develop new more sensitive and efficacious screening methods and make them available as routine tests. In this light, the present study seeks to review these three means through which to increase colon cancer screening rates.

  19. Growth inhibition and antioxidative status induced by selenium-enriched broccoli extract and selenocompounds in DNA mismatch repair-deficient human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Ou, Bor-Rung; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Yeh, Jan-Ying

    2013-08-15

    The effects of enzymatic-digested Se-enriched broccoli extracts (SeB) and selenocompounds on growth and antioxidative status in human colon cancer cells was investigated in this study. HCT116 and HCT116+Chr.3 cells were treated with selenocompounds (sodium selenite, sodium selenate, Se-Met, MeSeCys) or SeB [high-Se (H-SeB) or low-Se (L-SeB)]. The cytotoxicity induced by selenocompounds in HCT116 cells was not associated with cellular H2O2 level, while the differential cytotoxicity observed by sodium selenite between HCT116 and HCT116+Chr.3 cell lines was related to cellular H2O2 production with the change in antioxidative enzyme activity, and the restoration of chromosome 3. H-SeB was found to reduce the cellular H2O2 content in HCT116+Chr.3 cells. The results in this study indicate that regardless of Se content, the cytotoxicity in HCT116 cells of both SeB forms appeared to be H2O2-independent, whereas the cytotoxicity in HCT116+Chr.3 of either SeB form appeared to be H2O2-dependent with an increase in antioxidative ability for H-SeB.

  20. Colon cancer modulation by a diabetic environment: A single institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Nieves; Portal-Nuñez, Sergio; Zazo, Sandra; Corton, Marta; Minguez, Pablo; Gomez-Guerrero, Carmen; Arce, Jose Miguel; Sanz, Ana Belen; Mas, Sebastian; Aguilera, Oscar; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Esbrit, Pedro; Ortiz, Alberto; Ayuso, Carmen; Egido, Jesus; Rojo, Federico; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Background Multiple observational studies suggest an increased risk of colon cancer in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). This can theoretically be the result of an influence of the diabetic environment on carcinogenesis or the tumor biologic behavior. Aim To gain insight into the influence of a diabetic environment on colon cancer characteristics and outcomes. Material and methods Retrospective analysis of clinical records in an academic tertiary care hospital with detailed analysis of 81 diabetic patients diagnosed of colon cancer matched with 79 non-diabetic colon cancer patients. The impact of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the growth of colon cancer xenografts was studied in mice. Results The incidence of DM in 1,137 patients with colorectal cancer was 16%. The diabetic colon cancer cases and non-diabetic colon cancer controls were well matched for demographic and clinical variables. The ECOG Scale Performance Status was higher (worse) in diabetics (ECOG ≥1, 29.1% of controls vs 46.9% of diabetics, p = 0.02), but no significant differences were observed in tumor grade, adjuvant therapy, tumor site, lymphovascular invasion, stage, recurrence, death or cancer-related death. Moreover, no differences in tumor variables were observed between patients treated or not with metformin. In the xenograft model, tumor growth and histopathological characteristics did not differ between diabetic and nondiabetic animals. Conclusion Our findings point towards a mild or negligible effect of the diabetes environment on colon cancer behavior, once cancer has already developed. PMID:28253286

  1. LIGHT Elevation Enhances Immune Eradication of Colon Cancer Metastases.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Guilin; Qin, Jianzhong; Kunda, Nicholas; Calata, Jed F; Mahmud, Dolores L; Gann, Peter; Fu, Yang-Xin; Rosenberg, Steven A; Prabhakar, Bellur S; Maker, Ajay V

    2017-04-15

    The majority of patients with colon cancer will develop advanced disease, with the liver being the most common site of metastatic disease. Patients with increased numbers of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in primary colon tumors and liver metastases have improved outcomes. However, the molecular factors that could empower antitumor immune responses in this setting remain to be elucidated. We reported that the immunostimulatory cytokine LIGHT (TNFSF14) in the microenvironment of colon cancer metastases associates with improved patient survival, and here we demonstrate in an immunocompetent murine model that colon tumors expressing LIGHT stimulate lymphocyte proliferation and tumor cell-specific antitumor immune responses. In this model, increasing LIGHT expression in the microenvironment of either primary tumors or liver metastases triggered regression of established tumors and slowed the growth of liver metastases, driven by cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated antitumor immunity. These responses corresponded with significant increases in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and increased expression of lymphocyte-homing signals in the metastatic tumors. Furthermore, we demonstrated evidence of durable tumor-specific antitumor immunity. In conclusion, increasing LIGHT expression increased T-cell proliferation, activation, and infiltration, resulting in enhanced tumor-specific immune-mediated tumor regressions in primary tumors and colorectal liver metastases. Mechanisms to increase LIGHT in the colon cancer microenvironment warrant further investigation and hold promise as an immunotherapeutic strategy. Cancer Res; 77(8); 1880-91. ©2017 AACR.

  2. Locally advanced colon cancer with cutaneous invasion: case report.

    PubMed

    Tenreiro, Nádia; Ferreira, Cátia; Silva, Silvia; Marques, Rita; Ribeiro, Artur; Sousa, Paulo Jorge; Luís, Fernando Próspero

    2017-03-01

    Locally advanced colon cancer with direct abdominal wall and skin invasion is an extremely rare finding with most data being derived from case reports, historical autopsy-based or single-center retrospective studies. We present a unique case of a colon cancer with direct cutaneous invasion and colocutaneous fistulization. Eighty-six year old Caucasian female with multiple comorbidities, referred to Surgical Consultation due to ulcerated skin lesion in the abdomen. She had a long-standing large umbilical hernia but with no previous episodes of incarceration or occlusive symptoms. She denied any digestive or constitutional symptoms. Physical examination showed a large non-reducible umbilical hernia, with an associated painless firm mass within the hernia sac and cutaneous ulcerated growth. Colonoscopy revealed transverse colon cancer (endoscopic biopsy of the tumor and skin punch biopsy confirmed adenocarcinoma of the colon). Computed tomography showed a tumoral mass within the umbilical hernia, with cutaneous infiltration and enlarged regional lymph nodes. Rapid local progression led to colocutaneous fistula with total fecal diversion. We performed an extended right hemicolectomy with en bloc excision of the hernia sac and infiltrating cutaneous mass. In the current era of widespread use of screening colonoscopies, initial diagnosis of locally advanced colon cancer is decreasing. However, this unique case presented an opportunity to recall the advantages of multivisceral resections.

  3. The Na(+)/HCO3(-) Co-Transporter SLC4A4 Plays a Role in Growth and Migration of Colon and Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Parks, Scott K; Pouyssegur, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    The hypoxic and acidic tumor environment necessitates intracellular pH (pHi) regulation for tumor progression. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX; hypoxia-induced) is known to facilitate CO2 export and generate HCO3(-) in the extracellular tumor space. It has been proposed that HCO3(-) is re-captured by the cell to maintain an alkaline pHi . A diverse range of HCO3(-) transporters, coupled with a lack of a clear over-expression in cancers have limited molecular identification of this cellular process. Here, we report that hypoxia induces the Na(+)/HCO3(-) co-transporter (NBCe1) SLC4A4 mRNA expression exclusively in the LS174 colon adenocarcinoma cell line in a HIF1α dependent manner. HCO3(-) dependent pHi recovery observations revealed the predominant use of an NBC mechanism suggesting that reversal of a Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger is not utilized for tumor cell pHi regulation. Knockdown of SLC4A4 via shRNA reduced cell proliferation and increased mortality during external acidosis and spheroid growth. pHi recovery from acidosis was partially reduced with knockdown of SLC4A4. In MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells expressing high levels of SLC4A4 compared to LS174 cells, SLC4A4 knockdown had a strong impact on cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. SLC4A4 knockdown also altered expression of other proteins including CA IX. Furthermore the Na(+)/HCO3(-) dependent pHi recovery from acidosis was reduced with SLC4A4 knockdown in MDA-MB-231 cells. Combined our results indicate that SLC4A4 contributes to the HCO3(-) transport and tumor cell phenotype. This study complements the on-going molecular characterization of the HCO3(-) re-uptake mechanism in other tumor cells for future strategies targeting these potentially important drug targets.

  4. Tomatine-Containing Green Tomato Extracts Inhibit Growth of Human Breast, Colon, Liver, and Stomach Cancer Cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum) synthesize the glycoalkaloids dehydrotomatine and a–tomatine, possibly as a defense against bacteria, fungi, viruses, and insects. We investigated six green and three red tomato extracts for their ability to induce cell death in human cancer and normal cells ...

  5. Targeted agents for adjuvant therapy of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    de Gramont, Aimery; Tournigand, Christophe; André, Thierry; Larsen, Annette K; Louvet, Christophe

    2006-12-01

    Adjuvant therapy for colorectal cancer consists primarily of combinations of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (5-FU/LV) (with infusional or bolus 5-FU) with oxaliplatin or oral capecitabine. The angiogenesis inhibitor bevacizumab and the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor cetuximab have shown activity when combined with 5-FU/LV-based regimens as first-line treatment of advanced disease and are currently being evaluated as part of adjuvant therapy in colon cancer. Bevacizumab is being evaluated in combination with FOLFOX4 (5-FU/LV/oxaliplatin), FOLFOX6, or XELOX (capecitabine/oxaliplatin) in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project C08 trial, the AVANT (AVastin adjuvANT) trial, and the Intergroup Rectal Adjuvant trial. Cetuximab is being evaluated in combination with FOLFOX4 and FOLFOX6 in the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) N0147 trial and the Pan European Trials in Adjuvant Colon Cancer (PETTAC) 8 trial.

  6. Flavanols and procyanidins of cocoa and chocolate inhibit growth and polyamine biosynthesis of human colonic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Carnésecchi, Stéphanie; Schneider, Yann; Lazarus, Sheryl A; Coehlo, David; Gossé, Francine; Raul, Francis

    2002-01-25

    The effects of cocoa powder and extracts with different amounts of flavanols and related procyanidin oligomers were investigated on the growth of Caco-2 cells. Treatment of the cells with 50 microg/ml of procyanidin-enriched (PE) extracts caused a 70% growth inhibition with a blockade of the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. PE extracts caused a significant decrease of ornithine decarboxylase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase activities, two key enzymes of polyamine biosynthesis. This led to a decrease in the intracellular pool of the polyamines. These observations indicate that polyamine metabolism might be an important target in the anti-proliferative effects of cocoa polyphenols.

  7. Chemoembolization Using Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Liver Metastases From Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-10

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer

  8. Asian and Hispanic Americans' cancer fatalism and colon cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jungmi; Oh, Kyeung Mi

    2013-03-01

    To explore fatalistic attributions of colon cancer development among Asian and Hispanic Americans in comparison with non-Hispanic whites; also to examine the impacts of fatalism on adherence to the colon cancer screening guideline. For the analysis, the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey data were employed. Both Asian and Hispanic Americans were more likely to make fatalistic attribution and were less likely to follow the guideline than whites. Particularly for Asians, fatalism was a significant predictor for not adhering to the guideline. These findings emphasize the need for cultural interventions to disrupt fatalistic attitudes towards colon cancer preventions.

  9. Family History of Colon Cancer Calls for Earlier Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164202.html Family History of Colon Cancer Calls for Earlier Screening ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you've got a family history of colon or rectal cancers, you probably ...

  10. Enterobacter Strains Might Promote Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yurdakul, Dilşad; Yazgan-Karataş, Ayten; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2015-09-01

    Many studies have been performed to determine the interaction between bacterial species and cancer. However, there has been no attempts to demonstrate a possible relationship between Enterobacter spp. and colon cancer so far. Therefore, in the present study, it is aimed to investigate the effects of Enterobacter strains on colon cancer. Bacterial proteins were isolated from 11 Enterobacter spp., one Morganella morganii, and one Escherichia coli strains, and applied onto NCM460 (Incell) and CRL1790 (ATCC) cell lines. Cell viability and proliferation were determined in MTS assay. Flow Cytometry was used to detect CD24 level and apoptosis. Real-Time PCR studies were performed to determine NFKB and Bcl2 expression. Graphpad Software was used for statistical analysis. The results showed that proteins, isolated from the Enterobacter spp., have significantly increased cell viability and proliferation, while decreasing the apoptosis of the cell lines tested. The data in the present study indicated that Enterobacter strains might promote colon cancer. Moreover, Enterobacter spp. could be a clinically important factor for colon cancer initiation and progression. Studies can be extended on animal models in order to develop new strategies for treatment.

  11. Differential control of growth, apoptotic activity and gene expression in human colon cancer cells by extracts derived from medicinal herbs, Rhazya stricta and Zingiber officinale and their combination

    PubMed Central

    Elkady, Ayman I; Hussein, Rania Abd El Hamid; Abu-Zinadah, Osama A

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of extracts from Rhazya stricta (R. stricta) and Zingiber officinale (Z. officinale) on human colorectal cancer cells. METHODS: Human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116) were subjected to increasing doses of crude alkaloid extracts from R. stricta (CAERS) and crude flavonoid extracts from Z. officinale (CFEZO). Cells were then harvested after 24, 48 or 72 h and cell viability was examined by trypan blue exclusion dye test; clonogenicity and soft agar colony-forming assays were also carried out. Nuclear stain (Hoechst 33342), acridine orange/ethidium bromide double staining, agarose gel electrophoresis and comet assays were performed to assess pro-apoptotic potentiality of the extracts. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), using gene-specific primers and Western blot analyses were performed to assess the impact of CAERS and CFEZO on the expression levels of key regulatory proteins in HCT116 cells. RESULTS: Treatment with a combination of CAERS and CFEZO synergistically suppressed the proliferation, colony formation and anchorage-independent growth of HCT116 cells. Calculated IC50, after 24, 48 and 72 h, were 70, 90 and 130 μg/mL for CAERS, 65, 85 and 120 μg/mL for CFEZO and 20, 25 and 45 μg/mL for both agents, respectively. CAERS- and CFEZO-treated cells exhibited morphologic and biochemical features of apoptotic cell death. The induction of apoptosis was associated with the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, activation of caspases 3 and 9 and cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase. CAERS and CFEZO treatments downregulated expression levels of anti-apoptotic proteins including Bcl-2, Bcl-X, Mcl-1, survivin and XIAP, and upregulated expression levels of proapoptotic proteins such as Bad and Noxa. CAERS and CFEZO treatments elevated expression levels of the oncosuppressor proteins, p53, p21 and p27, and reduced levels of the oncoproteins, cyclin D1, cyclin

  12. General Information about Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... D Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role in Cancer Research ... major research initiatives R&D Resources Tools and data sets for researchers Research by Cancer Type Find ...

  13. Schlafen 3, a novel gene, regulates colonic mucosal growth during aging.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhaumik B; Yu, Yingjie; Du, Jianhua; Rishi, Arun K; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Tarca, Adi L; Wali, Anil; Majumdar, Adhip P N

    2009-04-01

    Although aging is associated with increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis in the colonic mucosa of Fischer 344 rats, the regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Gene expression profiling (Illumina platform) was carried out in freshly isolated colonic mucosal cells from young (4-6 mo old) and aged (22-24 mo old) Fischer 344 rats. Sixty-six genes were differentially expressed in the colonic mucosa between young and old animals (P<0.05). In particular, the expression of schlafen 3, a negative regulator of proliferation, was decreased by 8- to 10-fold in the colonic mucosa of aged rats. Administration of wortmannin, which inhibited colonic mucosal proliferation in the colonic mucosa of aged rats, stimulated the expression of schlafen 3, indicating a growth regulatory role of this gene. To further determine the growth regulatory properties of schlafen 3 gene, schlafen 3 cDNA was transfected in colon cancer HCT-116 cells. This resulted in a 30-40% inhibition of cellular growth, accompanied by decreased expression of PCNA and cyclin D1 and reduced phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, our present study demonstrates that several genes involved in proliferation and apoptosis are differentially expressed in the colonic mucosa of young and aged rats. Schlafen 3, a novel negative regulator of growth, which is markedly downregulated in the colonic mucosa of the aged, may play a role in regulating colonic mucosal growth during aging.

  14. Schlafen 3, a novel gene, regulates colonic mucosal growth during aging

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bhaumik B.; Yu, Yingjie; Du, Jianhua; Rishi, Arun K.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Tarca, Adi L.; Wali, Anil; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2009-01-01

    Although aging is associated with increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis in the colonic mucosa of Fischer 344 rats, the regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Gene expression profiling (Illumina platform) was carried out in freshly isolated colonic mucosal cells from young (4–6 mo old) and aged (22–24 mo old) Fischer 344 rats. Sixty-six genes were differentially expressed in the colonic mucosa between young and old animals (P < 0.05). In particular, the expression of schlafen 3, a negative regulator of proliferation, was decreased by 8- to 10-fold in the colonic mucosa of aged rats. Administration of wortmannin, which inhibited colonic mucosal proliferation in the colonic mucosa of aged rats, stimulated the expression of schlafen 3, indicating a growth regulatory role of this gene. To further determine the growth regulatory properties of schlafen 3 gene, schlafen 3 cDNA was transfected in colon cancer HCT-116 cells. This resulted in a 30–40% inhibition of cellular growth, accompanied by decreased expression of PCNA and cyclin D1 and reduced phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, our present study demonstrates that several genes involved in proliferation and apoptosis are differentially expressed in the colonic mucosa of young and aged rats. Schlafen 3, a novel negative regulator of growth, which is markedly downregulated in the colonic mucosa of the aged, may play a role in regulating colonic mucosal growth during aging. PMID:19228883

  15. Mechanisms underlying aspirin-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis induction of cyclooxygenase-2 negative colon cancer cell line SW480

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ming-Yu; Huang, Jie-An; Liang, Zhi-Hai; Jiang, Hai-Xing; Tang, Guo-Du

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) on proliferation and apoptosis of colorectal cancer cell line SW480 and its mechanism. METHODS: Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 negative colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was treated with aspirin at concentrations of 2.5 mmol/L, 5.0 mmol/L, 10.0 mmol/L for different periods in vitro. Anti-proliferation effect of aspirin on SW480 was detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were observed by flow cytometry (FCM). Transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used for morphological study. Apoptosis-associated genes were detected by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. RESULTS: Aspirin inhibited SW480 proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment with different concentrations of aspirin significantly increased the proportions of cells at the G0/G1 phase and decreased the proportions of cells at the S- and G2/M phases in a concentration-dependent manner. Aspirin not only induced apoptosis but also caused cell necrosis at a high concentration as well. After treatment with aspirin, SW480 cells displayed typically morphological features of apoptosis and necrosis under TEM, and increased the Bcl-2 expression in cells, but the expression of Bax was down regulated. CONCLUSION: Aspirin inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of SW480 cells. Its anti-tumor mechanism may arrest cell cycle and shift Bax/Bcl-2 balance in cells. PMID:18636671

  16. Colon cancer stem cells: controversies and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Tesori, Valentina; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-05-28

    Tumors have long been viewed as a population in which all cells have the equal propensity to form new tumors, the so called conventional stochastic model. The cutting-edge theory on tumor origin and progression, tends to consider cancer as a stem cell disease. Stem cells are actively involved in the onset and maintenance of colon cancer. This review is intended to examine the state of the art on colon cancer stem cells (CSCs), with regard to the recent achievements of basic research and to the corresponding translational consequences. Specific prominence is given to the hypothesized origin of CSCs and to the methods for their identification. The growing understanding of CSC biology is driving the optimization of novel anti-cancer targeted drugs.

  17. Colon cancer: it's CIN or CIMP.

    PubMed

    Issa, Jean-Pierre

    2008-10-01

    Combined genetic and epigenetic analysis of sporadic colon cancer suggest that it can no longer be viewed as a single disease. There are at least three different subsets with distinct clinico-pathologic features, with important implications for preventions, screening, and therapy.

  18. Novel diet-related mouse model of colon cancer parallels human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Anil R; Prasad, Shilpa; Nguyen, Huy; Facista, Alexander; Lewis, Cristy; Zaitlin, Beryl; Bernstein, Harris; Bernstein, Carol

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the close parallels between our novel diet-related mouse model of colon cancer and human colon cancer. METHODS: Twenty-two wild-type female mice (ages 6-8 wk) were fed the standard control diet (AIN-93G) and an additional 22 female mice (ages 6-8 wk) were fed the control diet supplemented with 0.2% deoxycholic acid [diet + deoxycholic acid (DOC)] for 10 mo. Tumors occurred in the colons of mice fed diet + DOC and showed progression to colon cancer [adenocarcinoma (AC)]. This progression is through the stages of tubular adenoma (TA), TA with high grade dysplasia or adenoma with sessile serrated morphology, intramucosal AC, AC stage T1, and AC stage T2. The mouse tumors were compared to human tumors at the same stages by histopathological analysis. Sections of the small and large intestines of mice and humans were evaluated for glandular architecture, cellular and nuclear morphology including cellular orientation, cellular and nuclear atypia, pleomorphism, mitotic activity, frequency of goblet cells, crypt architecture, ulceration, penetration of crypts through the muscularis mucosa and presence of malignant crypts in the muscularis propria. In addition, preserved colonic tissues from genetically similar male mice, obtained from a prior experiment, were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The male mice had been fed the control diet or diet + DOC. Four molecular markers were evaluated: 8-OH-dG, DNA repair protein ERCC1, autophagy protein beclin-1 and the nuclear location of beta-catenin in the stem cell region of crypts. Also, male mice fed diet + DOC plus 0.007% chlorogenic acid (diet + DOC + CGA) were evaluated for ERCC1, beclin-1 and nuclear location of beta-catenin. RESULTS: Humans with high levels of diet-related DOC in their colons are at a substantially increased risk of developing colon cancer. The mice fed diet + DOC had levels of DOC in their colons comparable to that of humans on a high fat diet. The 22 mice without added DOC in their diet

  19. ARMc8 indicates aggressive colon cancers and promotes invasiveness and migration of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guiyang; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Xiupeng; Fan, Chuifeng; Wang, Liang; Xu, Hongtao; Yu, Juanhan; Wang, Enhua

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have implicated ARMc8 in promoting tumor formation in non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer; however, so far, no studies have revealed the expression pattern or cellular function of ARMc8 in colon cancer. In this study, we used immunohistochemical staining to measure ARMc8 expression in 206 cases of colon cancer and matched adjacent normal colon tissue. Clinically important behaviors of cells, including invasiveness and migration, were evaluated after upregulation of ARMc8 expression in HT29 cells through gene transfection or downregulation of expression in LoVo cells using RNAi. We found that ARMc8 was primarily located in the membrane and cytoplasm of tumor cells, and its expression level was significantly higher in colon cancer in comparison to that in the adjacent normal colon tissues (p < 0.001). ARMc8 expression was closely related to TNM stage (p = 0.006), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.001), and poor prognosis (p = 0.002) of colon cancer. The invasiveness and migration capacity of HT29 cells transfected with ARMc8 were significantly greater than those of control cells (p < 0.001), while ARMc8 siRNA treatment significantly reduced cell invasion and migration in LoVo cells (p < 0.001). Furthermore, we demonstrated that ARMc8 could upregulate the expression of MMP7 and snail and downregulate the expression of p120ctn and α-catenin. Therefore, ARMc8 probably enhanced invasiveness and metastatic capacity by affecting these tumor-associated factors, thereby playing a role in enhancing the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. ARMc8 is likely to become a potential therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  20. Molecular mechanisms linking adipokines to obesity-related colon cancer: focus on leptin.

    PubMed

    Drew, Janice E

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is linked to increased risk of colon cancer, currently the third most common cancer. Consequently rising levels of obesity worldwide are likely to significantly impact on obesity-related colon cancers in the decades to come. Understanding the molecular mechanisms whereby obesity increases colon cancer risk is thus a focus for research to inform strategies to prevent the increasing trend in obesity-related cancers. This review will consider research on deregulation of adipokine signalling, a consequence of altered adipokine hormone secretion from excess adipose tissue, with a focus on leptin, which has been studied extensively as a potential mediator of obesity-related colon cancer. Numerous investigations using colon cell lines in vitro, in vivo studies in rodents and investigations of colon cancer patients illuminate the complexity of the interactions of leptin with colon tissues via leptin receptors expressed by the colon epithelium. Although evidence indicates a role for leptin in proliferation of colon epithelial cells in vitro, this has been contradicted by studies in rodent models. However, recent studies have indicated that leptin may influence inflammatory mediators linked with colon cancer and also promote cell growth dependent on genotype and is implicated in growth promotion of colon cancer cells. Studies in human cancer patients indicate that there may be different tumour sub-types with varying levels of leptin receptor expression, indicating the potential for leptin to induce variable responses in the different tumour types. These studies have provided insights into the complex interplay of adipokines with responsive tissues prone to obesity-related colon cancer. Deregulation of adipokine signalling via adipokine receptors located in the colon appears to be a significant factor in obesity-related colon cancer. Molecular profiling of colon tumours will be a useful tool in future strategies to characterise the influence that adipokines may have

  1. Patient Beliefs About Colon Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Ely, John W; Levy, Barcey T; Daly, Jeanette; Xu, Yinghui

    2016-03-01

    Only about half of eligible individuals undergo colon cancer screening. We have limited knowledge about the patient beliefs that adversely affect screening decisions and about which beliefs might be amenable to change through education. As part of a clinical trial, 641 rural Iowans, aged 52 to 79 years, reported their beliefs about colon cancer screening in response to a mailed questionnaire. Consenting subjects were randomized into four groups, which were distinguished by four levels of increasingly intensive efforts to promote screening. Two of the groups received mailed educational materials and completed a follow-up questionnaire, which allowed us to determine whether their beliefs about screening changed following the education. We also completed a factor analysis to identify underlying (latent) factors that might explain the responses to 33 questions about readiness, attitudes, and perceived barriers related to colon cancer screening. The strongest predictors of a patient's stated readiness to be screened were a physician's recommendation to be screened (1 point difference on 10-point Likert scale, 95 % confidence interval [CI], 0.5 to 1.6 point difference), a family history of colon cancer (0.85-point Likert scale difference, 95 % CI, 0.1 to 1.6), and a belief that health-care decisions should be mostly left to physicians rather than patients (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.21, P < .001). Of the 33 questionnaire items about screening beliefs, 11 (33 %) changed favorably following the educational intervention. In the factor analysis, the 33 items were reduced to 8 underlying factors, such as being too busy to undergo screening and worries about screening procedures. We found a limited number of underlying factors that may help explain patient resistance to colon cancer screening.

  2. Nuclear matrix proteins in human colon cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Keesee, S K; Meneghini, M D; Szaro, R P; Wu, Y J

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear matrix is the nonchromatin scaffolding of the nucleus. This structure confers nuclear shape, organizes chromatin, and appears to contain important regulatory proteins. Tissue specific nuclear matrix proteins have been found in the rat, mouse, and human. In this study we compared high-resolution two-dimensional gel electropherograms of nuclear matrix protein patterns found in human colon tumors with those from normal colon epithelia. Tumors were obtained from 18 patients undergoing partial colectomy for adenocarcinoma of the colon and compared with tissue from 10 normal colons. We have identified at least six proteins which were present in 18 of 18 colon tumors and 0 of 10 normal tissues, as well as four proteins present in 0 of 18 tumors and in 10 of 10 normal tissues. These data, which corroborate similar findings of cancer-specific nuclear matrix proteins in prostate and breast, suggest that nuclear matrix proteins may serve as important markers for at least some types of cancer. Images PMID:8127905

  3. PSF3 marks malignant colon cancer and has a role in cancer cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagahama, Yumi; Ueno, Masaya; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2010-02-05

    PSF3 (partner of Sld five 3) is a member of the tetrameric complex termed GINS, composed of SLD5, PSF1, PSF2, and PSF3, and well-conserved evolutionarily. Previous studies suggested that some GINS complex members are upregulated in cancer, but PSF3 expression in colon carcinoma has not been investigated. Here, we established a mouse anti-PSF3 antibody, and examined PSF3 expression in human colon carcinoma cell lines and colon carcinoma specimens. We found that PSF3 is expressed in the crypt region in normal colonic mucosa and that many PSF3-positive cells co-expressed Ki-67. This suggests that PSF3-positivity of normal mucosa is associated with cell proliferation. Expression of the PSF3 protein was greater in carcinoma compared with the adjacent normal mucosa, and even stronger in high-grade malignancies, suggesting that it may be associated with colon cancer progression. PSF3 gene knock-down in human colon carcinoma cell lines resulted in growth inhibition characterized by delayed S-phase progression. These results suggest that PSF3 is a potential biomarker for diagnosis of progression in colon cancer and could be a new target for cancer therapy.

  4. Pectin matrix as oral drug delivery vehicle for colon cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tin Wui; Colombo, Gaia; Sonvico, Fabio

    2011-03-01

    Colon cancer is the fourth most common cancer globally with 639,000 deaths reported annually. Typical chemotherapy is provided by injection route to reduce tumor growth and metastasis. Recent research investigates the oral delivery profiles of chemotherapeutic agents. In comparison to injection, oral administration of drugs in the form of a colon-specific delivery system is expected to increase drug bioavailability at target site, reduce drug dose and systemic adverse effects. Pectin is suitable for use as colon-specific drug delivery vehicle as it is selectively digested by colonic microflora to release drug with minimal degradation in upper gastrointestinal tract. The present review examines the physicochemical attributes of formulation needed to retard drug release of pectin matrix prior to its arrival at colon, and evaluate the therapeutic value of pectin matrix in association with colon cancer. The review suggests that multi-particulate calcium pectinate matrix is an ideal carrier to orally deliver drugs for site-specific treatment of colon cancer as (1) crosslinking of pectin by calcium ions in a matrix negates drug release in upper gastrointestinal tract, (2) multi-particulate carrier has a slower transit and a higher contact time for drug action in colon than single-unit dosage form, and (3) both pectin and calcium have an indication to reduce the severity of colon cancer from the implication of diet and molecular biology studies. Pectin matrix demonstrates dual advantages as drug carrier and therapeutic for use in treatment of colon cancer.

  5. Protein Kinase Cβ Is an Effective Target for Chemoprevention of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Alan P.; Calcagno, Shelly R.; Krishna, Murli; Rak, Sofija; Leitges, Michael; Murray, Nicole R.

    2009-01-01

    Colon cancer develops over a period of 10 to 15 years, providing a window of opportunity for chemoprevention and early intervention. However, few molecular targets for effective colon cancer chemoprevention have been characterized and validated. Protein kinase CβII (PKCβII) plays a requisite role in the initiation of colon carcinogenesis in a preclinical mouse model by promoting proliferation and increased β-catenin accumulation. In this study, we test the hypothesis that PKCβII is an effective target for colon cancer chemoprevention using enzastaurin (LY317615), a PKCβ-selective inhibitor, in a mouse model of colon carcinogenesis. We find that enzastaurin potently reduces azoxymethane-induced colon tumor initiation and progression by inhibiting PKCβII-mediated tumor cell proliferation and β-catenin accumulation. Biochemically, enzastaurin reduces expression of the PKCβII- and β-catenin/T-cell factor–regulated genes PKCβII, cyclooxygenase II, and vascular endothelial growth factor, three genes implicated in colon carcinogenesis. Our results show that enzastaurin is an effective chemopreventive agent in a mouse model of sporadic colon cancer that significantly reduces both tumor initiation and progression by inhibiting expression of proproliferative genes. Thus, PKCβII is an important target for colon cancer chemoprevention and the PKCβ-selective inhibitor enzastaurin may represent an effective chemopreventive agent in patients at high risk for colon cancer. PMID:19221092

  6. Role of colonic stents in the management of colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Jayesh

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the commonly encountered cancers across the Western World. In United Kingdom, this constitutes third most common ranked cancer and second most common ranked cause of cancer related deaths. Its acute presentation as a malignant colonic obstruction imposes challenges in its management. Colonic stent has been used for many years to alleviate acute obstruction in such cases allowing optimisation of patient’s physiological status and adequate staging of cancer. In this review, current literature evidence regarding use of colonic stent in acute malignant colonic obstruction is critically appraised and recommendations on the use of colonic stent are advocated. PMID:26962401

  7. Modulation of colon cancer by nutmeg.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Yang, Xiu-Wei; Krausz, Kristopher W; Nichols, Robert G; Xu, Wei; Patterson, Andrew D; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-04-03

    Colon cancer is the most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer mortality in humans. Using mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, the current study revealed the accumulation of four uremic toxins (cresol sulfate, cresol glucuronide, indoxyl sulfate, and phenyl sulfate) in the serum of mice harboring adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene mutation-induced colon cancer. These uremic toxins, likely generated from the gut microbiota, were associated with an increase in the expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and a disorder of lipid metabolism. Nutmeg, which exhibits antimicrobial activity, attenuated the levels of uremic toxins and decreased intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(min/+) mice. Nutmeg-treated Apc(min/+) mice had decreased IL-6 levels and normalized dysregulated lipid metabolism, suggesting that uremic toxins are responsible, in part, for the metabolic disorders that occur during tumorigenesis. These studies demonstrate a potential biochemical link among gut microbial metabolism, inflammation, and metabolic disorders and suggest that modulation of gut microbiota and lipid metabolism using dietary intervention or drugs may be effective in colon cancer chemoprevention strategies.

  8. Terahertz polarization imaging for colon cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Alavi, Karim; Joseph, Cecil S.; Giles, Robert H.

    2014-03-01

    Continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging has the potential to offer a safe, noninvasive medical imaging modality for delineating colorectal cancer. The terahertz reflectance measurements of fresh 3 - 5 mm thick human colonic excisions were acquired using a continuous-wave polarization imaging technique. A CO2 optically pumped Far- Infrared molecular gas laser operating at 584 GHz was used to illuminate the colon tissue, while the reflected signals were detected using a liquid Helium cooled silicon bolometer. Both co-polarized and cross-polarized remittance from the samples was collected using wire grid polarizers in the experiment. The experimental analysis of 2D images obtained from THz reflection polarization imaging techniques showed intrinsic contrast between cancerous and normal regions based on increased reflection from the tumor. Also, the study demonstrates that the cross-polarized terahertz images not only correlates better with the histology, but also provide consistent relative reflectance difference values between normal and cancerous regions for all the measured specimens.

  9. Coffee, colon function and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vitaglione, Paola; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2012-09-01

    For several years the physiological effects of coffee have been focused on its caffeine content, disregarding the hundreds of bioactive coffee components, such as polyphenols, melanoidins, carbohydrates, diterpenes, etc. These compounds may exert their protection against colorectal cancer (CRC), the third most common cancer worldwide. However, the amount and type of compounds ingested with the beverage may be highly different depending on the variety of coffee used, the roasting degree, the type of brewing method as well as the serving size. In this frame, this paper reviews the mechanisms by which coffee may influence the risk of CRC development focusing on espresso and filtered coffee, as well as on the components that totally or partially reach the colon i.e. polyphenols and dietary fiber, including melanoidins. In particular the effects of coffee on some colon conditions whose deregulation may lead to cancer, namely microbiota composition and lumen reducing environment, were considered. Taken together the discussed studies indicated that, due to their in vivo metabolism and composition, both coffee chlorogenic acids and dietary fiber, including melanoidins, may reduce CRC risk, increasing colon motility and antioxidant status. Further studies should finally assess whether the coffee benefits for colon are driven through a prebiotic effect.

  10. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Olson, Kenneth R; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-16

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H(2)S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH-aspirin, which is an NO- and H(2)S-releasing agent. NOSH-aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC(50)s of 45.5 ± 2.5, 19.7 ± 3.3, and 7.7 ± 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH-aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G(0)/G(1) cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure-activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH-aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH-aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH-ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH-aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation.

  11. Interleukin genes and associations with colon and rectal cancer risk and overall survival

    PubMed Central

    Bondurant, Kristina L.; Lundgreen, Abbie; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Kadlubar, Susan; Wolff, Roger K.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2012-01-01

    Interleukins are a group of cytokines that contribute to growth and differentiation, cell migration, and inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses by the immune system. In this study we examined genetic variation in genes from various anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory interleukins to determine association with colon and rectal cancer risk and overall survival. Data from two population-based incident studies of colon cancer (1555 cases and 1956 controls) and rectal cancer (754 cases and 954 controls) were utilized. After controlling for multiple comparisons, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from four genes, IL3, IL6R, IL8, IL15, were associated with increased colon cancer risk and CXCR1, and CXCR2 were significantly associated with increased rectal cancer risk. Only SNPs from genes within the IL-8 pathway (IL8, CXCR1, and CXCR2) showed a significant association with both colon and rectal cancer risk. Several SNPs interacted significantly with IL8 and IFNG SNPs and with aspirin/NSAID, cigarette smoking, estrogen use and BMI. For both colon and rectal cancer, increasing numbers of risk alleles were associated with increased hazard of death from cancer; the estimated hazard of death for colon cancer for the highest category of risk alleles was 1.74 (95% CI 1.18–2.56) and 1.96 (95% CI 1.28–2.99) for rectal cancer. These data suggest interleukin genes play a role in risk and overall survival for colon and rectal cancer. PMID:22674296

  12. Interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages depending on cancer cell-derived colony stimulating factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Sun, Jintang; Ma, Chao; Gao, Wenjuan; Wang, Qingjie; Zhao, Lei; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-infiltrated macrophages were potential targets of the immune therapy for patients with colon cancer. Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) is a primary chemoattractant and functional regulator for macrophages, and therefore would be a feasible intervention for the macrophage-targeting therapeutics. However, the expression of CSF1 in colon cancer microenvironment and its roles in cancer development is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that CSF1 was over-expressed exclusively in colon cancer cells and was correlated with macrophages infiltration. The high CSF1 expression and macrophages infiltration were related to the tumor–node-metastasis (TNM) stage of colon cancer, and suggested to be positively associated with survival of colon cancer patients. In the in vitro studies based on an indirect Transwell system, we found that co-culture with macrophage promoted CSF1 production in colon cancer cells. Further investigation on regulatory mechanisms suggested that CSF1 production in colon cancer cells was dependent on PKC pathway, which was activated by IL-8, mainly produced by macrophages. Moreover, colon cancer cell-derived CSF1 drove the recruitment of macrophages and re-educated their secretion profile, including the augment of IL-8 production. The mice tumor xenografts study also found that over-expression of CSF1 in colon cancer cells promoted intratumoral infiltration of macrophages, and partially suppressed tumor growth. In all, our results demonstrated that CSF1 was an important factor in the colon cancer microenvironment, involving in the interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages. PMID:27141406

  13. Interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages depending on cancer cell-derived colony stimulating factor 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Sun, Jintang; Ma, Chao; Gao, Wenjuan; Wang, Qingjie; Zhao, Lei; Qu, Xun

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-infiltrated macrophages were potential targets of the immune therapy for patients with colon cancer. Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) is a primary chemoattractant and functional regulator for macrophages, and therefore would be a feasible intervention for the macrophage-targeting therapeutics. However, the expression of CSF1 in colon cancer microenvironment and its roles in cancer development is largely unknown. In the present study, we found that CSF1 was over-expressed exclusively in colon cancer cells and was correlated with macrophages infiltration. The high CSF1 expression and macrophages infiltration were related to the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage of colon cancer, and suggested to be positively associated with survival of colon cancer patients. In the in vitro studies based on an indirect Transwell system, we found that co-culture with macrophage promoted CSF1 production in colon cancer cells. Further investigation on regulatory mechanisms suggested that CSF1 production in colon cancer cells was dependent on PKC pathway, which was activated by IL-8, mainly produced by macrophages. Moreover, colon cancer cell-derived CSF1 drove the recruitment of macrophages and re-educated their secretion profile, including the augment of IL-8 production. The mice tumor xenografts study also found that over-expression of CSF1 in colon cancer cells promoted intratumoral infiltration of macrophages, and partially suppressed tumor growth. In all, our results demonstrated that CSF1 was an important factor in the colon cancer microenvironment, involving in the interactions between colon cancer cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages.

  14. Colon cancer proliferating desulfosinigrin in wasabi (Wasabia japonica).

    PubMed

    Weil, Marvin J; Zhang, Yanjun; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2004-01-01

    A reduced incidence of different types of cancer has been linked to consumption of Brassica vegetables, and there is evidence that glucosinolates (GSLs) and their hydrolysis products play a role in reducing cancer risk. Wasabi (Wasabia japonica) and horseradish (Armoracia rusticana), both Brassica vegetables, are widely used condiments both in Japanese cuisine and in the United States. Desulfosinigrin (DSS) (1) was isolated from a commercially available wasabi powder and from fresh wasabi roots. Sinigrin (2) was isolated from horseradish roots. DSS and sinigrin were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzymes, on lipid peroxidation, and on the proliferation of human colon (HCT-116), breast (MCF-7), lung (NCIH460), and central nervous system (CNS, SF-268) cancer cell lines. DSS did not inhibit COX enzymes or lipid peroxidation at 250 microg/ml. Sinigrin inhibited lipid peroxidation by 71% at 250 microg/ml. However, DSS promoted the growth of HCT-116 (colon) and NCI H460 (lung) human cancer cells as determined by the MTT assay in a concentration-dependent manner. At 3.72 microg/ml, a 27% increase in the number of viable human HCT-116 colon cancer cells was observed; the corresponding increases at 7.50 and 15 microg/ml were 42 and 69%, respectively. At 60 microg/ml, DSS doubled the number of HCT-16 colon cancer cells. For NCI H460 human lung cancer cells, DSS at 60 microg/ml increased the cell number by 20%. Sinigrin showed no proliferating effect on the tumor cells tested. This is the first report of the tumor cell-proliferating activity by a desulfoglucosinolate, the biosynthetic precursor of GSLs found in Brassica spp.

  15. Colon cancer stem cells: promise of targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Todaro, Matilde; Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Medema, Jan Paul; Stassi, Giorgio

    2010-06-01

    First developed for hematologic disorders, the concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) was expanded to solid tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). The traditional model of colon carcinogenesis includes several steps that occur via mutational activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Intestinal epithelial cells exist for a shorter amount of time than that required to accumulate tumor-inducing genetic changes, so researchers have investigated the concept that CRC arises from the long-lived stem cells, rather than from the differentiated epithelial cells. Colon CSCs were originally identified through the expression of the CD133 glycoprotein using an antibody directed to its epitope AC133. It is not clear if CD133 is a marker of colon CSCs-other cell surface markers, such as epithelial-specific antigen, CD44, CD166, Musashi-1, CD29, CD24, leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, have been proposed. In addition to initiating and sustaining tumor growth, CSCs are believed to mediate cancer relapse after chemotherapy. How can we identify and analyze colon CSCs and what agents are being designed to kill this chemotherapy-refractory population?

  16. Identification of colonic fibroblast secretomes reveals secretory factors regulating colon cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sun-Xia; Xu, Xiao-En; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Cui, Shu-Jian; Xu, Lei-Lei; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Yang; Yan, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Qian; Qiao, Jie; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2014-10-14

    Stromal microenvironment influences tumor cell proliferation and migration. Fibroblasts represent the most abundant stromal constituents. Here, we established two pairs of normal fibroblast (NF) and cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) cultures from colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues and the normal counterparts. The NFs and CAFs were stained positive for typical fibroblast markers and inhibited colon cancer (CC) cell proliferation in in vitro cocultures and in xenograft mouse models. The fibroblast conditioned media were analyzed using LC-MS and 227 proteins were identified at a false discovery rate of 1.3%, including 131 putative secretory and 20 plasma membrane proteins. These proteins were enriched for functional categories of extracellular matrix, adhesion, cell motion, inflammatory response, redox homeostasis and peptidase inhibitor. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, transgelin, follistatin-related protein 1 (FSTL1) and decorin was abundant in the fibroblast secretome as confirmed by Western blot. Silencing of FSTL1 and transgelin in colonic fibroblast cell line CCD-18Co induced an accelerated proliferation of CC cells in cocultures. Exogenous FSTL1 attenuates CC cell proliferation in a negative fashion. FSTL1 was upregulated in CC patient plasma and cancerous tissues but had no implication in prognosis. Our results provided novel insights into the molecular signatures and modulatory role of CC associated fibroblasts. In this study, a label-free LC-MS was performed to analyze the secretomes of two paired primary fibroblasts, which were isolated from fresh surgical specimen of colorectal adenocarcinoma and adjacent normal colonic tissues and exhibited negative modulatory activity for colon cancer cell growth in in vitro cocultures and in vivo xenograph mouse models. Follistatin-related protein 1 was further revealed to be one of the stroma-derived factors of potential suppression role for colon cancer cell proliferation. Our results provide novel

  17. Four microRNAs Signature for Survival Prognosis in Colon Cancer using TCGA Data

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop microRNA expression signature for colon cancer survival prognosis based on the Cancer Genomic Common database. miRNAs levels between colon cancer and non-cancer tissues were screened by t-test (p < 0.05). Kaplan-Meier survival method was used to discriminate survival significant miRNAs, followed by miRNAs index accumulation to power the miRNAs-survival reliability. In the end, we test the selected miRNAs in HT126 colon cancer cells to validate its anti-cancer effect. The study identified a 84-miRNAs signature. Of the above 84 miRNAs, we got four miRNAs which were survival associated by using ROC curve method and Kaplan-Meier survival method (p < 0.001). The result showed that low risk group had quite a low death rate, the survival rate was over 80%. The high risk group had survival rate lower than 20%, which was also extremely lower than the overall survival rate. In the HT126 cells study, cell growth assay showed miR-130a sponge inhibited colon cancer cells growth and sensitized the anti-cancer drug effect of 5-FU to blocked cancer cell growth. We developed a prognostic 4-microRNA expression signature for colon cancer patient survival, and validated miR-130a sponge could sensitized 5-FU anti-cancer effect. PMID:27974852

  18. Neuropilin-1 in human colon cancer: expression, regulation, and role in induction of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Alexander A; Fan, Fan; Liu, Wen Biao; Ahmad, Syed A; Stoeltzing, Oliver; Reinmuth, Niels; Bielenberg, Diane; Bucana, Corazon D; Klagsbrun, Michael; Ellis, Lee M

    2004-06-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1), a recently identified co-receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor, is expressed by several nongastrointestinal tumor types and enhances prostate cancer angiogenesis and growth in preclinical models. We investigated the expression and regulation of NRP-1 and the effect of NRP-1 overexpression on angiogenesis and growth of human colon adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. NRP-1 was expressed in 20 of 20 human colon adenocarcinoma specimens but not in the adjacent nonmalignant colonic mucosa. By reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis, NRP-1 mRNA was expressed in seven of seven colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Subcutaneous xenografts of stably transfected KM12SM/LM2 human colon cancer cells overexpressing NRP-1 led to increased tumor growth and angiogenesis in nude mice. In in vitro assays, conditioned medium from NRP-1-transfected cell lines led to an increase in endothelial cell migration, but did not affect endothelial cell growth. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) led to induction of NRP-1 in human colon adenocarcinoma cells and selective blockade of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) decreased constitutive and EGF-induced NRP-1 expression. Blockade of the Erk 1/2 and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways also led to a decrease in constitutive and EGF-induced NRP-1 expression. These findings demonstrate the ubiquitous expression of NRP-1 in human colon cancer and suggest that NRP-1 may contribute to colon cancer angiogenesis and growth. This study also suggests that EGF and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways play an important role in NRP-1 regulation in colon cancer cells.

  19. Polarization of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment is influenced by EGFR signaling within colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weina; Chen, Lechuang; Ma, Kai; Zhao, Yahui; Liu, Xianghe; Wang, Yu; Liu, Mei; Liang, Shufang; Zhu, Hongxia; Xu, Ningzhi

    2016-11-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target of colon cancer therapy, but the effects of this therapy on the tumor microenvironment remain poorly understood. Our in vivo studies showed that cetuximab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, effectively inhibited AOM/DSS-induced, colitis-associated tumorigenesis, downregulated M2-related markers, and decreased F4/80+/CD206+ macrophage populations. Treatment with conditioned medium of colon cancer cells increased macrophage expression of the M2-related markers arginase-1 (Arg1), CCL17, CCL22, IL-10 and IL-4. By contrast, conditioned medium of EGFR knockout colon cancer cells inhibited expression of these M2-related markers and induced macrophage expression of the M1-related markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), IL-12, TNF-α and CCR7. EGFR knockout in colon cancer cells inhibited macrophage-induced promotion of xenograft tumor growth. Moreover, colon cancer-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) increased Arg1 expression, and treatment with the IGF1R inhibitor AG1024 inhibited that increase. These results suggest that inhibition of EGFR signaling in colon cancer cells modulates cytokine secretion (e.g. IGF-1) and prevents M1-to-M2 macrophage polarization, thereby inhibiting cancer cell growth.

  20. Polarization of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment is influenced by EGFR signaling within colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weina; Chen, Lechuang; Ma, Kai; Zhao, Yahui; Liu, Xianghe; Wang, Yu; Liu, Mei; Liang, Shufang; Zhu, Hongxia; Xu, Ningzhi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a target of colon cancer therapy, but the effects of this therapy on the tumor microenvironment remain poorly understood. Our in vivo studies showed that cetuximab, an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, effectively inhibited AOM/DSS-induced, colitis-associated tumorigenesis, downregulated M2-related markers, and decreased F4/80+/CD206+ macrophage populations. Treatment with conditioned medium of colon cancer cells increased macrophage expression of the M2-related markers arginase-1 (Arg1), CCL17, CCL22, IL-10 and IL-4. By contrast, conditioned medium of EGFR knockout colon cancer cells inhibited expression of these M2-related markers and induced macrophage expression of the M1-related markers inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), IL-12, TNF-α and CCR7. EGFR knockout in colon cancer cells inhibited macrophage-induced promotion of xenograft tumor growth. Moreover, colon cancer-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) increased Arg1 expression, and treatment with the IGF1R inhibitor AG1024 inhibited that increase. These results suggest that inhibition of EGFR signaling in colon cancer cells modulates cytokine secretion (e.g. IGF-1) and prevents M1-to-M2 macrophage polarization, thereby inhibiting cancer cell growth. PMID:27683110

  1. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  2. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  3. Colon Cancer on The Rise Among Gen Xers, Millennials

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colon Cancer on the Rise Among Gen Xers, Millennials And an old adversary -- the obesity epidemic -- may ... their early 50s and younger -- Gen Xers and millennials -- are experiencing significant increases in colon and rectal ...

  4. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-06-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  5. [The role of NF-kappaB in colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Seo, Geom Seog

    2011-01-01

    Colon cancer is the 3rd common malignancy and 4th common cause of cancer death in Korea. Recent studies have shown that abnormal inflammatory response plays a critical role in colon carcinogenesis. A striking example of connection between inflammation and cancer is NF-kappaB, in which key regulator of inflammation and immune response is associated with target for colon cancer treatment. Constitutive NF-kappaB expression in colon cancer is 40-80% in vivo as well as in vitro, and the inactivation of IKKbeta subunit can reduce tumor multiplicity. The possible mechanisms by which NF-kappaB can contribute to colon carcinogenesis include the activator of antiapoptotic gene expression, enhanced cell survival and proliferation, regulation of angiogenesis and promotion of metastasis of cancer cells. Recent insights into the role of NF-kappaB involved in colon cancer development as well as their relevance as therapeutic targets are herein discussed.

  6. Nutraceuticals as potential therapeutic agents for colon cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kuppusamy, Palaniselvam; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Ichwan, Solachuddin Jauhari Arief; Soundharrajan, Ilavenil; Govindan, Natanamurugaraj

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is a world-wide health problem and the second-most dangerous type of cancer, affecting both men and women. The modern diet and lifestyles, with high meat consumption and excessive alcohol use, along with limited physical activity has led to an increasing mortality rate for colon cancer worldwide. As a result, there is a need to develop novel and environmentally benign drug therapies for colon cancer. Currently, nutraceuticals play an increasingly important role in the treatment of various chronic diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer׳s disease. Nutraceuticals are derived from various natural sources such as medicinal plants, marine organisms, vegetables and fruits. Nutraceuticals have shown the potential to reduce the risk of colon cancer and slow its progression. These dietary substances target different molecular aspects of colon cancer development. Accordingly, this review briefly discusses the medicinal importance of nutraceuticals and their ability to reduce the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:26579381

  7. Engineered Resistant-Starch (ERS) Diet Shapes Colon Microbiota Profile in Parallel with the Retardation of Tumor Growth in In Vitro and In Vivo Pancreatic Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Concetta; Adamberg, Kaarel; Adamberg, Signe; Saracino, Chiara; Jaagura, Madis; Kolk, Kaia; Di Chio, Anna Grazia; Graziano, Paolo; Vilu, Raivo; Pazienza, Valerio

    2017-03-27

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is ranked as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite recent advances in treatment options, a modest impact on the outcome of the disease is observed so far. We have previously demonstrated that short-term fasting cycles have the potential to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy against PC. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an engineered resistant-starch (ERS) mimicking diet on the growth of cancer cell lines in vitro, on the composition of fecal microbiota, and on tumor growth in an in vivo pancreatic cancer mouse xenograft model. BxPC-3, MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells were cultured in the control, and in the ERS-mimicking diet culturing condition, to evaluate tumor growth and proliferation pathways. Pancreatic cancer xenograft mice were subjected to an ERS diet to assess tumor volume and weight as compared to mice fed with a control diet. The composition and activity of fecal microbiota were further analyzed in growth experiments by isothermal microcalorimetry. Pancreatic cancer cells cultured in an ERS diet-mimicking medium showed decreased levels of phospho-ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase proteins) and phospho-mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) levels, as compared to those cultured in standard medium. Consistently, xenograft pancreatic cancer mice subjected to an ERS diet displayed significant retardation in tumor growth. In in vitro growth experiments, the fecal microbial cultures from mice fed with an ERS diet showed enhanced growth on residual substrates, higher production of formate and lactate, and decreased amounts of propionate, compared to fecal microbiota from mice fed with the control diet. A positive effect of the ERS diet on composition and metabolism of mouse fecal microbiota shown in vitro is associated with the decrease of tumor progression in the in vivo PC xenograft mouse model. These results suggest that engineered dietary interventions could be supportive as a

  8. Engineered Resistant-Starch (ERS) Diet Shapes Colon Microbiota Profile in Parallel with the Retardation of Tumor Growth in In Vitro and In Vivo Pancreatic Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Panebianco, Concetta; Adamberg, Kaarel; Adamberg, Signe; Saracino, Chiara; Jaagura, Madis; Kolk, Kaia; Di Chio, Anna Grazia; Graziano, Paolo; Vilu, Raivo; Pazienza, Valerio

    2017-01-01

    Background/aims: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is ranked as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite recent advances in treatment options, a modest impact on the outcome of the disease is observed so far. We have previously demonstrated that short-term fasting cycles have the potential to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy against PC. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an engineered resistant-starch (ERS) mimicking diet on the growth of cancer cell lines in vitro, on the composition of fecal microbiota, and on tumor growth in an in vivo pancreatic cancer mouse xenograft model. Materials and Methods: BxPC-3, MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells were cultured in the control, and in the ERS-mimicking diet culturing condition, to evaluate tumor growth and proliferation pathways. Pancreatic cancer xenograft mice were subjected to an ERS diet to assess tumor volume and weight as compared to mice fed with a control diet. The composition and activity of fecal microbiota were further analyzed in growth experiments by isothermal microcalorimetry. Results: Pancreatic cancer cells cultured in an ERS diet-mimicking medium showed decreased levels of phospho-ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase proteins) and phospho-mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) levels, as compared to those cultured in standard medium. Consistently, xenograft pancreatic cancer mice subjected to an ERS diet displayed significant retardation in tumor growth. In in vitro growth experiments, the fecal microbial cultures from mice fed with an ERS diet showed enhanced growth on residual substrates, higher production of formate and lactate, and decreased amounts of propionate, compared to fecal microbiota from mice fed with the control diet. Conclusion: A positive effect of the ERS diet on composition and metabolism of mouse fecal microbiota shown in vitro is associated with the decrease of tumor progression in the in vivo PC xenograft mouse model. These results suggest that

  9. Induction of KIAA1199/CEMIP is associated with colon cancer phenotype and poor patient survival.

    PubMed

    Fink, Stephen P; Myeroff, Lois L; Kariv, Revital; Platzer, Petra; Xin, Baozhong; Mikkola, Debra; Lawrence, Earl; Morris, Nathan; Nosrati, Arman; Willson, James K V; Willis, Joseph; Veigl, Martina; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Wang, Zhenghe; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2015-10-13

    Genes induced in colon cancer provide novel candidate biomarkers of tumor phenotype and aggressiveness. We originally identified KIAA1199 (now officially called CEMIP) as a transcript highly induced in colon cancer: initially designating the transcript as Colon Cancer Secreted Protein 1. We molecularly characterized CEMIP expression both at the mRNA and protein level and found it is a secreted protein induced an average of 54-fold in colon cancer. Knockout of CEMIPreduced the ability of human colon cancer cells to form xenograft tumors in athymic mice. Tumors that did grow had increased deposition of hyaluronan, linking CEMIP participation in hyaluronan degradation to the modulation of tumor phenotype. We find CEMIP mRNA overexpression correlates with poorer patient survival. In stage III only (n = 31) or in combined stage II plus stage III colon cancer cases (n = 73), 5-year overall survival was significantly better (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0003, respectively) among patients with low CEMIP expressing tumors than those with high CEMIP expressing tumors. These results demonstrate that CEMIP directly facilitates colon tumor growth, and high CEMIP expression correlates with poor outcome in stage III and in stages II+III combined cohorts. We present CEMIP as a candidate prognostic marker for colon cancer and a potential therapeutic target.

  10. Induction of KIAA1199/CEMIP is associated with colon cancer phenotype and poor patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Stephen P.; Myeroff, Lois L.; Kariv, Revital; Platzer, Petra; Xin, Baozhong; Mikkola, Debra; Lawrence, Earl; Morris, Nathan; Nosrati, Arman; Willson, James K. V.; Willis, Joseph; Veigl, Martina; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Wang, Zhenghe; Markowitz, Sanford D.

    2015-01-01

    Genes induced in colon cancer provide novel candidate biomarkers of tumor phenotype and aggressiveness. We originally identified KIAA1199 (now officially called CEMIP) as a transcript highly induced in colon cancer: initially designating the transcript as Colon Cancer Secreted Protein 1. We molecularly characterized CEMIP expression both at the mRNA and protein level and found it is a secreted protein induced an average of 54-fold in colon cancer. Knockout of CEMIPreduced the ability of human colon cancer cells to form xenograft tumors in athymic mice. Tumors that did grow had increased deposition of hyaluronan, linking CEMIP participation in hyaluronan degradation to the modulation of tumor phenotype. We find CEMIP mRNA overexpression correlates with poorer patient survival. In stage III only (n = 31) or in combined stage II plus stage III colon cancer cases (n = 73), 5-year overall survival was significantly better (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0003, respectively) among patients with low CEMIP expressing tumors than those with high CEMIP expressing tumors. These results demonstrate that CEMIP directly facilitates colon tumor growth, and high CEMIP expression correlates with poor outcome in stage III and in stages II+III combined cohorts. We present CEMIP as a candidate prognostic marker for colon cancer and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26437221

  11. Three components of cigarette smoke altered the growth and apoptosis of metastatic colon cancer cells via inducing the synthesis of reactive oxygen species and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Miru; Kim, Cho-Won; Hwang, Kyung-A; Choi, Dal-Woong; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-07-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is a well-known risk factor for carcinogenesis and has been found to be related to the occurrence and development of colon cancer. In this study, the effect of formaldehyde (FA), benzene (Bz), and isoprene (IP), which are included in main components of CS, on cell viability and apoptosis of SW620 colorectal cancer cells was examined to identify the connection between CS components and colon cancer. In cell viability assay, FA, Bz, and IP decreased cell viability of SW620 cells in a dose dependent manner. In Western blot assay, the protein expression of cell cycle related genes, cyclin D1 & E1, was decreased by FA, Bz, and IP, which corresponded to their inhibitory effect on cell viability. In addition, FA, Bz, and IP increased the protein expression of pro-apoptotic genes, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and Bax, and reduced the protein expression of anti-apoptotic gene, Bcl-2. In reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay using dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA), FA, Bz, and IP increased the ROS production in SW620 cells. In the measurement of apoptotic cells, the numbers of apoptotic cells were increased by the treatment of FA, Bz, and IP. As CHOP is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress related apoptosis marker of which production is induced by ROS, it was considered that these CS components induce apoptosis of SW620 cells by increasing ROS synthesis and ER-stress. Taken together, these results showed that CS components, i.e., FA, Bz, and IP, inhibited the cell viability of SW620 cells by down-regulating the protein expression of cyclin D1 & E1 and induced apoptosis of SW620 cells by increasing ROS production and simultaneously activating ER-stress.

  12. Niclosamide inhibition of STAT3 synergizes with erlotinib in human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lingyi; Zheng, Hailun; Hu, Wanle; Zhou, Bin; Dai, Xuanxuan; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Zhiguo; Wu, Xiaoping; Zhao, Chengguang; Liang, Guang

    2017-01-01

    Niclosamide, an anthelmintic drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration against cestodes, is used to treat tapeworm infection. In this study, we show that niclosamide can potentially inhibit signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in colon cancer cell lines. Combined inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor and STAT3 by erlotinib and niclosamide synergistically induces apoptosis and antiproliferation in colon cancer cell lines. Our findings suggest that erlotinib and niclosamide combination provides an effective therapeutic approach to improving the prognosis of colon cancer. PMID:28367059

  13. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Olson, Kenneth R.; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin is the first dual acting NO and H{sub 2}S releasing hybrid. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its IC{sub 50} for cell growth inhibition is in the low nano-molar range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure-activity studies show that the sum of the parts does not equal the whole. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NOSH-aspirin reduced tumor growth by 85% in mice bearing a colon cancer xenograft. -- Abstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prototypical anti-cancer agents. However, their long-term use is associated with adverse gastrointestinal effects. Recognition that endogenous gaseous mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) can increase mucosal defense mechanisms has led to the development of NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing NSAIDs with increased safety profiles. Here we report on a new hybrid, NOSH-aspirin, which is an NO- and H{sub 2}S-releasing agent. NOSH-aspirin inhibited HT-29 colon cancer growth with IC{sub 50}s of 45.5 {+-} 2.5, 19.7 {+-} 3.3, and 7.7 {+-} 2.2 nM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. This is the first NSAID based agent with such high degree of potency. NOSH-aspirin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle block. Reconstitution and structure-activity studies representing a fairly close approximation to the intact molecule showed that NOSH-aspirin was 9000-fold more potent than the sum of its parts towards growth inhibition. NOSH-aspirin inhibited ovine COX-1 more than ovine COX-2. NOSH-ASA treatment of mice bearing a human colon cancer xenograft caused a reduction in volume of 85%. Taken together, these results demonstrate that NOSH-aspirin has strong anti-cancer potential and merits further evaluation.

  14. Activation of ERK signaling and induction of colon cancer cell death by piperlongumine.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, H; Kibble, K; Zeng, H; Moyer, M P; Reindl, K M

    2013-09-01

    Piperlongumine (PPLGM) is a bioactive compound isolated from long peppers that shows selective toxicity towards a variety of cancer cell types including colon cancer. The signaling pathways that lead to cancer cell death in response to PPLGM exposure have not been previously identified. Our objective was to identify the intracellular signaling mechanisms by which PPLGM leads to enhanced colon cancer cell death. We found that PPLGM inhibited the growth of colon cancer cells in time- and concentration-dependent manners, but was not toxic toward normal colon mucosal cells at concentrations below 10 μM. Acute (0-60 min) and prolonged (24h) exposure of HT-29 cells to PPLGM resulted in phosphorylation of ERK. To investigate whether ERK signaling was involved in PPLGM-mediated cell death, we treated HT-29 cells with the MEK inhibitor U0126, prior to treating with PPLGM. We found that U0126 attenuated PPLGM-induced activation of ERK and partially protected against PPLGM-induced cell death. These results suggest that PPLGM works, at least in part, through the MEK/ERK pathway to result in colon cancer cell death. A more thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which PPLGM induces colon cancer cell death will be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to treat colon cancer.

  15. Thrombospondin 2 expression is correlated with inhibition of angiogenesis and metastasis of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, T; Nakamura, M; Oshika, Y; Abe, Y; Ozeki, Y; Fukushima, Y; Hatanaka, H; Sadahiro, S; Kijima, H; Tsuchida, T; Yamazaki, H; Tamaoki, N; Ueyama, Y

    1999-01-01

    Two subtypes of thrombospondin (TSP-1 and TSP-2) have inhibitory roles in angiogenesis in vitro, although the biological significance of these TSP isoforms has not been determined in vivo. We examined TSP-1 and TSP-2 gene expression by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis in 61 colon cancers. Thirty-eight of these 61 colon cancers were positive for TSP-2 expression and showed hepatic metastasis at a significantly lower incidence than those without TSP-2 expression (P = 0.02). TSP-2 expression was significantly associated with M0 stage in these colon cancers (P = 0.03), whereas TSP-1 expression showed no apparent correlation with these factors. The colon cancer patients with TSP-2 expression showed a significantly low frequency of liver metastasis correlated with the cell-associated isoform of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-189) (P = 0.0006). Vascularity was estimated by CD34 staining, and TSP-2(–)/VEGF-189(+) colon cancers showed significantly increased vessel counts and density in the stroma (P < 0.0001). TSP-2(–)/VEGF-189(+) colon cancer patients also showed significantly poorer prognosis compared with those with TSP-2(+) / VEGF-189(–) (P = 0.0014). These results suggest that colon cancer metastasis is critically determined by angiogenesis resulting from the balance between the angioinhibitory factor TSP-2 and angiogenic factor VEGF-189. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:9888480

  16. Cutaneous metastasis of colon cancer: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Nicholas; Powers, Jeremy; Richmond, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous metastases arising from an internal malignancy are a rare phenomenon, occurring in 0.001% of all skin biopsies performed. Of these, 6.5% originate from the a primary colon cancer. Colon cancer, when metastatic to the skin, typically appears as a painless flesh-colored nodule or as a mass with occasional ulceration. We report a case of a large cutaneous metastasis to the suprascapular region as the initial presenting symptom of an underlying colon cancer.

  17. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Colon or Rectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-13

    Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Colon Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Signet Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  18. Hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α) promotes colon cancer growth by potentiating Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoya; Zhang, Huabing; Xue, Xiang; Shah, Yatrik M

    2017-08-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third-leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and other industrialized countries. A hypoxic microenvironment is a hallmark for solid tumors. The hypoxia-induced signal transduction is transcriptionally mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Three major HIF isoforms HIF-1, HIF-2, and HIF-3 are present in the intestine. Our previous work demonstrates that HIF-2 is essential for CRC growth and progression. However, the mechanisms mediating cell proliferation following hypoxia or HIF-2 activation in CRC are unclear. Data mining of RNA-Seq experiments with mouse models of intestinal HIF-2 or Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) overexpression indicates a significant overlap of genes in these conditions. YAP1 is a transcriptional co-activator in the Hippo signaling pathway, and YAP1-induced transcriptional responses are essential in cancer cell proliferation. Here, we report that HIF-2 robustly increases YAP1 expression and activity in CRC-derived cell lines and in mouse models. The potentiation of YAP1 activity by HIF-2 was not via canonical signaling mechanisms such as Src (non-receptor tyrosine kinase), PI3K, ERK, or MAPK pathways. Moreover, we detected no direct interaction of HIF-2 with YAP1. Of note, YAP1 activation was critical for cancer cell growth under hypoxia. Our findings indicate that HIF-2 increases cancer cell growth by upregulating YAP1 activity, suggesting that this pathway might be targeted in potential anti-cancer approaches for treating CRC patients. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Estrogen in obesity-associated colon cancer: friend or foe? Protecting postmenopausal women but promoting late-stage colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Iverson, Don

    2012-11-01

    Obesity is associated with the increased incidence of colon cancer. Many cancer risk factors have been identified including increased blood levels of insulin, leptin, interleukin-6, interleukin-17, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and decreased blood levels of adiponectin. However, the role of blood levels of estrogen in obesity-associated colon cancer is controversial. Evidence showed that obesity affected men more strongly than women in the carcinogenesis of colon cancer, indicating protective effect of estrogen which is increased in obesity. However, an epidemiological study has also shown that endogenous estradiol level is an independent risk factor for colon cancer, positively associated with colon cancer after normalizing insulin, IGF-1. The controversial opinions may be caused by different effects of ER-alpha and ER-beta. ER-alpha can increase colon cancer cell proliferation and increase cancer incidence. ER-beta has the opposite effect to ER-alpha, and it causes apoptosis of colon cancer cells. The normal colonocytes mainly express ER-beta. Therefore, increased estrogen in obesity may have protective effect via ER-beta in obesity-associated colon cancer. However, with the development of colon cancer, ER-alpha is increased and ER-beta is decreased. In the late stage of colon cancer, estrogen may promote cancer development via ER-alpha. The different effects and expression of ER-alpha and ER-beta may explain the different results observed in several epidemiological studies as well as several animal experiments. Therefore, manipulation of estrogen-caused signal pathways to inhibit ER-alpha and stimulate ER-beta may have preventive and therapeutic effect for obesity-associated colon cancer.

  20. CacyBP/SIP promotes the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Huihong; Shi, Yongquan; Chen, Xiong; Wang, Jun; Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Faming; Liu, Zhengxiong; Lei, Ting; Fan, Daiming

    2017-01-01

    CacyBP/SIP is a component of the ubiquitin pathway and is overexpressed in several transformed tumor tissues, including colon cancer, which is one of the most common cancers worldwide. It is unknown whether CacyBP/SIP promotes the proliferation of colon cancer cells. This study examined the expression level, subcellular localization, and binding activity of CacyBP/SIP in human colon cancer cells in the presence and absence of the hormone gastrin. We found that CacyBP/SIP was expressed in a high percentage of colon cancer cells, but not in normal colonic surface epithelium. CacyBP/SIP promoted the cell proliferation of colon cancer cells under both basal and gastrin stimulated conditions as shown by knockdown studies. Gastrin stimulation triggered the translocation of CacyBP/SIP to the nucleus, and enhanced interaction between CacyBP/SIP and SKP1, a key component of ubiquitination pathway which further mediated the proteasome-dependent degradation of p27kip1 protein. The gastrin induced reduction in p27kip1 was prevented when cells were treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132. These results suggest that CacyBP/SIP may be promoting growth of colon cancer cells by enhancing ubiquitin-mediated degradation of p27kip1.

  1. CacyBP/SIP promotes the proliferation of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiong; Wang, Jun; Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Faming; Liu, Zhengxiong; Lei, Ting; Fan, Daiming

    2017-01-01

    CacyBP/SIP is a component of the ubiquitin pathway and is overexpressed in several transformed tumor tissues, including colon cancer, which is one of the most common cancers worldwide. It is unknown whether CacyBP/SIP promotes the proliferation of colon cancer cells. This study examined the expression level, subcellular localization, and binding activity of CacyBP/SIP in human colon cancer cells in the presence and absence of the hormone gastrin. We found that CacyBP/SIP was expressed in a high percentage of colon cancer cells, but not in normal colonic surface epithelium. CacyBP/SIP promoted the cell proliferation of colon cancer cells under both basal and gastrin stimulated conditions as shown by knockdown studies. Gastrin stimulation triggered the translocation of CacyBP/SIP to the nucleus, and enhanced interaction between CacyBP/SIP and SKP1, a key component of ubiquitination pathway which further mediated the proteasome-dependent degradation of p27kip1 protein. The gastrin induced reduction in p27kip1 was prevented when cells were treated with the proteasome inhibitor MG132. These results suggest that CacyBP/SIP may be promoting growth of colon cancer cells by enhancing ubiquitin-mediated degradation of p27kip1. PMID:28196083

  2. Rsf-1 overexpression correlates with poor prognosis and cell proliferation in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuli; Dong, Qianze; Wang, Enhua

    2012-10-01

    Rsf-1 (HBXAP) was recently reported to be overexpressed in various cancers and associated with the malignant behavior of cancer cells. However, the expression of Rsf-1 and its biological roles in colon cancer have not been reported. The molecular mechanism of Rsf-1 in cancer aggressiveness remains ambiguous. In the present study, we analyzed the expression pattern of Rsf-1 in colon cancer tissues and found that Rsf-1 was overexpressed in 50.4 % of colon cancer specimens. There was a significant association between Rsf-1 overexpression and TNM stage (p = 0.0205), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0025), and poor differentiation (p = 0.0235). Furthermore, Rsf-1 overexpression correlated with a poor prognosis in colon cancer patients (p = 0.0011). In addition, knockdown of Rsf-1 expression in HT29 and HCT116 cells with high endogenous Rsf-1 expression decrease cell proliferation and colony formation ability. Further analysis showed that Rsf-1 knockdown decreased cyclin E expression and phospho-Rb level. In conclusion, Rsf-1 is overexpressed in colon cancers and contributes to malignant cell growth by cyclin E and phospho-Rb modulation, which makes Rsf-1 a candidate therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  3. MicroRNA-1299 is a negative regulator of STAT3 in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Lu, Zhi; Wang, Ningning; Zhang, Man; Zeng, Xiandong; Zhao, Wei

    2017-06-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) is a family of transcription factors which regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, metastasis, immune and inflammatory responses, and angiogenesis. STAT3 is a latent cytoplasmic transcription factor that belongs to STATs. STAT3 has been reported be regulates genes involved with cellular growth, proliferation and metastasis. Worldwide, colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Cumulative evidence has established that STAT3 is essential for colon cancer progression to advanced malignancy. In our study, we showed that microRNA-1299 (miR-1299) was closely related to the TNM stage of colon cancer, and that the expression of miR-1299 was negatively correlated with the expression of STAT3 in colon cancer which means that miR-1299 can be a negative regulator of STAT3 in colon cancer. A total of 60 cases of different grades of colon samples were used to detect the expression of miR-1299. Results showed that miR-1299 was significantly lower in high-grade colons both in mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, Overall survival (OS) in patients with low miR-1299 is shorter than 25.6 months, as compared with an OS of 28.4 months in patients with high level of miR-1299. We also confirmed that the overexpression of miR-1299 can not only downregulate the STAT3 pathway, but also inhibited colon cancer cell growth. Our findings could provide new insights into the molecular therapeutic of colon cancer.

  4. MicroRNA-1299 is a negative regulator of STAT3 in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Lu, Zhi; Wang, Ningning; Zhang, Man; Zeng, Xiandong; Zhao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) is a family of transcription factors which regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, metastasis, immune and inflammatory responses, and angiogenesis. STAT3 is a latent cytoplasmic transcription factor that belongs to STATs. STAT3 has been reported be regulates genes involved with cellular growth, proliferation and metastasis. Worldwide, colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Cumulative evidence has established that STAT3 is essential for colon cancer progression to advanced malignancy. In our study, we showed that microRNA-1299 (miR-1299) was closely related to the TNM stage of colon cancer, and that the expression of miR-1299 was negatively correlated with the expression of STAT3 in colon cancer which means that miR-1299 can be a negative regulator of STAT3 in colon cancer. A total of 60 cases of different grades of colon samples were used to detect the expression of miR-1299. Results showed that miR-1299 was significantly lower in high-grade colons both in mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, Overall survival (OS) in patients with low miR-1299 is shorter than 25.6 months, as compared with an OS of 28.4 months in patients with high level of miR-1299. We also confirmed that the overexpression of miR-1299 can not only downregulate the STAT3 pathway, but also inhibited colon cancer cell growth. Our findings could provide new insights into the molecular therapeutic of colon cancer. PMID:28498395

  5. Minimally invasive colorectal resection is associated with a rapid and sustained decrease in plasma levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the colon cancer setting.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Michael J; Shantha Kumara, H M C; Baxter, Raymond; Dujovny, Nadav; Kalady, Matthew F; Cekic, Vesna; Luchtefeld, Martin; Whelan, Richard L

    2010-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates tumor growth directly via tumor cell EGF receptors or indirectly via its proangiogenic effects. This study's purpose was to determine the impact of minimally invasive colorectal resection (MICR) on postoperative (postop) plasma EGF levels in the colorectal cancer (CRC) and benign disease settings and to see if preoperative (PreOp) EGF levels are altered in cancer patients. MICR patients with benign pathology (n = 40) and CRC (n = 48) had blood samples taken PreOp and on postoperative days (POD) 1 and 3. In some patients, late samples were taken between POD7 and POD60; these were bundled into 7-day blocks and considered as single time points. EGF levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and results were reported as mean ± SD after logarithmic transformation. The Student t test was used (p < 0.008 after Bonferroni correction). The cancer and benign groups were comparable except for age. The mean PreOp CRC plasma EGF level (122.9 ± 75.9 pg/ml) was significantly higher than that of the benign group (85.3 ± 38.5 pg/ml) (p = 0.015). The cancer group's EGF levels were significantly decreased on POD1 and POD3 and for the POD31-55 time point (mean EGF level = 63.1 ± 42.2 (n = 10). The benign group's POD3 and POD7-14 EGF levels were significantly lower than the PreOp level; later levels returned toward baseline. Small late sample size limited analysis. Plasma EGF levels are significantly higher in cancer patients. MICR is associated with a significant decrease in EGF levels early postop in both cancer and benign settings. Unlike the benign group, EGF blood levels in cancer patients remain low during the second postop month. A larger study with more late samples is needed to verify these results. EGF may have value as a tumor marker.

  6. Diet, genes, and microbes: complexities of colon cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Birt, Diane F; Phillips, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and generally, as countries climb the economic ladder, their rates of colon cancer increase. Colon cancer was an early disease where key genetic mutations were identified as important in disease progression, and there is considerable interest in determining whether specific mutations sensitize the colon to cancer prevention strategies. Epidemiological studies have revealed that fiber- and vegetable-rich diets and physical activity are associated with reduced rates of colon cancer, while consumption of red and processed meat, or alcoholic beverages, and overconsumption as reflected in obesity are associated with increased rates. Animal studies have probed these effects and suggested directions for further refinement of diet in colon cancer prevention. Recently a central role for the microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract in colon cancer development is being probed, and it is hypothesized that the microbes may integrate diet and host genetics in the etiology of the disease. This review provides background on dietary, genetic, and microbial impacts on colon cancer and describes an ongoing project using rodent models to assess the ability of digestion-resistant starch in the integration of these factors with the goal of furthering colon cancer prevention.

  7. Colon cancer presenting as a testicular metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Mohiuddin, Majid; Sharif, Asma

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 43-year-old male who initially presented with intermittent testicular pain as the first sign of metastatic stage IV colon cancer. Physical examination revealed a normal penis, scrotum and testes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pelvis showed an irregular 3 cm mass of the spermatic cord and right radical inguinal orchiectomy was performed. The pathological diagnosis was metastatic adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, even though metastases to the testes are rare, they should be considered in clinical practice especially in older men who present with a testicular mass or discomfort. PMID:28138654

  8. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by prostaglandin E2 stimulation of the prostanoid EP4 receptor via coupling to Gαi and transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in HCA-7 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenji; Fujino, Hiromichi; Otake, Sho; Seira, Naofumi; Regan, John W; Murayama, Toshihiko

    2013-10-15

    Increased expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and its downstream metabolite, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), are well documented events in the development of colorectal cancer. Interestingly, PGE2 itself can induce the expression of COX-2 thereby creating the potential for positive feedback. Although evidence for such a positive feedback has been previously described, the specific E-type prostanoid (EP) receptor subtype that mediates this response, as well as the relevant signaling pathways, remain unclear. We now report that the PGE2 stimulated induction of COX-2 expression in human colon cancer HCA-7 cells is mediated by activation of the prostanoid EP4 receptor subtype and is followed by coupling of the receptor to Gαi and the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Subsequent activation of metalloproteinases releases membrane bound heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor resulting in the transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases and induction of COX-2 expression. This induction of COX-2 expression by PGE2 stimulation of the prostanoid EP4 receptor may underlie the upregulation of COX-2 during colorectal cancer and appears to be an early event in the process of tumorigenesis. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Endoscopic Localization of Colon Cancer Is Frequently Inaccurate.

    PubMed

    Nayor, Jennifer; Rotman, Stephen R; Chan, Walter W; Goldberg, Joel E; Saltzman, John R

    2017-08-01

    Colonoscopic location of a tumor can influence both the surgical procedure choice and overall treatment strategy. To determine the accuracy of colonoscopy in determining the location of colon cancer compared to surgical localization and to elucidate factors that predict discordant colon cancer localization. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study of colon cancers diagnosed on colonoscopy at two academic tertiary-care hospitals and two affiliated community hospitals from 2012 to 2014. Colon cancer location was obtained from the endoscopic and surgical pathology reports and characterized by colon segment. We collected data on patient demographics, tumor characteristics, endoscopic procedure characteristics, surgery planned, and surgery performed. Univariate analyses using Chi-squared test and multivariate analysis using forward stepwise logistic regression were performed to determine factors that predict discordant colon cancer localization. There were 110 colon cancer cases identified during the study period. Inaccurate endoscopic colon cancer localization was found in 29% (32/110) of cases. These included 14 cases (12.7%) that were discordant by more than one colonic segment and three cases where the presurgical planned procedure was significantly changed at the time of surgery. On univariate analyses, right-sided colon lesions were associated with increased inaccuracy (43.8 vs 24.4%, p = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, right-sided colon lesions remained independently associated with inaccuracy (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.03-2.93, p = 0.04). Colon cancer location as determined by colonoscopy is often inaccurate, which can result in intraoperative changes to surgical management, particularly in the right colon.

  10. Effects of iodonium-class flavin dehydrogenase inhibitors on growth, reactive oxygen production, cell cycle progression, NADPH oxidase 1 levels, and gene expression in human colon cancer cells and xenografts.

    PubMed

    Doroshow, James H; Gaur, Shikha; Markel, Susan; Lu, Jiamo; van Balgooy, Josephus; Synold, Timothy W; Xi, Bixin; Wu, Xiwei; Juhasz, Agnes

    2013-04-01

    Iodonium-class flavoprotein dehydrogenase inhibitors have been demonstrated to possess antiproliferative potential and to inhibit reactive oxygen production in human tumor cells, although the mechanism(s) that explains the relationship between altered cell growth and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) remains an area of active investigation. Because of the ability of these compounds to inhibit the activity of flavoprotein-containing epithelial NADPH oxidases, we chose to examine the effects of several iodonium-class flavoprotein inhibitors on human colon cancer cell lines that express high, functional levels of a single such oxidase (NADPH oxidase 1, or Nox1). We found that diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), di-2-thienyliodonium (DTI), and iodonium diphenyl inhibited the growth of Caco2, HT-29, and LS-174T colon cancer cells at concentrations (10-250nM for DPI, 0.5-2.5μM for DTI, and 155nM to 10μM for iodonium diphenyl) substantially lower than needed for DU145 human prostate cancer cells, which do not possess functional NADPH oxidase activity. Drug treatment was associated with decreased H2O2 production and diminished intracellular ROS levels, lasting up to 24h, after short-term (1-h) exposure to the iodonium analogs. Decreased tumor cell proliferation was caused, in part, by a profound block in cell cycle progression at the G1/S interface in both LS-174T and HT-29 cells exposed to either DPI or DTI; and the G1 block was produced, for LS-174T cells, by upregulation of p27 and a drug concentration-related decrease in the expression of cyclins D1, A, and E that was partially prevented by exogenous H2O2. Not only did DPI and DTI decrease intracellular ROS, they both also significantly decreased the mRNA expression levels of Nox1, potentially contributing to the prolonged reduction in tumor cell reactive oxygen levels. We also found that DPI and DTI significantly decreased the growth of both HT-29 and LS-174T human tumor xenografts, at dose levels that produced

  11. Caffeic Acid Derivatives Inhibit the Growth of Colon Cancer: Involvement of the PI3-K/Akt and AMPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Pai, Man-Hui; Chiu, Hsi-Lin; Rodriguez, Raymond L.; Tang, Feng-Yao

    2014-01-01

    Background The aberrant regulation of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3-K)/Akt, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR) signaling pathways in cancer has prompted significant interest in the suppression of these pathways to treat cancer. Caffeic acid (CA) has been reported to possess important anti-inflammatory actions. However, the molecular mechanisms by which CA derivatives including caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and caffeic acid phenylpropyl ester (CAPPE), exert inhibitory effects on the proliferation of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells have yet to be elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings CAPE and CAPPE were evaluated for their ability to modulate these signaling pathways and suppress the proliferation of CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Anti-cancer effects of these CA derivatives were measured by using proliferation assays, cell cycle analysis, western blotting assay, reporter gene assay and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining assays both in vitro and in vivo. This study demonstrates that CAPE and CAPPE exhibit a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation and survival of CRC cells through the induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and augmentation of apoptotic pathways. Consumption of CAPE and CAPPE significantly inhibited the growth of colorectal tumors in a mouse xenograft model. The mechanisms of action included a modulation of PI3-K/Akt, AMPK and m-TOR signaling cascades both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the results demonstrate novel anti-cancer mechanisms of CA derivatives against the growth of human CRC cells. Conclusions CA derivatives are potent anti-cancer agents that augment AMPK activation and promote apoptosis in human CRC cells. The structure of CA derivatives can be used for the rational design of novel inhibitors that target human CRC cells. PMID:24960186

  12. Current treatment options for colon cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Terracina, Krista P; Raza, Ali; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-09-21

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC), the dissemination of cancer cells throughout the lining of the abdominal cavity, is the second most common presentation of colon cancer distant metastasis. Despite remarkable advances in cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy for colon cancer over the last 15 years, it has been repeatedly shown that these therapies remain ineffective for colon cancer PC. Recently, there has been a rapid accumulation of reports that cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC) prolongs the life of colon cancer PC patients. Here, we will review the clinical presentation, the mechanisms of disease progression, and current treatment options for colon cancer PC, with a focus on the benefits and limitations of CRS-HIPEC.

  13. Current treatment options for colon cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Terracina, Krista P; Raza, Ali; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC), the dissemination of cancer cells throughout the lining of the abdominal cavity, is the second most common presentation of colon cancer distant metastasis. Despite remarkable advances in cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy for colon cancer over the last 15 years, it has been repeatedly shown that these therapies remain ineffective for colon cancer PC. Recently, there has been a rapid accumulation of reports that cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS-HIPEC) prolongs the life of colon cancer PC patients. Here, we will review the clinical presentation, the mechanisms of disease progression, and current treatment options for colon cancer PC, with a focus on the benefits and limitations of CRS-HIPEC. PMID:25253949

  14. Oxaliplatin and Infliximab Combination Synergizes in Inducing Colon Cancer Regression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenya; Xu, Jian; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Background Colon cancer is one of the most common malignant cancers and causes millions of deaths each year. There are still no effective treatments for colon cancer patients who are at advanced stage. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) might be a good therapy target due to its widely-accepted roles in regulating multiple important biological processes, especially in promoting inflammation. Material/Methods We evaluated the expression of TNF-α in 108 human colon cancer tissue samples and 2 colon cancer cell lines (CT26 and HCT116), and analyzed its prognostic values. Further, we explored the roles and mechanism of anti-TNF-α treatment in combination with chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo. Results We found that TNF-α was highly expressed in colon cancer cell lines. The survival analysis and Cox regression analysis indicated that high TNF-α was an independent adverse prognosticator of colon cancer. In addition, anti-TNF-α treatment enhanced the effects of chemotherapy in the xenograft mouse model through inducing ADCC and CDC effects. Conclusions We conclude that TNF-α is an independent adverse prognosticator of colon cancer, and anti-TNF-α might benefit colon cancer patients. PMID:28190020

  15. Exo70 is an independent prognostic factor in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li; Zheng, Kaifeng; Lv, Xia; Hou, Jihuan; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Yujie; Song, Fei; Fan, Yaqiong; Cao, Hanwei; Zhang, Wenqing; Hong, Xiaoting; Zhan, Yan-Yan; Hu, Tianhui

    2017-07-11

    Exo70, a key component of the Exocyst complex, plays important roles in human cancer progression beyond exocytosis. However, the expression of Exo70 and its prognostic value for patients with colon cancer has not been well investigated to date. In this study, we observed that the mRNA and protein levels of Exo70 were upregulated in 11 of 13 colon cancer tissues, compared with their normal counterparts, which was validated by immunohistochemical analysis in a tissue microarray containing 89 pairs of colon cancer tissues and the matched adjacent normal tissues. Statistical analysis revealed that Exo70 expression is positively correlated with tumor size, invasion depth, TNM stage and distant metastasis. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that colon cancer patients with higher Exo70 expression have a poorer clinical outcome than those with lower Exo70 expression. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that Exo70, age and distant metastasis were there independent prognostic factors for overall survival rate of colon cancer patients. Through gain- and loss of Exo70 in colon cancer cells, we found that Exo70 could enhance the migration ability of colon cancer cells. Taken together, our studies revealed that Exo70 might be a promising negative prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  16. [Colon cancer after colon interposition for oesophageal replacement].

    PubMed

    Sikorszki, László; Horváth, Ors Péter; Papp, András; Cseke, László; Pavlovics, Gábor

    2010-08-01

    The authors report the case of a colon adenocarcinoma developed on the neck at the anastomosis of the skin tube and colon 44 years following a corrosive oesophageal injury. This patient suffered a moderately severe oesophageal, stomach and laryngeal injuries due to drinking hydrochloric acid 44 years ago. He underwent serial laryngoplasties, then needed a tracheostomy, oesophagectomy, pyloroplasty and ileocolon transposition. An antethoracal oesophagus formation was performed with ileocolon and skin tube amendment. 44 years later an ulcerated adenocarcinoma developed in the transposed colon, which was resected and the ability to swallow was reinstated by the transplantation of an isolated jejunal segment using microvascular anastomosis.

  17. Microchimerism and survival after breast and colon cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we reported microchimerism to be oppositely associated with maternal breast and colon cancer. In women with a blood test positive for male microchimerism the risk of breast cancer development was reduced to one third, whereas the risk of colon cancer was elevated 4-fold. In this article addendum, I report the survival of cases in the original study after being diagnosed with cancer. Despite small numbers, the analysis suggests that microchimerism may be positively associated with survival after breast and maybe colon cancer diagnosis. Despite the findings on colon cancer in our original report, I speculate whether microchimerism could have a general beneficial role in cancer, which in some sites may not be evident because an allogeneic maternal immune reaction hastens cancer development.

  18. Gene Signature in Sessile Serrated Polyps Identifies Colon Cancer Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Kanth, Priyanka; Bronner, Mary P.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Burt, Randall W.; Neklason, Deborah W.; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Delker, Don A.

    2016-01-01

    Sessile serrated colon adenoma/polyps (SSA/Ps) are found during routine screening colonoscopy and may account for 20–30% of colon cancers. However, differentiating SSA/Ps from hyperplastic polyps (HP) with little risk of cancer is challenging and complementary molecular markers are needed. Additionally, the molecular mechanisms of colon cancer development from SSA/Ps are poorly understood. RNA sequencing was performed on 21 SSA/Ps, 10 HPs, 10 adenomas, 21 uninvolved colon and 20 control colon specimens. Differential expression and leave-one-out cross validation methods were used to define a unique gene signature of SSA/Ps. Our SSA/P gene signature was evaluated in colon cancer RNA-Seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify a subtype of colon cancers that may develop from SSA/Ps. A total of 1422 differentially expressed genes were found in SSA/Ps relative to controls. Serrated polyposis syndrome (n=12) and sporadic SSA/Ps (n=9) exhibited almost complete (96%) gene overlap. A 51-gene panel in SSA/P showed similar expression in a subset of TCGA colon cancers with high microsatellite instability (MSI-H). A smaller seven-gene panel showed high sensitivity and specificity in identifying BRAF mutant, CpG island methylator phenotype high (CIMP-H) and MLH1 silenced colon cancers. We describe a unique gene signature in SSA/Ps that identifies a subset of colon cancers likely to develop through the serrated pathway. These gene panels may be utilized for improved differentiation of SSA/Ps from HPs and provide insights into novel molecular pathways altered in colon cancer arising from the serrated pathway. PMID:27026680

  19. The inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in human colon cancer cells by sulindac.

    PubMed

    Tai, Wei-Ping; Hu, Pin-Jin; Wu, Jing; Lin, Xiang-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays important roles in the initial development of colon cancer. Sulindac is a commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. We demonstrated the effects of sulindac on growth inhibition, apoptosis induction, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling suppression in human colon cancer cells. Sulindac significantly inhibited proliferation of HT-29 colon cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Sulindac was found to induce the apoptosis of HT-29 cells and inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The inhibition was further confirmed by the decreased protein levels of β-catenin. The results indicate that sulindac may play a beneficial role in the comprehensive treatment of colon cancer.

  20. INPP4B is an oncogenic regulator in human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, S T; Chi, M N; Yang, R H; Guo, X Y; Zan, L K; Wang, C Y; Xi, Y F; Jin, L; Croft, A; Tseng, H-Y; Yan, X G; Farrelly, M; Wang, F H; Lai, F; Wang, J F; Li, Y P; Ackland, S; Scott, R; Agoulnik, I U; Hondermarck, H; Thorne, R F; Liu, T; Zhang, X D; Jiang, C C

    2016-01-01

    Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) negatively regulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling and is a tumor suppressor in some types of cancers. However, we have found that it is frequently upregulated in human colon cancer cells. Here we show that silencing of INPP4B blocks activation of Akt and serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 3 (SGK3), inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation and retards colon cancer xenograft growth. Conversely, overexpression of INPP4B increases proliferation and triggers anchorage-independent growth of normal colon epithelial cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that the effect of INPP4B on Akt and SGK3 is associated with inactivation of phosphate and tensin homolog through its protein phosphatase activity and that the increase in INPP4B is due to Ets-1-mediated transcriptional upregulation in colon cancer cells. Collectively, these results suggest that INPP4B may function as an oncogenic driver in colon cancer, with potential implications for targeting INPP4B as a novel approach to treat this disease. PMID:26411369

  1. Benefits of Recurrent Colonic Stent Insertion in a Patient with Advanced Gastric Cancer with Carcinomatosis Causing Colonic Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Semi; Shin, Sang Joon; Ahn, Joong Bae; Jeung, Hei-Cheul; Rha, Sun Young; Lee, Sang Kil

    2009-01-01

    Malignant obstruction develops frequently in advanced gastric cancer. Although it is primarily the gastric outlet that is obstructed, there are occasional reports of colonic obstruction. Treating intestinal obstruction usually requires emergency surgery or stent insertion. There are several kinds of complications with stent insertion, such as bowel perforation, stent migration, bleeding, abdominal pain and reobstruction. Nevertheless, endoscopic stent insertion could be a better treatment than emergency surgery in cases of malignant bowel obstruction in cancer patients with poor performance status. We report a case of advanced gastric cancer with carcinomatosis in which a recurrent colonic stent was inserted at the same site because of cancer growth into the stent. The patient maintained a good condition for chemotherapy, thus improving their chances for survival. PMID:19430568

  2. LIN28B Promotes Colon Cancer Migration and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Minghui; Wu, Gang; Hou, Xiaolin; Hou, Nengyi; Liang, Liqin; Jia, Guiqing; Shuai, Ping; Luo, Bin; Wang, Kang; Li, Guoxin

    2014-01-01

    LIN28B is involved in “stemness” and tumourigenesis by negatively regulating the maturation of let-7 microRNA family members. In this study, we showed that LIN28B expression promotes migration and recurrence of colon cancer. Immunohistochemistry and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions were performed to detect LIN28B expression in colon cancer tissue microarrays, paraffin-embedded surgical resected tissues and cancer cells. Loss-of-function, migration and proliferation analyses were performed to delineate the potential roles of LIN28B in colon cancer. LIN28B was upregulated in colon cancer tissue compared to normal mucosa, and its overexpression correlated with reduced patient survival and increased tumour recurrence. LIN28B suppression inhibited the migration of SW480 colon cancer cells and facilitated the cytotoxicity induced by oxaliplatin in SW480 and HCT116 colon cancer cells. In conclusion, LIN28B overexpression contributes to colon tumourigenesis, and LIN28B may serve as a diagnostic tool and therapeutic target for colon cancer. PMID:25360631

  3. Quercetin induces human colon cancer cells apoptosis by inhibiting the nuclear factor-kappa B Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-An; Zhang, Shuangxi; Yin, Qing; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin can inhibit the growth of cancer cells with the ability to act as chemopreventers. Its cancer-preventive effect has been attributed to various mechanisms, including the induction of cell-cycle arrest and/or apoptosis as well as the antioxidant functions. Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) is a signaling pathway that controls transcriptional activation of genes important for tight regulation of many cellular processes and is aberrantly expressed in many types of cancer. Inhibitors of NF-κB pathway have shown potential anti-tumor activities. However, it is not fully elucidated in colon cancer. In this study, we demonstrate that quercetin induces apoptosis in human colon cancer CACO-2 and SW-620 cells through inhibiting NF-κB pathway, as well as down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 and up-regulation of Bax, thus providing basis for clinical application of quercetin in colon cancer cases.

  4. From colonic polyps to colon cancer: pathophysiology, clinical presentation, screening and colonoscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Cappell, M S

    2007-12-01

    Colon cancer is the most common nondermatologic cancer in Italy and throughout Europe, with about 250,000 cases annually in Europe, about half of whom die. Yet, colon cancer is largely preventable through intensive, mass screening programs to remove premalignant colonic polyps. The persistently high incidence and mortality is largely due to ineffective implementation of established screening protocols due to patient fears about screening tests, physician under-referral for screening, and test costs. Colon cancer mostly arises from adenomas, recognized as colonic polyps, but may occasionally arise from the sessile serrated adenoma. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene mutation is the key molecular step in adenoma formation. Mismatch repair gene mutation is a less common alternative pathway. Progression from adenomas to colon cancer is a multistep process, involving mutations of the DCC, k-ras, and p53 genes; loss of heterozygosity in which cells loose one allele of some genes from chromosomal loss; and DNA methylation which can silence DNA expression. Numerous environmental factors can increase the risk of colon cancer, presumably by modulating these molecular pathways. While colon cancer in an advanced and incurable stage often produces clinical findings, premalignant adenomatous polyps and early, highly curable, colon cancer are often asymptomatic. This phenomenon renders adenomas or early cancers difficult to detect by clinical presentation and provides the rationale for mass screening of asymptomatic adults over 50 years old for early detection and prevention of colon cancer. Colonoscopy is the primary screening test. All polyps identified at colonoscopy are removed by colonoscopic polypectomy. Endoscopic mucosal resection is required for deeply penetrating noncancerous polyps. Colonoscopy is repeated every ten years if the index colonoscopy revealed no lesions, but is repeated more frequently if adenomatous polyps were identified at this colonoscopy due to an

  5. A prognostic analysis of 895 cases of stage III colon cancer in different colon subsites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Junli; Zhang, Sai; Deng, Ganlu; Wu, Xiaoling; He, Jingxuan; Pei, Haiping; Shen, Hong; Zeng, Shan

    2015-09-01

    Stage III colon cancer is currently treated as an entity with a unified therapeutic principle. The aim of the retrospective study is to explore the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of site-specific stage III colon cancers and the influences of tumor location on prognosis. Eight hundred ninety-five patients with stage III colon cancer treated with radical operation and subsequent adjuvant chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin) were divided into seven groups according to colon segment (cecum, ascending colon, hepatic flexure, transverse colon, splenic flexure, descending colon, and sigmoid colon). Expression of excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) and thymidylate synthase (TS) was examined by immunohistochemistry. We assessed if differences exist in patient characteristics and clinic outcomes between the seven groups. There were significant differences in tumor differentiation (P < 0.001), T stage (P < 0.001), N stage (P < 0.001), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P < 0.001), metachronous liver metastasis (P < 0.001), metachronous lung metastasis (P < 0.001), and ERCCI expression (P < 0.001) between the seven groups. Both 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) exhibited significant differences (both P < 0.001) with survival gradually decreasing from cecum to sigmoid colon. Cox regression analyses identified that tumor location was an independent prognostic factor for RFS and OS. Stage III colon cancer located proximally carried a poorer survival than that located distally. Different efficacies of FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy may be an important factor affecting survival of site-specific stage III colon cancers.

  6. Proteoglycans as potential microenvironmental biomarkers for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Suhovskih, Anastasia V; Aidagulova, Svetlana V; Kashuba, Vladimir I; Grigorieva, Elvira V

    2015-09-01

    Glycosylation changes occur widely in colon tumours, suggesting glycosylated molecules as potential biomarkers for colon cancer diagnostics. In this study, proteoglycans (PGs) expression levels and their transcriptional patterns are investigated in human colon tumours in vivo and carcinoma cells in vitro. According to RT-PCR analysis, normal and cancer colon tissues expressed a specific set of PGs (syndecan-1, perlecan, decorin, biglycan, versican, NG2/CSPG4, serglycin, lumican, CD44), while the expression of glypican-1, brevican and aggrecan was almost undetectable. Overall transcriptional activity of the PGs in normal and cancer tissues was similar, although expression patterns were different. Expression of decorin and perlecan was down-regulated 2-fold in colon tumours, while biglycan and versican expression was significantly up-regulated (6-fold and 3-fold, respectively). Expression of collagen1A1 was also increased 6-fold in colon tumours. However, conventional HCT-116 colon carcinoma and AG2 colon cancer-initiating cells did not express biglycan and decorin and were versican-positive and -negative, respectively, demonstrating an extracellular origin of the PGs in cancer tissue. Selective expression of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans syndecan-1 and perlecan in the AG2 colon cancer-initiating cell line suggests these PGs as potential biomarkers for cancer stem cells. Overall transcriptional activity of the HS biosynthetic system was similar in normal and cancer tissues, although significant up-regulation of extracellular sulfatases SULF1/2 argues for a possible distortion of HS sulfation patterns in colon tumours. Taken together, the obtained results suggest versican, biglycan, collagen1A1 and SULF1/2 expression as potential microenvironmental biomarkers and/or targets for colon cancer diagnostics and treatment.

  7. Prolonged Antibiotic Use Tied to Precancerous Colon Growths

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164445.html Prolonged Antibiotic Use Tied to Precancerous Colon Growths Drugs that ... 2017 TUESDAY, April 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Taking antibiotics for an extended period in early to middle ...

  8. En bloc pancreaticoduodenectomy for right colon cancer invading adjacent organs.

    PubMed

    Berrospi, Francisco; Celis, Juan; Ruiz, Eloy; Payet, Eduardo

    2002-03-01

    Surgical treatment of colorectal cancer needs an extended resection of the tumor en block with invaded organs. There is little information about the surgical treatment of right-sided colon carcinoma directly involving duodenum and pancreas. Our objective is to report our experience with three patients who underwent en bloc pancreaticoduodenectomy and hemicolectomy for locally advanced right colon cancer. Retrospective review of clinical records of patients with colon cancer. Three patients with right colon cancer adherent to adjacent organs underwent en block surgery. No operative deaths occurred. All patients are alive without evidence of disease at 10, 30, 113 months of follow-up, respectively. Locally advanced right-sided colon cancer can be safely treated with en bloc pancreaticoduodenectomy and colectomy with excellent long-term results. Copyright 2002 Wiley--Liss, Inc.

  9. The roles of miR-200c in colon cancer and associated molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianmei; Wang, Weining; Zhang, Yangde; Hu, Tiehui; Chen, Yuxiang

    2014-07-01

    The expression of miR-200c has been widely reported to be elevated in tumor tissues and sera of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and has been found to correlate with poor prognosis. However, how miR-200c regulates the apoptosis, survival, invasion, metastasis, and tumor growth in colon cancer cells remains to be fully elucidated. This study seeks to further investigate the role of miR-200c in colon cancer development. The expression of miR-200c in tumor and peritumoral tissues of 101 colon cancer patients was measured by real-time PCR. miR-200c expression in HCT-116 and HT-29 colon cancer cells was silenced by adenovirus-carried expression of antisense mRNA against miR-200c. The protein levels of PTEN, p53 Ser(15), PP1, and activated caspase-3 in HCT-116 and HT-29 cells were measured by Western blot. This study demonstrated that the expression of miR-200c was significantly higher in tumor tissues than in peritumoral tissues of colon cancer patients. The elevated miR-200c expression significantly correlated with the TNM stage, lymph node metastasis, and invasion of colon cancer. Silencing miR-200c expression significantly induced cell apoptosis, inhibited long-term survival, invasion, and metastasis, and delayed xenograft tumor growth. Importantly, silencing miR-200c expression sensitized the therapeutic effect of Ara-C (Cytarabine). The effects of silencing miR-200c expression were associated with upregulation of PTEN protein and p53 Ser(15) phosphorylation levels in HCT-116 cells and PTEN protein expression in HT-29 cells. In conclusion, miR-200c functions as an oncogene in colon cancer cells through regulating tumor cell apoptosis, survival, invasion, and metastasis as well as xenograft tumor growth through inhibition of PTEN expression and p53 phosphorylation.

  10. Phellinus linteus Grown on Germinated Brown Rice Increases Cetuximab Sensitivity of KRAS-Mutated Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jin; Park, Jeong-Bin; Lee, Sang-Jae; Song, Minjung

    2017-08-11

    Colon cancer is one of the most common types of cancer, and it has recently become a leading cause of death worldwide. Among colon cancers, the v-ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS)-mutated form is notorious for its non-druggable features. Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to the epidermal growth factor receptor, has been introduced as an antitumor therapy; however, secondary resistance and side effects significantly limit its effective use in these cancers. In this study, we prepared Phellinuslinteus on germinated brown rice (PBR) extracts to increase the sensitivity of KRAS-mutated colon cancers to cetuximab. The combined treatment of PBR extract and cetuximab suppressed SW480 cell viability/proliferation, with the cells exhibiting altered cellular morphology and clonogenic potential. AnnexinV-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide-stained flow cytometry and Western blotting were performed, and PBR extract combined with cetuximab treatment increased apoptosis of the SW480 cells and suppressed their KRAS protein expression. The potential of PBR as a synergistic anticancer agent was further investigated in a tumor-xenografted mouse model. Tumor growth was significantly suppressed with PBR extract and cetuximab co-treatment. In conclusion, PBR increased the sensitivity of KRAS-mutated colon cancer cells to cetuximab, which indicates the potential use of PBR as a medical food against colon cancer.

  11. Phellinus linteus Grown on Germinated Brown Rice Increases Cetuximab Sensitivity of KRAS-Mutated Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye-Jin; Park, Jeong-Bin; Lee, Sang-Jae; Song, Minjung

    2017-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most common types of cancer, and it has recently become a leading cause of death worldwide. Among colon cancers, the v-ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS)-mutated form is notorious for its non-druggable features. Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to the epidermal growth factor receptor, has been introduced as an antitumor therapy; however, secondary resistance and side effects significantly limit its effective use in these cancers. In this study, we prepared Phellinuslinteus on germinated brown rice (PBR) extracts to increase the sensitivity of KRAS-mutated colon cancers to cetuximab. The combined treatment of PBR extract and cetuximab suppressed SW480 cell viability/proliferation, with the cells exhibiting altered cellular morphology and clonogenic potential. AnnexinV–fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide–stained flow cytometry and Western blotting were performed, and PBR extract combined with cetuximab treatment increased apoptosis of the SW480 cells and suppressed their KRAS protein expression. The potential of PBR as a synergistic anticancer agent was further investigated in a tumor-xenografted mouse model. Tumor growth was significantly suppressed with PBR extract and cetuximab co-treatment. In conclusion, PBR increased the sensitivity of KRAS-mutated colon cancer cells to cetuximab, which indicates the potential use of PBR as a medical food against colon cancer. PMID:28800074

  12. Interleukin genes and associations with colon and rectal cancer risk and overall survival.

    PubMed

    Bondurant, Kristina L; Lundgreen, Abbie; Herrick, Jennifer S; Kadlubar, Susan; Wolff, Roger K; Slattery, Martha L

    2013-02-15

    Interleukins are a group of cytokines that contribute to growth and differentiation, cell migration, and inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses by the immune system. In our study, we examined genetic variation in genes from various anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory interleukins to determine association with colon and rectal cancer risk and overall survival. Data from two population-based incident studies of colon cancer (1,555 cases and 1,956 controls) and rectal cancer (754 cases and 954 controls) were used. After controlling for multiple comparisons, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from four genes, IL3, IL6R, IL8, IL15, were associated with increased colon cancer risk, and CXCR1 and CXCR2 were significantly associated with increased rectal cancer risk. Only SNPs from genes within the IL-8 pathway (IL8, CXCR1 and CXCR2) showed a significant association with both colon and rectal cancer risk. Several SNPs interacted significantly with IL8 and IFNG SNPs and with aspirin/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), cigarette smoking, estrogen use and BMI. For both colon and rectal cancer, increasing numbers of risk alleles were associated with increased hazard of death from cancer; the estimated hazard of death for colon cancer for the highest category of risk alleles was 1.74 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-2.56) and 1.96 (95% CI 1.28-2.99) for rectal cancer. These data suggest that interleukin genes play a role in risk and overall survival for colon and rectal cancer. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  13. Differential regulation of EGFR-MAPK signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Centuori, Sara M.; Martinez, Jesse D.

    2014-01-01

    A high fat diet coincides with elevated levels of bile acids. This elevation of bile acids, particularly deoxycholic acid (DCA), has been strongly associated with the development of colon cancer. Conversely, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) may have chemopreventive properties. Although structurally similar, DCA and UDCA present different biological and pathological effects in colon cancer progression. The differential regulation of cancer by these two bile acids is not yet fully understood. However, one possible explanation for their diverging effects is their ability to differentially regulate signaling pathways involved in the multistep progression of colon cancer, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. This review will examine the biological effects of DCA and UDCA on colon cancer development, as well as the diverging effects of these bile acids on the oncogenic signaling pathways that play a role in colon cancer development, with a particular emphasis on bile acid regulation of the EGFR-MAPK pathway. PMID:25027205

  14. Differential regulation of EGFR-MAPK signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Centuori, Sara M; Martinez, Jesse D

    2014-10-01

    A high-fat diet coincides with increased levels of bile acids. This increase in bile acids, particularly deoxycholic acid (DCA), has been strongly associated with the development of colon cancer. Conversely, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) may have chemopreventive properties. Although structurally similar, DCA and UDCA present different biological and pathological effects in colon cancer progression. The differential regulation of cancer by these two bile acids is not yet fully understood. However, one possible explanation for their diverging effects is their ability to differentially regulate signaling pathways involved in the multistep progression of colon cancer, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. This review will examine the biological effects of DCA and UDCA on colon cancer development, as well as the diverging effects of these bile acids on the oncogenic signaling pathways that play a role in colon cancer development, with a particular emphasis on bile acid regulation of the EGFR-MAPK pathway.

  15. Clinical significance of urothelial carcinoma associated 1 in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Kun; Yang, Jing; Hu, Yuemei; Sun, Yaohua; Tan, Zhenyu; Duan, Jinglin; Zhang, Feng; Yan, Hongli; Deng, Anmei

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the expression levels of urothelial carcinoma associated 1 (UCA1) in cancer tissues and plasma of colon cancer patients, and evaluate its clinical significance. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the expression levels of UCA1 in 80 pairs of colon cancer and adjacent normal tissues, plasma samples from 20 healthy controls, 20 colon cancer patients before and after tumor removal. The relationships between UCA1 expression and clinical features and overall survival were analyzed. Compared with adjacent normal tissues, UCA1 was significantly upregulated in colon cancer tissues, especially in cases with LNM and advanced TNM stages (P < 0.05). High UCA1 expression was associated with LMN, higher pT category, and advanced TNM stages (P < 0.05). Patients with high UCA1 expression had worse survival time than those with low UCA1 expression (adjusted HR = 2.002, 95% CI 1.007-3.981, P = 0.048). Furthermore, plasma levels of UCA1 in colon cancer patients were significantly higher than those of controls (P = 0.016). There was significant difference in plasma level of UCA1 between samples taken before and after surgery (P = 0.048). In conclusion, tissue expression of UCA1 is related to prognosis in colon cancer. Plasma UCA1 may serve as a potential biomarker for early diagnosis and disease monitoring of colon cancer patients.

  16. Expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi; Liu, Yi-Yi; Zhao, Xiao-Kun

    2013-07-01

    To study the expression of ALDH1 in colon cancer and its clinical significance. The expression of ALDH1 was examined in 98 surgical specimens of primary colonic carcinoma and 15 normal colon tissues with immunohistochemistry method. The correlations of the expression with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis of colon cancer were analyzed. The positive rate of expression of ALDH1 was 76.5% (75/98) in the cancer tissues and 13.3% (2/15) in normal colon tissues. There were an obvious statistical difference (P<0.05) between the two groups. The ALDH1 expression was significantly correlated with the histological grade, TNM stages and lymph node metastasis in colon cancer (P<0.05). It was also related with patients' survival time, those with positive expressions had a poor prognosis (P<0.05). The results suggeste that the overexpression of ALDH1 plays important roles in proliferation and progression in colon cancer, the ALDH1 may be a valuable marker to predict the biological behavior and trend of metastasis of colon cancer. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The novel HDAC inhibitor AR-42-induced anti-colon cancer cell activity is associated with ceramide production

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling; Shen, Jie

    2015-08-07

    In the current study, we investigated the potential activity of AR-42, a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, against colon cancer cells. Our in vitro results showed that AR-42 induced ceramide production, exerted potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities in established (SW-620 and HCT-116 lines) and primary human colon cancer cells. Exogenously-added sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) suppressed AR-42-induced activity, yet a cell-permeable ceramide (C4) facilitated AR-42-induced cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In addition, AR-42-induced ceramide production and anti-colon cancer cell activity were inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1, but were exacerbated by PDMP, which is a ceramide glucosylation inhibitor. In vivo, oral administration of a single dose of AR-42 dramatically inhibited SW-620 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, without inducing overt toxicities. Together, these results show that AR-42 dramatically inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ceramide production might be the key mechanism responsible for its actions. - Highlights: • AR-42 is anti-proliferative against primary/established colon cancer cells. • AR-42 induces significant apoptotic death in primary/established colon cancer cells. • Ceramide production mediates AR-42-induced cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells. • AR-42 oral administration potently inhibits SW-620 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  18. Added sugar, glycemic index and load in colon cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Galeone, Carlotta; Pelucchi, Claudio; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2012-07-01

    There is a growing body of in-vivo evidences that sucrose-rich diets cause mutations in the rat colon epithelium, with several biological mechanism hypothesized, but epidemiological studies have yielded conflicting results. In order to provide a quantification of the magnitude of the risk of colon cancer for high intake of added sugar, high dietary glycemic index and glycemic load, we performed a meta-analysis based on a systematic review of the literature to date. Recent epidemiological data indicate a lack of association between high intake of added sugar, high-glycemic index and glycemic load diets and risk of colon cancer. There is no consistent evidence from epidemiological studies, although a modest excess risk emerged in case-control studies, that added sugars, dietary glycemic index and glycemic load are associated with increased risk of colon cancer, independently from their effect on energy intake, overweight, obesity and diabetes, which are related to excess colon cancer risk.

  19. Vertebral Metastasis as the Initial Manifestation of Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tushina; Williams, Renee; Liechty, Benjamin; Ann Chen, Lea

    2016-08-01

    Oncology guidelines currently recommend against performing colonoscopies in the workup of adenocarcinoma of unknown primary unless colonic malignancy is otherwise suggested by clinical signs or symptoms. We present 2 cases of metastatic colonic adenocarcinoma that presented only with neurologic symptoms from vertebral metastasis. Although bony metastases are a rare presentation of colon cancer and colonoscopy is not warranted in the initial workup of adenocarcinoma of unknown primary, we describe these cases as a reminder that bony metastases do not rule out a colon cancer diagnosis.

  20. Vertebral Metastasis as the Initial Manifestation of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tushina; Williams, Renee; Liechty, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Oncology guidelines currently recommend against performing colonoscopies in the workup of adenocarcinoma of unknown primary unless colonic malignancy is otherwise suggested by clinical signs or symptoms. We present 2 cases of metastatic colonic adenocarcinoma that presented only with neurologic symptoms from vertebral metastasis. Although bony metastases are a rare presentation of colon cancer and colonoscopy is not warranted in the initial workup of adenocarcinoma of unknown primary, we describe these cases as a reminder that bony metastases do not rule out a colon cancer diagnosis. PMID:27807574

  1. Preoperative anemia in colon cancer: assessment of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Dunne, James R; Gannon, Christopher J; Osborn, Tiffany M; Taylor, Michelle D; Malone, Debra L; Napolitano, Lena M

    2002-06-01

    Anemia is common in cancer patients and is associated with reduced survival. Recent studies document that treatment of anemia with blood transfusion in cancer patients is associated with increased infection risk, tumor recurrence, and mortality. We therefore investigated the incidence of preoperative anemia in colorectal cancer and assessed risk factors for anemia. Prospective data were collected on 311 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer over a 6-year period from 1994 through 1999. Patients were stratified by age, gender, presenting complaint, preoperative hematocrit, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, and TNM classification. Discrete variables were compared using Pearson's Chi-square analysis. Continuous variables were compared using Student's t test. Differences were considered significant when P < 0.05. The mean age of the study cohort was 67 +/- 9.2 with 98 per cent of the study population being male. The mean AJCC stage was 2.2 +/- 1.2 and the mean preoperative hematocrit was 35 +/- 7.9 with an incidence of 46.1 per cent. The most common presenting complaints were hematochezia (n = 59), anemia (n = 51), heme-occult-positive stool (n = 33), bowel obstruction (n = 26), abdominal pain (n = 21), and palpable mass (n = 13). Preoperative anemia was most common in patients with right colon cancer with an incidence of 57.6 per cent followed by left colon cancer (42.2%) and rectal cancer (29.8%). Patients with right colon cancer had significantly lower preoperative hematocrits compared with left colon cancer (33 +/- 8.5 vs 36 +/- 7.4; P < 0.01) and rectal cancer (33 +/- 8.5 vs 38 +/- 6.0; P < 0.0001). Patients with right colon cancer also had significantly increased stage at presentation compared with left colon cancer (2.3 +/- 1.3 vs 2.1 +/- 1.2; P < 0.02). Age was not a significant risk factor for preoperative anemia in colorectal cancer. We conclude that there is a high incidence of anemia in patients with colon cancer. Patients with right colon

  2. Glucagon-like peptide 2 in colon carcinogenesis: possible target for anti-cancer therapy?

    PubMed

    Kannen, Vinicius; Garcia, Sergio Britto; Stopper, Helga; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria

    2013-07-01

    The role of glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP2) in colon tissue has been studied extensively, from the time it was discovered that GLP2 promotes intestinal growth. A large number of studies have shown potential applications for GLP2 in human therapy. However, recent data have suggested the notion that GLP2 plays a key role in colon carcinogenesis. Questions have been arisen regarding the pro-proliferative effects of GLP2 and whether they might promote intestinal healing or advance colon tumor growth. Here, we provide striking evidence to show that the physiological activities of GLP2 are closely related to cancer-related molecular pathways that have been shown to circumvent drug desensitization. We further explore the different pathways of GLP2-signaling to suggest suitable GLP2-based therapeutic strategies in colon cancer.

  3. Roles of hormones and signaling molecules in describing the relationship between obesity and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Sikalidis, Angelos K; Varamini, Behzad

    2011-12-01

    Colon cancer represents a highly prevalent disease in the Western world. While dietary and lifestyle recommendations remain important factors in disease prevention and treatment, epidemiological data have made it clear that obesity and excess body weight remain significant risk factors for the disease. A number of potential direct and indirect relationships exist between obesity and increased risk of colon cancer. Several mechanisms which appear promising and warrant further investigation are discussed here, specifically the modifying role of insulin and insulin-like growth factors, leptin, adipose-tissue induced changes in estrogens and androgens, and inflammatory molecules. A brief review of these hormones and signaling molecules and their action in colon cancer development is described. A thorough integration and understanding of the mechanisms of action these systems exert on colonic epithelia will be important in designing studies and experiments aimed at elucidating disease etiology for prevention and treatment.

  4. Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    2013). Predictive Biomarkers of Sensitivity to the Aurora and Angiogenic Kinase Inhibitor ENMD-2076 in Preclinical Breast Cancer Models. Clinical...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0527 TITLE: Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Aik...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0527 5c

  5. The utility of Apc-mutant rats in modeling human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Irving, Amy A; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Hart, Marcia L; Parker, Taybor; Clipson, Linda; Ford, Madeline R; Kuramoto, Takashi; Dove, William F; Amos-Landgraf, James M

    2014-11-01

    Prior to the advent of genetic engineering in the mouse, the rat was the model of choice for investigating the etiology of cancer. Now, recent advances in the manipulation of the rat genome, combined with a growing recognition of the physiological differences between mice and rats, have reignited interest in the rat as a model of human cancer. Two recently developed rat models, the polyposis in the rat colon (Pirc) and Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) strains, each carry mutations in the intestinal-cancer-associated adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene. In contrast to mouse models carrying Apc mutations, in which cancers develop mainly in the small intestine rather than in the colon and there is no gender bias, these rat models exhibit colonic predisposition and gender-specific susceptibility, as seen in human colon cancer. The rat also provides other experimental resources as a model organism that are not provided by the mouse: the structure of its chromosomes facilitates the analysis of genomic events, the size of its colon permits longitudinal analysis of tumor growth, and the size of biological samples from the animal facilitates multiplexed molecular analyses of the tumor and its host. Thus, the underlying biology and experimental resources of these rat models provide important avenues for investigation. We anticipate that advances in disease modeling in the rat will synergize with resources that are being developed in the mouse to provide a deeper understanding of human colon cancer.

  6. The utility of Apc-mutant rats in modeling human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Amy A.; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Hart, Marcia L.; Parker, Taybor; Clipson, Linda; Ford, Madeline R.; Kuramoto, Takashi; Dove, William F.; Amos-Landgraf, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the advent of genetic engineering in the mouse, the rat was the model of choice for investigating the etiology of cancer. Now, recent advances in the manipulation of the rat genome, combined with a growing recognition of the physiological differences between mice and rats, have reignited interest in the rat as a model of human cancer. Two recently developed rat models, the polyposis in the rat colon (Pirc) and Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) strains, each carry mutations in the intestinal-cancer-associated adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene. In contrast to mouse models carrying Apc mutations, in which cancers develop mainly in the small intestine rather than in the colon and there is no gender bias, these rat models exhibit colonic predisposition and gender-specific susceptibility, as seen in human colon cancer. The rat also provides other experimental resources as a model organism that are not provided by the mouse: the structure of its chromosomes facilitates the analysis of genomic events, the size of its colon permits longitudinal analysis of tumor growth, and the size of biological samples from the animal facilitates multiplexed molecular analyses of the tumor and its host. Thus, the underlying biology and experimental resources of these rat models provide important avenues for investigation. We anticipate that advances in disease modeling in the rat will synergize with resources that are being developed in the mouse to provide a deeper understanding of human colon cancer. PMID:25288683

  7. Knockdown of lymphoid enhancer factor 1 inhibits colon cancer progression in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Juan; Yao, Yu; Jiang, Li-Li; Hu, Ting-Hua; Ma, Jie-Qun; Liao, Zi-Jun; Yao, Jun-Tao; Li, Dong-Fan; Wang, Shu-Hong; Nan, Ke-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Expression of lymphoid enhancer factor 1 (LEF1) is frequently altered in different human cancers. This study aimed to assess LEF1 expression in colon cancer tissues and to explore changed phenotypes, gene expressions, and the possible mechanism after knocked down LEF1 expression in colon cancer cell lines. A total of 106 colon cancer and matched paratumorous normal tissues were used to assess LEF1 expression using immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR. LEF1 lentivirus was used to knockdown LEF1 expression for the assessment of cell viability, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and gene expressions. The nude mouse xenograft assay was performed to detect the effects of LEF1 knockdown in vivo. The data showed that the levels of LEF1 mRNA and protein were significantly increased in human colon cancer tissues compared to the matched paratumorous normal tissues and were associated with infiltration depth, lymph node and distant metastases, advanced TNM (tumor-node-metastasis) stages, and shorter overall survival. Furthermore, LEF1 knockdown reduced tumor cell viability, invasion capacity, MMP2 and MMP-9 expression, but induced apoptosis. Nude mouse xenograft assay showed that LEF1 knockdown suppressed tumor formation and growth in vivo. In addition, the expression of Notch pathway-related proteins RBP-jκ and Hes1 was reduced in LEF1 knockdown cells. Taken together, LEF1 protein was overexpressed in colon cancer tissues and knockdown of LEF1 expression inhibited colon cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that targeting of LEF1 expression should be further evaluated for colon cancer prevention and therapy.

  8. Knockdown of Lymphoid Enhancer factor 1 Inhibits Colon Cancer Progression In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li-Li; Hu, Ting-Hua; Ma, Jie-Qun; Liao, Zi-Jun; Yao, Jun-Tao; Li, Dong-Fan; Wang, Shu-Hong; Nan, Ke-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Expression of lymphoid enhancer factor 1 (LEF1) is frequently altered in different human cancers. This study aimed to assess LEF1 expression in colon cancer tissues and to explore changed phenotypes, gene expressions, and the possible mechanism after knocked down LEF1 expression in colon cancer cell lines. A total of 106 colon cancer and matched paratumorous normal tissues were used to assess LEF1 expression using immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR. LEF1 lentivirus was used to knockdown LEF1 expression for the assessment of cell viability, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and gene expressions. The nude mouse xenograft assay was performed to detect the effects of LEF1 knockdown in vivo. The data showed that the levels of LEF1 mRNA and protein were significantly increased in human colon cancer tissues compared to the matched paratumorous normal tissues and were associated with infiltration depth, lymph node and distant metastases, advanced TNM (tumor-node-metastasis) stages, and shorter overall survival. Furthermore, LEF1 knockdown reduced tumor cell viability, invasion capacity, MMP2 and MMP-9 expression, but induced apoptosis. Nude mouse xenograft assay showed that LEF1 knockdown suppressed tumor formation and growth in vivo. In addition, the expression of Notch pathway-related proteins RBP-jκ and Hes1 was reduced in LEF1 knockdown cells. Taken together, LEF1 protein was overexpressed in colon cancer tissues and knockdown of LEF1 expression inhibited colon cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that targeting of LEF1 expression should be further evaluated for colon cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:24098538

  9. Functions and regulation of MUC13 mucin in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Brij K.; Maher, Diane M.; Ebeling, Mara C.; Stephenson, Phillip D.; Puumala, Susan E.; Koch, Michael R.; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2013-01-01

    Background MUC13 is over-expressed and aberrantly localized in colon cancer tissue; however, the specific functions and regulation of MUC13 expression are unknown. Methods Stable cell lines with either over-expressed or suppressed MUC13 levels were analyzed to determine cell growth, colony formation, cell migration, and cell invasion assays. The molecular mechanisms involved in MUC13 regulation were elucidated via chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and analysis of interleukin 6 (IL6) treatments. Colon cancer tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for the protein levels of MUC13 and P-STAT5 in colon cancer cells. Results Over-expression of MUC13 increased cell growth, colony formation, cell migration, and invasion. In concordance, MUC13 silencing decreased these tumorigenic features. Over-expression of MUC13 also modulated various cancer-associated proteins, including telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), sonic hedgehog (SHH), B cell lymphoma murine like site 1 (BMI-1), and GATA like transcription factor 1 (GATA1). Additionally, MUC13 over-expressing cells showed increased HER2 and P-ERK expression. ChIP analysis revealed binding of STAT5 to the predicted MUC13 promoter. IL6 treatment of colon cancer cells increased the expression of MUC13 via activation of JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway. Suppression of JAK2 and STAT5 signaling by chemical inhibitors abolished IL6 induced MUC13 expression. IHC analysis showed increased expression of both P-STAT5 and MUC13 in colon cancer as compared to adjacent normal tissue Conclusions The results of this study, for the first time, suggest functional roles of MUC13 in colon cancer progression and provide information regarding the regulation of MUC13 expression via JAK2/STAT5 which may reveal promising therapeutic approaches for colon cancer treatment. PMID:24097071

  10. Association of interleukin-22 polymorphisms with the colon cancer: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Xu, Weili; Zhang, Guojian; Ren, Pengtao; Zhao, Jing; Yan, Qinghui

    2017-08-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22), an IL-10 family cytokine produced by T cells and innate lymphoid cells, is implicated in inflammation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association of IL-22 polymorphisms with the colon cancer in a Chinese population. Five hundred forty colon cancer cases and 540 healthy controls were recruited in the case-control study. The fluorogenic 5' exonuclease assays were used for genotype analysis of three common polymorphisms (-429C/T, +1046T/A and +1995A/C) of the IL-22 gene. Colon cancer cases had a significantly higher frequency of IL-22-429 TT genotype [odds ratio (OR)=1.69, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.24, 2.30; P=0.001] and -429T allele (OR=1.35, 95% CI=1.14, 1.60; P=0.001) than healthy controls. The findings are still emphatic by the Bonferroni correction (P<0.017). When stratifying by the differentiation of colon cancer, we found that colon cancer cases with poor differentiation had a significantly higher frequency of IL-22-429 TT genotype (OR=1.45, 95% CI=1.02, 2.07; P=0.04). When stratifying by the tumor location, tumor size, growth pattern and TNM stage of colon cancer, we found no statistical association. The IL-22 +1046T/A and IL-22 +1995A/C gene polymorphisms were not associated with colon cancer. Our findings suggested that the IL-22 -429C/T gene polymorphisms might be associated with colon cancer. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Helicobacter Infection Is Required for Inflammation and Colon Cancer in Smad3-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Maggio-Price, Lillian; Treuting, Piper; Zeng, Weiping; Tsang, Mark; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Iritani, Brian M.

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that intestinal microbial organisms may play an important role in triggering and sustaining inflammation in individuals afflicted with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Moreover, individuals with IBD are at increased risk for developing colorectal cancer, suggesting that chronic inflammation may initiate genetic or epigenetic changes associated with cancer development. We tested the hypothesis that bacteria may contribute to the development of colon cancer by synergizing with defective transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling, a pathway commonly mutated in human colon cancer. Although others have reported that mice deficient in the TGF-β signaling molecule SMAD3 develop colon cancer, we found that SMAD3-deficient mice maintained free of the Gram-negative enterohepatic bacteria Helicobacter spp. for up to 9 months do not develop colon cancer. Furthermore, infection of SMAD3−/− mice with Helicobacter triggers colon cancer in 50% to 66% of the animals. Using real-time PCR, we found that Helicobacter organisms concentrate in the cecum, the preferred site of tumor development. Mucinous adenocarcinomas develop 5 to 30 weeks after infection and are preceded by an early inflammatory phase, consisting of increased proliferation of epithelial cells; increased numbers of cyclooxygenase-2–positive cells, CD4+ T cells, macrophages; and increased MHC class II expression. Colonic tissue revealed increased transcripts for the oncogene c-myc and the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α, some of which have been implicated in colon cancer. These results suggest that bacteria may be important in triggering colorectal cancer, notably in the context of gene mutations in the TGF-β signaling pathway, one of the most commonly affected cellular pathways in colorectal cancer in humans. PMID:16424015

  12. Chemopreventive effect of apple and berry fruits against colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Vellayappan, Muthu Vignesh; Narasimhan, Gayathri; Supriyanto, Eko; Octorina Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti; Narayanan, Aqilah Leela T; Balaji, Arunpandian; Subramanian, Aruna Priyadarshini; Yusof, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer arises due to the conversion of precancerous polyps (benign) found in the inner lining of the colon. Prevention is better than cure, and this is very true with respect to colon cancer. Various epidemiologic studies have linked colorectal cancer with food intake. Apple and berry juices are widely consumed among various ethnicities because of their nutritious values. In this review article, chemopreventive effects of these fruit juices against colon cancer are discussed. Studies dealing with bioavailability, in vitro and in vivo effects of apple and berry juices are emphasized in this article. A thorough literature survey indicated that various phenolic phytochemicals present in these fruit juices have the innate potential to inhibit colon cancer cell lines. This review proposes the need for more preclinical evidence for the effects of fruit juices against different colon cancer cells, and also strives to facilitate clinical studies using these juices in humans in large trials. The conclusion of the review is that these apple and berry juices will be possible candidates in the campaign against colon cancer. PMID:25493015

  13. Chemopreventive effect of apple and berry fruits against colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Vellayappan, Muthu Vignesh; Narasimhan, Gayathri; Supriyanto, Eko; Octorina Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti; Narayanan, Aqilah Leela T; Balaji, Arunpandian; Subramanian, Aruna Priyadarshini; Yusof, Mustafa

    2014-12-07

    Colon cancer arises due to the conversion of precancerous polyps (benign) found in the inner lining of the colon. Prevention is better than cure, and this is very true with respect to colon cancer. Various epidemiologic studies have linked colorectal cancer with food intake. Apple and berry juices are widely consumed among various ethnicities because of their nutritious values. In this review article, chemopreventive effects of these fruit juices against colon cancer are discussed. Studies dealing with bioavailability, in vitro and in vivo effects of apple and berry juices are emphasized in this article. A thorough literature survey indicated that various phenolic phytochemicals present in these fruit juices have the innate potential to inhibit colon cancer cell lines. This review proposes the need for more preclinical evidence for the effects of fruit juices against different colon cancer cells, and also strives to facilitate clinical studies using these juices in humans in large trials. The conclusion of the review is that these apple and berry juices will be possible candidates in the campaign against colon cancer.

  14. The new view of colon cancer screening: forwards and backwards.

    PubMed

    Waye, Jerome D

    2013-07-01

    Many different techniques for colon cancer screening are available. The fecal immunochemical test is best for fecal-based screening, although the DNA investigation may be more specific when further developed. Computed tomographic colonography is as good as colonoscopy for detecting colon cancer and is almost as good as colonoscopy for detecting advanced adenomas, but has limitations. The flexible sigmoidoscopic examination markedly decreases the incidence of cancer in the visualized segments, but colonoscopy is currently the best procedure for evaluating the large bowel. Techniques for retroflexion or backward view of the colon have been investigated, with all showing increased polyp detection. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Nicotine enhances colon cancer cell migration by induction of fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Wei, Po-Li; Kuo, Li-Jen; Huang, Ming-Te; Ting, Wen-Chien; Ho, Yuan-Soon; Wang, Weu; An, Jane; Chang, Yu-Jia

    2011-06-01

    Long-term cigarette smoking increases the risk of colorectal cancer mortality. Tobacco's addictive toxin, nicotine, was reported to increase DNA synthesis of colon cancer cells. Because metastasis is the major cause of cancer death, the influence of nicotine on the migration of colon cancer cells remains to be determined. The influence of nicotine on the migration of colon cancer cells was evaluated using transwell assay. Nicotine receptor-mediated migration was studied by using both inhibitors and small interfering RNA (siRNA). The role of COX-2 signal was studied using pharmacological inhibitors. The expression of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker and COX-2 signal was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Nicotine enhanced DLD-1 and SW480 cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. We used inhibitors and siRNA to demonstrate that α7-nAChR mediates nicotine-enhanced colon cancer cell migration and upregulates fibronectin expression, which is involved in nicotine-enhanced migration. Furthermore, COX-2 signal was induced by nicotine treatment and is involved in nicotine-enhanced fibronectin expression. Nicotine, tobacco's additive toxin, enhances colon cancer metastasis through α7-nAChR and fibronectin--a mesenchymal marker for epithelial mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, COX-2 signal was involved in the induction of fibronectin. Therefore, smoking may play role in the progression of colon cancer.

  16. Prostate and Colon Cancer Screening Messages in Popular Magazines

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Mira L; Sheridan, Stacey; Pignone, Michael; Lewis, Carmen; Battle, Jamila; Gollop, Claudia; O'Malley, Michael

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To 1) compare the number of articles published about prostate, colon, and breast cancer in popular magazines during the past 2 decades, and 2) evaluate the content of in-depth prostate and colon cancer screening articles identified from 1996 to 2001. DESIGN We used a searchable database to identify the number of prostate, colon, and breast cancer articles published in three magazines with the highest circulation from six categories. In addition, we performed a systematic review on the in-depth (≥2 pages) articles on prostate and colon cancer screening that appeared from 1996 through 2001. RESULTS Although the number of magazine articles on prostate and colon cancer published in the 1990s increased compared to the 1980s, the number of articles is approximately one third of breast cancer articles. There were 36 in-depth articles from 1996 to 2001 in which prostate or colon cancer screening were mentioned. Over 90% of the articles recommended screening. However, of those articles, only 76% (25/33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 58% to 89%) cited screening guidelines. The benefits of screening were mentioned in 89% (32/36; 95% CI, 74% to 97%) but the harms were only found in 58% (21/36; 95% CI, 41% to 75%). Only 28% (10/36; 95% CI, 14% to 45%) of the articles provided all the necessary information needed for the reader to make an informed decision. CONCLUSIONS In-depth articles about prostate and colon cancer in popular magazines do not appear as frequently as articles about breast cancer. The available articles on prostate and colon cancer screening often do not provide the information necessary for the reader to make an informed decision about screening. PMID:15242469

  17. Colon Polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... or family history of colon polyps or colon cancer. Colon polyps often don't cause symptoms. It's important ... removed safely and completely. The best prevention for colon cancer is regular screening for polyps. Colon polyps care ...

  18. Radioimmunotoxin Therapy of Experimental Colon and Ovarian Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Vallera, Daniel A.

    2006-02-09

    mixed with the EpCam sFv that was synthesized without any toxin attached. The proliferation studies showed that EpCam sFv was able to block the killing of the EpCam expressing cells by DTEpCam. An irrelevant control protein, 1D10Fc was unable to block. Together, these studies indicated that EpCam was exquisitely selective. In order to produce an IT of even greater potency, we used a toxin containing the Golgi retention sequence KDEL. The same EpCam sFv was spliced to truncated PE containing the terminal KDEL sequence. The addition of KDEL enhanced the potency of the EpCam sFv IT at least 6 logs or 1000-fold with an IC50 of 2 to 7 x 10-8 nM. This conjugate was also shown to be highly selective. Taken together, all of these studies indicate that in vitro experiments have shown that we have a highly potent IT that selectively kills colon cancer cells. The next step was to show that the EpCam IT had the ability to inhibit the growth of flank tumors in vivo in nude mice. The same human colon tumor cells, HT29 used in the in vitro studies were injected into the flank of nude mice. Tumor cells were injected into groups of mice and when tumors reached the size of 0.5 cm3, we injected our best-performing EpCam IT called EpCamKDEL intratumorally. There was a significant drop in tumor size indicating that this agent was very effective against human colon cancer. Since the EpCamKDEL was injected intratumorally, it did not have to travel through the systemic circulation to find its target. Our next step will be to inject EpCamKDEL intravenously into mice with flank tumors to determine if EpCamKDEL has the ability to migrate to the tumor systemically. The next step was to radiolabel EpCamKDEL to see whether it could serve as an RIT. We radiolabeled EpCam with 111In as a surrogate for 90Y and then incubated it with HT29. The labeling efficiency was over 90% indicating that a high percentage of the protein molecules could be readily radiolabeled. However, the immunoreactivity was only

  19. Colon cancer releases alpha-tocopherol from its O-glycosides better than normal colon tissue.

    PubMed

    Knaś, Małgorzata; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Snarska, Jadwiga; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Walejko, Piotr; Borzym-Kluczyk, Malgorzata; Knaś-Karaszewska, Katarzyna; Kepka, Alina; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zimnoch, Magdalena; Maj, Jadwiga; Hryniewicka, Agnieszka; Dudzik, Danuta; Witkowshi, Stanislaw; Puchalski, Zbigniew; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Free radicals, in a colon, may damage DNA, make difficult DNA repair and change course of post-translational modifications of regulatory proteins, which promote tumor initiation and progression. Therefore risk of colon cancer is closely related to diet and other lifestyle factors. Dietary antioxidants, such as vitamin E, should reduce the levels of harmful oxidation products. However vitamin E is not soluble in water, which decreases its bioavailability. As O-glycosides of alpha-tocopherol are better soluble in water and penetrate to tissues easier than free alpha-tocopherol, the aim of our work was to investigate the rate of release the free tocopherol from its O-glycosides in colon cancer, in comparison to human healthy colon tissue. The activities of enzymes catalysing hydrolysis of alpha-tocopheryl glucoside (1a) and mannoside (1b) as well as p-nitrophenyl beta-glucoside (2a) and mannoside (2b) in cancer and healthy human colon tissues, were determined according to the modified method described by Zwierz et al. The alpha-tocopherol and p-nitrophenol were significantly better released from the respective glucosides and mannosides in cancer tissue than in "healthy" human colon tissues, with p = 0.000947 for la, p = 0.033024 for 1b; p = 0.0028 for 2a, and p = 0.0033 for 2b, respectively. Alpha-tocopherol and p-nitrophenol are released from the O-glycosides of glucose and mannose in significantly higher amount in colon cancer than in healthy tissues. The alpha-tocopherol O-glycosides can be considered as prodrugs in prevention and treatment of the colon cancer.

  20. Colon cancer presented with sigmoid volvulus: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Aras, Abbas; Kızıltan, Remzi; Batur, Abdussamet; Çelik, Sebahattin; Yılmaz, Özkan; Kotan, Çetin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sigmoid volvulus is the most prevalent type of colonic volvulus. Colon cancer is seen less where sigmoid volvulus is common, so it is rare to see that colon cancer is synchronous with sigmoid volvulus. Presentation of case We would like to present a case of sigmoid volvulus caused by colon cancer in a male patient aged 80 who was referred to the hospital with toxaemic shock presentation. Discussion Sigmoid cancer can be presented as sigmoid volvulus to the emergency department. In intestinal obstruction early diagnosis is of crucial importance. Computarized tomography is a diagnosis tool that should be preferred both in the diagnosis of obstruction and in detecting its cause, localisation, degree and complications. Conclusion When surgery is performed due to the urgent colonic obstruction in colonic volvulus diagnosed patients, a colon tumour should be considered in the same column loops or in the distal colon. We believe that CT is the method that should be preferred in large-bowel obstruction suspected patients. PMID:26519810

  1. [Evaluation of knowledge about colon cancer prevention versus other tumors].

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, José María; Henry, Nicolás; Ocaña, Domingo; Polesel, Julio Lotero

    2015-06-01

    In Argentina almost 7% of deaths are due to different cancers with screening strategies. Evaluate knowledge about cancer prevention compared with other tumors. Materials. A descriptive and comparative study. A survey between April and June 2013 in Salta City, province of Salta, Argentina. Correct answers were considered. Statistical analysis: Descriptive (mean and percentage), comparative Chi square Test (significance level P<0,05). 100 surveys. Correct answers: 36% Colon (CI 0,27-0,45), 46% Prostate (CI 0,33-0,52) and 69 (CI 0,59-0,77) and 58 (CI 0,48-0,67)for mama and cervix. 20% (CI 0,13-0,28) knew that colon cancer has a genetic predisposition and 58% (CI 0,48-0,67) about mama. 73% (CI 0,63-0,8) received information about cancer prevention. The main source of information was the physician. 46% (CI 0,36-0,55) received medical care in private institutions. Those who had social security, higher educational levels and medical care in private institutions had better knowledge about cancer prevention except in colon cancer. The global results showed levels below 70% in general but extremely low in colon cancer. Not having social security, receiving medical care in public institutions and having a low educational level are related with poor knowledge about cancer prevention except for colon and prostate cancer.

  2. Nutrition, growth, and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tryfiates, G.P. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 26 papers. Some of the titles are: Defects in early and late stages of nucleotide excision repair and the origins of cancer; Mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and the metal elements - DNA interaction; An overview of the role of diet and nutrition in carcinogenesis; Dietary modifiers in cancer; and Factors influencing glia growth in culture: Nutrients and cell-secreted factors.

  3. Patients with Acromegaly Presenting with Colon Cancer: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Nakhle, Samer; Ludlam, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Frequent colonoscopy screenings are critical for early diagnosis of colon cancer in patients with acromegaly. Case Presentations. We performed a retrospective analysis of the incidental diagnoses of colon cancer from the ACCESS trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01995734). Colon cancer was identified in 2 patients (4.5%). Case  1 patient was a 36-year-old male with acromegaly who underwent transsphenoidal surgery to remove the pituitary adenoma. After surgery, the patient underwent routine colonoscopy screening, which revealed a 40 mm tubular adenoma in the descending colon. A T1N1a carcinoma was surgically removed, and 1 of 22 lymph nodes was positive for metastatic disease, leading to a diagnosis of stage 3 colon cancer. Case  2 patient was a 50-year-old male with acromegaly who underwent transsphenoidal surgery to remove a 2 cm pituitary adenoma. The patient reported severe cramping and lower abdominal pain, and an invasive 8.1 cm3 grade 2 adenocarcinoma with signet rings was identified in the ascending colon and removed. Of the 37 lymph nodes, 34 were positive for the presence of tumor cells, and stage 3c colon cancer was confirmed. Conclusion. Current guidelines for colonoscopy screening at the time of diagnosis of acromegaly and at appropriate follow-up intervals should be followed. PMID:28025627

  4. Gut Bacteria May Link Diet, Colon Cancer, Study Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163274.html Gut Bacteria May Link Diet, Colon Cancer, Study Says High- ... link appears to be a type of intestinal bacteria, the Boston research team said. Specifically, they looked ...

  5. Colon Cancer Rates, Deaths Drop in Americans Over 50

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163856.html Colon Cancer Rates, Deaths Drop in Americans Over 50 Report suggests higher ... over 50 fell 32 percent since 2000, while deaths from the disease fell by 34 percent. Those ...

  6. Vitamin E, Selenium Don't Cut Colon Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162669.html Vitamin E, Selenium Don't Cut Colon Cancer Risk: ... 2016 WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Taking vitamin E and selenium does not appear to reduce ...

  7. Defective IL-23/IL-17 Axis Protects p47phox−/− Mice from Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Cornelia; Herrero San Juan, Martina; Weigmann, Benno; Bergis, Dominik; Dauber, Katrin; Muders, Michael H.; Baretton, Gustavo B.; Pfeilschifter, Josef Martin; Bonig, Halvard; Brenner, Sebastian; Radeke, Heinfried H.

    2017-01-01

    In the colon, a sophisticated balance between immune reaction and tolerance is absolutely required. Dysfunction may lead to pathologic phenotypes ranging from chronic inflammatory processes to cancer development. Two prominent modulators of colon inflammation are represented by the closely related cytokines interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-23, which initiate adaptive Th1 and Th17 immune responses, respectively. In this study, we investigated the impact of the NADPH oxidase protein p47phox, which negatively regulates IL-12 in dendritic cells, on colon cancer development in a colitis-associated colon cancer model. Initially, we found that IL-12−/− mice developed less severe colitis but are highly susceptible to colon cancer. By contrast, p47phox−/− mice showed lower tumor scores and fewer high grade tumors than wild-type (WT) littermates. Treatment with toll-like receptor 9 ligand CpG2216 significantly enhanced colitis in p47phox−/− mice, whereas tumor growth was simultaneously reduced. In tumor tissue of p47phox−/− mice, the IL-23/IL-17 axis was crucially hampered. IL-23p19 protein expression in tumor tissue correlated with tumor stage. Reconstitution of WT mice with IL-23p19−/− bone marrow protected these mice from colon cancer, whereas transplantation of WT hematopoiesis into IL-23p19−/− mice increased the susceptibility to tumor growth. Our study strengthens the divergent role of IL-12 and IL-23 in colon cancer development. With the characterization of p47phox as a novel modulator of both cytokines our investigation introduces a promising new target for antitumor strategies. PMID:28191009

  8. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  9. Irinotecan-Eluting Beads in Treating Patients With Refractory Metastatic Colon or Rectal Cancer That Has Spread to the Liver

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Liver Metastases; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  10. Right Versus Left Colon Cancer Biology: Integrating the Consensus Molecular Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S; Menter, David G; Kopetz, Scott

    2017-03-01

    Although clinical management of colon cancer generally has not accounted for the primary tumor site, left-sided and right-sided colon cancers harbor different clinical and biologic characteristics. Right-sided colon cancers are more likely to have genome-wide hypermethylation via the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), hypermutated state via microsatellite instability, and BRAF mutation. There are also differential exposures to potential carcinogenic toxins and microbiota in the right and left colon. Gene expression analyses further shed light on distinct biologic subtypes of colorectal cancers (CRCs), with 4 consensus molecular subtypes (CMSs) identified. Importantly, these subtypes are differentially distributed between right- and left-sided CRCs, with greater proportions of the "microsatellite unstable/immune" CMS1 and the "metabolic" CMS3 subtypes found in right-sided colon cancers. This review summarizes important biologic distinctions between right- and left-sided CRCs that likely impact prognosis and may predict for differential responses to biologic therapy. Given the inferior prognosis of stage III-IV right-sided CRCs and emerging data suggesting that anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody therapy is associated with worse survival in right-sided stage IV CRCs compared with left-sided cancers, these biologic differences between right- and left-sided CRCs provide critical context and may provide opportunities to personalize therapy.

  11. Docosahexaenoic acid sensitizes colon cancer cells to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Eunmyong; Lee, Eun-Hye; Kim, Soo-Yeon; Cha, Jun Hyung; Choi, Hwanho; Park, Wanseo; Choi, Hyeon Kyeom; Ko, Seong-Hee; Kim, So Hee

    2012-06-01

    Sulindac analogs represent one of the most efficacious groups of NSAIDs reducing the risk of colon cancer. Recent studies have shown that sulindac sulfide, a sulindac analog effective at lower doses compared to its parent compound, triggers the death receptor (DR)5-dependent extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Induction of apoptosis via activation of the DR-mediated pathway would be an ideal therapeutic strategy to eliminate cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the possibility that colon cancer cells are sensitized to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis by docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), via activation of the DR/extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Our data demonstrated that DHA combination sensitized colon cancer cells to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis, leading to enhanced growth suppression of human colon cancer xenografts. The combination effect was primarily attributed to increased cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase-8 activation. Moreover, pretreatment with z-IETD-FMK (caspase-8 inhibitor) or stable expression of dominant negative caspase-8 genes blocked DHA/sulindac sulfide cotreatment-induced apoptosis. In view of the finding that DR5 silencing abrogated the combination-stimulated apoptosis, we propose that apoptotic synergy induced by sulindac sulfide plus DHA is mediated via DR5. Our findings collectively support the utility of a combination of sulindac sulfide and DHA in the effective prevention and treatment of colon cancer.

  12. Natural products and colon cancer: current status and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Rajamanickam, Subapriya; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion and progression phases. Thus, the multistage sequence of events has many phases for prevention and intervention. Chemoprevention, a novel approach for controlling cancer, involves the use of specific natural products or synthetic chemical agents to reverse, suppress or prevent premalignancy before the development of invasive cancer. Several natural products, such as, grains, nuts, cereals, spices, fruits, vegetables, beverages, medicinal plants and herbs and their various phytochemical constituents including, phenolics, flavonoids, carotenoids, alkaloids, nitrogen containing as well as organosulfur compounds confer protective effects against wide range of cancers including colon cancer. Since diet has an important role in the etiology of colon cancer, dietary chemoprevention received attention for colon cancer prevention. However, identification of an agent with chemopreventive potential requires in vitro studies, efficacy and toxicity studies in animal models before embarking on human clinical trials. A brief introduction about colon cancer and the role of some recent natural products in colon cancer chemoprevention with respect to multiple molecular mechanisms in various in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies are described in this review. PMID:19884979

  13. Minimally invasive colorectal resection is associated with a transient increase in plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels early after surgery for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Shantha Kumara, H M C; Tohme, Samer T; Kim, Ik Y; Kim, Donald G; Kalady, Matthew F; Luchtefeld, Martin; Hoffman, Keith; Dimaggio, Vincent; Whelan, Richard L

    2011-09-01

    Surgery's impact on blood levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a potent angiogenic factor, is unknown. Preoperative (PreOp) HGF blood levels are elevated in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and correlate with disease stage and prognosis. This study's purpose was to determine plasma HGF levels after minimally invasive colorectal resection (MICR) in patients with CRC. Clinical and operative data were collected. Blood samples were obtained in all patients PreOp and on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 3; in some, samples were taken during weeks 2 and 3 after MICR. Late samples were bundled into 7-day time blocks. HGF levels were determined via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in duplicate. Student's t test was used to analyze the data (significance, P < .0125 after Bonferroni correction). A total of 28 CRC patients who underwent MICR were studied. Most had right, sigmoid, or left segmental colectomy. The mean plasma HGF level was higher on POD 1 (2417 ± 1476 pg/mL, P < .001) and POD 3 (2081 ± 1048 pg/mL, P < .001) when compared with PreOp levels (1045 ± 406 pg/mL). Plasma levels were back to baseline by the second (1100 ± 474 pg/mL, P = .64) and third postoperative weeks (1010 ± 327 pg/mL, P = .51). MICR for CRC is associated with a 1.9- to 2.3-fold increase in plasma HGF levels during the first 3 PODs after which levels normalize. This transient increase may briefly promote angiogenesis and the growth of residual tumor cells.

  14. Adenosine induces apoptosis through TNFR1/RIPK1/P38 axis in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shunji; Hou, Daisen; Chen, Ping; Zhang, Qi; Lv, Bin; Ma, Yunfang; Liu, Fuchen; Liu, Hui; Song, Evelyn J; Yang, Dongqin; Liu, Jie

    2015-05-08

    Adenosine, a metabolite of ATP, ubiquitously exists in a wide range of organs and tissues. We previously reported that adenosine was implicated in apoptosis in many cancer cells by extrinsic and/or intrinsic pathways. Here, we found that adenosine suppresses the cell growth by induction of apoptosis of human colonic cancer cells through a novel mechanism. Adenosine suppresses the cell growth of human SW620 and SW480 colon cells in an adenosine transporter and adenosine kinase dependent manner. Moreover, the cell growth suppression is induced by apoptosis through activation of caspase-3 and PARP, and accumulation of ROS in cells. Importantly, we found that adenosine increases the expression of TNFR1 and RIPK1 and the phosphorylation of p38. Knockdown of TNFR1 or RIPK1 impairs the activation of p38, blocks the cleavage of PARP, and provides partially, yet significantly protection from cell death, including reducing the ROS generation in the colon cancer cells. These results indicate that a TNFR1/RIPK1/P38 axis is present in adenosine-induced apoptosis of colonic cancer cells. This axis triggers apoptosis and plays crucial roles in relay of the death signaling. Our study also provides additional experimental evidence for adenosine as a potent therapeutic drug in cancer therapy.

  15. Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Breast   Cancer  Models.   Clinical   Cancer  Research.  19(1):  19:291-­‐303.     McKenna  A,  Hanna  M,  Banks  E...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0526 TITLE: Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer PRINCIPAL...15 Sep 2011 - 14 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

  16. Surveillance and Survivorship after Treatment for Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Makhoul, Rami; Alva, Suraj; Wilkins, Kirsten B.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in the United States. Majority of patients have localized disease that is amenable to curative resection. Disease recurrence remains a major concern after resection. In addition, patients are at an increased risk for developing a second or metachronous colon cancer. The principal goal of surveillance following treatment of colon cancer is to improve disease-free and overall survival. Survivorship is a distinct phase following surveillance to help improve quality of life and promote longevity. PMID:26648797

  17. Metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 in gastric cancer: Beyond metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhen-Zhen; Chen, Li-Shan; Zhou, Rui; Bin, Jian-Ping; Liao, Yu-Lin; Liao, Wang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 (MACC1) is an oncogene that was first identified in colon cancer. The upstream and downstream of MACC1 form a delicate regulatory network that supports its tumorigenic role in cancers. Multiple functions of MACC1 have been discovered in many cancers. In gastric cancer (GC), MACC1 has been shown to be involved in oncogenesis and tumor progression. MACC1 overexpression adversely affects the clinical outcomes of GC patients. Regarding the mechanism of action of MACC1 in GC, studies have shown that it promotes the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and accelerates cancer metastasis. MACC1 is involved in many hallmarks of GC in addition to metastasis. MACC1 promotes vasculogenic mimicry (VM) via TWIST1/2, and VM increases the tumor blood supply, which is necessary for tumor progression. MACC1 also facilitates GC lymphangiogenesis by upregulating extracellular secretion of VEGF-C/D, indicating that MACC1 may be an important player in GC lymphatic dissemination. Additionally, MACC1 supports GC growth under metabolic stress by enhancing the Warburg effect. In conclusion, MACC1 participates in multiple biological processes inside and outside of GC cells, making it an important mediator of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27547006

  18. A link between lipid metabolism and epithelial-mesenchymal transition provides a target for colon cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Ruth; Cruz-Gil, Silvia; Gómez de Cedrón, Marta; Álvarez-Fernández, Mónica; Vargas, Teodoro; Molina, Susana; García, Belén; Herranz, Jesús; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Reglero, Guillermo; Pérez-Moreno, Mirna; Feliu, Jaime; Malumbres, Marcos; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2015-11-17

    The alterations in carbohydrate metabolism that fuel tumor growth have been extensively studied. However, other metabolic pathways involved in malignant progression, demand further understanding. Here we describe a metabolic acyl-CoA synthetase/stearoyl-CoA desaturase ACSL/SCD network causing an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program that promotes migration and invasion of colon cancer cells. The mesenchymal phenotype produced upon overexpression of these enzymes is reverted through reactivation of AMPK signaling. Furthermore, this network expression correlates with poorer clinical outcome of stage-II colon cancer patients. Finally, combined treatment with chemical inhibitors of ACSL/SCD selectively decreases cancer cell viability without reducing normal cells viability. Thus, ACSL/SCD network stimulates colon cancer progression through conferring increased energetic capacity and invasive and migratory properties to cancer cells, and might represent a new therapeutic opportunity for colon cancer treatment.

  19. The inhibitory efficacy of methylseleninic acid against colon cancer xenografts in C57BL/6 mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Data indicate that methylselenol is a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. We tested the hypoththesis that oral dosing methylseleninic acid (MSeA), a methylselenol precursor, inhibits the growth of colon cancer xenografts in C57BL/6 mice fed a Se adequate diet. In this...

  20. Hyperglycemia exacerbates colon cancer malignancy through hexosamine biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos-Dos-Santos, A; Loponte, H F B R; Mantuano, N R; Oliveira, I A; de Paula, I F; Teixeira, L K; de-Freitas-Junior, J C M; Gondim, K C; Heise, N; Mohana-Borges, R; Morgado-Díaz, J A; Dias, W B; Todeschini, A R

    2017-03-20

    Hyperglycemia is a common feature of diabetes mellitus, considered as a risk factor for cancer. However, its direct effects in cancer cell behavior are relatively unexplored. Herein we show that high glucose concentration induces aberrant glycosylation, increased cell proliferation, invasion and tumor progression of colon cancer. By modulating the activity of the rate-limiting enzyme, glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT), we demonstrate that hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) is involved in those processes. Biopsies from patients with colon carcinoma show increased levels of GFAT and consequently aberrant glycans' expression suggesting an increase of HBP flow in human colon cancer. All together, our results open the possibility that HBP links hyperglycemia, aberrant glycosylation and tumor malignancy, and suggest this pathway as a potential therapeutic target for colorectal cancer.

  1. Family history and environmental risk factors for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Esteve; Gallus, Silvano; La Vecchia, Carlo; Talamini, Renato; Negri, Eva; Franceschi, Silvia

    2004-04-01

    We analyzed the joint effect of environmental risk factors and family history of colorectal cancer on colon cancer. We used data from a case-control study conducted in northern Italy between 1992 and 1996 including 1225 cases with colon cancer and 4154 controls. We created a weighed risk factor score for the main environmental risk factors in this population (positive family history, high education, low occupational physical activity, high daily meal frequency, low intake of fiber, low intake of calcium, and low intake of beta-carotene). Compared with the reference category (subjects with no family history of colorectal cancer and in the lowest tertile of the risk factor score), the odds ratios of colon cancer were 2.27 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.89-2.73] for subjects without family history and in the highest environmental risk factor score, 3.20 (95% CI = 2.05-5.01) for those with family history and low risk factor score, and 7.08 (95% CI = 4.68-10.71) for those with family history and high risk factor score. The pattern of risk was similar for men and women and no meaningful differences emerged according to subsite within the colon. Family history of colorectal cancer interacts with environmental risk factors of colon cancer.

  2. Peripheral Neutrophil to Lymphocyte Ratio Improves Prognostication in Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rashtak, Shahrooz; Ruan, Xiaoyang; Druliner, Brooke R; Liu, Hongfang; Therneau, Terry; Mouchli, Mohamad; Boardman, Lisa A

    2017-06-01

    We studied the role of peripheral neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) on survival outcomes in colon and rectal cancer to determine if its inclusion improved prognostication within existing staging systems. Disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) hazard ratios (HRs) of pretreatment NLR were calculated for 2536 patients with stage I to III colon or rectal cancer and adjusted for age, positive/total number of nodes, T stage, and grade. The association of NLR with clinicopathologic features and survival was evaluated and compared with the American Joint Committee on cancer (AJCC) TNM staging and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) models. High NLR was significantly associated with worse DFS (HR, 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.70; P = .009) and OS (HR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.29-2.10; P < .0005) in all stages for patients with colon, but not rectal, cancer. High NLR was significantly associated with site-specific worse prognosis, which was stronger in the left versus right colon; an inverse relationship with grade was found. The impact of high NLR on DFS and OS occurred early, with the majority of deaths within 2 years following surgery. Adjusted HRs for 5-year and 2-year outcomes in colon cancer per each additional 2-unit increase in NLR were 1.15 (95% CI, 1.08-1.23) and 1.20 (95% CI, 1.10-1.30), respectively. The addition of NLR enhanced the prognostic utility of TNM (TNM alone vs. TNM + NLR: concordance index, 0.60 vs. 0.68), and MSKCC (MSKCC alone vs. MSKCC + NLR: concordance index, 0.71 vs. 0.73) models for colon cancer patients. NLR is an independent prognostic variable for nonmetastatic colon cancer that enhances existing clinical staging systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. FRAT1 expression regulates proliferation in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kongxi; Guo, Jianqiang; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Weihua

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common gastric malignancies worldwide. However, the underlying mechanism of colon cancer development and valuable indicators of the disease remain unclear. In this study, the expression of frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas 1 (FRAT1) in colon cancer was investigated and the association between FRAT1 expression and biological properties of tumors was analyzed. A total of 147 colon cancer tissue samples and adjacent normal tissues were collected between January 2013 and June 2014. The FRAT1 gene and protein expression levels were analyzed in tissues with different TNM and pathological stages. Small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) containing the human FRAT1 gene were constructed and transfected into colon cancer HT-29 cells. The proliferation and migration of the cells was also analyzed in relation to a reduction in FRAT1 expression. In colon cancer tissues, the expression of FRAT1 was significantly higher when compared with adjacent tissues. In addition, FRAT1 expression was found to positively correlate with the degree of tumor malignancy, and this difference was determined to be statistically significant (P<0.05). Following shRNA transfection in HT-29 cells to decrease the expression of FRAT1, the proliferation and migration of the HT-29 cells decreased (due to conversion of the shRNA into small interfering RNA). These results indicate that in colon cancer, FRAT1 may present a novel tool for analyzing the tumor progression and may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of colon cancer.

  4. HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via geranylgeranylation and RhoA activation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Haidari, Amr A.; Syk, Ingvar; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Simvastatin blocked CCL17-induced and CCR4-dependent RhoA activation in HT29 cells. • CCL17/CCR4-mediated migration of colon cancer cells was antagonised by simvastatin. • Cell migration recovered by adding Mevalonate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. • Targeting HMG-CoA reductase might be useful to inhibit colon cancer metastasis. - Abstract: Background: Simvastatin is widely used to lower cholesterol levels in patients with cardiovascular diseases, although accumulating evidence suggests that statins, such as simvastatin, also exert numerous anti-tumoral effects. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration. Methods: Migration assays were performed to evaluate CCL17-induced colon cancer cell (HT-29) chemotaxis. In vitro tumor growth and apoptosis were assessed using a proliferation assay and annexin V assay, respectively. Active RhoA protein levels in CCL17-stimulated colon cancer cells were quantified using a G-LISA assay. Results: We found that simvastatin dose-dependently decreased CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Simvastatin had no effect on colon cancer cell proliferation or apoptosis. Inhibition of beta chemokine receptor 4, CCR4, reduced CCL17-evoked activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Moreover, administration of mevalonate reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Interestingly, co-incubation with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) antagonized the inhibitory impact of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration triggered by CCL17. Moreover, we observed that simvastatin decreased CCL17-induced activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Administration of mevalonate and GGPP reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-provoked RhoA activation in colon cancer cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings show for the first time that HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via

  5. Aberrant, ectopic expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors 1 and 2 in malignant colonic epithelial cells. Implications for these cells growth via an autocrine mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Amrita; Jones, Michael K.; Szabo, Sandor; Tarnawski, Andrzej S.

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Malignant colonic epithelial cells express VEGF and its receptors. •Cultured colon cancer cells secrete VEGF into the medium. •Inhibition of VEGF receptor significantly decreases colon cancer cell proliferation. •VEGF is critical for colon cancer cell growth. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor A (referred to as VEGF) is implicated in colon cancer growth. Currently, the main accepted mechanism by which VEGF promotes colon cancer growth is via the stimulation of angiogenesis, which was originally postulated by late Judah Folkman. However, the cellular source of VEGF in colon cancer tissue; and, the expression of VEGF and its receptors VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in colon cancer cells are not fully known and are subjects of controversy. Material and methods: We examined and quantified expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in three different human colonic tissue arrays containing sections of adenocarcinoma (n = 43) and normal mucosa (n = 41). In human colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 and normal colon cell lines NCM356 and NCM460, we examined expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 mRNA and protein, VEGF production and secretion into the culture medium; and, the effect of a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGF receptors, AL-993, on cell proliferation. Results: Human colorectal cancer specimens had strong expression of VEGF in cancer cells and also expressed VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2.In vitro studies showed that human colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and HT29, but not normal colonic cell lines, express VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 and secrete VEGF into the medium up to a concentration 2000 pg/ml within 48 h. Furthermore, we showed that inhibition of VEGF receptors using a specific VEGF-R inhibitor significantly reduced proliferation (by >50%) of cultured colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our findings support the contention that VEGF generated by colon cancer cells stimulates their growth directly through an autocrine mechanism that is

  6. Fat and dietary fiber intake and colon cancer mortality: a chronological comparison between Japan and the United States.

    PubMed

    Honda, T; Kai, I; Ohi, G

    1999-01-01

    To estimate the role of dietary fiber (DF) and fat in the striking growth of colon cancer mortality in Japan after World War II, we analyzed relations between the above variables in comparison with those in the United States. In the United States, fat intake grew by only one-third over the past 70 years (from 124 g in 1909-1913 to 166 g in 1984), whereas colon cancer mortality increased fourfold (from 5 to 20 per 100,000). In Japan, although fat intake roughly doubled during the 40 years after World War II (from 20 to 38 g), colon cancer mortality grew 5.5-fold (from 2 to 11 per 100,000). It is difficult to give a consistent explanation for the growth patterns of colon cancer mortality in both countries on the basis of fat consumption as a cancer promoter. In the United States, DF intake continuously dwindled at a level always less than in Japan throughout this century. DF intake in Japan also declined rather steadily, except for war time, over the past 80 years. However, with regard to the growth pattern of colon cancer mortality, it began rising steeply around the period when the daily DF intake diminished below 20 g, suggesting the presence of a threshold level in this neighborhood in preventing the development of colon cancer.

  7. Acidic microenvironment and bone pain in cancer-colonized bone

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hiasa, Masahiro; Nagata, Yuki; Okui, Tatsuo; White, Fletcher A

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers and hematologic cancers frequently colonize bone and induce skeletal-related complications. Bone pain is one of the most common complications associated with cancer colonization in bone and a major cause of increased morbidity and diminished quality of life, leading to poor survival in cancer patients. Although the mechanisms responsible for cancer-associated bone pain (CABP) are poorly understood, it is likely that complex interactions among cancer cells, bone cells and peripheral nerve cells contribute to the pathophysiology of CABP. Clinical observations that specific inhibitors of osteoclasts reduce CABP indicate a critical role of osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are proton-secreting cells and acidify extracellular bone microenvironment. Cancer cell-colonized bone also releases proton/lactate to avoid intracellular acidification resulting from increased aerobic glycolysis known as the Warburg effect. Thus, extracellular microenvironment of cancer-colonized bone is acidic. Acidosis is algogenic for nociceptive sensory neurons. The bone is densely innervated by the sensory neurons that express acid-sensing nociceptors. Collectively, CABP is evoked by the activation of these nociceptors on the sensory neurons innervating bone by the acidic extracellular microenvironment created by bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-colonizing cancer cells. As current treatments do not satisfactorily control CABP and can elicit serious side effects, new therapeutic interventions are needed to manage CABP. Understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism by which the acidic extracellular microenvironment is created in cancer-colonized bone and by which the expression and function of the acid-sensing nociceptors on the sensory neurons are regulated would facilitate to develop novel therapeutic approaches for the management of CABP. PMID:25987988

  8. An endoscope with integrated transparent bioelectronics and theranostic nanoparticles for colon cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunjae; Lee, Youngsik; Song, Changyeong; Cho, Hye Rim; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Choi, Tae Kyu; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Young Bum; Ling, Daishun; Lee, Hyuk; Yu, Su Jong; Choi, Seung Hong; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a challenging anatomical target for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for bleeding, polyps and cancerous growths. Advanced endoscopes that combine imaging and therapies within the gastrointestinal tract provide an advantage over stand-alone diagnostic or therapeutic devices. However, current multimodal endoscopes lack the spatial resolution necessary to detect and treat small cancers and other abnormalities. Here we present a multifunctional endoscope-based interventional system that integrates transparent bioelectronics with theranostic nanoparticles, which are photoactivated within highly localized space near tumours or benign growths. These advanced electronics and nanoparticles collectively enable optical fluorescence-based mapping, electrical impedance and pH sensing, contact/temperature monitoring, radio frequency ablation and localized photo/chemotherapy, as the basis of a closed-loop solution for colon cancer treatment. In vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experiments highlight the utility of this technology for accurate detection, delineation and rapid targeted therapy of colon cancer or precancerous lesions. PMID:26616435

  9. An endoscope with integrated transparent bioelectronics and theranostic nanoparticles for colon cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunjae; Lee, Youngsik; Song, Changyeong; Cho, Hye Rim; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Choi, Tae Kyu; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Young Bum; Ling, Daishun; Lee, Hyuk; Yu, Su Jong; Choi, Seung Hong; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2015-11-30

    The gastrointestinal tract is a challenging anatomical target for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for bleeding, polyps and cancerous growths. Advanced endoscopes that combine imaging and therapies within the gastrointestinal tract provide an advantage over stand-alone diagnostic or therapeutic devices. However, current multimodal endoscopes lack the spatial resolution necessary to detect and treat small cancers and other abnormalities. Here we present a multifunctional endoscope-based interventional system that integrates transparent bioelectronics with theranostic nanoparticles, which are photoactivated within highly localized space near tumours or benign growths. These advanced electronics and nanoparticles collectively enable optical fluorescence-based mapping, electrical impedance and pH sensing, contact/temperature monitoring, radio frequency ablation and localized photo/chemotherapy, as the basis of a closed-loop solution for colon cancer treatment. In vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experiments highlight the utility of this technology for accurate detection, delineation and rapid targeted therapy of colon cancer or precancerous lesions.

  10. Thyroid Growth and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dillwyn

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that most papillary thyroid cancers originate in infancy and childhood, based on the early rise in sporadic thyroid carcinoma incidence, the pattern of radiation-induced risk (highest in those exposed as infants), and the high prevalence of sporadic papillary thyroid cancers in children and adolescents (ultrasound screening after the Fukushima accident). The early origin can be linked to the growth pattern of follicular cells, with a high mitotic rate in infancy falling to very low replacement levels in adult life. The cell of origin of thyroid cancers, the differentiated follicular cell, has a limited growth potential. Unlike cancers originating in stem cells, loss of the usually tight link between differentiation and replicative senescence is required for immortalisation. It is suggested that this loss distinguishes larger clinically significant papillary thyroid cancers from micro-papillary thyroid cancers of little clinical significance. Papillary carcinogenesis can then be divided into 3 stages: (1) initiation, the first mutation in the carcinogenic cascade, for radiation-induced papillary thyroid cancers usually a RET rearrangement, (2) progression, acquisition of the additional mutations needed for low-grade malignancy, and (3) escape, further mutations giving immortality and a higher net growth rate. Most papillary thyroid cancers will not have achieved full immortality by adulthood, and remain as so-called micro-carcinomas with a very low growth rate. The use of the term ‘cancer’ to describe micro-papillary thyroid cancers in older patients encourages overtreatment and alarms patients. Invasive papillary thyroid tumours show a spectrum of malignancy, which at its lowest poses no threat to life. The treatment protocols and nomenclature for small papillary carcinomas need to be reconsidered in the light of the new evidence available, the continuing discovery of smaller lesions, and the model of thyroid carcinogenesis proposed. PMID

  11. Patterns of metastasis in colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riihimäki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Investigating epidemiology of metastatic colon and rectal cancer is challenging, because cancer registries seldom record metastatic sites. We used a population based approach to assess metastatic spread in colon and rectal cancers. 49,096 patients with colorectal cancer were identified from the nationwide Swedish Cancer Registry. Metastatic sites were identified from the National Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. Rectal cancer more frequently metastasized into thoracic organs (OR = 2.4) and the nervous system (1.5) and less frequently within the peritoneum (0.3). Mucinous and signet ring adenocarcinomas more frequently metastasized within the peritoneum compared with generic adenocarcinoma (3.8 [colon]/3.2 [rectum]), and less frequently into the liver (0.5/0.6). Lung metastases occurred frequently together with nervous system metastases, whereas peritoneal metastases were often listed with ovarian and pleural metastases. Thoracic metastases are almost as common as liver metastases in rectal cancer patients with a low stage at diagnosis. In colorectal cancer patients with solitary metastases the survival differed between 5 and 19 months depending on T or N stage. Metastatic patterns differ notably between colon and rectal cancers. This knowledge should help clinicians to identify patients in need for extra surveillance and gives insight to further studies on the mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27416752

  12. Metachronous adenoma on ileorectal anastomosis suture line and submucosal deep invasive cancer suspected of rapid growth in rectal remnant following long-term interval after curative surgery for advanced colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Uraoka, Toshio; Horii, Joichiro; Goto, Osamu; Shimoda, Masayuki; Yahagi, Naohisa

    2013-05-01

    There is general agreement as to the value of postoperative surveillance and the effectiveness of colonoscopy in the early detection of metachronous colorectal lesions. In the present case, a 56-year-old woman with no family history of colon cancer underwent surveillance colonoscopy in which a metachronous flat adenoma was detected following an interval of 23 years after a colectomy and 20 years subsequent to treatment for uterine cancer. A second metachronous flat lesion histopathologically determined to be a submucosal (sm) deep invasive cancer with lymphovascular involvement was detected 12 months later. This second metachronous lesion was suspected of having developed rapidly in the rectal remnant accounting for its sm deep invasion. The findings of this case suggest colonoscopy surveillance guidelines proposed for individuals at high risk should be evaluated based on cancer history and an analysis of possible mismatch repair gene mutations. In addition, the first metachronous lesion was located directly on the suture line of the anastomosis. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was indicated despite severe fibrosis into the sm layer. This case also demonstrates the successful use of improved ESD instruments, sm injection agents and technique refinements in the treatment of a technically difficult lesion with a high risk of complications.

  13. Mechanisms of drug resistance in colon cancer and its therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Li, Zhen; Gao, Chun-Ying; Cho, Chi Hin

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance develops in nearly all patients with colon cancer, leading to a decrease in the therapeutic efficacies of anticancer agents. This review provides an up-to-date summary on over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and evasion of apoptosis, two representatives of transport-based and non-transport-based mechanisms of drug resistance, as well as their therapeutic strategies. Different ABC transporters were found to be up-regulated in colon cancer, which can facilitate the efflux of anticancer drugs out of cancer cells and decrease their therapeutic effects. Inhibition of ABC transporters by suppressing their protein expressions or co-administration of modulators has been proven as an effective approach to sensitize drug-resistant cancer cells to anticancer drugs in vitro. On the other hand, evasion of apoptosis observed in drug-resistant cancers also results in drug resistance to anticancer agents, especially to apoptosis inducers. Restoration of apoptotic signals by BH3 mimetics or epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors and inhibition of cancer cell growth by alternative cell death pathways, such as autophagy, are effective means to treat such resistant cancer types. Given that the drug resistance mechanisms are different among colon cancer patients and may change even in a single patient at different stages, personalized and specific combination therapy is proposed to be more effective and safer for the reversal of drug resistance in clinics. PMID:27570424

  14. Gef gene therapy enhances the therapeutic efficacy of cytotoxics in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Raúl; Prados, Jose; Melguizo, Consolación; Rama, Ana R; Alvarez, Pablo J; Rodríguez-Serrano, Fernando; Caba, Octavio; Boulaiz, Houria; Aranega, Antonia

    2012-10-01

    The potential use of gene therapy to improve the response of patients with advanced cancer is being intensively analyzed. We evaluated the cytotoxic impact of the gef gene, a suicide gene, which has a demonstrated antiproliferative activity in tumor cells, in colon carcinoma cells in order to improve the antitumour effect of chemotherapeutic drugs used as first line treatment in the management of advanced colon cancer. We found that the gef gene induced a marked decrease in cell viability (50% in 24h) in T-84 cells through cell death by apoptosis. Interestingly, when gef gene expression was combined with drugs of choice in the clinical treatment of colon cancer (5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin and irinotecan), a strong synergistic effect was observed with approximately a 15-20% enhancement of the antiproliferative effect. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that gef gene expression induces significant growth arrest in colon cancer cells and that it is able to enhance the effect of some cytotoxic drugs compared with a single therapeutic approach. These results indicate the potential therapeutic value of the gef gene in colon cancer combination therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The oncogenic effects of p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3) in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Joo; Kim, Hong Beum; Kim, Jeeho

    2017-01-01

    The p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3), initially identified as a gene downstream of p53, plays an important role in the apoptotic process triggered by p53-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Recently, several studies have suggested that PIG3 may play a role in various types of cancer. However, the functional significance of PIG3 in cancer remains unclear. Here, we found that PIG3 was highly expressed in human colon cancer cell lines compared to normal colonderived fibroblasts. Therefore, we attempted to elucidate the functional role of PIG3 in colon cancer. PIG3 overexpression increases the colony formation, migration and invasion ability of HCT116 colon cancer cells. Conversely, these tumorigenic abilities were significantly decreased in in vitro studies with PIG3 knockdown HCT116 cells. PIG3 knockdown also attenuated the growth of mouse xenograft tumors. These results demonstrate that PIG3 is associated with the tumorigenic potential of cancer cells, both in vitro and in vivo, and could play a key oncogenic role in colon cancer. PMID:28280421

  16. Milky Spots Promote Ovarian Cancer Metastatic Colonization of Peritoneal Adipose in Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Robert; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Schoof, Michael; Rodriguez, Irving; Theriault, Betty; Chekmareva, Marina; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    The goal of controlling ovarian cancer metastasis formation has elicited considerable interest in identifying the tissue microenvironments involved in cancer cell colonization of the omentum. Omental adipose is a site of prodigious metastasis in both ovarian cancer models and clinical disease. This tissue is unusual for its milky spots, comprised of immune cells, stromal cells, and structural elements surrounding glomerulus-like capillary beds. The present study shows the novel finding that milky spots and adipocytes play distinct and complementary roles in omental metastatic colonization. In vivo assays showed that ID8, CaOV3, HeyA8, and SKOV3ip.1 cancer cells preferentially lodge and grow within omental and splenoportal fat, which contain milky spots, rather than in peritoneal fat depots. Similarly, medium conditioned by milky spot–containing adipose tissue caused 75% more cell migration than did medium conditioned by milky spot–deficient adipose. Studies with immunodeficient mice showed that the mouse genetic background does not alter omental milky spot number and size, nor does it affect ovarian cancer colonization. Finally, consistent with the role of lipids as an energy source for cancer cell growth, in vivo time-course studies revealed an inverse relationship between metastatic burden and omental adipocyte content. Our findings support a two-step model in which both milky spots and adipose have specific roles in colonization of the omentum by ovarian cancer cells. PMID:23885715

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates cell motility in human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ssu-Ming; Lin, Chingju; Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Chiu, Chien-Ming; Fang, Chia-Wei; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Dar-Ren; Yeh, Wei-Lan

    2015-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor that has been shown to affect cancer cell metastasis and migration. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of BDNF-induced cell migration in colon cancer cells. The migratory activities of two colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and SW480, were found to be increased in the presence of human BDNF. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO)-1 is known to be involved in the development and progression of tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie HO-1 in the regulation of colon cancer cell migration remain unclear. Expression of HO-1 protein and mRNA increased in response to BDNF stimulation. The BDNF-induced increase in cell migration was antagonized by a HO-1 inhibitor and HO-1 siRNA. Furthermore, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also increased in response to BDNF stimulation, as did VEGF mRNA expression and transcriptional activity. The increase in BDNF-induced cancer cell migration was antagonized by a VEGF-neutralizing antibody. Moreover, transfection with HO-1 siRNA effectively reduced the increased VEGF expression induced by BDNF. The BDNF-induced cell migration was regulated by the ERK, p38, and Akt signaling pathways. Furthermore, BDNF-increased HO-1 and VEGF promoter transcriptional activity were inhibited by ERK, p38, and AKT pharmacological inhibitors and dominant-negative mutants in colon cancer cells. These results indicate that BDNF increases the migration of colon cancer cells by regulating VEGF/HO-1 activation through the ERK, p38, and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. The results of this study may provide a relevant contribution to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which BDNF promotes colon cancer cell motility.

  18. Omega-3 fatty acid is a potential preventive agent for recurrent colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Anita; Yu, Yingjie; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Woods, James; Farhana, Lulu; Rajendra, Sindhu G; Patel, Aamil; Dyson, Gregory; Levi, Edi; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Majumdar, Adhip P N; Nangia-Makker, Pratima

    2014-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the contention that many malignancies, including sporadic colorectal cancer, are driven by the self-renewing, chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem/stem-like cells (CSC/CSLC), underscoring the need for improved preventive and therapeutic strategies targeting CSCs/CSLCs. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA), have been reported to inhibit the growth of primary tumors, but their potential as a preventive agent for recurring cancers is unexplored. The primary objectives of this investigation are (i) to examine whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; one of the ω-3 PUFA) synergizes with FuOx (5-FU+Oxaliplatin), the backbone of colon cancer chemotherapy, and (ii) whether EPA by itself or in combination with conventional chemotherapy prevents the recurrence of colon cancer via eliminating/suppressing CSCs/CSLCs. FuOx-resistant (chemoresistant; CR) colon cancer cells, highly enriched in CSCs, were used for this study. Although EPA alone was effective, combination of EPA and FuOx was more potent in (i) inhibiting cell growth, colonosphere formation, and sphere-forming frequency, (ii) increasing sphere disintegration, (iii) suppressing the growth of SCID mice xenografts of CR colon cancer cells, and (iv) decreasing proinflammatory metabolites in mice. In addition, EPA + FuOx caused a reduction in CSC/CSLC population. The growth reduction by this regimen is the result of increased apoptosis as evidenced by PARP cleavage. Furthermore, increased pPTEN, decreased pAkt, normalization of β-catenin expression, localization, and transcriptional activity by EPA suggests a role for the PTEN-Akt axis and Wnt signaling in regulating this process. Our data suggest that EPA by itself or in combination with FuOx could be an effective preventive strategy for recurring colorectal cancer.

  19. Epidural analgesia associated with better survival in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Vogelaar, F J; Abegg, R; van der Linden, J C; Cornelisse, H G J M; van Dorsten, F R C; Lemmens, V E; Bosscha, K

    2015-08-01

    Surgery remains the mainstay of treatment for potentially curable colon cancer. Otherwise, the surgical stress response might increase the likelihood of cancer dissemination during and after cancer surgery. There is growing evidence that the type of anaesthesia during cancer surgery plays a role in the metastatic process. Therefore, we assessed if the method of anaesthesia is associated with long-term survival after colon cancer surgery. A retrospective single-centre study was conducted including 588 patients who underwent colorectal cancer surgery, TNM stage I-IV, in the Jeroen Bosch Hospital between 1995 and 2003. The Cox proportional hazard model was used for statistical analysis. Adjustments were made for age, sex, comorbidity, TNM stage, chemotherapy, emergency surgery status and year of incidence. Of the 588 primary colon cancer patients with a median age of 70 years, 399 (68 %) patients underwent colon surgery with epidural anaesthesia, whilst 189 (32 %) patients were operated without epidural anaesthesia. Five-year survival for patients not receiving epidural analgesia was 42 % versus 51 % for patients receiving epidural analgesia (p = 0.03). This effect remained after adjustment for relevant patient, tumour, and treatment characteristics (hazard ratio (HR) 1.30 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.59), p = 0.01). Subgroup analysis in patients of 80 years and older (n = 100) showed also a better overall survival after receiving epidural analgesia (HR 1.74 (95 % CI 1.11-2.72), p = 0.01). Epidural analgesia during colon cancer surgery was associated with a better overall survival. Prospective trials evaluating the effects of locoregional analgesia on colon cancer recurrence are warranted.

  20. Intestinal protozoa are hypothesized to stimulate immunosurveillance against colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Juckett, David A; Aylsworth, Charles F; Quensen, Janet Murphy

    2008-01-01

    Colon cancer in humans results in considerable morbidity and mortality throughout most of the world. During the twentieth century, there was a rapid rise in colon cancer within modernizing countries that has not been adequately explained, although the role of diet has been widely explored. Previously, we showed that the presence of the endemic Eimeria spp. protozoan in intestinal tissues is associated with regions of low tumorigenesis in the large and small bovine intestine and that an Eimeria surface protein is a potent activator of dendritic cells and a useful immunomodulator, with anti-cancer and anti-viral properties. Therefore, we hypothesize that the persistent presence of such an intestinal protozoan enhances immunosurveillance by elevating the intestinal alert status and that the loss of these organisms could lead to a higher incidence of colon cancer. Preliminary support of this hypothesis derives from the observations that domestic animals, known to maintain this protozoan, have very low colon cancer incidence. We propose that this also may occur in human populations that use human excrement (night soil) as a fertilizer, a practice that serves to complete the life cycle of this type of microbe. We examine some evidence for this hypothesis in Japan's mortality patterns, where we show that colon cancer increased after the cessation of night soil use, but before the change to a western diet. We conclude that this hypothesis, a variation of the hygiene hypothesis, is worth further consideration and continued elaboration.

  1. Multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy used to discriminate human colon cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Bianchi, Mariana; de Thomaz, André A.; Baratti, Mariana O.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; Casco, Víctor H.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2013-02-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most diffused cancers in the Western World, ranking third worldwide in frequency of incidence after lung and breast cancers. Even if it is curable when detected and treated early, a more accurate premature diagnosis would be a suitable aim for both cancer prognostic and treatment. Combined multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopies, such as two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), second-harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can be used to detect morphological and metabolic changes associated with stroma and epithelial transformation in colon cancer disease. NLO microscopes provide complementary information about tissue microstructure, showing distinctive patterns between normal and malignant human colonic mucosa. Using a set of scoring methods significant differences both in the content, distribution and organization of stroma collagen fibrils, and lifetime components of NADH and FAD cofactors of human colon mucosa biopsies were found. Our results provide a framework for using NLO techniques as a clinical diagnostic tool for human colon cancer, and also suggest that the SHG and FLIM metrics could be applied to other intestinal disorders, which are characterized by abnormal cell proliferation and collagen assembly.

  2. Sporadic colon cancer murine models demonstrate the value of autoantibody detection for preclinical cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Barderas, Rodrigo; Villar-Vázquez, Roi; Fernández-Aceñero, María Jesús; Babel, Ingrid; Peláez-García, Alberto; Torres, Sofía; Casal, J Ignacio

    2013-10-15

    Although autoantibody detection has been proposed for diagnosis of colorectal cancer, little is known about their initial production and development correlation with cancer progression. Azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-treated mice developed colon adenocarcinoma in the distal colon similar to human sporadic colon cancer. We assessed this model together with AOM and DSS-only models for their applicability to early detection of cancer. All AOM/DSS-treated mice produced autoantibodies to tumor-associated antigens analogous to those observed in human colon cancer patients. Autoantibody response was related to tumor antigen overexpression. Cancer autoantibodies were detected 21 days after starting treatment, when no malignant histopathological features were detectable, and they increased according to tumor progression. When carcinogenesis was induced separately by AOM or DSS, only those mice that developed malignant lesions produced significant levels of autoantibodies. These findings demonstrate that autoantibody development is an early event in tumorigenesis and validates its use for preclinical colon cancer diagnosis.

  3. Products of the colonic microbiota mediate the effects of diet on colon cancer risk.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Stephen J D; Ou, Junhai; Aufreiter, Susanne; O'Connor, Deborah; Sharma, Sumit; Sepulveda, Jorge; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi; Mawhinney, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    It is estimated that most colon cancers can be attributed to dietary causes. We have hypothesized that diet influences the health of the colonic mucosa through interaction with the microbiota and that it is the milieu interior that regulates mucosal proliferation and therefore cancer risk. To validate this further, we compared colonic contents from healthy 50- to 65-y-old people from populations with high and low risk, specifically low risk Native Africans (cancer incidence <1:100,000; n = 17), high risk African Americans (risk 65:100,000; n = 17), and Caucasian Americans (risk 50:100,000; n = 18). Americans typically consume a high-animal protein and -fat diet, whereas Africans consume a staple diet of maize meal, rich in resistant starch and low in animal products. Following overnight fasting, rapid colonic evacuation was performed with 2 L polyethylene glycol. Total colonic evacuants were analyzed for SCFA, vitamins, nitrogen, and minerals. Total SCFA and butyrate were significantly higher in Native Africans than in both American groups. Colonic folate and biotin content, measured by Lactobacillus rhamnoses and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014 bioassay, respectively, exceeded normal daily dietary intakes. Compared with Africans, calcium and iron contents were significantly higher in Caucasian Americans and zinc content was significantly higher in African Americans, but nitrogen content did not differ among the 3 groups. In conclusion, the results support our hypothesis that the microbiota mediates the effect diet has on colon cancer risk by their generation of butyrate, folate, and biotin, molecules known to play a key role in the regulation of epithelial proliferation.

  4. Lifetime costs of colon and rectal cancer management in Canada.

    PubMed

    Maroun, Jean; Ng, Edward; Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Le Petit, Christel; Dahrouge, Simone; Flanagan, William M; Walker, Hugh; Evans, William K

    2003-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality among Canadians. We derived the direct health care costs associated with the lifetime management of an estimated 16,856 patients with a diagnosis of colon and rectal cancer in Canada in 2000. Information on diagnostic approaches, treatment algorithms, follow-up and care at disease progression was obtained from various databases and was integrated into Statistics Canada's Population Health Model (POHEM) to estimate lifetime costs. The average lifetime cost (in Canadian dollars) of managing patients with colorectal cancer ranged from $20,319 per case for TNM stage I colon cancer to $39,182 per case for stage III rectal cancer. The total lifetime treatment cost for the cohort of patients in 2000 was estimated to be over $333 million for colon and $187 million for rectal cancer. Hospitalization represented 65% and 61% of the lifetime costs of colon and rectal cancer respectively. Disease costing models can be important policy- relevant tools to assist in resource allocation. Our results highlight the importance of performing preoperative tests and staging in an ambulatory care setting, where possible, to achieve optimal cost efficiencies. Similarly, terminal care might be delivered more efficiently in the home environment or in palliative care units.

  5. Clostridium difficile colonization in preoperative colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Luo, Yun; Lv, Yinxiang; Huang, Chen; Sheng, Qinsong; Zhao, Peng; Ye, Julian; Jiang, Weiqin; Liu, Lulu; Song, Xiaojun; Tong, Zhou; Chen, Wenbin; Lin, Jianjiang; Tang, Yi-Wei; Jin, Dazhi; Fang, Weijia

    2017-01-02

    The entire process of Clostridium difficile colonization to infection develops in large intestine. However, the real colonization pattern of C. difficile in preoperative colorectal cancer patients has not been studied. In this study, 33 C. difficile strains (16.1%) were isolated from stool samples of 205 preoperative colorectal cancer patients. C. difficile colonization rates in lymph node metastasis patients (22.3%) were significantly higher than lymph node negative patients (10.8%) (OR=2.314, 95%CI=1.023-5.235, P =0.025). Meanwhile, patients positive for stool occult blood had lower C. difficile colonization rates than negative patients (11.5% vs. 24.0%, OR=0.300, 95%CI=0.131-0.685, P =0.019). A total of 16 sequence types were revealed by multilocus sequence typing. Minimum spanning tree and time-space cluster analysis indicated that all C. difficile isolates were epidemiologically unrelated. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed all isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and metronidazole. The results suggested that the prevalence of C. difficile colonization is high in preoperative colorectal cancer patients, and the colonization is not acquired in the hospital. Since lymph node metastasis colorectal cancer patients inevitably require adjuvant chemotherapy and C. difficile infection may halt the ongoing treatment, the call for sustained monitoring of C. difficile in those patients is apparently urgent.

  6. Clostridium difficile colonization in preoperative colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yinxiang; Huang, Chen; Sheng, Qinsong; Zhao, Peng; Ye, Julian; Jiang, Weiqin; Liu, Lulu; Song, Xiaojun; Tong, Zhou; Chen, Wenbin; Lin, Jianjiang; Tang, Yi-Wei; Jin, Dazhi; Fang, Weijia

    2017-01-01

    The entire process of Clostridium difficile colonization to infection develops in large intestine. However, the real colonization pattern of C. difficile in preoperative colorectal cancer patients has not been studied. In this study, 33 C. difficile strains (16.1%) were isolated from stool samples of 205 preoperative colorectal cancer patients. C. difficile colonization rates in lymph node metastasis patients (22.3%) were significantly higher than lymph node negative patients (10.8%) (OR=2.314, 95%CI=1.023-5.235, P =0.025). Meanwhile, patients positive for stool occult blood had lower C. difficile colonization rates than negative patients (11.5% vs. 24.0%, OR=0.300, 95%CI=0.131-0.685, P =0.019). A total of 16 sequence types were revealed by multilocus sequence typing. Minimum spanning tree and time-space cluster analysis indicated that all C. difficile isolates were epidemiologically unrelated. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed all isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and metronidazole. The results suggested that the prevalence of C. difficile colonization is high in preoperative colorectal cancer patients, and the colonization is not acquired in the hospital. Since lymph node metastasis colorectal cancer patients inevitably require adjuvant chemotherapy and C. difficile infection may halt the ongoing treatment, the call for sustained monitoring of C. difficile in those patients is apparently urgent. PMID:28060753

  7. Adjuvant therapy for colon cancer in the new millenium.

    PubMed

    Rao, S; Cunningham, D

    2003-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients with colon cancer who undergo curative surgical resection develop metastatic disease. Over the last 20 years large prospective randomised studies have demonstrated a clear survival benefit for patients with stage III colon cancer who are treated with adjuvant 5FU based chemotherapy. At the present time 6 months of 5FU and leucovorin is generally considered the standard adjuvant therapy. For stage II disease the routine use of adjuvant treatment remains controversial. Newer drugs such as oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and the oral fluoropyrimidines have proven active in advanced colorectal cancer and are currently being evaluated in the adjuvant setting. Molecular markers for this disease are being identified and may help define those patients who would benefit from therapy. The integration of adjuvant immunotherapy with conventional chemotherapy offers the potential to improve the long-term outcome for surgically resected colon cancer.

  8. 15-LOX-1 suppression of hypoxia-induced metastatic phenotype and HIF-1α expression in human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuanqing; Mao, Fei; Zuo, Xiangsheng; Moussalli, Micheline J; Elias, Elias; Xu, Weiguo; Shureiqi, Imad

    2014-01-01

    The expression of 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LOX-1) is downregulated in colon cancer and other major cancers, and 15-LOX-1 reexpression in cancer cells suppresses colonic tumorigenesis. Various lines of evidence indicate that 15-LOX-1 expression suppresses premetastatic stages of colonic tumorigenesis; nevertheless, the role of 15-LOX-1 loss of expression in cancer epithelial cells in metastases continues to be debated. Hypoxia, a common feature of the cancer microenvironment, promotes prometastatic mechanisms such as the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, a transcriptional master regulator that enhances cancer cell metastatic potential, angiogenesis, and tumor cell invasion and migration. We have, therefore, tested whether restoring 15-LOX-1 in colon cancer cells affects cancer cells' hypoxia response that promotes metastasis. We found that 15-LOX-1 reexpression in HCT116, HT29LMM, and LoVo colon cancer cells inhibited survival, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, angiogenesis, cancer cell migration and invasion, and HIF-1α protein expression and stability under hypoxia. These findings demonstrate that 15-LOX-1 expression loss in cancer cells promotes metastasis and that therapeutically targeting ubiquitous 15-LOX-1 loss in cancer cells has the potential to suppress metastasis. PMID:24634093

  9. 15-LOX-1 suppression of hypoxia-induced metastatic phenotype and HIF-1α expression in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanqing; Mao, Fei; Zuo, Xiangsheng; Moussalli, Micheline J; Elias, Elias; Xu, Weiguo; Shureiqi, Imad

    2014-06-01

    The expression of 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LOX-1) is downregulated in colon cancer and other major cancers, and 15-LOX-1 reexpression in cancer cells suppresses colonic tumorigenesis. Various lines of evidence indicate that 15-LOX-1 expression suppresses premetastatic stages of colonic tumorigenesis; nevertheless, the role of 15-LOX-1 loss of expression in cancer epithelial cells in metastases continues to be debated. Hypoxia, a common feature of the cancer microenvironment, promotes prometastatic mechanisms such as the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, a transcriptional master regulator that enhances cancer cell metastatic potential, angiogenesis, and tumor cell invasion and migration. We have, therefore, tested whether restoring 15-LOX-1 in colon cancer cells affects cancer cells' hypoxia response that promotes metastasis. We found that 15-LOX-1 reexpression in HCT116, HT29LMM, and LoVo colon cancer cells inhibited survival, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, angiogenesis, cancer cell migration and invasion, and HIF-1α protein expression and stability under hypoxia. These findings demonstrate that 15-LOX-1 expression loss in cancer cells promotes metastasis and that therapeutically targeting ubiquitous 15-LOX-1 loss in cancer cells has the potential to suppress metastasis.

  10. Aberrant DNA methylation occurs in colon neoplasms arising in the azoxymethane colon cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Borinstein, Scott C.; Conerly, Melissa; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Biswas, Swati; Washington, M. Kay; Trobridge, Patty; Henikoff, Steve; Grady, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Mouse models of intestinal tumors have advanced our understanding of the role of gene mutations in colorectal malignancy. However, the utility of these systems for studying the role of epigenetic alterations in intestinal neoplasms remains to be defined. Consequently, we assessed the role of aberrant DNA methylation in the azoxymethane (AOM) rodent model of colon cancer. AOM induced tumors display global DNA hypomethylation, which is similar to human colorectal cancer. We next assessed the methylation status of a panel of candidate genes previously shown to be aberrantly methylated in human cancer or in mouse models of malignant neoplasms. This analysis revealed different patterns of DNA methylation that were gene specific. Zik1 and Gja9 demonstrated cancer-specific aberrant DNA methylation, whereas, Cdkn2a/p16, Igfbp3, Mgmt, Id4, and Cxcr4 were methylated in both the AOM tumors and normal colon mucosa. No aberrant methylation of Dapk1 or Mlt1 was detected in the neoplasms, but normal colon mucosa samples displayed methylation of these genes. Finally, p19Arf, Tslc1, Hltf, and Mlh1 were unmethylated in both the AOM tumors and normal colon mucosa. Thus, aberrant DNA methylation does occur in AOM tumors, although the frequency of aberrantly methylated genes appears to be less common than in human colorectal cancer. Additional studies are necessary to further characterize the patterns of aberrantly methylated genes in AOM tumors. PMID:19777566

  11. Models of Human Metastatic Colon Cancer in Nude Mice Orthotopically Constructed by Using Histologically Intact Patient Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xinyu; Besterman, Jeffrey M.; Monosov, Ann; Hoffman, Robert M.

    1991-10-01

    There is an important need for clinically relevant animal models for human cancers. Toward this goal, histologically intact human colon-cancer specimens derived surgically from patients were implanted orthotopically to the colon or cecum of nude mice. We have observed extensive orthotopic growth in 13 of 20 cases of implanted patient colon tumors. These showed various growth patterns with subsequent regional, lymph-node, and liver metastasis, as well as general abdominal carcinomatosis. Thus, models for human colon cancer have been developed that show (i) local growth, (ii) abdominal metastasis, (iii) general abdominal carcinomatosis with extensive peritoneal seeding, (iv) lymph-node metastasis, (v) liver metastasis, and (vi) colonic obstruction. These models permit the passage of the tumors to form large cohorts. They will facilitate research into the biology of colon cancer metastatic capability and the development of new drugs active against metastatic cancer. These models may also predict the clinical course and the in vivo response to drugs of the cancer of individual patients.

  12. Smad4 Inhibits VEGF-A and VEGF-C Expressions via Enhancing Smad3 Phosphorylation in Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuemei; Li, Xinlei; Lv, Xiaohong; Xiao, Jianbing; Liu, Baoquan; Zhang, Yafang

    2017-09-01

    Smad4 is a critical factor in the TGF-β pathway and is involved in tumor progression and metastasis, but the role of Smad4 in colon cancer cells is unclear. The aim of this study is to explore the effect and the underlying mechanism of Smad4 on the growth, migration and apoptosis of colon cancer cells as well as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and VEGF-C secreted by these cells. In this study, we showed that Smad4, VEGF-A, and VEGF-C are independent prognostic factors of colon cancer, and Smad4 expression was negatively correlated with VEGF-A and -C in samples. We found that Smad4 mRNA and protein levels in colon cancer cells, particularly in HCT-116 cells, were significantly lower than those in the human intestinal epithelial cell line (HIEC). Smad4 overexpression promoted tumor cell apoptosis, inhibited VEGF-A and -C expression in vitro and in vivo, but had no effect on cell proliferation and migration. Tail vein injection of the virus inhibited xenograft growth in nude mice. Importantly, we also demonstrated that Smad4 could increase the phosphorylation level of Smad3, but not Smad2, which may be one of the mechanisms underlying these effects of Smad4 in colon cancer. Therefore, Smad4 may be a new target for the treatment of colon cancer. Anat Rec, 300:1560-1569, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Epigenetic silencing of glutaminase 2 in human liver and colon cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glutaminase 2 (Gls2) is a p53 target gene and is known to play an important role in energy metabolism. Gls2 has been reported to be downregulated in human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). However, the underlying mechanism responsible for its downregulation is still unclear. Here, we investigated Gls2 expression and its promoter methylation status in human liver and colon cancers. Methods mRNA expression of Gls2 was determined in human liver and colon cancer cell lines and HCC tissues by real-time PCR and promoter methylation was analyzed by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and validated by bisulfite genome sequencing (BGS). Cell growth was determined by colony formation assay and MTS assay. Statistical analysis was performed by Wilcoxon matched-pairs test or non-parametric t test. Results First, we observed reduced Gls2 mRNA level in a selected group of liver and colon cancer cell lines and in the cancerous tissues from 20 HCC and 5 human colon cancer patients in comparison to their non-cancerous counter parts. Importantly, the lower level of Gls2 in cancer cells was closely correlated to its promoter hypermethylation; and chemical demethylation treatment with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (Aza) increased Gls2 mRNA level in both liver and colon cancer cells, indicating that direct epigenetic silencing suppressed Gls2 expression by methylation. Next, we further examined this correlation in human HCC tissues, and 60% of primary liver tumor tissues had higher DNA methylation levels when compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues. Detailed methylation analysis of 23 CpG sites at a 300-bp promoter region by bisulfite genomic sequencing confirmed its methylation. Finally, we examined the biological function of Gls2 and found that restoring Gls2 expression in cancer cells significantly inhibited cancer cell growth and colony formation ability through induction of cell cycle arrest. Conclusions We provide evidence showing that epigenetic silencing of Gls2 via promoter

  14. Roles for Growth Factors in Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Witsch, Esther; Sela, Michael; Yarden, Yosef

    2011-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, cells receive fate-determining signals from their tissue surroundings, primarily in the form of polypeptide growth factors. Integration of these extracellular signals underlies tissue homeostasis. Although departure from homeostasis and tumor initiation are instigated by oncogenic mutations rather than by growth factors, the latter are the major regulators of all subsequent steps of tumor progression, namely clonal expansion, invasion across tissue barriers, angiogenesis, and colonization of distant niches. Here, we discuss the relevant growth factor families, their roles in tumor biology, as well as the respective downstream signaling pathways. Importantly, cancer-associated activating mutations that impinge on these pathways often relieve, in part, the reliance of tumors on growth factors. On the other hand, growth factors are frequently involved in evolvement of resistance to therapeutic regimens, which extends the roles for polypeptide factors to very late phases of tumor progression and offers opportunities for cancer therapy. PMID:20430953

  15. Near-infrared Mueller matrix imaging for colonic cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Kan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Mueller matrix imaging along with polar decomposition method was employed for the colonic cancer detection by polarized light in the near-infrared spectral range (700-1100 nm). A high-speed (<5s) Muller matrix imaging system with dual-rotating waveplates was developed. 16 (4 by 4) full Mueller matrices of the colonic tissues (i.e., normal and caner) were acquired. Polar decomposition was further implemented on the 16 images to derive the diattentuation, depolarization, and the retardance images. The decomposed images showed clear margin between the normal and cancerous colon tissue samples. The work shows the potential of near-infrared Mueller matrix imaging for the early diagnosis and detection of malignant lesions in the colon.

  16. Omega-3 fatty acid is a potential preventive agent for recurrent colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Anita; Yu, Yingjie; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Woods, James; Farhana, Lulu; Rajendra, Sindhu G.; Patel, Aamil; Dyson, Gregory; Levi, Edi; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Majumdar, Adhip P.N.; Nangia-Makker, Pratima

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports the contention that many malignancies, including sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC), are driven by the self-renewing, chemotherapy-resistant cancer stem/stem-like cells (CSCs/CSLCs) underscoring the need for improved preventive and therapeutic strategies targeting CSCs/CSLCs. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA), have been reported to inhibit the growth of primary tumors, but their potential as a preventive agent for recurring cancers is un-explored. The primary objectives of this investigation are to examine whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; one of the ω-3 PUFA) synergizes with FuOx (5-FU+Oxaliplatin), the backbone of colon cancer chemotherapy, and (b) whether EPA by itself or in combination with conventional chemotherapy prevents the recurrence of colon cancer via eliminating/suppressing CSCs/CSLCs. FuOx-resistant (chemo-resistant; CR) colon cancer cells, highly enriched in CSCs, were utilized for this study. While EPA alone was effective, combination of EPA and FuOx was more potent in (a) inhibiting cell growth, colonosphere formation and sphere-forming frequency, (b) increasing sphere disintegration, (c) suppressing the growth of SCID mice xenografts of CR colon cancer cells, and (d) decreasing pro-inflammatory metabolites in mice. Additionally, EPA + FuOx caused a reduction in CSC/CSLC population. The growth reduction by this regimen is the result of increased apoptosis as evidenced by PARP cleavage. Furthermore, increased pPTEN, decreased pAkt, normalization of β-catenin expression, localization and transcriptional activity by EPA suggests a role for PTEN/Akt axis and Wnt signaling in regulating this process. Our data suggest that EPA by itself or in combination with FuOx could be an effective preventive strategy for recurring CRC. PMID:25193342

  17. Variation in Positron Emission Tomography Use After Colon Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Christina E.; Hu, Chung-Yuan; You, Y. Nancy; Kaur, Harmeet; Ernst, Randy D.; Chang, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Colon cancer surveillance guidelines do not routinely include positron emission tomography (PET) imaging; however, its use after surgical resection has been increasing. We evaluated the secular patterns of PET use after surgical resection of colon cancer among elderly patients and identified factors associated with its increasing use. Patients and Methods: We used the SEER-linked Medicare database (July 2001 through December 2009) to establish a retrospective cohort of patients age ≥ 66 years who had undergone surgical resection for colon cancer. Postoperative PET use was assessed with the test for trends. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Results: Of the 39,221 patients with colon cancer, 6,326 (16.1%) had undergone a PET scan within 2 years after surgery. The use rate steadily increased over time. The majority of PET scans had been performed within 2 months after surgery. Among patients who had undergone a PET scan, 3,644 (57.6%) had also undergone preoperative imaging, and 1,977 (54.3%) of these patients had undergone reimaging with PET within 2 months after surgery. Marriage, year of diagnosis, tumor stage, preoperative imaging, postoperative visit to a medical oncologist, and adjuvant chemotherapy were significantly associated with increased PET use. Conclusion: PET use after colon cancer resection is steadily increasing, and further study is needed to understand the clinical value and effectiveness of PET scans and the reasons for this departure from guideline-concordant care. PMID:25852143

  18. MicroRNA-320a suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation by directly targeting {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian-Yong; Huang, Yi; Li, Ji-Peng; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei; Meng, Yan-Ling; Yan, Bo; Bian, Yong-Qian; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Wei-Zhong; and others

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a is downregulated in human colorectal carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin is a direct target of miR-320a in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a expression inversely correlates with mRNA expression of {beta}-catenin's target genes in human colon carcinoma. -- Abstract: Recent profile studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-320a) in human colorectal carcinoma. However, its expression pattern and underlying mechanisms in the development and progression of colorectal carcinoma has not been elucidated clearly. Here, we performed real-time PCR to examine the expression levels of miR-320a in colon cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. And then, we investigated its biological functions in colon cancer cells by a gain of functional strategy. Further more, by the combinational approaches of bioinformatics and experimental validation, we confirmed target associations of miR-320a in colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that miR-320a was frequently downregulated in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues. And we demonstrated that miR-320a restoration inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and {beta}-catenin, a functionally oncogenic molecule was a direct target gene of miR-320a. Finally, the data of real-time PCR showed the reciprocal relationship between miR-320a and {beta}-catenin's downstream genes in colon cancer tissues. These findings indicate that miR-320a suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells by directly targeting {beta}-catenin, suggesting its application in prognosis prediction and cancer treatment.

  19. The anti-cancer effects of poi (Colocasia esculenta) on colonic adenocarcinoma cells In vitro.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amy C; Reitzenstein, Jonathan E; Liu, Jessie; Jadus, Martin R

    2005-09-01

    Hawaiians tend to have lower incidence rates of colorectal cancer and it was hypothesized that this may be due to ethnic differences in diet, specifically, their consumption of poi, a starchy paste made from the taro (Colocasia esulenta L.) plant corm. Soluble extracts of poi were incubated at 100 mg/mL in vitro for antiproliferative activity against the rat YYT colon cancer cell line. (3)H-thymidine incorporation studies were conducted to demonstrate that the poi inhibited the proliferation of these cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. The greatest suppression of YYT colon cancer growth occurred when 25% concentration was used. When poi was incubated with the YYT cells after 2 days, the YYT cells underwent apoptotic changes as evidenced by a positive terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) stain. Poi enhanced the proliferation of normal mouse splenocyte control cells, suggesting that poi is not simply toxic to all cells but even has a positive immunostimulatory role. By flow cytometry, T cells (CD4+ and CD8+) were predominantly activated by the poi. Although numerous factors can contribute to the risk of colon cancer, perhaps poi consumption may contribute to the lower colon cancer rates among Hawaiians by two distinct mechanisms. First, by inducing apoptosis within colon cancer cells; second, by non-specifically activating lymphocytes, which in turn can lyse cancerous cells. Our results suggest for the first time that poi may have novel tumor specific anti-cancer activities and future research is suggested with animal studies and human clinical trials.

  20. Cigarette smoke extracts induced the colon cancer migration via regulating epithelial mesenchymal transition and metastatic genes in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cho-Won; Go, Ryeo-Eun; Lee, Hae-Miru; Hwang, Kyung-A; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Bumseok; Lee, Moo-Yeol; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2017-02-01

    There was considerable evidence that exposure to cigarette smoke is associated with an increased risk for colon cancer. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the relationship between cigarette smoking and colon cancer remains unclear. Moreover, there were only a few studies on effects of complexing substance contained in cigarette smoke on colon cancer. Thus, we further investigated whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) affects the cell cycle, apoptosis and migration of human metastatic colon cancer cells, SW-620. MTT assay revealed that SW-620 cell proliferation was significantly inhibited following treatments with all CSEs, 3R4F, and two-domestic cigarettes, for 9 days in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, CSE treatments decreased cyclin D1 and E1, and increased p21 and p27 proteins by Western blot analysis in SW-620 cells. Additionally, the treatment of the cells with CSE contributed to these effects expressing by apoptosis-related proteins. An increased migration or invasion ability of SW-620 cells following CSE treatment was also confirmed by a scratch or fibronectin invasion assay in vitro. In addition, the protein levels of E-cadherin as an epithelial maker were down-regulated, while the mesenchymal markers, N-cadherin, snail, and slug, were up-regulated in a time-dependent manner. A metastatic marker, cathepsin D, was also down-regulated by CSE treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that CSE exposure in colon cancer cells may deregulate the cell growth by altering the expression of cell cycle-related proteins and pro-apoptotic protein, and stimulate cell metastatic ability by altering epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and cathepsin D expression. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 690-704, 2017.

  1. Rural-Urban Differences in Colon Cancer Risk in Blacks and Whites: The North Carolina Colon Cancer Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeomans Kinney, Anita; Harrell, Janna; Slattery, Marty; Martin, Christopher; Sandler, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Geographic and racial variations in cancer incidence have been observed. Studies of colorectal carcinoma indicate a higher incidence and mortality rate for blacks than for whites in the United States. Purpose: We evaluated the effect of rural versus urban residence on colon cancer risk and stage of disease at diagnosis in blacks and…

  2. Rural-Urban Differences in Colon Cancer Risk in Blacks and Whites: The North Carolina Colon Cancer Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeomans Kinney, Anita; Harrell, Janna; Slattery, Marty; Martin, Christopher; Sandler, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Geographic and racial variations in cancer incidence have been observed. Studies of colorectal carcinoma indicate a higher incidence and mortality rate for blacks than for whites in the United States. Purpose: We evaluated the effect of rural versus urban residence on colon cancer risk and stage of disease at diagnosis in blacks and…

  3. Resveratrol oligomers isolated from Carex species inhibit growth of human colon tumorigenic cells mediated by cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Gromek, Samantha; Niesen, Daniel; Seeram, Navindra P; Henry, Geneive E

    2011-08-24

    Research has shown that members of the Carex genus produce biologically active stilbenoids including resveratrol oligomers. This is of great interest to the nutraceutical industry given that resveratrol, a constituent of grape and red wine, has attracted immense research attention due to its potential human health benefits. In the current study, five resveratrol oligomers (isolated from Carex folliculata and Carex gynandra ), along with resveratrol, were evaluated for antiproliferative effects against human colon cancer (HCT-116, HT-29, Caco-2) and normal human colon (CCD-18Co) cells. The resveratrol oligomers included one dimer, two trimers, and two tetramers: pallidol (1); α-viniferin (2) and trans-miyabenol C (3); and kobophenols A (4) and B (5), respectively. Although not cytotoxic, the resveratrol oligomers (1-5), as well as resveratrol, inhibited growth of the human colon cancer cells. Among the six stilbenoids, α-viniferin (2) was most active against the colon cancer cells with IC(50) values of 6-32 μM (>2-fold compared to normal colon cells). Moreover, α-viniferin (at 20 μM) did not induce apoptosis but arrested cell cycle (in the S-phase) for the colon cancer but not the normal colon cells. This study adds to the growing body of knowledge supporting the anticancer effects of resveratrol and its oligomers. Furthermore, Carex species should be investigated for their nutraceutical potential given that they produce biologically active stilbenoids such as α-viniferin.

  4. β-Catenin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ coordinate dynamic chromatin loops for the transcription of vascular endothelial growth factor A gene in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Injoo; Kim, Jeeho; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2012-11-30

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) mRNA is regulated by β-catenin and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor δ (PPAR-δ) activation in colon cancer cells, but the detailed mechanism remains to be elucidated. As chromatin loops are generally hubs for transcription factors, we tested here whether β-catenin could modulate chromatin looping near the VEGFA gene and play any important role for PPAR-δ activated VEGFA transcription. First, we identified the far upstream site as an important site for VEGFA transcription by luciferase assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation in colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells. Chromatin conformation capture analysis also revealed the chromatin loops formed by the β-catenin bindings on these sites near the VEGFA gene. Dynamic association and dissociation of β-catenin/TCF-4/PPAR-δ on the far upstream site and β-catenin/NF-κB p65 on the downstream site were also detected depending on PPAR-δ activation. Interestingly, β-catenin-mediated chromatin loops were relieved by PPAR-δ activation, suggesting a regulatory role of β-catenin for VEGFA transcription. Based on these data, we propose a model for PPAR-δ-activated VEGFA transcription that relies on β-catenin-mediated chromatin looping as a prerequisite for the activation. Our findings could extend to other β-catenin regulated target genes and could provide a general mechanism and novel paradigm for β-catenin-mediated oncogenesis.

  5. Get Tested for Colon Cancer: Here's How

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  6. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Breast and Colon Cancer Survivors Relative to Adults Without Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Joyce W; MacInnis, Robert J; Boyle, Terry; Vallance, Jeff K; Winkler, Elisabeth A H; Lynch, Brigid M

    2017-03-01

    To assess differences in accelerometer-assessed moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA), light-intensity physical activity, and sedentary time between cancer survivors and adults without cancer. Accelerometer data collected from 241 breast cancer survivors (ACCEL-Breast study, 2013) and 171 colon cancer survivors (ACCEL-Colon study, 2012-2013) were pooled with data collected from adults without cancer (Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle accelerometer substudy, 2011-2012). Linear regression was used to estimate differences in physical activity and sedentary behavior levels between cancer survivors and adults without cancer, adjusted for potential confounding factors. The mean MVPA was significantly higher among breast cancer survivors than among females who had not had cancer (29 vs 22 min/d; P<.001). Colon cancer survivors had significantly lower levels of light activity than did adults without cancer (311 vs 338 min/d; P<.001), more sedentary time (532 vs 507 min/d; P=.003), and more prolonged sedentary time (210 vs 184 min/d; P=.002). Contrary to findings from previous research (based on self-reported physical activity), cancer survivors engaged in more (breast) or equivalent (colon) MVPA compared with adults without cancer. Differences between colon cancer survivors and adults without cancer for light activity and sedentary behavior highlight the importance of considering the full activity spectrum in the context of cancer control. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Tart cherry anthocyanins inhibit tumor development in Apc(Min) mice and reduce proliferation of human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soo-Young; Seeram, Navindra P; Nair, Muraleedharan G; Bourquin, Leslie D

    2003-05-08

    Anthocyanins, which are bioactive phytochemicals, are widely distributed in plants and especially enriched in tart cherries. Based on previous observations that tart cherry anthocyanins and their respective aglycone, cyanidin, can inhibit cyclooxygenase enzymes, we conducted experiments to test the potential of anthocyanins to inhibit intestinal tumor development in Apc(Min) mice and growth of human colon cancer cell lines. Mice consuming the cherry diet, anthocyanins, or cyanidin had significantly fewer and smaller cecal adenomas than mice consuming the control diet or sulindac. Colonic tumor numbers and volume were not significantly influenced by treatment. Anthocyanins and cyanidin also reduced cell growth of human colon cancer cell lines HT 29 and HCT 116. The IC(50) of anthocyanins and cyanidin was 780 and 63 microM for HT 29 cells, respectively and 285 and 85 microM for HCT 116 cells, respectively. These results suggest that tart cherry anthocyanins and cyanidin may reduce the risk of colon cancer.

  8. Antitumor Effects of Fucoidan on Human Colon Cancer Cells via Activation of Akt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong-Seok; Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-05-01

    We identified a novel Akt signaling mechanism that mediates fucoidan-induced suppression of human colon cancer cell (HT29) proliferation and anticancer effects. Fucoidan treatment significantly inhibited growth, induced G1-phase-associated upregulation of p21WAF1 expression, and suppressed cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase expression in HT29 colon cancer cells. Additionally, fucoidan treatment activated the Akt signaling pathway, which was inhibited by treatment with an Akt inhibitor. The inhibition of Akt activation reversed the fucoidan-induced decrease in cell proliferation, the induction of G1-phase-associated p21WAF1 expression, and the reduction in cell cycle regulatory protein expression. Intraperitoneal injection of fucoidan reduced tumor volume; this enhanced antitumor efficacy was associated with induction of apoptosis and decreased angiogenesis. These data suggest that the activation of Akt signaling is involved in the growth inhibition of colon cancer cells treated with fucoidan. Thus, fucoidan may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for colon cancer.

  9. Crizotinib induces PUMA-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xingnan; He, Kan; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2013-05-01

    Oncogenic alterations in MET or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified in a variety of human cancers. Crizotinib (PF02341066) is a dual MET and ALK inhibitor and approved for the treatment of a subset of non-small cell lung carcinoma and in clinical development for other malignancies. Crizotinib can induce apoptosis in cancer cells, whereas the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we found that crizotinib induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells through the BH3-only protein PUMA. In cells with wild-type p53, crizotinib induces rapid induction of PUMA and Bim accompanied by p53 stabilization and DNA damage response. The induction of PUMA and Bim is mediated largely by p53, and deficiency in PUMA or p53, but not Bim, blocks crizotinib-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, MET knockdown led to selective induction of PUMA, but not Bim or p53. Crizotinib also induced PUMA-dependent apoptosis in p53-deficient colon cancer cells and synergized with gefitinib or sorafenib to induce marked apoptosis via PUMA in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, PUMA deficiency suppressed apoptosis and therapeutic responses to crizotinib in xenograft models. These results establish a critical role of PUMA in mediating apoptotic responses of colon cancer cells to crizotinib and suggest that mechanisms of oncogenic addiction to MET/ALK-mediated survival may be cell type-specific. These findings have important implications for future clinical development of crizotinib.

  10. RPM peptide conjugated bioreducible polyethylenimine targeting invasive colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Mi; Lee, Duhwan; Kim, Jihoon; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Won Jong

    2015-05-10

    CPIEDRPMC (RPM) peptide is a peptide that specifically targets invasive colorectal cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In this study, we exploited RPM peptide as a targeting ligand to produce a novel and efficient gene delivery system that could potentially be used to treat invasive colon cancer. In order to achieve enhanced specificity to colon cancer cells, the RPM peptide was conjugated to a bioreducible gene carrier consisting of a reducible moiety of disulfide-crosslinked low molecular weight polyethylenimine, IR820 dye, and polyethylene glycol. Here, we examined the physiochemical properties, cytotoxicity, in vitro transfection efficiency, and in vivo biodistribution of the RPM-conjugated polyplex. Our results showed that the RPM-conjugated gene carrier formed a compact polyplex with pDNA that had low toxicity. Furthermore, the RPM-conjugated polymer not only had higher cellular uptake in invasive colon cancer than the non-targeted polymer, but also showed enhanced transfection efficiency in invasive colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Acetylation modification regulates GRP78 secretion in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongwei; Zhuang, Ming; Zhang, Lichao; Zheng, Xingnan; Yang, Peng; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-01-01

    High glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression contributes to the acquisition of a wide range of phenotypic cancer hallmarks, and the pleiotropic oncogenic functions of GRP78 may result from its diverse subcellular distribution. Interestingly, GRP78 has been reported to be secreted from solid tumour cells, participating in cell-cell communication in the tumour microenvironment. However, the mechanism underlying this secretion remains elusive. Here, we report that GRP78 is secreted from colon cancer cells via exosomes. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors blocked GRP78 release by inducing its aggregation in the ER. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibitor treatment suppressed HDAC6 activity and led to increased GRP78 acetylation; acetylated GRP78 then bound to VPS34, a class III phosphoinositide-3 kinase, consequently preventing the sorting of GRP78 into multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Of note, we found that mimicking GRP78 acetylation by substituting the lysine at residue 633, one of the deacetylated sites of HDAC6, with a glutamine resulted in decreased GRP78 secretion and impaired tumour cell growth in vitro. Our study thus reveals a hitherto-unknown mechanism of GRP78 secretion and may also provide implications for the therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:27460191

  12. Anti-carcinogenic properties of omeprazole against human colon cancer cells and azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci formation in rats.

    PubMed

    Patlolla, Jagan M R; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Qian; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2012-01-01

    Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor, a widely used drug to treat ulcers and gastroesophageal refluxdisease. We have evaluated colon cancer chemopreventive properties of omeprazole using azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in male F344 rats and analyzed cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in human colon cancer cells. Five-week-old male F344 rats were fed a control or experimental diet containing two doses of omeprazole (200 and 400 ppm). After one week, all animals were s.c. injected with AOM (15 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for two weeks). Rats continued on experimental diets for seven more weeks before being sacrificed. Colons were histopathologically evaluated for ACF. Human colon cancer HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells treated with omeprazole were evaluated for different markers associated with proliferation and apoptotic markers using Western blot technique. Rats fed with 200 and 400 ppm of omeprazole significantly suppressed total colonic ACF formation (~30%, P<0.001) and showed significant suppression of multi-crypt foci (~30-50%, P<0.05-0.001). Omeprazole produced significant dose-response effects on inhibition of multi-crypt foci (≥4). Omeprazole treatment in human colon cancer cell lines HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells resulted in induction of p21waf1/cip1 and decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and survivin in a dose-dependent manner. Anticancer properties observed in colon cancer cell lines suggest that omeprazole may induce key signaling molecules of antiproliferation and inhibition of anti-apoptotic proteins.

  13. [Adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer. About 119 cases].

    PubMed

    Yaich, Asma; Khanfir, Afef; Bayrouti, Mohamed Issam; Frikha, Mounir

    2015-04-01

    colon cancer is a public health problem worldwide and in Tunisia. The prognosis of patients with unresectable colorectal cancer varies according to the stage. The indication for adjuvant chemotherapy is well established in the colon cancer stage III, while it remains a matter of controversy for stage II. The aim of this work is to identify the epidemiological and anatomoclinical assess therapeutic outcomes in terms of overall survival of patients with high-risk stage II and stage III colon cancer treated with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. DS: It's a retrospective study based on 119 patients with colon adenocarcinoma from 1996 to 2010. This patients suffering from colon cancer classified stage II and III having them all radical surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. The average age of our patients was 53 years. The surgery was performed in an emergency situation in 53 patients (44%). Stages II and III, respectively, were observed in 47% and 53% of cases. Three regimens of chemotherapy were used: protocol FUFOL (50%), followed by FOLFOX (34%) and the protocol LV5FU2 (16%). Overall survival of patients all stages combined was 73.4% at 5 years. Stage III of the TNM classification (p = 0.03) and the number of cycles of chemotherapy <6 (p=0.02) were a negative prognostic factors influencing overall survival. Patients stage III treated with FOLFOX chemotherapy type had a better survival than those treated with chemotherapy type LV5FU2 or FUFOL with a significant difference (p= 0.05). Our results are consistent with those in the literature. The prognosis of colon cancer is improving thanks to recent advances that have enabled the integration of new cytogenetic factors in the therapeutic decision.

  14. Grape seed proanthocyanidins inhibit colon cancer-induced angiogenesis through suppressing the expression of VEGF and Ang1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuangsheng; Yang, Ninggang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Gao, Jing; Huang, Tao; Hu, Lamei; Zhao, Jin; Li, Yongquan; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiaosu

    2012-12-01

    Tumor cells trigger angiogenesis through overexpression of various angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin 1 (Ang1). Therefore, inhibition of the expression of both VEGF and Ang1, the initial step of tumor angiogenesis, is a promising strategy for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) are widely consumed dietary supplements that have antitumor activity. Due to their polymeric structure, GSPs are poorly absorbed along the gastrointestinal tract and can reach the colon at high concentrations, allowing these chemicals to act as chemopreventive agents for colon cancer. In the present study, we found that GSPs inhibited colon tumor-induced angiogenesis and, thus, the growth of colon tumor xenografts on the chick chorioallantoic membranes. The mechanisms of their action were related to inhibiting the expression of both VEGF and Ang1 through scavenging reactive oxygen species. Previous studies have demonstrated that the chemopreventive effects of GSPs on colon cancer are associated with their growth inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effects. Our results demonstrate another mechanism by which GSPs inhibit colon tumor growth, which will be helpful for developing GSPs as a pharmacologically safe angiopreventive agent against colorectal cancer.

  15. Stabilization of MDA-7/IL-24 for colon cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shili; Oshima, Takashi; Imada, Toshio; Masuda, Munetaka; Debnath, Bikash; Grande, Fedora; Garofalo, Antonio; Neamati, Nouri

    2013-07-28

    Colon cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States. Recombinant MDA-7/IL-24 has showed its selective cytotoxicity against cancer cells, and Ad-mda7 (INGN-241) is currently under clinical investigation for solid tumors. Here, we investigated the expression of MDA-7/IL-24 in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues from 202 patients. Compared with the adjacent mucosa, CRC tissues displayed significantly lower MDA-7/IL-24 levels. The MDA-7/IL-24 levels in CRC were significantly associated with patients' survival rate in a 6-year period. These results indicate MDA-7/IL-24 level is both a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for CRC, and support the role of MDA-7/IL-24 in the treatment of CRC. To elevate MDA-7/IL-24 level for colon cancer treatment, we successfully developed a small-molecule compound SC144 with the ability to up-regulate MDA-7/IL-24 expression via direct binding and stabilizing MDA-7/IL-24 in human colon cancer cells. Among the analogs tested, SC144 exhibited the highest cytotoxicity in a panel of colon cancer cell lines in a p53-independent manner, accompanied by cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 with downregulation of Cyclin D1 levels, and apoptosis induction with upregulation of cell surface-bound Fas/CD95. These results combined with our previous studies support the anticancer role of MDA-7/IL-24 as well as the clinical development of SC144 for colon cancer treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Phosphoproteomic Analysis Identifies Signaling Pathways Regulated by Curcumin in Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Higuchi, Yutaka; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Hattori, Seisuke

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin, a major polyphenol of the spice turmeric, acts as a potent chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent in several cancer types, including colon cancer. Although various proteins have been shown to be affected by curcumin, how curcumin exerts its anticancer activity is not fully understood. Phosphoproteomic analyses were performed using SW480 and SW620 human colon cancer cells to identify curcumin-affected signaling pathways. Curcumin inhibited the growth of the two cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Thirty-nine curcumin-regulated phosphoproteins were identified, five of which are involved in cancer signaling pathways. Detailed analyses revealed that the mTORC1 and p53 signaling pathways are main targets of curcumin. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of the anticancer activities of curcumin and future molecular targets for its clinical application. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. In colon cancer, normal colon tissue and blood cells have altered telomere lengths.

    PubMed

    Valls-Bautista, Cristina; Piñol-Felis, Carme; Reñé-Espinet, Josep M; Buenestado-García, Juan; Viñas-Salas, Joan

    2015-06-01

    Telomere length (TL) shortened occurs in colorectal carcinogenetic process. Our objective is to determine if it is only a local fact or there are alterations in normal colon cells and in other body cells. TL of tumoral and normal mucosa and leukocytes of 40 patients operated of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 40 control patients with normal colonoscopy were measured by Southern-blot. Groups were matched by the same localization as tumors, sex, and age. In CRC patients, TRFL (Telomere Repeat Factor Length) leukocytes mean was 8.84 kpb, normal colonic mucosa 7.97 kpb, and tumoral mucosa 7.33 kpb (P < 0.001). In the 40 normal control patients, mean TRFL of colonic mucosa was 7.76 kpb, while in blood cells was 7.01 kpb (P < 0.001). We observed an inverse correlation between leukocytes TRFL and age (r(2)  = 0.17, P = 0.008). Mucosa TRFL correlates significantly with patient's age (r(2)  = 0.138, P = 0.018). TRFL of controls colonic mucosa correlates with TRFL of their blood cells (r(2)  = 0.354, P < 0.001). Normal colonic mucosa and leukocytes in CCR patients presents telomere altered in respect to normal patients. Telomere length in normal leukocytes could be an initial marker for colorectal cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Lazarova, Darina L; Bordonaro, Michael

    2014-02-15

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which modifies the host's metabolism in various ways. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which dietary fiber-dependent changes in gut microbiota enhance bile acid deconjugation, produce short chain fatty acids, and modulate inflammatory bioactive substances can lead to a better understanding of the beneficial role of dietary fiber. This article reviews the current knowledge concerning the mechanisms via which dietary fiber protects against colon cancer.

  19. Carbohydrate-containing molecules as potential biomarkers in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Joo, Eun Ji; Weyers, Amanda; Li, Guoyun; Gasimli, Leyla; Li, Lingyun; Choi, Won Jun; Lee, Kyung Bok; Linhardt, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    Glycans play a critical role in physiological and pathological processes through interaction with a variety of ligands. Altered expression and dysregulation of these molecules can cause aberrant cellular function such as malignancy. Glycomics provide information of the structure and function of glycans, glycolipids, and glycoproteins such as proteoglycans, and may help to predict cancer development and progression as biomarkers. In this report, we compared the expression of proteoglycans, the content and structure of glycosaminoglycans and glycolipids between patient-matched normal and cancer tissues obtained from colon cancer patients. Tumor-related proteoglycans, glypican-3, and syndecan-1 showed downregulation in cancer tissues compared to normal tissues. In cancer tissue, the total amount of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate were lower and, interestingly, the level of disaccharide units of both 4S6S (CS-E) and 6S (CS-C) were higher compared to normal tissue. Also, overall lipids including glycolipids, a major glycomics target, were analyzed by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Increase of lyso-phosphatidylcholine (phospholipid), sphingomyelin (sphigolipid), and four types of glycolipids (glucosylceramide, lactosylceramide, monosialic acid ganglioside, and globoside 4) in cancer tissue showed the possibility as potential biomarkers in colon cancer. While requiring the need for careful interpretation, this type of broad investigation gives us a better understanding of pathophysiological roles on glycosaminoglycans and glycolipids and might be a powerful tool for colon cancer diagnosis.

  20. Carbohydrate-Containing Molecules as Potential Biomarkers in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Eun Ji; Weyers, Amanda; Li, Guoyun; Gasimli, Leyla; Li, Lingyun; Choi, Won Jun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glycans play a critical role in physiological and pathological processes through interaction with a variety of ligands. Altered expression and dysregulation of these molecules can cause aberrant cellular function such as malignancy. Glycomics provide information of the structure and function of glycans, glycolipids, and glycoproteins such as proteoglycans, and may help to predict cancer development and progression as biomarkers. In this report, we compared the expression of proteoglycans, the content and structure of glycosaminoglycans and glycolipids between patient-matched normal and cancer tissues obtained from colon cancer patients. Tumor-related proteoglycans, glypican-3, and syndecan-1 showed downregulation in cancer tissues compared to normal tissues. In cancer tissue, the total amount of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate and heparan sulfate were lower and, interestingly, the level of disaccharide units of both 4S6S (CS-E) and 6S (CS-C) were higher compared to normal tissue. Also, overall lipids including glycolipids, a major glycomics target, were analyzed by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Increase of lyso-phosphatidylcholine (phospholipid), sphingomyelin (sphigolipid), and four types of glycolipids (glucosylceramide, lactosylceramide, monosialic acid ganglioside, and globoside 4) in cancer tissue showed the possibility as potential biomarkers in colon cancer. While requiring the need for careful interpretation, this type of broad investigation gives us a better understanding of pathophysiological roles on glycosaminoglycans and glycolipids and might be a powerful tool for colon cancer diagnosis. PMID:24502776

  1. Exosomes from human colorectal cancer induce a tumor-like behavior in colonic mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Lugini, Luana; Valtieri, Mauro; Federici, Cristina; Cecchetti, Serena; Meschini, Stefania; Condello, Maria; Signore, Michele; Fais, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer cells, including colorectal cancer ones (CRC), release high amounts of nanovesicles (exosomes), delivering biochemical messages for paracrine or systemic crosstalk. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to play contradicting roles in tumor progression. Results CRC exosomes induce in cMSCs: i) atypical morphology, higher proliferation, migration and invasion; ii) formation of spheroids; iii) an acidic extracellular environment associated with iv) a plasma membrane redistribution of vacuolar H+-ATPase and increased expression of CEA. Colon cancer derived MSCs, which were isolated from tumor masses, produce umbilicated spheroids, a future frequently observed in the inner core of rapidly growing tumors and recapitulate the changes observed in normal colonic MSCs exposed to CRC exosomes. Materials and Methods Tissue specific colonic (c)MSCs were exposed to primary or metastatic CRC exosomes and analysed by light and electron microscopy, proliferation in 2D and 3D cultures, migration and invasion assays, Western blot and confocal microscopy for vacuolar H+-ATPase expression. Conclusions CRC exosomes are able to induce morphological and functional changes in colonic MSCs, which may favour tumor growth and its malignant progression. Our results suggest that exosomes are actively involved in cancer progression and that inhibiting tumor exosome release may represent a way to interfere with cancer. PMID:27418137

  2. Effects of low-dose radiation on adaptive response in colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Cui, J-W; Hu, J-H; Gao, S-J; Liu, X-L

    2017-07-01

    Biological effects of low-dose radiation (LDR) are distinguishable from those of high-dose radiation. Adaptive response is an important biological effect following low-dose radiation. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have self-renewal and multidirectional differentiation potency which results in relapse and metastasis of cancer. In this study, we aimed to examine whether adaptive response could be induced in CSCs by LDR. Parental cells of three colon cancer cell lines (HRT18, HT29, and HCT116) and CSCs of these three cell lines were irradiated with LDR (i.e., D1) and then high-dose radiation (HDR) of X-rays (i.e., D1 + D2) or only HDR (D2 alone), followed by examination of adaptive response. Adaptive response was not observed either in the three tumor parental cells lines or in three CSCs lines following LDR, due to the lack of resistance to subsequent D2-induced cell growth inhibition. These results suggested that LDR may not induce adaptive response in colon cancer cells or colon CSCs under in vitro conditions. Our study provided experimental and clinical foundations for the application of LDR in the treatment of colon cancers.

  3. Noscapine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human colon cancer cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zi-Rong; Liu, Meng; Peng, Xiu-Lan; Lei, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Xiang; Dong, Wei-Guo

    2012-05-11

    Noscapine, a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid derived from opium, has been widely used as a cough suppressant for decades. Noscapine has recently been shown to potentiate the anti-cancer effects of several therapies by inducing apoptosis in various malignant cells without any detectable toxicity in cells or tissues. However, the mechanism by which noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells remains unclear. The signaling pathways by which noscapine induces apoptosis were investigated in colon cancer cell lines treated with various noscapine concentrations for 72 h, and a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability was observed. Noscapine effectively inhibited the proliferation of LoVo cells in vitro (IC(50)=75 μM). This cytotoxicity was reflected by cell cycle arrest at G(2)/M and subsequent apoptosis, as indicated by increased chromatin condensation and fragmentation, the upregulation of Bax and cytochrome c (Cyt-c), the downregulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Moreover, in a xenograft tumor model in mice, noscapine injection clearly inhibited tumor growth via the induction of apoptosis, which was demonstrated using a TUNEL assay. These results suggest that noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells via mitochondrial pathways. Noscapine may be a safe and effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon cancer.

  4. Epsin is required for Dishevelled stability and Wnt signaling activation in colon cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Baojun; Tessneer, Kandice L.; McManus, John; Liu, Xiaolei; Hahn, Scott; Pasula, Satish; Wu, Hao; Song, Hoogeun; Chen, Yiyuan; Cai, Xiaofeng; Dong, Yunzhou; Brophy, Megan L.; Rahman, Ruby; Ma, Jian-Xing; Xia, Lijun; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled canonical Wnt signaling supports colon epithelial tumor expansion and malignant transformation. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms involved is crucial for elucidating the pathogenesis of and will provide new therapeutic targets for colon cancer. Epsins are ubiquitin-binding adaptor proteins upregulated in several human cancers; however, epsins’ involvement in colon cancer is unknown. Here we show that loss of intestinal epithelial epsins protects against colon cancer by significantly reducing the stability of the crucial Wnt signaling effector, dishevelled (Dvl2), and impairing Wnt signaling. Consistently, epsins and Dvl2 are correspondingly upregulated in colon cancer. Mechanistically, epsin binds Dvl2 via its epsin N-terminal homology domain and ubiquitin-interacting motifs and prohibits Dvl2 polyubiquitination and degradation. Our findings reveal an unconventional role for epsins in stabilizing Dvl2 and potentiating Wnt signaling in colon cancer cells to ensure robust colon cancer progression. Epsins’ pro-carcinogenic role suggests they are potential therapeutic targets to combat colon cancer. PMID:25871009

  5. Obesity promotes colonic stem cell expansion during cancer initiation

    PubMed Central

    DeClercq; McMurray, DN; Chapkin, RS

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to elucidate the mechanistic links between obesity and colon cancer. Convincing evidence for the role of Lgr5+stem cells in colon tumorigenesis has been established, however, the influence of obesity on stem cell maintenance is unknown. We assessed the effects of high fat (HF) feeding on colonic stem cell maintenance during cancer initiation (AOM induced) and the responsiveness of stem cells to adipokine signaling pathways. The number of colonic GFP+stem cells was significantly higher in the AOM-injected HF group compared to the LF group. The Lgr5+stem cells of the HF fed mice exhibited statistically significant increases in cell proliferation and decreases in apoptosis in response to AOM injection compared to the LF group. Colonic organoid cultures from lean mice treated with an adiponectin receptor agonist exhibited a reduction in Lgr5-GPF+stem cell number and an increase in apoptosis, however this response was diminished in the organoid cultures from obese mice. These results suggest that the responsiveness of colonic stem cells to adiponectin in diet-induced obesity is impaired and may contribute to the stem cell accumulation observed in obesity. PMID:26455770

  6. Obesity promotes colonic stem cell expansion during cancer initiation.

    PubMed

    DeClercq, V; McMurray, D N; Chapkin, R S

    2015-12-28

    There is an urgent need to elucidate the mechanistic links between obesity and colon cancer. Convincing evidence for the role of Lgr5(+) stem cells in colon tumorigenesis has been established; however, the influence of obesity on stem cell maintenance is unknown. We assessed the effects of high fat (HF) feeding on colonic stem cell maintenance during cancer initiation (AOM induced) and the responsiveness of stem cells to adipokine signaling pathways. The number of colonic GFP(+) stem cells was significantly higher in the AOM-injected HF group compared to the LF group. The Lgr5(+) stem cells of the HF fed mice exhibited statistically significant increases in cell proliferation and decreases in apoptosis in response to AOM injection compared to the LF group. Colonic organoid cultures from lean mice treated with an adiponectin receptor agonist exhibited a reduction in Lgr5-GPF(+) stem cell number and an increase in apoptosis; however, this response was diminished in the organoid cultures from obese mice. These results suggest that the responsiveness of colonic stem cells to adiponectin in diet-induced obesity is impaired and may contribute to the stem cell accumulation observed in obesity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ferritin content in human cancerous and noncancerous colonic tissue.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, C B; Weinstein, R; Bond, B; Rice, R; Vaughn, R W; McKendrick, A; Ayad, G; Rockwell, M A; Rocchio, R

    1987-01-01

    Tumor tissue samples from 25 patients with adenocarcinoma of the colon, twelve related samples of normal colons as well as five serum specimens from the same patients were analyzed for ferritin. The average ferritin content of the tumor tissue was 788 ng/mcp with a range of 47-1,745 ng/mcp. The average ferritin content of normal colon mucosa was 115 ng/mcp with a range of 32-230 ng/mcp. Two specimens of metastatic colon cancer taken from the retroperitoneal space and liver, respectively, contained 3,867 and 2,827 ng/mcp of ferritin. The ferritin content of the tumor tissue was higher than that of the normal colon in 8 of 9 patients who had specimens obtained from both sites. The amount of ferritin found in tumor tissue was independent of sex, age, and the site of the original tumor. This study shows that the ferritin content of colon neoplasms is elevated and indicates that the tumor tissue may be the direct source of elevated serum levels of ferritin previously observed in cancer patients.

  8. Procaine Induces Epigenetic Changes in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sabit, Hussein; Samy, Mariam B; Said, Osama A M; El-Zawahri, Mokhtar M

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the world, and it is the major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The present study aimed at treating colon cancer cell line (HCT116) with different chemotherapeutic drug/drug combinations (procaine, vorinostat "SAHA," sodium phenylbutyrate, erlotinib, and carboplatin). Two different final concentrations were applied: 3 μM and 5 μM. Trypan blue test was performed to assess the viability of the cell before and after being treated with the drugs. The data obtained showed that there was a significant decrease in the viability of cells after applying the chemotherapeutic drugs/drug combinations. Also, DNA fragmentation assay was carried out to study the effect of these drugs on the activation of apoptosis-mediated DNA degradation process. The results indicated that all the drugs/drug combinations had a severe effect on inducing DNA fragmentation. Global DNA methylation quantification was performed to identify the role of these drugs individually or in combination in hypo- or hypermethylating the CpG dinucleotide all over the genome of the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Data obtained indicated that different combinations had different effects in reducing or increasing the level of methylation, which might indicate the effectiveness of combining drugs in treating colon cancer cells.

  9. Diet, microorganisms and their metabolites, and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Stephen J D

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the so-called westernized diseases and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. On the basis of global epidemiological and scientific studies, evidence suggests that the risk of colorectal cancer is increased by processed and unprocessed meat consumption but suppressed by fibre, and that food composition affects colonic health and cancer risk via its effects on colonic microbial metabolism. The gut microbiota can ferment complex dietary residues that are resistant to digestion by enteric enzymes. This process provides energy for the microbiota but culminates in the release of short-chain fatty acids including butyrate, which are utilized for the metabolic needs of the colon and the body. Butyrate has a remarkable array of colonic health-promoting and antineoplastic properties: it is the preferred energy source for colonocytes, it maintains mucosal integrity and it suppresses inflammation and carcinogenesis through effects on immunity, gene expression and epigenetic modulation. Protein residues and fat-stimulated bile acids are also metabolized by the microbiota to inflammatory and/or carcinogenic metabolites, which increase the risk of neoplastic progression. This Review will discuss the mechanisms behind these microbial metabolite effects, which could be modified by diet to achieve the objective of preventing colorectal cancer in Western societies.

  10. Procaine Induces Epigenetic Changes in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Samy, Mariam B.; Said, Osama A. M.; El-Zawahri, Mokhtar M.

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the world, and it is the major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The present study aimed at treating colon cancer cell line (HCT116) with different chemotherapeutic drug/drug combinations (procaine, vorinostat “SAHA,” sodium phenylbutyrate, erlotinib, and carboplatin). Two different final concentrations were applied: 3 μM and 5 μM. Trypan blue test was performed to assess the viability of the cell before and after being treated with the drugs. The data obtained showed that there was a significant decrease in the viability of cells after applying the chemotherapeutic drugs/drug combinations. Also, DNA fragmentation assay was carried out to study the effect of these drugs on the activation of apoptosis-mediated DNA degradation process. The results indicated that all the drugs/drug combinations had a severe effect on inducing DNA fragmentation. Global DNA methylation quantification was performed to identify the role of these drugs individually or in combination in hypo- or hypermethylating the CpG dinucleotide all over the genome of the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Data obtained indicated that different combinations had different effects in reducing or increasing the level of methylation, which might indicate the effectiveness of combining drugs in treating colon cancer cells. PMID:27843649

  11. Validation of methylation biomarkers that distinguish normal colon mucosa of cancer patients from normal colon mucosa of patients without cancer.

    PubMed

    Cesaroni, Matteo; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    We have validated differences in DNA methylation levels of candidate genes previously reported to discriminate between normal colon mucosa of patients with colon cancer and normal colon mucosa of individuals without cancer. Here, we report that CpG sites in 16 of the 30 candidate genes selected show significant differences in mean methylation level in normal colon mucosa of 24 patients with cancer and 24 controls. A support vector machine trained on these data and data for an additional 66 CpGs yielded an 18-gene signature, composed of ten of the validated candidate genes plus eight additional candidates. This model exhibited 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity in a 40-sample training set and classified all eight samples in the test set correctly. Moreover, we found a moderate-strong correlation (Pearson coefficients r = 0.253-0.722) between methylation levels in colon mucosa and methylation levels in peripheral blood for seven of the 18 genes in the support vector model. These seven genes, alone, classified 44 of the 48 patients in the validation set correctly and five CpGs selected from only two of the seven genes classified 41 of the 48 patients in the discovery set correctly. These results suggest that methylation biomarkers may be developed that will, at minimum, serve as useful objective and quantitative diagnostic complements to colonoscopy as a cancer-screening tool. These data also suggest that it may be possible to monitor biomarker methylation levels in tissues collected much less invasively than by colonoscopy.

  12. Validation of methylation biomarkers that distinguish normal colon mucosa from cancer patients from normal colon mucosa of patients without cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cesaroni, Matteo; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    We have validated differences in DNA methylation levels of candidate genes previously reported to discriminate between normal colon mucosa of colon cancer patients and normal colon mucosa of individuals without cancer. Here, we report that CpG sites in 16 of the 30 candidate genes selected show significant differences in mean methylation level in normal colon mucosa of 24 cancer patients and 24 controls. A support vector machine trained on these data and data for an additional 66 CpGs yielded an 18-gene signature, composed of 10 of the validated candidate genes plus eight additional candidates. This model exhibited 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity in a 40-sample training set and classified all eight samples in the test set correctly. Moreover, we found a moderate-strong correlation (Pearson coefficients r=0.253-0.722) between methylation levels in colon mucosa and methylation levels in peripheral blood for seven of the 18 genes in the support vector model. These seven genes, alone, classified 44 of the 48 patients in the validation set correctly and five CpGs selected from only two of the seven genes classified 41 of the 48 patients in the discovery set correctly. These results suggest that methylation biomarkers may be developed that will, at minimum, serve as useful objective and quantitative diagnostic complements to colonoscopy as a cancer-screening tool. These data also suggest that it may be possible to monitor biomarker methylation levels in tissues collected much less invasively than by colonoscopy. PMID:24806665

  13. Effects of airborne particulate matter on alternative pre-mRNA splicing in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Buggiano, Valeria; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Alló, Mariano; Lafaille, Celina; Redal, María Ana; Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I.; Shamy, Magdy; Muñoz, Manuel J.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific cell differentiation as well as in the onset of hereditary disease and cancer, being controlled by multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. We report here that airborne particulate matter, resulting from industrial pollution, inhibits expression and specifically affects alternative splicing at the 5′ untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the bone morphogenetic protein BMP4 in human colon cells in culture. These effects are consistent with a previously reported role for BMP4 in preventing colon cancer development, suggesting that ingestion of particulate matter could contribute to the onset of colon cell proliferation. We also show that the underlying mechanism might involve changes in transcriptional elongation. This is the first study to demonstrate that particulate matter causes non-pleiotropic changes in alternative splicing. - Highlights: • Airborne particulate matter (PM10) affects alternative splicing in colon cells. • PM10 upregulates one of the two mRNA variants of the growth factor BMP-4. • This variant has a longer 5′ unstranslated region and introduces an upstream AUG. • By regulating BMP-4 mRNA splicing PM10 inhibits total expression of BMP-4 protein. • BMP-4 downregulation was previously reported to be associated to colon cancer.

  14. Schlafen-3 decreases cancer stem cell marker expression and autocrine/juxtacrine signaling in FOLFOX-resistant colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Phil-Sun; Patel, Vaishali B.; Sanders, Matthew A.; Kanwar, Shailender S.; Yu, Yingjie; Nautiyal, Jyoti; Patel, Bhaumik B.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that expression of the novel gene schlafen-3 (Slfn-3) correlates with intestinal epithelial cell differentiation (Patel VB, Yu Y, Das JK, Patel BB, Majumdar AP. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 388: 752–756, 2009). The present investigation was undertaken to examine whether Slfn-3 plays a role in regulating differentiation of FOLFOX-resistant (5-fluorouracil + oxaliplatin) colon cancer cells that are highly enriched in cancer stem cells (CSCs). Transfection of Slfn-3 in FOLFOX-resistant colon cancer HCT-116 cells resulted in increase of alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of intestinal differentiation. Additionally, Slfn-3 transfection resulted in reduction of mRNA and protein levels of the CSC markers CD44, CD133, CD166, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in both FOLFOX-resistant HCT-116 and HT-29 cells. This was accompanied by decreased formation of tumorosphere/colonosphere (an in vitro model of tumor growth) in stem cell medium and inhibition of expression of the chemotherapeutic drug transporter protein ABCG2. Additionally, Slfn-3 transfection of FOLFOX-resistant HCT-116 and HT-29 cells reduced Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion. Finally, Slfn-3 transfection inhibited the expression of transforming growth factor-α in both FOLFOX-resistant colon cancer cells, but stimulated apoptosis in response to additional FOLFOX treatment. In summary, our data demonstrate that Slfn-3 expression inhibits multiple characteristics of CSC-enriched, FOLFOX-resistant colon cancer cells, including induction of differentiation and reduction in tumorosphere/colonosphere formation, drug transporter activity, and autocrine stimulation of proliferation. Thus Slfn-3 expression may render colon CSCs more susceptible to cancer chemotherapeutics. PMID:21596996

  15. Schlafen-3 decreases cancer stem cell marker expression and autocrine/juxtacrine signaling in FOLFOX-resistant colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Phil-Sun; Patel, Vaishali B; Sanders, Matthew A; Kanwar, Shailender S; Yu, Yingjie; Nautiyal, Jyoti; Patel, Bhaumik B; Majumdar, Adhip P N

    2011-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that expression of the novel gene schlafen-3 (Slfn-3) correlates with intestinal epithelial cell differentiation (Patel VB, Yu Y, Das JK, Patel BB, Majumdar AP. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 388: 752-756, 2009). The present investigation was undertaken to examine whether Slfn-3 plays a role in regulating differentiation of FOLFOX-resistant (5-fluorouracil + oxaliplatin) colon cancer cells that are highly enriched in cancer stem cells (CSCs). Transfection of Slfn-3 in FOLFOX-resistant colon cancer HCT-116 cells resulted in increase of alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of intestinal differentiation. Additionally, Slfn-3 transfection resulted in reduction of mRNA and protein levels of the CSC markers CD44, CD133, CD166, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in both FOLFOX-resistant HCT-116 and HT-29 cells. This was accompanied by decreased formation of tumorosphere/colonosphere (an in vitro model of tumor growth) in stem cell medium and inhibition of expression of the chemotherapeutic drug transporter protein ABCG2. Additionally, Slfn-3 transfection of FOLFOX-resistant HCT-116 and HT-29 cells reduced Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion. Finally, Slfn-3 transfection inhibited the expression of transforming growth factor-α in both FOLFOX-resistant colon cancer cells, but stimulated apoptosis in response to additional FOLFOX treatment. In summary, our data demonstrate that Slfn-3 expression inhibits multiple characteristics of CSC-enriched, FOLFOX-resistant colon cancer cells, including induction of differentiation and reduction in tumorosphere/colonosphere formation, drug transporter activity, and autocrine stimulation of proliferation. Thus Slfn-3 expression may render colon CSCs more susceptible to cancer chemotherapeutics.

  16. Piwil2 modulates the proliferation and metastasis of colon cancer via regulation of matrix metallopeptidase 9 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Sun, Xing; Yan, Dongwang; Huang, Jianfeng; Luo, Qiongzhen; Tang, Huamei; Peng, Zhihai

    2012-10-01

    Piwi-like protein 2 (Piwil2) has recently emerged as a putative oncogene which is amplified in several human malignancies. However, the role of Piwil2 in colon cancer remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and pathological significance of Piwil2, and the possible role in the proliferation and metastasis of colon cancer. Primary colon cancer paired with adjacent normal colon tissue and lymph node metastasis (LNM) lesions in 66 patients' tissue microarrays (TMA) were used to determine the expression of Piwil2. Knocked down Piwil2 expression in SW620 and SW480 colon cancer cell lines was performed to evaluate the role of Piwil2 in cell proliferation, invasion, metastasis in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. The possible roles of Piwil2 in the regulation of a 2 kb matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) promoter fragment and on the regulation of apoptotic pathways were evaluated by using a luciferase reporter construct and Western blots, respectively. Significantly higher expression levels of Piwil2 were observed in primary colon cancer tissue and in LNM in comparison with normal colon mucosa. Piwil2 expression significantly correlated with more aggressive clinical and pathological parameters with poorer five-year metastasis-free survival and overall survival. Piwil2 silencing significantly reduced cancer cell proliferation, colony formation ability and increased apoptosis in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Piwil2 knockdown also attenuated migration and invasion of colon cancer cells via modulation of MMP9 transcriptional activities. Our results indicate that Piwil2 moderates the proliferation and metastasis potential of colon cancer.

  17. Registered report: Wnt activity defines colon cancer stem cells and is regulated by the microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Evans, James; Essex, Anthony; Xin, Hong; Amitai, Nurith; Brinton, Lindsey; Griner, Erin

    2015-08-19

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by replicating selected results from a substantial number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from 'Wnt activity defines colon cancer stem cells and is regulated by the microenvironment' by Vermeulen and colleagues, published in Nature Cell Biology in 2010 (Vermeulen et al., 2010). The key experiments that will be replicated are those reported in Figures 2F, 6D, and 7E. In these experiments, Vermeulen and colleagues utilize a reporter for Wnt activity and show that colon cancer cells with high levels of Wnt activity also express cancer stem cell markers (Figure 2F; Vermeulen et al., 2010). Additionally, treatment either with conditioned medium derived from myofibroblasts or with hepatocyte growth factor restored clonogenic potential in low Wnt activity colon cancer cells in vitro (Figure 6D; Vermeulen et al., 2010) and in vivo (Figure 7E; Vermeulen et al., 2010). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange and the results of the replications will be published in eLife.

  18. Treatment Options (by Stage) for Colon Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish . ... the PDQ cancer information summaries and keep them up to date. These Boards are made up of experts in ...

  19. Tumor-derived hydrogen sulfide, produced by cystathionine-β-synthase, stimulates bioenergetics, cell proliferation, and angiogenesis in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Csaba; Coletta, Ciro; Chao, Celia; Módis, Katalin; Szczesny, Bartosz; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Hellmich, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The physiological functions of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) include vasorelaxation, stimulation of cellular bioenergetics, and promotion of angiogenesis. Analysis of human colon cancer biopsies and patient-matched normal margin mucosa revealed the selective up-regulation of the H2S-producing enzyme cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) in colon cancer, resulting in an increased rate of H2S production. Similarly, colon cancer-derived epithelial cell lines (HCT116, HT-29, LoVo) exhibited selective CBS up-regulation and increased H2S production, compared with the nonmalignant colonic mucosa cells, NCM356. CBS localized to the cytosol, as well as the mitochondrial outer membrane. ShRNA-mediated silencing of CBS or its pharmacological inhibition with aminooxyacetic acid reduced HCT116 cell proliferation, migration, and invasion; reduced endothelial cell migration in tumor/endothelial cell cocultures; and suppressed mitochondrial function (oxygen consumption, ATP turnover, and respiratory reserve capacity), as well as glycolysis. Treatment of nude mice with aminooxyacetic acid attenuated the growth of patient-derived colon cancer xenografts and reduced tumor blood flow. Similarly, CBS silencing of the tumor cells decreased xenograft growth and suppressed neovessel density, suggesting a role for endogenous H2S in tumor angiogenesis. In contrast to CBS, silencing of cystathionine-γ-lyase (the expression of which was unchanged in colon cancer) did not affect tumor growth or bioenergetics. In conclusion, H2S produced from CBS serves to (i) maintain colon cancer cellular bioenergetics, thereby supporting tumor growth and proliferation, and (ii) promote angiogenesis and vasorelaxation, consequently providing the tumor with blood and nutritients. The current findings identify CBS-derived H2S as a tumor growth factor and anticancer drug target. PMID:23836652

  20. Honokiol augments the anti-cancer effects of oxaliplatin in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hua, Hanju; Chen, Wenbin; Shen, Ling; Sheng, Qinsong; Teng, Lisong

    2013-09-01

    Oxaliplatin is an important drug in the chemotherapy of colorectal carcinoma, but its toxicity, especially dose-related neurosensory toxicity, is not well tolerated. In this study, we investigated whether honokiol could augment the anti-tumor effect of oxaliplatin in colon cancer HT-29 cells in vitro and whether honokiol could be used with oxaliplatin to decrease oxaliplatin dose. We used the normal colon cells, human colonic epithelial cells (HCoEpiCs) as control cells. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were also investigated. Expression levels of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), VEGF, AKT/p-AKT, extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)1/2/p-ERK1/2, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) P65/p-P65, and caspase-3 were measured. Honokiol or oxaliplatin suppressed the proliferation of HT-29 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, but only high concentrations of honokiol would suppress the proliferation of HCoEpiCs. HT-29 cells were more sensitive to oxaliplatin treatment in the presence of honokiol. Oxaliplatin combined with honokiol improved the apoptosis rate of HT-29 cell and reduced PGE2 and VEGF secretion levels. Expression levels of COX-2 and VEGF protein and phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, and NF-κB P65 were also inhibited. Caspase-3 levels were upregulated after honokiol treatment. Therefore, honokiol can be used in combination with oxaliplatin in the chemotherapy of colon cancer. This combination allows a reduction in oxaliplatin dose, and thereby reduces its adverse effects. It may also enhance the chemotherapeutic effect of oxaliplatin for this disease.

  1. Up-regulation of CHAF1A, a poor prognostic factor, facilitates cell proliferation of colon cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zehua; Cui, Feifei; Yu, Fudong; Peng, Xiao; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Dawei; Lu, Su; Tang, Huamei; Peng, Zhihai

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • We identified that CHAF1A was up-regulated in colon tumor mucosa in TMA. • The expression pattern of CHAF1A was validated with qPCR and western-blot. • CHAF1A overexpression is an independent indicator for poor colon cancer survival. • CHAF1A facilitates cell proliferation of colon cancer both in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: Deregulation of chromatin assembly factor 1, p150 subunit A (CHAF1A) has recently been reported to be involved in the development of some cancer types. In this study, we identified that the frequency of positive CHAF1A staining in primary tumor mucosa (45.8%, 93 of 203 samples) was significantly elevated compared to that in paired normal mucosa (18.7%, 38 of 203 samples). The increased expression was strongly associated with cancer stage, tumor invasion, and histological grade. The five-year survival rate of patients with CHAF1A-positive tumors was remarkably lower than that of patients with CHAF1A-negative tumors. Colon cancer cells with CHAF1A knockdown exhibited decreased cell growth index, reduction in colony formation ability, elevated cell apoptosis rate as well as impaired colon tumorigenicity in nude mice. Hence, CHAF1A upregulation functions as a poor prognostic indicator of colon cancer, potentially contributing to its progression by mediating cancer cell proliferation.

  2. Honokiol in combination with radiation targets notch signaling to inhibit colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ponnurangam, Sivapriya; Mammen, Joshua M V; Ramalingam, Satish; He, Zhiyun; Zhang, Youcheng; Umar, Shahid; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Anant, Shrikant

    2012-04-01

    Cancer stem cells are implicated in resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and chemotherapy. Honokiol, a biphenolic compound has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating various ailments. In this study, we determined the ability of honokiol to enhance the sensitivity of colon cancer stem cells to IR. The combination of honokiol and IR suppressed proliferation and colony formation while inducing apoptosis of colon cancer cells in culture. There were also reduced numbers and size of spheroids, which was coupled with reduced expression of cancer stem cell marker protein DCLK1. Flow cytometry studies confirmed that the honokiol-IR combination reduced the number of DCLK1+ cells. In addition, there were reduced levels of activated Notch-1, its ligand Jagged-1, and the downstream target gene Hes-1. Furthermore, expression of components of the Notch-1 activating γ-secretase complex, presenilin 1, nicastrin, Pen2, and APH-1 was also suppressed. On the other hand, the honokiol effects were mitigated when the Notch intracellular domain was expressed. To determine the effect of honokiol-IR combination on tumor growth in vivo, nude mice tumor xenografts were administered honokiol intraperitoneally and exposed to IR. The honokiol-IR combination significantly inhibited tumor xenograft growth. In addition, there were reduced levels of DCLK1 and the Notch signaling-related proteins in the xenograft tissues. Together, these data suggest that honokiol is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer growth that targets the stem cells by inhibiting the γ-secretase complex and the Notch signaling pathway. These studies warrant further clinical evaluation for the combination of honokiol and IR for treating colon cancers.

  3. Therapeutic opportunities from tumour biology in metastatic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    McLeod, H L; McKay, J A; Collie-Duguid, E S; Cassidy, J

    2000-08-01

    Tumour metastasis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer. While improvements in quality of life and patient survival have been made over the past 10 years, the majority of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer will die from their disease. As knowledge of the biology of colon cancer and its invasion/metastasis programme evolve, this presents new therapeutic opportunities for pharmacological and genetic intervention. This review discusses the current approaches to metastatic colorectal cancer therapy, details genomic and biological variance between primary and metastatic tumours, and highlights approaches for harnessing these differences to improve therapy.

  4. Late metastatic colon cancer masquerading as primary jejunal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Meshikhes, A-WN; Joudeh, AA

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the small bowel from a previously resected colorectal cancer is rare and may erroneously be diagnosed as a primary small bowel carcinoma. It usually occurs several years after the primary resection. We present the case of a 67-year-old man who had undergone left hemicolectomy for colon cancer 3 years earlier and returned with subacute small bowel obstruction. This was initially thought, based on preoperative radiological findings and normal colonoscopic examination, to be due a primary jejunal cancer. Even at surgery, the lesion convincingly appeared as an obstructing primary small bowel carcinoma. However, the histology of the resected small bowel revealed metastatic colon cancer. This rare and an unusual metastatic occurrence some years after the primary resection is described and reviewed. PMID:26890851

  5. Dietary fibre and colon cancer: epidemiologic and experimental evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, B S

    1980-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have identified two dietary factors, a relatively high intake of fat and a relatively low intake of fibre, that are associated with colon cancer in humans. However, a recent study has shown a low risk of large bowel cancer in a rural Finnish population with a high dietary intake of fat, but also a high intake of fibre. Observations in humans and studies in animals have indicated that dietary fibre may protect against colon carcinogenesis by binding bile acids in the intestinal tract, by a direct effect on the colonic mucosa and by an indirect effect on the metabolism of carcinogens. The strength of protection varies with the type of fibre. PMID:6254626

  6. The potential therapeutic applications and prognostic significance of metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 (MACC1) in cancers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The metastasis-associated in colon cancer-1 (MACC1) gene was identified in 2009. Expression of MACC1 was found to be significantly upregulated in primary and metastatic colon carcinomas compared to normal tissues or adenomas. The induction of MACC1 occurs at the crucial step of transition from a benign to a malignant phenotype. The aim of this review was to summarise current results of non-clinical and clinical studies on the role of MACC1 in the carcinogenesis and progression of cancer, as well its potential therapeutic and prognostic significance. The gene encoding the HGF receptor MET is a transcriptional target of MACC1. In addition to promoting the proliferation, invasion, and migration of colon cancer cells in cell culture and tumour growth and metastasis in mouse models, MACC1 also contributes to carcinogenesis and progression of colorectal cancer through the β-catenin signalling pathway and mesenchymal-epithelial transition. MACC1 knockdown with si/sh RNA was investigated in cell lines of different types of cancer. MACC1 is a promising therapeutic target for antitumour and antimetastatic intervention strategies for cancers. Here, it is presented as a potential independent prognostic indicator of reduced overall survival as well as of the occurrence of distant metastasis in patients with different types of cancer. PMID:27688722

  7. Increased expression and aberrant localization of mucin 13 in metastatic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Brij K; Maher, Diane M; Ebeling, Mara C; Sundram, Vasudha; Koch, Michael D; Lynch, Douglas W; Bohlmeyer, Teresa; Watanabe, Akira; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Puumala, Susan E; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2012-11-01

    MUC13 is a newly identified transmembrane mucin. Although MUC13 is known to be overexpressed in ovarian and gastric cancers, limited information is available regarding the expression of MUC13 in metastatic colon cancer. Herein, we investigated the expression profile of MUC13 in colon cancer using a novel anti-MUC13 monoclonal antibody (MAb, clone ppz0020) by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. A cohort of colon cancer samples and tissue microarrays containing adjacent normal, non-metastatic colon cancer, metastatic colon cancer, and liver metastasis tissues was used in this study to investigate the expression pattern of MUC13. IHC analysis revealed significantly higher (p<0.001) MUC13 expression in non-metastatic colon cancer samples compared with faint or very low expression in adjacent normal tissues. Interestingly, metastatic colon cancer and liver metastasis tissue samples demonstrated significantly (p<0.05) higher cytoplasmic and nuclear MUC13 expression compared with non-metastatic colon cancer and adjacent normal colon samples. Moreover, cytoplasmic and nuclear MUC13 expression correlated with larger and poorly differentiated tumors. Four of six tested colon cancer cell lines also expressed MUC13 at RNA and protein levels. These studies demonstrate a significant increase in MUC13 expression in metastatic colon cancer and suggest a correlation between aberrant MUC13 localization (cytoplasmic and nuclear expression) and metastatic colon cancer.

  8. Increased Expression and Aberrant Localization of Mucin 13 in Metastatic Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Brij K.; Maher, Diane M.; Ebeling, Mara C.; Sundram, Vasudha; Koch, Michael D.; Lynch, Douglas W.; Bohlmeyer, Teresa; Watanabe, Akira; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Puumala, Susan E.; Jaggi, Meena

    2012-01-01

    MUC13 is a newly identified transmembrane mucin. Although MUC13 is known to be overexpressed in ovarian and gastric cancers, limited information is available regarding the expression of MUC13 in metastatic colon cancer. Herein, we investigated the expression profile of MUC13 in colon cancer using a novel anti-MUC13 monoclonal antibody (MAb, clone ppz0020) by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. A cohort of colon cancer samples and tissue microarrays containing adjacent normal, non-metastatic colon cancer, metastatic colon cancer, and liver metastasis tissues was used in this study to investigate the expression pattern of MUC13. IHC analysis revealed significantly higher (p<0.001) MUC13 expression in non-metastatic colon cancer samples compared with faint or very low expression in adjacent normal tissues. Interestingly, metastatic colon cancer and liver metastasis tissue samples demonstrated significantly (p<0.05) higher cytoplasmic and nuclear MUC13 expression compared with non-metastatic colon cancer and adjacent normal colon samples. Moreover, cytoplasmic and nuclear MUC13 expression correlated with larger and poorly differentiated tumors. Four of six tested colon cancer cell lines also expressed MUC13 at RNA and protein levels. These studies demonstrate a significant increase in MUC13 expression in metastatic colon cancer and suggest a correlation between aberrant MUC13 localization (cytoplasmic and nuclear expression) and metastatic colon cancer. PMID:22914648

  9. The G-protein coupled chemoattractant receptor FPR2 promotes malignant phenotype of human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yi; Yao, Xiaohong; Chen, Keqiang; Wang, Xiafei; Zhou, Jiamin; Gong, Wanghua; Yoshimura, Teizo; Huang, Jiaqiang; Wang, Rongquan; Wu, Yuzhang; Shi, Guochao; Bian, Xiuwu; Wang, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein coupled chemoattractant receptor formylpeptide receptor-2 (FPR2 in human, Fpr2 in mice) is expressed by mouse colon epithelial cells and plays a critical role in mediating mucosal homeostasis and inflammatory responses. However, the biological role of FPR2 in human colon is unclear. Our investigation revealed that a considerable number of human colon cancer cell lines expressed FPR2 and its ligands promoted cell migration and proliferation. Human colon cancer cell lines expressing high levels of FPR2 also formed more rapidly growing tumors in immunocompromised mice as compared with cell lines expressing lower levels of FPR2. Knocking down of FPR2 from colon cancer cell lines highly expressing FPR2 reduced their tumorigenicity. Clinically, FPR2 is more highly expressed in progressive colon cancer, associated with poorer patient prognosis. These results suggest that FPR2 can be high-jacked by colon cancer cells for their growth advantage, thus becoming a potential target for therapeutic development. PMID:27904774

  10. Three cases of endoscopic resection for synchronous early colon cancers after self-expandable metallic stent placement for obstructive colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moroi, Rintaro; Endo, Katsuya; Ichikawa, Ryo; Takahashi, So; Shiroki, Takeharu; Shinkai, Hirohiko; Ishiyama, Fumitake; Kayaba, Shoichi

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The feasibility of endoscopic resection for synchronous early colon cancer after placement of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) for malignant colorectal obstruction is unknown. Herein we evaluated 3 cases of endoscopic resection for synchronous early colorectal cancers after SEMS placement. Patient 1 was an 82-year-old man with obstructive sigmoid colon cancer. We curatively treated the synchronous descending colon cancer with endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and the rectal cancer with endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) after SEMS placement. This is the first reported case of a successful ESD for synchronous early colon cancer via the use of a colonic stent. Patient 2 was an 81-year-old man with obstructive ascending colon cancer. We resected the synchronous transverse colon cancer via ESD. Histologic findings indicated that the carcinoma cells had invaded the submucosal layer. Therefore, we immediately performed expanded right-hemicolectomy. Patient 3 was an 81-year-old man with obstructive sigmoid colon cancer. We curatively treated the synchronous transverse colon cancer with EMR after SEMS placement. There were no complications associated with the endoscopic treatments in any of the cases. Our results indicate that preoperative endoscopic resection combined with the ESD technique for synchronous colorectal cancer after SEMS placement could be effective as a surgical strategy for patients with malignant colorectal obstruction. PMID:27652303

  11. Potentiation of Colon Cancer Susceptibility in Mice by Colonic Epithelial PPAR-δ/β Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ/β (PPAR-d) is upregulated in human colorectal cancers, but its role in colonic tumorigenesis remains controversial. Methods We generated a novel mouse model of intestinally targeted PPAR-d overexpression to simulate PPAR-d upregulation in human colon carcinogenesis. Colon-specific PPAR-d overexpression was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and activity assays. Mice with and without targeted PPAR-d overexpression were tested for azoxymethane (AOM)–induced colonic tumorigenesis. Mouse whole-genome transcriptome microarray analyses were performed to identify PPAR-d target genes to promote tumorigenesis. We used linear models to test for PPAR-d overexpression trend effects on tumor multiplicity. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Targeted PPAR-d overexpression markedly increased colonic tumor incidence (from 0 of 10 wild-type [WT] littermate mice to 9 of 10 mice [P < .001] in 2 FVB/N background mouse lines [villin-PPAR-d-1 and villin-PPAR-d-2] at a 5-mg/kg AOM dose) and multiplicity (number of tumors per mouse per mg/kg dose of AOM increased from 0.47 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.22 to 0.72] for the WT littermates to 2.15 [95% CI = 1.90 to 2.40] [P < .001] for the villin-PPAR-d-1 mice and from 0.44 [95% CI = 0.09 to 0.79] for the WT littermates to 1.91 [95% CI = 1.57 to 2.25] [P < .001] for the villin-PPAR-d-2 mice). PPAR-d overexpression reversed resistance to AOM-induced colonic tumorigenesis in C57BL/6 mice. PPAR-d overexpression modulated expression of several novel PPAR-d target genes in normal-appearing colonic epithelial cells of mice with PPAR-d overexpression in a pattern that matched the changes in colonic tumors. Conclusions Our finding that PPAR-d upregulation profoundly enhances susceptibility to colonic tumorigenesis should impact the development of strategies of molecularly targeting PPAR-d in cancer and

  12. A familial component to human rectal cancer, independent of colon cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Maul, John Scott; Burt, Randall W.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims: The Utah Population Database (UPDB) is unique; it links genealogy for over 2 million Utah individuals to a statewide Cancer Registry. We have investigated the familial nature of rectal cancer, considered independently from colon cancer. Methods: We estimated relative risks in relatives, and average relatedness among rectal cancer cases using matched controls from the UPDB. Results: There is a significant increased risk for rectal cancer in first-degree relatives of rectal cancer cases (Relative Risk = 1.97), equivalent to the risk for colon cancer (RR =2.11). The significant increased risk for rectal cancer extends to second- and third-degree relatives. The relative risk for rectal cancer among first-degree relatives of young-onset rectal cancer cases (< 55 years), is equivalent (RR = 3.34) to their risk of colon cancer (RR=3.35). Conclusions: The UPDB provides strong evidence for a familial component to rectal cancer that may include a genetic component in addition to shared environment. There is a significant increased risk of rectal cancer in the close and distant relatives of rectal cancer cases, which is even higher among relatives of young-onset cases. While it has been reported that relatives of colon cancer probands are at increased risk for colorectal cancer, the risk of large bowel cancer among relatives of rectal cancer patients has been less clear. Relatives of rectal cancer probands experience a risk of cancer of the large bowel that is at least as high as the risk previously reported for relatives of individuals with colon cancer. PMID:17625976